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Sample records for oral necrotizing microvasculitis

  1. Oral necrotizing microvasculitis in a patient affected by Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardina, Giuseppe Alessandro; Fucà, Gerlandina; Carini, Francesco; Valenza, Vincenzo; Spicola, Michele; Procaccianti, Paolo; Messina, Pietro; Maresi, Emiliano

    2007-12-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) was first described in 1967 by Kawasaki, who defined it as "mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome". KD is an acute systemic vasculitis, which mainly involves medium calibre arteries; its origin is unknown, and it is observed in children under the age of 5, especially in their third year. The principal presentations of KD include fever, bilateral nonexudative conjunctivitis, erythema of the lips and oral mucosa, changes in the extremities, rash, and cervical lymphadenopathy. Within KD, oral mucositis - represented by diffuse mucous membrane erythema, lip and tongue reddening and lingual papillae hypertrophy with subsequent development of strawberry tongue - can occur both in the acute stage of the disease (0-9 days), and in the convalescence stage (>25 days) as a consequence of the pharmacological treatment. KD vascular lesions are defined as systemic vasculitis instead of systemic arteritis. This study analyzed the anatomical-pathological substrata of oral mucositis in a baby affected by Kawasaki disease and suddenly deceased for cardiac tamponade caused by coronary aneurysm rupture (sudden cardiac death of a mechanical type).

  2. Necrotic erythema nodosum leprosum with oral mucosal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, J P; Soud, A; Agarwal, S K

    2008-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic, infectious disease with varied clinical presentations. The type 2 lepra reaction / erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) classically involves extremities and face. Besides to the classical lesions of type 2 lepra reaction sometimes rare findings of vesicular lesions with necroticans may be observed. We are reporting a case of lepromatous leprosy with bullous reaction and necroticans involving usual sites along with the unusual involvement of oral cavity, which on first look mimicked necrotizing vasculitis or other bullous disorders. This manifestation of type 2 lepra reaction in oral mucosa should be kept in mind by the physicians while dealing with a case of type 2 lepra reaction.

  3. The effects of oral Acyclovir in the treatment of necrotizing Herpetic keratouveitis

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    "Hosseini Tehrani M;Poormostadam B;Vallaei N;Raiszadeh F "

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of administering oral acyclovir in conjunction with topical acyclovir and steroids in the treatment of necrotizing herpetic keratouveitis. All patients with necrotizing herpetic keratouveits who have been consulted during 1996-1997 at the farbi Eye Hospital were studied . the patients were randomly assigned to two groups. In the first group, topical acyclovir ointment and topical steroids were administered, while the second group took oral acyclovir, 1600 mg in four divided does in addition to the above mentioned treatment. The patients undervent follow-up examination every three days in the first three weeks and therafter periodically for one year.After three weeks, 92% and 88% improvement was observed in the first and second groups, respectively. The observed difference was not statistically significant. Making nonpharmacologic interventions such as application of soft contact lenses, corneal grafts, and conjunctival flaps were inevitable in some cases in both groups. Secondary infection was observed in three patients (first grop and two patients (2 and group.The sample size was not large enough to draw a definite statistical conclusion, but it seems that the addition of oral acyclovir has no added effect in the treatment of necrotizing herpetic keratouveitis than topical acyclovir and steroids. In this study , the males were affected more frequently than females.

  4. Bacterial diversity in oral samples of children in niger with acute noma, acute necrotizing gingivitis, and healthy controls.

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    Ignacio Bolivar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites were amplified using "universal" PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis, gender, and site status (diseased or control site. Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98-99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries. CONCLUSIONS: Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent.

  5. Bacterial diversity in oral samples of children in niger with acute noma, acute necrotizing gingivitis, and healthy controls

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio Bolivar; Katrine Whiteson; Benoît Stadelmann; Denise Baratti-Mayer; Yann Gizard; Andrea Mombelli; Didier Pittet; Jacques Schrenzel

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL ...

  6. Oral antibiotics increase blood neutrophil maturation and reduce bacteremia and necrotizing enterocolitis in the immediate postnatal period of preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Fuglsang, Eva; Jiang, Pingping

    2016-01-01

    Immature immunity may predispose preterm neonates to infections and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intravenous antibiotics are frequently given to prevent and treat sepsis, while oral antibiotics are seldom used. We hypothesized that oral antibiotics promote maturation of systemic immunity...... and delay gut bacterial colonization and thereby protect preterm neonates against both NEC and bacteremia in the immediate postnatal period. Preterm pigs were given formula and administered saline (CON) or broad-spectrum antibiotics orally (ORA) or systemically (SYS) for 5 d after birth. Temporal changes......, high gut permeability, Gram-positive bacteremia and NEC. Neonatal oral antibiotics may benefit mucosal and systemic immunity via delayed gut colonization and enhanced blood neutrophil maturation just after preterm birth....

  7. Oral antibiotics increase blood neutrophil maturation and reduce bacteremia and necrotizing enterocolitis in the immediate postnatal period of preterm pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Fuglsang, Eva; Jiang, Pingping; Birck, Malene M; Pan, Xiaoyu; Kamal, Shamrulazhar B S; Pors, Susanne E; Gammelgaard, Pernille L; Nielsen, Dennis S; Thymann, Thomas; Levy, Ofer; Frøkiær, Hanne; Sangild, Per T

    2016-01-01

    Immature immunity may predispose preterm neonates to infections and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intravenous antibiotics are frequently given to prevent and treat sepsis, while oral antibiotics are seldom used. We hypothesized that oral antibiotics promote maturation of systemic immunity and delay gut bacterial colonization and thereby protect preterm neonates against both NEC and bacteremia in the immediate postnatal period. Preterm pigs were given formula and administered saline (CON) or broad-spectrum antibiotics orally (ORA) or systemically (SYS) for 5 d after birth. Temporal changes in blood parameters and bacterial composition in the intestine, blood and immune organs were analyzed. Newborn preterm pigs had few blood neutrophils and a high frequency of progenitor cells. Neutrophils gradually matured after preterm birth with increasing CD14 and decreasing CD172a expressions. Preterm neutrophil and monocyte TLR2 expression and TLR2-mediated blood cytokine responses were low relative to adults. ORA pigs showed enhanced blood neutrophil maturation with reduced cell size and CD172a expression. Only ORA pigs, but not SYS pigs, were protected from a high density of gut Gram-positive bacteria, high gut permeability, Gram-positive bacteremia and NEC. Neonatal oral antibiotics may benefit mucosal and systemic immunity via delayed gut colonization and enhanced blood neutrophil maturation just after preterm birth.

  8. Necrotizing enterocolitis

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    ... please enable JavaScript. Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the death of tissue in the intestine. It occurs most often in premature or sick babies. Causes Necrotizing enterocolitis occurs when the lining of the ...

  9. Necrotizing vasculitis

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000432.htm Necrotizing vasculitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Necrotizing vasculitis is a group of disorders that involve inflammation ...

  10. Necrotizing Fasciitis

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    Jagdish Sadasivan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is among the most challenging surgical infections faced by a surgeon. The difficulty in managing this entity is due to a combination of difficulty in diagnosis, and also of early as well as late management. For the patient, such a diagnosis means prolonged hospital stay, painful dressings, an extended recovery, and in some unfortunate cases even loss of limb or life. Necrotizing fasciitis is a fairly common condition in surgical practice in the Indian context resulting in a fairly large body of clinical experience. This article reviews literature on MEDLINE with the key words ′′necrotizing,′′ ′′fasciitis,′′ and ′′necrotizing infections′′ from 1970, as well as from articles cross referenced therein. The authors attempt to draw comparisons to their own experience in managing this condition to give an Indian perspective to the condition.

  11. [A case of membranous nephropathy with ANCA-associated necrotizing glomerulonephritis during oral administration of PTU for Graves' disease].

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    Fujii, Takayuki; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Ueda, Shiro; Akikusa, Bunshiro; Hasegawa, Shigeru; Tsukahara, Tsunemichi; Iesato, Kenji; Ogawa, Makoto; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2003-01-01

    We experienced a coincidental case of two types of glomerulopathy associated with Graves' disease. A 64-year-old man, who had been treated with propylthiouracil(PTU) for Graves' disease for 15 years, was admitted to our hospital for macroscopic hematuria and rapidly progressive deterioration of renal function. Although his thyroid function had been within the normal range during treatment, the level of thyrotropin receptor antibody(TRAb) gradually increased from a year before admission. Serological tests revealed that he was positive for myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody(MPO-ANCA). The renal biopsy specimen showed necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis(GN) superimposed on membranous nephropathy(MN). This is a rare case of MN complicated with ANCA associated crescentic GN in a Graves' disease patient. Association of these two renal alterations was not clearly defined. MN involved with Graves' disease also has been rarely reported. Some reports demonstrated deposition of thyroglobulin and other thyroid related antigens in the glomeruli. In the present case, long-term impairment of Graves' disease and elevation of TRAb might have been responsible for the formation and deposition of thyroid-associated immune complex in the glomeruli. As for crescentic GN, PTU might have induced ANCA-associated GN independently of MN. This case is instructive for considering the relation between Graves' disease and renal injury.

  12. NECROTIZING FASCIITIS IN CHILDREN

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    F. S. Kharlamova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors presented a review of literature of necrotizing fasciitis in children. A rare case of necrotizing fasciitis in 3-year-old child is described. The difficulties of differential diagnostics of the given disease are presented.

  13. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coogan, Maeve M; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J

    2005-01-01

    .... Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma...

  14. Necrotizing Pneumonia Caused by Penicillium chrysogenum

    OpenAIRE

    D’Antonio, Domenico; Violante, Beatrice; Farina, Claudio; Sacco, Rocco; Angelucci, Domenico; Masciulli, Maurizio; Iacone, Antonio; Romano, Ferdinando

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of necrotizing pneumonia due to Penicillium chrysogenum in a 57-year-old woman operated on for lung cancer. The residual right lower pulmonary lobe was infiltrated by Penicillium chrysogenum. The patient underwent a second pulmonary right lobectomy and was successfully treated with oral itraconazole. To our knowledge, this is the first case of pneumonia due to P. chrysogenum.

  15. Necrotizing enterocolitis Enterocolitis necrosante.

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    Norma Carmenate González

    Full Text Available Necrosantizing enterocolitis constitutes the most frequent and devastator gastrointestinal emergency in newborn patients, affecting especially premature patients and those with low weight (< 1500 g during the two first weeks of life, that by some motive have suffered episodes of anoxy during the labor or shortly after and in which habitually the oral diet has been initiated. It can be seen in small infants, especially in the less than 3 months and associated to diarrhea. It is reported between 15 and 75 cases by each 1000 admissions in a unit of neonatal intensive cares. The mortality varies from 10 to 40%, greater in groups of high risk and is greater than the surgical mortality of all the congenital anomalies of the digestive tract combined. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Necrotizing enterocolitis, approved by consensus in the 2nd National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Manzanillo, Cuba, September 31 - October 3, 2002.

    La enterocolitis necrosante constituye la emergencia gastrointestinal más frecuente y devastadora del recién nacido, afecta especialmente a los pretérminos y a los de bajo peso al nacer (< 1500 g durante las dos primeras semanas de vida, que por algún motivo han sufrido episodios de anoxia durante el parto o poco después y en los que habitualmente se ha iniciado la alimentación oral. Puede verse en lactantes pequeños, en especial en los menores de tres meses y asociado a cuadros de diarrea. Se reportan entre 15 y 75 casos por cada 1000 admisiones en una unidad de cuidados intensivos neonatales. La mortalidad varía de 10 a 40 %, mayor en grupos de alto riesgo y supera la mortalidad quirúrgica de todas las anomalías congénitas del tracto digestivo combinadas. Se presenta la Guía de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas para Enterocolitis Necrosante, aprobada por consenso en el 2º Taller Nacional de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas en Cirugía Pedi

  16. Pyoderma Gangrenosum Simulating Necrotizing Fasciitis

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    Erik Friedrich Alex de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyoderma gangrenosum received this name due to the notion that this disease was related to infections caused by bacteria in the genus Streptococcus. In contrast to this initial assumption, today the disease is thought to have an autoimmune origin. Necrotizing fasciitis was first mentioned around the fifth century AD, being referred to as a complication of erysipelas. It is a disease characterized by severe, rapidly progressing soft tissue infection, which causes necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and the fascia. On the third day of hospitalization after antecubital venipuncture, a 59-year-old woman presented an erythematous and painful pustular lesion that quickly evolved into extensive ulceration circumvented by an erythematous halo and accompanied by toxemia. One of the proposed etiologies was necrotizing fasciitis. The microbiological results were all negative, while the histopathological analysis showed epidermal necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of dermal neutrophils. Pyoderma gangrenosum was considered as a diagnosis. After 30 days, the patient was discharged with oral prednisone (60 mg/day, and the patient had complete healing of the initial injury in less than two months. This case was an unexpected event in the course of the hospitalization which was diagnosed as pyoderma gangrenosum associated with myelodysplastic syndrome.

  17. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis.

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    Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Weyer, Nils; Metzger, Marc C; Schön, Ralf

    2006-05-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a fast spreading acute soft tissue inflammation. Death can occur within 12-24 h. Early identification and treatment is needed. We report the case of a 75 year old woman with diabetes and high cholesterol, adipositas who developed cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odotongenic origin with massive subcutaneous air collection and first sign of septicaemia. Surgical treatment with debridement and drainage in combination with intravenous broadbased antibiotics as well as daily irrigation of the wound with iodine solution (Betaisodona) and metronidazol (local antibiotic treatment) was performed. The patient recovered completely. Surgical debridement combined with broad-spectrum of antibiotics showed satisfying result for the management of cervical necrotizing fasciitis of dentogenous origin.

  18. [Necrotizing fasciitis after varicella].

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    Gonçalves, E; Furtado, F; Estrada, J; Vale, M C; Pinto, M; Santos, M; Moura, G; Vasconcelos, C

    2001-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and severe infection characterised by extremely rapid progressive involvement of the superficial fascias and deep dermal layers of the skin, with resultant vasculitis and necrosis. The authors present three clinical cases of necrotizing fasciitis; all three patients previously had varicella rash, rapid progressive spreading erythema with severe pain and toxic shock syndrome. Two patients had positive cultures of b-haemolytic streptococcus. Early stage differential diagnosis with celulitis, aggressive antibiotic treatment and pediatric intensive care support are essential. However, the main therapy is early extensive surgical approach involving all indurate areas, down to and including the muscle fascia.

  19. A Case of Necrotizing Epiglottitis Due to Nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

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    Lake, Jessica A; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Suchi, Mariko; Chun, Robert H; Willoughby, Rodney E

    2015-07-01

    Diphtheria is a rare cause of infection in highly vaccinated populations and may not be recognized by modern clinicians. Infections by nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae are emerging. We report the first case of necrotizing epiglottitis secondary to nontoxigenic C diphtheriae. A fully vaccinated child developed fever, poor oral intake, and sore throat and was found to have necrotizing epiglottitis. Necrotizing epiglottitis predominantly occurs in the immunocompromised host. Laboratory evaluation revealed pancytopenia, and bone marrow biopsy was diagnostic for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Clinicians should be aware of aggressive infections that identify immunocompromised patients. This case highlights the features of a reemerging pathogen, C diphtheriae.

  20. Necrotizing fasciitis: an alternative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Percival, R.; Hargreaves, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of necrotizing fasciitis are presented. The initial management of necrotizing fasciitis remains undisputed. However, following a limited success with a conventional treatment policy, a more radical approach with immediate skin grafting following debridement is suggested.

  1. NECROTIZING SIALOMETAPLASIA. CASE REPORT

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    A.I. Navazo Eguía

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NSM is a benign lesion affecting the salivary glands mainly in the hard palate. It presents as an ulcer with irregular borders, slightly elevated and necrotic The differential diagnosis should include malignant neoplasms. Case Report: A 26-year-old woman sought medical advice for a painful 2 cm ulceration of the hard palate. She is carrying pierced tongue. The patient had a history of cigarette smoking, chronic anxiety disorder and bulimia,. Analytical normal (including HIV and syphilis serology. Histopathology: accessory gland with squamous metaplasia, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and conservation lobulararchitecture. She had an important improvement with total resolution of the lesion in 4 months Discussion: The NSM is a necrotizing inflammatory process. It presents as an ulcer located in the posterior hard palate or the junction between the hard and soft palate. This situation has been associated with local ischemia as surgical trauma, thromboangiitis obliterans, dentures, alcohol, snuff, cocaine, and certain malignancies such as lymphomas, rhabdomyosarcoma or Warthin tumor. Currently associated withbulimia, it being necessary suspected in young women. It is important to rule out neoplasms and infectious processes (tuberculosis or syphilis. Also consider subacute necrotizing sialadenitis, nonspecific acute inflammatory process of unknown cause, with focal necrosis without hyperplasia or ductal metaplasia pseudoepitheliomatous. Treatment is symptomatic and usually resolves in 2-3 months. Conclusion: The NSM is a benign lesion which may mimic neoplasia. The trend is toward resolution. It must be recognized to avoid unnecessary surgery.

  2. [Necrotizing enterocolitis. Pathogenesis and iatrogenic factors].

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    Obladen, M

    1986-08-01

    Following clinical observations, measurements of osmolarity of liquid drugs, and determination of blood loss due to sampling in very low birthweight infants, the following hypothesis on iatrogenic factors contributing to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis is proposed: Due to diagnostic blood sampling during intensive care, premature infants may become severely anemic. Therefore their intestinal perfusion is reduced, causing hypoxia and hypoperfusion in the submucosa. Especially in infants with oral feeding and hyperosmolar medication, mechanical factors, hyperosmolarity and infection can affect the mucosa from the luminal side. Simultaneous hypoperfusion and hyperosmolar load may contribute to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis. This hypothesis, which needs experimental verification, explains the different incidence of the disease in different hospitals.

  3. Complicated necrotizing otitis externa.

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    Nawas, Mariam T; Daruwalla, Vistasp J; Spirer, David; Micco, Alan G; Nemeth, Alexander J

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing (malignant) otitis externa (NOE) is a rare and invasive infection originating in the external acoustic meatus seen most commonly in diabetes and other immunocompromised states. After a protracted course, disease can smolder and extend into the mastoid, skull base, dural sinuses, and intracranially. We present a case of NOE complicated by mastoiditis, dural sinus thrombosis, and Bezold's abscess in an uncontrolled diabetic presenting with a prolonged course of facial nerve palsy. We stress the importance of maintaining a high index of clinical suspicion for NOE in diabetic patients and offering timely, aggressive treatment to mitigate its complications.

  4. Necrotizing faciitis: report of case.

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    Mruthyunjaya, B

    1981-01-01

    A case of necrotizing fasciitis following infection of a mandibular third molar is reported. Necrotizing fasciitis is a relatively rare but fulminating clinical entity characterized by necrosis of fascia with widespread undermining of the superficial tissue and extreme systemic toxicity. Prompt recognition and proper management can reduce the morbidity and mortality in this severe soft tissue infection.

  5. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Slavin1; Paula Ghaneh; Robert Sutton1; Mark Hartley; Peter Rowlands; Conall Garvey; Mark Hughes; John Neoptolemos

    2001-01-01

    Infection complicating pancreatic necrosis leads to persisting sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and accounts for about half the deaths that occur following acute pancreatitis. Severe cases due to gallstones require urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Patients with pancreatic necrosis should be followed with serial contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and if infection is suspected fine needle aspiration of the necrotic area for bacteriology (FNAB) should be undertaken. Treatment of sterile necrosis should initially be non-operative. In the presence of infection necrosectomy is indicated. Although traditionally this has been by open surgery, minimally invasive procedures are a promising new alternative. There are many unresolved issues in the management of pancreatic necrosis. These include, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, the precise indications for and frequency of repeat CE-CT and FNAB,and the role of enteral feeding.

  6. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis.

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    Maisel, R H; Karlen, R

    1994-07-01

    Nine cases of cervical necrotizing faciitis are presented. Five were odontogenic, three were pharyngeal in origin, and one developed from a soft-tissue spider bite. The bacteriology represented a polyculture of gram-positive, gram-negative, as well as anaerobic bacteria, and initial medical treatment by third-generation cephalosporin and metronidazole or clindamycin was successful and is recommended. Airway control is necessary early, as is a wide exploration of the fascial spaces of the neck, with frequent reexploration in either the operating room or at the bedside to evaluate the effects of treatment and to prevent further progression of the disease. Intensive medical support is crucial, and hyperbaric oxygen is advised for patients who are deteriorating under standard therapy.

  7. Is it necrotizing fasciitis or necrotizing cellulitis after varicella zoster infection? Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundeslioglu, Ayse Ozlem; Selimoglu, Muhammed Nebil; Toy, Hatice

    2014-08-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis and necrotizing cellulitis are serious cutaneous complications in varicella patients. Differentiation of necrotizing cellulitis from necrotizing fasciitis can initially be challenging because of indistinct clinical course at the onset of infection and the lack of definitive diagnostic criteria. This paper reports 2 children with necrotizing cellulitis that developed after varicella infection to draw the attention of health care providers to necrotizing cellulitis that showed slower clinical course than necrotizing fasciitis and recovered with conservative treatment approaches without aggressive surgical intervention.

  8. Pauci-immune necrotizing glomerulonephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, Abraham; Sanders, Jan S F; Stegeman, Coen A; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2010-01-01

    Pauci-immune necrotizing glomerulonephritis is the most frequent cause of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and, in most cases, is associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). It is either the renal manifestation of Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis of Churg-St

  9. Quantification of gut lesions in a subclinical necrotic enteritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholamiandehkordi, Ahmad R.; Timbermont, Leen; Lanckriet, Anouk

    2007-01-01

    , E. maxima or an overdose of live coccidial vaccine inoculations did not result in grossly visible necrotic gut lesions, while combined inoculation resulted in typical necrotic lesions at approximately 4 days after inoculations with C. perfringens in approximately one-half of the inoculated animals....... Semi-quantitative histological lesion scoring was done to evaluate gut damage in gut sections of animals in which no gross necrotic lesions were detected. This included scoring of hyperaemia, haemorrhages, the amount of red blood cells and protein precipitate in the lumen, villus fusion and epithelial......-inoculated and single-inoculated groups. In general, the highest histological scores for gut lesions were observed in the double-inoculated groups, but the single-inoculated groups had higher scores than the control group. It was concluded that oral inoculation of broilers with an overdose of live coccidial vaccine...

  10. Necrotizing black tattoo reaction: what's in a name?

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    Bhogal, Ricky Harminder; Thomas, Sunil Solomon

    2009-01-01

    We report the rare case of an 18-year-old man who developed a necrotizing cutaneous reaction 5 days after having a permanent black tattoo on his left forearm spelling his name. Three cases of reactions to permanent black tattoos have been reported within the literature. These cases described the development of cellulitis of the skin adjacent to the tattoo but none reported florid necrotizing cutaneous reactions. The initial management with oral antibacterials failed to resolve the symptoms and use of intravenous antibacterials and topical corticosteroids was needed. Six weeks after presentation the tattoo lettering showed the presence of hyperpigmented skin. Subsequent patch testing confirmed that the patient had no allergy to black tattoo pigments suggesting that the necrotizing cutaneous reaction was secondary to infection. We show that successful treatment of this rare infective complication of permanent black tattoos involves the early institution of intravenous antibacterial agents and topical corticosteroids.

  11. Pediatric Cervicofacial Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ericka; Chun, Robert; Sulman, Cecille

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present a case of a pediatric cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (NF), a rapidly progressive infection, and a review of a 10-year pediatric inpatient database. Design Case report and review. Setting Pediatric intensive care unit. Patients A healthy 5-year-old male who developed NF of the lower lip 36 hours following minor trauma. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code 728.86 (NF), was the inclusion criteria for the Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) in 1997 and 2006. Results A pediatric case is presented with a thorough photographic record demonstrating the need for rapid diagnosis and treatment. In a review of the KID from 1997 and 2006, the relative risk of being discharged with NF in 2006 vs 1997 was 1.4 (95% CI, 9.95-2.28). Age at diagnosis of NF was older in 2006 compared with 1997 (11.5 years vs 8.05 years; Ppediatric discharges with a diagnosis of NF compared with discharges without a diagnosis of NF (Pnecrotizing fasciitis with aggressive medical and surgical treatment are still the foundation in disease survival. PMID:22508620

  12. Probiotics and necrotizing enterocolitis.

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    Fleming, Paul; Hall, Nigel J; Eaton, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics for the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis have attracted a huge interest. Combined data from heterogeneous randomised controlled trials suggest that probiotics may decrease the incidence of NEC. However, the individual studies use a variety of probiotic products, and the group at greatest risk of NEC, i.e., those with a birth weight of less than 1000 g, is relatively under-represented in these trials so we do not have adequate evidence of either efficacy or safety to recommend universal prophylactic administration of probiotics to premature infants. These problems have polarized neonatologists, with some taking the view that it is unethical not to universally administer probiotics to premature infants, whereas others regard the meta-analyses as flawed and that there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine probiotic administration. Another problem is that the mechanism by which probiotics might act is not clear, although some experimental evidence is starting to accumulate. This may allow development of surrogate endpoints of effectiveness, refinement of probiotic regimes, or even development of pharmacological agents that may act through the same mechanism. Hence, although routine probiotic administration is controversial, studies of probiotic effects may ultimately lead us to effective means to prevent this devastating disease.

  13. Temporary feed restriction partially protects broilers from necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouris, V; Georgopoulou, I; Batzios, Chr; Pappaioannou, N; Ducatelle, R; Fortomaris, P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of feed restriction on the intestinal ecosystem and on the pathogenesis of experimental necrotic enteritis in broiler chicks. To induce subclinical necrotic enteritis, an experimental challenge model using a specific diet formulation, Gumboro vaccination, oral inoculation of broilers with a 10-fold dose of attenuated anticoccidial vaccine and multiple oral inoculations with a specific strain of Clostridium perfringens was adopted. Two hundred and forty 1-day-old Cobb 500 broilers were randomly allocated to four groups: feed restricted, challenged, both feed restricted and challenged, and negative control. At 21, 22, 23 and 24 days of age, the intestines, gizzard and liver were collected from 15 birds in each group and scored for gross lesions. The intestinal digesta was collected for pH and viscosity determination. One caecum from each bird was taken for microbiological analysis. The application of feed restriction in birds challenged with C. perfringens reduced the necrotic enteritis lesion score significantly (P ≤ 0.05) and feed restriction significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) pH in the small intestine, the viscosity of the jejunum digesta as well as the C. perfringens counts in the caeca compared with the controls. In conclusion, feed restriction of broilers has a positive effect on the intestinal ecosystem and a significant protective effect against necrotic enteritis in the subclinical experimental model.

  14. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacić, Marijan; Kovacić, Ivan; Delalija, Boris

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and rapidly progressive infection characterized by necrosis of the superficial fascia and spread on the surrounding skin or muscles, which can be fatal. It usually occurs in the limbs, abdominal wall and perineum. In this retrospective review, the authors present 15 patients with cervical necrotizing fasciitis. The patient mean age was 54.7 years and they had one or more comorbid health problems. Five of them had descending necrotizing mediastinitis and three had progressive sepsis with toxic shock syndrome. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotic therapy was administered to all patients immediately, and in three of them we used five-day intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for the signs of toxic shock syndrome. After positive computed tomography imaging for necrotizing fasciitis, we used surgical exploration and debridement of necrotic tissue. In five patients, the initial surgery also included mediastinal transcervical drainage. Preoperative tracheotomy was performed in six patients and delayed tracheotomy in one patient. Histopathologically, all cases showed extensive necrosis of debrided fascia and vascular thrombosis of the neck soft tissue. The mortality rate was 6.7% (1/15). The authors point to the importance of early diagnosis and timely surgical management, broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy when patients are too unstable to undergo surgery.

  15. Necrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the glans penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulidou, Michelle; Bunker, Christopher B; Trevisan, Giorgia; Muneer, Asif

    2016-08-24

    We describe the case of a 73-year-old man who presented with a 10-month history of an ulcerating lesion on the glans penis. Initially this was thought to be an invasive squamous cell carcinoma but a biopsy showed histological features consistent with necrotizing granulomatous inflammation. Extensive serological, immunological and microbiological tests only showed a positive antinuclear and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies indicating a possible autoimmune aetiology but an underlying systemic cause was not identified. Treatment with oral corticosteroids limited the inflammatory process but due to the gross destruction of the glans penis, he still required a glansectomy and split-skin graft reconstruction from which he recovered well. Although this patient ultimately required surgery for this rare presentation, this case highlights the differential diagnosis of penile ulceration (that transcends neoplasia) and the importance of performing and interpreting penile biopsies before undertaking potentially mutilating definitive surgery.

  16. Escherichia coli necrotizing fasciitis in Hirschsprung's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal A. Alsaif

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare post-operative complication of Hirschsprung's disease. Very recently the only previous case of necrotizing fasciitis following a Soave procedure was reported with the etiologic agent being Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we are reporting the second case of necrotizing fasciitis following a Soave procedure caused by an extended spectrum beta lactamase harboring strain of Escherichia coli which is a rare pathogen in type II necrotizing fasciitis.

  17. Fatal Necrotizing Fasciitis following Episiotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Almarzouqi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon condition in general practice but one that provokes serious morbidity. It is characterized by widespread fascial necrosis with relative sparing of skin and underlying muscle. Herein, we report a fatal case of necrotizing fasciitis in a young healthy woman after episiotomy. Case Report. A 17-year-old primigravida underwent a vaginal delivery with mediolateral episiotomy. Necrotizing fasciitis was diagnosed on the 5th postpartum day, when the patient was referred to our tertiary care medical center. Surgical debridement was initiated together with antibiotics and followed by hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The patient died due to septic shock after 16 hours from the referral. Conclusion. Delay of diagnosis and consequently the surgical debridement were most likely the reasons for maternal death. In puerperal period, a physician must consider necrotizing fasciitis as a possible diagnosis in any local sings of infection especially when accompanied by fever and/or tenderness. Early diagnosis is the key for low mortality and morbidity.

  18. Infant with MRSA necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panglao Rajan M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maria Panglao Rajan,1 Pinkal Patel,1 Lori Cash,1 Anjali Parish,2 Scott Darby,1 Jack Yu,3 Jatinder Bhatia11Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA; 2Medical Center of Central Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA; 3Department of Plastic Surgery, Children's Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USAAbstract: This is an unusual case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in this premature infant, which highlights severity, rapid progression of this disease and shows outcome if intervention is initiated at an early stage. This case also highlights one of the possible serious complications of percutaneous inserted central catheter (PICC line, which can be life threatening.Keywords: necrotizing fasciitis, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, PICC, premature infant

  19. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissi, D R; Barros, C S L

    2013-09-01

    An 18-month-old Charolais cow developed depression and drooling and was submitted for necropsy after euthanasia. The cow was 1 of 50 moved between 2 farms approximately 5 days before the onset of clinical disease. Gross findings included swollen and hemorrhagic areas of malacia in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Microscopically there was a necrotizing meningoencephalitis with intranuclear astrocytic and neuronal eosinophilic viral inclusions in the frontal, temporal, and parietal cerebral cortex as well as in the basal nuclei and thalamus. The gross and microscopic findings were consistent with necrotizing meningoencephalitis caused by bovine herpesvirus (BHV-1 or BHV-5), and the diagnosis was confirmed by detection of bovine herpesviral antigen on fresh samples of brain via fluorescent antibody test using a monoclonal antibody against BHV-1 glycoprotein C.

  20. Necrotizing fasciitis: an urgent diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz Maya, Silvia; Dualde Beltran, Delfina [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Lemercier, Pierre; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos [Hospital Politecnico y Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare, life-threatening soft-tissue infection and a medical and surgical emergency, with increasing incidence in the last few years. It is characterized by a rapidly spreading, progressive necrosis of the deep fascia and subcutaneous tissue. Necrotizing fasciitis is often underestimated because of the lack of specific clinical findings in the initial stages of the disease. Many adjuncts such as laboratory findings, bedside tests - e.g., the ''finger test'' or biopsy - and imaging tests have been described as being helpful in the early recognition of the disease. Imaging is very useful to confirm the diagnosis, but also to assess the extent of the disorder, the potential surgical planning, and the detection of underlying etiologies. The presence of gas within the necrotized fasciae is characteristic, but may be lacking. The main finding is thickening of the deep fasciae due to fluid accumulation and reactive hyperemia, best seen on magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  1. [Necrotizing Fasciitis: A comprehensive review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonetti, F; Carusi, V; Guidi, M; David, V

    Even though necrotizing fasciitis is considered a rare disease, the spreading of the predisposing factors such as diabetes and chronic diseases, contribute to increase the incidence of this infection. Thus, how to diagnose and treat this clinical pathology, which represents an emerging need. This infection could be fatal for patients if not early diagnosed and treated and it represents a challenge both for the clinicians both for the surgeons. From this consideration was born the idea to write this review article in order to furnish to the readers a helpful tool in the management of this disease starting from its clinical and epidemiological features leading to the diagnosis, both clinical and radiological, and concluding with the treatment both medical both surgical .This article reviews literature on PubMed/MEDLINE with key words "necrotizing", "fasciitis" and "necrotizing fasciitis" from 1967 to 2014, considering all the aspects of the disease. The authors attempt to draw comparisons to their own experience managing this condition to give an Italian perspective to the condition.

  2. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus mitis caused by accidental human bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Aliye; Kislak, Sumeyye; Mutlu, Nevzat Mehmet; Akcaboy, Zeynep Nur; Koksal, Asude; Sertcelik, Ahmet; Ünlü, Ramazan Erkin; Akinci, Esragul; Bodur, Hurrem

    2016-01-31

    Human bite wounds are more prone to infection than animal bites, which may cause necrotizing soft tissue infections such as myositis, fasciitis. Both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms may be responsible, including Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Peptostreptococcus spp. Necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by serious tissue destruction and systemic toxicity with high morbidity and mortality. We report a patient with Streptococcus mitis associated necrotizing fasciitis on the upper extremity resulting from an accidental human bite, which caused nearly fatal infection. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment should be given after a human bite to prevent infection. If the infection signs and symptoms develop, rapid diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic and surgical therapy should be administered immediately. Streptococcus mitis is a viridans streptococcus, usually known as a relatively benign oral streptococcus. To our knowledge, this is the first necrotizing fasciitis case due to Streptococcus mitis after human bite.

  3. Nonodontogenic Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Sialadenitis

    OpenAIRE

    Alper Yenigun; Bayram Veyseller; Omer Vural; Orhan Ozturan

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive infectious disease of the soft tissue with high mortality and morbidity rates. Necrotizing fasciitis is occasionally located in the head and neck region and develops after odontogenic infections. Factors affecting treatment success rates are early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic treatment, and surgical debridement. We present a necrotizing fasciitis case located in the neck region that developed after sialoadenitis. It is important to emphasize...

  4. Necrotizing otitis externa: a painless reminder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Daniel; Reece, Phillip; Herdman, Rory

    2008-08-01

    Necrotizing otitis externa is a necrotizing osteomyelitis of the skull base that predominantly affects diabetic and immunocompromised patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently implicated organism. Patients present with severe otalgia, otorrhoea with or without facial palsy, or rarely, facial pain as a symptomatic feature. We report a case of necrotizing otitis externa presenting with totally painless otorrhoea and highlight the need for a high index of suspicion when treating patients with otitis externa.

  5. MRI in necrotizing fasciitis of the extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S Z; Srinivasan, S; Peh, W C G

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening soft-tissue infection of bacterial origin, which involves mainly the deep fascia. Early recognition of this condition may be hampered by the uncommon nature of the disease and non-specificity of initial clinical signs and symptoms in less fulminant cases, making the role of imaging important. MRI is the most useful imaging modality in the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. The presence of thick (>3 mm) hyperintense signal in the deep fascia (particularly intermuscular fascia) on fat-suppressed T2 weighted or short tau inversion-recovery images is an important marker for necrotizing fasciitis. Contrast enhancement of the thickened necrotic fascia can be variable, with a mixed-pattern of enhancement being more commonly encountered. Involvement of multiple musculofascial compartments increases the likelihood of necrotizing fasciitis. It is important to remember that T2-hyperintense signal in the deep fascia is not specific to necrotizing fasciitis and can also be seen in cases such as non-infective inflammatory fasciitis or muscle tear. In this pictorial essay, we aim to review the MRI findings in necrotizing fasciitis, discuss its limitations and pitfalls and identify differentiating features from non-necrotizing soft-tissue infections, such as cellulitis and infective myositis/pyomyositis, conditions which may clinically mimic necrotizing fasciitis.

  6. [NUG--necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Y

    2014-07-01

    Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (NUG) is an acute and rare (0.5-11% of the population) infectious disease of the gum tissue, which is characterized by ulceration and inflammation of the inter-dental gum tissue. NUG was documented by historians since the fourth century BC, most of the reports from the ancient world were in the context of illness among fighting troops, present studies of NUG in the modern world are still common among soldiers. NUG is associated with poor oral hygiene and weakening of the host, especially in immunocompromised patients, malnutrition and poor living conditions, as well as in the context of mental stress. NUG is more common in young adults, but reports of morbidity in young children with malnutrition in the background are not uncommon. NUG diagnosis is based on three essential symptoms: sore gums, bleeding gums and the most diagnostic characteristic, ulceration and necrosis of the interdental papillae. The disease is considered to have a clear initial infectious etiology, when the main bacteria, associated with the disease, include: Bacteroides intermedius and Fusobacterium sp. The infection involves anaerobic \\ aerobic bacteria with a majority of Gram-negative bacteria. The treatment of NUG is based on combining mechanical removal of tartar with local and systemic delivery of antimicrobial agents. Adequate treatment usually prevent the progression of the disease and ulcer healing is expected in a few days. Nevertheless, lack of treatment can lead to deterioration in the form NUP to Noma.

  7. Necrotizing fasciitis in a pediatric orthopedic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancevski, Aleksandar; Bono, Kenneth; Willis, Leisel; Klingele, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    Few studies have analyzed necrotizing fasciitis in children, and all have relied on cases of necrotizing fasciitis in the abdomen, head, and neck region. The authors sought to correlate the preoperative values of several laboratory tests previously validated in the adult literature, such as the Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis, with surgically confirmed necrotizing fasciitis in children to provide clinical guidance for the preoperative laboratory workup of necrotizing fasciitis. A retrospective chart review was performed on consecutive patients younger than 18 years with a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. A total of 13 patients with an average age of 7.9 years (range, 9 months-16 years) were included. Ten (76.9%) infections were found in the lower extremity and 3 (23.1%) in the upper extremity. Seven (53.8%) patients had ecchymosis on examination. All patients presented with an elevated white blood cell count. No amputations were performed, and no mortality occurred. All patients underwent surgery within 24 hours of presentation. Elevated temperature, white blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein values are typically seen in pediatric patients with necrotizing fasciitis; however, no correlation existed between other the preoperative laboratory values with the previously described scoring systems, such as the Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis. Aggressive monitoring of signs and symptoms is suggested, even if a patient does not meet all conventional diagnostic criteria. The authors recommend prompt surgical debridement and early administration of antibiotics, which should include clindamycin.

  8. Atorvastatin-induced necrotizing autoimmune myositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyanov, Yves; Landon-Cardinal, Océane; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Ferreira, José; Targoff, Ira N.; Rich, Eric; Goulet, Michelle; Goulet, Jean-Richard; Bourré-Tessier, Josiane; Robitaille, Yves; Drouin, Julie; Albert, Alexandra; Senécal, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The general aim of this study was to evaluate the disease spectrum in patients presenting with a pure polymyositis (pPM) phenotype. Specific objectives were to characterize clinical features, autoantibodies (aAbs), and membrane attack complex (MAC) in muscle biopsies of patients with treatment-responsive, statin-exposed necrotizing autoimmune myositis (NAM). Patients from the Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal autoimmune myositis (AIM) Cohort with a pPM phenotype, response to immunosuppression, and follow-up ≥3 years were included. Of 17 consecutive patients with pPM, 14 patients had a NAM, of whom 12 were previously exposed to atorvastatin (mean 38.8 months). These 12 patients were therefore suspected of atorvastatin-induced AIM (atorAIM) and selected for study. All had aAbs to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and none had overlap aAbs, aAbs to signal recognition particle, or cancer. Three stages of myopathy were recognized: stage 1 (isolated serum creatine kinase [CK] elevation), stage 2 (CK elevation, normal strength, and abnormal electromyogram [EMG]), and stage 3 (CK elevation, proximal weakness, and abnormal EMG). At diagnosis, 10/12 (83%) patients had stage 3 myopathy (mean CK elevation: 7247 U/L). The presenting mode was stage 1 in 6 patients (50%) (mean CK elevation: 1540 U/L), all of whom progressed to stage 3 (mean delay: 37 months) despite atorvastatin discontinuation. MAC deposition was observed in all muscle biopsies (isolated sarcolemmal deposition on non-necrotic fibers, isolated granular deposition on endomysial capillaries, or mixed pattern). Oral corticosteroids alone failed to normalize CKs and induce remission. Ten patients (83%) received intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) as part of an induction regimen. Of 10 patients with ≥1 year remission on stable maintenance therapy, IVIG was needed in 50%, either with methotrexate (MTX) monotherapy or combination immunosuppression. In the remaining

  9. Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Staphylococcus lugdunensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Hung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening soft tissue infection that results in rapid local tissue destruction. Type 1 necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by polymicrobial, synergistic infections that are caused by non-Group A streptococci, aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Type 2 necrotizing fasciitis involves Group A Streptococcus (GAS with or without a coexisting staphylococcal infection. Here we provide the first report of necrotizing fasciitis jointly associated with the microbes Group B Streptococcus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis. S. lugdunensis is a commensal human skin bacterium known to cause often painful and prolonged skin and soft tissue infections. To our knowledge, however, this is the first case of Staph. lugdunensis-associated necrotizing fasciitis to be reported in the literature.

  10. Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Study of 48 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurjit; Bharpoda, Pragnesh; Reddy, Raghuveer

    2015-12-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis represents a group of highly lethal infections characterized by rapidly progressing inflammation and necrosis. The aim of the study was to analyze the clinical profile, microbial flora, and predisposing risk factors in patients with necrotizing fasciitis. Lastly, we aimed to formulate a protocol for management of necrotizing fasciitis. Forty-eight cases of necrotizing fasciitis patients who reported to our hospital between April 2007 and September 2009 were included in the study. The commonest predisposing factors were age greater than 50 years (58 % cases) and diabetes mellitus (52 % cases). The commonest site involved was extremity (70.8 %). Majority of infections were polymicrobial (87.5 %). Repeated aggressive debridement was the commonest surgical procedure performed. Early and aggressive surgical debridement, often in multiple sittings, supplemented by appropriate antibiotics and supportive therapy, forms the key to a successful outcome in necrotizing fasciitis.

  11. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: A diagnostic dilemma!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir A Joshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS is a benign, self-limiting inflammatory reaction of salivary gland tissue which may mimic squamous cell carcinoma or mucoepidermoid carcinoma, both clinically and histologically, that creates diagnostic dilemma leading to unwarranted aggressive surgery. Most commonly affected site is the minor salivary glands of the palate. The pathogenesis is unknown but is believed to be due to ischemia of vasculature supplying the salivary gland lobules. A simple incisional biopsy is required to confirm the histological diagnosis and to rule out more serious disease processes. It is a self-limiting disease process and requires no treatment. It will be prudent to do repeat biopsy in case if the lesion does not heal within 3 months.

  12. What next in necrotizing enterocolitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdakök, Murat

    2008-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants, with a mortality rate of 10-50%. It is uncommon in term infants and in premature infants who have not yet been fed. Most commonly NEC develops suddenly in a preterm infant who was otherwise well, with initial symptoms of abdominal distention, bilious or bloody emesis or gastric aspirates, hematochezia, and pneumatosis intestinalis, and sometimes progresses quickly to include bowel perforation, acidosis, shock, and death. Trigger factors (i.e. perinatal hypoxia, mild infection or formula feeding) cause focal mild intestinal mucosal injury. In the presence of proliferation of commensal bacteria, local breakdown of mucosal barrier may cause entry of bacterial products (e.g. lipopolysaccharides, platelet-activating factor). Endothelial platelet-activating factor and/or tumor necrotizing factor and/or direct stimulating effects of polymorphonuclear leukocytes cause proinflammatory cascade and focal necrosis, which increase the entry of large amounts of bacterial toxins, and then severe NEC, sepsis, and shock develop. Therapies for the prevention of NEC that appear to have some benefit are breastfeeding and antenatal steroids, and probably probiotics. Enteral immunoglobulin, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and arginine or glutamine supplementation are therapies for the prevention of NEC that do not appear to be of benefit. Enteral erythropoietin and enteral granulocyte colony-stimulating factor are promising novel therapies. Treatment options are limited to gut rest, parenteral nutrition, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and surgical interventions for enteral perforation. Two commonly used methods for NEC with intestinal perforation are laparotomy or primary peritoneal drainage ("patch, drain and wait"); however, the preferred method is controversial.

  13. Infection increases mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werge, Mikkel; Novovic, Srdjan; Schmidt, Palle N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of infection on mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: Eligible prospective and retrospective studies were identified through manual and electronic searches (August 2015). The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Meta...... sterile necrosis and organ failure was associated with a mortality of 19.8%. If the patients had infected necrosis without organ failure the mortality was 1.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are more than twice as likely to die if the necrosis becomes infected. Both organ failure...... and infected necrosis increase mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis....

  14. Mortality associated with cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, J B; Harper, J L; Jauch, E C

    1996-09-01

    Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection but still occurs and carries a mortality rate up to 60%. It is a polymicrobial infection that is characterized by diffuse necrosis of fascial planes and subcutaneous tissues. Diagnosing early stages of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in relationship to other soft tissue infections of odontogenic origin is difficult and leads to less aggressive treatment with resulting increased morbidity and mortality. To prevent this significant mortality and morbidity associated with cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis early presentation, recognition and treatment by health care provider is essential.

  15. Necrotizing fasciitis: a case report of a premature infant with necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Denise M; Stebbins, Karen; Howland, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a severe infection involving the superficial fascia, subcutaneous tissue, and, occasionally, deeper tissue layers. Usual treatment is with surgical debridement in combination with antibiotics. In review of the literature there is one neonatal report of NF associated with necrotizing enterocolitis. We present a case report of a 25 week gestation infant with necrotizing fasciitis and the complexity of wound and pain management presented for the nursing staff in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  16. Pharm GKB: Acute necrotizing pancreatitis [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A165108252 External Vocabularies MeSH: Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing (D019283) SnoMedCT: Acute necrotizing... pancreatitis (7881005) UMLS: C0267941 (C0267941) MedDRA: Necrotising pancreatitis (10056219) NDFRT: Pancreatitis, Acute... Necrotizing [Disease/Finding] (N0000003910) Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Acute necrotizing pancreatitis ...

  17. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: Report of 2 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo; Cho, Bong Hae; Jung, Yun Hoa [Pusan National Univ. College of Dentistry, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) was defined by Abrams et al. in 1973 as a reactive necrotizing inflammatory process involving minor salivary glands of the hard palate. Before that recognition, many patients with this condition had been improperly treated because of its clinical and histologic resemblance to malignancy such as mucoepidermoid carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. We report two cases of necrotizing sialometaplasia. One case involved a 58-year-old male who had an ulcerative palatal lesion exposing underlying bone which has the typical features of the above mentioned condition. Another case involved a 59-year-old male who developed a necrotizing sialometaplasia in association with a dome-shaped palatal swelling which was proves as an adenoid cystic carcinoma after operation biopsy.

  18. Surgical intervention in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, MG; de Bruijn, MT; Rutten, JP; Boermeester, MA; Hofker, HS; Gooszen, HG

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the various surgical strategies for treatment of (suspected) infected necrotizing pancreatitis (INP) and patient referrals for this condition in the Netherlands. Methods: This retrospective study included all 106 consecutive patients who had surgical treatment for IN

  19. Chrysomya Bezziana oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Vijay Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is an opportunistic infestation of human and vertebrate animals with dipterous larvae. Oral myiasis is a rare condition associated with poor oral hygiene, mental disability, halitosis and other conditions. We present a case report of an adult mentally challenged woman with extensive necrotic oral lesion burrowing into the hard palate through which three live maggots (larvae were seen emerging out. The larvae were removed using forceps and the patient was treated with oral ivermectin. The maggots were identified as larvae of the Chrysomya bezziana fly.

  20. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to Vibrio damsela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, K Y; Ma, L; Wong, S S; Ng, W F

    1993-01-01

    A patient who succumbed to fulminant necrotizing fasciitis due to Vibrio damsela after injury by a rabbitfish is described. Despite the absence of any known underlying illness, he did not respond to appropriate antibiotic therapy and radical surgical intervention. This represents the first documented case of necrotizing fasciitis due to this organism, and is also the first reported case in Southeast Asia inflicted by rabbitfish.

  1. Necrotizing Faciitis-Acute Abdomen And Anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Güleç, Handan; Akın Kepek, Yurdal; Yaşar, Hansa; Kurtay, Aysun; Tutal, Zehra; Babayiğit, Münire; Horasanlı, Eyüp

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis ( NF) is a rare  soft-tissue infection characterized by progressive necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and fascia with a high morbidity and mortality.  This infection, which is usually induced by  toxin producing bacteria, can occur in any region of the body but it is predominantly located in the abdominal wall, perineum and extremities . NF treatments consist of  radical surgical debridement of all involved necrotic tissue, use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and...

  2. RANK/RANKL/OPG signaling pathways in necrotic jaw bone from bisphosphonate-treated subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Di Nisio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ is a chronic complication affecting long-term bisphosphonate-treated subjects, recognized by non-healing exposed bone in the maxillofacial region. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying ONJ has not been fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of RANK/RANKL/OPG signaling pathway and, in parallel, to evaluate angiogenic and matrix mineralization processes in jaw bone necrotic samples obtained from bisphosphonate-treated subjects with established ONJ. Necrotic bone samples and native bone samples were processed for Light and Field Emission in Lens Scanning Electron Microscope (FEISEM analyses, for Real-Time RT-PCR to evaluate the gene expression of TNFRSF11A (RANK, TNFSF11 (RANKL, and TNFSF11B (OPG and for immunohistochemical analyses of VEGF and BSP expression. Morphological analyses performed by Light microscope and FEISEM show empty osteocytic lacunae and alteration of lamellar organization with degradation of the mineralized bone matrix in necrotic bone samples. A significant increase in TNFRSF11A, TNFSF11, TRAF6 and NFAT2 gene expression, and a reduction of TNFSF11B gene transcription level compared is also showed in necrotic bone compared to control samples. No significant difference of VEGF expression is evidenced, while lower BSP expression in necrotic bone compared to healthy samples is found. Even if the pathogenesis of bisphosphonate-associated ONJ remains unknown, a link between oral pathogens and its development seems to exist. We suppose lipopolysaccharide produced by bacteria colonizing and infecting necrotic bone and the surrounding viable area could trigger RANK/RANKL/OPG signaling pathway and, in this context, osteoclasts activation could be considered as a protective strategy carried out by the host bone tissue to delimitate the necrotic area and to counteract infection.

  3. Necrotizing fasciitis following varicella in a child

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Feng; XIA Jie

    2012-01-01

    Varicella is a self-limited disease,but sometimes it may be associated with some serious life-threatening complications.Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare complication of varicella.This is a case of a 7-year-old girl with septic shock caused'by necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of varicella.Swelling and pain in the left inguinal region and left axillary region were found five days after varicella.Then a high fever occurred followed by hypotension.Fluid infusion,vasopressor and antibiotics were administered.Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated from exudates from the wounds.The clinical symptoms markedly improved after surgical drainage and removal of the necrotic tissue.Both wounds were covered with skin grafts after healthy granulation tissue formed.Although there have been few reports of life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis following varicella in western countries,it is rare in China.Usually patients with varicella were admitted to pediatric or infectious disease department but not surgical departments; so that the clinicians should be aware that varicella may be complicated by life-threatening surgical infections.Necrotizing fasciitis should be suspected in patients of varicella who showed an increasing pain and swelling in any body areas associated with increasing fever and local erythema.Early identification,surgical drainage and debridement are essential for successful treatment of necrotizing fasciitis.

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis following varicella in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Xia, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Varicella is a self-limited disease, but sometimes it may be associated with some serious life-threatening complications.Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare complication of varicella. This is a case of a 7-year-old girl with septic shock caused by necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of varicella. Swelling and pain in the left inguinal region and left axillary region were found five days after varicella. Then a high fever occurred followed by hypotension. Fluid infusion, vasopressor and antibiotics were administered. Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated from exudates from the wounds. The clinical symptoms markedly improved after surgical drainage and removal of the necrotic tissue. Both wounds were covered with skin grafts after healthy granulation tissue formed. Although there have been few reports of life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis following varicella in western countries, it is rare in China. Usually patients with varicella were admitted to pediatric or infectious disease department but not surgical departments; so that the clinicians should be aware that varicella may be complicated by life-threatening surgical infections. Necrotizing fasciitis should be suspected in patients of varicella who showed an increasing pain and swelling in any body areas associated with increasing fever and local erythema. Early identification, surgical drainage and debridement are essential for successful treatment of necrotizing fasciitis.

  5. [Necrotizing gastritis in a patient in severe neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielaciński, Konrad; Lech-Marańda, Ewa; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Dedecjus, Marek; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Szczepanik, Andrzej B

    2014-12-01

    One extremely rare complication of chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies that is burdened with a high mortality rate (50%-80%) is necrotizing gastritis and gastric gangrene as result of poor clinical outcome of neutropenic gastritis (NG). We present a unique case of a neutropenic patient with necrotizing full thickness gastritis due to bacterial and fungal infection. Up to date only few such cases have been reported in world literature. A 28-year-old patient was subjected to dose-escalated BEACOPP (bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone), (chemotherapy regimen) for Hodgkin lymphoma. In neutropenic patient abdominal pain, bleeding from the alimentary tract was observed. Hemorrhagic gastritis was recognized at endoscopy and CT demonstrated marked gastric wall thickness. Following NG diagnosis intensive treatment was initiated. On day 2 the patient's condition deteriorated (septic shock, multiple organ failure). Repeat endoscopy revealed gastric necrosis and laparotomy was performed. As consequence of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation the surgical procedure was limited to total gastrectomy, feeding jejustomy and esophageal drainage through nasoesophageal catherization. Roux-loop esophagojejunostomy was performed on day 22 and supplemented 4 days later by endoscopic placement of covered self-expandable stent due to anastomosis leak. The procedure proved successful and oral feeding was well-tolerated. The patient was discharged in 32 days following recognition of gastric necrosis. Chemotherapy complications in neutropenic patients are life-threatening conditions. Immediate pharmacological treatment usually leads to improvement. Surgical management usually the resection of necrotic zones is restricted to cases of poor prognosis or deterioration of patient's condition and complications.

  6. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alcides Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections.

  7. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections. PMID:27375905

  8. NECROTIZING FASCIITIS OF LIMB: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaarna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe, rare, potentially lethal, soft tissue infection that tends to develop in scrotum, perineum, abdominal wall or the extremities. It is a medical emergency that threatens both patient’s limb and life. Necrotizing fasciitis has the potential to become quite severe - in such cases a radical debridement amounting to amputation of the limb may be required to save the patient’s life. Early diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. We describe a case of a 49-year-old obese woman who developed necrotizing fasciitis in her left lower limb for which she underwent multiple radical surgical debridement, followed by skin grafting for reconstruction of the limb defects. Our main focus was to salvage the limb with the help of antibiotics and multiple debridements. This report emphasizes the need to have a relook at the use of Parenteral Crystalline Penicillin and diligent management of wounds resulting from repeated debridements.

  9. Anesthetic implications of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Mehmood A; Mansfield, John F

    2003-08-01

    Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis is a necrotizing soft tissue infection of face and neck spreading at the level of fascia. It has been described as a putrid ulcer, phagedaena, and hospital gangrene. It has a high mortality rate, and presents a challenge to anesthesiologists who must secure an airway to deliver anesthesia safely. We report a case of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in which the patient underwent repeated radical surgical debridement of face and neck, including a mandibulectomy. These critically ill patients often present with sepsis and multiple system organ failure. Extensive preoperative evaluation, invasive monitoring, and possibly the use of vasopressors and inotropes are essential in treating these patients. The tracheas of these patients should remain intubated after initial debridement. Tracheostomy should be performed early. Antibiotic therapy, nutritional support, early debridement, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy all help to decrease mortality in these patients.

  10. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis as a manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Shigetsuna; Honma, Masaru; Igawa, Satomi; Tsuji, Hitomi; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Migita, Kiyoshi; Ida, Hiroaki; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease, which is characterized by recurrent and paroxysmal fever, peritonitis, arthritis, myalgia, and skin rashes. Although various skin lesions such as "erysipelas-like erythema", urticaria, nonspecific purpura, and subcutaneous nodules have been described, cutaneous vasculitis is rare. We report a Japanese case of sporadic FMF accompanied by cutaneous arteritis at the time of febrile attacks of FMF. Gene analysis revealed M694I mutation in a single allele of the MEFV gene, and oral colchicine successfully controlled both periodic fever and subcutaneous nodules of arteritis. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis repeatedly emerging with febrile attacks should be included among the skin manifestations of FMF. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  11. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The first case of the confirmed necrotizing fasciitis caused by Group A Streptococcus in Yugoslavia was presented. Male patient, aged 28, in good health, suddenly developed symptoms and signs of severe infective syndrome and intensive pain in the axillary region. Parenteral antibiotic, substitution and supportive therapy was conducted along with the radical surgical excision of the necrotizing tissue. The patient did not develop streptococcal toxic shock syndrome thanks to the early established diagnosis and timely applied aggressive treatment. He was released from the hospital as completely cured two months after the admission.

  12. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-12-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved.

  13. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis following periodontal abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Rui; Catunda, Ivson de Sousa; Queiroz, Isaac Vieira; de Morais, Hecio Henrique Araujo; Leao, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino Monteiro

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue infections are characterized by acute inflammation, diffuse edema, and suppuration, and are often associated with symptoms such as malaise, fever, tachycardia, and chills. Necrotizing fasciitis is a destructive bacterial infection affecting subcutaneous tissue and superficial fascia and is associated with high rates of mortality. It usually involves the abdomen and extremities, but it also can occur in the head and neck. Early diagnosis is critical and the most commonly accepted treatment includes radical surgical intervention and administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics. This article reports and discusses the case of a patient with odontogenic cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis, and emphasizes the importance of early and effective treatment.

  14. Ascending necrotizing mediastinitis secondary to emphysematous pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajer-Fadel, Walid Leonardo; Pichardo-González, Martha; Estrada-Ramos, Sandra; Palafox, Damián; Navarro-Reynoso, Francisco Pascual; Argüero-Sánchez, Rubén

    2014-09-01

    Mediastinal infections usually originate from postoperative complications or in a descending manner from a cervical infectious process; few reports have emerged describing an ascending trajectory. A 56-year-old woman with a Huang class 1 left emphysematous pyelonephritis was referred due to a progression of an ascending necrotizing mediastinitis. A left posterolateral thoracotomy was performed, drainage and thorough lavage were carried out with a successful outcome. We believe this is the first reported case of ascending necrotizing mediastinitis secondary to an emphysematous renal infection. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Rare Disease, Especially for the Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Rare Disease, Especially for the Healthy Language: ... based hand rub if washing is not possible. Necrotizing Fasciitis Is Rarely Spread from Person to Person Most ...

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis : plain radiographic and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Dae; Park, Jeong Hee; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Heo, Tae Haeng; Park, Dong Rib [Konkuk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To evaluate the plain radiographic and CT findings of the necrotizing fasciitis. We retrospectively reviewed the radiologic findings of 4 cases with necrotizing fasciitis. Three cases were proven pathologically. We evaluated pattern and extent of the gas shadows in plain films. CT findings were analysed, with emphasis on : (a) gas pattern, (b) extent, (c) location and involved site, (d) associated focal abscess, and (e) swelling of the adjacent muscles. On plain radiographs, four cases showed streaky or mottled gas densities in the pelvis, three cases in the perineum, one case in the abdomen, and two cases in the thigh. On CT images, gas pattern was mottled and streaky appearance with swelling of the adjacent muscles. Gas shadows located in the extraperitoneal space in four cases, fascial layer in four cases, and subcutaneous layer in four cases. There were gas shadows in pelvic wall, perineum, abdominal wall, buttock, thigh, and scrotum. Focal low density lesion suggestive of focal abscess was not visualized. Plain radiography is useful for early diagnosis of the necrotizing fasciitis and CT is very useful for detection of precise location and extent of the disease. CT is also useful for differentiation of necrotizing fasciitis from focal abscess and cellulitis.

  17. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in infant: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiavetto, Renata Rennó

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis is a bacterial infection characterized by extensive necrosis of tissues, and may include skin and muscles. It's more frequent in adults than in children and generally involves the trunk and extremities. Head and neck area is less commonly affected. The most frequently isolated pathogens are the Streptococcus pyogenes (group A and Staphylococcus aureus. The anatomopathological exam is the best diagnostic method, which early identifies the disease. The clinical support, surgical debridement, and the intravenous antibiotic therapy, are fundamental for the treatment. Objective: To report a case of an infant who suffered from Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis. Case Report: Infant, male sex, white, 2 months old, previously healthy, with Necrotizing Fasciitis involving the frontal and right lateral cervical regions. After adequate treatment the patient obtained excellent recovery without presenting important aesthetic or functional alterations. Conclusion: The Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis is uncommon in children. The early surgical debridement is necessary to control the infection, even if it may result in great and deep injuries. The wide spectrum antibiotic therapy and hemodynamic support are also basic for the therapeutic success.

  18. Intestinal proteome changes during infant necrotizing enterocolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Pingping; Smith, Birgitte; Qvist, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Changes in the intestinal and colonic proteome in patients with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) may help to characterize the disease pathology and identify new biomarkers and treatment targets for NEC. Methods: Using gel-based proteomics, proteins in NEC-affected intestinal and coloni...

  19. Odontogenic cervical necrotizing fasciitis, etiological aspects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-26

    Jun 26, 2015 ... E-mail: dr_simionbran@yahoo.com. Introduction. Necrotizing ... each case were obtained through the study of the clinical observation ..... infection experience in West China: A retrospective study of 212 cases. Int J. Infect Dis ...

  20. Protein synthesis persists during necrotic cell death.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saelens, X.; Festjens, N.; Parthoens, E.; Overberghe, I. van; Kalai, M.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Vandenabeele, P.

    2005-01-01

    Cell death is an intrinsic part of metazoan development and mammalian immune regulation. Whereas the molecular events orchestrating apoptosis have been characterized extensively, little is known about the biochemistry of necrotic cell death. Here, we show that, in contrast to apoptosis, the inductio

  1. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Muggeo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an uncommon ssevere soft-tissue infection of the thighs in a male child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Early and aggressive medical treatment and the conservative surgical approach were successful. Necrotizing fasciitis should be suspected in any soft-tissue infection until it can be definitely ruled out, since prompt deliver of medical and surgical intervention is essential.

  2. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Cervical Region following Extravasation Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Özlem Gündeşlioğlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection that can cause local tissue destruction, necrosis, and life threatening severe sepsis. Necrotizing fasciitis in the head and neck region caused by an extravasation injury is rare. This paper reports a patient with necrotizing fasciitis of the cervical region caused by an extravasation injury which required an early surgical debridement.

  3. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Cervical Region following Extravasation Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ayşe Özlem Gündeşlioğlu; Emine Çiğdem Özen

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection that can cause local tissue destruction, necrosis, and life threatening severe sepsis. Necrotizing fasciitis in the head and neck region caused by an extravasation injury is rare. This paper reports a patient with necrotizing fasciitis of the cervical region caused by an extravasation injury which required an early surgical debridement.

  4. Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis presenting as bilateral pleural effusion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajalingham Sakthiswary

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis is an uncommon subacute form of Aspergillus infection. It typically occurs in immunocompromised individuals and in those with underlying lung disease. This interesting case highlights the occurrence of this entity of aspergillosis in an immunocompetent middle-aged woman with atypical radiological findings. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis presenting with pleural effusion. Case presentation Our patient was a 64-year-old Malay woman with a background history of epilepsy but no other comorbidities. She was a lifelong non-smoker. She presented to our facility with a six-month history of productive cough and three episodes of hemoptysis. An initial chest radiograph showed bilateral pleural effusion with bibasal consolidation. Bronchoscopy revealed a white-coated endobronchial tree and bronchoalveolar lavage culture grew Aspergillus niger. A diagnosis of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis was made based on the clinical presentation and microbiological results. She responded well to treatment with oral itraconazole. Conclusions The radiological findings in chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis can be very diverse. This case illustrates that this condition can be a rare cause of bilateral pleural effusion.

  5. Necrotizing otitis externa: a new trend? Report of 6 atypical cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Glynn, Fergal

    2009-12-01

    Necrotizing otitis externa (OE) is traditionally seen in elderly diabetics and immunocompromised patients. During a 7-year period at our institution, we treated 6 patients with necrotizing OE who were not diabetic, who were not immunocompromised, and who were relatively young (age range: 27 to 65 yr; mean: 42.8). The necrotizing OE in these patients was less aggressive but just as severe as its usual presentation in older diabetic or immunocompromised patients. All 6 patients had evidence of bony erosion on computed tomography of the temporal bones, although 4 had negative findings on technetium-99m scintigraphy. Four of the 6 patients required mastoid exploration and fascia lata grafting, and the other 2 chose to undergo extensive daily microdebridements and intravenous antibiotics followed by 6 weeks of oral antibiotics. We recommend that a diagnosis of necrotizing OE be kept in mind when evaluating any patient who presents with severe otalgia, particularly in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the external auditory canal, edema, granulation tissue, and bony erosion.

  6. The phylum Synergistetes in gingivitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Angelica; Thurnheer, Thomas; Lüthi-Schaller, Helga; Gmür, Rudolf; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2012-11-01

    The clinical manifestation of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is distinct from that of common gingivitis in that it is characterized by local necrosis of the gingival tissues, rapid onset, pain and extensive bleeding. The phylum Synergistetes is a novel bacterial phylum consisting of Gram-negative anaerobes, with evidence of presence in biofilms associated with periodontal and endodontic infections. To date, the involvement of members of this phylum in NUG has not been investigated. This study aimed to evaluate the presence and levels of known human oral Synergistetes bacterial clusters in dental plaque from patients with NUG and compare them with those found in gingivitis. Marginal dental plaque samples from 21 NUG and 21 gingivitis patients were analysed quantitatively by fluorescent in situ hybridization and microscopy for members of two oral Synergistetes clusters (A and B) and for Jonquetella anthropi. Synergistetes cluster A bacteria were detected in all samples but at higher levels (9.4-fold) and proportions (2.5-fold) in NUG patients than in gingivitis patients. However, with regard to Synergistetes cluster B bacteria, there were no differences between NUG and gingivitis patients. J. anthropi was detected in only half of the samples and at lower levels than the other taxa. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that Synergistetes cluster A bacteria, but not cluster B bacteria or J. anthropi, are more strongly associated with NUG than with gingivitis.

  7. Pectoralis myocutaneous flap for salvage of necrotic wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, J.C.; Davis, R.K.; Koltai, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The authors have utilized six pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps in attempts to salvage extensive necrotic wounds of the pharynx and neck. The flap was employed in the following situations: massive necrosis of the entire neck skin with both carotid artery systems exposed, radiation necrosis of the neck skin with exposure of carotid artery, dehiscence of gastric pull-up from pharynx with resultant carotid exposure, failed trapezius flap in a radionecrotic oral cavity, and two cases of pharyngocutaneous fistula with extensive soft tissue necrosis. These flaps achieved healing in all cases. One death occurred 3 weeks following complete cutaneous healing secondary to a ruptured carotid pseudoaneurysm. One flap underwent total skin loss but the entirety of the muscle survived and the fistula was successfully closed with the back of the muscle being subsequently skin grafted. One case of dehiscence of the flap from oral mucosa resulted in a minor exposure of mandible with limited osteoradionecrosis controlled by topical means. This flap has performed extremely well in these precarious and difficult situations that previously may not have been salvageable. It has also been effective in abbreviating the required hospitalization and wound care. The authors conclude that the pectoralis myocutaneous flap should be the primary choice for the management of extensive postsurgical wound necrosis.

  8. Kontribusi Higiene Mulut terhadap Timbulnya Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG (Survei Epidemiologi di Kecamatan Pacet Kabupaten Cianjur Jawa Barat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mirna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This analytical epidemiological survey was aimed to investigate the correlation between oral hygiene and the onset of an infectious, necrotic, ulcerative disease called acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG. The study involved 319 elementary school children consisting of 163 (52% male and 156 (48% female pupils from Kecamatan Pacet, Cianjur, WestJawa. Samples were chosen by stratified simple random sampling. The obtained data were analyzed with Bivariant Test (Chi2Ttest, and the results showed a quite high prevalence of ANUG, aboout 15.3% in total and consisting 9% male and 6.3% female subjects. The correlation between oral hygiene and the onset of ANUG was found to be significant (p<0.05. It was concluded that oral hygiene has an important contribution to the onset of ANUG.

  9. The effect of cold stress on the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouris, V; Georgopoulou, I; Batzios, C; Pappaioannou, N; Ducatelle, R; Fortomaris, P

    2015-01-01

    Cold stress is a physical environmental stressor with significant effect on the poultry industry. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of cold stress as a predisposing factor for necrotic enteritis in broiler chicks. The experimental challenge model included an oral inoculation with 10-fold dose of attenuated anticoccidial vaccine and multiple oral inoculations with a specific strain of Clostridium perfringens. Birds were either challenged or not as described above, and either exposed or not to repeated cold stress (15°C for 12 h/day for 4 days). From each bird, intestinal gross lesions were scored and intestinal digesta pH and viscosity were measured. C. perfringens was counted in the caecum. The statistical analysis and evaluation of the experimental data revealed that the cold stress in challenged birds significantly increased the incidence and the severity of necrotic enteritis lesions (Ρ ≤ 0.05), while causing no lesions in unchallenged birds. Moreover, the cold stress caused a significant increase (Ρ ≤ 0.05) in the pH and C. perfringens counts in the caeca. The study provides evidence that cold stress increased the susceptibility to necrotic enteritis in a subclinical experimental model and thus should be regarded as a physical environmental stressor that could significantly affect the welfare, health and intestinal ecosystem of broiler chicks.

  10. A case of acute periorbital necrotizing fasciitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nurhayati Abdul Kadir; Syed Shoeb Ahmad; Shuaibah Abdul Ghani; Madusudhan Paramananda

    2016-01-01

    Periorbital necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but potentially fatal infection. It is most commonly caused by Gram-positive group A b-haemolytic Streptococci and rarely by fungal infections. In this report, we present a rare case of periorbital necrotizing fasciitis caused by Aspergillus species in an immunocompromised patient. He presented to us with a history of a slowly progressive eyelid necrosis leading to a loss of vision in one eye. The patient was started on an antibiotic and subsequently, surgical debridement and enucle-ation were performed. A few days post-operatively, yellow white mould colonies were noted to grow on the wound surface. Microbiology cultures identified them as Aspergillus species and intravenous amphotericin B 10 mg was added daily. However, despite the extensive medical and surgical treatments, he failed to respond and succumbed from septicaemia and multi-organ failure.

  11. Necrotizing Periodontal Diseases II: Clinical Features

    OpenAIRE

    Maita Véliz, Luis V.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Odontología.; Castañeda Mosto, María; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Odontología.; Gálvez Calla, Luis; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Odontología.; Maita Castañeda, Luis M; Facultad de Odontología USMP; Navarro Contreras, Carmen; Odontóloga práctica privada; Ramos Perfecto, Donald; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Odontología.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a review of the most important aspects from necrotizing periodontal disease, specia-lly about clinical features, diagnostics, etiology, evolution, prognose and treatment. Se presenta una revisión de las enfermedades periodontales necrotizantes (EPN), sintetizando los aspec-tos clínicos, criterios de diagnóstico, etiología, evolución, diagnóstico diferencial, pronóstico y trata-miento.

  12. Necrotizing pancreatitis: a review of multidisciplinary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Anthony; Goussous, Naeem; Sardana, Neeraj; Patel, Shirali; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this review is to summarize the current state of the art of the management of necrotizing pancreatitis, and to clarify some confusing points regarding the terminology and diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis, as these points are essential for management decisions and communication between providers and within the literature. Acute pancreatitis varies widely in its clinical presentation. Despite the publication of the Atlanta guidelines, misuse of pancreatitis terminology continues in the literature and in clinical practice, especially regarding the local complications associated with severe acute pancreatitis. Necrotizing pancreatitis is a manifestation of severe acute pancreatitis associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is aided by pancreas-protocol computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, ideally 72 h after onset of symptoms to achieve the most accurate characterization of pancreatic necrosis. The extent of necrosis correlates well with the incidence of infected necrosis, organ failure, need for debridement, and morbidity and mortality. Having established the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis, goals of appropriately aggressive resuscitation should be established and adhered to in a multidisciplinary approach, ideally at a high-volume pancreatic center. The role of antibiotics is determined by the presence of infected necrosis. Early enteral feeds improve outcomes compared with parenteral nutrition. Pancreatic necrosis is associated with a multitude of complications which can lead to long-term morbidity or mortality. Interventional therapy should be guided by available resources and the principle of a minimally invasive approach. When open debridement is necessary, it should be delayed at least 3-6 weeks to allow demarcation of necrotic from viable tissue.

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusem Patir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, progressive, and life-threatening hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis and a prothrombotic state. Patients with PNH might have slightly increased risk of infections due to complement-associated defects subsequent to CD59 deficiency. Here, we report a rare case of a 65-year-old male patient with necrotic ulcers on both legs, where the recognition of pancytopenia and microthrombi led to the diagnosis of PNH based on FLAER (FLuorescent AERolysin flow cytometric analysis. He was subsequently started on eculizumab therapy, with starting and maintenance doses set as per drug labelling. Progression of the patient’s leg ulcers during follow-up, with fulminant tissue destruction, purulent discharge, and necrotic patches, led to a later diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics, surgical debridement, and superficial skin grafting were applied with successful effect during ongoing eculizumab therapy. This case highlights the point that it is important to maintain treatment of underlying disorders such as PNH in the presence of life-threatening infections like NF.

  14. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  15. [Fulminant isolated necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall, complicating thoracic empyema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Ottó; Szántó, Zoltán; Krasznai, Géza

    2016-03-01

    Authors introduce the case of a 64-year-old male patient with fulminant isolated necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall, complicating empyema thoracis of unknown origin. The patient's co-morbidities were hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation with oral anticoagulation. The real etiology was revealed post mortem, due to the rapid progression. The autopsy demonstrated that the fasciitis was caused by a small blunt thoracic trauma (haematoma), not emerged from patient's history and was not visible during physical examination. Authors review diagnostic pitfalls, leading to delayed recognition in addition to this very case. After quick diagnosis surgical debridement, targeted wide spectrum antibiotics and maximal intensive care are the basic pillars of the management of necrotizing fasciitis.

  16. Vaccination with recombinant NetB toxin partially protects broiler chickens from necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyburn, Anthony L; Portela, Ricardo W; Sproat, Kathy; Ford, Mark E; Bannam, Trudi L; Yan, Xuxia; Rood, Julian I; Moore, Robert J

    2013-07-16

    NetB toxin from Clostridium perfringens is a major virulence factor in necrotic enteritis in poultry. In this study the efficacy of NetB as a vaccine antigen to protect chickens from necrotic enteritis was examined. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with purified recombinant NetB (rNetB), formalin treated bacterin and cell free toxoid with or without rNetB supplementation. Intestinal lesion scores and NetB antibody levels were measured to determine protection after mild oral gavage, moderate in-feed and heavy in-feed challenges with virulent C. perfringens isolates. Birds immunized with rNetB were significantly protected against necrotic enteritis when challenged with a mild oral dose of virulent bacteria, but were not protected when a more robust challenge was used. Bacterin and cell free toxoid without rNetB supplementation did not protect birds from moderate and severe in-feed challenge. Only birds immunized with bacterin and cell free toxoid supplemented with rNetB showed significant protection against moderate and severe in-feed challenge, with the later giving the greatest protection. Higher NetB antibody titres were observed in birds immunized with rNetB compared to those vaccinated with bacterin or toxoid, suggesting that the in vitro levels of NetB produced by virulent C. perfringens isolates are too low to induce the development of a strong immune response. These results suggest that vaccination with NetB alone may not be sufficient to protect birds from necrotic enteritis in the field, but that in combination with other cellular or cell-free antigens it can significantly protect chickens from disease.

  17. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the palate. Ulcerative or necrotizing stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipsen, H P; Petersen, J K; Simonsen, B H

    1976-12-01

    A typical case of the recently described tumor-suspect lesion, necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) of the palate, in a 54-year old Caucasian male is presented. Results of complete blood- and urinanalysis including serum electrophoresis and labial salivary gland biopsy strongly pointed at a local etiologic factor. Previous statements that the disease represents a new entity are questioned. The present authors favor the idea that NS is the necrotizing (ulcerative) or terminal stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati (nicotinic stomatitis). It is of particular importance that this lesion is not diagnosed as a malignancy, as it heals spontaneously and uneventfully.

  18. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by a primary appendicocutaneous fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Makoto; Higashi, Yukihiro; Shoji, Tuyoshi; Hiraide, Takanori; Maruo, Hirotoshi

    2012-08-01

    We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the loin of a 76-year old man with several coexisting or past health issues, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, alcohol-related liver cirrhosis, gastrectomy for gastric cancer, subarachnoid hemorrhage, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and cerebral infarction. Incision of the necrotizing fasciitis was successful, but it revealed an appendicocutaneous fistula; thus, we performed appendectomy and fistulectomy. We think that the necrotizing fasciitis was caused by appendicitis perforation involving the retroperitoneum, inducing the formation of an appendicocutaneous fistula. Necrotizing fasciitis and appendicocutaneous fistulae are rare complications of appendicitis. Moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first report of fluoroscopic examination demonstrating that a primary appendicocutaneous fistula had caused necrotizing fasciitis. Our search of the literature found 12 cases of necrotizing fasciitis caused by preoperative appendicitis. We discuss the characteristics and findings of these cases.

  19. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Youn; Park, So Young; Moon, Soo-Youn; Son, Jun Seong; Lee, Mi Suk

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is known to be a highly lethal infection of deep-seated subcutaneous tissue and superficial fascia. Reports of necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae are exceedingly rare. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis in a 62-yr-old man with liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus. He presented with painful swelling of left leg and right hand. On the day of admission, compartment syndrome was aggravated and the patient underwent surgical exploration. Intra-operative findings revealed necrotizing fasciitis and cultures of two blood samples and wound aspirates showed S. pneumoniae. The patient died despite debridement and proper antimicrobial treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of fatal necrotizing fasciitis with meningitis reported in Korea. We also review and discuss the literature on pneumococcal necrotizing fasciitis.

  20. Necrotizing Fasciitis of vulva: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal A

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar necrotizing fascitis is an uncommon infectious disorder. Since the first reported cases almost 100 years, ago, necrotizing fasciitis continues to present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. What usually begins as a subtle infection can become life-threatening. We report two cases of vulvar necrotizing fasciitis, one after posterior colporrhaphy in a woman with four risk factors and the other in a young woman without any risk factor.

  1. Necrotizing fasciitis: A decade of surgical intensive care experience

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikh Nissar

    2006-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare disease, potentially limb and life-threatening infection of fascia, subcutaneous tissue with occasionally muscular involvement. Necrotizing faciitis is surgical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Aim: Aim of this study was to analyze presentation, microbiology, surgical, resuscitative management and outcome of this devastating soft tissue infection. Materials and Methods: The medical records of necrotizing fasciitis patients treated in surgical in...

  2. Necrotizing fasciitis: strategies for diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanar Hakan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is uncommon and difficult to diagnose, and it cause progressive morbidity until the infectious process is diagnosed and treated medically and surgically. The literature addressed NF contains confusing information, inaccurate bacteriologic data, and antiquated antibiotic therapy. A delay in diagnosis is associated with a grave prognosis and increased mortality. The main goal of the clinician must be to establish the diagnosis and initially treat the patient within the standard of care. This review is planned as a guide for the clinician in making an early diagnosis of NF and initiating effective medical and surgical therapy.

  3. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to necrotic toxin-producing Escherichia coli strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gallois

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a fatal case of necrotizing soft tissues infection caused by an Escherichia coli strain belonging to phylogenetic group C and harbouring numerous virulence factors reported to be part of a pathogenicity island (PAI such as PAI IIJ96 and conserved virulence plasmidic region.

  4. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to necrotic toxin-producing Escherichia coli strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallois, C.; Hauw-Berlemont, C.; Richaud, C.; Bonacorsi, S.; Diehl, J.-L.; Mainardi, J.-L.

    2015-01-01

    We report a fatal case of necrotizing soft tissues infection caused by an Escherichia coli strain belonging to phylogenetic group C and harbouring numerous virulence factors reported to be part of a pathogenicity island (PAI) such as PAI IIJ96 and conserved virulence plasmidic region. PMID:26693024

  5. Intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-yi; WANG Fang; FENG Jie-xiong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Based on the observation that coagulation necrosis occurs in the majority of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) patients,it is clear that intestinal ischemia is a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of NEC.However,the published studies regarding the role of intestinal ischemia in NEC are controversial.The aim of this paper is to review the current studies regarding intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and NEC,and try to elucidate the exact role of intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction in NEC.Data sources The studies cited in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed.The search terms used were "intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction" and "neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis".Study selection Mainly original milestone articles and critical reviews written by major pioneer investigators in the field were selected.Results Immature regulatory control of mesentery circulation makes the neonatal intestinal microvasculature vulnerable.When neonates are subjected to stress,endothelial cell dysfunction occurs and results in vasoconstriction of arterioles,inflammatory cell infiltration and activation in venules,and endothelial barrier disruption in capillaries.The compromised vasculature increases circulation resistance and therefore decreases intestinal perfusion,and may eventually progress to intestinal necrosis.Conclusion Intestinal ischemia plays an important role through the whole course of NEC.New therapeutic agents targeting intestinal ischemia,like HB-EGF,are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of NEC.

  6. Unusual tomographic findings of complicated necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Silveira Sigrist

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potential life-threatening disease, which originates from inflammatory involvement of the pancreas and surrounding tissues. Serious complications eventuate and treatment is difficult. AP is classified in both interstitial edematous pancreatitis, which occurs in 70-80% of patients, and necrotizing pancreatitis, which occurs in 20-30% of patients. Diagnosis is based on the presence of two of the following criteria: abdominal pain, increased serum determination of amylase and/or lipase more than three times the reference value, and characteristic tomographic findings. Among the latter, there is the pancreatic and surrounding tissue damage as well as that related to distant organ involvement. This case report shows the fatal case of a male patient with a history of heavy alcoholic abuse admitted with the diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis. The authors call attention to the unusual tomographic findings; namely, a huge duodenal hematoma and a large hemoperitoneum, ischemic involvement of the spleen and kidneys, as well as pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  8. Clinical parameters and challenges of managing cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in a Sub-Saharan tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeola A Olusanya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection. In our environment, patients presenting with this infection are usually financially incapacitated and, therefore, their management can be challenging. This paper aimed to document the pattern and challenges encountered in the management of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (CNF in the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Materials and Methods: Information such as biodata, site of infection, systemic conditions, widest span of defect, management provided, hospital stay, and outcome of management was prospectively collected on all patients with CNF who presented at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery between January 2007 and December 2013. The patients were managed according to a devised protocol of antibiotic therapy, serial debridement and honey dressings. Results: Twenty-four cases of CNF were seen. There were 9 males and 15 females while 70.9% of the patients belonged to the low socioeconomic class. The mean span of wound defect was 12.2 (±8.844 cm. The mean hospital stay was 27.8 (±23.1 days, and scar formation was the most common complication encountered. Conclusion: Our study represents the largest series of CNF from a Nigerian health facility presently. The management of necrotizing fascitis in the maxillofacial region poses a significant challenge to both the surgeon and the patient. However, the mortality rate of CNF in our center appears comparatively low.

  9. Utilization of probiotics for controlling clostridial necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Natalia

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridial necrotic enteritis (CNE is a common disease among rapidly growing broiler chickens. The purpose of this trial was to study the utilisation of probiotics in controlling experimental CNE in broiler chickens. Chicken normal gut bacterial flora (mucosal starter culture selective/MCS was used as a competitive exclusion treatment in broiler chicken and its influence to the occurence of clostridial necrotic enteritis were observed. The study comprised of 4 broiler cages treatments of probiotics (2 different dose of MCS, commercial probiotic, 1 cage untreated as control. Probiotics were given orally upon arrival. All groups were given live coccidial vaccine (as predisposing factor for CNE and challenged with 108 Clostridium perfringens tipe A and C spores on day 10 and 12. The results showed that the probiotics could reduced the incidence and severity of CNE after challenge and improved the performance of chickens treated. Untreated group showed 40% of the mortality due to CNE, and 30% of the chicken showed subclinical necrotic enteritis (SNE.

  10. A case of necrotizing sialomataplasia: consideration on cause, bone change, and incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seo; Kang, Byung Cheol [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) is a rare, benign, self-limiting lesion, but it mimics carcinoma both clinically and histologically. Authors present a case of NS on the right posterior hard palate in a 16-year-old boy. This case showed underlying erosive bone change on CT images. We supposed this lesion resulted from the local anesthesia for dental treatment. Presented NS is the only one case from approximately 1,500 oral and maxillofacial biopsies (0.07%) at Chonnam National University Hospital during the period from 1999 to 2004.

  11. Review of 58 patients with necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, S.F. van; Vries, J. de; Bijker, J.B.; Mollen, R.M.; Hekma, E.J.; Lemson, S.M.; Tan, E.C.T.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, life threatening soft tissue infection, primarily involving the fascia and subcutaneous tissue. In a large cohort of patients presenting with Necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands we analysed all available data to determine the causative pathogens and

  12. Pharm GKB: Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivostomatitis [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivostomatitis; V...lcerative (D005892) SnoMedCT: Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivostomatitis (173599005) UMLS: C0017575 (C00...lcerative [Disease/Finding] (N0000001343) Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivostomatitis ...

  13. Review of 58 patients with necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, S.F. van; Vries, J. de; Bijker, J.B.; Mollen, R.M.; Hekma, E.J.; Lemson, S.M.; Tan, E.C.T.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, life threatening soft tissue infection, primarily involving the fascia and subcutaneous tissue. In a large cohort of patients presenting with Necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands we analysed all available data to determine the causative pathogens and

  14. Necrotizing fasciitis: contribution and limitations of diagnostic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malghem, Jacques; Lecouvet, Frédéric E; Omoumi, Patrick; Maldague, Baudouin E; Vande Berg, Bruno C

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, rapidly spreading, deep-seated infection causing thrombosis of the blood vessels located in the fascia. Necrotizing fasciitis is a surgical emergency. The diagnosis typically relies on clinical findings of severe sepsis and intense pain, although subacute forms may be difficult to recognize. Imaging studies can help to differentiate necrotizing fasciitis from infections located more superficially (dermohypodermitis). The presence of gas within the necrotized fasciae is characteristic but may be lacking. The main finding is thickening of the deep fasciae due to fluid accumulation and reactive hyperemia, which can be visualized using computed tomography and, above all, magnetic resonance imaging (high signal on contrast-enhanced T1 images and T2 images, best seen with fat saturation). These findings lack specificity, as they can be seen in non-necrotizing fasciitis and even in non-inflammatory conditions. Signs that support a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis include extensive involvement of the deep intermuscular fascias (high sensitivity but low specificity), thickening to more than 3mm, and partial or complete absence on post-gadolinium images of signal enhancement of the thickened fasciae (fairly high sensitivity and specificity). Ultrasonography is not recommended in adults, as the infiltration of the hypodermis blocks ultrasound transmission. Thus, imaging studies in patients with necrotizing fasciitis may be challenging to interpret. Although imaging may help to confirm deep tissue involvement and to evaluate lesion spread, it should never delay emergency surgical treatment in patients with established necrotizing fasciitis.

  15. A case of fatal necrotizing fasciitis arising from chronic lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Young Joon; Kang, In Sook; Lee, Jung Ho; Kim, Sue Min; Kim, Young Jin

    2013-12-01

    Chronic lymphedema and lymphangitis are common adverse effects following treatment for gynecological cancer. Because the early symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis are similar to those of lymphangitis, fatal outcome can occur if patients or physicians underestimate this condition. Here, we present a case of necrotizing fasciitis in a patient with chronic lymphedema.

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis in association with Ludwig's angina - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavarodi, A M

    2011-07-01

    A 28 year old male diabetic patient developed Ludwig's angina which subsequently evolved into cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis. The differential characteristic of Ludwig's angina and cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis, as it relates to this rare presentation is discussed. The clinical and radiological features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management that resulted in a successful outcome are presented.

  17. Periorbital Necrotizing Fasciitis Secondary to Candida parapsilosis and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Matthew; Chelnis, James; Mawn, Louise A

    Necrotizing fasciitis is most often caused by either polymicrobial bacterial infections or by Gram-positive organisms, such as Streptococcus or Staphylococcus; however, rare cases of fungal necrotizing fasciitis have been reported. Candida parapsilosis is an emerging fungal pathogen. This fungus grows in either a yeast or pseudohyphal form. C. parapsilosis has been reported to cause keratitis, intraocular infection, and seeding of frontalis slings. C. parapsilosis is a commensal of human skin and can be acquired by nosocomial spread. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Candida has rarely been reported, but to date C. parapsilosis has not been identified as the causative organism in necrotizing fasciitis. This is the first documented case of human periocular soft tissue infection by C. parapsilosis, and also the first report providing evidence of mycotic infection in a necrotizing fasciitis concurrently infected by Streptococcus pyogenes.

  18. Pure White Cell Aplasia and Necrotizing Myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Geon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure white cell aplasia (PWCA is a rare hematologic disorder characterized by the absence of neutrophil lineages in the bone marrow with intact megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. PWCA has been associated with autoimmune, drug-induced, and viral exposures. Here, we report a case of a 74-year-old female who presented with severe proximal weakness without pain and was found to have PWCA with nonspecific inflammatory necrotizing myositis and acute liver injury on biopsies. These findings were associated with a recent course of azithromycin and her daily use of a statin. Myositis improved on prednisone but PWCA persisted. With intravenous immunoglobulin and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapies, her symptoms and neutrophil counts improved and were sustained for months.

  19. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, Sowmya [V.S Dental College and Hospital, Karnataka (India); Ramnarayan BK [Dayanada Sagar College of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Karnataka (India)

    2011-03-15

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) which mimics malignancy both clinically and histopathologically is an uncommon benign, self-limiting inflammatory disease of the mucus-secreting minor salivary glands. The lesion is believed to be the result of vascular ischemia that may be initiated by trauma. Till date, the diagnosis of NS remains a challenge. This report demonstrates a case of NS in a 73-year-old male patient who presented with an ulcerative lesion in his palate. He had a history of local trauma and was long-term user of salbutamol inhaler. An incisional biopsy was carried out and the diagnosis was established through history, clinical examination, histopathology using Hematoxylin and Eosin stain. The patient was given symptomatic treatment and the lesion healed in about 7 weeks.

  20. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Relation to systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, T M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I

    1999-01-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (CNV) is a complex multisystem disease generally involving the skin and mucous membranes, often accompanied by renal, gastrointestinal, pericardial, neurological, and articular signs and symptoms. CNV may be idiopatical or occur in association with a drug, infection, or underlying disease. CNV has been shown in patients with chronic infections (viral, bacterial, protozoa, helminthic), serum sickness, a variety of collagen vascular diseases (systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Behçet's disease) hyperglobulinemic states, cryoglobulinemia, bowel bypass syndrome, ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and HIV infection. Association with malignancies is not frequent. Lymphoproliferative disorders (Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides, lymphosarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, multiple mieloma) and solid tumors (lung cancer, colon carcinoma, renal, prostate, head and neck cancer and breast cancer) may be associated with CNV. Whenever possible, treatment is directed at the elimination of the cause. In other cases after adequate laboratory screening local and systemic therapy are recommended.

  1. Statin-induced autoimmune necrotizing myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Ząber

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Myositides comprise a large group of disorders involving limb muscle weakness. In differential diagnosis we have to consider idiopathic myositides, myositides associated with other diseases, and those induced by external factors, e.g. drug-induced. Statins are commonly used drugs, but many patients experience a broad spectrum of adverse effects including symptoms from skeletal muscle. Physicians should pay special attention to patients reporting muscle weakness lasting longer than 12 weeks, despite statin withdrawal, as well as other symptoms: dysphagia, disturbed grip function, elevated creatinine kinase (CK levels and abnormal electromyography. The reported case deals with the problem of differential diagnosis of drug-induced muscle injury, polymyositis with a recently reported myopathy – statin-induced autoimmune necrotizing myositis, related to anti-HMGCR antibodies.

  2. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in five Chihuahua dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R J; Dickinson, P J; Kube, S A; Moore, P F; Couto, S S; Vernau, K M; Sturges, B K; Lecouteur, R A

    2008-05-01

    An acute to chronic idiopathic necrotizing meningoencephalitis was diagnosed in 5 Chihuahua dogs aged between 1.5 and 10 years. Presenting neurologic signs included seizures, blindness, mentation changes, and postural deficits occurring from 5 days to 5.5 months prior to presentation. Cerebrospinal fluid analyses from 2 of 3 dogs sampled were consistent with an inflammatory disease. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of 2 dogs demonstrated multifocal loss or collapse of cortical gray/white matter demarcation hypointense on T1-weighted images, with T2-weighted hyperintensity and slight postcontrast enhancement. Multifocal asymmetrical areas of necrosis or collapse in both gray and white matter of the cerebral hemispheres was seen grossly in 4 brains. Microscopically in all dogs, there was a severe, asymmetrical, intensely cellular, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis usually with cystic necrosis in subcortical white matter. There were no lesions in the mesencephalon or metencephalon except in 1 dog. Immunophenotyping defined populations of CD3, CD11d, CD18, CD20, CD45, CD45 RA, and CD79a immunoreactive inflammatory cells varying in density and location but common to acute and chronic lesions. In fresh frozen lesions, both CD1b,c and CD11c immunoreactive dendritic antigen-presenting cells were also identified. Immunoreactivity for canine distemper viral (CDV) antigen was negative in all dogs. The clinical signs, distribution pattern, and histologic type of lesions bear close similarities to necrotizing meningoencephalitis as described in series of both Pug and Maltese breed dogs and less commonly in other breeds.

  3. Retroperitoneal Necrotizing Fasciitis Masquerading as Perianal Abscess - Rare and Perilous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaranathan, Anandhi; Sahoo, Ashok Kumar; Barathi, Deepak; Shankar, Gomathi; Sistla, Sarath Chandra

    2017-01-17

    Necrotizing fasciitis is one of the uncommon presentations of a rapidly spreading subcutaneous tissue infection. Although the actual cause is unclear in many cases, most of them are due to the rapid proliferation of microorganisms. Retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis is extremely rare. It is a potentially lethal infection that requires immediate and aggressive surgical care. Early diagnosis is the key to a better prognosis. The possibility of retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis should be suspected in patients with symptoms of sepsis that are disproportionate to clinical findings. The rapid deterioration of the patient also gives a clue towards the diagnosis. We report a 35-year-old male with perianal abscess who had been progressed to retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis. The patient was managed successfully with aggressive debridement and drainage after laparotomy. Appropriate antibiotics were used to combat the sepsis. The patient recovered well at follow up, three months after discharge. Another patient, a 45-year-old male with a retroperitoneal abscess, progressed to retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis, and extra peritoneal drainage and debridement was done. Antibiotics depending upon the culture and sensitivity were used to control sepsis. But the patient succumbed to death 45 days after surgery due to uncontrolled sepsis. Necrotizing fasciitis of any anatomical site needs aggressive surgical care with early intervention. But retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis needs an extra effort for diagnosis. After diagnosis, it needs timely surgical intervention and appropriate antibiotic therapy for the recovery of the patients.

  4. [Cosmetic blepharoplasty complicated by necrotizing periorbital fasciitis: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laouar, K; Ruban, J-M; Baggio, E; Dupeyron, G

    2012-06-01

    Necrotizing periorbital or palpebro-orbital fasciitis represents a unique anatomical site for necrotizing fasciitis, which is an extremely rare and very severe, potentially devastating bacterial infection, rapidly leading to facial necrosis with loss of vision and even death of the patient from toxic shock. In this paper, we report a case of necrotizing periorbital fasciitis as a complication of cosmetic lower eyelid blepharoplasty. Necrotizing fasciitis most often affects the upper and lower limbs, the trunk and the perineal area. It is rarely observed in the facial region due to the rich blood supply in this area. The most commonly implicated pathogen is group A, β-hemolytic "pyogenic"Streptococcus, either alone or in combination with other bacteria, such as staphylococcus or pseudomonas. Mortality varies according to the series and anatomical site. The mortality rate for necrotizing fasciitis is approximately 28 %. It is slightly lower in the periorbital area (15 %). Risk factors for death include alcoholism, diabetes mellitus, immunocompromise, hematologic or pulmonary diseases, and the identity of the causative agent (group A Streptococcus), although approximately 50 % of patients have no predisposing conditions. Management of periorbital necrotizing fasciitis is based on early detection of initial symptoms and on aggressive multidisciplinary treatment including surgical debridement of necrotic areas and antibiotic coverage. The timeliness of treatment and the multidisciplinary approach are considered to be the two essential factors in influencing the mortality and morbidity of this condition.

  5. [Necrotizing mucosal ulcers cause by anaerobic bacteria. Fusiform bacterial and spirochete infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollandt, J H; Hollandt, H

    1996-12-01

    Vincent's angina (Plaut-Vincent) is the most prominent disease caused by coinciding infections from fusibacteria and spirochaeta both belonging to obligate anaerobic bacteria. A possible symbiotic infection of both anaerobics may become manifest on the mucous membranes of the oral cavity and the oropharynx beside the tonsillas. The clinical outcome may be different and pose difficulties in the differential diagnosis. We report the case of a 29 year old female patient with necrotizing ulcera of the soft palate suspicious for stomatitis ulceromembranacea. In case necrotizing inflammations of the oral cavity area were to be found infections due to anaerobic bacteria should be considered mostly occurring as mixed infections. The correct identification by cultivation turns out to be difficult in that it requires special conditions. Furthermore, reliable detection of these bacteria necessitates careful collection and transport of patients specimens. In case of Fusospirochaetosis (Fusotreponematose) a specimen should be prepared for microscopic examination beside setting up a special culture. This is because the staining is the most suitable procedure for bacteril identification to support the clinical diagnosis of stomatitis ulceromembranacea.

  6. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Nose Complicated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Swaminath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive life threatening bacterial infection of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, and the fascia. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the nose complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis. Few cases of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis have been reported to be caused by cellulitis of the face but necrotizing fasciitis of the nose is rare. It is very important to recognize the early signs of cavernous thrombosis. Treatment for septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is controversial but early use of empirical antibiotics is imperative.

  7. Polymicrobial abdominal wall necrotizing fasciitis after cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMuro, Jp; Hanna, Af; Chalas, E; Cunha, Ba

    2012-09-01

    We report a case of a previously healthy woman after an uneventful caesarean section who developed polymicrobial necrotizing fasciitis. She was given a non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drug (NSAID) after her delivery. Her post-delivery course was complicated by septic shock, and required multiple debridements before abdominal reconstruction. This case describes the increased risk of necrotizing fasciitis with NSAID use. Unusual were the organisms causing the polymicrobial necrotizing fasciitis: Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter agglomerans, Acinetobacter baumannii, and two strains of Enterobacter cloacae.

  8. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the lip simulating squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, A; Willén, H; Willén, R; Thorstensson, S; Ekman, L

    1980-01-01

    A case of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the lip in an 68-year-old pipe smoker is described. Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a self-healing non-neoplastic disease probably of ischaemic nature. Thirty-nine cases of sialometaplasia are described in the literature up to early 1979. These cases appeared in the palate, nasal cavity, gingiva, lip, hypopharynx and maxillary sinus. Six cases have also been reported from major salivary glands. Histologically there is necrosis of mucous cells with partial replacement by squamous epithelium. This entity has often been mistaken for squamous or mucoepidermoid carcinoma. One has to be familiar with the existence of necrotizing sialometaplasia in ordeg surgery.

  9. An atypical case of necrotizing fasciitis of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufty, H; Smeets, A; Christiaens, M R

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and aggressive soft tissue infection involving the fascia and subcutaneous tissues. It carries a high mortality and morbidity rate. In literature, the few case reports on necrotizing fasciitis of the breast, describe the need for a mastectomy in 90% of the cases. We report on a case of a 72-year old Caucasian women with an atypical presentation of necrotizing fasciitis of the breast in combination with an acute abdomen, successfully treated with breast-conserving debridement and secondary wound closure.

  10. Diagnosis of necrotizing faciitis with bedside ultrasound: the STAFF Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleberg, Erik; Jenson, Natasa; Dinh, Vi Am

    2014-02-01

    The early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis is often ambiguous. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, while sensitive and specific modalities, are often time consuming or unavailable. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis that was rapidly diagnosed using bedside ultrasound evaluating for subcutaneous thickening, air, and fascial fluid (STAFF). We propose the STAFF ultrasound exam may be beneficial in the rapid evaluation of unstable patients with consideration of necrotizing fasciitis, in a similar fashion to the current use of a focused assessment with sonography for trauma exam in the setting of trauma.

  11. Hospital epidemiology of emergent cervical necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a surgical emergency. It is a rapidly progressing infection of the fascia and subcutaneous tissue and could be fatal if not diagnosed early and treated properly. NF is common in the groin, abdomen, and extremities but rare in the neck and the head. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF is an aggressive infection of the neck and the head, with devastating complications such as airway obstruction, pneumonia, pulmonary abscess, jugular venous thrombophlebitis, mediastinitis, and septic shock associated with high mortality. Aim : To assess the presentation, comorbidities, type of infection, severity of disease, and intensive care outcome of CNF. Methods : Medical records of the patients treated for NF in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU from January 1995 to February 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results : Out of 94 patients with NF, 5 (5.3% had CNF. Four patients were male. The mean age of our patients was 41.2 ± 14.8 years. Sixty percent of patients had an operative procedure as the predisposing factor and 80% of patients received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The only comorbidity associated was diabetes mellitus (DM in 3 patients (60%. Sixty percent of the cases had type1 NF. Mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score on admission to the ICU was 8.8 ± 3.6. All patients had undergone debridement at least two times. During the initial 24 h our patients received 5.8 ± 3.0 l of fluid, 2.0 ± 1.4 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC, 4.8 ± 3.6 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP, and 3.0 ± 4.5 units of platelet concentrate. The mean number of days patients were intubated was 5.2 ± 5.1 days and the mean ICU stay was 6.4 ± 5.2 days. Sixty percent of cases had multiorgan dysfunction (MODS and one patient died, resulting in a mortality rate of 20%. Conclusion : According to our study, CNF represents around 5% of NF patients. CNF was higher among male patients and in

  12. Case Report of Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is an extremely rare and life-threatening bacterial soft tissue infection. We report a case of early necrotizing fasciitis associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in a 26-year-old man who was immunocompromised with mixed connective tissue disease. The patient presented with acute, painful, erythematous, and edematous skin lesions of his right lower back, which rapidly progressed to the right knee. The patient underwent surgical exploration, and a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was confirmed by pathological evidence of necrosis of the fascia and neutrophil infiltration in tissue biopsies. Cultures of fascial tissue biopsies and blood samples were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae diagnosed at early phase; the patient recovered well without surgical debridement.

  13. Tube Thoracostomy-Related Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Pin Hsu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumothorax is a serious complication of pulmonary tuberculosis that requires immediate treatment. Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious, rapidly progressive infection of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia, most related to trauma or surgery. Here, we report a case of pulmonary tuberculosis with spontaneous pneumothorax. A standard procedure of tube thoracostomy was performed for lung re-expansion. Two days after the tube was removed, necrotizing fasciitis developed from the puncture site. Computed tomography of the chest showed focal thickness with gas formation and loss of the fat plane over the chest wall, which is compatible with the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. Aggressive treatment was given, including emergency fasciectomy and adequate systemic antibiotic and antituberculous treatment. The necrotizing fasciitis was successfully treated. The patient was discharged and sent home with maintenance antituberculous therapy.

  14. Pharm GKB: Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: PharmGKB Accession Id: PA164924608 Publications related to Acute...uman genetics. 2009. Neilson Derek E, et al. Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy ...

  15. Metabolomic determinants of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies in premature infants and animals show that carbohydrate malabsorption and gut microbiota colonisation are key elements for triggering necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Our aim was to determine how dietary carbohydrate composition affects the metabolomic profile and whether unique metabolite s...

  16. The phylum Synergistetes in gingivitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baumgartner, Angelica; Thurnheer, Thomas; Lüthi-Schaller, Helga; Gmür, Rudolf; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2012-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is distinct from that of common gingivitis in that it is characterized by local necrosis of the gingival tissues, rapid onset, pain and extensive bleeding...

  17. Avian necrotic enteritis: Experimental models, climate change, and vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review summarizes recent developments in disease models, pathogenesis, host immunity, risk factors, and vaccine development for Clostridium perfringens infection of poultry and necrotic enteritis (NE). The increasing trends of legislative restrictions and voluntary removal of antibiotic growth...

  18. Interventions for Necrotizing Pancreatitis Summary of a Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Martin L.; Werner, Jens; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Baron, Todd H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Windsor, John A.; Horvath, Karen D.; vanSonnenberg, Eric; Bollen, Thomas L.; Vege, Santhi Swaroop

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis may result in significant morbidity and mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis. Many recommendations have been made for management of necrotizing pancreatitis, but no published guidelines have incorporated the many recent developments in minimally invasi

  19. Klebsiella pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in a Latin American male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persichino, Jon; Tran, Richard; Sutjita, Made; Kim, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae, is a rare and life-threatening bacterial infection. Most documented cases have been reported from Asia, particularly associated with diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of this infection in the USA is rare, especially among persons of non-Asian descent and those without travel to Asia. We report a case of disseminated necrotizing fasciitis, caused by K. pneumoniae, in a Latin American male with diabetes mellitus. Given our review of the literature, this is the only case report, to our knowledge, of a Latin American patient with Klebsiella necrotizing fasciitis in the USA. This case may reflect the geographical spread and emergence of K. pneumoniae infection in the USA. Clinicians need to be aware of the possible relationship between this organism and necrotizing fasciitis in persons of Latin American descent with diabetes mellitus.

  20. Microecology, intestinal epithelial barrier and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Renu; Tepas, Joseph J

    2010-01-01

    Soon after birth, the neonatal intestine is confronted with a massive antigenic challenge of microbial colonization. Microbial signals are required for maturation of several physiological, anatomical, and biochemical functions of intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) after birth. Commensal bacteria regulate intestinal innate and adaptive immunity and provide stimuli for ongoing repair and restitution of IEB. Colonization by pathogenic bacteria and/or dysmature response to microbial stimuli can result in flagrant inflammatory response as seen in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Characterized by inflammation and hemorrhagic-ischemic necrosis, NEC is a devastating complication of prematurity. Although there is evidence that both prematurity and presence of bacteria, are proven contributing factors to the pathogenesis of NEC, the molecular mechanisms involved in IEB dysfunction associated with NEC have begun to emerge only recently. The metagenomic advances in the field of intestinal microecology are providing insight into the factors that are required for establishment of commensal bacteria that appear to provide protection against intestinal inflammation and NEC. Perturbations in achieving colonization by commensal bacteria such as premature birth or hospitalization in intensive care nursery can result in dysfunction of IEB and NEC. In this article, microbial modulation of functions of IEB and its relationship with barrier dysfunction and NEC are described.

  1. EXTENSIVE NECROTIZING FASCIITIS OF TRUNK FOLLOWING APPENDICECTOMY

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    Siddharth

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is usually diagnosed and managed easily with a low mortality and morbidity. However, in 20.74% patients, acute appendicitis may occasionally become extraordinarily complicated and life threatening with significant morbidity and mortality . [1] We report a case of 44 year old male, a known case of Diabetes Mellitus since 4 years (on irregular treatment who was brought to our hospital with severe pain in right lower quadrant of abdomen since 4 days. On examination, patient had tachycardia, tender ness and guarding in the right iliac fossa. Laboratory results revealed leucocytosis and raised blood glucose levels. Measures for glycemic control were initiated. At exploratory laparotomy, an inflamed and retrocaecal appendix ruptured at the base with sm all local abscess was found. Abscess was drained and appendectomy done. Initially patient did well but at the end of second post - operative week, the patient started having pain and swelling over posterior chest wall, flank, sacral and occipital regions sug gestive of inflammation. CT abdomen and pelvis showed extensive necrotizing fasciitis of trunk, occiput and sacrum. Repeated multiple fasciotomies were performed over the back. The patient finally recovered fully at the end of 8 th post - operative week

  2. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cruz, L; Navarro, S; Valderrama, R; Sáenz, A; Guarner, L; Aparisi, L; Espi, A; Jaurietta, E; Marruecos, L; Gener, J

    1994-04-01

    A multicenter study of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) classified in accordance with the Balthazar criteria (grades D and E), has been performed in 12 teaching hospitals. A total of 233 patients were reviewed, and the mortality rate was 26.6%. The most common etiology was biliary pancreatitis (45.5%). Among the complications, shock, renal insufficiency, pulmonary insufficiency and hemorrhagic gastritis were associated with a mortality rate of 51-66%. Diffuse fluid collections were associated with a higher mortality rate (26.8%) than localized fluid collections (14.5%). In 106 patients with gallstone pancreatitis, early surgery was performed in 17, and 5 patients (29.4%) died. No mortality was observed in 32 patients with delayed surgery. Sphincterotomy was performed in 13 patients, and 4 (30.7%) died. Early surgery (necrosectomy and closed peritoneal lavage) was undertaken in 75 patients, with a mortality rate of 39%. In conclusion, the morbidity and mortality rates of ANP can be improved with proper monitoring, adequate supportive care and the judicious use of surgery based on clinical and morphological findings.

  3. Necrotizing Fasciitis and The Diabetic Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacopi, Elisabetta; Coppelli, Alberto; Goretti, Chiara; Piaggesi, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) represents a rapidly progressive, life-threatening infection involving skin, soft tissue, and deep fascia. An early diagnosis is crucial to treat NF effectively. The disease is generally due to an external trauma that occurs in predisposed patients: the most important risk factor is represented by diabetes mellitus. NF is classified into 3 different subtypes according to bacterial strains responsible: type 1 associated to polymicrobial infection, type 2 NF, generally associated to Streptococcus species, often associated to Staphylococcus aureus and, eventually, Type 3, due to Gram-negative strains, such as Clostridium difficile or Vibrio. NF is usually characterized by the presence of the classic triad of symptoms: local pain, swelling, and erythema. In daily clinical practice immune-compromised or neuropathic diabetic patients present with atypical symptomatology. This explains the high percentage of misdiagnosed cases in the emergency department and, consequently, the worse outcome presented by these patients. Prompt aggressive surgical debridement and antibiotic systemic therapy are the cornerstone of its treatment. These must be associated with an accurate systemic management, consisting in nutritional support, glycemic compensation, and hemodynamic stabilization. Innovative methods, such as negative pressure therapy, once the acute conditions have resolved, can help fasten the surgical wound closure. Prompt management can improve prognosis of patients affected from NF reducing limb loss and saving lives.

  4. Long-Term Outcomes after Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis: What Happens to the Pancreas and to the Patient?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Cristina Goebel Winter Gasparoto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Late consequences of acute pancreatitis have received little attention. It is controversial whether the pancreas fully recovers after an episode of acute pancreatitis, especially in the presence of necrosis. Therefore, the presence of late pancreatic dysfunction following acute necrotizing pancreatitis is uncertain and there are controversies about how it may affect long-term quality of life. Objectives To evaluate pancreatic function and morphology, besides quality of life, in patients with prior acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Patients Patients who were admitted to our hospital with acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a ten-year interval were identified and thirty-eight survivors were contacted to enroll in the study out of which sixteen patients were included. Methods Exocrine function was studied by qualitative fecal fat excretion. Endocrine function was evaluated by oral glucose tolerance test, HOMA-beta and C-peptide. Pancreatic morphology was examined by computed tomography. Quality of life was measured by 36-item short-form health survey. Tests were performed at leasttwelve months after the index episode of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Results The prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency was 6.2%. Endocrine dysfunction was observed in half the cases, and no association with the extension of necrosis was found. Morphological changes were frequent (62.5% and more prevalent in those who faced extensive necrosis. Quality of life was considered good, and its impairment was found exclusively in mental health domain, markedly in patients who had alcoholic pancreatitis. There was no correlation between quality of life and prognostic indicators. Conclusions Exocrine function and quality of life were preserved in this group of patients. However, endocrine dysfunction and morphological abnormalities were frequent after acute necrotizing pancreatitis. These findings justify a long-term follow-up in order to initiate specific

  5. Long-term outcomes after acute necrotizing pancreatitis: what happens to the pancreas and to the patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter Gasparoto, Rafaela Cristina Goebel; Racy, Marcelo De Castro Jorge; De Campos, Tercio

    2015-03-20

    Late consequences of acute pancreatitis have received little attention. It is controversial whether the pancreas fully recovers after an episode of acute pancreatitis, especially in the presence of necrosis. Therefore, the presence of late pancreatic dysfunction following acute necrotizing pancreatitis is uncertain and there are controversies about how it may affect long-term quality of life. To evaluate pancreatic function and morphology, besides quality of life, in patients with prior acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Patients who were admitted to our hospital with acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a ten-year interval were identified and thirty-eight survivors were contacted to enroll in the study out of which sixteen patients were included. Exocrine function was studied by qualitative fecal fat excretion. Endocrine function was evaluated by oral glucose tolerance test, HOMA-beta and C-peptide. Pancreatic morphology was examined by computed tomography. Quality of life was measured by 36-item short-form health survey. Tests were performed at least twelve months after the index episode of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency was 6.2%. Endocrine dysfunction was observed in half the cases, and no association with the extension of necrosis was found. Morphological changes were frequent (62.5%) and more prevalent in those who faced extensive necrosis. Quality of life was considered good, and its impairment was found exclusively in mental health domain, markedly in patients who had alcoholic pancreatitis. There was no correlation between quality of life and prognostic indicators. Exocrine function and quality of life were preserved in this group of patients. However, endocrine dysfunction and morphological abnormalities were frequent after acute necrotizing pancreatitis. These findings justify a long-term follow-up in order to initiate specific treatment promptly.

  6. Necrotizing gastritis due to Bacillus cereus in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Scanff, J; Mohammedi, I; Thiebaut, A; Martin, O; Argaud, L; Robert, D

    2006-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is increasingly being acknowledged as a serious bacterial pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We present a case of acute necrotizing gastritis caused by B. cereus in a 37-year-old woman with acute myeloblastic leukemia, who recovered following total parenteral nutrition and treatment with imipenem and vancomycin. B. cereus was isolated from gastric mucosa and blood cultures. Up to now, no case of acute necrotizing gastritis due to this organism has been reported.

  7. Necrotizing enterocolitis and cytomegalovirus infection in a premature infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lynn; Ferris, Michael; Norori, Johana; Stark, Matthew; Craver, Randall; Dowd, Scot; Penn, Duna

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in neonates. The etiology is considered multifactorial. Risk factors include prematurity, enteral feeding, hypoxia, and bacterial colonization. The etiologic role of viruses is unclear. We present a case of necrotizing enterocolitis associated with cytomegalovirus and Proteobacteria in a 48-day-old, ex-premature infant and discuss the effects of potential viral-bacterial interactions on host susceptibility to this disease.

  8. Necrotic enteritis in broilers: an updated review on the pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbermont, L; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis and related subclinical disease have become economically significant problems for the broiler industry. Fortunately, scientific interest in this topic has grown: new C. perfringens virulence factors have been discovered and new insight gained about the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis. It has been shown that alpha toxin, for a long time thought to be the key virulence factor, is not essential for the development of the disease. Moreover, it is now clearly established that only certain C. perfringens strains are capable of inducing necrotic enteritis under specific conditions that predispose to the disease and they constitute only a minority in the intestinal tract of healthy chickens. A novel pore-forming toxin, NetB, has been identified in these virulent avian C. perfringens strains. Using a gene knockout mutant, it has been shown that NetB is a critical virulence factor in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broilers. In addition to toxin production, other factors have been described that contribute to the ability of certain C. perfringens strains to cause necrotic enteritis in broilers. It has been suggested that proteolytic enzymes play an important role in the initial stages of necrotic enteritis since the villi are first affected at the level of the basement membrane and the lateral domain of the enterocytes. In field outbreaks of necrotic enteritis, a single clone of C. perfringens is dominant in intestines of all affected birds, as opposed to the mixture of different C. perfringens strains that can be isolated from healthy bird intestines. It has been proposed that bacteriocin production is responsible for the dominance of a single strain in necrotic enteritis cases. Furthermore, it has been shown that virulent strains are more able to adhere to extracellular matrix molecules than non-virulent strains. The current knowledge on the pathogenesis of the disease has been summarized in this short review.

  9. Diagnosis of Necrotizing Fasciitis with Bedside Ultrasound: the STAFF Exam

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Castleberg; Natasa Jenson; Vi Am Dinh

    2014-01-01

    The early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis is often ambiguous. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, while sensitive and specific modalities, are often time consuming or unavailable. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis that was rapidly diagnosed using bedside ultrasound evaluating for subcutaneous thickening, air, and fascial fluid (STAFF). We propose the STAFF ultrasound exam may be beneficial in the rapid evaluation of unstable patients with consideration of necrotizi...

  10. Bacterial translocation and intestinal injury in experimental necrotizing enterocolitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, I; Ozdemir, M; Aktan, M; Aslan, K

    2012-01-01

    To study the occurrence of bacterial translocation and to assess the impact of breastfeeding on bacterial translocation in the animal model of necrotizing enterocolitis. A total of 20 neonate Sprague-Dawley rats were enrolled in the study. Rats were randomly allocated into either control or study group just after birth. Ten newborn rats in the control group were left with their mother to be breast-fed. In contrary, necrotizing enterocolitis group consisted of neonates that were separated from their mothers, housed in an incubator and were gavaged with a special rodent formula three times daily. Survival rates, weight changes, and morphologic scoring obtained after microscopic evaluation were determined as microbiologic evaluation criteria. All the rats in the control group survived, while 1 (10 %) rat died in the necrotizing enterocolitis group. Mortality rates of the two groups were similar. All the formula-fed animals in the necrotizing enterocolitis group had significant weight loss compared to the breast milk-fed rats in the control group (p<0.05). A total of 7 (70 %) and 2 (20 %) E. coli growths were identified in the bowel lumen, liver, and spleen of necrotizing enterocolitis and control groups, respectively. This difference was statistically significant. In peritoneal smear cultures, a total of 3 (30 %) growths were detected in the necrotizing enterocolitis group and 1 (10 %) growth in the control group. As the result of a disturbance in the intestinal flora and impairment of the intestinal barrier in necrotizing enterocolitis, microrganisms in the bowel pass through the intestinal barrier and reach the liver and the spleen via the hematogenous route. This condition is closely related to the impairment of physiological and functional features of the intestinal barrier and is independent from the degree of intestinal injury. Bacterial translocation should be remembered in cases suspected of necrotizing enterocolitis, and a rapid and effective treatment

  11. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Chest Wall: Report of Pediatric Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Monica; Meeks, Andrew; Kearl, Liza

    2015-09-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a soft tissue infection uncommonly described in children and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if not treated early and aggressively. Reports of cases involving the upper torso are rare in general. In adults, necrotizing fasciitis is most commonly described in the abdomen, perineum, and extremities. For children, particularly neonates, necrotizing fasciitis most commonly involves the trunk presenting as omphalitis. In this report, we describe 2 pediatric cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall that presented within 6 months from each other at Los Angeles County Hospital/University of Southern California Pediatric Emergency Department. Both cases involved previously healthy children with above normal body mass indices of 36 and 25.6, respectively. These cases are noteworthy because of the rarity of necrotizing fasciitis among children especially in the chest wall, atypical presentation with nonspecific symptoms which made the diagnosis challenging, and suggestion that obesity may be a potential risk factor. Despite the rarity of this disease, the information presented in these cases may aid in raising the index of suspicion for diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis.

  12. Optimal treatment of cervical necrotizing fasciitis associated with descending necrotizing mediastinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkas, A; Chahine, K; Schmerber, S; Brichon, P-Y; Righini, C A

    2010-04-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) associated with descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is a rapidly evolving and life-threatening condition. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe a treatment strategy for CNF with DNM and present a management algorithm for mediastinal extensions of CNF. Patients diagnosed and treated for CNF with DNM over 14 years in a tertiary referral centre were included. Seventeen adult patients were included. The origin of infection was mainly oropharyngeal. The diagnosis of CNF/DNM was based on clinical and computed tomography findings. All patients underwent cervicotomy for CNF. In ten patients, DNM was located above the carina and could be accessed by a cervical approach. In seven patients, DNM was below the carina, and necessitated sternotomy for anteroinferior mediastinal involvement and posterolateral thoracotomy for posteroinferior mediastinal involvement. All patients received broad-spectrum antibiotics. One patient died 3 days after surgery. The median hospital stay was 30 days. There was no recurrence during long-term follow-up. Prompt diagnosis and early surgical treatment are essential for reducing mortality in CNF/DNM. All patients should undergo extensive cervicotomy. The surgical approach to the mediastinum depends on the supracarinal or infracarinal location of the disease. Copyright (c) 2010 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Necrotizing fasciitis: A decade of surgical intensive care experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare disease, potentially limb and life-threatening infection of fascia, subcutaneous tissue with occasionally muscular involvement. Necrotizing faciitis is surgical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Aim: Aim of this study was to analyze presentation, microbiology, surgical, resuscitative management and outcome of this devastating soft tissue infection. Materials and Methods: The medical records of necrotizing fasciitis patients treated in surgical intensive care unit (SICU of our hospital from Jan 1995 to Feb 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Ninety-four patients with necrotizing fasciitis were treated in the surgical intensive care unit during the review period. Necrotizing fasciitis accounted for 1.15% of total admissions to our SICU. The mean age of our patients was 48.6 years, 75.5% of the cases were male. Diabetes mellitus was the most common comorbid disease (56.4%, 24.5% patients had hypertension, 14.9% patients had coronary artery disease, 9.6% had renal disease and 6.4% cases were obese. History of operation (11.7% was most common predisposing factor in our patients. All patients had leucocytosis at admission to the hospital. Mean duration of symptoms was 3.4 days. Mean number of surgical debridement was 2.1, mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score at admission to SICU was 8.6, 56.38% cases were type 1 necrotizing fasciitis and 43.61% had type 2 infection. Streptococci were most common bacteria isolated (52.1%, commonest regions of the body affected by necrotizing fasciitis were the leg and the foot. Mean intubated days and intensive care unit (ICU stay were 4.8 and 7.6 days respectively. Mean fluid, blood, fresh frozen plasma and platelets concentrate received in first 24 hours were 4.8 liters, 2.0 units, 3.9 units and 1.6 units respectively. Most commonly used antibiotics were tazocin and clindamycin. Common complication was ventricular tachycardia (6.4. 46.8% patients had

  14. Necrotizing fasciitis: a six-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunovic, Edin; Gawaziuk, Justin; Bzura, Tom; Embil, John; Esmail, Ali; Logsetty, Sarvesh

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening infectious disease whose incidence has been on the rise. Commonly a consequence of group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infection, it results in high levels of morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is difficult and treatment involves emergent surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy. The aim of this study is to examine the incidence of NF in Manitoba with the goal of observing whether there is a geographic variation in incidence and outcomes based on Regional Health Authorities (RHAs). This is a 6-year retrospective chart review of all NF patients who presented to the Health Sciences Center from 2004 to 2009. A total of 130 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 47 ± 16 years. The most common comorbidities were diabetes (33.8%) and hypertension (33.1%). The overall mortality was 13.1% with advanced age being an independent risk factor (P < .05). Lower extremity was the most common location of infection (44.6%) and the most common causative organism was group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (63.9%). The type of infection (mono- vs. polymicrobial) was not found to affect length of stay, amputation rate, or mortality. There was no statistical difference in rate of amputations, length of stay, or mortality based on RHA. Incidence within the province, however, varied significantly based on RHA and ethnicity (P < .05). We determined that regardless of origin before admission, all our patients have equivalent prognosis. Burntwood RHA was found to have substantially higher incidence than the rest of the province, and higher incidence was established among the Aboriginal population.

  15. Necrotizing soft tissue infection in pregnancy

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    Nestorović Milica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI is a life-threatening condition, characterized by widely spread necrosis of skin, subcutaneous fat, fascia and muscles. Treatment involves surgical debridement and broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy. Mortality is still high due to diagnostic delays. NSTI is rare in general population, there are even less literature data of this condition in pregnancy. Timely diagnosis and therapy is crucial for outcome of these patients. Clinicians should have in mind NSTI in patients with perianal infections, especially in cases where immunosuppressive role of pregnancy is present. Case outline. We present a case of a 21-year-old pregnant woman with NSTI spreading from perianal region. The patient was admitted to hospital in the 31st week of otherwise healthy twin pregnancy one day after incision of perianal abscess. At admission she was examined by a gynecologist; vital signs were stable, laboratory results showed the presence of infection. She was referred for another surgical procedure and broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed. The next morning the patient complained of intense abdominal pain. Clinical exam revealed only discrete redness of the skin tender on palpation, crepitating. She was immediately referred to surgery. Intraoperative findings revealed massive soft tissue infection spreading up to the chest wall. Wide skin incisions and debridement were performed. The patient developed septic shock and after initial resuscitation gynecologist confirmed intrauterine death of twins and indicated labor induction. Over the next few days the patient’s general condition improved. On several occasions the wounds were aggressively debrided under general anesthesia, which left the patient with large abdominal wall defect. Twenty-three days after the initial operation, the defect was reconstructed with partial-thickness skin grafts, providing satisfactory results. Conclusion. Diagnosis and outcome of

  16. Platelet-rich fibrin-mediated revitalization of immature necrotic tooth

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    Navin Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary studies have shown that the regeneration of tissues and root elongation is possible in necrotic immature permanent teeth. The purpose of this case report is to add a new vista in regenerative endodontic therapy by using platelet rich fibrin for revitalization of immature non vital tooth. An 11year old boy with the history of trauma was diagnosed with the pulpal necrosis and symptomatic apical periodontitis in tooth #21. Intra oral periapical radiograph showed open apex and associated immature supernumerary tooth with respect to tooth #21. Access preparation and minimal instrumentation was done to remove necrotic debris under copious irrigation with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite. Triple antibiotic paste was packed in the canal for four weeks. During second visit, 5 mL of whole blood was drawn from the medial cubital vein of the patient and blood was then subjected to centrifugation at 2400 rpm for 12 minutes for the preparation of Platelet rich fibrin (PRF utilizing Choukroun′s method. Triple antibiotic paste was removed and canal was dried. PRF clot was pushed to the apical region of tooth #21 using hand pluggers. Three milimetres of Mineral trioxide (MTA was placed in cervical part of the root canal and permanent restoration was done three days later. Clinical examination at 6 and 12 months revealed no sensitivity to percussion and palpation in tooth #21and it responded positively to both electric pulp and cold tests. Radiographic examination showed resolution of periapical rarefaction, further root development and apical closure of the tooth #21 and its associated supernumerary tooth. On the basis of successful outcome of the present case it can be stated that PRF clot may serve as a scaffold for regeneration of necrotic immature teeth.

  17. Unusual Presentation of Necrotic Erythema Nodosum Leprosum on Scalp: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, K D; Madan, A; Garg, V K; Goel, K; Khurana, N

    2015-01-01

    Lepra reactions are acute episodes occurring during the disease process of leprosy and are of 2 types: type 1 or reversal reaction and type 2 reaction or erythema odosumleprosum (ENL). In the episodes of lepra reaction several parts are affected including face and extremities like oral cavity. In the present case report we reported a rare case of lepromatous leprosy with necrotic ENL involving scalp apart from the usual sites. A 58 year old married male presented to us with complaints of spontaneous onset, recurrent eruption of multiple reddish raised painful lesions. Biopsy from the infiltrated skin over the back showed atrophic epidermis, free Grenz zone, diffuse and periadnexal macrophage granulomas with predominant mononuclear infiltrate, appandageal atrophy, fibrosis around the neural structures and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Fites stain showed strong positivity for M. leprae. His routine blood investigations showed anemia (Hb = 7.8 gm%), neutrophil leukocytosis (TLC = 17,600, DLC = P66L28M4E2) and raised ESR (80 mm in the first hour). These bullous and necrotic lesions in leprosy may be a manifestation of severe type II reactions in patients with very high bacillary load.

  18. The antimicrobial peptide sublancin ameliorates necrotic enteritis induced by Clostridium perfringens in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Zeng, X F; Wang, Q W; Zhu, J L; Peng, Q; Hou, C L; Thacker, P; Qiao, S Y

    2015-10-01

    Sublancin is an antimicrobial peptide produced by 168 containing 37 amino acids. The objective of this study was to investigate its inhibitory efficacy against both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro study, we determined that sublancin had a minimum inhibitory concentration of 8 μM against , which was much higher than the antibiotic lincomycin (0.281 μM). Scanning electron microscopy showed that sublancin damaged the morphology of . The in vivo study was conducted on broilers for a 28-d period using a completely randomized design. A total of 252 chickens at 1 d of age were randomly assigned to 1 of 6 treatments including an uninfected control; an infected control; 3 infected groups supplemented with sublancin at 2.88, 5.76, or 11.52 mg activity/L of water; and an infected group supplemented with lincomycin at 75 mg activity/L of water (positive control). Necrotic enteritis was induced in the broilers by oral inoculation of on d 15 through 21. Thereafter, the sublancin or lincomycin were administered fresh daily for a period of 7 days. The challenge resulted in a significant decrease in ADG ( enteritis induced by in vivo than lincomycin. These novel findings indicate that sublancin could be used as a potential antimicrobial agent to control necrotic enteritis.

  19. Noma and cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis: clinicopathological differentiation and an illustrative case report of noma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Charles; Khammissa, Razia A G; Altini, Mario; Lemmer, Johan; Feller, Liviu

    2014-03-01

    Noma predominantly affects malnourished young children. The pathogenesis of noma is complex and multifactorial, involving interaction between local polybacterial infection on the one hand, and malnutrition, immunosuppression, or systemic bacterial or viral infections on the other hand. Noma is considered to be an opportunistic disease, but the immediate cause is uncertain. Immunosuppression associated with a high HIV load may be an important risk factor in South Africa. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis, on the other hand, occurs mainly in adults. It is frequently a consequence of an odontogenic infection and is characterized by an irregular pattern of rapidly spreading necrosis of fascia, muscle, and skin. We present an unusual case of noma in a 32-year-old malnourished HIV-seropositive female with AIDS in whom, within a period of 3 days, the initial intraoral necrotizing process spread rapidly and caused circular full thickness perforating destruction of the lower lip. Prompt diagnosis and treatment brought about control of the active disease and limited the extension of the established noma and of progression of the disease at other affected oral sites.

  20. Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis score for early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis in Darwin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Vignesh; Ooi, Geraldine; Weidlich, Stephanie; Carson, Phillip

    2017-03-15

    Soft tissue infections are a major health burden in the Top End of the Northern Territory of Australia. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is associated with mortality rates from 8 to 40%. Early recognition and aggressive surgical debridement are the cornerstones of successful treatment. The Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis (LRINEC) score, developed by Wong et al., uses six routine biochemical variables to aid early diagnosis. We aim to assess the diagnostic efficacy of the LRINEC score in our population. A retrospective review of patients with NF between 2005 and 2013 was conducted. A time matched cohort of abscesses/cellulitis was selected. Admission bloods were used to calculate the LRINEC score. An intraoperative finding of NF was used as the gold standard definition for comparison. The diagnostic accuracy of the LRINEC score was assessed. Ninety-eight patients with NF and 205 control patients were identified. The area under the receiver operator curve for the LRINEC score in detecting NF was 0.925 (0.890-0.959, P < 0.001). The sensitivity of the LRINEC ≥5 for NF was 76.3%, with a specificity of 93.1%. The positive and negative predictive values were 95.5 and 88.1%, respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 11 and 0.25. The LRINEC score is a useful, robust, non-invasive and easily calculated scoring system that can be used as an adjunct to early diagnosis of NF. However, a high degree of clinical suspicion remains the most important factor in early diagnosis of NF. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  1. [Immunonegative necrotizing glomerulonephritis: an atypical case of lupus nephropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, E; Vallès, M; Torguet, P; Bronsoms, J; Maté, G; Bernadó, L; Mauri, J M

    2003-01-01

    We report here a case of systemic lupus erythematosus with severe, active pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis. This patient had been diagnosed of a lupus nephritis type III previously and treated with steroids and azathioprine. After a renal symptomless period of nine years, she developed heavy proteinuria and hypertension. A second kidney biopsy was then performed. The pathological study disclosed a pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic and segmental glomerulonephritis. The absence of subendothelial and mesangial deposits was confirmed by both immunofluorescent microscopy and electron microscopy. The simultaneous immunological study showed normal ANCA levels while complement, anti-dsDNA and ANA were altered. The patient was treated with steroids and cyclophosphamide eith good response. This case points out the possibility previously recognized by others of an association between lupus and an pauci-immune necrotizing glomerulonephritis.

  2. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza SALEHIOMRAN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Salehi Omran MR, Nooreddini H, Baghdadi F. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood; A Case Report. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Spring;7(2:51-54. AbstractAcute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood (ANEC is an atypical disease followed by respiratory or gastrointestinal infection, high fever, which is accompanied with rapid alteration of consciousness and seizures. This disease is seen nearly exclusively in East Asian infants and children who had previously a good health. Serial MRI examinations demonstrated symmetric lesions involving the thalami, brainstem, cerebellum, and white matter. This disease has a poor prognosis, often culminating in profound morbidity and mortality. A 22-month infant with ANEC hospitalized in Amirkola Children Hospital has been evaluated. References1. Mizuguchi M. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a novel form of acute encephalopathy prevalent in Japan and Taiwan. Brain Dev. 1997 Mar;19(2:81-92. Review.2. Wang HS, Huang SC. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood. Chang Gung Med J 2001 Jan;24(1:1-10.3. Campistol J, Gassió R, Pineda M, Fernandez-Alvarez E. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (infantile bilateral  thalamic necrosis: two non-Japanese cases. Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Nov;40(11:771-4.4. Ito Y, Ichiyama T, Kimura H, Shibata M, Ishiwada N, Kuroki H, Furukawa S, Morishima T. Detection of influenza virus RNA by reverse transcription-PCR and proinflammatory cytokines in influenza-virus-associated encephalopathy. J Med Virol 1999 Aug;58(4:420-5.5. Sugaya N. Influenza-associated encephalopathy in Japan. Semin Pediatr Infect Dis 2002 Apr;13(2:79-84. Review.6. Skelton BW, Hollingshead MC, Sledd AT, Phillips CD, Castillo M. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: typical findings in an atypical disease. Pediatr Radiol 2008 Jul; 38(7:810-3.7. Wong AM, Simon EM, Zimmerman RA, Wang HS, Toh CH, Ng SH. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood

  3. TNF α and reactive oxygen species in necrotic cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael J Morgan; You-Sun Kim; Zheng-gang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Death receptors, including the TNF receptor-1 (TNF-RI), have been shown to be able to initiate caspase-independent cell death. This form of "necrotic cell death" appears to be dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Recent data have indicated that superoxide generation is dependent on the activation of NADPH oxidases, which form a complex with the adaptor molecules RIP1 and TRADD. The mechanism of superoxide generation further establishes RIP1 as the central molecule in ROS production and cell death initiated by TNFa and other death receptors. A role for the sustained JNK activation in necrotic cell death is also suggested. The sensitization of virus-infected cells to TNFa indicates that necrotic cell death may represent an alternative cell death pathway for clearance of infected cells.

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, A; Robaina, R; Pérez, G; Cairoli, E

    2016-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive destructive soft tissue infection with high mortality. Streptococcus pneumoniae as etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is extremely unusual. The increased susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is probably a multifactorial phenomenon. We report a case of a patient, a 36-year-old Caucasian female with 8-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus who presented a fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis. The role of computed tomography and the high performance of blood cultures for isolation of the causative microorganism are emphasized. Once diagnosis is suspected, empiric antibiotic treatment must be prescribed and prompt surgical exploration is mandatory. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Paliperidone Palmitate Associated with Necrotizing Deep Tissue Infection and Sepsis Requiring Surgical Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G. Leung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-acting injectable antipsychotics provide the delivery of medication over an extended period of time requiring administration typically only every 2 to 4 weeks. The side effect profile of a long-acting injectable antipsychotic is predictable and similar to the oral formulation. However, injection site reactions may occur with this novel delivery system. The risk of an injection site reaction may be greater with the repeated administration of a lipophilic decanoate formulation and include pain, development of indurations, and fibrosis. Severe complications from injection site reactions have rarely been described in the literature with newer agents. We report the first case of a patient prescribed paliperidone palmitate every 3 weeks that developed severe sepsis requiring vasopressors and intubation due to delayed relayed recognition of a necrotizing infection at an injection site. Clinicians should be alerted to screen for injection site reactions when there is an unknown source infection in a patient receiving a long-acting injectable antipsychotic.

  6. Biofilm in group A streptococcal necrotizing soft tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemens, Nikolai; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Shambat, Srikanth Mairpady

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus (GAS) is a life-threatening, rapidly progressing infection. At present, biofilm is not recognized as a potential problem in GAS necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI), as it is typically linked to chronic infections or associated with foreign...... devices. Here, we present a case of a previously healthy male presenting with NSTI caused by GAS. The infection persisted over 24 days, and the surgeon documented the presence of a "thick layer biofilm" in the fascia. Subsequent analysis of NSTI patient tissue biopsies prospectively included...

  7. A case of fever of unknown origin: necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlü, G; Onyılmaz, T A; Barış, S A; Turhan, N; Vural, C; Başyiğit, I; Boyacı, H

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis is a rare type of vasculitis; its etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease primarily affects the lungs, although extra-pulmonary involvement has been reported. The typical symptoms are cough, chest pain, dyspnea, and weight loss; high temperatures have been reported in rare cases. We present the case of a 65-year-old woman who was diagnosed with lymph node tuberculosis, for which she received treatment for six months. The patient experienced no improvement in her symptoms, which included fever, weakness and dyspnea. A re-evaluation of previously collected thoracoscopic biopsy material revealed compatibility with necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis.

  8. Analysis of a mathematical model describing necrotic tumor growth

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, Joachim; Matioc, Bogdan-Vasile

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a model describing the growth of necrotic tumors in different regimes of vascularisation. The tumor consists of a necrotic core of death cells and a surrounding nonnecrotic shell. The corresponding mathematical formulation is a moving boundary problem where both boundaries delimiting the nonnecrotic shell are allowed to evolve in time.We determine all radially symmetric stationary solutions of the problem and reduce the moving boundary problem into a nonlinear evolution. Parabolic theory provides us the perfect context in order to show local well-posed of the problem for small initial data.

  9. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection Occurring after Exposure to Mycobacterium marinum

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    Shivani S. Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous infections caused by Mycobacterium marinum have been attributed to aquarium or fish exposure after a break in the skin barrier. In most instances, the upper limbs and fingers account for a majority of the infection sites. While previous cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections related to M. marinum have been documented, the importance of our presenting case is to illustrate the aggressive nature of M. marinum resulting in a persistent necrotizing soft tissue infection of a finger that required multiple aggressive wound debridements, followed by an amputation of the affected extremity, in order to hasten recovery.

  10. Ischemic Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in a Marathon Runner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay J Mast

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Acute pancreatitis due to pancreatic ischemia is a rare condition. Case report In this case report we describe a 57-year-old male who developed an acute necrotizing pancreatitis after running a marathon and visiting a sauna the same evening, with an inadequate fluid and food consumption during both events. Conclusions Pancreatic ischemia imposed by mechanical and physical stress and dehydration can induce the development of acute pancreatitis. Separately, these factors are rare causes of ischemic acute pancreatitis. But when combined, as in this particular case, the risk of an acute necrotizing pancreatitis cannot be neglected

  11. Neonatal necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Junpei; Inoue, Nobuaki; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Terakawa, Toshiro; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2015-04-01

    We herein describe the case of a 27-day-old male infant who was brought to the emergency room for intermittent crying, and swelling of the left scrotum. Based on the clinical findings, necrotizing fasciitis was suspected, and surgical intervention was successfully completed within a few hours of admission. Streptococcus agalactiae type Ia was cultured from the drained abscess, and was considered the causative pathogen. To our knowledge, this is the first report of neonatal necrotizing fasciitis caused by S. agalactiae. Prompt diagnosis and immediate surgical debridement are crucial in the initial management of this disease.

  12. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis: report of three cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, R J; Sisto, J M; Bosack, R C

    1988-06-01

    Three cases of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis have been reported, two of dental etiology, and one the result of blunt and abrasive facial trauma. All cases responded well to aggressive surgical intervention in combination with broad spectrum antibiotic coverage and supportive medical therapy. The presence of increased vascularity in the head and neck region probably minimizes the amount of overlying soft tissue that must be excised during surgical management (in comparison to extremity and trunk necrotizing fasciitis cases). The key to successful management of such infections is early diagnosis of the disease process with prompt surgical and medical intervention.

  13. Systematic review of percutaneous catheter drainage as primary treatment for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baal, M.C. van; Santvoort, H.C. van; Bollen, T.L.; Bakker, O.J.; Besselink, M.G.; Gooszen, H.G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in patients with (infected) necrotizing pancreatitis was evaluated. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed. Inclusion criteria were: consecutive cohort of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis undergoing PCD as primary trea

  14. Neonatal scrotal wall necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene: a case report

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    Zgraj Oskar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis in neonates is rare and is associated with almost 50% mortality. Although more than 80 cases of neonates (under one month of age with necrotizing fasciitis have been reported in the literature, only six of them are identified as originating in the scrotum. Case presentation We report the case of a four-week-old, full-term, otherwise-healthy Caucasian baby boy who presented with an ulcerating lesion of his scrotal wall. His scrotum was explored because of a provisional diagnosis of missed torsion of the testis. He was found to have necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum. We were able to preserve the testis and excise the necrotic tissue, and with intravenous antibiotics there was a successful outcome. Conclusions Fournier gangrene is rarely considered as part of the differential diagnosis in the clinical management of the acute scrotum. However, all doctors who care for small babies must be aware of this serious condition and, if it is suspected, should not hesitate in referring the babies to a specialist pediatric surgical center immediately.

  15. Triple diagnostics for early detection of ambivalent necrotizing fasciitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hietbrink, Falco; Bode, Lonneke G.; Riddez, Louis; Leenen, Luke P H; van Dijk, MR

    2016-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon, rapidly progressive and potential lethal condition. Over the last decade time to surgery decreased and outcome improved, most likely due to increased awareness and more timely referral. Early recognition is key to improve mortality and morbidity.

  16. Novel Phaeoacremonium species associated with necrotic wood of Prunus trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damm, U.; Mostert, L.; Crous, P.W.; Fourie, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    The genus Phaeoacremonium is associated with opportunistic human infections, as well as stunted growth and die-back of various woody hosts, especially grapevines. In this study, Phaeoacremonium species were isolated from necrotic woody tissue of Prunus spp. (plum, peach, nectarine and apricot) from

  17. Neonatal scrotal wall necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene): a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, Oskar

    2011-12-12

    Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis in neonates is rare and is associated with almost 50% mortality. Although more than 80 cases of neonates (under one month of age) with necrotizing fasciitis have been reported in the literature, only six of them are identified as originating in the scrotum. Case presentation We report the case of a four-week-old, full-term, otherwise-healthy Caucasian baby boy who presented with an ulcerating lesion of his scrotal wall. His scrotum was explored because of a provisional diagnosis of missed torsion of the testis. He was found to have necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum. We were able to preserve the testis and excise the necrotic tissue, and with intravenous antibiotics there was a successful outcome. Conclusions Fournier gangrene is rarely considered as part of the differential diagnosis in the clinical management of the acute scrotum. However, all doctors who care for small babies must be aware of this serious condition and, if it is suspected, should not hesitate in referring the babies to a specialist pediatric surgical center immediately.

  18. [Method and procedures in bacteriological study of necrotic teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ponce, A; López Campos, A; López Paz, J; Pazos Sierra, R

    1991-01-01

    Research was conducted of 160 radicular canals with necrotic pulp. Results of different bacteriological analyses are presented. Culture analyses in aerobic and anaerobic media, resulted in the isolation of Staphylococcus Epidermidis, Streptococcus Viridans and Corynebacterium sp in the group studied, as the most frequent bacteria. There was no evidence of a specific germ linked with the pulp necrosis.

  19. Cerebral and splanchnic oxygenation and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schat, Trijntje Eelkje

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common and deadliest gastrointestinal disease in preterm infants. Mortality rates of NEC can be as high as 40%. Furthermore, NEC is associated with adverse neurological outcomes at school age and gastrointestinal complications in the long term, such as sho

  20. Risk Factors For Development Of Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanovic Bojan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP is a severe form of acute pancreatitis that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, an adequate initial treatment of patients who present with acute pancreatitis (AP based on correct interpretation of early detected laboratory and clinical abnormalities may have a significant positive impact on the disease course.

  1. Necrotizing enterocolitis. New thoughts about pathogenesis and potential treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKendrick, W; Caplan, M

    1993-10-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. An incomplete understanding of its pathogenesis has hampered efforts to devise an effective preventative strategy. New insights into the pathogenesis of NEC, particularly at the cellular and biochemical level, however, offer a rational basis for the development of new approaches to this disease.

  2. Severe necrotizing cutaneous reaction to topical 5-fluorouracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available 5-flourouracil (5-FU has been used for the treatment of various malignant and pre-malignant conditions. It has also been used to treat viral warts as a topical agent. It usually does not produce any significant adverse effects when used topically. Severe necrotizing cutaneous reaction following topical 5-FU used for the treatment of warts is being reported.

  3. Carbohydrate maldigestion induces necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains the most severe gastrointestinal disorder in preterm infants. It is associated with the initiation of enteral nutrition and may be related to immature carbohydrate digestive capacity. We tested the hypothesis that a formula containing maltodextrin vs. lactose ...

  4. Negative pressure treatment for necrotizing fasciitis after chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraia Melchionda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe 2 cases of children with malignant disease who developed severe mucositis with perineal necrotizing fasciitis during severe neutropenia after chemotherapy. Treatment with topical negative pressure therapy with silver foam dressing, together with large spectrum antibiotics, resolved the problem with complete closure of the wound after 30 and 36 days of treatment, respectively.

  5. Necrotizing enterocolitis with recurrent hepatic portal venous gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, J H; Smith, W L; Tsang, R C

    1976-03-01

    Two separate episodes of pneumatosis intestinalis and hepatic portal venous gas were observed in a premature infant with necrotizing enterocolitis. Although HPVG has previously been considered an ominous roentgenographic sign, the infant survived without surgical intervention. As in several cases reported by others, clinical and roentgenographic signs of NEC reappeared when enteric feedings were restarted prior to 10 days of medical therapy.

  6. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a large mixed-breed dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, Chelsie M; Scott, Steven J; Cerda-Gonzalez, Sofia

    2014-12-01

    A 4-year-old 26-kg (57.2-lb) spayed female Staffordshire Bull Terrier mix was evaluated because of a 24-hour history of cluster seizures. Neurologic examination revealed altered mentation and multifocal intracranial signs; MRI was performed. The MRI findings included multifocal, asymmetric forebrain lesions affecting both the gray and white matter, an area suggestive of focal necrosis, and loss of corticomedullary distinction. A midline shift and caudal transtentorial herniation were noted, suggestive of greater than normal intracranial pressure. Because the dog's clinical signs worsened despite medical treatment and additional evidence of increased intracranial pressure, bilateral craniectomy and durectomy were performed. Histologic evaluation of a brain biopsy specimen revealed bilateral and asymmetric areas of necrosis in the subcortical white matter and adjacent gray matter. At the periphery of the necrotic areas, there was increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and Virchow-Robin spaces were expanded by CD3+ lymphocytes. Results of immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue were negative for canine distemper virus, Neospora canis, and Toxoplasma gondii. These clinical, imaging, and histopathologic findings were compatible with necrotizing meningoencephalitis. The dog's neurologic status continued to worsen following surgery. Repeated MRI revealed ongoing signs of increased intracranial pressure, despite the bilateral craniectomy. The owners elected euthanasia. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a large mixed-breed dog. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs other than small or toy breeds that have signs suggestive of inflammatory disease.

  7. Triple diagnostics for early detection of ambivalent necrotizing fasciitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hietbrink, Falco; Bode, Lonneke G.; Riddez, Louis; Leenen, Luke P H; van Dijk, MR

    2016-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon, rapidly progressive and potential lethal condition. Over the last decade time to surgery decreased and outcome improved, most likely due to increased awareness and more timely referral. Early recognition is key to improve mortality and morbidity. How

  8. [Dentogene Focus as a Rare Cause of Necrotizing Fasciitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, Christopher; Hoefert, Sebastian; Fischborn, Till; Schraml, Christina

    2017-02-01

    History and clinical findings We elaborate the case of a 72-year-old patient who presented with a painful swelling of the lower jaw in the emergency unit. Investigations and diagnosis In the clinical examination and the CT scan, a widespread cervical emphysema was found which raised suspicion for the presence of a necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck due to aerogenic infection. Close spatial vicinity to the teeth of the left upper and lower jaw was present, so that the necrotizing fasciitis was assumed to be odontogenic. Treatment and course Based on the clinical presentation and the imaging findings the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis in the sense of a possible infection with gas building bacteria accompanying with an infection of the mediastinum was made. Immediately performed therapy included sternotomy and extended surgical debridement of necrosis. Conclusion The presented case emphasizes that necrotizing fasciitis due to gas-producing infections should be considered as a differential diagnosis for cervical soft tissue emphysema for which an odontogenic focus is the most common cause. Rapid diagnosis is essential for successful treatment consisting of immediate surgical debridement and intravenous antibiotics.

  9. Allelism and Molecular Mapping of Soybean Necrotic Root Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutability of the w4 flower color locus in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is conditioned by an allele designated w4-m. Germinal revertants recovered among self-pollinated progeny of mutable plants have been associated with the generation of necrotic root mutations, chlorophyll-deficiency mutation...

  10. [Necrotizing fasciitis caused by cutaneous mucormycosis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telich-Tarriba, José Eduardo; Pérez-Ortíz, Andric Christopher; Telich-Vidal, José

    2012-01-01

    Mucormycosis are opportunistic infections with high morbidity and mortality caused by fungi of the class Zygomycetes, they mainly affect diabetic and immunocompromised patients. In up to 20% of all cases the main infection is localized in the skin, with a great number of them presenting in healthy patients that have suffered from severe trauma or burns. Zygomycetes tend to invade arteries, which leads to thrombosis and generates wide necrotic areas; this favors the progress of the infection and invasion of deep tissues. Up to 24% of primary cutaneous mucormycosis can be complicated with necrotizing fasciitis. We present the case of a 52 year-old male that received the clinical diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. The patient received wide spectrum antibiotics and was submitted to extensive debridement of the wound bed; transoperative biopsy revealed the presence of zygomycetes in the tissues and the diagnosis of primary cutaneous zygomycosis was made. Antifungal treatment with amphotericin B was initiated and two weeks later autologous skin grafts were applied over the wounds. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose cutaneous zygomycosis, therefore it should always be considered amongst the differentials of necrotic wounds that do not respond to standard treatment. The rapid evolution of the disease remarks the importance of biopsying the wound bed early and treating aggressively.

  11. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Filipino female in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel; Frazee, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae has been described in Southeast Asia, but has only recently begun to emerge in North America. The hypermucoviscous strain of K. pneumoniae is a particularly virulent strain known to cause devastatingly invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Here we present the first known case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae in North America.

  12. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines coinfected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seung I; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lee, Kyung Woo; Lillehoj, Erik P; Hong, Yeong Ho; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, D Hye-Young; Chun, Ji-Eun

    2013-09-01

    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with coinfection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis. Day-old male Cobb, Ross, and Hubbard broilers were orally infected with viable C. perfringens and E. maxima and fed a high-protein diet to promote the development of experimental disease. Body weight loss, intestinal lesions, and serum antibody levels against alpha-toxin and necrotic enteritis B-like (NetB) toxin were measured as parameters of disease susceptibility and host immune response. Cobb chickens exhibited increased body weight loss compared with Ross and Hubbard breeds and greater gut lesion severity compared with Ross chickens. NetB antibody levels were greater in Cobb chickens compared with the Ross or Hubbard groups. These results suggest that Cobb chickens may be more susceptible to necrotic enteritis in the field compared with the Ross and Hubbard lines.

  13. Bilateral necrotizing sialometaplasia of the hard palate in a patient with bulimia: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, Simone F M; Suter, Valerie G A; Altermatt, Hans Jörg; Reichart, Peter A; Bornstein, Michael M

    2014-05-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) is a rare and benign lesion that mostly affects the posterior hard palate. Its importance resides in its clinical and microscopic characteristics, which can closely mimic malignant neoplasias, in particular oral squamous cell carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Accurate histopathologic evaluation of an incisional biopsy is considered as the diagnostic gold standard. NS lesions heal spontaneously within weeks, and no further treatment is necessary. We report a case of a bilateral palatal NS in a 22-yearold woman with bulimia, where an incisional biopsy confirmed the clinical diagnosis. The different clinical stages of the lesions from onset to resolution and the possible etiologic factors are described in detail, as well as a discussion of the differential diagnoses of palatal ulcers. When taking a biopsy from suspicious oral lesions, care has to be taken that an appropriate tissue sample is harvested, and the histopathologic analysis is performed by an experienced pathologist to establish a correct diagnosis.

  14. Noma (cancrum oris) associated with oral myiasis in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, A M M; Enwonwu, C O; Pires, F R

    2003-05-01

    Noma is a devastating oro-facial necrotic condition affecting debilitated subjects. Oral myiasis is an infectious disease caused by deposition of larval flies in oral wounds and lesions. Oro-facial noma-myiasis association has not been previously reported in the literature. The aim of this paper is to report a case of noma associated with myiasis in a 65-year-old Brazilian male.

  15. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  16. [A case of subacute necrotizing lymphadenitis complicated with brachial plexus neuritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, A; Araki, E; Arakawa, K; Kikuchi, H; Iwaki, T; Yamada, T; Kira, J

    1998-01-01

    A 22-year-old female noted a low grade fever and swelling of the cervical lymph nodes in May 1997, and later developed a dry cough. She was diagnosed to have interstitial pneumonitis, and then administration of corticosteroids alleviated her symptoms. On February 6, 1998, however, a high fever recurred and her swollen cervical lymph node on the right side was biopsied on February 9, 1998. A histological examination revealed an increased number of histiocytes and karyorrhexis of the lymphocytes in the paracortical areas, and she was therefore diagnosed to have histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis. She could not fully elevate her arm on February 16, 1998. On admission, her cervical lymph node was swollen on the left side. A neurological examination revealed a marked weakness of the right deltoid muscle, moderate weakness of the right latissimus dorsi, triceps and brachioradialis muscles and also a mild weakness of the serratus anterior, supra- and infra-spinatus, and biceps brachii muscles. The muscle power of the other muscles were normal and no muscle atrophy was evident. Winging of the right scapula was observed. The deep tendon reflexes were normal in all four limbs, and her sensation was also normal. No cerebellar sign was found. The Jackson, Spurling, Allen, Morley and Adson tests were all negative. ESR was mildly elevated to 18 mm/hr, but CRP was negative. RF, ANA and anti-SS-A and SS-B antibodies were positive, whereas LE-test, direct and indirect Coombs tests and other autoantibodies were negative. Needle EMG disclosed fasciculation potentials in the right triceps muscle and polyphasic waves in the right deltoid muscle. MRI showed gadolinium-enhancement of the right brachial plexus. Although an abnormal accumulation of gallium was detected in the right parotid and bilateral submandibular glands, no sicca symptoms were found and the Schirmer test findings were normal. Oral prednisolone (50 mg/day with gradual tapering) alleviated both her symptoms and the

  17. Efficacy of early treatment with toltrazuril in prevention of coccidiosis and necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnassan, Alaa Aldin; Shehata, Awad Ali; Kotsch, Marianne; Schrödl, Wieland; Krüger, Monika; Daugschies, Arwid; Bangoura, Berit

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, efficacy of the toltrazuril treatment for prevention of coccidiosis and necrotic enteritis was tested. Ninety-six 14-day-old commercial broiler chickens were caged and divided into eight groups (n=12), designated groups 1 to 8. Chickens of groups 1 to 6 were inoculated orally at 18 days of age with 25,000 oocysts of Eimeria tenella and 75,000 oocysts of Eimeria brunetti. At 22 days of age, chickens of groups 1 to 6 were infected with 10(9) colony-forming unit Clostridium perfringens. Chickens of group 1 were treated with 75 parts/10(6) toltrazuril in drinking water for 8 h on two consecutive days up to 12 h before Eimeria infection, while chickens of groups 2 to 5 were treated with the same dose of toltrazuril at 12 h, 36 h, 60 h and 84 h after Eimeria infection, respectively. The non-treated group 6 served as a positive control. Chickens in group 7 were treated with toltrazuril at 17 and 18 days of age, and those of group 8 remained uninfected and non-treated as a negative control. The feed conversion ratio was higher in the positive control compared with other groups. The mortality rates were 16.8% and 41.7% in the late toltrazuril-treated (at 84 h) and infected non-treated chickens, respectively. Lesions scores of necrotic enteritis or coccidiosis in infected, non-treated chickens were significantly more severe compared with negative controls (Penteritis caused by C. perfringens infection.

  18. Surgical Strategies for the Management of Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica M Dua

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The surgical management of necrotizing pancreatitis continues to evolve and now includes multiple alternatives to traditional open debridement – minimally invasive strategies have been developed with the intent to decrease the physiologic stress associated with this procedure. Proponents of each procedure report their technical success and the “safety and feasibility” of their favored strategy. However, extension into routine clinical practice is limited by considerable variation in technique and lack of widespread expertise. No single approach is optimal for all patients. The strategy for drainage/debridement among the breadth of techniques now available must be individualized according to patient presentation and anatomy. The purpose of this review is to present the current state of interventions for necrotizing pancreatitis and provide a practical guide to understanding the indications and application of these procedures.

  19. Necrotizing enterocolitis: A multifactorial disease with no cure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kareena L Schnabl; John E Van Aerde; Alan BR Thomson; Michael T Clandinin

    2008-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is an inflammatory bowel disease of neonates with significant morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Due to the multifactorial nature of the disease and limitations in disease models, early diagnosis remains challenging and the pathogenesis elusive. Although preterm birth, hypoxic-ischemic events,formula feeding, and abnormal bacteria colonization are established risk factors, the role of genetics and vasoactive/inflammatory mediators is unclear.Consequently, treatments do not target the specific underlying disease processes and are symptomatic and surgically invasive. Breast-feeding is the most effective preventative measure. Recent advances in the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis have focused on bioactive nutrients and trophic factors in human milk. Development of new disease models including the aspect of prematudty that consistently predisposes neonates to the disease with multiple risk factors will improve our understanding of the pathogenesis and lead to discovery of innovative therapeutics.

  20. [Postoperative necrotizing fasciitis: a rare and fatal complication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezala, Hassen Ben; Feriani, Najla

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative parietal complications can be exceptionally severe and serious threatening vital prognosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection of the skin and deep subcutaneous tissues, spreading along fascia and adipose tissue. It is mainly caused by group A streptococcus (streptococcus pyogenes) but also by other bacteria such as Vibrio vulnificus, Clostridium perfringens or Bacteroides fragilis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a real surgical and medical emergency. We report, in this study, a very rare case of abdominal parietal gangrene occurring in a 75-year-old woman on the fifth day after surgery for an ovarian cyst. Evolution was marked by occurrence of a refractory septic shock with a rapidly fatal course on the third day of management.

  1. Acute anterior necrotizing scleritis:A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuen Keat Gan; Syed Shoeb Ahmad; Sheena Mary Alexander; Amir Samsudin

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing scleritis is an uncommon but potential disastrous infection to the eye. It is commonly caused by vaso-occlusive autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or surgically-induced, and rarely due to infections. In this article, we presented a rare case of necrotizing scleritis caused by herpes infection in an immunocompromised patient. A 49 years old, retroviral positive gentleman presented to our clinic with a painful, red right eye associated with watering, photophobia and blurring of vision. His right eye rapidly deteriorated leading to an impending perforation of the sclera despite intensive antimicrobial therapy. The patient was started on acyclovir ointment and subsequently improved remarkably salvaging the eye from the need of an evis-ceration. Although the visual prognosis was poor, structural integrity of the eye was achieved.

  2. Necrotizing fasciitis: unreliable MRI findings in the preoperative diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Arzu E-mail: arzuarslan@netscape.net; Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Borthne, Arne

    2000-12-01

    The authors present two cases of necrotizing fasciitis (NF), one case of dermatomyositis and one case of posttraumatic muscle injury, which have similar magnetic resonance imaging findings in terms of skin, subcutaneous fat, superficial and deep fasciae and muscle involvement. These cases highlight the need for cautious interpretation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, for they are nonspecific and the preoperative decision should be based mostly on the evolution of the clinical status.

  3. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis as fi rst manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeroen; I; Lenz; Jimmy; M; Jacobs; Bart; Op; de; Beeck; Ivan; A; Huyghe; Paul; A; Pelckmans; Tom; G; Moreels

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a female patient with severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with hypercalcemia as first manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism caused by a benign parathyroid adenoma.Initially the acute pancreatitis was treated conservatively.The patient subsequently underwent surgical resection of the parathyroid adenoma and surgical clearance of a large infected pancreatic pseudocyst.Although the association of parathyroid adenoma-induced hypercalcemia and acute pancreatitis is a kno...

  4. Emergence of a unique group of necrotizing mycobacterial diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Dobos, K. M.; Quinn, F D; Ashford, D. A.; Horsburgh, C R; King, C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Although most diseases due to pathogenic mycobacteria are caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, several other mycobacterial diseases-caused by M. ulcerans (Buruli ulcer), M. marinum, and M. haemophilum-have begun to emerge. We review the emergence of diseases caused by these three pathogens in the United States and around the world in the last decade. We examine the pathophysiologic similarities of the diseases (all three cause necrotizing skin lesions) and common reservoirs of infection (sta...

  5. Necrotizing hepatitis in a domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, L; O'Connor, M; Premanandan, C

    2014-11-01

    An adult male domestic pigeon (Columba livia) was presented for necropsy following natural death after a period of chronic weight loss and severe intestinal ascariasis. Histopathologic examination of the liver found moderate to marked, multifocal necrotizing hepatitis with large, basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Transmission electron microscopy of affected hepatocytes demonstrated numerous intra- and perinuclear icosahedral virions arranged in a lattice structure, consistent with adenoviral infection.

  6. Bacteriological analysis of necrotic pulp and fistulae in primary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    FABRIS, Antônio Scalco; Nakano, Viviane; Avila-Campos,Mario Júlio

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Primary teeth work as guides for the eruption of permanent dentition, contribute for the development of the jaws, chewing process, preparing food for digestion, and nutrient assimilation. Treatment of pulp necrosis in primary teeth is complex due to anatomical and physiological characteristics and high number of bacterial species present in endodontic infections. The bacterial presence alone or in association in necrotic pulp and fistula samples from primary teeth of boys and gir...

  7. Necrotizing Fasciitis Complicating Pregnancy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos Nikolaou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, life-threatening surgical infection in pregnancy with high rates of morbidity and mortality. A 15-year-old primigravid woman, at 28 weeks of gestation with no significant previous medical history, was admitted to our hospital complaining of severe left lower extremity pain and high fever the last 72 hours. During clinical examination, she had a swollen, erythematous and tender to palpation inflamed skin over the medial aspect of the upper thigh without any evidence of injury. Incision drainage was performed immediately and she received broad spectrum antibiotics. During initial laboratory examinations, diabetes mellitus was diagnosed. There was no clinical improvement over the following days. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed subcutaneous tissue inflammation and edema of infected tissues confirming the disease entity. Multidisciplinary therapy with immediate aggressive surgical debridement of necrotic tissues, multiple antibiotics, and intensive care monitoring was performed successfully. The patient’s postoperative course was uncomplicated and skin defect was closed with split thickness skin grafting. Our case emphasized the potential immunosuppressive role of pregnancy state in conjunction with diabetes mellitus in the development of severe necrotizing soft tissue infections.

  8. NetB and necrotic enteritis: the hole movable story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Julian I; Keyburn, Anthony L; Moore, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the primary causative agent of avian necrotic enteritis. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of this economically important disease has been enhanced by the discovery of C. perfringens NetB toxin, which belongs to the α-haemolysin family of β-pore-forming toxins. In a chicken disease model, the analysis of an isogenic set of strains comprising the wild type, a netB mutant, and its complemented derivative, fulfilled molecular Koch's postulates and revealed that NetB was essential for disease. These results were consistent with epidemiological surveys, which generally found that there was a higher prevalence of netB carriage in C. perfringens isolates from diseased poultry compared to healthy birds. The netB gene has been shown to be located on large conjugative plasmids that are closely related to other toxin plasmids from C. perfringens, which has potential implications for the epidemiology of necrotic enteritis infections. The crystal structures of both monomeric NetB and the heptameric NetB pore have been determined, the latter revealed a central pore diameter of approximately 26 Å. Finally, it has been shown that vaccine preparations that include NetB can protect chickens against disease and a series of single amino acid substitution derivatives of NetB that have potential value for vaccine formulations have been isolated and analysed. It is likely that NetB will be an important antigen to include in an effective, commercially viable, necrotic enteritis vaccine.

  9. Necrotic Enteritis in Chickens Associated with Clostridium sordellii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Guillermo; Uzal, Francisco; Chin, R P; Palombo, Enzo A; Awad, Milena; Lyras, Dena; Shivaprasad, H L

    2015-09-01

    Three outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordelii were diagnosed in commercial broiler chicken flocks with 18,000 to 31,000 birds between 18 and 26 days old. Clinical signs in the affected flocks included high mortality up to 2% a day, depression, and diarrhea. The main gross changes included segmental dilation of the small intestine with watery contents, gas, mucoid exudate, and roughened and uneven mucosa, occasionally covered with a pseudomembrane. Microscopic lesions in the small intestine were characterized by extensive areas of coagulative necrosis of the villi, fibrinous exudate in the lumen, and high numbers of large, Gram-positive rods, occasionally containing subterminal spores, seen in the necrotic tissue and lumen. These rods were identified as C. sordellii by immunohistochemistry. Clostridium sordellii was isolated in an almost pure culture from the intestine of affected birds. A retrospective study of commercial broiler chicken and turkey submissions to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated from intestinal lesions in outbreaks of necrotic enteritis-like disease in 8 of 39 cases, 5 times together with Clostridium perfringens and 3 times alone. The latter three cases are reported here.

  10. Perforating oesophageal carcinoma presenting as necrotizing fasciitis of the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francque, S M; Van Laer, C; Struyf, N; Vermeulen, P; Corthouts, B; Jorens, P G

    2001-10-01

    A patient with a history of schizophrenia was admitted to our hospital in an already severe stage of necrotizing fasciitis of the neck, complicated with mediastinitis and gangrene. Later on, he also developed a vena cava superior syndrome and sepsis. In the few cases and small series described in the literature, necrotizing fasciitis of the neck is usually associated with surgery or trauma. Less frequently, an orodental or pharyngeal infection, often innocuous, is the underlying cause. None of these causes could be identified in our patient. Initially, on computer-assisted tomography (CT) scan, a tracheal rupture was suspected, but this diagnosis could not be confirmed on bronchoscopic examination. On gastroscopy, a stenotic oesophageal segment was discovered. Biopsy of this segment showed a poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The patient died in sepsis. Autopsy confirmed the presence of a large proximal oesophageal tumour with perforation. As far as we know, no case of a necrotizing fasciitis of the neck caused by perforation of a formerly unknown oesophageal carcinoma has been reported. Even mediastinitis, with or without gangrene, is rarely associated with oesophageal cancer, and in the few cases reported it is always due to fistulization after surgery.

  11. Urticaria associated with necrotic uterine leiomyomas infected with salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachdjian, Raffi; Tourangeau, Louanne; Schneider, Jessica Lynn; Nel, Andre

    2010-08-01

    We describe a unique case of urticaria associated with a Salmonella infection of uterine leiomyomas. A 55-year-old woman with a known history of uterine leiomyomas and a chief complaint of recurrent small and coalescing urticarial lesions confined to the abdomen presented with an 18-year history of recurrent fever and flu-like symptoms associated with the urticaria. After confirming the presence of a leiomyoma containing necrotic tissue on the computed tomography scan, a hysterectomy was performed. A large, 11-cm intramural leiomyoma was removed, and a culture of the purulent content grew a previously untyped Salmonella. The urticaria resolved on removal of the necrotic tissue. Subsequent follow-up for more than 2 years shows no relapse of symptoms. Our patient harbored Salmonella bacteria in a necrotic uterine leiomyoma, where it was difficult to detect until the time of surgery. In patients presenting with localized urticaria of the abdomen, an infection in the pelvic and abdominal tissue should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  12. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jie; Yao, Le; He, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Bin; Song, Zhen-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain. Accurate diagnosis is often hindered due to various presentations that differ from the typical signs of appendicitis, especially the position of the appendix. A delay in diagnosis or treatment may result in increased risks of complications, such as perforation, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis is extremely rare. We herein report a case of 50-year-old man presenting with an appendiceal abscess in local hospital. After ten days of conservative treatment with intravenous antibiotics, the patient complained about pain and swelling of the right lower limb and computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a perforated appendix and gas and fluid collection extending from his retroperitoneal cavity to the subcutaneous layer of his right loin and right lower limb. He was transferred to our hospital and was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis. Emergency surgery including surgical debridement and appendectomy was performed. However, the patient died of severe sepsis and multiple organ failure two days after the operation. This case represents an unusual complication of a common disease and we should bear in mind that retroperitoneal inflammation and/or abscesses may cause necrotizing fasciitis through lumbar triangles.

  13. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis: an unusual sequel of odontogenic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhashraj, Krishnaraj; Jayakumar, Naveen; Ravindran, Chinnasamy

    2008-12-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection of the fascial planes, which is less common in head and neck, because of the rarity and higher vascularity in the region. We reviewed five patients with cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic infection managed at a teaching hospital at Chennai, India. There were four men and one woman, of whom four patients were diabetic and hypertensive, with a mean age of 53 years. Mandibular molars (periapical or pericoronal abscess) were found to be the source of infection in all of the cases. The treatment involved incision and drainage and debridement. Anti-microbial drugs were given for all the patients, which included cephalosporins, metronidazole and gentamycin. In four patients the wound healed by contracture and one patient required split skin grafting. Due to the smaller extent of the necrosis, better control of the systemic disease and small size of the sample, there was neither a major complication nor death. This paper reminds us that cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) remains one of the potential complications of long standing odontogenic infections in patients with immune-compromised status, particularly in lower dentition.

  14. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis: can we expect a favourable outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Naresh K; Simhadri, Sridhar; Sridhara, Suryanarayana Rao

    2004-10-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck is an uncommon, progressive, destructive soft tissue infection of mixed aerobic and anaerobic organisms, having high mortality if left untreated (22 to 100 per cent). This study makes an attempt to analyse various factors and management methods determining the overall prognosis. A retrospective analysis of all cases of necrotizing fasciitis involving the head and neck, with exclusion of those involving the eyelid and the scalp, was undertaken. Various parameters such as demography, aetiology, complications, management and outcome were studied. Males outnumbered the females with the latter having a greater risk of involvement after 60 years. Odontogenic infection was the primary source of infection. Anaerobes were cultured in seven out of 17 cases, with six others showing mixed Gram positive and Gram negative organisms. Anaemia was the most commonly associated illness, with diabetes affecting four out of 17 cases. Aggressive surgical debridement with triple antibiotic therapy was used in the management of necrotizing fasciitis with an overall mortality of 11.8 per cent. Patients having late referral, anaemia and one or other complication had increased duration of total hospital stay. Better results can be obtained with proper control of infection by early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement and triple antibiotic therapy, along with timely control of complications and associated illnesses.

  15. Oral Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  16. Oral myiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Thalaimalai Saravanan; Mathan A Mohan; Meera Thinakaran; Saneem Ahammed

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability ...

  17. Systemic alendronate prevents resorption of necrotic bone during revascularization. A bone chamber study in rats

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    Aspenberg Per

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avascular necrosis of bone (osteonecrosis can cause structural failure and subsequent deformation, leading to joint dysfunction and pain. Structural failure is the result of resorption of necrotic bone during revascularization, before new bone has formed or consolidated enough for loadbearing. Bone resorption can be reduced by bisphosphonates. If resorption of the necrotic bone could be reduced during the revascularization phase until sufficient new bone has formed, it would appear that structural failure could be avoided. Methods To test whether resorption of necrotic bone can be prevented, structural grafts were subjected to new bone ingrowth during systemic bisphosphonate treatment in a rat model. Results In rats treated with alendronate the necrotic bone was not resorbed, whereas it was almost entirely resorbed in the controls. Conclusion Systemic alendronate treatment prevents resorption of necrotic bone during revascularization. In patients with osteonecrosis, bisphosphonates may therefore prevent collapse of the necrotic bone.

  18. Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Filipino Female in North America

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    Ng, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae has been described in Southeast Asia, but has only recently begun to emerge in North America. The hypermucoviscous strain of K. pneumoniae is a particularly virulent strain known to cause devastatingly invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Here we present the first known case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae in North America. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:165–168.

  19. Concurrent emphysematous pyelonephritis and thigh necrotizing fasciitis after intramuscular administration of diclofenac

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    Fateme Shamekhi Amiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a rapidly progressive, life-threatening soft tissue infec-tion. NF may result from any injury to the skin or from hematogenous spread. However, con-current emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis of the left thigh has not been reported. We report a case of emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis of the left thigh after intramuscular administration of diclofenac that improved with aggressive management including broad-spectrum antibiotics, nephrectomy and surgical intervention.

  20. Disseminated necrotizing myeloencephalitis: a herpes-associated neurological disease of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, P B; Thorsen, J

    1976-01-01

    Equine viral rhinopneumonitis type I virus was isolated from spinal cord and brain of a paraparetic horse with disseminated necrotizing myeloencephalitis. Necrotic arteriolitis,nonsuppurative necrotizing myeloencephalitis and Gasserian ganglioneuritis were present. On record were 12 more cases of horses with similar lesions. The horses had been ataxic or paretic for up to several weeks. A field survey indicated that 14 of 24 horses with acute myelitic signs developed them after recent exposure to respiratory disease.

  1. Primary testicular necrotizing vasculitis clinically presented as neoplasm of the testicle: a case report

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    Španjol Josip

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of necrotizing vasculitis with the testicle as the isolated affected organ. A 25-year-old man, pretreated for epididymo-orchitis, presented with a presumed testicular neoplasm. Radical orchiectomy was performed and diagnosis of necrotizing vasculitis was established. In the absence of any other sign of systemic disease, the diagnosis of isolated necrotizing vasculitis of the testis was confirmed. Two years after the operation, the patient showed no symptoms of systemic disease.

  2. Concurrent emphysematous pyelonephritis and thigh necrotizing fasciitis after intramuscular administration of diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Fateme Shamekhi; Foroughi, Alireza

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rapidly progressive, life-threatening soft tissue infection. NF may result from any injury to the skin or from hematogenous spread. However, con-current emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis of the left thigh has not been reported. We report a case of emphysematous pyelonephritis and necrotizing fasciitis of the left thigh after intramuscular administration of diclofenac that improved with aggressive management including broad-spectrum antibiotics, nephrectomy and surgical intervention.

  3. A Fatal Case of Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by a Highly Virulent Escherichia coli Strain

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    Sadjia Bekal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious disease characterized by the necrosis of the subcutaneous tissues and fascia. E. coli as the etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is a rare occurrence. A 66-year-old woman underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. She rapidly developed necrotizing fasciitis which led to her death 68 hours following surgery. An E. coli strain was isolated from blood and fascia cultures. DNA microarray revealed the presence of 20 virulence genes.

  4. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis: an unusual complication of chronic suppurative otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Ashwani; Sabherwal, Anup; Puri, Rajeev; Jain, Pooja

    2006-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare microbial soft tissue infection characterized by rapidly spreading areas of necrosis and a high mortality rate. It may be of odontogenic or traumatic origin or may arise from insect bites, burns or surgical infections. We present a clinical case of an eight-year-old child with facial and cervical necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of chronic suppurative otitis media. The causes, diagnosis and management of necrotizing fasciitis are reviewed.

  5. Necrotizing fasciitis: epidemiology and clinical predictors for amputation

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    Khamnuan P

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Patcharin Khamnuan,1,2 Wilaiwan Chongruksut,3 Kijja Jearwattanakanok,4 Jayanton Patumanond,5 Apichat Tantraworasin3 1Clinical Epidemiology Program, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 2Department of Nursing, Phayao Hospital, Phayao, 3Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, 4Department of Surgery, Nakornping Hospital, Chiang Mai, 5Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Clinical Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand Background: Necrotizing fasciitis, a relatively uncommon infection involving the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and fascia, is a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection and a medical and surgical urgency. Delayed debridement, with subsequent huge soft tissue loss is associated with loss of limb and infection and is the most common cause of mortality. The purpose of this work is to describe the epidemiology of necrotizing fasciitis and to identify the clinical characteristics that may be used to predict amputation in routine clinical practice. Methods: Retrospective cohort study data were collected from three general hospitals located in the Chiang Rai, Kamphaeng Phet, and Phayao provinces in northern Thailand. Epidemiologic data for all patients with a surgically confirmed diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis between 2009 and 2012 were collected. Medical records and reviews were retrieved from inpatient records, laboratory reports, and registers. Clinical predictors for amputation were analyzed by multivariable risk regression. Results: A total of 1,507 patients with a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis were classified as being with amputation (n=127, 8.4% and without amputation (n=1,380, 91.6%. The most common causative Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens were Streptococcus pyogenes (33.3% in the amputation group and 40.8% in the non-amputation group and Escherichia coli (25% in the amputation group and 17.1% in the non-amputation group. Predictive

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis: eight-year experience and literature review

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    Jinn-Ming Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To describe clinical, laboratory, microbiological features, and outcomes of necrotizing fasciitis. METHODS: From January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2011, 115 patients (79 males, 36 females diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis were admitted to Mackay Memorial Hospital in Taitung. Demographic data, clinical features, location of infection, type of comorbidities, microbiology and laboratory results, and outcomes of patients were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: Among 115 cases, 91 survived (79.1% and 24 died (20.9%. There were 67 males (73.6% and 24 females (26.4% with a median age of 54 years (inter-quartile ranges, 44.0-68.0 years in the survival group; and 12 males (50% and 12 females (50% with a median age of 61 years (inter-quartile ranges, 55.5-71.5 years in the non-surviving group. The most common symptoms were local swelling/erythema, fever, pain/tenderness in 92 (80%, 87 (76% and 84 (73% patients, respectively. The most common comorbidies were liver cirrhosis in 54 patients (47% and diabetes mellitus in 45 patients (39%. A single organism was identified in 70 patients (61%, multiple pathogens were isolated in 20 patients (17%, and no microorganism was identified in 30 patients (26%. The significant risk factors were gender, hospital length of stay, and albumin level. DISCUSSION: Necrotizing fasciitis, although not common, can cause notable rates of morbidity and mortality. It is important to have a high index of suspicion and increase awareness in view of the paucity of specific cutaneous findings early in the course of the disease. Prompt diagnosis and early operative debridement with adequate antibiotics are vital.

  7. Clostridial necrotic enteritis in chicken associated with growth rate depression

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    Adin Priadi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen causing necrotic enteritis. C. perfringens only causes necrotic enteritis when it transforms from non-toxin producing type to toxin producing type. The alpha toxin, (phospholipase C is believed to be a key to the occurrence of Clostridial necrotic enteritis (CNE. The best known predisposing factor is mucosal damage, caused by coccidiosis that damages the intestinal lining, making the gut susceptible to infections including C. perfringens. The purpose of this study was to observe the chicken performance in experimental CNE and field cases of CNE. Diagnosis of CNE were made by latex agglutination test, isolation and identification of the agent. Pathological and histopathological changes were also observed. Experimentally, NE could be reproduced when Eimeria sp and C. perfringens spores are inoculated in chicken. Signs of an NE are wet litter and diarrhea, and an increase in mortality is not often obvious. The depression of growth rate and feed efficiency of chicken become noticeable by week 5 because of damage to the intestine and the subsequent reduction in digestion and absorption of food. Subclinical form of CNE was also frequently found in the field, leading to significant decreases in performance. Chicken gut samples examinations revealed that subclinical form of CNE causes damage to the intestinal mucosa caused by C. perfringens leads to decreased digestion and absorption, increased feed conversion ratio and reduced weight gain. Dual infection with C. perfringens and Eimeria sp. was frequently found in field. The results of these studies provide evidence for C. perfringens as a causative bacteria for growth depression.

  8. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Lower Extremity Caused by Serratia marcescens A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heigh, Evelyn G; Maletta-Bailey, April; Haight, John; Landis, Gregg S

    2016-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and potentially fatal infection, with mortality of up to 30%. This case report describes a patient recovering from a laryngectomy for laryngeal squamous cell cancer who developed nosocomial necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity due to Serratia marcescens . Only eight cases of necrotizing fasciitis exclusive to the lower extremity due to S marcescens have been previously reported. Patients with S marcescens necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity often have multiple comorbidities, are frequently immunosuppressed, and have a strikingly high mortality rate.

  9. Necrotizing Lung Infection Caused by the Protozoan Balantidium coli

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    Sat Sharma

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Balantidium coli, a ciliated protozoan, is well known to cause intestinal infection in humans. Extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity and genitourinary tract has rarely been reported. There have also been a few cases of lung involvement from this parasite. A case of B coli causing a thick-walled right upper lobe cavity in an organic farmer who had contact with aerosolized pig manure is reported. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid examined for ova and parasite revealed trophozoites of B coli in large numbers. Treatment with doxycycline hyclate led to marked improvement. Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan B coli should be considered in individuals who report contact with pigs.

  10. Fatal Clostridial necrotizing enterocolitis in a term infant with gastroschisis

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    Kevin M. Riggle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is most often a disease of preterm infants, but can develop in full term infants with gastroschisis. The latter cases typically present later and have a milder clinical course; we present the first case of fatal Clostridium perfringes-associated NEC in a full term infant with gastroschisis. Our case highlights the need for a high index of clinical suspicion for Clostridial NEC when there is rapid progression of disease and/or evidence of hemolysis. When Clostridial NEC is suspected, we recommend treatment with penicillin G and clindamycin, as well as prompt, aggressive surgical intervention.

  11. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a Turkish case

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    Olcay Unver

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC is a rare form of acute encephalopathy of unknown etiology characterized by typical symmetrical lesions in the thalami, with variable involvement of the white matter, brainstem and cerebellum. Clinically there is a rapid neurologic deterioration after a short period of a nonspecific viral-like illness associated with gastrointestinal or respiratory signs. Asian children are especially affected. Here we present a 3-year-old boy admitted to our hospital with fever and deterioration of consciousness. The diagnosis of ANEC was made by radiologic findings [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 641-645

  12. Olanzapine-Induced Hypertriglyceridemia Resulting in Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Yadlapalli, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic agent that was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1996 for treatment of psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Since that time, numerous case reports have been published that describe the association of olanzapine and the development of pancreatitis. Furthermore, 3 reports suggest the mechanism of olanzapine-induced hypertriglyceridemia as the etiology of this progression. We report a case of a 36-year-old man who developed necrotizing pancreatitis secondary to olanzapine-induced hypertriglyceridemia. This case, to our knowledge, is the most severe case of this progression and the first case requiring plasmapheresis for acute management.

  13. Necrotizing (malignant otitis externa: An unusual localization of mucormycosis

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    Tuzcu A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant otitis externa (MOE is a severe infection of external auditory canal and skull base. A 17-year-old diabetic girl was admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis. Cellulitis of her right ear occurred on the second day of hospitalization and a black necrotic scar in the same region appeared on the next day. The lesion rapidly invaded to right side of neck and surrounding tissue of the patient. Therefore, antimycotic therapy was started. Unfortunately the patient died on seventh day of hospitalization because of probably extensive fungal invasion. Physicians should suspect MOE connected to mucormycosis especially in patients with cutaneous lesions of ear unresponsive to antibiotic therapy.

  14. Minor trauma triggering cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis from odontogenic abscess

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    Jain Shraddha; Nagpure Prakash; Singh Roohie; Garg Deepika

    2008-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the face and neck is a very rare complication of dental infection. Otolaryngologists and dentists should be familiar with this condition because of its similarity to odontogenic deep neck space infection in the initial stages, its rapid spread, and its life-threatening potential. Trauma has been reported to be an important predisposing factor for NF of the face. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 62-year-old man who developed NF of the...

  15. Medicolegal aspects of necrotizing fasciitis of the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, K; McFeeley, P J

    1987-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck (NFN) is a relatively rare, fulminating infectious process of the cervicofacial tissues which may cause sudden and unexpected death. Although often the result of a dental infection, injuries of the soft tissues of the neck may also initiate rampant cellulitis, and recognition of the underlying etiology of such cases is necessary to determine properly the manner of death. Five cases of NFN are presented with a review of the causative factors and usual bacteriology, and specific factors of medicolegal interest are addressed.

  16. Autopsy report of acute necrotizing opticomyelopathy associated with thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Y; Miyahara, M; Sakemi, T; Matsui, M; Ryu, T; Yamaguchi, M; Sasadomi, E; Sugihara, H

    1993-12-01

    We report an autopsied case of paraneoplastic necrotizing myelopathy. The patient had bilateral blindness, quadriplegia, and dyspnea of acute onset and died without remission 7 weeks later. The severe tissue necrosis and demyelination were found in the optic chiasm and from the medulla oblongata throughout the whole length of spinal cord. A papillary carcinoma was found in the thyroid gland at autopsy. In the present case IgG, myelin basic protein and activated helper T cells were increased in the CSF at onset, suggesting a mechanism of autoimmune demyelination for the condition.

  17. [Necrotizing periodontal disease: a manifestation of systemic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Escribano-Bermejo, Marta

    2005-11-19

    Necrotizing periodontal disease (NPD) is an infection characterized by gingival necrosis presenting as "punched-out" papillae, with gingival bleeding, and pain. Prevotella intermedia and spirochetes have been associated with the gingival lesions. Predisposing factors may include emotional stress, immunosuppression, especially secondary to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, cigarette smoking, poor diet and pre-existing gingivitis. During the last few years, diagnosis of NPD has became more important not only because of its contribution to the appearance of clinical attachment loss and gingival sequelae, but also because it has been revealed as a marker for immune deterioration in HIV-seropositive patients.

  18. Early dental implant failure in patient associated with oral bisphosphonates

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    Ridhimaa Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral bisphosphonates are routinely prescribed to post menopausal women. These have shown to increase the risk of osteonecrosis. However, this action may be augmented by local factors. A case report is presented showing an early implant failure in a patient taking oral bisphosphonates. Two implants were placed in left maxillary incisor area. Central incisor was associated with a previous endodontic failure and extraction. Lateral incisor was avulsed 3 years back. After 4 weeks of an implant placement, necrotic bone was evident along with the failing implant in central incisor area. This case report emphasizes on the incidence and an increased risk of implant failure in patients taking oral bisphosphonates.

  19. Occurrence of yeasts, enterococci and other enteric bacteria in subgingival biofilm of HIV-positive patients with chronic gingivitis and necrotizing periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetti-Jardim Júnior, Elerson; Nakano, Viviane; Wahasugui, Thais C; Cabral, Fátima C; Gamba, Rosa; Avila-Campos, Mario Julio

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of enteric bacteria and yeasts in biofilm of 80 HIV-positive patients with plaque-associated gingivitis or necrotizing periodontitis. Patients were subjected to extra, intra oral and radiographic examinations. The oral hygiene, bleeding on probing, gingival conditions, and attachment loss were evaluated. Clinical specimens were collected from gingival crevices or periodontal pockets, transferred to VMGA III, diluted and transferred to Sabouraud Dextrose agar with 100 μg/ml of chloramphenicol, peptone water, EVA broth, EMB agar, SS agar, Bile esculin agar and Brilliant green agar. Isolation of yeasts was carried out at room temperature, for 3-7 days; and for the isolation of enteric microorganisms plates were incubated at 37°C, for 24-48 h. The yeasts identification was performed according to the carbon and nitrogen assimilation, fermentation of carbohydrates and germ tube formation. Bacteria were identified according to their colonial and cellular morphologies and biochemical tests. Yeasts were identified as Candida albicans and its occurrence was more common in patients with CD4+ below 200/mm(3) and was affected by the extension of periodontal involvement (P = 0.0345). Enteric bacteria recovered from clinical specimens were identified as Enterobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia liquefaciens, Klebsiella oxytoca and Enterococcus sp. Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci were detected in 32.5% of clinical samples from patients with necrotizing periodontitis. In conclusion, non-oral pathogenic bacteria and C. albicans were more prevalent in periodontal sites of HIV-positive patients with necrotizing periodontitis and chronic gingivitis.

  20. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces a Predominantly Necrotic Cell Death via the Microenvironment.

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    François Virard

    Full Text Available Cold plasma is a partially ionized gas generated by an electric field at atmospheric pressure that was initially used in medicine for decontamination and sterilization of inert surfaces. There is currently growing interest in using cold plasma for more direct medical applications, mainly due to the possibility of tuning it to obtain selective biological effects in absence of toxicity for surrounding normal tissues,. While the therapeutic potential of cold plasma in chronic wound, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment is beginning to be documented, information on plasma/cell interaction is so far limited and controversial.Using normal primary human fibroblast cultures isolated from oral tissue, we sought to decipher the effects on cell behavior of a proprietary cold plasma device generating guided ionization waves carried by helium. In this model, cold plasma treatment induces a predominantly necrotic cell death. Interestingly, death is not triggered by a direct interaction of the cold plasma with cells, but rather via a transient modification in the microenvironment. We show that modification of the microenvironment redox status suppresses treatment toxicity and protects cells from death. Moreover, necrosis is not accidental and seems to be an active response to an environmental cue, as its execution can be inhibited to rescue cells.These observations will need to be taken into account when studying in vitro plasma/cell interaction and may have implications for the design and future evaluation of the efficacy and safety of this new treatment strategy.

  1. Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis in pneumoconiosis - Clinical and radiologic findings in 10 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T.; Usami, I.; Morita, H.; Goto, M.; Hosoda, M.; Nakamura, A.; Shima, S. [Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan). School of Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine

    2002-01-01

    The authors studied 10 male patients with pneumoconiosis who were seen at Asahi Rosai Hospital and received a clinical diagnosis of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA) during a 15-year period, and detailed the long-term clinical and radiologic courses of four cases. Their occupational histories included pottery making and coal mining. Chest radiographic findings by the International Labor Organization profusion grading system were greater than category 2. All patients were symptomatic, with a productive cough, haemoptysis, and dyspnea. Serum findings were positive for the aspergillosis antibody in seven patients. The radiologic findings consisted of parenchymal infiltrates and cavities mostly containing mycetoma, which generally involved the upper lobes. The disease progressed slowly; in one patient, broad destruction of the lung was observed after > 10 years without antifungal administration. Most of the patients experienced clinical and radiologic improvement after receiving antifungal therapy, by oral, inhaled, or intracavitary administration. It was concluded that chronic persistent or progressive upper-lobe infiltrates and cavities in patients with pneumoconiosis should raise the possibility of CNPA. Early diagnosis and initiation of effective therapy are recommended to achieve a better outcome.

  2. Effects of dietary selenium on host response to necrotic enteritis in young broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shouzhen; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Hong, Yeong Ho; Bravo, David

    2015-02-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation of young broiler chickens with an organic selenium (Se) formulation, B-Traxim Se, on experimental necrotic enteritis (NE) were studied. Chickens treated with three Se doses (0.25, 0.50, 1.00 mg/kg) from hatch were orally challenged with Eimeria maxima at 14 days of age followed by Clostridium perfringens to induce NE. Chickens fed with 0.50 mg/kg Se showed significantly increased body weights and antibody levels against NetB, and significantly reduced gut lesions compared with non-supplemented chickens. However, there were no significant differences in Eimeria oocyst shedding between the Se-treated and non-supplemented groups. Levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, iNOS, LITAF, TNFSF15, AvBD6, AvBD8, and AvBD13 transcripts were increased in the gut and spleen of at least one of the three Se-treated groups compared with the non-treated group. These results suggest that dietary supplementation of young broilers with Se might be beneficial to reduce the negative consequence of NE.

  3. Necrotizing Fasciitis Secondary to Aeromonas Infection Presenting with Septic Shock

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    Nikhil Bhatia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case of necrotizing fasciitis presenting with septic shock due to an Aeromonas infection. The patient cut his foot while mowing the lawn and then spent time in a pool with black mold. He began feeling ill and developed swelling and a quarter-sized black area on his right lower extremity. Despite being hemodynamically unstable with systolic blood pressure in the low 70s, the patient was transferred to our facility from outside hospital 100 miles away. Upon arriving to facility, the patient appeared to be septic and the infected area of skin had grown. Irrigation and debridement were performed and appropriate antibiotic therapy was given; however, the patient subsequently died on hospital day 8. On review of the literature, cases of necrotizing fasciitis due to Aeromonas infection have been treated successfully with the aforementioned therapy; however, there is high mortality associated with these infections, many times related to a delayed diagnosis. Our patient also had multiple poor prognostic factors including hepatic dysfunction and immunosuppression.

  4. Shewanella algae: a rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, Aditi L; Nassiri, Naiem; Pamoukian, Vicken N

    2014-06-01

    The genus Shewanella consists of motile, gram-negative, facultative anaerobes found in marine environments. Shewanella putrefaciens and Shewanella algae are the two species with documented pathogenicity in human beings. Most documented cases of S. algae infection worldwide have been reported in the context of bacteremia, cellulitis, and acute exacerbations of chronic otitis media in predisposed individuals. We report a rare case of necrotizing soft tissue infection by S. algae in an immunocompetent individual. The infection followed exposure to S. algae in contaminated water in New York City, New York. We reviewed the English-language literature on similar cases of soft tissue infection using PubMed. Search terms included "Shewanella algae" and "Shewanella putrefaciens" in conjunction with "necrotizing" and "infection." Cognizant that this search method may not have yielded early (pre-1985) reports about Shewanella because of changes in classification and nomenclature, we also searched for "Pseudomonas putrefaciens." After prompt surgical debridement and culture-directed antibiotic therapy, the patient recovered from his infection without the need for re-intervention. This case may reflect the geographic spread and emergence of S. algae infection in the United States. Clinicians should be aware of the virulence of S. algae and potential for the rapid clinical deterioration of persons it infects even among immunocompetent individuals.

  5. Medical image of the week: necrotizing soft tissue infection

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    Taylor A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 70-year-old man with a history of coronary artery disease, chronic back pain, and general debilitation presented to the emergency department with complaints of fever, weakness and right buttock discomfort. Physical exam was remarkable for a temperature of 101.7º F, and for moderate erythema of the skin of the right inguinal area and right buttock, with associated tenderness. Laboratory exam was significant for a WBC of 22.7 K/ɥL, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 82 mm, and serum creatinine phosphokinase of 2856 U/L. CAT of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated extensive gluteal and perineal soft tissue inflammation with gas formation, consistent with a necrotizing soft tissue infection (Figures 1 and 2. Three basic subsets of necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs have been described. Type I infections are the most common form and are characterized by a polymicrobial process typically involving gram positive cocci, gram negative rods, and anaerobes. Type I infections occur ...

  6. Characterization and identification of microbial communities in bovine necrotic vulvovaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpigel, N Y; Adler-Ashkenazy, L; Scheinin, S; Goshen, T; Arazi, A; Pasternak, Z; Gottlieb, Y

    2017-01-01

    Bovine necrotic vulvovaginitis (BNVV) is a severe and potentially fatal disease of post-partum cows that emerged in Israel after large dairy herds were merged. While post-partum cows are commonly affected by mild vulvovaginitis (BVV), in BNVV these benign mucosal abrasions develop into progressive deep necrotic lesions leading to sepsis and death if untreated. The etiology of BNVV is still unknown and a single pathogenic agent has not been found. We hypothesized that BNVV is a polymicrobial disease where the normally benign vaginal microbiome is remodeled and affects the local immune response. To this end, we compared the histopathological changes and the microbial communities using 16S rDNA metagenetic technique in biopsies taken from vaginal lesions in post-partum cows affected by BVV and BNVV. The hallmark of BNVV was the formation of complex polymicrobial communities in the submucosal fascia and abrogation of neutrophil recruitment in these lesions. Additionally, there was a marked difference in the composition of bacterial communities in the BNVV lesions in comparison to the benign BVV lesions. This difference was characterized by the abundance of Bacteroidetes and lower total community membership in BNVV. Indicator taxa for BNVV were Parvimonas, Porphyromonas, unclassified Veillonellaceae, Mycoplasma and Bacteroidetes, whereas unclassified Clostridiales was an indicator for BVV. The results support a polymicrobial etiology for BNVV.

  7. MR findings of subacute necrotizing myelopathy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Dong Gyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Jip; Kim, Chong Jai; Chi, Je G. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    Subacute necrotizing myelopathy(SNM) is a rare non-tumorous disease of spinal cord characterized by subacute clinical course of progressive neurological deterioration. We report MR findings of a patient with pathologically proved SNM. 1 case of pathologically proved subacute necrotizing myelopathy. The patients was a 56-year-old man with progressive motor weakness and sensory loss of the lower extremities, and urinary and fecal incontinence for 11 months. Spine MRI revealed diffuse enlargement of the thoracic spinal cord from T2 to T7 level. Signal intensity of the expanded spinal cord was isointense relative to normal cord on T1-weighted image and hyperintense on proton-density and T2-weighted images. On contrast enhanced T1-weighted image, there was diffuse homogeneous enhancement in the expanded cord lesion. MR demonstration of stable persistence of spinal cord lesion or atrophy over months or years with clinical findings of gradual progressive neurologic deterioration may be helpful in the diagnosis of SNM.

  8. Necrotizing Periodontal Diseases in a Semirural District of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Hamilton Wood

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this study was to characterize the lesions of necrotizing gingivitis (NG and necrotizing periodontitis (NP with regard to extent and severity, and to correlate these parameters with the host HIV serostatus, CD4+ T-cell count, neutrophil count, age, and gender. Methods. Eighty-four consecutive patients, 39 black females and 45 black males aged 20–46 years, diagnosed with NG/NP were recruited to the study over a period of two years. Results. For both HIV-seropositive and -seronegative patients, the mandibular anterior gingiva was most frequently affected; 74% had NG/NP affecting ≥5 gingival tooth sites. Ninety percent of all patients had a mean severity of ≤4 mm. There was no statistically significant association between either extent or severity of NG/NP and HIV serostatus, CD4+ T-cell count, neutrophil count, age, or gender. The difference between the number of HIV-seropositive patients with NG/NP who had CD4+ T-cell counts ≤200 cells/mm3 and those who had CD4+ T cell counts of 201–499 cells/mm3 was not statistically significant. Conclusion. The clinical signs of NG/NP are similar in HIV-seropositive and -seronegative patients, and are not related to CD4+ T-cell count, to neutrophil count, to gender, or to age.

  9. Establishment of a rat model for canine necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, E-S; Uchida, K; Nakayama, H

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenesis of necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME), necrotizing leukoencephalitis (NLE), and granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis (GME) is still uncertain, although they are considered immune-mediated diseases. The purpose of the present study is to generate a rodent model(s) of these diseases. Rats were injected with rat cerebral or cerebellar homogenate. Rats injected with cerebral homogenate (Cbr) exhibited vacuolar or malacic changes mainly in the cerebral cortex. CD3-positive T cells and Iba-1-positive and CD163-negative microglia infiltrated and activated around the lesions. IgG deposited in the glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP)-positive glia limitans from the early phase, and CD3-positive T cells attached to GFAP-positive astrocytes. Autoantibodies against GFAP were detected in the sera. These pathological features of Cbr rats were consistent with those of canine NME. In contrast, rats injected with cerebral homogenate (Cbe) exhibited demyelinating lesions with inflammatory reactions in the cerebellum, brainstem, and spinal cord. The presence of demyelination and autoantibodies against myelin proteins in Cbe rats was similar to murine experimental autoimmune encephalitis and differed from NME, NLE, and GME. All the present findings indicate that autoantibodies together with microglia and T cells may play a major role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic canine meningoencephalomyelitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis: management challenges in poor resource environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekanye, Abiola Grace; Umana, A N; Offiong, M E; Mgbe, R B; Owughalu, B C; Inyama, M; Omang, H M

    2016-09-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck is a rare and potentially fatal disease. It is a bacterial infection characterized by spreading along fascia planes and subcutaneous tissue resulting in tissue necrosis and likely death. It is commonly of dental or pharyngeal origin. Factors affecting the success of the treatment are early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotics and surgical debridement. Our study showed eight patients, five males and three females with mean age of 49.25 years (range 20-71 years). Clinical presentations were a rapidly progressing painful neck swelling, fever, dysphagia and trismus. The aetiology varied from idiopathic, pharyngeal/tonsillar infection, trauma and nasal malignancy. There were associated variable comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, HIV infection, hypertension and congestive cardiac failure). All the patients received early and aggressive medical treatment. The earliest time of surgery was 12 h after admission because of the poor financial status of patients. Three cases came in with complications of the disease and were not fit for extensive debridement under general anaesthesia. For them limited and reasonable bed side debridement was done. Mortality was 50 % from multiple organ failure, HIV encephalopathy, aspiration pneumonitis and septicemia. The duration of hospital stay for the patients that died ranged from 1 to 16 days and 4 to 34 days for the survivor. Our study heightens awareness and outlines the management challenges of necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck in a poor resource setting.

  11. MRI gadolinium enhancement precedes neuroradiological findings in acute necrotizing encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Tamura, Takuya; Nagai, Yuhki; Ueda, Hiroyuki; Awaya, Tomonari; Shibata, Minoru; Kato, Takeo; Heike, Toshio

    2013-11-01

    We report a 2-year-old Japanese boy with acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) triggered by human herpes virus-6, who presented insightful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. He was admitted due to impaired consciousness and a convulsion, 2 days after the onset of an upper respiratory infection. At admission, cranial MRI showed marked gadolinium enhancement at the bilateral thalami, brainstem and periventricular white matter without abnormal findings in noncontrast MRI sequences. On the following day, noncontrast computed tomography demonstrated homogeneous low-density lesions in the bilateral thalami and severe diffuse brain edema. The patient progressively deteriorated and died on the 18th day of admission. The pathogenesis of ANE remains mostly unknown, but it has been suggested that hypercytokinemia may play a major role. Overproduced cytokines cause vascular endothelial damage and alter the permeability of the vessel wall in the multiple organs, including the brain. The MRI findings in our case demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeability was altered prior to the appearance of typical neuroradiological findings. This suggests that alteration of blood-brain barrier permeability is the first step in the development of the brain lesions in ANE, and supports the proposed mechanism whereby hypercytokinemia causes necrotic brain lesions. This is the first report demonstrating MRI gadolinium enhancement antecedent to typical neuroradiological findings in ANE.

  12. NECROTIZING SOFT-TISSUE INFECTIONS (NSTIs: A REVIEW ARTICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyank

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing Soft-Tissue Infections (NSTI are a dreaded form of infections of the layers within the soft tissue compartment (dermis, subcutaneous tissue, superficial fascia, deep fascia, or muscle that are associated with necrotizing changes and systemic toxicity. These spread rapidly and carry high mortality (16%-24%. These infections can present with trivial features like small ulcers or mild cellulitis. Gram staining is important for empirical treatment and specific treatment starts after culture and sensitivity of the toxic fluid according to the organisms isolated. Even after the advancements of antibiotics, adequate surgical debridement remains the mainstay in limiting the spread of the infection. Novel therapeutic management like hyperbaric oxygen, Intravenous immunoglobulin have been developed but with limited success. Various prognostic scoring systems are present to predict the morbidity and mortality associated with these infections which help to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from the new therapeutic strategies. Care for patients with NSTIs requires an approach with expertise from critical care, surgery, reconstructive surgery, and rehabilitation specialists.

  13. Thoracic Wall Necrotizing Fasccitiss in a Neonate: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Onat

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a rapidly progressive and potentially life-threatening infection of superficial fascia and subcutaneous tissue. Thoracic wall is one of the rarest locations for NF. Broadspectrum antibiotics receiving, early surgical debridement, and skin grafting are life saving in NF. We report a 7-day-old female neonate who had left sided thoracic wall NF. She had undergone extensive surgical debridement within 4 hours of hospital admission, and reconstruction of skin defect by split-thickness skin grafting later. Early diagnosis is important, as prompt surgical debridement offers the best chance for survival. Early and extensive surgical debridement is a widely accepted clinical approach and the mainstay of effective treatment. The goals of surgical intervention are to remove all necrotic tissues, and to help control the progression of NF. Reconstruction of skin defects should be performed by early split-thickness skin grafting like our patient or primary closure. Because early wound resurfacing prevents fluid, electrolyte, and protein loss from the wound site, and decreases secondary infection. Although chest wall NF is rare in neonates, it is a rapidly spreading, highly lethal infection. A high index of suspicion, early diagnosis, and aggressive approach are essential to its successful treatment.

  14. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  15. Trichoderma L-Lysine-α-Oxidase Producer Strain Culture Fluid Inhibits Impatiens Necrotic Spot Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, I P; Shneider, Yu A; Karimova, E V

    2016-01-01

    A method for PCR diagnosis of impatiens necrotic spot virus is developed. Concentrated culture fluid with active L-lysine-α-oxidase (0.54 U/ml) from Trichoderma harzianum Rifai fungus producer strain F-180 inhibits vitally hazardous impatiens necrotic spot phytovirus.

  16. Necrotic cells trigger a sterile inflammatory response through the Nlrp3 inflammasome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S. Iyer; W.P. Pulskens; J.J. Sadler; L.M. Butter; G.J. Teske; T.K. Ulland; S.C. Eisenbarth; S. Florquin; R.A. Flavell; J.C. Leemans; F.S. Sutterwala

    2009-01-01

    Dying cells are capable of activating the innate immune system and inducing a sterile inflammatory response. Here, we show that necrotic cells are sensed by the Nlrp3 inflammasome resulting in the subsequent release of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 beta. Necrotic cells produced by pressure disru

  17. Effect of bismuth citrate, lactose, and organic acid on necrotic enteritis in broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium perfringens – associated necrotic enteritis causes significant losses and increased morbidity in poultry. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bismuth citrate and acidifiers on the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. The first study was a dose response t...

  18. A Conservative and Minimally Invasive Approach to Necrotizing Pancreatitis Improves Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Bollen, Thomas L.; Besselink, Marc G.; Ali, Usama Ahmed; Schrijver, A. Marjolein; Boermeester, Marja A.; van Goor, Harry; Dejong, Cornelis H.; van Eijck, Casper H.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; van der Harst, Erwin; Hofker, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Brink, Menno A.; Kruyt, Philip M.; Manusama, Eric R.; van der Schelling, George P.; Karsten, Tom; Hesselink, Eric J.; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J.; Rosman, Camiel; Bosscha, Koop; de Wit, Ralph J.; Houdijk, Alexander P.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Wahab, Peter J.; Gooszen, Hein G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Treatment of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis has become more conservative and less invasive, but there are few data from prospective studies to support the efficacy of this change. We performed a prospective multicenter study of treatment outcomes among patients with necrot

  19. A step-up approach or open necrosectomy for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C. van Santvoort; M.G. Besselink; O.J. Bakker; H.S. Hofker; M.A. Boermeester; C.H. Dejong; H. van Goor; A.F. Schaapherder; C.H. van Eijck; T.L. Bollen; B. van Ramshorst; V.B. Nieuwenhuijs; R. Timmer; J.S. Laméris; P.M. Kruyt; E.R. Manusama; E. van der Harst; G.P. van der Schelling; T. Karsten; E.J. Hesselink; C.J. van Laarhoven; C. Rosman; K. Bosscha; R.J. de Wit; A.P. Houdijk; M.S. van Leeuwen; E. Buskens; H.G. Gooszen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing pancreatitis with infected necrotic tissue is associated with a high rate of complications and death. Standard treatment is open necrosectomy. The outcome may be improved by a minimally invasive step-up approach. METHODS: In this multicenter study, we randomly assigned 88 pat

  20. A step-up approach or open necrosectomy for necrotizing pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santvoort, H.C. van; Besselink, M.G.; Bakker, O.J.; Hofker, H.S.; Boermeester, M.A.; Dejong, C.H.; Goor, H. van; Schaapherder, A.F.; Eijck, C.H. van; Bollen, T.L.; Ramshorst, B. van; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Timmer, R.; Lameris, J.S.; Kruyt, P.M.; Manusama, E.R.; Harst, E. van der; Schelling, G.P. van der; Karsten, T.; Hesselink, E.J.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Rosman, C.; Bosscha, K.; Wit, R.J. de; Houdijk, A.P.; Leeuwen, M.S. van; Buskens, E.; Gooszen, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing pancreatitis with infected necrotic tissue is associated with a high rate of complications and death. Standard treatment is open necrosectomy. The outcome may be improved by a minimally invasive step-up approach. METHODS: In this multicenter study, we randomly assigned 88 pat

  1. A Step-up Approach or Open Necrosectomy for Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; Boermeester, Marja A.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; van Goor, Harry; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; van Eijck, Casper H.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Timmer, Robin; Lameris, Johan S.; Kruyt, Philip M.; Manusama, Eric R.; van der Harst, Erwin; van der Schelling, George P.; Karsten, Tom; Hesselink, Eric J.; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J.; Rosman, Camiel; Bosscha, Koop; de Wit, Ralph J.; Houdijk, Alexander P.; van Leeuwen, Maarten S.; Buskens, Erik; Gooszen, Hein G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Necrotizing pancreatitis with infected necrotic tissue is associated with a high rate of complications and death. Standard treatment is open necrosectomy. The outcome may be improved by a minimally invasive step-up approach. METHODS In this multicenter study, we randomly assigned 88 patie

  2. A step-up approach or open necrosectomy for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C. van Santvoort (Hjalmar); M.G. Besselink (Marc); O.J. Bakker (Olaf ); H.S. Hofker (Sijbrand); M.A. Boermeester (Marja); C.H. Dejong (Cees); H. van Goor (Harry); A.F.M. Schaapherder (Alexander); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); T.L. Bollen (Thomas); B. van Ramshorst (Bert); V.B. Nieuwenhuijs (Vincent); R. Timmer (Robin); J.S. Laméris (Johan ); Ph.M. Kruyt (Philip); E.R. Manusama (Eric); E. van der Harst (Erwin); G. van der Schelling; T.M. Karsten (Thomas); E.J. Hesselink (Eric); C.J. van Laarhoven (Cees); C. Rosman (Camiel); K. Bosscha (Koop); R.J. de Wit (Ralph ); A.P. Houdijk (Alexander); M.S. Leeuwen (Maarten); E. Buskens (Erik); H.G. Gooszen (Hein)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Necrotizing pancreatitis with infected necrotic tissue is associated with a high rate of complications and death. Standard treatment is open necrosectomy. The outcome may be improved by a minimally invasive step-up approach. Methods: In this multicenter study, we randomly ass

  3. The use of negative pressure in critical necrotizing fasciitis treatment: a case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Kui; Xu, Bing; Wu, Jia-Jun; Wu, Minjie; Lu, Shuliang; Xie, Ting

    2014-09-01

    Surgery complemented by antibiotics forms the backbone of the successful management of necrotizing fasciitis. But it will be very difficult to clear away extensive necrotizing tissue thoroughly in critically ill patients when their vital signs are unstable. The authors report the case of a 33-year-old woman who had extensive necrotizing fasciitis of the right lower limb with septic shock. The patient was severely anemic and malnutrition and had been given conservative debridement at bedside, that is, only detached necrotizing tissues was taken away while some other necrotizing tissue still remained, so that the skin tissue within the same area could be saved as much as possible. After debridement, negative pressure was applied at 125 mm Hg. Broad-spectrum antibiotics and effective supplementation were also complemented, thus controlling the septic shock. All necrotizing tissues were detached, and the sparing vital skin on necrotizing fascia was preserved successfully after negative pressure treatment. The patient was finally saved. In conclusion, negative pressure treatment may help diminish toxin absorbance, detach gangrene tissue, and preserve sparing vital tissue. This case suggests the value of combined use of negative pressure therapy and conservative debridement in critically ill patients with extensive necrotizing fasciitis.

  4. Tigecycline salvage therapy for necrotizing fasciitis caused by Vibrio vulnificus: Case report in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-San; Hung, Min-Hsiang; Chen, Chi-Chung; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Ko, Wen-Chien; Tang, Hung-Jen

    2016-02-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Vibrio vulnificus is rarely reported in children. We describe a 12-year-old immunocompetent boy with necrotizing fasciitis caused by V. vulnificus. He was cured by radical and serial debridement and salvage therapy with intravenous cefpirome plus tigecycline. The in vitro antibacterial activity of combination regimens and a literature review of pediatric V. vulnificus infection are described.

  5. Necrotizing fasciitis in association with Ludwig’s angina – A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kavarodi, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    A 28 year old male diabetic patient developed Ludwig’s angina which subsequently evolved into cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis. The differential characteristic of Ludwig’s angina and cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis, as it relates to this rare presentation is discussed. The clinical and radiological features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management that resulted in a successful outcome are presented.

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis in association with Ludwig’s angina – A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavarodi, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    A 28 year old male diabetic patient developed Ludwig’s angina which subsequently evolved into cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis. The differential characteristic of Ludwig’s angina and cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis, as it relates to this rare presentation is discussed. The clinical and radiological features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management that resulted in a successful outcome are presented. PMID:24151421

  7. Paediatric necrotizing fasciitis complicating third molar extraction: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricalde, P; Engroff, S L; Jansisyanont, P; Ord, R A

    2004-06-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon but well-described entity. In the paediatric population compromising risk factors are frequently absent. We describe the successful treatment of a case of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in a healthy 14-year-old male following routine extraction of an uninfected wisdom tooth for orthodontic purposes.

  8. Nipple Sparing Mastectomy: Does Breast Morphological Factor Related to Necrotic Complications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakasit Chirappapha, MD

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Large glandular specimen increases the risk of NAC necrosis. The degree of ptosis and the distance between the sternal notch and the NAC have no significant impact on necrotic complications in NSM. To reduce the necrotic complications in large breast after NSM, reconstruction should better be performed with autologous flap or slow skin expansion using the expander technique.

  9. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the larynx associated with necrotizing sialometaplasia--a diagnostic challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Tomaas; Trolle, Waldemar; Kiss, Katalin

    2009-01-01

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a benign, self-limiting, inflammatory process involving salivary glands, commonly associated with tissue ischemia. Clinically, necrotizing sialometaplasia is most often found in the hard palate as a deep ulcer with raised, indurated edges that can be indolent. This,...

  10. Clinical diagnosis and treatment of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis in the orthodontic patient. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Rodríguez-Pulido

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: About 0.1% of the population suffers from necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, a disease of rapid progression and acute manifestation, which may progress to necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and eventually to bone sequestration and loss of gingival tissue. Case report: A 21-year-old female patient undergoing orthodontic treatment for six months, diagnosed with necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis due to acute pain in the gingival tissue, spontaneous bleeding, halitosis and abundant plaque. The treatment was conservative and effective, obtaining total remission of the lesion after seven days and three months of postoperative follow-up. Conclusion: Today there are no epidemiological or clinical reports that support the relationship of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and orthodontic treatment. Prevention is critical to the success of the treatment, which is why the dentist should recognize the clinical features of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis to raise awareness of its risks in the orthodontic patient.

  11. MOUTH FLOOR DIFFUSE SUPPURATION COMPLICATED BY CERVICOTHORACIC NECROTIZING FASCIITIS – A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta TRANDAFIR

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection, often life-threatening, characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous and fascial tissue, which can be extended along the fascial plans, affecting the adjacent vessels, nerves and muscle tissue. The predisposing factors of the disease include: advanced age, immuno-compromised bodies, diabetes, chronic alcoholism and chronic smoking. Necrotizing fasciitis in head and neck segments is rare, usually with an odontogenic source of infection. In the early stages of evolution, a necrotizing fasciitis is difficult to differentiate from the non-necrotizing infection of the soft tissue. Due to its extremely severe evolution, an early presumptive diagnosis is necessary (based on clinical and imaging aspects, as well as a prompt aggressive surgery backed by an intensive care support. The clinical case of an immunocompromised patient admitted for a mouth floor diffuse suppuration, previously complicated with cervicothoracic necrotizing fasciitis with aggressive evolution, is discussed in the following.

  12. Orbital necrotizing fasciitis and osteomyelitis caused by arcanobacterium haemolyticum: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Lindsay A; Harshbarger, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    The facial region is infrequently affected by necrotizing infections. Orbital necrotizing infections are even rarer, seen following trauma, local skin infection, and sinusitis. The authors report a unique case of orbital necrotizing fasciitis and osteomyelitis resulting from Arcanobacterium Haemolyticum ethmoid sinusitis. No prior occurrences of Arcanobacterial species orbital necrotizing fasciitis/osteomyelitis have been reported.A 16-year-old boy presented to the ER with a 3-day history of fever, chills, headache, and sinus pressure. CT scan revealed soft tissue swelling of the right orbit, forehead, and ethmoid sinusitis. Within 24 hours of admission, he suffered rapidly progressive swelling and erythema of the right orbit and forehead with diminished visual acuity, despite broad-spectrum antibiotics. Orbital exploration revealed frankly necrotic fascia and periosteum along the superior aspect. Lateral canthotomy, cantholysis, decompression of the optic nerve, and soft tissue debridement with bone biopsy was performed. Operative specimens isolated Arcanobacterium Haemolyticum. Pathologic examination revealed right orbital osteomyelitis.

  13. Analysis on clinical features of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi LI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical manifestations and auxiliary examination features of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM. Methods According to the inclusion criteria from European Neuromuscular Center (ENMC International Workshop on idiopathic inflammatory myopathies published in 2004, 57 patients were diagnosed as NAM from 107 patients with necrotizing myopathy (NM. The risk factors, clinical symptoms, laboratory tests, electrocardiography (ECG, electromyography (EMG, skeletal muscle MRI and muscle pathology were retrospectively analyzed. Results There were more female patients than male patients (male∶female = 1.00∶1.59, with the peak onset age during 40 to 59 years old (43.86% , 25/57 in this study. Clinical types included idiopathic NAM, NAM with connective tissue disease, statin-associated NAM and NAM with cancer. Muscle weakness mainly affected proximal muscle, while it may simultaneously affect distal muscle (28.07% , 16/57. Serum creatine kinase (CK elevated apparently (420-15 320 U/L. Serum anti-signal recognition particle (SRP antibodies were detected in 24 out of 44 patients (54.55%. A total of 41 in 45 patients (91.11% were detected myogenic damage on EMG, and 15 patients (33.33%, 15/45 also had spontaneous potentials. Thigh muscle MRI showed edema in 25 out of 27 patients (92.59% and fatty infiltration in 16 out of 27 patients (59.26% . Other than necrotic fibers, major histocompatibility complex-1 (MHC-1 on sarcolemma were positive in 98.25% (56/57 cases, and membrane attack complex (MAC deposition on capillary walls was detected in 92.98% (53/57 cases. Conclusions NAM can happen in all ages, mainly during 40 to 59 years old. Idiopathic NAM is the main type. Its main manifestation involves weakness of proximal muscle, sometimes with distal muscle. Extra-muscle symptoms are rare. Serum anti-SRP antibodies are common in NAM and edema is prominent change in thigh MRI. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.10.009

  14. Oral Thrush

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feeding mothers In addition to the distinctive white mouth lesions, infants may have trouble feeding or be fussy ... candidiasis (yeast infection) patient information. American Academy of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology. http://www.aaomp.org/public/oral-candidiasis.php. ...

  15. Oral Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 規子; スズキ, ノリコ; Noriko, SUZUKI

    2004-01-01

    The major oral functions can be categorized as mastication, swallowing, speech and respiratory functions. Dysfunction of these results in dysphagia, speech disorders and abnormal respiration (such as Sleep Apnea). These functions relate to dentistry in the occurrence of : (1) oral preparatory and oral phases, (2) articulation disorders and velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI), and (3) mouth breathing, respiratory and blowing disorders. These disorders are related to oral and maxillofacial diseas...

  16. The Role of the Intestinal Microcirculation in Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Daniel J.; Besner, Gail E.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) continues to be a devastating inflammatory disease of the newborn intestine. Despite advances in management, morbidity and mortality remain high. While it is clear that intestinal ischemia plays a large role in disease pathogenesis, attempts to link NEC to intestinal macrovascular derangement have been largely unsuccessful. More recently, there has been a concerted effort to characterize the pathologic changes of the intestinal microcirculation in response to intestinal injury, including NEC. This microcirculatory regulation is controlled by a balance of vasoconstrictor and vasodilator forces. Vasoconstriction is mediated primarily by endothelin-1 (ET-1) while vasodilation is mediated primarily by nitric oxide (NO). These chemical mediators have been implicated in many aspects of intestinal ischemic injury and NEC, with the balance shifting towards increased vasoconstriction associated with intestinal injury. With a proper understanding of these antagonistic forces, potential therapeutic avenues may result from improving this pathologic microcirculatory dysregulation. PMID:23611611

  17. Flesh-Eating Disease: A Note on Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Dele Davies

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been much media attention in the past few years to the condition dubbed 'flesh-eating disease', which refers, primarily, to a form of invasive group A beta hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS infection that leads to fascia and muscle necrosis. In 1999, the Canadian Paediatric Society issued a statement on the state of knowledge and management of children, and close contacts of persons with all-invasive GABHS disease (1. The present note is intended to deal specifically with necrotizing fasciitis (NF by providing an update on the limited current state of knowledge, diagnosis and management. Surveillance to establish actual national rates and epidemiology of NF through the Canadian Paediatric Society is proposed.

  18. Necrotizing enterocolitis--150 years of fruitless search for the cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is not a new disease but one that has been reported since special care units began to house preterm infants. It was observed in foundling hospitals in Paris [Billard, 1828] and Vienna [Bednar, 1850] and, as it occurred in clusters, was regarded as a nosocomial infection in the infant hospitals of Zurich [Willi, 1944] and Berlin [Ylppo, 1931]. Clinical and patho-anatomic characterization was achieved by Schmidt and Quaiser in 1952. The unproven hypothesis of mesenteric hypoperfusion as a major etiological factor arose from animal models and analogous perforating disorders in term infants. Despite similarities between NEC and clostridial infections, few studies employed anaerobic culture techniques. The pathogenesis remains unclear and its distinction from related disorders uncertain. It is unlikely that strategies to prevent NEC will be successful unless the disease is better understood.

  19. Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC: what’s going on

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    Mario De Curtis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is among the most common and devastating diseases in neonates and, despite the significant advances in neonatal care and clinical and basic science investigations, its etiology remains incompletely understood, specific treatment strategies are lacking, and morbidity and mortality from this disease remain high. Recent improvements in the pathophysiology of NEC may have therapeutic consequences. Toll-like receptors and intestinal microflora play an increasing role in the pathogenesis of NEC. Pharmacologic inhibition of TLR signaling, the use of novel nutritional strategies, and microflora modulation may represent novel promising approaches to the prevention and treatment of NEC. This review focuses on current and future therapeutic perspectives, starting from the recent acquisitions in the pathogenic mechanisms of NEC. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  20. Kikuchi's disease (histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis): report of one case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, C H; Yang, W; Tsai, Y C; Huang, P H

    1999-01-01

    Kikuchi's disease (histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis) is a self-limited disease of unknown cause. The disease often presents with persistently intermittent fever and enlarged cervical lymph nodes. It usually occurs in adult group and is unresponsive to antibiotic therapy. The diagnosis can be confirmed by histopathological findings of lymph node in open biopsy. We report a pediatric case of Kikuchi's disease in an 8-year-8-month-old school-age boy with generalized lymphadenopathy. He was hospitalized under the impression of fever of unknown origin. A diagnosis of Kikuchi's disease was made by cervical lymph node histology. Reviewing the literature of Kikuchi's disease, we found very few reports in young pediatric group. We conclude that Kikuchi's disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin in children, even in the absence of cervical lymphadenopathy.

  1. Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and the orthodontic patient: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangani, Indiya; Watt, Eileen; Cross, David

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) can be a painful periodontal disease that can lead to loss of the interdental papillae. It is usually accompanied by systemic signs of fever, malaise and cervical and submandibular lymphadenopathy. It is caused by the profileration of anaerobic bacteria and has been linked to smoking and immunosuppression. This case series reports the occurrence of NUG in orthodontic patients and demonstrates that there is a varying scale of severity of the condition. Orthodontists should be aware of the clinical signs of NUG to ensure early detection and treatment of their patients in order to prevent irreversible loss of the interdental papillae and reduce the likelihood of recurrence. A treatment regime is suggested.

  2. Necrotizing gastritis associated with Clostridium septicum in a rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jorge P; Moore, Janet; Loukopoulos, Panayiotis; Diab, Santiago S; Uzal, Francisco A

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium septicum is the causative agent of histotoxic infections, including malignant edema and braxy (necrotizing abomasitis) in several animal species. The carcass of a 2-year-old, female New Zealand white rabbit with a history of acute depression and obtundation followed by death was received at the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System (San Bernardino, California) for necropsy and diagnostic workup. No gross lesions were detected at necropsy. Microscopically, there was moderate to severe, multifocal fibrinonecrotizing, transmural gastritis with numerous intralesional Gram-positive, sporulated rods, and disseminated thrombosis of the brain, lungs, heart, and liver, with occasional intravascular rods. The rods observed within the gastric wall and thrombi in the stomach and lung were positive for C. septicum by immunohistochemical staining. However, this microorganism was not isolated from stomach content. Clostridium septicum should be included in the list of possible etiologies of gastritis in rabbits.

  3. ANALYSIS OF DEATH FACTORS FOR ACUTE HEMORRHAGIC NECROTIZING PANCREATITIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To analyse the factors affecting the mortality of acute hemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis (AHNP). Methods:One hundred and twelve patients with AHNP were retrospectively divided into two groups--the dead and survivors. Some parameters were analysed statistically.Results:The average age,sex ratio and onset of illness were similar between two groups. The difference of early shock, early ARDS, high body temperature, leukocytosis and high blood glucose between two groups were not significant. The important factors affecting the mortality were: severe pancreatic necrosis; incorrect therapeutic surgery;improper surgical methods.Conclusion: The patients with mild or moderate AHNP should mainly receive conservative treatment for 48~72 hours. The early shock and ARDS should be corrected before surgical intervention, the swelling pancreas should be dissected fully and duodenostomy should be performed in operation.

  4. Acute necrotizing herpetic tonsillitis: a report of two cases.

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    Borhan, Walaa M; Dababo, Mohammed A; Thompson, Lester D R; Saleem, M; Pashley, N

    2015-03-01

    The finding of herpetic tonsillitis is rare. Tonsillectomies are usually done for children with recurrent chronic tonsillitis, while viral throat infections are generally self-limiting. We present two cases: A 5 year-old girl, with atypical hemolytic anemia managed with Eculizumab, who presented with a pharyngeal infection and tonsillar enlargement that did not respond to intravenous antibiotics or antifungal therapies; and a 30 year-old man who presented with upper airway obstruction and fever; bilateral tonsillectomies were performed. Histopathological examination showed a necrotizing tonsillitis with numerous ground-glass intranuclear inclusions, characteristic of herpes viral infection, further confirmed by Herpes simplex virus in situ hybridization. Both patients were managed by intravenous Acyclovir, with dramatic improvement.

  5. Management of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Its Surgical Aspects.

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    Sun, Xiaofang; Xie, Ting

    2015-12-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a severe and rapidly progressive infectious disease that attacks superficial an as well as deep fascia, subcutaneous fat tissue, and muscle. Although the incidence is of relatively low frequency, the median mortality is high. NF is a great burden to patients and hospitals. The most common cause of NF is trauma injuries, followed by other conditions with comorbidity. A classification for NF was presented concerning microbial cause, depth of infection, and anatomy. But the value of classification is not convincing. Early diagnosis of NF is essential and still to be realized by far. Information from clinic or laboratory might contribute to the purpose. Surgery is used in exploration debridement and tissue reconstruction as the main method with NF. Negative pressure wound therapy has proved to be useful in improving wound bed preparation and healing.

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis secondary to enterocutaneous fistula: three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guo-Li; Wang, Lin; Wei, Xue-Ming; Li, Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-06-28

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon, rapidly progressive, and potentially fatal infection of the superficial fascia and subcutaneous tissue. NF caused by an enterocutaneous fistula has special clinical characters compared with other types of NF. NF caused by enterocutaneous fistula may have more rapid progress and more severe consequences because of multiple germs infection and corrosion by digestive juices. We treated three cases of NF caused by postoperative enterocutaneous fistula since Jan 2007. We followed empirically the principle of eliminating anaerobic conditions of infection, bypassing or draining digestive juice from the fistula and changing dressings with moist exposed burn therapy impregnated with zinc/silver acetate. These three cases were eventually cured by debridement, antibiotics and wound management.

  7. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis. A devastating complication of blepharoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, A M; Bressler, K; Davis, R E; Gallo, J F; Patete, M L

    1997-06-01

    We report a case of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis that developed after blepharoplasty, an occurrence that, to our knowledge, has not previously been reported in the medical literature. A patient who presented to our institution 3 days after undergoing blepharoplasty of the upper eyelid was diagnosed as having fulminant fasciitis involving extensive areas of the face, scalp, and neck. We review the case in detail and discuss clinical and radiological clues to diagnosis, surgical and medical management, wound care, and subsequent scar contracture. This case emphasizes the need for individualized, appropriate postoperative care and for an awareness of this rare, potentially fatal complication. Early recognition and aggressive treatment of cervicofacial fasciitis can arrest its rapid progression and prevent devastating sequelae.

  8. Minor trauma triggering cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis from odontogenic abscess

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    Jain Shraddha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis (NF of the face and neck is a very rare complication of dental infection. Otolaryngologists and dentists should be familiar with this condition because of its similarity to odontogenic deep neck space infection in the initial stages, its rapid spread, and its life-threatening potential. Trauma has been reported to be an important predisposing factor for NF of the face. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 62-year-old man who developed NF of the face and neck following bilateral odontogenic deep neck space abscesses. The disease progressed rapidly, with necrosis of the skin, after the patient inflicted minor trauma in the form of application of heated medicinal leaves. The organism isolated in culture from pus was Acinetobacter sp . The comorbid conditions in our patient were anemia and chronic alcoholism. The patient was managed by immediate and repeated extensive debridements and split-skin grafting.

  9. Minor trauma triggering cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis from odontogenic abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shraddha; Nagpure, Prakash S; Singh, Roohie; Garg, Deepika

    2008-07-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the face and neck is a very rare complication of dental infection. Otolaryngologists and dentists should be familiar with this condition because of its similarity to odontogenic deep neck space infection in the initial stages, its rapid spread, and its life-threatening potential. Trauma has been reported to be an important predisposing factor for NF of the face. In this paper, we describe the presentation and treatment of a 62-year-old man who developed NF of the face and neck following bilateral odontogenic deep neck space abscesses. The disease progressed rapidly, with necrosis of the skin, after the patient inflicted minor trauma in the form of application of heated medicinal leaves. The organism isolated in culture from pus was Acinetobacter sp. The comorbid conditions in our patient were anemia and chronic alcoholism. The patient was managed by immediate and repeated extensive debridements and split-skin grafting.

  10. Surgical Findings in Transfusion-Associated Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couselo, Miguel; Fonseca, Rosa; Mangas, Lucía; Vila, Juan José

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The extent of intestinal damage in transfusion-associated necrotizing enterocolitis (TNEC) has been scarcely studied. The aim of this investigation was to study surgical findings in TNEC and determine their severity considering the extent of the disease and risk of bowel perforation. Materials and Methods Neonates who required surgical treatment for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) were studied retrospectively. Patients who developed NEC within 48 hours after a red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) formed group TR48 and patients who did not receive a RBCT 48 hours before the diagnosis of NEC became group CN (conventional NEC). Both groups were compared: main outcomes were the extent of the disease (isolated, multifocal, or panintestinal), the existence of perforated NEC, and mortality. Categorical variables were analyzed with the chi-square test and continuous variables with the Mann-Whitney u-test. The relationship between RBCTs 48 hours before the diagnosis and the extent of intestinal disease was evaluated by ordinal logistic regression. Results Forty-seven patients were included in the study: 16 patients in TR48 and 31 in CN. The odds ratio of multifocal or panintestinal NEC for patients in TR48 was 0.5 (95% CI: 0.148-1.68). Neonates in TR48 had a relative risk (RR) of perforated NEC of 1.2 (95% CI: 0.76-1.85). The RR of death was 1.55 (95% CI: 0.76-3.14) in group TR48. Conclusion No differences in surgical findings between TR48 and CN could be demonstrated in this investigation; therefore, the hypothesis that intestinal damage might be more severe in TNEC was not confirmed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. [Emergency Keratoplasty with Porcine Xenografts in Necrotizing Keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozhzhyna, Galyna I; Gaidamaka, Tetiana B; Cursiefen, Claus; Bachmann, Björn O; Ivanovska, Olena V; Ostashevsky, Viktor L; Kogan, Boris M; Usov, Volodymyr J; Pasyechnikova, Natalija V

    2017-07-06

    Background The great shortage of donor material in Ukraine makes it necessary to find additional sources of transplant material. A possible suitable material are the porcine corneas, as they are similar in structure and biomechanical parameters to the human cornea. The purpose of our study was to analyze the results of therapeutic keratoplasty (KP) with keratoxenotransplants from cryolyophilized porcine corneas in patients with severe necrotizing keratitis. Methods A retrospective analysis of 32 xenotransplantations patients with severe necrotizing keratitis (17 lamellar, 6 stepped perforating, 4 perforating, 5 "biological coverage" according to Puchkovskaya) was completed. Results All eyes could be preserved, but the graft was rejected in all eyes. A semitransparent xenograft (XG) was achieved in 9 patients (33.3%). The best results were obtained after lamellar XKP with an XT diameter of 3.5 - 6.5 mm. Lamellar XTs with larger diameters (7.0 - 10.0 mm) were opaque. Postoperatively, the intensity of the inflammatory response after stepped XKP was slightly lower than that of the classical perforating XKP. A new KP with human corneas had to be performed in 5 patients, in one case combined with an antiglaucomatous operation and in another case with cataract extraction. Antiglaucomatous surgery had to be performed in 5 patients (15.6%). Conclusion In the absence of human donor corneas, a porcine keratoxenoimplant can be used as temporary therapeutic keratoplasty in case of emergency stop the inflammation process and to save the eye. In cases of keratoxenoimplant, a poor visual outcome is expected. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Necrotizing Keratitis Caused by Acyclovir-Resistant Herpes Simplex Virus

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    Koji Toriyama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report a case of necrotizing keratitis caused by acyclovir (ACV-resistant herpes simplex virus (HSV with a clinical appearance similar to a previous fungal keratitis infection. Methods: Observational case report. Results: Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in the left eye with a history of herpetic keratitis that resolved with periodic treatment with ACV ointment and a topical steroid. The left eye was painful and red with an abscess and corneal erosion in the peripheral donor cornea. Examination of the scraped corneal epithelium by light microscopy and culturing identified Candida albicans; polymerase chain reaction (PCR was negative for human herpes viruses. After antifungal treatment, the ocular pain gradually decreased and the lesions slowly improved but recurred with a similar clinical appearance. A second light microscopy examination and cultures were negative for pathogens including C. albicans. PCR was positive for HSV-1 DNA; treatment with 3% topical ACV ointment was unsuccessful. A third examination showed only HSV-1 DNA. Despite antiviral ACV ointment, no clinical improvement occurred based on the HSV DNA copy numbers, which were the same before and after treatment, indicating a possible ACV-resistant strain. When topical trifluorothymidine was substituted for ACV, clinical improvement occurred and the HSV DNA copy numbers decreased. Conclusion: Necrotizing keratitis induced by ACV-resistant HSV occurred independently after fungal keratitis, with a similar clinical appearance in this case, making diagnosis and treatment difficult. Monitoring the HSV DNA load by real-time PCR could be useful for refractory cases even with atypical clinical appearances.

  13. Current concepts in the management of necrotizing fasciitis

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    Evangelos P. Misiakos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe, rare, potentially lethal soft tissue infection that develops in the scrotum and perineum, the abdominal wall or the extremities. The infection progresses rapidly, and septic shock may ensue; hence, the mortality rate is high (median mortality 32.2%. Prognosis becomes poorer in the presence of co-morbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression, chronic alcohol disease, chronic renal failure and liver cirrhosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is classified into four types, depending on microbiological findings. Most cases are polymicrobial, classed as type I. The clinical status of the patient varies from erythema, swelling and tenderness in the early stage to skin ischemia with blisters and bullae in the advanced stage of infection. In its fulminant form, the patient is critically ill with signs and symptoms of severe septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction. The clinical condition is the most important clue for diagnosis. However, in equivocal cases, the diagnosis and severity of the infection can be secured with laboratory-based scoring systems, such as the LRINEC score or FGSI score, especially in regard to Fournier’s gangrene. Computed tomography or ultrasonography can be helpful, but definitive diagnosis is attained by exploratory surgery at the infected sites.Management of the infection begins with broad spectrum antibiotics, but early and aggressive drainage and meticulous debridement constitute the mainstay of treatment. Postoperative management of the surgical wound is also important for the patient’s survival, along with proper nutrition. The vacuum-assisted closure system has proved to be helpful in wound management, with its combined benefits of continuous cleansing of the wound and the formation of granulation tissue.

  14. Mesoglycan treatment restores defective fibrinolytic potential in cutaneous necrotizing venulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, T; Celasco, G; Tsampau, D; Teofoli, P; Benci, M; Dahm, M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I; Matucci-Cerinic, M

    1993-05-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing venulitis (CNV) is a clinical disorder associated with segmental inflammation and fibrinoid necrosis of the dermal venules. It usually presents clinically as palpable purpura, even sometimes as nodules, bullae, ulcers, and urticarial lesions. This form, when showing as leukocytoclastic vasculitis is apparently characterized by the tissue deposition of circulating immune complexes and by reduced cutaneous (CFA) and plasma (PFA) fibrinolytic activity due to reduced release of plasminogen activator (PA) from the venular endotheliocytes. Reduced CFA and PFA cause large amounts of fibrin deposits in both intra- and perivascular areas, which are able to magnify and self perpetuate the inflammatory processes following immune complex deposition. We have studied both the PFA and CFA potential (the maximum amount of PA released in the skin after certain stimuli) and the deposits of immunoglobulins, C3, and fibrin related antigen, before and after intradermal injection of histamine (a substance able to provoke endothelial release of PA), in three subjects affected by CNV before and 20 days after 10 mg/kg/day I.M. treatment with the fibrinolytic agent mesoglycan. Cutaneous fibrinolytic activity and CFA potential, reduced prior to treatment, was normal after treatment, while the deposits of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG and IgM), C3, and fibrin related antigen, detected with direct immune fluorescence (DIF) showed similar findings before and after treatment. These data suggest that reduced CFA may play a major role in the pathogenesis of the immunologically mediated injury in CNV. The intraperivascular deposition of fibrin is favored. The fibrinolytic agent mesoglycan seems effective in restoring defective fibrinolysis in patients affected by cutaneous necrotizing venulitis, suggesting that in cases with reduced cutaneous fibrinolytic activity (or potential) the use of a fibrinolytic agent should be considered.

  15. Necrotizing Fasciitis Resulting from Human Bites: A Report of Two Cases of Disease Caused by Group A Streptococci

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    Christopher A Sikora

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. Although bite wounds are common, they are not frequently reported as a cause of necrotizing fasciitis. In the present article, two cases of bite-associated necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus are reported. Previously published cases are also reviewed.

  16. Chemical facial cellulitis due to inadvertent injection of formalin into oral tissue space

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    Aditi Bector

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the accidental injection of formalin into oral tissue space, in an 8-year old child resulting in chemical facial necrotizing cellulitis and its management. The common practice of keeping formalin in local anesthesia vials should be avoided by dental clinics, to prevent such unfortunate incidents.

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus: the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nai-Chen; Wang, Jann-Tay; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Tai, Hao-Chih; Tang, Yueh-Bih

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an uncommon causative agent of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis, but we have noted several cases over the years. The patients treated for necrotizing fasciitis between January 1998 and December 2008 in our institution were identified, and their medical records were reviewed. Of 105 necrotizing fasciitis cases during the study period, 18 were caused by monomicrobial S. aureus infection (17%). The median age was 62 years (range, 12-81 years). Among this cohort, 10 patients had coexisting medical conditions or risk factors, including diabetes and hypertension. Lower limbs and upper limbs are the most commonly involved sites. Among the bacterial isolates from these cases, 8 were methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and 10 were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). One patient died in the MSSA group, and 5 patients died in the MRSA group. The mortality rate and other clinical characteristics were not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, all MRSA necrotizing fasciitis developed after the year 2000, and it was significantly different from MSSA necrotizing fasciitis that predominantly took place before the year 2000. In conclusion, S. aureus is an important pathogen of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis, and MRSA has emerged as the predominant causative agent in recent years. Therefore, MRSA-directed antibiotic therapy should be considered when treating patients suspected with necrotizing fasciitis in endemic areas.

  18. Retroperitoneal Necrotizing Fasciitis Masquerading as Perianal Abscess – Rare and Perilous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaranathan, Anandhi; Barathi, Deepak; Shankar, Gomathi; Sistla, Sarath Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is one of the uncommon presentations of a rapidly spreading subcutaneous tissue infection. Although the actual cause is unclear in many cases, most of them are due to the rapid proliferation of microorganisms. Retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis is extremely rare. It is a potentially lethal infection that requires immediate and aggressive surgical care. Early diagnosis is the key to a better prognosis. The possibility of retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis should be suspected in patients with symptoms of sepsis that are disproportionate to clinical findings. The rapid deterioration of the patient also gives a clue towards the diagnosis. We report a 35-year-old male with perianal abscess who had been progressed to retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis. The patient was managed successfully with aggressive debridement and drainage after laparotomy. Appropriate antibiotics were used to combat the sepsis. The patient recovered well at follow up, three months after discharge. Another patient, a 45-year-old male with a retroperitoneal abscess, progressed to retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis, and extra peritoneal drainage and debridement was done. Antibiotics depending upon the culture and sensitivity were used to control sepsis. But the patient succumbed to death 45 days after surgery due to uncontrolled sepsis. Necrotizing fasciitis of any anatomical site needs aggressive surgical care with early intervention. But retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis needs an extra effort for diagnosis. After diagnosis, it needs timely surgical intervention and appropriate antibiotic therapy for the recovery of the patients. PMID:28229030

  19. Necrotic Cells Actively Attract Phagocytes through the Collaborative Action of Two Distinct PS-Exposure Mechanisms.

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    Zao Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Necrosis, a kind of cell death closely associated with pathogenesis and genetic programs, is distinct from apoptosis in both morphology and mechanism. Like apoptotic cells, necrotic cells are swiftly removed from animal bodies to prevent harmful inflammatory and autoimmune responses. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, gain-of-function mutations in certain ion channel subunits result in the excitotoxic necrosis of six touch neurons and their subsequent engulfment and degradation inside engulfing cells. How necrotic cells are recognized by engulfing cells is unclear. Phosphatidylserine (PS is an important apoptotic-cell surface signal that attracts engulfing cells. Here we observed PS exposure on the surface of necrotic touch neurons. In addition, the phagocytic receptor CED-1 clusters around necrotic cells and promotes their engulfment. The extracellular domain of CED-1 associates with PS in vitro. We further identified a necrotic cell-specific function of CED-7, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter family, in promoting PS exposure. In addition to CED-7, anoctamin homolog-1 (ANOH-1, the C. elegans homolog of the mammalian Ca(2+-dependent phospholipid scramblase TMEM16F, plays an independent role in promoting PS exposure on necrotic cells. The combined activities from CED-7 and ANOH-1 ensure efficient exposure of PS on necrotic cells to attract their phagocytes. In addition, CED-8, the C. elegans homolog of mammalian Xk-related protein 8 also makes a contribution to necrotic cell-removal at the first larval stage. Our work indicates that cells killed by different mechanisms (necrosis or apoptosis expose a common "eat me" signal to attract their phagocytic receptor(s; furthermore, unlike what was previously believed, necrotic cells actively present PS on their outer surfaces through at least two distinct molecular mechanisms rather than leaking out PS passively.

  20. Multi-limb necrotizing fasciitis in a patient with rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shirley Yuk Wah Liu; Simon Siu Man Ng; Janet Fung Yee Lee

    2006-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a devastating soft tissue infection affecting fascias and subcutaneous soft tissues. Literature reviews have identified several related risk factors,including malignancy, alcoholism, malnutrition, diabetes, male gender and old age. There are only scanty case reports in the literature describing its rare association with colorectal malignancy. All published cases areattributed to bowel perforation resulting in necrotizing fasciitis over the perineal region. Isolated upper or lower limb diseases are rarely identified. Simultaneous upper and lower limb infection in colorectal cancer patients has never been described in the literature. We report an unusual case of multi-limb necrotizing fasciitis in a patient with underlying non-perforated rectal carcinoma.

  1. Presentation and outcomes of necrotizing soft tissue infections

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    Chen KJ

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Kuan-Chin Jean Chen,1 Michelle Klingel,2 Shelley McLeod,3 Sean Mindra,4 Victor K Ng5 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, 2Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Schwartz/Reisman Emergency Medicine Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, 4Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, 5Division of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, Western University, London, ON, Canada Background: Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs are aggressive infections associated with significant morbidity, including amputation and organ failure, and high mortality. The rapid progression and significant risk of morbidity and mortality associated with NSTIs makes quick diagnosis and treatment critical. The objective of this study was to determine the presentation of patients diagnosed with NSTIs and their in-hospital outcomes. Methods: This was a retrospective review of adult (>17 years patients with a discharge diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis at London Health Sciences Centre (annual census 125,000 over a 5-year period (April 2008–March 2013. Results: Sixty patients with confirmed NSTI were included in this study. Common comorbidities at presentation included immunocompromise (58.3%, diabetes mellitus (41.7%, vascular disease (45.0%, and obesity (24.6%. Initial presentations included swelling (91.7%, erythema (86.7%, bullae (28.3%, petechiae (8.3%, and bruising (45.0%. Fifty (83.3% underwent surgery, with a median (interquartile range time from initial emergency department presentation to surgery of 15.5 hours (7.8, 74.9. In-hospital mortality among those who had surgical intervention was 14.0%, compared to 60.0% for patients who did not have surgery (Δ46.0%; 95% CI: 14.8% to 70

  2. Fatores associados à enterocolite necrosante Factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis

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    Maria Teresa Campos Vieira

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar as formas de apresentação clínica da enterocolite necrosante neonatal e os fatores associados à doença. MÉTODOS: estudo retrospectivo dos casos de enterocolite necrosante neonatal (ECN (n = 56 ocorridos na UTI Neonatal Lagoa, entre dezembro de 1986 e julho de 1992. O diagnóstico e estadiamento da doença seguiram o critério de Bell modificado. Foram avaliados o diagnóstico e a evolução de todos os casos. Posteriormente, foram selecionados os casos de enterocolite grau II e III (n =44 e comparados com um grupo controle (n = 44, selecionado pelo peso de nascimento (± 250g e época de internação (± 2 semanas. Para a análise estatística, foi considerado significante p OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the features of clinical presentation of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis and its associated factors. METHODS: retrospective study of the cases of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (n = 56 diagnosed at Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Lagoa (NICU, between December 1986 and July 1992. Diagnosis and stages of the disease followed the modified Bell's criteria. Diagnosis and follow-up of all cases were evaluated. The cases of enterocolitis - degrees II and III (n = 44 - were subsequently selected and compared to a case-control group (n = 44, selected according to birthweight ( 250 g and hospitalization period ( 2 weeks. The statistically significant analysis was considered as p < 0.05. RESULTS: out of 2,447 newborns admitted to the NICU, 56 (2.3% presented enterocolitis. Mean weight was 1908.5 g; mean gestational age was 35 weeks and 1 day; mean period for diagnosis was 10.7 days; 51 (91.1% patients were fed before diagnosis; 18 (32.1% needed urgent surgery; nine (16.9% hemocultures were positive; 10 (17.8% patients died. Four clinical standards were observed: fulminant, acute with pneumatosis, insidious and suspect. Comparatively to the case-control group, three factors were significantly associated with enterocolitis: apnea (p = 0

  3. Amniotic fluid-borne hepatocyte growth factor protects rat pups against experimental necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sunil K; Baggerman, Eric W; Mohankumar, Krishnan; Namachivayam, Kopperuncholan; Jagadeeswaran, Ramasamy; Reyes, Victor E; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2014-03-01

    Fetal swallowing of amniotic fluid, which contains numerous cytokines and growth factors, plays a key role in gut mucosal development. Preterm birth interrupts this exposure to amniotic fluid-borne growth factors, possibly contributing to the increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature infants. We hypothesized that supplementation of formula feeds with amniotic fluid can provide amniotic fluid-borne growth factors and prevent experimental NEC in rat pups. We compared NEC-like injury in rat pups fed with infant formula vs. formula supplemented either with 30% amniotic fluid or recombinant hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Cytokines/growth factors in amniotic fluid were measured by immunoassays. Amniotic fluid and HGF effects on enterocyte migration, proliferation, and survival were measured in cultured IEC6 intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, we used an antibody array to investigate receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation and immunoblots to measure phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Amniotic fluid supplementation in oral feeds protected rat pups against NEC-like injury. HGF was the most abundant growth factor in rat amniotic fluid in our panel of analytes. Amniotic fluid increased cell migration, proliferation, and cell survival in vitro. These effects were reproduced by HGF and blocked by anti-HGF antibody or a PI3K inhibitor. HGF transactivated several RTKs in IEC6 cells, indicating that its effects extended to multiple signaling pathways. Finally, similar to amniotic fluid, recombinant HGF also reduced the frequency and severity of NEC-like injury in rat pups. Amniotic fluid supplementation protects rat pups against experimental NEC, which is mediated, at least in part, by HGF.

  4. Efficacy test of a hydrolysable tannin extract against necrotic enteritis in challenged broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Tosi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A hydrolysable tannin extracted from chestnut (SaviotaN® was tested for efficacy in controlling the proliferation of Clostridium perfringens in the gut of broiler chickens challenged via oral gavage first with coccidia (Eimeria tenella, Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria maxima at the age of 10 days, and then with Clostridium perfringens at the age of 15 days. We randomly allocated 150 broiler chickens within 5 poultry isolators (30 birds each. Dietary treatments consisted of a basal diet (C composed of corn [575 g/kg on dry matter (DM] and soybean meal (100 g/kg DM, barley bran (220 g/kg DM, corn gluten feed (30 g/kg DM, soybean oil (25 g/kg DM, vitamin mineral premix (49.5 g/kg DM, and four other diets obtained by adding chestnut tannin extract (1.5, 3, 5, and 12 g/kg during week 1, 10.0 g/kg during week 2, and 8.0 g/kg during the last two weeks, respectively to C. At the age of 20 days, 15 birds/group were euthanised and individually examined for the level of gut infection by counting Clostridium perfringens and macroscopic gut lesions. Results demonstrated that chestnut tannin gave significant results even at low concentration levels in the feed (1.5 to 3.0 g/kg, but was actually efficient in controlling necrotic enteritis at levels ≥5.0 g/kg. The treatment (12.0 g/kg during the first week and 8.0 g/kg during the last two weeks of age resulted very efficient in controlling the proliferation of Clostridium perfringens and in reducing the severity of gut damage compared to the untreated infected group. 

  5. Electroretinogram Changes in the Sound Eye of Subjects with Unilateral Necrotizing Herpetic Retinitis

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    Mohsen Azarmina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate electroretinogram (ERG changes in the contralateral normal appearing eye of patients with unilateral acute necrotizing herpetic retinitis (NHR. Methods: This interventional case series includes subjects with acute unilateral NHR. All patients were treated with intravenous followed by oral acyclovir and systemic steroids. Main outcome measures were changes in a- and b-wave amplitudes of scotopic and photopic full-field ERG in the sound eye, 1 and 3 months after therapy as compared to baseline. Twenty normal subjects served as controls. Results: Forty eyes of 20 patients including 12 male and 8 female subjects with mean age of 44.1±11.5 (range 22 to 66 years were studied. Twenty unaffected eyes were the subject of the current study. The retina in all of these eyes remained intact during the course of the study. In the sound eyes, mean b-wave amplitude of the maximal combined response ERG before initiation of treatment was 229.5±38.8 microvolts which increased to 356.1±34.0 (P<0.001 and 365.8±32.7 (P<0.001 microvolts 1 and 3 months after treatment, respectively. Corresponding figures for b-wave amplitudes of the cone response ERG were 24.9±6.0, 47.0±12.9 (P<0.001 and 52.8±12.7 (P<0.001 microvolts, respectively. Visual acuity of all sound eyes remained unchanged throughout the study. Conclusion: Despite normal retinal appearance and intact visual acuity in the sound eyes of patients with NHR, electrophysiological changes were observed. Prompt diagnosis and management of NHR and continuation of medication for 3 months may reverse subclinical ERG changes and reduce the risk of progression to overt clinical disease.

  6. Oropharyngeal administration of mother's milk to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in extremely low-birth-weight infants: theoretical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Nancy A; Caplan, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    The oropharyngeal administration of mother's milk-placing drops of milk onto the infant's oral mucosa-may serve as a preventative strategy against necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) for extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW: birth weight milk to ELBW infants may serve to expose the infant's oropharynx to protective (immune and trophic) biofactors (also present in amniotic fluid) and may protect the infant against NEC. Emerging evidence suggests that this intervention may have many benefits for extremely premature infants including protection against bacteremia, NEC, and ventilator-associated pneumonia, an earlier attainment of full enteral feeds, enhanced maturation of oral feeding skills, improved growth, and enhanced breast-feeding outcomes. While more research is needed to definitively establish safety and efficacy of this intervention, this article will examine biological plausibility and will describe the theoretical mechanisms of protection against NEC for ELBW infants who receive this intervention. Nurses play a key role in advancing the science and practice of this intervention. Future directions for research and implications for nursing practice will also be presented.

  7. Oral histoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Karthikeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal disease that takes various clinical forms, among which oral lesions are rare. The disseminated form of the disease that usually occurs in association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV is one of the AIDS-defining diseases. Isolated oral histoplasmosis, without systemic involvement, with underlying immunosuppression due to AIDS is very rare. We report one such case of isolated oral histoplasmosis in a HIV-infected patient.

  8. Marine Bacteria as a Leading Cause of Necrotizing Fasciitis in Coastal Areas of South Korea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Kyung-Hwa; Jung, Sook-In; Jung, Young-Sun; Shin, Jong-Hee; Hwang, Jae-Ha

    2009-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening soft-tissue infection. It is useful to know the etiology of this disease in each community and region because this information can facilitate early diagnosis and treatment...

  9. Klebsiella pneumoniae Causing Necrotizing Fasciitis in a Patient With Thalassaemia Major

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    Kwan Kenny

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of Klebsiella pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in a patient with thalassaemia major. Klebsiella sp. is known to cause severe infections in patients with thalassaemia, with high mortality rates.

  10. Fulminant necrotizing fasciitis following the use of herbal concoction: a case report

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    Nasir Abdulrasheed A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and life-threatening rapidly progressive soft tissue infection. A fulminant case could involve muscle and bone. Necrotizing fasciitis after corticosteroid therapy and intramuscular injection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been reported. We present a case of fulminant necrotizing fasciitis occurring in a patient who used a herbal concoction to treat a chronic leg ulcer. Case presentation A 20-year-old Ibo woman from Nigeria presented with a three-year history of recurrent chronic ulcer of the right leg. She started applying a herbal concoction to dress the wound two weeks prior to presentation. This resulted in rapidly progressive soft tissue necrosis that spread from the soft tissue to the bone, despite aggressive emergency debridement. As a result she underwent above-knee amputation. Conclusion The herbal concoction used is toxic, and can initiate and exacerbate necrotizing fasciitis. Its use for wound dressing should be discouraged.

  11. A Case of Postsurgical Necrotizing Fasciitis Invading the Rectus Abdominis Muscle and Review of the Literature

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    Francesco Carbonetti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening, soft tissue infection and an early diagnosis is needed to permit a prompt surgical and medical intervention. Due to the high fatal potential of the disease complications, the radiologist should distinguish necrotizing fasciitis from the most common soft tissue infections, in order to permit a prompt surgical and medical treatment. We present a case of a wide necrotizing fasciitis who presented at our emergency department and we also provide the basic tools, through a review of the literature, for the general radiologist to distinguish, with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, necrotizing fasciitis from the most common infections that could present during our routine practice.

  12. Laboratory risk indicators for acute necrotizing fasciitis in the emergency setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shayan Ali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare bacterial skin condition which forms a major diagnostic challenge and is associated with poor prognosis unless promptly treated. Initial clinical presentation is often misleading with characteristic features developing only late in the course of the disease. In this review, we discuss the applicability and usefulness of laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis score in facilitating rapid diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis in emergency department by differentiating it from other skin infections like cellulitis and abscesses. A high index of suspicion resulting from the laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis score can facilitate early diagnosis enabling prompt antibiotic administration and timely referral to surgery for wound debridement, ultimately reducing both the morbidity and mortality.

  13. Analysis of Treatment-Related Factors Affecting Mortality in Patients with Severe Necrotizing Acute Pancreatitis

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    Praznik Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to determine the factors related to the initial therapy that may contribute to death from severe necrotizing acute pancreatitis and to analyze their clinical importance as well as possible additive effects.

  14. Postnatal amniotic fluid intake reduces gut inflammatory responses and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siggers, Jayda; Østergaard, Mette V.; Siggers, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Preterm neonates are susceptible to gastrointestinal disorders such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Maternal milk and colostrum protects against NEC via growth promoting, immunomodulatory, and antimicrobial factors. The fetal enteral diet amniotic fluid (AF), contains similar components, and we...

  15. A distinct tospovirus causing necrotic straek on alstroemeria sp. in Colombia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehraban, A.; Botermans, M.; Verhoeven, J.Th.J.; Meekes, E.; Saaijer, J.; Peters, D.; Goldbach, R.W.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A tospovirus causing necrotic streaks on leaves was isolated from Alstroemeria sp. in Colombia. Infected samples reacted positively with tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) antiserum during preliminary serological tests. Further analysis revealed a close serological relationship to tomato chlorotic spo

  16. Protection against avian necrotic enteritis after immunisation with NetB genetic or formaldehyde toxoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes da Costa, Sérgio P; Mot, Dorien; Bokori-Brown, Monika; Savva, Christos G; Basak, Ajit K; Van Immerseel, Filip; Titball, Richard W

    2013-08-20

    NetB (necrotic enteritis toxin B) is a recently identified β-pore-forming toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens. This toxin has been shown to play a major role in avian necrotic enteritis. In recent years, a dramatic increase in necrotic enteritis has been observed, especially in countries where the use of antimicrobial growth promoters in animal feedstuffs has been banned. The aim of this work was to determine whether immunisation with a NetB toxoid would provide protection against necrotic enteritis. The immunisation of poultry with a formaldehyde NetB toxoid or with a NetB genetic toxoid (W262A) resulted in the induction of antibody responses against NetB and provided partial protection against disease.

  17. Fatal streptococcal toxic shock syndrome in a child with varicella and necrotizing fasciitis of the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minodier, Philippe; Chaumoitre, Kathia; Vialet, Renaud; Imbert, Guenièvre; Bidet, Philippe

    2008-08-01

    The report described here presents a fatal streptococcal toxic shock syndrome secondary to a necrotizing fasciitis of the face in a 3-year-old girl with varicella. Pathogenesis and treatment of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are discussed below.

  18. CEREBROSPINAL FLUID FROM PRETERM PIGS WITH NECROTIZING ENTEROCOLITIS HAS ALTERED CYTOKINE PROFILE AND PROMOTES HIPPOCAMPAL NEURITOGENESIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Sun, J.; Li, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants is associated with neurodevelopmental delay and cerebral palsy. We hypothesized that intestinal NEC lesions affect inflammatory cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which in turn may affect neurite differentiation. Methods...

  19. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis complicating Takayasu's arteritis with a review of cutaneous manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, A R; Marafie, A A; Dajani, A I

    1985-06-01

    We report a case of a 32-year-old man with chronic active Takayasu's arteritis complicated by cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Symptoms of the early phase of his disease coexisted with complications of the late phase.

  20. Fulminant cerebral infarction of anterior and posterior cerebral circulation after ascending type of facial necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Ho; Choi, Hui-Chul; Kim, Chulho; Sohn, Jong Hee; Kim, Heung Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a soft tissue infection that is characterized by extensive necrosis of the subcutaneous fat, neurovascular structures, and fascia. Cerebral infarction after facial necrotizing fasciitis has been rarely reported. A 61-year-old woman with diabetes was admitted with painful swelling of her right cheek. One day later, she was stuporous and quadriplegic. A computed tomographic scan of her face revealed right facial infection in the periorbital soft tissue, parotid, buccal muscle, and maxillary sinusitis. A computed tomographic scan of the brain revealed cerebral infarction in the right hemisphere, left frontal area, and both cerebellum. Four days later, she died from cerebral edema and septic shock. Involvement of the cerebral vasculature, such as the carotid or vertebral artery by necrotizing fasciitis, can cause cerebral infarction. Facial necrotizing fasciitis should be treated early with surgical treatment and the appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  1. Necrotizing Faciitis after shoulder mobilization and intra-articular infiltration with betametasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento-Rodrigues, Joana; Judas, Fernando; Pedrosa Rodrigues, Jorge; Oliveira, João; Simões, Pedro; Lucas, Francisco; Pais Lopes, António

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing Fasciitis is a rapidly progressive, potentially fatal infection of superficial fasciae and subcutaneous tissue, usually resulting from an inciting trauma to the skin. Medical literature refers few cases of necrotizing fasciitis related to intra-articular infiltrations, that often lead to patients death. This report describes the clinical events on a 55 year-old diabetic patient who developed upper extremity Necrotizing Fasciitis, 18 days after shoulder mobilization and intra-articular infiltration, due to Staphylococcus epidermidis. An early surgical debridement was performed and antibiotherapy was established, resulting in a successful outcome, despite the functional disability. We point out, through this case, the possibility of intra-articular injections of drugs causing Necrotizing Fasciitis, especially in risk patients.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor α antibody prevents brain damage of rats with acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Ling Yang; Ji-Peng Li; Kai-Zong Li; Ke-Feng Dou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the protective effects of tumor necrosis factor á (TNFα) antibody on pancreatic encephalopathy in rats.METHODS:One hundred and twenty SD rats were randomly divided into normal control group,acute necrotizing pancreatitis group and TNFα antibody treated group.Acute hemorrhage necrotizing pancreatitis model in rats was induced by retrograde injection of 50 g/L sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct.Serum TNFα was detected and animals were killed 12 h after drug administration.Changes in content of brain water,MDA and SOD as well as leucocyte adhesion of brain microvessels were measured.RESULTS:In TNFα antibody treated group,serum TNFálevel was decreased.Content of brain water,MDA and SOD as well as leucocyte adhesion were decreased significantly in comparison with those of acute necrotizing pancreatitis group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION:TNFα antibody can alleviate the brain damage of rats with acute hemorrhage necrotizing pancreatitis.

  3. Laboratory risk indicators for acute necrotizing fasciitis in the emergency setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Syed Shayan Ali; Fatimah Lateef

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare bacterial skin condition which forms a major diagnostic challenge and is associated with poor prognosis unless promptly treated. Initial clinical presentation is often misleading with characteristic features developing only late in the course of the disease. In this review, we discuss the applicability and usefulness of laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis score in facilitating rapid diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis in emergency department by differentiating it from other skin in-fections like cellulitis and abscesses. A high index of suspicion resulting from the lab-oratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis score can facilitate early diagnosis enabling prompt antibiotic administration and timely referral to surgery for wound debridement, ultimately reducing both the morbidity and mortality.

  4. A Case of Brucellosis Associated with Histiocytic Necrotizing Lymphadenitis: A Diagnostic Pitfall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Dalton Wheeler

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Human cases of brucellosis are rare in the United States and difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a young female who underwent a diagnostic investigation of fever of unknown origin, which included a lymph node biopsy. The biopsy was consistent with Kikuchi’s Disease, or histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, an entity where the major differential diagnosis is systemic lupus erythematosus. Interestingly, serologic studies supported the diagnosis of brucellosis. Brucellosis has rarely been associated with histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis. This association has never been reported in the United States, thus suggesting that brucellosis should be considered in the differential for histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, along with lupus-like autoimmune disease. As the prognosis and treatment of histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, brucellosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus are distinct, it is important to differentiate these entities. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2013; 1(5.000: 274-279

  5. Skin grafting for necrotizing fasciitis in a child with nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Narendra; Saha, Abhijeet; Dubey, Nandkishore K; Rai, Ashish; Bhattacharya, Sameek

    2013-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare complication of nephrotic syndrome in children, with a high mortality rate. We report a case with successful outcome with judicious intravenous antibiotics and skin grafting of the bilateral lower thighs.

  6. Atypical presentation of cervical necrotizing fasciitis. Case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Moraga.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a soft tissue infection with a low incidence, characterized by rapid progression and high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this report is to communicate the case of a patient diagnosed with cervical NF and its successful management. A 54-year-old male consulted after suffering from the condition for seven days. It was characterized by bilateral submandibular swelling, accompanied by fever, dysphagia, odynophagia, which were severely affecting the patient’s general health. Physical examination revealed a painful, erythematous cervical swelling. A cervical computed tomography scan was performed, revealing a gaseous collection in the left mucosal pharyngeal space, extending to the glottis, associated with significant deep plane soft tissue emphysema onon the left side of the neck and with possible involvement of the danger space; pertinent lab findings include 19,190/uL leukocytes and 219mg/L CRP. Broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy was initiated with ceftriaxone and clindamycin. Exploratory surgery, lavage and drainage of the collected material were performed. Streptococcus anginosus was isolated by culture. The patient recovered appropriately showing improvement in clinical as well as in inflammatory parameters, being discharged on the ninth day. He is currently receiving periodical checkups in the surgery polyclinic.

  7. Demographics, Microbiology and Outcome in Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chance Witt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI are potentially severe infections that have a high morbidity and mortality even with modern medical care. This study examines factors associated with outcomes in patients with NSTI in an academic tertiary care hospital. Design: This is a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted with NSTI between 2003 and 2008. Baseline demographics and comorbid conditions, laboratory and clinical parameters, timing of surgery, and outcomes, including length of stay and mortality, were compared with univariate analysis; significant factors were then analyzed for their effects on mortality using binary logistic regression analysis. Results: Sixty-nine patients with NSTI were analyzed; 61% were men. Diabetes (39% was the most common comorbid condition. Most infections (55% were polymicrobial. The most common organism in monomicrobial infections was Staphylococcus aureus, and 50 % of these isolates were methicillin resistant. Nine patients (13% required amputation. Mortality was 20%, and the most significant predictor of mortality was a higher respiratory rate on admission (p=0.02. Conclusion: Patients in this series frequently had diabetes, usually had polymicrobial infections, and had a 20% mortality rate.

  8. Novel Phaeoacremonium species associated with necrotic wood of Prunus trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, U; Mostert, L; Crous, P W; Fourie, P H

    2008-06-01

    The genus Phaeoacremonium is associated with opportunistic human infections, as well as stunted growth and die-back of various woody hosts, especially grapevines. In this study, Phaeoacremonium species were isolated from necrotic woody tissue of Prunus spp. (plum, peach, nectarine and apricot) from different stone fruit growing areas in South Africa. Morphological and cultural characteristics as well as DNA sequence data (5.8S rDNA, ITS1, ITS2, beta-tubulin, actin and 18S rDNA) were used to identify known, and describe novel species. From the total number of wood samples collected (257), 42 Phaeoacremonium isolates were obtained, from which 14 species were identified. Phaeoacremonium scolyti was most frequently isolated, and present on all Prunus species sampled, followed by Togninia minima (anamorph: Pm. aleophilum) and Pm. australiense. Almost all taxa isolated represent new records on Prunus. Furthermore, Pm. australiense,Pm. iranianum, T. fraxinopennsylvanica and Pm. griseorubrum represent new records for South Africa, while Pm. griseorubrum, hitherto only known from humans, is newly reported from a plant host. Five species are newly described, two of which produce a Togninia sexual state. Togninia africana, T. griseo-olivacea and Pm. pallidum are newly described from Prunus armeniaca, while Pm. prunicolum and Pm. fuscum are described from Prunus salicina.

  9. Management of patient with necrotizing fasciitis: a challenge for anaesthesiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Mahajan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Necrotising fasciitis, a highly lethal infection of deep seated subcutaneous tissue and fascia, is associated with high mortality and long term morbidity. A five year old child of necrotizing fasciitis with poor general condition, deranged investigations and unstable vitals was posted for debridement. After initial resuscitation, TIVA was given, intraoperative period was uneventful and post operatively patient was shifted to recovery room as fully conscious with O2 by face mask. After 1 and frac12; hours, patient became drowsy, hypotensive with bradycardia and urine output was nil. Immediate resuscitation started and vasopressors added. Despite all aggressive interventions, the patient died due to sepsis induced multiorgan failure. Blood samples and wound aspirate culture showed group A beta hemolytic Streptococcous. In this case report we discuss the best possible management of such patients and tried to minimize several barriers like lack of early recognition of severe sepsis and septic shock, treatment delay, lack of several investigations and drugs, shortage of health care providers, absence of locally written protocol, remote area and tried to give the massage that adherence to published guidelines for the management of severe sepsis patients lowers mortality. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 763-766

  10. ACUTE BILATERAL VIRAL NECROTIZING RETINITIS : AN UNCOMMON CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Ku.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A 22 year old male with a history of high grade fever 2 days, diarrhea 3 times and vomiting 2 times presented with diminution of vision in right eye of 1 days duration. His best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was counting finger 1 meter with no pin hole im provement and 20/20 ( S nellen ’ s in the right and left eye respectively. Fundus examination RE revealed white lesion in geographic fashion with clear edge involving macula and in left eye small peanut size white lesion present at paramacular area. Clinicall y a diagnosis of acute necrotizing was made. We started treatment by intra venous antiviral and systemic steroid. ELISA (serum and PCR (aqueous were positive for herpes simplex virus ( I ndex above 1.1 i.e. 1.54 . 1,2 The lesions showed a good response to t he above treatment. At 2 months follow - up, lesion had resolved well with BCVA of 20/40 and 20/20 in right and left eye respectively

  11. An update on necrotizing enterocolitis: pathogenesis and preventive strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Hoon Lee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is one of the most critical morbidities in preterm infants. The incidence of NEC is 7% in very-low-birthweight infants, and its mortality is 15 to 30%. Infants who survive NEC have various complications, such as nosocomial infection, malnutrition, growth failure, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, and neurodevelopmental delays. The most important etiology in the pathogenesis of NEC is structural and immunological intestinal immaturity. In preterm infants with immature gastrointestinal tracts, development of NEC may be associated with a variety of factors, such as colonization with pathogenic bacteria, secondary ischemia, genetic polymorphisms conferring NEC susceptibility, anemia with red blood cell transfusion, and sensitization to cow milk proteins. To date, a variety of preventive strategies has been accepted or attempted in clinical practice with regard to the pathogenesis of NEC. These strategies include the use of breast feeding, various feeding strategies, probiotics, prebiotics, glutamine and arginine, and lactoferrin. There is substantial evidence for the efficacy of breast feeding and the use of probiotics in infants with birth weights above 1,000 g, and these strategies are commonly used in clinical practice. Other preventive strategies, however, require further research to establish their effect on NEC.

  12. Is it lucio phenomenon or necrotic erythema nodosum leprosum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PSS Ranugha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lucio phenomenon (LP or erythema necroticans is a relatively rare, peculiar reaction pattern occurring in untreated lepromatous (LL or borderline lepromatous (BL leprosy cases. A 38-year-old male, a cook by occupation, was referred to the dermatology clinic from otolaryngology department with blistering over both the hands and feet of 2 days duration. He had been admitted 1 week back with epistaxis and nasopharyngeal myiasis in otolaryngology department. He was started on systemic antibiotics gentamycin, crystalline penicillin, and metronidazole with nasal instillation of turpentine oil 2 drops 6 times a day. Two days later, he had developed edema with painless hemorrhagic blistering over the dorsum of left hand followed by involvement of the right hand, dorsa of both feet, and both the earlobes within a day. Histopathology of the blister showed sub-epidermal blister, with necrotizing leukocytoclastic vasculitis of papillary dermal vessels with thrombosis, numerous acid-fast bacilli in macrophages, and macrophage granulomas extending up to subcutis. In view of the absent fever or constitutional symptoms, and the classical angular infarcts and hemorrhagic blisters evolving into ulcers with angulated margins, we considered LP as the most likely diagnosis. The patient was started on a combination of WHO recommended multibacillary anti-leprosy therapy and prednisolone (40 mg/day.

  13. Severe Necrotizing Adenovirus Tubulointerstitial Nephritis in a Kidney Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Parasuraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (AdV are emerging pathogens with a prevalence of 11% viruria and 6.5% viremia in kidney transplant recipients. Although AdV infection is common, interstitial nephritis (ADVIN is rare with only 13 biopsy proven cases reported in the literature. We report a case of severe ADVIN with characteristic histological features that includes severe necrotizing granulomatous lesion with widespread tubular basement membrane rupture and hyperchromatic smudgy intranuclear inclusions in the tubular epithelial cells. The patient was asymptomatic at presentation, and the high AdV viral load (quantitative PCR>2,000,000 copies/mL in the urine and 646,642 copies/mL in the serum confirmed the diagnosis. The patient showed excellent response to a combination of immunosuppression reduction, intravenous cidofovir, and immunoglobulin therapy resulting in complete resolution of infection and recovery of allograft function. Awareness of characteristic biopsy findings may help to clinch the diagnosis early which is essential since the disseminated infection is associated with high mortality of 18% in kidney transplant recipients. Cidofovir is considered the agent of choice for AdV infection in immunocompromised despite lack of randomized trials, and the addition of intravenous immunoglobulin may aid in resolution of infection while help prevention of rejection.

  14. Human milk is the feeding strategy to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, Diana; Schanler, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    Human milk is the preferred diet for preterm infants as it protects against a multitude of NICU challenges, specifically necrotizing enterocolitis. Infants who receive greater than 50% of mother's own milk (MOM) in the 2 weeks after birth have a significantly decreased risk of NEC. An additional factor in the recent declining rates of NEC is the increased utilization of donor human milk (DHM). This creates a bridge until MOM is readily available, thus decreasing the exposure to cow milk protein. Preterm infants are susceptible to NEC due to the immaturity of their gastrointestinal and immune systems. An exclusive human milk diet compensates for these immature systems in many ways such as lowering gastric pH, enhancing intestinal motility, decreasing epithelial permeability, and altering the composition of bacterial flora. Ideally, preterm infants should be fed human milk and avoid bovine protein. A diet consisting of human milk-based human milk fortifier is one way to provide the additional nutritional supplements necessary for adequate growth while receiving the protective benefits of a human milk diet.

  15. Necrotic stercoral colitis: Importance of computed tomography findings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Hsien Wu; Li-Jen Wang; Yon-Cheong Wong; Chen-Chih Huang; Chien-Cheng Chen; Chao-Jan Wang; Jen-Feng Fang; Chuen Hsueh

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the computed tomography (CT) signs in facilitating early diagnosis of necrotic stercoral colitis(NSC).METHODS: Ten patients with surgically and pathologically confirmed NSC were recruited from the Clinico-Pathologic-Radiologic conference at Chang Gung MemorialHospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan. Their CT images and medical records were reviewed retrospectively to correlate CT findings with clinical presentation.RESULTS: All these ten elderly patients with a mean age of 77.1 years presented with acute abdomen at our Emergency Room. Nine of them were with systemic medmedical disease and 8 with chronic constipation. Seven were with leukocytosis, two with low-grade fever, two with peritoneal sign, and three with hypotensive shock. Only one patient was with radiographic detected abnormal gas. Except the crux of fecal impaction, the frequency of the CT signs of NSC were, proximal colon dilatation (20%),colon wall thickening (60%), dense mucosa (62.5%),mucosal sloughing (10%), perfusion defect (70%),pericolonic stranding (80%), abnormal gas (50%) with pneumo-mesocolon (40%) in them, pericolonic abscess(20%). The most sensitive signs in decreasing order were pericolonic stranding, perfusion defect, dense mucosal,detecting about 80%, 70%, and 62.5% of the cases, respectively.CONCLUSION: Awareness of NSC and familiarity with the CT diagnostic signs enable the differential diagnosis between NSC and benign stool impaction.

  16. Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 Contributes to Escherichia coli Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsien Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available E. coli is the most common Gram-negative bacteria causing neonatal meningitis, and E. coli meningitis continues to be an important cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. Recent reports of E. coli meningitis caused by antimicrobial resistant strains are a particular concern. These findings indicate that a novel strategy is needed to identify new targets for prevention and therapy of E. coli meningitis. Cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1 is a bacterial virulence factor associated principally with E. coli strains causing urinary tract infection and meningitis. We have shown that CNF1 contributes to E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier and penetration into the brain, the essential step in the development of E. coli meningitis, and identified the host receptor for CNF1, 37-kDa laminin receptor precursor (37LRP. CNF1, however, is a cytoplasmic protein and its contribution to E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier requires its secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm. No signal peptide is found in the CNF1 sequence. CNF1 secretion is, therefore, a strategy utilized by meningitis-causing E. coli to invade the blood-brain barrier. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved in CNF1 secretion, as shown in this report with the involvement of Fdx and YgfZ provides the novel information on potential targets for prevention and therapy of E. coli meningitis by virtue of targeting the secretion of CNF1.

  17. An update on necrotizing enterocolitis: pathogenesis and preventive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Hoon

    2011-09-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is one of the most critical morbidities in preterm infants. The incidence of NEC is 7% in very-low-birth-weight infants, and its mortality is 15 to 30%. Infants who survive NEC have various complications, such as nosocomial infection, malnutrition, growth failure, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, and neurodevelopmental delays. The most important etiology in the pathogenesis of NEC is structural and immunological intestinal immaturity. In preterm infants with immature gastrointestinal tracts, development of NEC may be associated with a variety of factors, such as colonization with pathogenic bacteria, secondary ischemia, genetic polymorphisms conferring NEC susceptibility, anemia with red blood cell transfusion, and sensitization to cow milk proteins. To date, a variety of preventive strategies has been accepted or attempted in clinical practice with regard to the pathogenesis of NEC. These strategies include the use of breast feeding, various feeding strategies, probiotics, prebiotics, glutamine and arginine, and lactoferrin. There is substantial evidence for the efficacy of breast feeding and the use of probiotics in infants with birth weights above 1,000 g, and these strategies are commonly used in clinical practice. Other preventive strategies, however, require further research to establish their effect on NEC.

  18. Interaction of late apoptotic and necrotic cells with vitronectin.

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    Ondrej Stepanek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vitronectin is an abundant plasma glycoprotein identified also as a part of extracellular matrix. Vitronectin is substantially enriched at sites of injured, fibrosing, inflamed, and tumor tissues where it is believed to be involved in wound healing and tissue remodeling. Little is known about the mechanism of vitronectin localization into the damaged tissues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 2E12 antibody has been described to bind a subset of late apoptotic cells. Using immunoisolation followed by mass spectrometry, we identified the antigen recognized by 2E12 antibody as vitronectin. Based on flow cytometry, we described that vitronectin binds to the late apoptotic and necrotic cells in cell cultures in vitro as well as in murine thymus and spleen in vivo. Confocal microscopy revealed that vitronectin binds to an intracellular cytoplasmic structure after the membrane rupture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that vitronectin could serve as a marker of membrane disruption in necrosis and apoptosis for flow cytometry analysis. Moreover, we suggest that vitronectin binding to dead cells may represent one of the mechanisms of vitronectin incorporation into the injured tissues.

  19. Innate Immune Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

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    David J. Hackam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is a challenging disease to treat, and caring for patients afflicted by it remains both frustrating and difficult. While NEC may develop quickly and without warning, it may also develop slowly, insidiously, and appear to take the caregiver by surprise. In seeking to understand the molecular and cellular processes that lead to NEC development, we have identified a critical role for the receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS toll like receptor 4 (TLR4 in the pathogenesis of NEC, as its activation within the intestinal epithelium of the premature infant leads to mucosal injury and reduced epithelial repair. The expression and function of TLR4 were found to be particularly elevated within the intestinal mucosa of the premature as compared with the full-term infant, predisposing to NEC development. Importantly, factors within both the enterocyte itself, such as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70, and in the extracellular environment, such as amniotic fluid, can curtail the extent of TLR4 signaling and reduce the propensity for NEC development. This review will highlight the critical TLR4-mediated steps that lead to NEC development, with a focus on the proinflammatory responses of TLR4 signaling that have such devastating consequences in the premature host.

  20. Genetic susceptibility to non-necrotizing erysipelas/cellulitis.

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    Katariina Hannula-Jouppi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial non-necrotizing erysipelas and cellulitis are often recurring, diffusely spreading infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissues caused most commonly by streptococci. Host genetic factors influence infection susceptibility but no extensive studies on the genetic determinants of human erysipelas exist. METHODS: We performed genome-wide linkage with the 10,000 variant Human Mapping Array (HMA10K array on 52 Finnish families with multiple erysipelas cases followed by microsatellite fine mapping of suggestive linkage peaks. A scan with the HMA250K array was subsequently performed with a subset of cases and controls. RESULTS: Significant linkage was found at 9q34 (nonparametric multipoint linkage score (NPL(all 3.84, p=0.026, which is syntenic to a quantitative trait locus for susceptibility to group A streptococci infections on chromosome 2 in mouse. Sequencing of candidate genes in the 9q34 region did not conclusively associate any to erysipelas/cellulitis susceptibility. Suggestive linkage (NPL(all>3.0 was found at three loci: 3q22-24, 21q22, and 22q13. A subsequent denser genome scan with the HMA250K array supported the 3q22 locus, in which several SNPs in the promoter of AGTR1 (Angiotensin II receptor type I suggestively associated with erysipelas/cellulitis susceptibility. CONCLUSIONS: Specific host genetic factors may cause erysipelas/cellulitis susceptibility in humans.

  1. Monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis in a white male caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon L; Brandt, Pernille B; Gad, Dorte

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae in an immunocompromised white male after travel to China. The K. pneumoniae isolate belonged to the K2 serotype, and carried the virulence factors RmpA and aerobactin. To the best of our...... knowledge this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae resembling the highly virulent K. pneumoniae isolates associated with liver abscess syndrome in Asia....

  2. Lower extremity necrotizing fasciitis: A unique initial presentation of Crohn's disease

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    Anna Weiss

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease is a disease of the bowel, typically presenting with diarrhea, weight loss, and abdominal pain. Complications such as abscesses, fistulas, and strictures may require surgical intervention. We would like to report a patient with Crohn's disease who presented for the first time with left lower extremity necrotizing fasciitis. There are very few reports of necrotizing fasciitis in Crohn's disease as the initial presentation.

  3. Necrotizing Fasciitis and Toxic Shock Syndrome from Clostridium septicum following a Term Cesarean Delivery

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    B. H. Rimawi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome are life-threatening conditions that can be seen after any surgical procedure. With only 4 previous published case reports in the obstetrics and gynecology literature of these two conditions occurring secondary to Clostridium septicum, we describe a case of necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome occurring after a term cesarean delivery caused by this microorganism, requiring aggressive medical and surgical intervention.

  4. Responses of macrophages to the danger signals released from necrotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Sayama, Aoi; MaruYama, Takashi; Muta, Tatsushi

    2014-12-01

    The immune system maintains homeostasis by recognizing and responding to cell death caused by various stresses. The immune response is considered to be elicited by 'danger signals' released from necrotic cells. However, the identity of the danger signals remains elusive. In this study, we focused on the expression of chemokines by macrophages stimulated with necrotic cells. In mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages, the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-3 was induced at both the mRNA and protein levels in response to heat-killed murine cells. The induction of MCP-3 was also observed in MyD88-deficient macrophages, indicating that Toll-like receptors and the IL-1 receptor are not involved in this response. Consistent with this observation, the activation of NF-κB was not detected in RAW264.7 macrophages stimulated with necrotic cells. Treatments with proteinase K, DNaseI or RNaseA did not affect the ' STIMULATING ACTIVITY': of necrotic cells. In contrast, treatment with apyrase, which removes phosphates from nucleoside tri- and di-phosphates, abolished the inducing activity. Purified UDP at 30 µM concentration elicited similar induction of MCP-3 in RAW264.7 macrophages. Small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of the UDP receptor P2Y6 in RAW264.7 cells significantly reduced the induction of MCP-3 in response to necrotic cells, but not its induction by lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, ectopic expression of the P2Y6 receptor in HEK293 cells conferred responsiveness to necrotic cells. These results suggest that UDP released by necrotic cells plays a critical role as an endogenous danger signal and that P2Y6 is required for the induction of MCP-3 in response to necrotic cells.

  5. Necrotizing Fasciitis and Toxic Shock Syndrome from Clostridium septicum following a Term Cesarean Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimawi, B. H.; Graybill, W.; Pierce, J. Y.; Kohler, M.; Eriksson, E. A.; Shary, M. T.; Crookes, B.; Soper, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome are life-threatening conditions that can be seen after any surgical procedure. With only 4 previous published case reports in the obstetrics and gynecology literature of these two conditions occurring secondary to Clostridium septicum, we describe a case of necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome occurring after a term cesarean delivery caused by this microorganism, requiring aggressive medical and surgical intervention. PMID:24822140

  6. Utilization of probiotics for controlling clostridial necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Lily Natalia; Adin Priadi

    2005-01-01

    Clostridial necrotic enteritis (CNE) is a common disease among rapidly growing broiler chickens. The purpose of this trial was to study the utilisation of probiotics in controlling experimental CNE in broiler chickens. Chicken normal gut bacterial flora (mucosal starter culture selective/MCS) was used as a competitive exclusion treatment in broiler chicken and its influence to the occurence of clostridial necrotic enteritis were observed. The study comprised of 4 broiler cages treatments of p...

  7. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis and myositis in a western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allender, M C; McCain, S L; Ramsay, E C; Schumacher, J; Ilha, M R S

    2009-06-01

    A 39-yr-old wild-caught, female western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) died during an immobilization to assess swelling and apparent pain of the cervical region. Necropsy revealed a fistulous tract containing plant material in the oropharynx, above the soft palate, communicating with a left-sided cervical necrotizing fasciitis and myositis. Alpha-hemolytic Streptococcus and Prevotella sp. were isolated from the cervical lesion. This is a report of cervical necrotizing fasciitis in a western lowland gorilla.

  8. Long-term immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine plus prednisolone for necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a Pekingese dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dong-In; Kim, Ju-Won; Park, Hee-Myung

    2012-06-01

    A 4-year-old intact female Pekingese dog was presented with ataxia and seizure episodes. Based on magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis results, meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology was suspected. The present case survived for 1,096 days under cyclosporine plus prednisolone therapy and was definitively diagnosed with necrotizing meningoencephalitis. This report describes the clinical findings, serial magnetic resonance imaging characteristics and pathologic features of a necrotizing meningoencephalitis and long-term survival after cyclosporine with prednisolone therapy.

  9. NetB, a pore-forming toxin from necrotic enteritis strains of Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyburn, Anthony L; Bannam, Trudi L; Moore, Robert J; Rood, Julian I

    2010-07-01

    The Clostridium perfringens necrotic enteritis B-like toxin (NetB) is a recently discovered member of the β-barrel pore-forming toxin family and is produced by a subset of avian C. perfringens type A strains. NetB is cytotoxic for avian cells and is associated with avian necrotic enteritis. This review examines the current state of knowledge of NetB: its role in pathogenesis, its distribution and expression in C. perfringens and its vaccine potential.

  10. [Pyoderma gangrenosum after intramedullary nailing of tibial shaft fracture: A differential diagnosis to necrotizing fasciitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, S; Merkel, P; Hungerer, S; Friederichs, J; Müller, N; Militz, M; Bühren, V

    2015-12-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare non-infectious neutrophilic dermatitis, whereas necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening bacterial soft tissue infection of the fascia and adjacent skin. As in the case described here after intramedullary nailing, the clinical appearance of both diseases can be similar. Because of the completely different therapeutic approach and a worse outcome in the case of false diagnosis, pyoderma gangrenosum should always be taken into consideration before treating necrotizing fasciitis.

  11. Clinical parameters and challenges of managing cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in a Sub-Saharan tertiary hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Olusanya, Adeola A; Gbolahan, Olalere O; Aladelusi, Timothy O; Akinmoladun, Victor I; Arotiba, Juwon T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection. In our environment, patients presenting with this infection are usually financially incapacitated and, therefore, their management can be challenging. This paper aimed to document the pattern and challenges encountered in the management of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) in the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Materials and Methods: Information such as biodata, site of infection, systemic conditions, widest s...

  12. Necrotizing myelitis in an immunocompetent child : a case report with review of literature.

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    Parmar R

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A few cases of necrotizing myelitis have been reported in adults since its first description in 1973. No case has been described in the pediatric age group. A 12-year-old boy, who presented with acute flaccid paraplegia, loss of sphincter control and sensory loss showed features suggestive of necrotizing myelitis on magnetic resonance imaging. Investigations carried out could not reveal a specific etiological or pre-disposing factor. No clinical improvement occurred despite the therapy.

  13. Hepatitis C viral infection as an associated risk factor for necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Danielle; Kanlic, Enes; Bader, Julia; Ortiz, Melchor; Abdelgawad, Amr

    2012-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare soft tissue infection associated with a high mortality rate. Several risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis have been studied, which has given surgeons insight into the types of patients who are more likely to present with this rapidly progressive infection. The concomitant diagnosis of hepatitis C viral infection has not been reported in the literature previously. In this retrospective study covering a 12-year period in 1 Level I trauma center, 10 (34%) of 29 patients presenting with necrotizing fasciitis had an underlying diagnosis of hepatitis C viral infection. The mortality rate in patients with hepatitis C viral infection was 30% compared with 21% for those without hepatitis C viral infection (P=.59). The proportion of patients presenting with the concomitant diagnosis of hepatitis C viral infection and necrotizing fasciitis was statistically greater than that expected from the prevalence of hepatitis C viral infection in the general population (1.8%; Pnecrotizing fasciitis. Although our sample size was too small to show a statistical significance, we believe that a clinically significant increase in mortality of necrotizing fasciitis occurred in patients with concomitant hepatitis C viral infection. Therefore, the presence of hepatitis C viral infection in patients presenting with symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis should raise the clinical suspicion for this diagnosis, with the potential for a worse prognosis.

  14. A Fatal Case of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Necrotizing Fasciitis: The Changing Scary Face of Nosocomial Infection

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    Nupur Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft-tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter baumannii is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Wound infections due to A. baumannii have been described in association with severe trauma in soldiers. There are only sporadic reports of monomicrobial A. baumannii necrotizing fasciitis. We report a unique case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by multidrug resistant (MDR A. baumannii, in absence of any preceding trauma, surgery, or any obvious breech in the continuity of skin or mucosa. A 48-year-old woman with history of HIV, asthma, hypertension, and tobacco and excocaine use presented with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She was treated for pneumonia for 7 days and was successfully extubated. All septic work-up was negative. Two days later, she developed rapidly spreading nonblanching edema with bleb formation at the lateral aspect of right thigh. Emergent extensive debridement and fasciotomy were performed. Operative findings and histopathology were consistent with necrotizing fasciitis. Despite extensive debridement, she succumbed to septic shock in the next few hours. Blood, wound, and tissue cultures grew A. baumannii, sensitive only to amikacin and polymyxin. Histopathology was consistent with necrotizing fasciitis.

  15. Oral Myiasis Caused by Chrysomya bezziana in Anterior Maxilla

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    Ankur Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral myiasis is a rare pathology and is associated with poor oral hygiene, alcoholism, senility, suppurating lesions, and severe halitosis. It arises from invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals by maggots or larvae of certain dipterian flies. It is mostly reported in developing countries and in the tropics. We hereby report a rare case of oral myiasis in a 70-year-old female with extensive necrotic oral lesion burrowing into the hard palate through which numerous live maggots (larvae and seen emerging out and discuss the definition, etiology, predisposing factors, classification, and management of the same. Furthermore, the life cycle of the causative organism in the present case, that is, Chrysomya bezziana, has also been discussed.

  16. Necrotizing Fasciitis versus Pyomyositis: Discrimination with Using MR Imaging

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    Seok, Jee Hyun; Jee, Won Hee; Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Ji Young; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Yang Ree; Kim, Yang Soo; Chung, Yang Guk [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Wan Kyu [KyungHee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    We wanted to evaluate the MR findings for differentiating between necrotizing fasciitis (NF) and pyomyositis (PM). The MR images of 19 patients with surgically confirmed NF (n = 11) and pathologically confirmed PM (n = 8) were retrospectively reviewed with regard to the presence or absence of any MRI finding criteria that could differentiate between them. The patients with NF had a significantly greater prevalence of the following MR findings (p < 0.05): a peripheral band-like hyperintense signal in muscles on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images (73% of the patients with NF vs. 0% of the patients with PM), peripheral band-like contrast enhancement (CE) of muscles (82% vs. 0%, respectively) and thin smooth enhancement of the deep fascia (82% vs. 13%, respectively). The patients with PM had a significantly greater prevalence of the following MRI findings (p < 0.05): a diffuse hyperintense signal in muscles on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images (27% of the patients with NF vs. 100% in the patients with PM), diffuse CE of muscles (18% vs. 100%, respectively), thick irregular enhancement of the deep fascia (0% vs. 75%, respectively) and intramuscular abscess (0% vs. 88%, respectively). For all patients with NF and PM, the superficial fascia and muscle showed hyperintense signals on T2- weighted images and CE was seen on fat-suppressed CE T1-weighted images. The subcutaneous tissue and deep fascia showed hyperintense signals on T2- weighted images and CE was seen in all the patients with NF and in seven (88%) of the eight patients with PM, respectively. MR imaging is helpful for differentiating between NF and PM.

  17. Carbohydrate maldigestion induces necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thymann, Thomas; Møller, Hanne K; Stoll, Barbara; Støy, Ann Cathrine F; Buddington, Randal K; Bering, Stine B; Jensen, Bent B; Olutoye, Oluyinka O; Siggers, Richard H; Mølbak, Lars; Sangild, Per T; Burrin, Douglas G

    2009-12-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains the most severe gastrointestinal disorder in preterm infants. It is associated with the initiation of enteral nutrition and may be related to immature carbohydrate digestive capacity. We tested the hypothesis that a formula containing maltodextrin vs. a formula containing lactose as the principal source of carbohydrate would predispose preterm pigs to a higher NEC incidence. Cesarean-derived preterm pigs were given total parenteral nutrition for 48 h followed by total enteral nutrition with a lactose-based (n = 11) or maltodextrin-based (n = 11) formula for 36 h. A higher incidence (91% vs. 27%) and severity (score of 3.3 vs. 1.8) of NEC were observed in the maltodextrin than in the lactose group. This higher incidence of NEC in the maltodextrin group was associated with significantly lower activities of lactase, maltase, and aminopeptidase; reduced villus height; transiently reduced in vivo aldohexose uptake; and reduced ex vivo aldohexose uptake capacity in the middle region of the small intestine. Bacterial diversity was low for both diets, but alterations in bacterial composition and luminal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids were observed in the maltodextrin group. In a second study, we quantified net portal absorption of aldohexoses (glucose and galactose) during acute jejunal infusion of a maltodextrin- or a lactose-based formula (n = 8) into preterm pigs. We found lower net portal aldohexose absorption (4% vs. 42%) and greater intestinal recovery of undigested carbohydrate (68% vs. 27%) in pigs acutely perfused with the maltodextrin-based formula than those perfused with the lactose-based formula. The higher digestibility of the lactose than the maltodextrin in the formulas can be attributed to a 5- to 20-fold higher hydrolytic activity of tissue-specific lactase than maltases. We conclude that carbohydrate maldigestion is sufficient to increase the incidence and severity of NEC in preterm pigs.

  18. Intestinal microbial ecology and environmental factors affecting necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Murgas Torrazza

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is the most devastating intestinal disease affecting preterm infants. In addition to being associated with short term mortality and morbidity, survivors are left with significant long term sequelae. The cost of caring for these infants is high. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that use of antibiotics and type of feeding may cause an intestinal dysbiosis important in the pathogenesis of NEC, but the contribution of specific infectious agents is poorly understood. Fecal samples from preterm infants ≤ 32 weeks gestation were analyzed using 16S rRNA based methods at 2, 1, and 0 weeks, prior to diagnosis of NEC in 18 NEC cases and 35 controls. Environmental factors such as antibiotic usage, feeding type (human milk versus formula and location of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU were also evaluated. Microbiota composition differed between the three neonatal units where we observed differences in antibiotic usage. In NEC cases we observed a higher proportion of Proteobacteria (61% two weeks and of Actinobacteria (3% 1 week before diagnosis of NEC compared to controls (19% and 0.4%, respectively and lower numbers of Bifidobacteria counts and Bacteroidetes proportions in the weeks before NEC diagnosis. In the first fecal samples obtained during week one of life we detected a novel signature sequence, distinct from but matching closest to Klebsiella pneumoniae, that was strongly associated with NEC development later in life. Infants who develop NEC exhibit a different pattern of microbial colonization compared to controls. Antibiotic usage correlated with these differences and combined with type of feeding likely plays a critical role in the development of NEC.

  19. Effects of octreotide on acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    László Czakó; Péter Hegyi; Tamás Takács; Csaba Góg; András Farkas; Yvette Mándy; Ilona Sz. Varga; László Tiszlavicz; János Lonovics

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role of oxygen-derived free radicals and cytokines in the pathogenesis of taurocholic acid-induced acute pancreatitiS, and to evaluate the preventive effects of octreotide towards the development of acute pancreatitis.METHODS: Acute pancreatitis was induced in male New Zealand 50 g/L sodium taurocholate (NaTC) in the pancreatic duct. Shamwas administered subcutaneously before the induction of pancreatitis. Blood was taken from the jugular vein before and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h after pancreatitis induction.Serum activities of amylase, IL-6 and TNF-α and levels of malonyl dialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase and superoxide dismutase (Mn-,Cu-, and Zn-SOD) in pancreatic tissue were measured.RESULTS: Serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels increased significantly 3 h after the onset of pancreatitis, and then returned to control level. The tissue concentration of MDA was significantly elevated at 24 h, while the GSH level and GP-x, catalase, Mn-SOD, Cu-, Zn-SOD activities were all significantly decreased in animals with pancreatitis as compared to the control. Octreotide pretreatment significantly reversed the changes in cytokines and reactive oxygen metabolites. Octreotide treatment did not alter the serum amylase activity and did not have any beneficial effects on the development of histopathological changes.CONCLUSION: Oxygen-derived free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines are generated at an early stage of NaTc-induced acute pancreatitis in rabbits. Prophylactic octreotide treatment can prevent release of cytokines and generation of reactive oxygen metabolites, but does not have any beneficial effects on the development of necrotizing pancreatitis.

  20. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-02-20

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  1. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The idea of identifying oral lesions with a precancerous nature, i.e. in the sense of pertaining to a pathologic process with an increased risk for future malignant development, of course is to prevent frank malignancy to occur in the affected area. The most common oral lesion with a precancerous...... nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  2. Effects of in ovo injection with selenium on immune and antioxidant responses during experimental necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S H; Lillehoj, H S; Jang, S I; Jeong, M S; Xu, S Z; Kim, J B; Park, H J; Kim, H R; Lillehoj, E P; Bravo, D M

    2014-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of in ovo injection of Se on modulating the immune system and antioxidant responses in broiler chickens with experimental necrotic enteritis. Broiler eggs were injected at 18 d of embryo age with either 100 μL of PBS alone or sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) in PBS, providing 0 (SS0), 10 (SS10), or 20 (SS20) μg of Se/egg. At 14 d posthatch, PBS-treated and uninfected chickens were kept as the control group, whereas the remaining chickens were orally infected with 1.0 × 10(4) sporulated oocysts of Eimeria maxima (SS0, SS10, SS20). At 18 d posthatch, E. maxima-infected chickens were orally infected with 1.0 × 10(9) cfu of Clostridium perfringens. Infected control SS0 group showed significantly decreased BW compared with the uninfected control. However, SS20 group showed significantly increased BW compared with the infected control SS0 group, whereas the BW were similar among uninfected control and infected SS10 and SS20 groups. The SS10 group showed significantly lower intestinal lesions compared with the SS0 group, and oocyst production was decreased in both SS10 and SS20 groups. Serum malondialdehyde level and catalase activity were also decreased in both SS10 and SS20 groups, whereas the superoxide dismutase level was significantly lower in the SS10 group compared with the SS0 group. The SS20 group showed significantly higher levels of transcripts for IL-1β and IL-6 in intestine, and SS10 and SS20 groups had higher levels of transcripts for IL-8 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and decreased glutathione peroxidase 7 mRNA levels compared with the SS0 group. The SS10 and SS20 groups also showed increased serum antibody levels to C. perfringens α-toxin and NetB toxin compared with the SS0 group. These collective results suggest that the injection of Se into the amniotic cavity of developing eggs may be beneficial for enhancing immune and antioxidant responses in the hatched chickens exposed to the

  3. Monocyte Activation by Necrotic Cells Is Promoted by Mitochondrial Proteins and Formyl Peptide Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouser, Elliott D.; Shao, Guohong; Julian, Mark W.; Macre, Jennifer E.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Tridandapani, Susheela; Huang, Qin; Wewers, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Necrotic cells evoke potent innate immune responses through unclear mechanisms. The mitochondrial fraction of the cell retains constituents of its bacterial ancestors, including N-formyl peptides, which are potentially immunogenic. Thus, we hypothesized that the mitochondrial fraction of the cell, particularly N-formyl peptides, contributes significantly to the activation of monocytes by necrotic cells. Design Human peripheral blood monocytes were incubated with necrotic cell fractions and mitochondrial proteins in order to investigate their potential for immune cell activation. Setting University medical center research laboratory. Subjects Healthy human adults served as blood donors. Measurements and Main Results Human blood monocyte activation was measured after treatment with cytosolic, nuclear and mitochondrial fractions of necrotic HepG2 cells or necrotic HepG2 cells depleted of N-formyl peptides [Rho(0) cells]. The specific role of the high affinity formyl peptide receptor (FPR) was then tested using specific pharmacological inhibitors and RNA-silencing. The capacity of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides to activate monocytes was confirmed using a synthetic peptide conforming to the N-terminus of mitochondrial NADH subunit 6. The results demonstrated that mitochondrial cell fractions most potently activated monocytes, and IL-8 was selectively released at low protein concentrations. Mitochondria from Rho(0) cells induced minimal monocyte IL-8 release, and specific pharmacological inhibitors and RNA-silencing confirmed that FPR contributes significantly to monocyte IL-8 responses to both necrotic cells and mitochondrial proteins. N-formyl peptides alone did not induce monocyte IL-8 release; whereas, the combination of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) dramatically increased IL-8 release from monocytes. Likewise, HMGB1, the nuclear homologue of TFAM, did not induce monocyte IL-8 release unless combined with

  4. Neutrophil extracellular traps form a barrier between necrotic and viable areas in acute abdominal inflammation

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    Rostyslav Bilyy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs of decondensed DNA and histones that trap and immobilize particulate matter and microbial pathogens like bacteria. NET aggregates reportedly surround and isolate large objects like monosodium urate (MSU crystals, which cannot be sufficiently cleared from tissues. In the setting of acute necrotizing pancreatitis massive tissue necrosis occurs, which is organized as pancreatic pseudocysts. In contrast to regular cysts, these pseudocysts are not surrounded by epithelial layers. We hypothesize that, instead, the necrotic areas observed in necrotizing pancreatitis are isolated from the surrounding healthy tissues by aggregated NETs. These may form an alternative, putatively transient barrier separating necrotic areas from viable tissue. To test this hypothesis, we investigated histological samples from the necropsy material of internal organs of two patients with necrotizing pancreatitis and peritonitis accompanied by multiple organ failure. Tissues including the inflammatory zone were stained with H&E and evaluated for signs of inflammation. Infiltrating neutrophils and NETs were detected by immunohistochemistry for DNA, neutrophil elastase, and citrullinated histone H3. Interestingly, in severely affected areas of pancreatic necrosis or peritonitis, chromatin stained positive for neutrophil elastase and citrullinated histone H3, and may, therefore, be considered NET-derived. These NET structures formed a layer which separated the necrotic core from the areas of viable tissue remains. A condensed layer of aggregated NETs thus spatially shields and isolates the site of necrosis, thereby limiting the spread of necrosis-associated proinflammatory mediators. We propose that necrotic debris may initiate and/or facilitate the formation of the NET-based surrogate barrier.

  5. Uptake of the necrotic serpin in Drosophila melanogaster via the lipophorin receptor-1.

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    Sandra Fausia Soukup

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The humoral response to fungal and Gram-positive infections is regulated by the serpin-family inhibitor, Necrotic. Following immune-challenge, a proteolytic cascade is activated which signals through the Toll receptor. Toll activation results in a range of antibiotic peptides being synthesised in the fat-body and exported to the haemolymph. As with mammalian serpins, Necrotic turnover in Drosophila is rapid. This serpin is synthesised in the fat-body, but its site of degradation has been unclear. By "freezing" endocytosis with a temperature sensitive Dynamin mutation, we demonstrate that Necrotic is removed from the haemolymph in two groups of giant cells: the garland and pericardial athrocytes. Necrotic uptake responds rapidly to infection, being visibly increased after 30 mins and peaking at 6-8 hours. Co-localisation of anti-Nec with anti-AP50, Rab5, and Rab7 antibodies establishes that the serpin is processed through multi-vesicular bodies and delivered to the lysosome, where it co-localises with the ubiquitin-binding protein, HRS. Nec does not co-localise with Rab11, indicating that the serpin is not re-exported from athrocytes. Instead, mutations which block late endosome/lysosome fusion (dor, hk, and car cause accumulation of Necrotic-positive endosomes, even in the absence of infection. Knockdown of the 6 Drosophila orthologues of the mammalian LDL receptor family with dsRNA identifies LpR1 as an enhancer of the immune response. Uptake of Necrotic from the haemolymph is blocked by a chromosomal deletion of LpR1. In conclusion, we identify the cells and the receptor molecule responsible for the uptake and degradation of the Necrotic serpin in Drosophila melanogaster. The scavenging of serpin/proteinase complexes may be a critical step in the regulation of proteolytic cascades.

  6. Oral pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  7. Herpes - oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000606.htm Herpes - oral To use the sharing features on this page, ... 374. Read More Atopic dermatitis Cancer Fever Genital herpes Mouth ulcers Vesicles Review Date 8/14/2015 Updated ...

  8. Paracoccidioidomicosis en cavidad oral Oral cavity paracoccidioidomycosis

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    D. Antunes Freitas

    2012-02-01

    completamente y el paciente continúa bajo control en el servicio.Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM or South-american Blastomycosis is the most important systemic mycosis in Latin America, is relatively common in Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador and Argentina. Sporadic cases can also be seen in some other countries, which is a rare progressive and fatal if not treated. It has been regarded as a multifocal disease with oral lesions as the prominent feature. It is caused by a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, which mainly affects the skin, lymph nodes, lungs and mucous membranes, oral, nasal and gastrointestinal. Depending on the specific immunity of the host, the infection can take many forms and affects one or more organs, becoming a serious and potentially fatal disease. It is very important for health professionals worldwide have knowledge about Paracoccidioidomycosis because sometimes the disease only manifests itself many years after you have left the endemic area. To provide useful information about the diagnosis and treatment of disease A case report of case of male patient 48 years old from a rural area of Brazil Oath, presenting multiple painful ulcers on the gums and palate of 3 months duration, referred to chronic smoking history, clinical examination extraoral lesions are discarded in other intraoral examination bodies and multiple ulcers were observed necrotic and granulomatous background located on the gums and palate. We performed an incisional biopsy of the lesion and the material was sent for pathologic examination. The pathology report confirmed the clinical impression of Paracoccidioidomycosis. The patient was treated with the use of sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim - 800/60 mg/day, orally every 12 hours for 30 days. The oral lesions disappeared completely and the patient remains under control in the service.

  9. Disparities in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020: Oral Health Objectives Site Map Disparities in Oral Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Oral health ... to get and keep dental insurance. Disparities in Oral Health Some of the oral health disparities that exist ...

  10. RETROPERITONEAL NECROTIZING FASCIITIS WITH ADNEXITIS PRESENTING AS ACUTE ABDOMEN IN A 40 YEAR UNMARRIED FEMALE PATIENT: A CASE REPORT

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    Sribatsa Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Retroperitoneal Necrotizing Fasciitis is a rare variant of Necrotizing fasciitis (NF which is fulminant and potentially lethal. Although NF is a common occurrence in Indian Subcontinent due to low standard of living and poor hygiene Necrotizing fasciitis of retroperitoneum is extremely rare and only few cases have been reported till now. Herein we report a case of a 40yr unmarried female patient presenting to emergency department for acute abdomen and on exploratory laparotomy it was found out to be a case of extensive retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis with pregangrenous right ovary and adjacent fallopian tube.

  11. Pseudomembranous necrotizing tracheobronchial aspergillosis:an analysis of 16 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hai-dong; LI Qiang; HUANG Yi; BAI Chong; WU Ning; WANG Qing; YAO Xiao-peng; CHEN Bin

    2012-01-01

    Background In our clinical practice we have been attracted by a group of patients with airway aspergillosis who have airway obstruction; we termed the condition as pseudomembranous necrotizing tracheobronchial aspergillosis (PNTA).In this study we analyzed the clinical data from patients with PNTA,so as to guide the diagnosis and treatment of the disease.@@Methods A total of 16 PNTA patients were treated in Changhai Hospital from January 2000 to January 2009.Their clinical data,including the demographic information,clinical symptoms,imaging findings,bronchoscopy findings,treatment strategies and efficacy,and prognosis,were retrospectively analyzed.@@Results All 16 patients were found to have primary systemic immunodeficiency diseases and/or damage of the focal airways.Nine patients (9/16,56.3%) had pulmonary and tracheobronchial tumors,5/16 (31.3%) had tracheobronchial involvement secondary to non-pulmonary tumors,and 2/16 (12.5%) had lung transplantation.The most common causes of PNTA included local radiotherapy (10/16,62.5%),repeated chemotherapy (7/16,43.8%) and recurrent intervention therapy by bronchoscope (4/16,25.0%).Aspergillus fumigatus was the most frequent pathogen (62.5%,10/16).The main clinical manifestations included progressive dyspnea (14/16,87.5%) and irritable cough (12/16,75.0%).The trachea was involved in 9/16 patients (56.3%),right main bronchus in 10/16 (62.5%).All 16 patients were treated with systemic anti-aspergillosis agents,local anti-aspergillosis agents with amphotedcin B inhalation and direct perfusion of amphotericin B by bronchoscope,and interventional treatment by bronchoscope to ensure an unobstructed airway.The total efficiency was 31.3%.@@Conclusions PNTA is an infectious disease caused by aspergillus and it mainly involves the trachea,primary bronchus and segmental bronchus.A.fumigatus is the most common pathogen.PNTA can pose a severe clinical threat and often occurs after systemic immunodeficiency and

  12. Acute necrotizing retinal vasculitis as onset of systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Monov, Simeon; Hristova, Ruska; Dacheva, Rositza; Toncheva, Reni; Shumnalieva, Russka; Shoumnalieva-Ivanova, Viara; Monova, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody production, complement activation, and deposition of immune complexes in tissues and organs. SLE can involve any region of the visual system. Although ocular manifestations are not part of the classification criteria for SLE, they can be observed in up to one-third of the patients with SLE. They are rarely reported at the time of disease onset. Retinal vasculitis is usually associated with active generalized disease. Due to its low frequency, we report a case of acute necrotizing retinal vasculitis as onset of SLE. Patient concerns and diagnosis: A 25-year-old white female was referred to the rheumatology clinic with gradually and rapid deterioration of the vision due to abnormal vessel permeability in the right fundus with edema along the vessels, occlusion of arterial branches in the middle periphery with leakage of the dye in these areas and indentical but less prominent changes with cotton wool spots in the papillomacular area and extensive hemorrhages in the left eye. The onset of malar rash, arthralgias and positive antinuclear, anti-double stranded DNA, anti-ribosomal P and anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies with decreased C4 complement levels, as well as the positive lupus-band test confirmed the diagnosis of SLE. Interventions: Aggressive immunomodulating therapy with high-dose methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, and cyclophosphamide was used for suppression of the disease activity followed by azathioprine as maintaince therapy. Outcomes: Substantial improvement and partial resorption of the vasculitic changes, including central retinal artery and vein, was achieved prominently in the left eye. The study was conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and written informed consent was obtained from the patient. Because of this, there is no need to conduct special ethic review and the ethical approval is not necessary

  13. Continuous veno venous hemofiltration in treatment of acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢红浪; 季大玺; 龚德华; 刘芸; 徐斌; 周红; 刘志红; 黎磊石; 李维勤; 全竹富; 黎介寿

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of using continuous veno venous hemofiltration (CVVH) in the treatment of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). Methods Thirteen ANP patients were involved in this study, including 4 females and 9 males, averaging 50.6±10.8 years old. CT scans upon admission revealed 33% necrosis involving the body of the pancreas in 2 patients, 67% necrosis in 3 patients and 100% necrosis in the other 8; the CT severity score was 8.9±2.1. CVVH was maintained for at least 72 hours and the AN69 hemofilter (1.2 m2) was changed every 24 hours. The ultrafiltration rate during CVVH was 2993.9±983.0 ml/h, the blood flow rate was 250-300 ml/min, and the substitute fluid was infused in a pre-diluted manner. Low molecular weight heparin was used as anticoagulant. Results CVVH was well tolerated in all the patients. Bloody abdominal cavity drainage fluid was observed in 2 patients, but no other side-effects related with CVVH were observed. Two patients died of systemic fungal infections and another died of intracranial fungi infection, resulting in an ICU mortality of 23.1%. Ten of the patients survived in the ICU, but one of them died for other reasons unrelated to the SAP before discharge. The APACHE Ⅱ score before CVVH was 15.2±6.5, but decreased significantly to 8.1±5.3, 7.5±4.9 and 8.0±5.2 at the 24th, 48th and 72nd hour after CVVH, respectively (P<0.01). Serum concentration of IL-1β and TNFα decreased to the trough at the 6th hour after a new hemofilter was used and increased slowly to pre-CVVH levels 12 hours later. After CVVH had ceased, the serum levels of two cytokines increased to their peaks at the 120th hour and decreased eventually at the 144th hour. The sieving coefficient (SC) of IL-1β and TNFα was 0.33±0.11 and 0.16±0.08. Conclusion CVVH offered therapeutic options for ANP and was well tolerated resulting in clearance of IL-1β and TNFα; CVVH at early stages of SAP may contribute to the improvement of outcome.

  14. FORMATION OF NECROTIC CORES IN THE GROWTH OF TUMORS: ANALYTIC RESULTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author studies the mechanism of formation of necrotic cores in the growth of tumors by using rigorous analysis of a mathematical model. The model modifies a corresponding tumor growth model proposed by Byrne and Chaplain in 1996, in the case where no inhibitors exist. The modification is made such that both necrotic tumors and nonnecrotic tumors can be considered in a joint way. It is proved that if the nutrient supply is below a threshold value, then there is not dormant tumor,and all evolutionary tumors will finally vanish. If instead the nutrient supply is above this threshold value then there is a unique dormant tumor which can either be necrotic or nonnecrotic, depending on the level of the nutrient supply and the level of dead-cell dissolution rate, and all evolutionary tumors will converge to this dormant tumor. It is also proved that, in the second case, if the dormant tumor is necrotic then an evolutionary tumor will form a necrotic core at a finite time, and if the dormant tumor is nonnecrotic then an evolutionary tumor will also be nonnecrotic from a finite time.

  15. Day-of-hatch vaccination is not protective against necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mot, Dorien; Timbermont, Leen; Delezie, Evelyne; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2013-04-01

    Necrotic enteritis, caused by netB toxin-producing Clostridium perfringens type A, is an important disease in broiler chickens worldwide. Earlier attempts to prevent necrotic enteritis by vaccination have not sufficiently taken into account the practical limitations of broiler vaccination. In most published studies on vaccination against necrotic enteritis, multiple doses at different ages are administered, which is not practical for broilers. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of subcutaneous single vaccination at day 1 or day 3 and double vaccination at day 3 and day 12, using crude supernatant containing active toxin or formaldehyde-inactivated supernatant (toxoid) of a netB-positive C. perfringens strain in a subclinical necrotic enteritis model. Double vaccination with crude supernatant resulted in a significant decrease in the number of chickens with necrotic enteritis lesions. The efficacy of vaccination using toxoid was lower compared with crude supernatant. Single vaccination with crude supernatant at day 3 resulted in significant protection, while vaccination of 1-day-old chickens with crude supernatant or toxoid, as envisaged for practical field application, did not induce protection.

  16. Community-acquired necrotizing fasciitis caused by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Yuko; Nagae, Masaaki; Omae, Takahito; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Horitani, Ryosuke; Maeda, Daigen; Yoshinaga, Takayuki

    2014-05-01

    A 61-year-old man presented with pain in the abdomen and right lower limb. He had a history of hepatitis B virus-induced liver cirrhosis, but had not been visiting the outpatient clinic and did not receive any medication. Cutaneous necrosis and bulla were observed on his abdomen and right lower limb. The necrotic skin was incised, and he was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis. A nonfermentative Gram-negative bacillus infection was confirmed from aspirated fluid and blood cultures. Therefore, meropenem and immunoglobulins were administered. Because necrosis was widespread, surgical debridement was performed. Thereafter, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus infection was confirmed by semi-quantitative PCR using the bullous fluid and blood cultures. Meropenem was administered for 3 weeks, followed by levofloxacin alone for 1 week. The patient's condition improved; therefore, skin grafting was performed as planned and yielded a favorable response. After rehabilitation, the patient could walk without support and infection did not recur. However, he had severe liver cirrhosis and large esophageal varices, and he eventually died from sudden varix rupture. Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality, and early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Although this is a very rare case of the occurrence of necrotizing fasciitis due to A. calcoaceticus infection, we believe that this organism can be pathogenic in immunocompromised patients such as those with liver cirrhosis by reporting this case.

  17. The necrotic signal induced by mycophenolic acid overcomes apoptosis-resistance in tumor cells.

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    Gwendaline Guidicelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The amount of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, a pivotal enzyme for the biosynthesis of the guanosine tri-phosphate (GTP, is frequently increased in tumor cells. The anti-viral agent ribavirin and the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid (MPA are potent inhibitors of IMPDH. We recently showed that IMPDH inhibition led to a necrotic signal requiring the activation of Cdc42. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, we strengthened the essential role played by this small GTPase in the necrotic signal by silencing Cdc42 and by the ectopic expression of a constitutive active mutant of Cdc42. Since resistance to apoptosis is an essential step for the tumorigenesis process, we next examined the effect of the MPA-mediated necrotic signal on different tumor cells demonstrating various mechanisms of resistance to apoptosis (Bcl2-, HSP70-, Lyn-, BCR-ABL-overexpressing cells. All tested cells remained sensitive to MPA-mediated necrotic signal. Furthermore, inhibition of IMPDH activity in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia cells was significantly more efficient at eliminating malignant cells than apoptotic inducers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings indicate that necrosis and apoptosis are split signals that share few if any common hub of signaling. In addition, the necrotic signaling pathway induced by depletion of the cellular amount of GTP/GDP would be of great interest to eliminate apoptotic-resistant tumor cells.

  18. Probability of developing severe sepsis in patients of elderly and senile age with necrotic erysipelas

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    Shapkin Yu.G.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the probable determination of severe sepsis in patients of elderly and senile age with necrotic erysipelas based on a comprehensive assessment (clinical examination using systems — scales and determination of the level markers of SIRS. Material and methods. The analysis of peculiarities of necrotic erysipelas clinical course in 59 patients. The first group consisted of 17 patients with severe sepsis, the second — 18 patients with sepsis without multiple organ failure, in the comparison group —22 patients with local infection. We determined albumin, urea, creatinine, pro-calcitonin of plasma. The scale SAPS III was used to quantify SIRS, scale SOFA —to determine the extent of damage to organs and systems. Results. The most sensitive marker of developing sepsis in patients with necrotic erysipelas was procalcitonin. The second important indicator of SIRS severity in patients with necrotic erysipelas was the blood albumin. Scale SAPS III also allows to select a group of patients with high risk of developing severe sepsis. Use of the SOFA to predict the scale has been found out to be less important. Conclusion. A comprehensive assessment of the severity of the condition by scale SAPS III in combination with determining the levels of procalcitonin and plasma albumin is advisable to apply for prediction the probability of developing severe sepsis in patients of elderly and senile age with necrotic erysipelas. For the last indicator it is important to assess of absolute values and the decrease of its concentration.

  19. Antibiotics increase gut metabolism and antioxidant proteins and decrease acute phase response and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonates.

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    Pingping Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The appropriate use of antibiotics for preterm infants, which are highly susceptible to develop necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC, is not clear. While antibiotic therapy is commonly used in neonates with NEC symptoms and sepsis, it remains unknown how antibiotics may affect the intestine and NEC sensitivity. We hypothesized that broad-spectrum antibiotics, given immediately after preterm birth, would reduce NEC sensitivity and support intestinal protective mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Preterm pigs were treated with antibiotics for 5 d (oral and systemic doses of gentamycin, ampicillin and metrodinazole; AB group and compared with untreated pigs. Only the untreated pigs showed evidence of NEC lesions and reduced digestive function, as indicated by lowered villus height and activity of brush border enzymes. In addition, 53 intestinal and 22 plasma proteins differed in expression between AB and untreated pigs. AB treatment increased the abundance of intestinal proteins related to carbohydrate and protein metabolism, actin filaments, iron homeostasis and antioxidants. Further, heat shock proteins and the complement system were affected suggesting that all these proteins were involved in the colonization-dependent early onset of NEC. In plasma, acute phase proteins (haptoglobin, complement proteins decreased, while albumin, cleaved C3, ficolin and transferrin increased. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Depressed bacterial colonization following AB treatment increases mucosal integrity and reduces bacteria-associated inflammatory responses in preterm neonates. The plasma proteins C3, ficolin, and transferrin are potential biomarkers of the colonization-dependent NEC progression in preterm neonates.

  20. Barriers to Knowledge Translation Regarding the Use of Probiotics as a Risk-Reduction Strategy for Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-08-01

    Increasingly, evidence supports enteral probiotics are an important risk-reduction strategy for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) among very low birth-weight and extremely low birth-weight preterm infants. Yet, the majority of providers remain reluctant to implement practice changes. The aim of this study was to better understand the discrepancy between the available evidence and clinical practice regarding the use of probiotics and other NEC prevention strategies in New Jersey. Using an exploratory descriptive design, a multimodal interprofessional survey was developed and executed to elicit intensive care nursery provider knowledge, views, and current practice. Although the sample size was small (N = 29), approximately one-half of respondents familiar with the literature rated the quality of the evidence regarding probiotics as "above average" to "excellent." These respondents were "very likely" to "extremely likely" to recommend probiotics as an NEC prevention strategy; however, none actually prescribed this intervention. The most important reason respondents did not prescribe probiotics was the focus on providing exclusive maternal and donor breast milk feedings. Other confounding factors included provision of oral colostrum care, standardized feeding protocols, and withholding feedings during blood transfusion. Study results suggested that some providers (primarily nurses) were not familiar with probiotic literature, which may contribute to deficits in knowledge translation to practice. Areas for future study include identifying improved mechanisms for knowledge dissemination, recognizing and addressing barriers and facilitators to knowledge translation, and understanding how probiotics fit and/or contrast with other NEC risk-reduction strategies in the research and clinical settings.

  1. Successful Treatment of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome with the Addition of Linezolid

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    Hana Rac

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a deep-seated subcutaneous tissue infection that is commonly associated with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS. Surgical debridement plus penicillin and clindamycin are the current standard of care. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal TSS where linezolid was added after a failure to improve with standard therapy. Briefly after isolation of Streptococcus pyogenes from tissue cultures, the patient underwent two surgical debridement procedures and was changed to standard of care therapy. While the patient was hemodynamically stable, the patient’s wounds, leukocytosis, and thrombocytopenia all progressively worsened. After initiation of linezolid, the patient slowly improved clinically. The present report is the first to highlight the role of linezolid in streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis and TSS not improving with standard therapy.

  2. A Case of Rituximab-Induced Necrotizing Fasciitis and a Review of the Literature

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    Abdullateef Abdulkareem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a fulminant soft tissue infection characterized by rapid progression and high mortality. Rituximab is a generally well-tolerated immunosuppresive medication used for B-cell malignancies and some rheumatological disorders. We report a case of a 69-year-old male with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who suffered necrotizing fasciitis of his left lower extremity secondary to Clostridium septicum 7 weeks after treatment with rituximab. Despite immediate intravenous antimicrobial therapy and emergent fasciotomy with extensive debridement, his hospital course was complicated by septic shock and he required an above-the-knee amputation. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of necrotizing fasciitis in patients presenting with skin infections after rituximab therapy.

  3. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2L presenting as necrotizing myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ilka; Stoltenburg, Gisela; Deschauer, Marcus; Winterholler, Martin; Hanisch, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Recessive mutations in the ANO5 gene, encoding anoctamin 5, cause proximal limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2L), Miyoshi-type distal myopathy (MM3) and asymptomatic hyper- CKemia. We report a woman with exertion-induced myalgia and weakness in the hip girdle manifesting at the age of 40. Creatine kinase (CK) was increased 20-fold. Histologically the dominating feature was necrotizing myopathy, but long-term immunosuppressive therapy did not change CK level or myopathic symptoms. Molecular genetic investigation led to the finding of the homozygous ANO5 c.191dupA mutation. This is a report of a muscular dystrophy due to ANO5 mutation presenting histologically as necrotizing myopathy. For this reason our finding extends the histological spectrum of myopathies due to ANO5 mutations as well as the possible differential diagnoses for necrotizing myopathy.

  4. A Report of Peritonitis from Aeromonas sobria in a Peritoneal Dialysis (PD) Patient with Necrotizing Fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janma, Jirayut; Linasmita, Patcharasarn; Changsirikulchai, Siribha

    2015-11-01

    A 70-years of age, male patient with underlying type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia and ischemic heart disease had undergone continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)for 3 years without any episodes of peritonitis. He was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis and later developed peritonitis after receiving a laceration from an aquatic injury suffered during the flood disaster of 2011. The blood culture, necrotic tissue and the clear dialysate collected upon admission had shown Aeromonas sobria. The route of peritonitis may be from the hematogenous spread of A. sobria resulting in necrotizing fasciitis. A. sobria should be considered as the pathogen of peritonitis in PD patients who have history of wounds from contaminated water. We suggest that the PD patients who present with septicemia and did not meet the criteria for peritonitis, the initial dialysate effluent should be sent for culture. The benefit of this is to allow early recognition and treatment of peritonitis.

  5. Binding of Clostridium perfringens to collagen correlates with the ability to cause necrotic enteritis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, B; Keyburn, A L; Seemann, T; Rood, J I; Moore, R J

    2015-11-18

    This study investigated the ability of Clostridium perfringens isolates derived from chickens to bind to collagen types I-V and gelatin. In total 21 strains from three distinct backgrounds were studied: (i) virulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis, (ii) avirulent strains isolated from birds suffering from necrotic enteritis and (iii) strains isolated from healthy birds. All strains isolated from diseased birds had been assessed for virulence in a disease induction model. The virulent isolates all displayed collagen binding ability. However, most strains in the other two classes showed negligible binding to collagen. The prevalence of a previously described C. perfringens putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene was investigated by PCR screening. It was found that five of the strains carried the putative collagen adhesin-encoding gene and that all of these strains were virulent isolates. Based on these studies it is postulated that collagen adhesion may play a role in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis.

  6. Successful Treatment of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome with the Addition of Linezolid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojikian, Karine D.; Lucar, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a deep-seated subcutaneous tissue infection that is commonly associated with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS). Surgical debridement plus penicillin and clindamycin are the current standard of care. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal TSS where linezolid was added after a failure to improve with standard therapy. Briefly after isolation of Streptococcus pyogenes from tissue cultures, the patient underwent two surgical debridement procedures and was changed to standard of care therapy. While the patient was hemodynamically stable, the patient's wounds, leukocytosis, and thrombocytopenia all progressively worsened. After initiation of linezolid, the patient slowly improved clinically. The present report is the first to highlight the role of linezolid in streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis and TSS not improving with standard therapy. PMID:28299216

  7. A Unique Case of Penile Necrotizing Fasciitis Secondary to Spontaneous Corpus Cavernosal Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Dempster

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corpus cavernosal abscess and necrotizing fasciitis occur rarely, and precipitating factors can usually be elicited with careful history and examination. Whilst both conditions share common risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, this is the first reported case of penile necrotizing fasciitis secondary to spontaneous corpus cavernosal abscess in an otherwise healthy patient. A 32-year-old man presented with 4-day history of swollen, painful penis, with ultrasound confirming corpus cavernosal abscess. Biopsies were taken and the cavity aspirated, but, despite intravenous antibiotics, he developed penile necrotizing fasciitis necessitating open cavernostomy and debridement. The overlying skin defect healed by secondary intention, but the patient experienced persistent postoperative erectile dysfunction, so he was referred for penile prosthesis insertion.

  8. [Staphylococcus lugdunensis necrotizing fasciitis after abdominal dermolipectomy: report of two cases and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunay, F; Pegot, A; Coquerel-Beghin, D; Aktouf, A; Auquit-Auckbur, I

    2014-04-01

    Necrotizing dermohypodermitis is a severe and potential fatal infection of soft tissues. We report two cases of 39- and 41-year-old patients operated of abdominal dermolipectomy and liposculpture after bariatric surgery. Because of a body mass index (BMI) less than 35kg/m(2), and trouble of interpretation of the SFAR recommendations, we have not achieved antibiotics. These patients presented an abdominal necrotizing dermohypodermitis at Staphylococcus lugdunensis, requiring wide excision of necrosis in emergency. The suites have been favorable after surgical and medical care. Perineal proximity, skin and subcutaneous peeling appear to be significant risk factors for this pathology. We suggest if case of abdominal dermolipectomy preventive measures in skin preparation and systematic antibiotics regardless of BMI. Indeed, the risk of a necrotizing dermohypodermitis recalls the importance of rigorous prevention and early diagnosis.

  9. Evaluation of high dietary inclusion of distillers dried grains with solubles and supplementation of protease and xylanase in the diets of broiler chickens under necrotic enteritis challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barekatain, M R; Antipatis, C; Rodgers, N; Walkden-Brown, S W; Iji, P A; Choct, M

    2013-06-01

    A 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of a high level of sorghum distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS; 20%), with or without a combination of protease and xylanase in broiler chickens, under a necrotic enteritis disease challenge. A total of 576 male broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 8 experimental treatments, each replicated 6 times, with 12 birds per replicate for 35 d. Oral inoculation of the challenged group with Eimeria spp. occurred on d 9, followed by 3 consecutive inoculations of Clostridium perfringens from d 14 through 16. The disease challenge and DDGS inclusion significantly (P enteritis-related lesions (d 17) were more severe (P enteritis. Supplementation of enzymes did not reveal significant mitigation effect in infected birds but helped the birds fed DDGS to maintain feed intake and BW gain.

  10. Effects of Probiotic Lactobacillus Reuteri (DSM 17938 on the Incidence of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Very Low Birth Weight Premature Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Nouri Shadkam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Feeding intolerance is a common problem among premature infants. There is limited information on the safety and effects of oral probiotic supplements, especially products containing Lactobacillus reuteri, and the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC in low birth weight preterm infants. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Lactobacillus reuteri on the gastrointestinal complications and feeding tolerance in premature infants. Methods: This randomized triple-blind clinical trial was conducted on 60 premature infants divided into two groups of intervention and placebo. Subjects in the intervention group received one drop/kg of supplementary oral probiotic with 0.5 ml of distilled water, and infants in the placebo group only received 0.5 ml of distilled water. Probiotic administration continued to reach full enteral feeding. Results: In this study, mean time to reach full enteral feeding was 12.83 and 16.75 days in the intervention and placebo groups, respectively, which was indicative of a significant difference (P=0.01. However, mean of neonatal weight at discharge had no significant difference between the two groups. In addition, 6.7% and 36.7% of infants in the intervention and placebo groups were diagnosed with NEC, respectively, which showed a significant difference (P=0.005. Also, prevalence of jaundice and sepsis was not significantly different between the study groups. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, Lactobacillus reuteri could reduce the time to reach full enteral feeding while diminishing the incidence of NEC in very low birth weight premature infants.

  11. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options.

  12. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Chest in a Neonate in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwafemi Olasupo Awe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful saving of a male neonate with necrotizing fasciitis of the chest following a hot fomentation of the umbilicus with exposure of the ribs and the pleural space on the right side. He recovered 5 weeks after admission. We stressed the need to recognize necrotizing fasciitis extending from the upper anterior abdominal wall to the chest following hot fomentation of the umbilicus. The need for multidisciplinary cooperation for excellent outcome is very important, that is, neonatologist, medical microbiologist, and plastic and chest surgeons.

  14. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the lower extremity: a case report and current concept of diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik SA

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection characterized by rapidly progressing necrosis, involving subcutaneous tissues. This rare condition carries high mortality rate and require prompt diagnosis and urgent treatment with radical debridement and antibiotics. We describe a case of 21-year old man who presented with the history of trivial injury to the knee. Initially he was admitted and treated for septic arthritis but later was diagnosed as necrotizing fasciitis which was successfully treated with no ill effects what so ever from this devastating condition. This rare condition has been reported in literature but still early diagnosis, which is a key for successful treatment, remains a challenge.

  15. NetB, a Pore-Forming Toxin from Necrotic Enteritis Strains of Clostridium perfringens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L. Keyburn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Clostridium perfringens necrotic enteritis B-like toxin (NetB is a recently discovered member of the β-barrel pore-forming toxin family and is produced by a subset of avian C. perfringens type A strains. NetB is cytotoxic for avian cells and is associated with avian necrotic enteritis. This review examines the current state of knowledge of NetB: its role in pathogenesis, its distribution and expression in C. perfringens and its vaccine potential.

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity: a case report and current concept of diagnosis and management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naqvi, G A

    2012-02-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection characterized by rapidly progressing necrosis, involving subcutaneous tissues. This rare condition carries high mortality rate and require prompt diagnosis and urgent treatment with radical debridement and antibiotics. We describe a case of 21-year old man who presented with the history of trivial injury to the knee. Initially he was admitted and treated for septic arthritis but later was diagnosed as necrotizing fasciitis which was successfully treated with no ill effects what so ever from this devastating condition. This rare condition has been reported in literature but still early diagnosis, which is a key for successful treatment, remains a challenge.

  17. Cultivars of tulip affected by tulip necrotic disease caused by tobacco necrosis virus in commercial field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahata, K.; Kusaba, T.; Mukobata, H.

    1983-08-01

    This paper represents the name of cultivars in which typical symptoms of tulip necrotic disease have been shown in commercial fields. Within 1976-1983 growing seasons, the authors observed fifty cultivars having the symptoms on their ground parts of tulips and it seemed that cultivars which belong to classes of Truimph, Darwin, Darwin Hybrid and Double Late were highly susceptible to tulip necrotic disease. It was also recognized that, most of affected cultivars flowered in mid or late April, and a few in early April.

  18. Necrotizing Tenon's capsule infection in a lymphopenic Down syndrome patient following strabismus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Melinda Y; Liu, Wenjing; Glasgow, Ben J; Isenberg, Sherwin J; Velez, Federico G

    2017-08-01

    Periocular infection is a rare complication of strabismus surgery. We describe a case of necrotizing Tenon's capsule infection after uncomplicated strabismus surgery in a boy with Down syndrome and blepharitis. Pathologic diagnosis was severe acute necrotizing inflammation with Gram positive coccal forms. Resolution of infection occurred after surgical debridement and intravenous and topical antibiotics. Work-up revealed lymphopenia related to Down syndrome. Patients with Down syndrome may have risk factors for postoperative infection including blepharitis and immunologic abnormalities. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the eyelids and toxic shock syndrome due to Streptococcus pyogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos B, Raúl; Soto G, Gonzalo; Hickmann O, Lilian; Torres B, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a serious infection that compromises subcutaneous tissue, fascia, and adipose tissue, with high mortality rate and sequelae. Extremities, trunk and pelvis are the most common body sites affected. Periorbital celullitis with necrotizing fasciitis of the eyelid is rare. We report the case of a three years oíd child with bilateral NF of the eyelids and toxic shock syndrome secondary to Streptococcus pyogenes infection occurring after a minor skin trauma. Early recognition leading to intensive care treatment and prompt surgical debridement were critical in the favourable outcome of the child.

  20. Necrotizing Fasciitis of Odontogenic Origin in a Non-Immunocompromised Patient- A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulabha A.N.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly spreading infection involving the superficial fat, fascial layers with necrosis of skin and is a disfiguring condition that is fatal. Head and neck is an unusual site which is rarely affected. It is characterized by its fulminating, devastating and rapid progressive course. It usually occurs in patients with systemic conditions such as diabetes mellitus, renal disease, cardiovascular disease, HIV infections etc. A case of cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin occurring in a non-immunocompromised patient is reported here who was treated successfully by surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy

  1. NetB, a Pore-Forming Toxin from Necrotic Enteritis Strains of Clostridium perfringens

    OpenAIRE

    Keyburn, Anthony L.; Bannam, Trudi L.; Robert J Moore; Rood, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    The Clostridium perfringens necrotic enteritis B-like toxin (NetB) is a recently discovered member of the β-barrel pore-forming toxin family and is produced by a subset of avian C. perfringens type A strains. NetB is cytotoxic for avian cells and is associated with avian necrotic enteritis. This review examines the current state of knowledge of NetB: its role in pathogenesis, its distribution and expression in C. perfringens and its vaccine potential.

  2. Necrotizing fasciitis involving the chest and abdominal wall caused by Raoultella planticola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Si-Hyun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Raoultella planticola was originally considered to be a member of environmental Klebsiella. The clinical significance of R. planticola is still not well known. Case presentation We describe the first case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the chest and abdominal wall caused by R. planticola. The identity of the organism was confirmed using 16S rRNA sequencing. The patient was successfully treated with the appropriate antibiotics combined with operative drainage and debridement. Conclusions R. planticola had been described as environmental species, but should be suspected in extensive necrotizing fasciitis after minor trauma in mild to moderate immunocompromised patients.

  3. Red clover necrotic mosaic virus: Biophysics and Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockney, Dustin M.

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a highly robust (Tm=60 °C), 36 nm icosahedral plant virus. The capsid of RCNMV is assembled from 180 chemically equivalent coat proteins (CPs). The CPs arrange in a T=3 symmetry, in 1 of 3 conformations forming the asymmetric subunit (ASU). There are two Ca(II) binding sites per CP; the removal of divalent cations causes the CP subunits of the ASU to rotate away from each other forming a ˜13 A channel. These channels lead to the highly organized bipartite genome of RCNMV and can be closed by adding back Ca(II). Titrimetric analysis and tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine the affinity of RCNMV for Ca(II) to be ˜Kd buffer was changed from 50 mM Tris-HCl/50 mM NaOAc/50 mM EDTA or 200 mM EDTA at pH 8.0 to 5 mM HEPES/5 mM Na4EDTA/10 mM NaCl pH 7.8. The Dox:RCNMV infusion mole ratio was also lowered from 5000:1 to 500:1 and the incubation temperature was changed from 4 °C to 22 °C for <12 hours, opposed to 24 hours. To impart targeting functionality to RCNMV, biomimetic peptides were conjugated to either the surface capsid lysines or cysteines using standard bioconjugation methods. For all of the biomimetic peptides screened, sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC) was used to orthogonally attach the cysteineterminated peptides to the surface lysines of RCNMV. The efficacy of a plant virus nanoparticle (PVN), loaded with a cargo (Dox or propidium iodide) and armed with a targeting peptide, was tested in vitro against several cell line using cell viability assays. ADH304, an N-cadherin targeting peptide, was synthesized to contain a lys[maleimide]. Dox infused RCNMV was armed with ADH304maleimide by conjugating the peptide to the endogenous C267 located in the P-domain. The use of a cysteine reactive peptide increased the PVN yield from ˜30% to ˜70% by eliminating several synthetic steps. The efficacy of this PVN formulation was tested on a human melanoma tumor in a

  4. The role of contrast enhanced computed tomography in the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis and comparison with the laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis (LRINEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonetti, Francesco; Cremona, Antonio; Carusi, Valentina; Guidi, Marco; Iannicelli, Elsa; Di Girolamo, Marco; Sergi, Daniela; Clarioni, Alvise; Baio, Giulio; Antonelli, Giulio; Fratini, Luca; David, Vincenzo

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) in emergency departments for diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) and for differential diagnosis of other musculoskeletal infections; to correlate radiological findings with the laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis (LRINEC). 7 radiological parameters to be analysed on CECT scans were established, exams of 36 patients with proven diagnosis of NF (n 12) and other musculoskeletal infections (n 24) were retrospectively reviewed; LRINEC score was calculated. Fisher's test and Spearman's and Kendall's coefficients of rank correlations were performed. Two parameters were found to be strongly associated with the diagnosis of NF: involvement of the fascia (Spearman's ρ of 0.888, p 5) also in other musculoskeletal infections. Final diagnosis of necrosis among the fascia is surgical. Presence of gas is not a specific sign of necrotizing fasciitis being present in other musculoskeletal infections. CT could easily discriminate NF from other musculoskeletal infections, adds an important value to clinical and laboratory tests in diagnosis of NF in an emergency context when magnetic resonance imaging, which is superior to CT in this discernment, could not be performed.

  5. Efficacy of Probiotics Versus Placebo in the Prevention of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Preterm Very Low Birth Weight Infants: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Tanjina; Ali, Muhammad Manajjir; Hossain, Muhammad Monir; Singh, Jugindra; Yousuf, Abu Noyeem Muhammad; Yasmin, Fatema; Chowdhury, Fazle Rabbi

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of orally administered probiotics in preventing necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Arandomized double blind controlled trial. The Paediatrics Department of Sylhet M.A.G. Osmani Medical College Hospital, Sylhet Bangladesh, from July 2012 to June 2015. Preterm (28 - 33 weeks gestation) VLBW (birth weight 1000 - 1499 g) neonates were enrolled. The study group was fed with probiotics once daily with breast milk from first feeding, and the control group with only breast milk without the addition of probiotics. Both the groups received other standard care. The primary outcome was the development of NEC (stage II and III), categorized by modified Bell's classification. In 108 neonates, development of NEC was significantly lower in the study group than that of control group [1 (1.9%) vs. 6 (11.5%); p=0.044]. Age of achievement of full oral feeding was significantly earlier in the study group than that in the control group (14.88 ±3.15 and 18.80 ±4.32 days; p control group (15.82 ±2.94 days vs. 19.57 ±4.26 days; p birth weight. It is also associated with faster achievement of full oral feeding and short duration of hospital stay.

  6. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  7. Dietary sodium selenite affects host intestinal and systemic immune response and disease susceptibility to necrotic enteritis in commercial broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S Z; Lee, S H; Lillehoj, H S; Bravo, D

    2015-01-01

    1. This study was to evaluate the effects of supplementary dietary selenium (Se) given as sodium selenite on host immune response against necrotic enteritis (NE) in commercial broiler chickens. 2. Chicks were fed from hatching on a non-supplemented diet or diets supplemented with different levels of Se (0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 Se mg/kg). To induce NE, broiler chickens were orally infected with Eimeria maxima at 14 d of age and then with Clostridium perfringens 4 d later using our previously established NE disease model. 3. NE-associated clinical signs and host protective immunity were determined by body weight changes, intestinal lesion scores, and serum antibodies against α-toxin and necrotic enteritis B (NetB) toxin. The effects of dietary Se on the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8LITAF (lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFα-factor), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) SF15, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), glutathione peroxidase 7 (GPx7), and avian β-defensins (AvBD) 6, 8, and 13 (following NE infection) were analysed in the intestine and spleen. 4. The results showed that dietary supplementation of newly hatched broiler chicks with 0.25 Se mg/kg from hatch significantly reduced NE-induced gut lesions compared with infected birds given a non-supplemented diet. The levels of serum antibody against the NetB toxin in the chicks fed with 0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg Se were significantly higher than the non-supplemented control group. The transcripts for IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, iNOS, LITAF, and GPx7, as well as AvBD6, 8, and 13 were increased in the intestine and spleen of Se-supplemented groups, whereas transcript for TNFSF15 was decreased in the intestine. 5. It was concluded that dietary supplementation with optimum levels of Se exerted beneficial effects on host immune response to NE and reduced negative consequence of NE-induced immunopathology.

  8. Bacillus subtilis PB6 improves intestinal health of broiler chickens challenged with Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Sathishkumar; Thangavel, Gokila; Kurian, Hannah; Mani, Ravichandran; Mukkalil, Rajalekshmi; Chirakkal, Haridasan

    2013-02-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is an enterotoxemic disease caused by Clostridium perfringens that results in significant economic losses, averaging damage of $0.05 per bird. The present study investigated the influence of a dietary supplement, Bacillus subtilis PB6, on performance, intestinal health, and gut integrity against C. perfringens-induced NE in broiler birds. Bacillus subtilis PB6 (ATCC-PTA 6737) is a natural strain isolated from healthy chicken gut that has been shown in in vitro to produce antimicrobial substances with broad activity against various strains of Campylobacter and Clostridium species. The animal study was conducted on broiler chickens (Cobb 400) for the period of 35 d using a completely randomized design. The experimental design included 3 treatments groups. Each treatment group contained 6 replicates, 3 male and 3 female, with 12 birds in each replicate. The 3 treatment groups were an uninfected control, an infected control, and an infected group supplemented with B. subtilis PB6 at 500 g/t of feed, containing 5 × 10(11) cfu/kg. Necrotic enteritis was induced in the broiler birds via oral inoculation of 30,000 oocysts of mixed strains of Eimeria species on d 14 followed by C. perfringens (10(8) cfu/mL) on d 19 through 21 of trial. The birds were analyzed for BW gain, mortality, feed conversion ratio (FCR), intestinal lesion score, intestinal C. perfringens counts, and villus histomorphometry. The infected control group showed markedly thickened mucosa, hemorrhages, intestinal lesions, and ballooning of intestine. The supplementation of B. subtilis PB6 reduced the FCR (P < 0.05) and intestinal C. perfringens counts significantly (P < 0.05) compared with the infected control group. It was also observed that B. subtilis PB6 improved villi length by 10.88 and 30.46% (P < 0.05) compared with uninfected and infected control groups, respectively. The group supplemented with B. subtilis PB6 significantly (P < 0.05) increased the villi length to crypt

  9. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  10. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  11. Penile abscess and necrotizing fasciitis secondary to neglected false penile fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Reshaid Reshaid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile infection and abscess formation have been described in association with priapism, cavernosography, intracavernosal injection therapy, trauma and penile prosthesis. We report a case of penile abscess and necrotizing fasciitis of penile skin in a 37-year-old male, presented 3 weeks after neglected false penile fracture.

  12. PERIORBITAL NECROTIZING FASCIITIS DUE TO CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS IN A HEALTHY-YOUNG MAN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOORENBOSBOT, ACC; HOOYMANS, JMM; BLANKSMA, LJ

    1990-01-01

    A case report is presented of a healthy 25-year-old man who developed a periorbital necrotising fasciitis after a trivial trauma with a wooden splinter. Necrotising fasciitis of the eyelids occurs rarely. Cryptococcus neoformans is not described as a causative factor of necrotizing fasciitis.

  13. Prognostic factors and monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis: gram-positive versus gram-negative pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Wei-Hsiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis is rapidly progressive and life-threatening. This study was undertaken to ascertain whether the clinical presentation and outcome for patients with this disease differ for those infected with a gram-positive as compared to gram-negative pathogen. Methods Forty-six patients with monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis were examined retrospectively from November 2002 to January 2008. All patients received adequate broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, aggressive resuscitation, prompt radical debridement and adjuvant hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Eleven patients were infected with a gram-positive pathogen (Group 1 and 35 patients with a gram-negative pathogen (Group 2. Results Group 2 was characterized by a higher incidence of hemorrhagic bullae and septic shock, higher APACHE II scores at 24 h post-admission, a higher rate of thrombocytopenia, and a higher prevalence of chronic liver dysfunction. Gouty arthritis was more prevalent in Group 1. For non-survivors, the incidences of chronic liver dysfunction, chronic renal failure and thrombocytopenia were higher in comparison with those for survivors. Lower level of serum albumin was also demonstrated in the non-survivors as compared to those in survivors. Conclusions Pre-existing chronic liver dysfunction, chronic renal failure, thrombocytopenia and hypoalbuminemia, and post-operative dependence on mechanical ventilation represent poor prognostic factors in monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis. Patients with gram-negative monobacterial necrotizing fasciitis present with more fulminant sepsis.

  14. Antibiotics modulate intestinal immunity and prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonatal piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preterm birth, bacterial colonization, and formula feeding predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Antibiotics are commonly administered to prevent sepsis in preterm infants, but it is not known whether this affects intestinal immunity and NEC resistance. We hypothesized that broad-spectrum a...

  15. Dietary supplementation of young broiler chickens with Capsicum and turmeric oleoresins increases resistance to necrotic enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clostridium-related poultry disease, necrotic enteritis (NE), causes substantial economic losses on a global scale. In this study, a mixture of two plant-derived phytonutrients, Capsicum oleoresin and turmeric oleoresin (XT), was evaluated for its effects on local and systemic immune responses ...

  16. Microbiological factors associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis : protective effect of early antibiotic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, TG; van Lelyveld, N; Vijlbrief, DC; Fleer, A; Gerards, LJ; Brouwers, H.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: The incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) strongly increased in an neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in 1997 and 1998 compared with previous years, which coincided with increased incidence of nosocomial sepsis. Specific risk factors related to this NICU and a possible relationship

  17. Mapping the New World of Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC): Review and Opinion

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive review of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is provided; including history, biological basis and frequently asked questions. In addition, a system of improved NEC classification is explained in detail (consisting of five NEC subsets and four NEC-like diseases), to aid the bedside clinician in therapy and prevention. The authors offer opinion for therapeutics in italics at the end of each definition.

  18. Mapping the New World of Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC): Review and Opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Phillip; Christensen, Robert; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive review of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is provided; including history, biological basis and frequently asked questions. In addition, a system of improved NEC classification is explained in detail (consisting of five NEC subsets and four NEC-like diseases), to aid the bedside clinician in therapy and prevention. The authors offer opinion for therapeutics in italics at the end of each definition.

  19. Necrotizing leptomeningeal vasculitis associated with a compressive meningioma in a cat: a rare paraneoplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les J. Gabor

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A 17 year old cat with a compressive meningioma was found to have an intradural, severe necrotizing vasculitis, spatially un associated with the neoplasm. Paraneoplastic vasculitis has been reported in two cases in the human literature associated with meningiomas. This is the first report of such an association in a domestic species.

  20. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy to Predict the Course of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schat, Trijntje E; Schurink, Maarten; van der Laan, Michelle E; Hulscher, Jan B F; Hulzebos, Christian V; Bos, Arend F; Kooi, Elisabeth M W

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether cerebral, liver, and infraumbilical regional tissue oxygen saturation (rSO2) and fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE) could be used to diagnose necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and complicated NEC (Bell's stage 3B or death) during its early stages. METHODS: A

  1. Microbiological factors associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis : protective effect of early antibiotic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, TG; van Lelyveld, N; Vijlbrief, DC; Fleer, A; Gerards, LJ; Brouwers, H.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: The incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) strongly increased in an neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in 1997 and 1998 compared with previous years, which coincided with increased incidence of nosocomial sepsis. Specific risk factors related to this NICU and a possible relationship betw

  2. Identification of bacterial invasion in necrotizing enterocolitis specimens using fluorescent in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, F H; Harmsen, H J M; Timmer, A; Kooi, E M W; Bos, A F; Hulscher, J B F

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigation of bacterial invasion into the intestinal wall in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) specimens. STUDY DESIGN: We compared 43 surgical NEC specimens with 43 age-matched controls. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), a universal bacterial probe together with species-

  3. Genome analysis of Clostridium perfringens isolates from healthy and necrotic enteritis infected chickens and turkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronco, Troels; Stegger, Marc; Ng, Kim Lee

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Clostridium perfringens causes gastrointestinal diseases in both humans and domestic animals. Type A strains expressing the NetB toxin are the main cause of necrotic enteritis (NE) in chickens, which has remarkable impact on animal welfare and production economy in the international...

  4. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from clinically healthy and necrotic enteritis-afflicted broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium perfringens (CP) Type A strains are the main etiological factor for necrotic enteritis (NE), one of the important enteric diseases in poultry, which has gained worldwide attention during the last decade and is responsible for the annual loss of 6 billion dollars in US poultry industry. ...

  5. Significance of thromboxane A2 and prostaglandin I2 in acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Ooijen (B.); W.J. Kort (Wil); C.J. Tinga (Cor); J.H.P. Wilson (Paul)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractPlasma thromboxane concentrations were found to be significantly elevated in acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats, whereas prostaglandin I2 levels were not. The significance of these alterations was investigated. Pancreatitis was induced by injecting 5% sodium taurocholate into the

  6. Gene expression profiling in necrotizing enterocolitis reveals pathways common to those reported in Crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    É. Tremblay (Éric); M.-P. Thibault (Marie-Pier); E. Ferretti (Emanuela); C. Babakissa (Corentin); V. Bertelle (Valérie); M. Bettolli (Marcos); K.M. Burghardt (Karolina Maria); J.-F. Colombani (Jean-François); D. Grynspan (David); E. Levy (Emile); P. Lu (Peng); S. Mayer (Sandeep); D. Ménard (Daniel); O. Mouterde (Olivier); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); E.G. Seidman (Ernest G.); J.-F. Beaulieu (Jean-François)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most frequent life-threatening gastrointestinal disease experienced by premature infants in neonatal intensive care units. The challenge for neonatologists is to detect early clinical manifestations of NEC. One strategy would be to ident

  7. Increased Intestinal Inflammation and Digestive Dysfunction in Preterm Pigs with Severe Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støy, Ann Cathrine Findal; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    The risk factors for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) are well known, but the factors involved in the different NEC presentations remain unclear. We hypothesized that digestive dysfunction and intestinal inflammation are mainly affected by severe NEC lesions. In 48 preterm pigs, the association be...

  8. Presence of necrotic strains of Potato virus Y in Mexican potatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Soriano Juan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Correction to Ramírez-Rodríguez VR, Frías-Treviño G, Aviña-Padilla K, Silva-Rosales L, Martínez-Soria JP: Presence of necrotic strains of Potato virus Y in Mexican potatoes. Virology Journal 2009, 6:48

  9. Genetically disparate Fayoumi chicken lines show different response to avian Necrotic Enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) has reemerged as a significant problem as a result of growing restrictions of antibiotics in agricultural animal production and increasing concerns over antibiotic resistance in human pathogens. To enhance our understanding of host-pathogen immunobiology in NE, transcriptomi...

  10. Genomic regions associated with necrotic enteritis resistance in Fayoumi and White Leghorn chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we used two breeds of chicken to identify genomic regions corresponding to necrotic enteritis (NE) resistance. We scanned the genomes of a resistant and susceptible line of Fayoumi and White Leghorn chicken using a chicken 60K Illumina SNP panel. A total of 235 loci with divergently ...

  11. Avian necrotic enteritis: experimental models, host immunity, pathogenesis, risk factors, and vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing trends of legislative restrictions and voluntary removal of antibiotic growth promoters worldwide has already impacted, and will continue to affect, poultry production and animal health. Necrotic enteritis (NE) is being considered among the most important infectious diseases in the c...

  12. The role of routine fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of infected necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baal, M.C.P.M. van; Bollen, T.L.; Bakker, O.J.; Goor, H. van; Boermeester, M.A.; Dejong, C.H.; Gooszen, H.G.; Harst, E. van der; Eijck, C.H. van; Santvoort, H.C. van; Besselink, M.G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnosing infected necrotizing pancreatitis (INP) may be challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the added value of routine fine-needle aspiration (FNA) in addition to clinical and imaging signs of infection in patients who underwent intervention for suspected INP. METHODS:

  13. Platelet-activating factor, tumor necrosis factor, hypoxia and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, W; Caplan, M S; Sun, X; Tan, X; MacKendrick, W; Gonzalez-Crussi, F

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is poorly understood. We have established several animal models of NEC by using a combination of various stimuli and stress, including endotoxin, PAF, TNF, and hypoxia. We discuss the mechanism of their actions and the possible roles of these factors in the pathogenesis of human NEC.

  14. Resistance of potato clones to necrotic recombinant strains of potato virus y (pvy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Regina Rodrigues de Paula Ribeiro

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Ry adg allele is widely used by breeders to confer extreme resistance to all strains of PVY. However, the necrotic strain has increased recombination resulting in recent considerable losses in productivity. Thus far, not all necrotic recombinant strains of PVY have been tested for their reaction to the Ry gene. The objective of this study was to identify potato clones carrying the resistant allele and to assess their reaction to the following recombinant strains: NTN (PVY NTN, Wilga (PVY N-Wi, and "curly top" (PVY E. Advanced clones from the potato breeding program at Universidade Federal de Lavras were evaluated through a specific molecular marker for the Ry adg allele. The clones carrying the resistance allele were grafted on tobacco plants infected with necrotic recombinant strains of PVY. The clones carrying the allele for resistance to PVY were not infected with any of the recombinants during the grafting test. These results confirm that resistance to necrotic recombinant strains has not yet been overcome and that the Ry adg allele also confers resistance to the three recombinant strains tested.

  15. Association of cord blood digitalis-like factor and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Graves, Steven W

    2014-04-01

    Endogenous digoxin-like factor (EDLF) has been linked to vasoconstriction, altered membrane transport, and apoptosis. Our objective was to determine whether increased EDLF in the cord sera of preterm infants was associated with an increased incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

  16. Regenerative potential of immature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps after different regenerative protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Mohamed M; Tawfik, Hosam E; Hashem, Ahmed Abdel Rahman; Abu-Seida, Ashraf M

    2014-02-01

    Regenerative endodontics is a promising alternative treatment for immature teeth with necrotic pulps. The present study was performed to assess the regenerative potential of young permanent immature teeth with necrotic pulp after the following treatment protocols: (1) a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plug, (2) the regenerative endodontic protocol (blood clot scaffold), and (3) the regenerative endodontic protocol with a blood clot and an injectable scaffold impregnated with basic fibroblast growth factor. Immature necrotic permanent maxillary central incisors (n = 36) of patients 9-13 years old were divided into 3 groups according to the treatment protocol: the MTA group (MTA apical plug), the REG group (regenerative endodontic protocol [blood clot]), and the FGF group (regenerative endodontic protocol [blood clot + injectable scaffold]). Follow-up was done up to 18 months. Standardized radiographs were digitally evaluated for an increase in root length and thickness, a decrease in the apical diameter, and a change in periapical bone density. After a follow-up period of 18 months, most of the cases showed radiographic evidence of periapical healing. Groups 2 and 3 showed a progressive increase in root length and width and a decrease in apical diameter. The regenerative endodontic procedure allowed the continued development of roots in teeth with necrotic pulps. The use of artificial hydrogel scaffold and basic fibroblast growth factor was not essential for repair. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Major genes for resistance to beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) in Beta vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Olga E.; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Keizer, L.C. Paul; Bock, Theo S.M. de; Lange, Wouter

    1996-01-01

    Inheritance of resistance to beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) was studied in segregating F2 and backcross families obtained from crosses between resistant plants of the sugar beet selection Holly-1-4 or the wild beet accession Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima WB42 and susceptible parents.

  18. Pseudocyst and a Collar Stud Abscess: New Face of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Meconium pseudocyst formation secondary to antenatal perforation is well described. We present a preterm infant who had intra-abdominal pseudocyst formation following postnatal intestinal perforation secondary to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC and secondarily leading to extra-abdominal collar stud abscess. This is new face of NEC and this presentation has not been reported earlier.

  19. Pseudocyst and a Collar Stud Abscess: New Face of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Patel, Ramnik; Patwardhan, Nitin; More, Bharat

    2014-01-01

    Meconium pseudocyst formation secondary to antenatal perforation is well described. We present a preterm infant who had intra-abdominal pseudocyst formation following postnatal intestinal perforation secondary to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and secondarily leading to extra-abdominal collar stud abscess. This is new face of NEC and this presentation has not been reported earlier. PMID:26023517

  20. Candida albicans-associated necrotizing vasculitis producing life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sargent, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    Patients undergoing treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are at risk for fungal infections including disseminated candidiasis. We describe a case of systemic Candida albicans infection associated with life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to unusual necrotizing vasculitis involving the gastrointestinal tract. We explore the association between Candida and such vasculopathy.

  1. Cancer resistance in the blind mole rat is mediated by concerted necrotic cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vera; Hine, Christopher; Tian, Xiao; Ablaeva, Julia; Gudkov, Andrei V; Nevo, Eviatar; Seluanov, Andrei

    2012-11-20

    Blind mole rats Spalax (BMR) are small subterranean rodents common in the Middle East. BMR is distinguished by its adaptations to life underground, remarkable longevity (with a maximum documented lifespan of 21 y), and resistance to cancer. Spontaneous tumors have never been observed in spalacids. To understand the mechanisms responsible for this resistance, we examined the growth of BMR fibroblasts in vitro of the species Spalax judaei and Spalax golani. BMR cells proliferated actively for 7-20 population doublings, after which the cells began secreting IFN-β, and the cultures underwent massive necrotic cell death within 3 d. The necrotic cell death phenomenon was independent of culture conditions or telomere shortening. Interestingly, this cell behavior was distinct from that observed in another long-lived and cancer-resistant African mole rat, Heterocephalus glaber, the naked mole rat in which cells display hypersensitivity to contact inhibition. Sequestration of p53 and Rb proteins using SV40 large T antigen completely rescued necrotic cell death. Our results suggest that cancer resistance of BMR is conferred by massive necrotic response to overproliferation mediated by p53 and Rb pathways, and triggered by the release of IFN-β. Thus, we have identified a unique mechanism that contributes to cancer resistance of this subterranean mammal extremely adapted to life underground.

  2. Ultrasound-assisted focused open necrosectomy in the treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupelis, Guntars; Fokin, Vladimir; Zeiza, Kaspars; Kazaka, Ita; Pereca, Jelizaveta; Skuja, Vita; Boka, Viesturs

    2015-03-20

    The surgical treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis includes percutaneous drainage of acute necrotic collections and sequestrectomy in the late phase of the disease. The aim of the study was to compare the conventional open necrosectomy (CON) approach with the alternative focused open necrosectomy (FON) approach in patients with infected necrosis and progression of sepsis. Patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis were included in the study prospectively from January 2004 to July 2014. All patients had been admitted with the first or a new episode of disease. Symptomatic large fluid collections were drained percutaneously. The step-up approach was used in patients with several distant localizations of infected necrosis. The methods were analysed by comparing the individual severity according to the ASA, APACHE II and SOFA scores, infection rate, postoperative complication rate and mortality. A total of 31 patients were included in the FON group and 39 in the CON group. The incidence of infection was similar in groups. More ASA III comorbid conditions, a higher APACHE II score, a more frequent need for renal replacement therapy was observed in the CON group. The postoperative complication rate was in the range of 32% to 44%; mortality reached 6.5% in the FON group and 12.8% in the CON group. Comorbid conditions, organ failure, and infection are the main risk factors in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. The step-up approach and perioperative ultrasonography navigation improves the clinical outcome and reduces the extent of invasive surgical intervention in patients unsuited to other minimally invasive procedures.

  3. Reconstructive considerations following a necrotic spider bite on the face: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Mikkelsen

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: In the few reported cases of necrotic spider bites in the facial region, active reconstructive measures have resulted in the best outcomes. Tissue expansion of local or regional skin may have a potential role, but in certain patients, simple reconstructive solutions will provide an aesthetically satisfactory result without requiring extensive or multi-stage surgeries, as demonstrated in this case.

  4. A rare cause of cellulitis (necrotic arachnidism: a report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugba Sari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bites from brown recluse spiders (Loxosceles reclusa result in several clinical manifestations, causing painful, disfiguring necrotic ulcers and, uncommonly, severe systemic effects. We report two cases reports with necrotic arachnidism from Turkey. A 21-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with the complaints of pruritis, redness on his neck. He had a history of spider bite one day ago. A 52-year-old woman had a cellulitis with hemorrhagic lesion and superficial necrosis on her arm and had a history of spider bite one day ago. Based on these clinical and epidemiological findings, a diagnosis of necrotic arachnidism was suspected, and the diagnosis of necrotic arachnidism was confirmed with these typical skin lesions and spiders bites in histories of patients. The outcome of our patients were good after antihistaminic, antibiotic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory treatments. The brown recluse spider is notorious for its necrosisinducing bite. Its venom contains a rare toxin, sphingomyelinase D, which activates the vascular endothelium and initiates a cascade of activation of neutrophils and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, resulting in tissue destruction. In many cases, diagnosis of spider bite is very difficult. Therefore, clinical and epidemiological findings, as well as a detailed history, may establish the diagnosis.

  5. PERIORBITAL NECROTIZING FASCIITIS DUE TO CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS IN A HEALTHY-YOUNG MAN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOORENBOSBOT, ACC; HOOYMANS, JMM; BLANKSMA, LJ

    1990-01-01

    A case report is presented of a healthy 25-year-old man who developed a periorbital necrotising fasciitis after a trivial trauma with a wooden splinter. Necrotising fasciitis of the eyelids occurs rarely. Cryptococcus neoformans is not described as a causative factor of necrotizing fasciitis. Crypto

  6. Cryptococcal necrotizing fasciitis in a patient after renal transplantation--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, T; Itami, Y; Hirayama, A; Saka, T; Yoshida, K; Fujimoto, K

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old man, who had received an ABO-incompatible living related preemptive renal transplantation 1 year before, presented with painful lesions on both lower extremities and fever. At first, bacterial cellulitis was suspected and antibiotic therapy was initiated, but it was not effective. The serum cryptococcal antigen titer was 1:4,098, and pathologic examination of debrided tissue and wound pus culture revealed cryptococcal necrotizing fasciitis. Liposomal amphotericin B and fluconazole were started, and repeated debridement and skin grafting were performed. Because his graft function deteriorated because of antibody-mediated rejection and polyoma viral nephropathy, hemodialysis was induced on day 9 of hospitalization. During the treatment, he suffered repeated urinary tract infections, which were treated with antibiotics, and cytomegalovirus retinopathy, which was treated with ganciclovir. His cryptococcal necrotizing fasciitis was successfully cured by the combination of antimicrobial treatment and surgical procedures. He could walk with a cane and was discharged on day 298 of hospitalization. Cryptococcal necrotizing fasciitis in renal transplant recipients is so rare that only 14 cases have been reported. The mortality is not very high, but the prognosis of the patient is complicated by worsening of the cryptococcal infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Early detection and treatment to prevent spreading to other sites, especially the CNS or disseminated disease, is very important in cases of cryptococcal necrotizing fasciitis.

  7. Diet- and colonization-dependent intestinal dysfunction predisposes to necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangild, Per T.; Siggers, Richard H.; Schmidt, Mette;

    2006-01-01

    Background & Aims: Preterm birth and formula feeding are key risk factors associated with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in infants, but little is known about intestinal conditions that predispose to disease. Thus, structural, functional, and microbiologic indices were used to investigate the et...

  8. A histomorphometric study of necrotic femoral head in rabbits treated with extracorporeal shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huan-Zhi; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Li, Dong; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Bing-Fang

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effectiveness and mechanisms of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in the treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis. [Subjects and Methods] Histomorphometric analysis of necrotic femoral head in rabbits treated with shock waves was performed. Bilateral osteonecrosis of femoral heads was induced with methylprednisolone and lipopolysaccharide in eight rabbits. The left limb (study side) received shock waves to the femoral head. The right limb (control side) received no shock waves. Biopsies of the femoral heads were performed at 12 weeks after shock wave therapy. [Results] Necrotic femoral heads treated with shock waves, compared with controls, had higher bone volume per tissue volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, osteoblast surface/bone surface, osteoid surface/bone surface, osteoid thickness, mineralizing surface/bone surface, mineralizing apposition rate, and bone formation rate. However, trabecular separation was lower in shock wave-treated femoral heads than in controls. Eroded surface/bone surface and osteoclast surface/bone surface did not differ significantly between groups. [Conclusion] The bone mass of necrotic femoral heads treated with shock waves increases. Extracorporeal shock wave may promote bone repair in necrotic femoral heads through the proliferation and activation of osteoblasts. PMID:28210032

  9. Microbial and metabolic signatures of necrotizing enterocolitis in formula-fed piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major risk factors for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) include premature birth, formula feeding, and microbial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. We previously showed that feeding formula composed of lactose vs corn syrup solids protects against NEC in preterm pigs, however the microbial an...

  10. First report of Impatiens necrotic spot virus infecting greenhouse-grown potatoes in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    In April and May 2010, potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Atlantic) plants grown from pre-nuclear minitubers in three separate greenhouses located at the USDA-ARS facility in Prosser, WA exhibited necrotic spots on leaves similar to those produced by the early blight pathogen, Alternaria solani (Sor.)...

  11. Modulation of microrna in two genetically disparate chicken lines showing different necrotic enteritis disease susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a re-emerging disease as a result of an increased restriction on the use of antibiotics in poultry. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of NE are unclear. Therefore, we carried out small RNA transcriptome analysis in an experimentally induced NE m...

  12. Ordered transcriptional factor recruitment and epigenetic regulation of tnf-alpha in necrotizing acute pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandoval, J.; Pereda, J.; Rodriguez, J.L.; Escobar, J.; Hidalgo, J.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Franco, L.; Sastre, J.; Lopez-Rodas, G.

    2010-01-01

    Tauhe expression of the critical initiator cytokine TNF-alpha was strongly upregulated in vivo in acute necrotic pancreatitis (AP) in rodents and in vitro in TNF-alpha activated acinar AR42J cells. Upregulation of tnf-alpha, inos, icam-1 and il-6 occurred both in TNF-alpha receptor 1 and 2 knock-out

  13. Consequence of reduced necrotic bone elastic modulus in a Perthes' hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salmingo, Remel A.; Skytte, Tina Lercke; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    in the femoral head using Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Methods The femoral and necrotic bone of the affected hip of a Perthes’ patient was segmented from the MR images using Simpleware. The segmented parts were exported to SolidWorks to build the 3D solid model and Comsol for FEA. A load of 750 N (300% body...

  14. Non-Invasive Markers for Early Diagnosis and Determination of the Severity of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuijls, Geertje; Derikx, Joep P. M.; van Wijck, Kim; Zimmermann, Luc J. I.; Degraeuwe, Pieter L.; Mulder, Twan L.; Van der Zee, David C.; Brouwers, Hens A. A.; Verhoeven, Bas H.; van Heurn, L. W. Ernest; Kramer, Boris W.; Buurman, Wim A.; Heineman, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To improve diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) by noninvasive markers representing gut wall integrity loss (I-FABP and claudin-3) and gut wall inflammation (calprotectin). Furthermore, the usefulness of I-FABP to predict NEC severity and to screen for NEC was evaluated. Methods:

  15. Non-invasive markers for early diagnosis and determination of the severity of necrotizing enterocolitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuijls, G.; Derikx, J.P.; Wijck, K. van; Zimmermann, L.J.; Degraeuwe, P.L.J.; Mulder, T.L.; Zee, D.C. van der; Brouwers, H.A.A.; Verhoeven, B.H.; Heurn, L.W.E. van; Kramer, B.W.; Buurman, W.A.; Heineman, E.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To improve diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) by noninvasive markers representing gut wall integrity loss (I-FABP and claudin-3) and gut wall inflammation (calprotectin). Furthermore, the usefulness of I-FABP to predict NEC severity and to screen for NEC was evaluated. METHODS:

  16. Abdominal near-infrared spectroscopy measurements are lower in preterm infants at risk for necrotizing enterocolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near-infrared spectroscopy is a noninvasive method of measuring local tissue oxygenation (StO[2]). Abdominal StO[2] measurements in preterm piglets are directly correlated with changes in intestinal blood flow and markedly reduced by necrotizing enterocolitis. The objectives of this study were to us...

  17. Hypoxia-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress characterizes a necrotic phenotype of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Stromal fibrosis and tissue necrosis are major histological sequelae of hypoxia. The hypoxia-to-fibrosis sequence is well-documented in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, hypoxic and necrotic PDAC phenotypes are insufficiently characterized. Recently, reduction of tuberous sclerosis expression in mice together with oncogenic Kras demonstrated a rapidly metastasizing phenotype with histologically eccentric necrosis, transitional hypoxia and devascularisation. We established cell...

  18. Comparison of Risk Factors in Necrotizing Enterocolitis among Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferda Ozlu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Necrotizing enterocolitis is one of the important problems of premature infants. The incidence is about 1-5% in infants followed in neonatal care units and inversely related to gestational age and birth weight. Materials and Methods: In this study, 31 infants with necrotizing enterocolitis and 31 infants with similar gestational age and birth weight as control group hospitalized in Cukurova University Neonatal Care Unit between 1 January 2001-31 January 2004 were evaluated. Results: The incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis in this period was 1.4 (31/2214 admission. Mean gestational age was 30.5  3.2 weeks (25-36, mean birth weight was 1331  384 (730-2150 grams while 71% was younger than 32 gestational weeks and 67.7% was under 1500 grams. The signs of NEC were detected at a mean of 11.2  10. (2-38 days. Twenty-six (83.9% were being fed at the time of the necrotizing enterocolitis signs appeared. According to the Walsh and Kliegman classification, 19 (61.3% infants were in stage 1 (17 were 1a, 2 were 1b; 3 (9.6% infants were in stage 2a, 9 (%29.1 infants were in stage 3 (7 were in 3b. Blood culture was positive in 7 (%22.6 infants with predominance of gram negative microorganisms (5 infants. Eleven (%35.5 infants were exitus, 12 were discharged. Hypoxia, respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage and umbilical catheterization were significant risk factors in necrotizing enterocolitis . Thrombocytopenia, leucopenia and high C-reactive protein levels were significantly high in necrotizing enterocolitis group. Breast feeding is significantly high in control group. Conclusion: Necrotizing enterocolitis, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units. Early breast feeding with small amounts, increasing amount of milk slowly, antenatal steroids, caring hygiene rules can prevent the development of it. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 642-647

  19. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Desai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dirofilaria is parasitic nematodes of domestic and wild animals that can infect humans accidentally via vectors. Its occurrence in the oral cavity is extremely rare. The most frequent presentation of human dirofilariasis is a single submucosal nodule without signs of inflammation. We hereby, report a case of human dirofilariasis affecting the buccal mucosa in a 32-year-old farmer caused by D. repens.

  20. Oral leiomyomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, D D; Neville, B W

    1979-04-01

    Oral leiomyomas are considered to be rare neoplasms, but they may be encountered more frequently than generally believed. Three types of leiomyomas are commonly described: solid leiomyomas, angiomyomas, and epithelioid leiomyomas. Three cases of solid leiomyoma are presented, all of which occurred in the anterior mandibular mucobuccal fold. Leiomyomas can be easily confused with other spindle-cell tumors. The necessity of using special stains, especially Mallory's phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin, is discussed.

  1. Necrotizing Enterocolitis: A dreadful condition of premature babies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak sharma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available NEC is inflammatory necrosis of intestine with most common site being terminal ileum and ascending colon in preterm babies (1. The condition is typically seen in premature infants, and the timing of its onset is generally inversely proportional to the gestational age of the baby at birth, i.e. The earlier a baby is born, longer is the time of risk for NEC in premature babies. The incidence of NEC is inversely proportional to the gestational age and birth weight (2. Baby have initial symptoms which include feeding intolerance, increased gastric residuals, abdominal distension and bloody stools (3. The laboratory triad includes metabolic acidosis, hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia. Pneumatosis intestinalis is the pathognomonic radiological finding in the NEC. Modified Bell’s staging is used to stage the NEC. Treatment involves Nil per Oral, supportive care, antibiotics, surgery in advanced stages and parenteral nutrition (4,5. Complication of NEC includes mortality, prolonged NICU stay, intestinal strictures, enterocutaneous fistula, intra-abdominal abscess, cholestasis, and short-bowel syndrome (6,7, neurodevelopmental, motor, sensory, and cognitive problems (8,9.

  2. Comparison of oral manifestations with CD4 count in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Arun Sontakke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objective: This study was carried out with the primary aim of correlating oral changes and general changes of HIV-infected patients with their CD4 count. Materials and Methods: 124 patients were selected, and after taking their informed consent, they were subjected to detailed history taking and thorough clinical examination. Specific oral lesions and general physical changes were recorded. Every patient was subjected to laboratory investigation for CD4 count. All these findings were tabulated. The clinical observation and laboratory findings were subjected to critical analysis and correlated. Statistical test, i.e. Student′s " t" test, was applied and objective conclusions were drawn. Result: Out of 124 patients, 40 had oral candidiasis, 6 had oral hairy leukoplakia, 12 had periodontal disease, 20 had xerostomia, 30 had melanin pigmentation, while 4 had HSV2, and atypical ulceration. Out of 40 patients with oral candidiasis, 28 patients had CD4 count 500 cell/mm 3 . Oral hairy leukoplakia occurred in equal proportions in group A and B. These periodontal diseases were more commonly in group B; xerostomia and melanin pigmentation was equally seen in group A and B. Conclusion: Oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, and necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis are specific oral indicators which will definitely suggest to the dental surgeon that the disease is running a rapid downhill course and due to this the oral physician is in a position to raise a suspicion and alert the general physician regarding the declining immune status of patient.

  3. Inverse association between size of the lipid-rich necrotic core and vascularization in human carotid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmgren, Ola; Johansson, Lars; Prahl, Ulrica; Schmidt, Caroline; Bergström, Göran M L

    2017-04-12

    To study the relationship between the size of the lipid-rich necrotic core measured by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and the level of plaque vascularization measured by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, in human carotid plaques. Further, to compare the size of lipid-rich necrotic core from MRI to plaque echogenicity. Thirty-one subjects with carotid plaques underwent standard B-mode ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound and MRI. The lipid-rich necrotic core was quantified using MRI. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound was used to measure carotid plaque vascularization. Standard B-mode ultrasound was used to measure plaque echogenicity as greyscale median. The amount of lipid-rich necrotic core correlated inversely with the degree of plaque vascularization (r = -0·40, P = 0·03). There were no correlations between the degree of plaque vascularization and the amount of fibrous tissue or calcifications. There were no correlations between greyscale median and the lipid-rich necrotic core, fibrous tissue or calcifications. We show that more dense plaque vascularization is associated with a lower plaque content of lipid-rich necrotic core. A large lipid-rich necrotic core and high plaque vascularization are both proposed as predictors of vulnerability, and our finding is therefore odds with some earlier observations. Our finding can be explained by the fact that the necrotic core of the plaque contains no viable tissue and therefore less of the plaque can be vascularized if the lipid-rich necrotic core is large. Our study suggests that the true relation between plaque vascularization and other indices of vulnerability is more complex than initially thought. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The effects of necrotic enteritis, aflatoxin B1, and virginiamycin on growth performance, necrotic enteritis lesion scores, and mortality in young broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, R L; Goss, G R; Chi, F; De Boer, E D; Davis, S W; Hendrix, S M; Richardson, J A; Johnston, S L

    2013-08-01

    The effects of increasing aflatoxin B1 concentration (0, 0.75, 1.5 mg/kg) on broilers with or without necrotic enteritis or virginiamycin were determined. In the 23-d study, 22 male Cobb 500 chicks per pen were allotted to 12 treatments (3 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement) with 8 replications. Intestines of 5 birds per pen were examined for lesions on d 21. Birds were allowed to consume feed and water ad libitum. Aflatoxin was included in the diets from d 0. All birds received a 10× dose of coccidiosis vaccine on d 10. Pens of birds where necrotic enteritis was being induced were on Clostridium perfringens pathogen (CPP) contaminated litter from d 0. Aflatoxin decreased gain and feed intake and resulted in poorer feed:gain, increased mortality, and higher lesion scores. Inducing necrotic enteritis increased lesion scores and decreased feed intake and gain. Adding virginiamycin to the diets improved gain, feed intake, feed conversion, and decreased mortality. There was a 3-way interaction (aflatoxin × virginiamycin × CPP) on gain; increasing aflatoxin decreased gain and the effects of CPP and virginiamycin were dependent on aflatoxin concentration. In the absence of aflatoxin virginiamycin increased gain but was unable to prevent the growth suppression caused by CPP. At 0.75 mg/kg of aflatoxin virginiamycin no longer increased growth in non-CPP challenged birds but was able to increase growth in CPP-challenged birds. At the 1.5 mg/kg of aflatoxin concentration, virginiamycin increased gain in non-CPP-challenged birds but challenging birds with CPP had no effect on gain. Virginiamycin improved overall feed conversion with the greatest improvement at 1.5 mg/kg (aflatoxin × virginiamycin, P enteritis decrease broiler performance and interact to decrease weight gain, virginiamycin helps improve gain in challenged birds at 0.75 mg/kg of aflatoxin, but not at 1.5 mg/kg of aflatoxin.

  5. Oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  6. Necrotizing fasciitis following saphenofemoral junction ligation with long saphenous vein stripping: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson Graeme

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare condition with a mortality rate of around 34%. It can be mono- or polymicrobial in origin. Monomicrobial infections are usually due to group A streptococcus and their incidence is on the rise. They normally occur in healthy individuals with a history of trauma, surgery or intravenous drug use. Post-operative necrotizing fasciitis is rare but accounts for 9 to 28% of all necrotizing fasciitis. The incidence of wound infection following saphenofemoral junction ligation and vein stripping is said to be less than 3%, although this complication is probably under-reported. We describe a case of group A streptococcus necrotizing fasciitis following saphenofemoral junction ligation and vein stripping. Case Presentation A 39-year-old woman presented three days following a left sided saphenofemoral junction ligation with long saphenous vein stripping at another institution. She had a three day history of fever, rigors and swelling of the left leg. She was pyrexial and shocked. She had a very tender, swollen left groin and thigh, with a small blister anteriorly and was in acute renal failure. She was prescribed intravenous penicillin and diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis. She underwent extensive debridement of her left thigh and was commenced on clindamycin and imipenem. Post-operatively, she required ventilatory and inotropic support with continuous veno-venous haemofiltration. An examination 12 hours after surgery showed no requirement for further debridement. A group A streptococcus, sensitive to penicillin, was isolated from the debrided tissue. A vacuum assisted closure device was fitted to the clean thigh wound on day four and split-skin-grafting was performed on day eight. On day 13, a wound inspection revealed that more than 90% of the graft had taken. Antibiotics were stopped on day 20 and she was discharged on day 22. Conclusion Necrotizing fasciitis is a very serious complication for a

  7. Early oral-motor management on feeding performance in premature neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Lin Liu

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Abnormal brain sonography [odds ratio (OR: 2.222, p = 0.047 and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC (OR: 2.857, p = 0.017 did affect the first trial in the study group. Early intervention of oral-motor management in very-low-birth-weight premature infants improved feeding performance and neonatal outcome in terms of shorter hospital days. Abnormal brain image and NEC could interfere with the success rate of initial challenge of transitioning from tube to oral feeding in the study group.

  8. Herpes simplex induced necrotizing tonsillitis in an immunocompromised patient with ulcerative colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Laura; Vos, Xander G; Löwenberg, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We here present the case of a 22-year-old female of Suriname ethnicity with ulcerative colitis who received treatment with mercaptopurine and infliximab. She presented herself with a severe necrotizing tonsillitis due to herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1). Combination therapy consisting of immunomodulators and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents is increasingly being used. Anti-TNF therapy is associated with an increased risk of developing serious infections, and especially patients receiving combination treatment with thiopurines are at an increased risk. We here show that HSV infections can cause a severe tonsillitis in immunocompromised patients. Early recognition is essential when there is no improvement with initial antibiotic therapy within the first 24 to 72 h. HSV infections should be in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised patients presenting with a necrotizing tonsillitis and can be confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Early treatment with antiviral agents should be considered especially if antibiotic treatment fails in such patients. PMID:26881193

  9. Alternatives to antibiotics to prevent necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens: a microbiologist’s perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Louise Caly

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 2006 European ban on the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feed, numerous studies have been published describing alternative strategies to prevent diseases in animals. A particular focus has been on prevention of necrotic enteritis in poultry caused by Clostridium perfringens by the use of microbes or microbe-derived products. Microbes produce a plethora of molecules with antimicrobial properties and they can also have beneficial effects through interactions with their host. Here we review recent developments in novel preventive treatments against C. perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens that employ yeasts, bacteria and bacteriophages or secondary metabolites and other microbial products in disease control.

  10. Characterization of Clostridium perfringens isolates from healthy turkeys and from turkeys with necrotic enteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhs, Ulrike; Perko-Mäkelä, P.; Kallio, H.;

    2013-01-01

    from 1998 to 2012. Furthermore, C. perfringens isolates from healthy and diseased turkeys were characterized and their genetic diversity was investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Isolates (n = 212) from birds with necrotic gut lesions and from healthy flocks of 30 commercial...... turkey farms were characterized for the presence of cpa, cpb, iA, etx, cpb2, and cpe and netB genes. A total of 93 C. perfringens isolates, including 55 from birds with necrotic gut lesions and 38 from healthy birds from 13 different farms, were analyzed with PFGE. All contract turkey farmers (n = 48......) of a turkey company that produces 99% of domestic turkey meat in Finland were interviewed about background information, management at the farm, and stress factors related to NE outbreaks. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis with SmaI restriction enzyme resulted in 30 PFGE patterns among the 92 C...

  11. Extensive Necrotic Purpura in Levamisole-Adulterated Cocaine Abuse - A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Garff, Erwan; Tournel, Gilles; Becquart, Coralie; Cottencin, Olivier; Dupin, Nicolas; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Hedouin, Valéry

    2016-11-01

    Levamisole, which is used as an adulterated compound of cocaine, is currently being seen year after year in cocaine intoxication. For a few cases in the last decade, necrotic purpura and neutropenia after levamisole/cocaine intoxication have been described in the medical community. Herein, we present an original case of levamisole intoxication of a 40-year-old woman who smoked heroin and cocaine few during a month. She rapidly presented an extensive necrotic purpura of the nose, cheeks and extremities (lower and upper), and immunologic reactions (positive anti-MPO and anti-HNE). Levamisole was detected on hairs with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. The case reports also a probable cocaine supplier deceit, which bring pure drug for hospital investigation after the intoxication of his client. The intoxicated woman had survived with several skin and chronic pain complications. That case recalls the knowledge about levamisole with a short review of the forensic literature.

  12. NECROTIZING HISTIOCYTIC LYMPHADENITIS/KIKUCHI-FUJIMOTO DISEASE: A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease is a rare benign, condition of necrotizing histiocytic lymphadenitis. A case of a 21 year old gentleman is described here. He presented with fever, weight loss and non-tender cervical lymph nodes. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease was diagnosed after cervical lymph node biopsy. Symptomatic treatment was provided and an uneventful full recovery was made. BACKGROUND: The presenting complaint of neck masses in association with non-specific systemic signs and symptoms prompt investigation towards the more common diagnoses. However, rarer conditions like Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease must be included in the differential diagnosis of necrotizing lymphadenopathies such as tuberculosis, lupus erythematosus and lymphoma as its course and treatment are entirely different. (1Here in we discuss a case of male patient who presented with a neck mass that was not attributable to the more common causes.

  13. Late-onset necrotizing scleritis due to pigmented mycetoma (dematiaceous fungi) in 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Jagadesh C; Rapuano, Christopher J; Eagle, Ralph C; Shields, Carol L; Shields, Jerry A

    2013-04-01

    To describe the atypical presentation of fungal infection and necrotizing scleritis, the potential role of histopathology in the diagnosis, and surgical excision in the management. Retrospective interventional case series. Two patients presented with a pigmented conjunctival mass, one resembling necrotizing scleritis with uveal prolapse and the other resembling a pigmented ocular surface tumor, both after excision of nasal pterygium, 12 and 50 years previously, respectively. The pigmented lesion was 2 × 1.5 mm in each case, both situated on the bulbar surface 2 mm from the nasal limbus. After surgical excision, each lesion histopathologically displayed fungal filaments (pigmented dematiaceous fungi). Pigmented mycetoma (dematiaceous fungi) can simulate uveal tissue prolapse, pigmented foreign body, or pigmented epibulbar tumors, particularly melanoma. Surgical excision of the entire lesion is effective for management.

  14. Cytopathological changes in Schefflera actinophylla Harms. naturally infected with impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rudzińska-Langwald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants of Schefflera actinophylla Harms. with stunted growth, chlorotic and necrotic spots and patterns, leaf epinasty and distortion are infected with impatiens necrotic spot virus classified as a member of genus Tospovirus. Studies with electron microscope revealed that in cells of S. actinophylla leaves there were no virus particle inclusions typical for tospovirus infection, but only single particles were present. The isolate of INSV was defective and the amount of INSV particles was strongly reduced in Schefflera plants. Some inclusions (I type were composed of short branched cisterns of endoplasmic reticulum and a dark substance forming characteristic bands. The II type represented inclusions that were usually ballshaped and composed of a dark substance resembling that of the I type, but not accompanied by endoplasmic reticulum cisterns. The III type of inclusions was composed of dark, osmophilic masses. The inclusions present in the cells differ from those typical for tospovirus infection.

  15. [Epidemiology of invasive group A streptococcal infections in developed countries : the Canadian experience with necrotizing fasciitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovetchkine, Ph; Bidet, Ph; Minodier, Ph; Frère, J; Bingen, E

    2014-11-01

    In industrialized countries, group A streptococcal infections were a source of concern, mainly due to the occurrence of rheumatic fever and its cardiac complications. At present, the incidence of rheumatic fever is decreasing in these countries, giving way to an increasing occurrence of invasive streptococcal group A infections with high level of morbidity and mortality. Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis, a specific entity, emerged these last decades, often in association with chickenpox. The introduction of the varicella vaccine in the province of Quebec routine immunization program, was followed by a significant decrease in the number of necrotizing fasciitis or other skin and soft-tissues infections in our pediatric population. However, in our experience at the CHU Sainte-Justine, this immunization program has not been helpful to reduce the overall incidence of invasive group A streptococcal infections. Conversely, an increase in the number of pleuro-pulmonary and osteo-articular infections was observed.

  16. Antiproteases in the Treatment of Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis: Continuous Regional Arterial Infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Takeda

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute necrotizing pancreatitis is still a fatal disease. Pancreatic necrosis might be, in part, a result of infarction due to ischemia with vasospasm and an increase in intravascular coagulability. Synthetic antiproteases have a broad inhibitory action on pancreatic enzymes, the coagulation system, the complement system and the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, antiproteases have been expected to prevent necrotic changes in the pancreas and to reduce the mortality rate. However, the clinical efficacy of antiproteases is still a matter of controversy. Unfortunately, an antiprotease cannot easily reach the pancreas when administered intravenously because of its pharmacokinetic characteristics and impaired microcirculation. Administration through a catheter placed in one of the arteries which supplies the inflamed area of the pancreas, dramatically increases the concentration of the antiprotease in the pancreas. Clinical studies of continuous regional arterial infusion of a protease inhibitor have been conducted in Japan and have demonstrated the possible therapeutic efficacy of the new treatment in severe acute pancreatitis.

  17. [Necrotizing fasciitis and group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome in two patients without risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Gaytán, Juan Jacobo; Guajardo-Lara, Claudia Elena; Valdovinos-Chávez, Salvador Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis associated to group A streptococcus (S. pyogenes) infection is a deep-seated infection of the subcutaneous tissue that results in progressive destruction of fascia and fat, with a high mortality rate due to a rapid progression of the illness to shock and multiple organ dysfunction. The challenge is to perform a prompt diagnosis because it is often confused with a minor soft-tissue infection. This infection should be aggressively treated with systemic antimicrobials, surgical debridement, and critical care. We present two cases of necrotizing fasciitis associated to infection with Streptococcus pyogenes patients developed myonecrosis and toxic shock syndrome within the following 24 hours after admission. In addition, we reviewed the pathogenic mechanism, diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome and discuss published treatment recommendations.

  18. A distinct tospovirus causing necrotic streak on Alstroemeria sp. in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani-Mehraban, Afshin; Botermans, Marleen; Verhoeven, J Th J; Meekes, Ellis; Saaijer, Janneke; Peters, Dick; Goldbach, Rob; Kormelink, Richard

    2010-03-01

    A tospovirus causing necrotic streaks on leaves was isolated from Alstroemeria sp. in Colombia. Infected samples reacted positively with tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) antiserum during preliminary serological tests. Further analysis revealed a close serological relationship to tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) and groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV). A major part of the S-RNA segment, encompassing the nucleocapsid (N) protein gene, the 5' untranslated region and a part of the intergenic region 3' of the N gene, was cloned and sequenced. The deduced N protein sequence showed highest amino acid identity (82%) to that of TCSV, indicating that the virus represents a new tospovirus species, for which the name Alstroemeria necrotic streak virus (ANSV) is coined. Phylogenetic analysis based on the N protein sequence revealed that this Alstroemeria-infecting tospovirus clustered with tospoviruses from the American continent. Frankliniella occidentalis was identified as potential vector species for ANSV.

  19. Necrotic dermatitis in waterfowl associated with consumption of perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Amir; Madani, Seyed Ahmad; Vajhi, Alireza

    2011-03-01

    Mute swans (Cygnus olor), whooper swans (Cygnus cygnus), and mixed-breed domestic geese (Anser anser domesticus) were presented for necrotic lesions on the feet, eyelids, and beak. Individuals from the same collection of birds had developed identical lesions during March-September of each of the previous 3 years. Vesicular and necrotic dermatitis involved only nonfeathered and nonpigmented areas of the integument. No abnormal clinical signs were seen on either carnivorous species or birds with pigmented skin from the same collection. The enclosure that housed the birds had been planted with perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne) 3 years previously. Based on the pathologic features and anatomic location of the lesions, the seasonal occurrence, the vegetation history of the enclosure, and the feeding behavior of the affected species, vesicular dermatitis resulting from photosensitization was the presumptive diagnosis. All affected birds recovered completely after the birds were removed from the enclosure, and no further clinical signs have been reported.

  20. [Tularemia lymphadenitis. An emerging differential diagnosis of necrotizing granulomatous cervical lymphadenitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehl, J; Schoerner, C; Hartmann, A; Agaimy, A

    2014-03-01

    Tularemia is emerging as an important differential diagnosis of necrotizing granulomatous lymphadenitis, particularly in the head and neck region. The causal organism, Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative coccoid bacterium. Tularemia usually presents with necrotizing granulomatous purulent lymphadenitis featuring multiple mostly small granulomas with geographic necrosis bordered by palisades of histiocytes. Diagnosis is mainly based on these characteristic but non-pathognomonic histological features in conjunction with negative tests for mycobacterial infections and serological confirmation of tularemia-specific antibodies or detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This article describes our experiences with five patients with tularemia lymphadenitis and gives an overview of the diverse histopathological features and the differential diagnosis of this uncommon but possibly underrecognized disease.

  1. Effects of bovine necrotic vulvovaginitis on productivity in a dairy herd in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, S; Mazuz, M; Brenner, J; Friedgut, O; Koren, O; Goshen, T; Elad, D

    2008-05-01

    Bovine necrotic vulvovaginitis (BNVV) is characterized by the development of a necrotic vulvovaginal lesion, almost exclusively in post-parturient first-lactation cows, associated with Porphyromonas levii. The scope of this survey was to evaluate the impact of BNVV on herd productivity as a means to rationally evaluate the resources that should be allocated in dealing with the syndrome. During an outbreak of BNVV in a dairy herd, following the introduction of a large number of cows from another farm, the impact of the animals' origin (local or transferred) and BNVV (positive or negative) upon involuntary culling rate, milk yield and days between pregnancies were assessed. The results indicated that the number of days between pregnancies was significantly higher in first-lactation cows with BNVV but was not influenced by the other independent variables. None of the other variables included in this survey had any effect on the involuntary culling rate and milk yield.

  2. Acute fulminant drug induced necrotizing pancreatitis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Miramontes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis is a rare adverse event, although it has been reported in association with different drugs, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and analgesic agents commonly used in rheumatology. In different reviews of the pancreotoxicity of drugs, infliximab and etanercept are mentioned among all medications implicated in drug-induced pancreatitis, but clinical cases of acute pancreatitis complicating treatment with these anti-TNF-α agents have been exceptionally reported. We describe a patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with etanercept, who developed an acute fulminant necrotizing pancreatitis that resulted in death. Doctors should pay close attention to patients taking biologic drugs in which a complaint of abdominal pain lasting for several days with no apparent cause may require a prompt referral for medical consultation.

  3. Spontaneous necrotizing sialometaplasia of the submandibular salivary gland in a Beagle dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaratirwa, Sydney; Petterino, Claudio; Bradley, Alys

    2015-07-01

    A single mass was found on the left submandibular salivary gland at necropsy of a 15-month-old male commercially bred laboratory Beagle dog from a control dose group from a repeat toxicity study. Microscopically, the mass was composed of a well-demarcated area of coagulative necrosis surrounded and separated from the normal salivary gland tissue by a thick fibrovascular capsule. Necrosis was admixed with areas of hemorrhage, fibrin, edema, fibrinoid necrosis of the vascular tunica media, and thrombosis of small and large vessels. Within the necrotic tissue, there was marked ductal hyperplasia, and squamous metaplasia of duct and acinar epithelium. The mass was diagnosed as necrotizing sialometaplasia of the submandibular gland. Hyperplastic ductal elements and squamous metaplasia can be mistaken microscopically with squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, pathologists should be aware of this lesion as to avoid errors in the diagnosis of this benign pathologic condition.

  4. Necrotic arachnidism of the eyelid due to Loxosceles rufescens spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajin, Meltem Soylev; Arikan, Gul; Parlak, Melih; Tuncok, Yesim; Yigit, Nazife; Durak, Ismet; Saatci, Ali Osman

    2011-12-01

    A 69-year-old woman was awakened with redness and swelling of the left upper eyelid a few days before her presentation. She also noticed a dead spider on her bed. Ophthalmic examination revealed severe left periorbital hyperemia, edema and a wide necrotic area on the upper eyelid. Systemic condition of the patient was well. She was hospitalized with the diagnosis of necrotic arachnidism of the left upper eyelid. Systemic corticosteroid and antibiotic treatment was commenced. No surgical intervention was carried out. A week later, whole upper eyelid was covered with a black eschar. This black eschar shrank with time, and it detached completely within 8 weeks and the lesion healed without a disfiguring scar. Meanwhile, the offending spider was identified as Loxosceles rufescens. Although rare, eyelid may be a biting site for Loxosceles spiders and a favorable result may be obtained with conservative management.

  5. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis and acute mediastinitis of odontogenic origin: A case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Cabello-Serrano, Almudena; Valencia-Laseca, Alfredo; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2017-01-01

    Necrotising fasciitis (NF) is an uncommon infection. Early signs and symptoms include fever, severe pain and swelling, and redness at the wound site. Moreover, fulminant evolution and high mortality rate are typical of this pathology. In the present report we describes three cases of cervical necrotizing fasciitis complicated by acute mediastinitis. All patients were apparently immunocompetent adults. The main aim of the present report is to show the serious consequences that a dental infection might trigger. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in these cases. The constant interaction between different medical specialties is essential for ensuring a proper management of each case. Key words:Cervical necrotizing fasciitis, acute mediastinitis, odontogenic origin , multidisciplinary approach. PMID:28149480

  6. An Eye Popping Case of Orbital Necrotizing Fasciitis Treated with Antibiotics, Surgery, and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singam, Narayanasarma V.; Rusia, Deepam; Prakash, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Necrotizing fasciitis of the eye Symptoms: Eye pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) of the orbit is a rare and deadly condition that requires prompt surgical and medical management to decrease morbidity and mortality. Case Report: Here we present an interesting case of an individual who developed fulminant NF of the left orbit requiring emergent surgical intervention, antibiotics, and subsequent hyperbaric oxygen therapy in an attempt to save the eye. Conclusions: With an early and aggressive multifaceted approach using antibiotics, surgery, and hyperbaric oxygen it may be possible to preserve eye structure and function. Without treatment NF is a rapidly progressive condition and can result in significant morbidity. PMID:28364115

  7. Necrotizing fasciitis – A rare but severe complication of perforated appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chung Hung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening and rapidly progressive inflammatory infection of the fascia, with secondary necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous fat and fascia, with or without inflammation of the underlying muscle. Herein, we describe two patients, a 73-year-old male and a 91-year-old female, who had several coexisting or past health issues, including diabetes mellitus (DM, hypertension and chronic renal disease. They were sent to emergency department (ED due to right lower abdomen, right flank and right thigh pain that had last for several days to one week. Computed tomography (CT revealed necrotizing fasciitis of the chest, abdominal wall and thigh due to a perforated appendix and a large retroperitoneal abscess. The male patient recovered following aggressive surgical and medical therapies. Mortality of the female patient was noted, despite percutaneous drainage of the retroperitoneal abscess and broad spectrum antibiotic treatment.

  8. Necrotizing fasciitis and infective endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli in a hemodialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Leu, Jyh-Gang; Fang, Yu-Wei; Hsieh, Shih-Chung

    2015-10-01

    Patients with uremia are often immunocompromised and uremia patients undergoing maintenance dialysis are often vulnerable to uncommon infections. We report a 40-year-old man who was undergoing maintenance hemodialysis and was initially diagnosed with monomicrobal necrotizing fasciitis of the lower limbs, based on blood and pus cultures that yielded Escherichia coli. His condition improved after surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. However, he eventually died of intracranial hemorrhage related to septic emboli. Concurrent infective endocarditis was diagnosed based on an echocardiogram that indicated vegetation in the left ventricular region. Escherichia coli-related necrotizing fasciitis and infective endocarditis is rarely seen in clinical practice. There should be a high index of suspicion for multiple infections when a hemodialysis patient presents with an uncommon infection.

  9. Group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome secondary to necrotizing pelvic inflammatory disease in a postmenopausal woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiwei Paulson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A β-hemolytic streptococcus (GAS is well known to cause upper respiratory tract or cutaneous infections, but some more virulent species of GAS can lead to a rapidly progressive life threatening soft tissue necrotizing infection and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS. In the modern era, GAS infections within the female reproductive tract leading to STSS are unusual and are often the result of retained products of conception or intrauterine devices. This report describes a case of GAS necrotizing pelvic infection in a previously healthy menopausal woman with no obvious portal of entry. Her clinical course rapidly progressed to septic shock and multiorgan failure. She required multiple surgeries in addition to targeted antimicrobials and aggressive management of shock and organ failures. After a prolonged hospital stay, she had a full recovery.

  10. Abdominal wall necrotizing fasciitis from dislodged percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Alexandra A; Miller, George; Bamboat, Zubin M; Hiotis, Karen

    2004-09-01

    We report three cases of abdominal wall necrotizing fasciitis that occurred as a result of leakage from displaced percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes. This is the first report of such a series. Patients underwent extensive operative excisions of their abdominal walls down to their posterior fascia. All patients tolerated their initial surgery, however, two patients ultimately expired from respiratory complications. The surviving patient underwent multiple repeat debridements and reconstructive abdominal wall surgery. We review the epidemiology of patients at risk for this complication and discuss its presentation, as well as the appropriate workup and management. We also address the issues of closure of large abdominal wall defects and future alimentation in this patient group. Finally, abdominal wall necrotizing faciitis from gastrostomy tube leakage is a devastating complication, and the development of preventative strategies for patients at risk is of paramount importance.

  11. Decreased Necrotizing Fasciitis Capacity Caused by a Single Nucleotide Mutation That Alters a Multiple Gene Virulence Axis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Randall J. Olsen; Izabela Sitkiewicz; Ara A. Ayeras; Vedia E. Gonulal; Concepcion Cantu; Stephen B. Beres; Nicole M. Green; Benfang Lei; Tammy Humbird; Jamieson Greaver; Ellen Chang; Willie P. Ragasa; Charles A. Montgomery; Joiner Cartwright; Allison McGeer; Donald E. Low; Adeline R. Whitney; Philip T. Cagle; Terry L. Blasdel; Frank R. DeLeo; James M. Musser; Richard Krause

    2010-01-01

    ... ("flesh-eating disease"). Working from this clinical observation, we find that wild-type mtsR function is required for group A Streptococcus to cause necrotizing fasciitis in mice and nonhuman primates...

  12. Investigation of the early intestinal microflora in premature infants with/without necrotizing enterocolitis using two different methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Birgitte; Bodé, Susan; Skov, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The pathophysiology of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is multifactorial, and gastrointestinal bacteria are thought to play an important role. In this study, the role of microflora in the gastrointestinal tract of neonates with NEC was assessed by comparing cases with controls....

  13. Centrally necrotizing breast carcinoma: a rare histological subtype, which was cause of misdiagnosis in an evident clinical local recurrence

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    Hernanz Fernando

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Centrally necrotizing carcinoma is a rare subtype of breast carcinoma, which is characterized by an extensive central necrotic zone accounting for at least 70% of the cross-sectional area of the neoplasm. This central necrotic zone, in turn, is surrounded by a narrow rim of proliferative viable tumor cells. We report an unusual clinical situation in which a patient whose evident breast mass suggested an ipsilateral local recurrence and for which numerous attempts to confirm the histological diagnosis had failed. The patient was treated with a radical mastectomy based on clinical suspicion of breast cancer recurrence after an undesirable delay. In this case, the narrow rim of viable malignant tissue had a thickness of 0.5 to 8 mm, and the centrally necrotizing carcinoma had a central zone with a predominance of fibrosis. The special features of this case led to a misdiagnosis and to an evident clinical local recurrence.

  14. Necrotizing fasciitis of lower extremity caused by Haemophilus influenzae in a healthy adult with a closed lisfranc injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, R Wesley; Casillas, Mark M; Almaguer, Enrique C

    2014-05-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare bacterial infection with an incidence of approximately 0.4 cases per 100,000 population. Although the majority of cases of necrotizing fasciitis are polymicrobial, a systematic review of the literature found only 7 reports of Haemophilus influenzae as the causal agent, and only 1 incidence of H influenzae causing the infection in a healthy adult. This report documents the unusual case of necrotizing fasciitis in a healthy adult with a history of smoking as her only risk factor. The patient presented with a seemingly innocuous low-grade Lisfranc injury. Our case illustrates the importance of early diagnosis and aggressive surgical management and medical treatment of necrotizing fasciitis.

  15. The Role of Growth Factors in Intestinal Regeneration and Repair in Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Kathryn J.; Choi, Pamela M.; Warner, Brad W.

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating intestinal disease resulting in major neonatal morbidity and mortality. The pathology is poorly understood, and means of preventing and treating NEC are limited. Several endogenous growth factors have been identified as having important roles in intestinal growth as well as aiding intestinal repair from injury or inflammation. In this review, we will discuss several growth factors as mediators of intestinal regeneration and repair as well as potential therapeutic agents for NEC. PMID:23611614

  16. Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Inconspicuous Infection of Aeromonas hydrophila in an Immunocompromised Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chun Liao

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of serious necrotizing fasciitis due to Aeromonas hydrophila without a suggestive history of routes of pathogen invasion in a 60-year-old male. Despite prompt broad-spectrum antibiotic and extensive surgical therapies, the patient died within 72 hours following initial presentation. Our experience suggests clinicians be highly alert to the disease when an immunocompromised patient featured fulminant soft-tissue infection in the endemic area.

  17. Periocular necrotizing fasciitis associated with kerato-conjunctivitis and treated with medical management: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shome Debraj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 25-year-old systemically healthy male who presented with periocular necrotizing fasciitis (NF in the left eyelid. This was associated with the presence of immunologically mediated marginal kerato-conjunctivitis, in the same eye. This potentially dangerous lid infection and the associated ocular surface infection resolved successfully, with medical management. We report this case to highlight the successful conservative management of periocular NF and the hitherto unreported anterior segment involvement.

  18. [Necrotizing tonsillitis and renal vein thrombosis due to acute myeloid leukaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Javed; Josefsson, Pernilla; Rømeling, Frans

    2012-09-03

    A 37-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with severe tonsillitis with unilateral necrotizing tonsillitis. She suddenly got fever, malaise, difficulties swallowing, pain in the throat and deterioration despite four days of penicillin treatment. During hospitalisation, she experienced abdominal pain, and blood tests showed pancytopenia. She was transferred to a haematological department, where a bone marrow biopsy showed acute myeloid leukaemia. Subsequently, an abdominal computed tomography with intravenous contrast revealed bilateral renal vein thrombosis, probably because of coagulopathy due to leukaemia.

  19. 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection and necrotizing pneumonia treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suntae Ji

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old girl with acute respiratory distress syndrome due to a H1N1 2009 influenza virus infection was complicated by necrotizing pneumonia was successfully treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO. This is the first reported case in which a pediatric patient was rescued with ECMO during the H1N1 influenza epidemic in Korea in 2009.

  20. Early Cytokine Profile Changes In Interstitial And Necrotic Forms Of Acute Pancreatitis

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    Kostic Irena

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a common, potentially lethal, acute inflammatory process with a highly variable clinical course. The aim of this study was to analyse early changes in the serum concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the peripheral blood of patients with the interstitial form of acute pancreatitis (IAP and necrotic acute pancreatitis (NAP, especially in those patients who had lethal outcomes.