WorldWideScience

Sample records for oral mucosal lesions

  1. Dental students' ability to detect and diagnose oral mucosal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad A; Joseph, Bobby K; Sundaram, Devipriya B

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of dental students in the screening clinic of the Kuwait University Dental Center to detect and diagnose oral mucosal lesions. Clinical examinations performed by dental students between January 2009 and February 2011 were included. All their findings regarding the oral mucosal lesions and dental carious lesions detected were recorded, after which the patients were re-examined by faculty examiners. The students rated their own ability to detect mucosal and carious lesions before each examination. Among the 341 patients screened, 375 oral mucosal lesions were found by the faculty examiners. Of those, the students detected 178 (47.5%). Out of the 375 lesions, including the ones they failed to detect, the students diagnosed 272 (72.5%) correctly. The students were more likely (p≤0.01) to correctly diagnose a mucosal lesion when they themselves had detected it (n=169/178) than when they failed to detect it and had it subsequently pointed out by the faculty examiners (n=103/197). The students were more competent in detecting carious lesions (p≤0.001) than in detecting mucosal lesions. A significantly higher proportion of students who felt confident in detecting mucosal lesions were actually more competent in detecting the lesions than those who were not confident (p≤0.001). Further educational strategies are needed to motivate Kuwait University dental students to develop the knowledge, skills, and judgment necessary to integrate a complete intraoral examination into their routine practice.

  2. Evaluation of Oral Mucosal Lesions in 598 Referred Iranian Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jahanbani, Jahanfar; Sandvik, Leiv; Lyberg, Torstein; Ahlfors, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The mucosal membrane of the oral cavity displays at times classical developmental lesions considered to be variations of normal structures rather than having disease characteristics. Of these lesions leukoedema, Fordyce granules, geographic-, fissured- and hairy tongue, median rhomboid glossitis and lingual varices were studied in 598 patients referred to the School of Dentistry, Tehran, Iran. The prevalence was studied in relation to age, gender, occupation, education, smoking habits, genera...

  3. Evaluation of oral mucosal lesions in 598 referred Iranian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbani, Jahanfar; Sandvik, Leiv; Lyberg, Torstein; Ahlfors, Eva

    2009-03-27

    The mucosal membrane of the oral cavity displays at times classical developmental lesions considered to be variations of normal structures rather than having disease characteristics. Of these lesions leukoedema, Fordyce granules, geographic-, fissured- and hairy tongue, median rhomboid glossitis and lingual varices were studied in 598 patients referred to the School of Dentistry, Tehran, Iran. The prevalence was studied in relation to age, gender, occupation, education, smoking habits, general health, addictions and or drug therapies. Oral developmental lesions were seen in 295 patients (49.3%). Only Fordyce granules (27,9%), fissured tongue (12,9%), leukoedema (12,5%) and hairy tongue (8,9%) had enough cases for statistical analysis. Three of these lesions increased with age but not fissured tongue. All were more common in men. After adjusting for age, the parameters education, occupation and complaints upon referral had little influence on the prevalence of the lesions. Fewer Fordyce granules were seen in oral mucosa of smoking men. Leukoedema and hairy tongue were significantly associated with smoking, leukoedema with diabetes mellitus. We conclude that there was a highly significant association between these oral lesions and age, gender and smoking. Few significant associations were found between oral lesions and general diseases.

  4. Dentists' knowledge and opinions about oral mucosal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, S; Ozel, S; Koray, M; Kürklü, E; Ak, G; Tanyeri, H

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to identify, compare and analyse the knowledge and opinions of dentists regarding oral mucosal lesions and evaluate the differences between the attitudes of dentists by practice settings. 300 dentists were enrolled in the study. Three groups were formed. The first group included general dental practitioners working in private dental offices; the second group were dentists practising in dental polyclinics; the third group was composed of dentists employed at universities in Istanbul, working in departments except for the department of oral surgery and medicine. A 17-item self constructed questionnaire investigating demographic attributes, dental practice characteristics, oral mucosal lesions (OML) knowledge and respondents' opinions was completed and all questions were asked by the same author. 85% of the dentists admitted difficulties in diagnosing OML. 62% failed to update their knowledge from the literature, 93% did not undertake biopsies or consult other practitioners. Dentists practising at universities attempted to treat fewer patients with OML (p=0.0001). The results of this questionnaire conclude that most dentists experience difficulties in diagnosing some OML.

  5. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in patients of the Kuwait University Dental Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ali, Mohammad; Joseph, Bobby; Sundaram, Devipriya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the number, types, and locations of oral mucosal lesions in patients who attended the Admission Clinic at the Kuwait University Dental Center to determine...

  6. Role of dental restoration materials in oral mucosal lichenoid lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajneesh Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental restorative materials containing silver-mercury compounds have been known to induce oral lichenoid lesions. Objectives: To determine the frequency of contact allergy to dental restoration materials in patients with oral lichenoid lesions and to study the effect of removal of the materials on the lesions. Results: Forty-five patients were recruited in three groups of 15 each: Group A (lesions in close contact with dental materials, Group B (lesions extending 1 cm beyond the area of contact and Group C (no topographic relationship. Thirty controls were recruited in two groups of 15 individuals each: Group D (oral lichenoid lesions but no dental material and Group E (dental material but no oral lichenoid lesions. Patch tests were positive in 20 (44.5% patients. Mercury was the most common allergen to elicit a positive reaction in eight patients, followed by nickel (7, palladium (5, potassium dichromate (3, balsam of Peru, gold sodium thiosulphate 2 and tinuvin (2 and eugenol (1, cobalt chloride (1 and carvone (1. Seven patients elicited positive response to more than one allergen. In 13 of 20 patients who consented to removal of the dental material, complete healing was observed in 6 (30%, marked improvement in 7 (35% and no improvement in 7 (35% patients. Relief of symptoms was usually observed 3 months after removal. Limitations: Limited number of study subjects and short follow up after removal/replacement of dental restoration materials are the main limitations of this study. Conclusion: Contact allergy to amalgam is an important etiologic factor in oral lichenoid lesions and removal of restorative material should be offered to patients who have lesions in close proximity to the dental material.

  7. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among chewing tobacco users: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha S Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and Fisher′s exact tests were used to assess the statistical significance. Results: Of the 901 subjects with CT habits, 55.8% revealed no clinically detectable oral mucosal changes and 44.1% showed mucosal changes of which 63.8% were males and 36.1% were females. The most common finding was chewers mucositis (59.5% followed by submucous fibrosis (22.8%, leukoplakia (8%, lichenoid reaction (6.5%, oral cancer (2.7%, and lichen planus (0.5%. Conclusion: This study provides information about different CT habits and associated mucosal lesions among this population.

  8. An Epidemiological Study of Oral Mucosal Lesions in Karnataka State, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. V Prasad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents oral mucosal lesions findings from a state oral health survey of Karnataka, India. A total of 46,579 subjects aged 1-4 to 65+ years were selected by using multistage-cluster-stratified random sampling method and subjects were examined by 32 dentists trained in standardized clinical diagnostic criteria for oral mucosal lesions. In the present study, 7.53% of subjects had one or more oral mucosal lesions, in which, male subjects (9.41 % had a significantly higher prevalence of lesions compared to female subjects (4.38%; urban subjects (11.61% had a significantly higher prevalence than rural subjects (5.01 % and the Christian subjects had a significantly higher prevalence of lesions than the Hindus, Muslims and others (F=211.594, <0.001, S. The observed prevalence of oral mucosal lesions increased with age (r=0.8174, P<0.05, S, which is statistically significant. The most prevalent lesions observed were Leukoplakia (1.73%, Lichen planus (2.02% Ulceration (0.73%, Candidiasis (0.94% and Abscess (1.05%. The maximum number of lesions was seen in sulci (7.33% and the minimum number of lesions was seen in lips (0.02%. Differences in prevalence were analyzed by sex, religion, location and geographical area.

  9. The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in patients visiting a dental school in Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Anuna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in Manipal, Karnataka State, India. A total of 1190 subjects who visited the department of oral medicine and radiology for diagnosis of various oral complaints over a period of 3 months were interviewed and clinically examined for oral mucosal lesions. The result showed the presence of one or more mucosal lesions in (41.2% of the population. Fordyce′s condition was observed most frequently (6.55% followed by frictional keratosis (5.79%, fissured tongue (5.71%, leukoedema (3.78%, smoker′s palate (2.77%, recurrent aphthae, oral submucous fibrosis (2.01%, oral malignancies (1.76%, leukoplakia (1.59%, median rhomboid glossitis (1.50%, candidiasis (1.3%, lichen planus (1.20%, varices (1.17%, traumatic ulcer and oral hairy leukoplakia (1.008%, denture stomatitis, geographic tongue, betel chewer′s mucosa and irritational fibroma (0.84%, herpes labialis, angular cheilitis (0.58%, and mucocele (0.16%. Mucosal lesions like tobacco-related lesions (leukoplakia, smoker′s palate, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral malignancies were more prevalent among men than among women. Denture stomatitis, herpes labialis, and angular cheilitis occurred more frequently in the female population.

  10. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions and associated habits in Kashmir, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasneem S. Ain

    2016-08-01

    Results: Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions was found to be 8%. Smoker's palate was the most frequently found oral lesion comprising of 33.89% followed by oral lichen planus and leukoplakia (13.55% each. Other lesions included chemical burns, erythroplakia, OSMF and lichenoid reactions. Subjects were indulged into various habits; the most prevalent being the cigarette smoking (56.46%, followed by hukka and bidi smoking and smokeless tobacco. Conclusions: The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions was 8% among the study sample. Subjects were associated with various deleterious habits which were found more in males than females. This study helps in public awareness about the ill effects of oral habits and may motivate them in overcoming their indulgence. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(8.000: 3525-3530

  11. [Analysis of oral mucosal lesions in patients referred to oral medicine specialists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailo, Vlaho; Boras, Vanja Vucićević; Pintar, Elizabeta; Juras, Danica Vidović; Karaman, Natasa; Rogulj, Ana Andabak

    2013-01-01

    The need for studies on prevalence of lesions in the field of oral medicine increases as more patients suffer from oral mucosal diseases. Data on prevalence of oral mucosal diseases throughout the world are scarce. Therefore, we have made a retrospective study of patients referred to the Department of Oral Medicine, University of Zagreb, during a period of one year, i.e. 2010. Data on patient age, gender and diagnosis were recorded. Out of 1118 analyzed clinical records of the patients, 756 (67.6%) were women and 362 (32.4%) were men. The age range of female patients was 54 +/- 19 years (mean age 62.17 years) and the male age range was 49+/-21 (mean age 64.17 years). The most common diagnosis was burning mouth syndrome (23.4%), followed by xerostomia (10.6%), traumatic ulceration (8.7%), geographic tongue (6.6%) and denture stomatitis (5.7%). Other diagnoses were found in a smaller percentage. Our results point out an increased need for oral medicine services.

  12. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in patients of the Kuwait University Dental Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad; Joseph, Bobby; Sundaram, Devipriya

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the number, types, and locations of oral mucosal lesions in patients who attended the Admission Clinic at the Kuwait University Dental Center to determine prevalence and risk factors for oral lesions. Intraoral soft tissue examination was performed on new patients seen between January 2009 and February 2011. The lesions were divided into six major groups: white, red, pigmented, ulcerative, exophytic, and miscellaneous. Five hundred thirty patients were screened, out of which 308 (58.1%) had one or more lesions. A total of 570 oral lesions and conditions were identified in this study, of which 272 (47.7%) were white, 25 (4.4%) were red, 114 (20.0%) were pigmented, 21 (3.7%) were ulcerative, 108 (18.9%) were exophytic, and 30 (5.3%) were in the miscellaneous group. Overall, Fordyce granules (n = 116; 20.4%) were the most frequently detected condition. A significantly higher (p lesions than those in the ⩽20 years age group. A significantly higher (p lesions than did nonsmokers. Most of the lesions and conditions were found on the buccal mucosa and gingiva. White, pigmented, and exophytic lesions were the most common types of oral mucosal lesions found in this study. Although most of these lesions are innocuous, the dentist should be able to recognize and differentiate them from the worrisome lesions, and decide on the appropriate treatment.

  13. Oral mucosal lesions in elderly dental patients in Sana’a, Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Al-Jamaei, Aisha Ahmed; Al-Sufyani, Ghadah A.; Tarakji, Bassel; Shugaa-Addin, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: With aging, the oral mucosa becomes more susceptible to external stimuli. The aims of this study were to obtain baseline data on the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (OMLs) in a population of elderly Yemeni patients and to investigate differences in the presentation of these findings in relation to age, gender, education level, and the wearing of dentures. Patients and Methods: The prevalence of OMLs was assessed by clinical examination of a sample of 310 elderly Yemeni patients aged 60 years and older. A single examiner performed detailed oral examinations of the oral cavity according to international criteria and the World Health Organization codes. Results: The overall prevalence of OMLs was 77.1%, with a significant difference (P 0.05). Conclusions: The present study has shown a high prevalence of oral lesions among Yemeni elders. PMID:25984462

  14. Assessment of oral mucosal lesions among eunuchs residing in Bhopal city, Madhya Pradesh, India: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh Arjun Torwane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present cross-sectional study following the STROBE guidelines was conducted to assess the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among males, females, and eunuchs residing in Bhopal city, Madhya Pradesh India. Materials and Methods: Based on convenient non-probability snowball sampling technique, all the self-identified eunuchs residing in the city of Bhopal who were present at the time of examination and who fulfilled the selection criteria were examined. A cross section of the general population (males and females residing in the same locality where these eunuchs live was also examined. The World Health Organization (WHO oral health assessment proforma (1997 was used to collect the information on oral mucosal lesions. All the obtained data were analyzed by using a Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20. Results: Overall prevalence of oral mucosal lesions was 127 (19.9% among the study subjects. Fifty-nine (28.5% eunuchs, 56 (25.7% males, and 12 (5.6% females were observed to have some oral mucosal lesions. Oral submucous fibrosis (6.4%, leukoplakia (5.5%, and traumatic ulceration (4.2% were the major oral mucosal conditions observed. Conclusion: The information presented in this study adds to our understanding of the common oral mucosal lesions occurring in the eunuch population. Efforts to increase patient awareness of the oral effects of tobacco use and to eliminate the habit are needed to improve the oral and general health of eunuchs.

  15. Assessment of oral mucosal lesions among eunuchs residing in Bhopal city, Madhya Pradesh, India: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torwane, Nilesh Arjun; Hongal, Sudhir; Goel, Pankaj; Chandrashekar, Byarakele; Saxena, Vrinda

    2015-01-01

    The present cross-sectional study following the STROBE guidelines was conducted to assess the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions among males, females, and eunuchs residing in Bhopal city, Madhya Pradesh India. Based on convenient non-probability snowball sampling technique, all the self-identified eunuchs residing in the city of Bhopal who were present at the time of examination and who fulfilled the selection criteria were examined. A cross section of the general population (males and females) residing in the same locality where these eunuchs live was also examined. The World Health Organization (WHO) oral health assessment proforma (1997) was used to collect the information on oral mucosal lesions. All the obtained data were analyzed by using a Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20. Overall prevalence of oral mucosal lesions was 127 (19.9%) among the study subjects. Fifty-nine (28.5%) eunuchs, 56 (25.7%) males, and 12 (5.6%) females were observed to have some oral mucosal lesions. Oral submucous fibrosis (6.4%), leukoplakia (5.5%), and traumatic ulceration (4.2%) were the major oral mucosal conditions observed. The information presented in this study adds to our understanding of the common oral mucosal lesions occurring in the eunuch population. Efforts to increase patient awareness of the oral effects of tobacco use and to eliminate the habit are needed to improve the oral and general health of eunuchs.

  16. A Study on Oral Mucosal Lesions in 3500 Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a great variety of diseases, which affect the oral tissues and those were .... The pattern of BMZ staining depends on its ultra-structural morphology in each tissue. .... of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) with geographic tongue .... brown to brownish black in color. All the ... symptoms such as anhidrosis, thin and sparse hair, dry.

  17. Oral hygiene and number of oral mucosal lesion correlate with oral health-related quality of life in elderly communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Agustina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quality of life assessment mostly is based on general health. Deterioration of physiologic condition, polypharmacy and the high occurrence of chronic disease in elderly may manifest in oral cavity that can affect oral function, in turn it will affect quality of life of elderly. Purpose: This study was aimed to determine the correlation of oral health status and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL in elderly communities of Yogyakarta city. Method: Seventy three elders were subjects of this study. Data of OHRQoL and oral health status were obtained from modification of questionnaire of Dental Impact of Daily Living (DIDL Index and from intraoral examination, respectively. Intraoral examination comprised oral mucosal lesion amount, oral hygiene, DMFT index and periodontal tissue status. The data then were analyzed statistically using Pearson Product Moment Correlation. Result: The results showed that mean of DMFT index was 16.9 and 63% of subjects were found with gingivitis, most subject had moderate oral hygiene and each subject at least had two oral mucosal lesions. Mean score of quality of life was 27.2 and classified as satisfying. Oral hygiene and number of oral mucosal lesion had correlation with OHRQoL with r were -0.236 (Sig. : 0.045 and -0.288 (Sig. : 0.013, respectively. Conclusion: The study suggested that oral hygiene and number of oral mucosal lesion correlate with oral health related-quality of life in elderly communities of Yogyakarta city.Latar belakang: Penilaian kualitas hidup terutama didasarkan pada kesehatan umum. Memburuknya kondisi fisiologis, polifarmasi dan tingginya kejadian penyakit kronis pada lansia dapat termanifestasi di dalam rongga mulut sehingga dapat mempengaruhi fungsi mulut yang pada gilirannya akan mempengaruhi kualitas hidup lansia. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meneliti hubungan antara status kesehatan mulut dan kualitas hidup berdasarkan kesehatan mulut pada masyarakat lanjut

  18. Contact Endoscopy of mucosal lesions of oral cavity – Preliminary experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Awadhesh Kumar; Nilakantan, Ajith; Sahai, Kavita; Datta, Rakesh; Malik, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Background Contact Endoscopy is a non invasive tool to visualise alterations in cell architecture in vivo. In this study we investigated the diagnostic accuracy of Contact Endoscopy in detecting malignancy in oral mucosal lesions. Methods 76 patients with oral mucosal lesions requiring biopsy were included. Contact Endoscopy was performed by Otolaryngologist before biopsy and findings recorded. The lesion was then biopsied and sent for histopathological examination by Pathologist who was blinded to Contact Endoscopy findings. Findings of Contact Endoscopy were compared with histopathological findings taking the latter as the gold standard. Two biopsies were reported as ‘inconclusive’ on histopathological examination and hence excluded from the final analysis. Data of the remaining 74 patients is presented here. Results Clinically lesions were diagnosed as ulcero-proliferative lesions in 34 patients, Leukoplakia in 19, Erythroplakia in 9, Lichen planus in 5 and Submucous fibrosis in 7 patients. Histopathological examination revealed presence of malignancy in 97.06% of ulcero-proliferative mucosal lesions, 10.53% of leukoplakia and 33.33% of erythroplakia while corresponding figures on Contact Endoscopy were 94.12%, 5.26% and 11.11% respectively. No malignancy was detected in lichen planus and submucous fibrosis by either technique. When compared with histopathological examination, CE showed sensitivity of 84.21%, specificity of 94.44% and accuracy of 89.19%. No adverse effects on the patients were seen due to the procedure or stain. Conclusion Contact Endoscopy may be useful in determining cellular structure in vivo without biopsy to detect oral malignancy early. Further studies are suggested. PMID:25378780

  19. Prevalence of potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions among tobacco users in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Attas, Safia Ali; Ibrahim, Suzan Seif; Amer, Hala Abbas; Darwish, Zeinab El-Said; Hassan, Mona Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is recognized as a health problem worldwide and there is an established tobacco epidemic in Saudi Arabia as in many other countries, with tobacco users at increased risk of developing many diseases. This cross sectional study was conducted to assess the prevalence of oral mucosal, potentially malignant or malignant, lesions associated with tobacco use among a stratified cluster sample of adults in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. A sample size of 599 was collected and each participant underwent clinical conventional oral examination and filled a questionnaire providing information on demographics, tobacco use and other relevant habits. The most common form of tobacco used was cigarette smoking (65.6 %) followed by Shisha or Moasel (38.1%), while chewing tobacco, betel nuts and gat accounted for 21-2%, 7.7%, and 5% respectively. A high prevalence (88.8%) of soft tissue lesions was found among the tobacco users examined, and a wide range of lesions were detected, about 50% having hairy tongue, 36% smoker's melanosis, 28.9% stomatitis nicotina, 27% frictional keratosis, 26.7% fissured tongue, 26% gingival or periodontal inflammation and finally 20% leukodema. Suspicious potentially malignant lesions affected 10.5% of the subjects, most prevalent being keratosis (6.3%), leukoplakia (2.3%), erythroplakia (0.7%), oral submucous fibrosis (0.5%) and lichenoid lesions (0.4%), these being associated with male gender, lower level of education, presence of diabetes and a chewing tobacco habit. It is concluded that smoking was associated with a wide range of oral mucosal lesions , those suspicious for malignancy being linked with chewable forms, indicating serious effects.

  20. Autofluorescence guided diagnostic evaluation of suspicious oral mucosal lesions: opportunities, limitations, and pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneswaran, Nadarajah

    2011-03-01

    Wide-filed autofluorescence examination is currently considered as a standard of care for screening and diagnostic evaluation of early neoplastic changes of the skin, cervix, lung, bladder, gastrointestinal tract and oral cavity. Naturally occurring fluorophores within the tissue absorb UV and visible light and can re-emit some of this light at longer wavelengths in the form of fluorescence. This non-invasive tissue autofluorescence imaging is used in optical diagnostics, especially in the early detection of cancer. Usually, malignant transformation is associated with thickening of the epithelium, enhanced cellular density due to increased nuclear cytoplasmic ratio which may attenuate the excitation leading to a decrease in collagen autofluorescence. Hence, dysplastic and cancerous tissues often exhibit decreased blue-green autofluorescence and appear darker compared to uninvolved mucosa. Currently, there are three commercially available devices to examine tissue autofluorescence in the oral cavity. In this study we used the oral cancer screening device IdentafiTM 3000 to examine the tissue reflectance and autofluorescence of PML and confounding lesions of the oral cavity. Wide-field autofluorescence imaging enables rapid inspection of large mucosal surfaces, to aid in recognition of suspicious lesions and may also help in discriminate the PML (class 1) from some of the confounding lesions (class II). However, the presence of inflammation or pigments is also associated with loss of stromal autofluorescence, and may give rise to false-positive results with widefield fluorescence imaging. Clinicians who use these autofluorescence based oral cancer screening devices should be aware about the benign oral mucosal lesions that may give false positivity so that unnecessary patient's anxiety and the need for scalpel biopsy can be eliminated.

  1. Oral mucosal lesions and their association with sociodemographic, behavioral, and health status factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheno, José Nicolau; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Munerato, Maria Cristina; Hugo, Fernando Neves; Sant'ana Filho, Manoel; Weissheimer, Camila; Carrard, Vinicius Coelho; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of oral mucosal lesions and their associations with sociodemographic, health, and behavioral factors in a southern Brazilian population. Information was collected from participants (n = 801) using a structured questionnaire during an oral cancer screening campaign held at an agribusiness show in southern Brazil in 2009. Data were described using frequency distributions or means and standard deviations. Associations between independent variables and outcomes were assessed using the Chi-squared test. A total of 465 lesions were detected (actinic cheilitis: n = 204, 25.5%; candidiasis: n = 50, 6.2%; fibrous inflammatory hyperplasia: n = 42, 5.2%; ulceration, n = 33, 4.1%; hemangioma: n = 14, 1.7%; leukoplakia: n = 11, 1.4%). Candidiasis, actinic cheilitis, and fibrous inflammatory hyperplasia were associated significantly with literacy. Actinic cheilitis was also associated significantly with sun exposure and hat use, and leukoplakia was associated with smoking. The high frequency of oral mucosal lesions observed highlights the importance of education about risk factors. Additionally, training of health professionals, mainly those from public health services, in the use of preventive and community education strategies is needed.

  2. Oral mucosal lesions and their association with sociodemographic, behavioral, and health status factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Nicolau GHENO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of oral mucosal lesions and their associations with sociodemographic, health, and behavioral factors in a southern Brazilian population. Information was collected from participants (n = 801 using a structured questionnaire during an oral cancer screening campaign held at an agribusiness show in southern Brazil in 2009. Data were described using frequency distributions or means and standard deviations. Associations between independent variables and outcomes were assessed using the Chi-squared test. A total of 465 lesions were detected (actinic cheilitis: n = 204, 25.5%; candidiasis: n = 50, 6.2%; fibrous inflammatory hyperplasia: n = 42, 5.2%; ulceration, n = 33, 4.1%; hemangioma: n = 14, 1.7%; leukoplakia: n = 11, 1.4%. Candidiasis, actinic cheilitis, and fibrous inflammatory hyperplasia were associated significantly with literacy. Actinic cheilitis was also associated significantly with sun exposure and hat use, and leukoplakia was associated with smoking. The high frequency of oral mucosal lesions observed highlights the importance of education about risk factors. Additionally, training of health professionals, mainly those from public health services, in the use of preventive and community education strategies is needed.

  3. Oral mucosal lesions in Indians from Northeast Brazil: cross-sectional study of prevalence and risk indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury, Patricia Ramos; Porto, Lia Pontes Arruda; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Figueiredo e Ribeiro, Livia Silva; de Aquino Xavier, Flavia Caló; Figueiredo, Andreia Leal; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions, and their risk indicators in adult Kiriri Indians from Northeast Brazil. Clinical oral examination was performed on a representative sample of 223 Indians (age ≥ 19 years). A systematic evaluation of lips, labial mucosa and sulcus, commissures, buccal mucosa and sulcus, gingiva and alveolar ridge, tongue, floor of the mouth, and soft and hard palate was performed. Bivariate analysis was conducted to assess associations between mucosal conditions and age, gender, income, educational level, diabetic status, and smoking status. Mucosal lesions were found in 50 participants (22.4%). The most prevalent lesions were fistulae (6.2%) and traumatic ulcers (4.48%). Oral mucosal was associated with higher age (≥ 35 years; odds ratio [OR] = 1.99, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.76, P = 0.03) and lower education level (<9 years; OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 0.96-4.71, P = 0.06). Mucosal conditions are prevalent in Kiriri Indians and the presence of mucosal lesions is associated with advanced age and lower education. A public health program aimed at preventing and treating mucosal lesions and targeted toward the high-risk group is vital to improve the oral health status of this population.

  4. The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in alcohol misusers in Chennai, south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rooban T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of various oral mucosal lesions (OML among alcohol misusers attending a rehabilitation center in Chennai, south India. Materials and Methods: Qualified dental surgeons examined 500 consecutive alcohol misusers at Ragas Dental College and Hospital and TTK Hospital, India. Thorough history and oral findings were recorded in a pre-determined format. Data entry and statistical analysis were done using SPSS 10.0.5β. The variables for this study were OML, Oral Hygiene Index (OHI, age, smoking, and alcohol misuse (type and units consumed and duration of misuse. Results: Of the 500 patients, 77% were in the 25-44 years old age group and 84% were married. The mean age of initiation of alcohol misuse was 34 years. In addition to alcohol, 72% smoked tobacco and 96% used other psychoactive substances. The mean alcohol use duration was 12.6 years. A total of 25% of the study group had at least one OML. The common oral lesions were smoker′s melanosis (10.2%, oral submucous fibrosis (8%, and leukoplakia (7.4%. Those who misused spirits had a higher incidence of OML than those who misused beer or both. Patients with fair oral hygiene had an odds ratio (OR of 2.96 for OML compared with an OR of 2.08 for those who had OML with good oral hygiene. Conclusion : This study indicates that subjects who misuse alcohol have poor oral hygiene and are at risk for the development of periodontal disease and OML. This survey indicates that oral examination and treatment should be a part of the standard care for alcohol misusers at rehabilitation centers.

  5. TREATMENT OF ORAL MUCOSAL LESIONS BY SCALPEL EXCISION AND PLATELET-RICH FIBRINMEMBRANE GRAFTING: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Chenchev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The treatment of oral mucosal lesions and mucosal hypertrophy in particular, is most often achieved by an excision with or without covering the surface of the wound. The platelet rich fibrin membrane (PRFm is an autogenous product containing platelets and leukocytes and their secreted growth factors and cytokines. The purpose of the presented clinical case is to describe a new, recent technique used for the covering of mucosal wounds left after the removal of pathological lesions. Material and Methods: On a single patient mucosal hypertrophy was removed by an excision with scalpel and the resulting surgical wound was covered with an autogenous PRF membrane. Postoperatively the healing process was followed on the 7th, 14th and 30th day. Results: The healing period went smoothly with minimal postoperative discomfort and no complications. Conclusion: The results of the presented clinical case demonstrate that the PRF membrane can successfully be used to cover postoperative mucosal defects.

  6. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in dermatologically diseased patients: A cross-sectional study in Meerut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanushree Keswani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is a noted fact that dermatologic diseases have varied oral manifestations. By far, there have been inordinately few studies focusing on the prevalence of a wide spectrum of oral mucosal lesions (OML in patients with dermatologic diseases. This is significant as oral lesions may be the only or the primary feature of the skin disease, which could be neglected by dentists. This study aimed to estimate the frequency and sociobehavioral correlates of OML in skin disease patients attending outpatient′s facility of Subharti Hospital, Dermatology Clinic, Meerut, India. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional hospital-based study conducted in Meerut during the period from August 2013 to October 2013. A total of 500 patients (mean age 37.2 ± 14.11 years, 41.4% females completed an oral examination and a personal interview. OML were recorded using the World Health Organization criteria. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Science (version 15.0.1. Cross tabulation and Chi-square with Fisher′s exact test were used. Results: At least one kind of OML was registered in 11.8%, males (58.6%: 60.0% versus females (40.0%: 45.6%, P < 0.01 skin disease patients. Thus, a certain number of patients had more than one type of OML. Aphthae were the most frequently diagnosed OML (3.4%, followed in descending order by oral lichen planus (1.8% and geographic tongue (1.6%. Conclusion: OML were frequently diagnosed in skin disease patients (11.80% and varied systematically with the dermatologic disease, age, and gender. The substantial prevalence rates of OML emphasize the importance of routine examination of the oral mucosa in a dermatology clinic.

  7. Immunohistochemical characterization of oral mucosal lesions in cats with chronic gingivostomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, R; Gruffydd-Jones, T J; Day, M J

    2011-05-01

    Histological and immunohistochemical studies were performed on samples of the glossopalatine mucosa from 30 cats with feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS). Immunohistochemical labelling and computer-assisted morphometric analysis were used to identify expression of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD79a, IgG, IgM, IgA, leucocyte antigen 1 (L1) and class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in tissue sections. Mast cells were detected by toluidine blue staining. The microscopical lesions were graded by severity of inflammation and although this grading correlated significantly with the severity of mucosal inflammation assessed at clinical examination, sites assessed as clinically normal or mildly inflamed were poorly predictive of the histopathological grade in the corresponding tissue sample. The number of CD79a+ cells (mostly plasma cells), L1+ cells (mostly neutrophils) and CD3+ T cells, and the level of MHC class II expression, tended to correlate with the severity of the inflammation. In general, CD8+ T cells were more numerous than CD4+ T cells. The majority of the plasma cells were of the IgG isotype and fewer IgA+ and IgM+ plasma cells were present. In some cases MHC class II expression by mucosal epithelium, salivary duct epithelium or skeletal muscle fibres was observed. Relative to equivalent oral mucosal samples from healthy cats, the number of cells labelled for CD3, CD4, CD8, CD79a, IgG, IgM, IgA or L1, and the number of mast cells, within the lamina propria/submucosa were significantly increased. Limited analysis of the epithelial compartment also found more CD3+ T cells compared with healthy cats. These findings indicate that the glossopalatine mucosal lesions in FCGS represent a complex, chronic and destructive inflammatory process affecting the epithelium and lamina propria, with frequent extension into submucosal tissues. The predominance of CD8+ cells over CD4+ cells suggests the induction of an underlying cytotoxic cell-mediated immune

  8. Candidiasis and other oral mucosal lesions during and after interferon therapy for HCV-related chronic liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagao Yumiko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral lichen planus (OLP is seen frequently in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of oral candidiasis, other mucosal lesions, and xerostomia during interferon (IFN therapy for HCV infection. Methods Of 124 patients with HCV-infected liver diseases treated with IFN therapy in our hospital, 14 (mean age 56.00 ± 12.94 years who attended to receive administration of IFN once a week were identified and examined for Candida infection and other oral lesions and for the measurement of salivary flow. Serological assays also were carried out. Results Cultures of Candida from the tongue surfaces were positive in 7 (50.0% of the 14 patients with HCV infection at least once during IFN therapy. C. albicans was the most common species isolated. The incidence of Candida during treatment with IFN did not increase above that before treatment. Additional oral mucosal lesions were observed in 50.0% (7/14 of patients: OLP in three (21.4%, angular cheilitis in three (21.4% and recurrent aphthous stomatitis in one (7.1%. OLP occurred in one patient before treatment with IFN, in one during treatment and in one at the end of treatment. 85.7% of the oral lesions were treated with topical steroids. We compared the characteristics of the 7 patients in whom Candida was detected at least once during IFN therapy (group 1 and the 7 patients in whom Candida was not detected during IFN therapy (group 2. The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (P=0.0075 and incidence of external use of steroids (P=0.0308 in group 1 were significantly higher than in group 2. The average body weight of group 1 decreased significantly compared to group 2 (P=0.0088. Salivary flow decreased in all subjects throughout the course of IFN treatment and returned at 6th months after the end of treatment. In group 1, the level of albumin at the beginning of the 6th month of IFN administration was lower than in group 2 (P=0

  9. Prevalencia de lesiones mucosas en población anciana de la Región de Murcia Prevanlence of oral mucosal lesions in elderly people in Murcia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. López Jornet

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El estudio de la prevalencia de la patología oral es importante, tanto para conocer el estado de salud como las necesidades de tratamiento. En este trabajo se valora la presencia de las lesiones mucosas orales en mayores de 65 años en pacientes institucionalizados y no institucionalizados de la Región de Murcia Pacientes y método: Se estudio una muestra representativa de ancianos de la región de Murcia igual o mayor de 65 años en total 385 sujetos; tasa de participación 46%. Se diagnosticaron las lesiones mucosas en base a los criterios establecidos por la OMS. Resultados: La prevalencia de las lesiones orales fue de 17,8% (no institucionalizado y 14,2% institucionalizado. La lesión mas frecuente asociada fue la ulcera traumática seguida de lengua geográfica y candidiasis protésica. Conclusión: Realizar programas de prevención y diagnostico de lesiones de mucosa oral. Además en los casos que se establezcan tratarlas adecuadamente.Background: Oral prevalence studies are important to know the state of health and the needs of treatment. The aim of the study was to determine the oral health status in a group of Murcia individuals 65 years of age or older Patients and Methods: A sample of 385 representative Murcia subjects older than 65 years old were (response rate 46% Oral mucosal lesions were gathered according World Health Organization. Results: The prevalence of oral lesions was17,8% (non-institutionalised and 14,2 (institutionalised. The most common lesion was traumatic ulcer followed geographic tongue and denture stomatitis. Conclusions: That oral mucosal lesions are common in elderly people in Murcia, suggesting the necessity for improved standards of prevention, and diagnostic and opportune treatment of these lesions.

  10. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  11. Clinicopathologic Correlation of White, Non scrapable Oral Mucosal Surface Lesions: A Study of 100 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidullah, Mohammed; Raghunath, Vandana; Karpe, Tanveer; Akifuddin, Syed; Imran, Shahid; Dhurjati, Venkata Naga Nalini; Aleem, Mohammed Ahtesham; Khatoon, Farheen

    2016-02-01

    White, non scrapable lesions are commonly seen in the oral cavity. Based on their history and clinical appearance, most of these lesions can be easily diagnosed, but sometimes diagnosis may go wrong. In order to arrive to a confirmative diagnosis, histopathological assessment is needed in many cases, if not all. 1) To find out the prevalence of clinically diagnosed oral white, non scrapable lesions. 2) To find out the prevalence of histopathologically diagnosed oral white, non scrapable lesions. 3) To correlate the clinical and histopathological diagnosis in the above lesions. A total of 100 cases of oral white, non scrapable lesions were included in the study. Based on their history and clinical presentation, clinical provisional diagnosis was made. Then biopsy was done and confirmatory histopathological diagnosis was given and both were correlated. In order to correlate clinical and histopathological diagnosis Discrepancy Index (DI) was calculated for all the cases. Based on clinical diagnosis, there were 59 cases (59%) of leukoplakia, 29 cases (29%) of lichen planus and six cases (6%) of lichenoid reaction; whereas, based on histopathological diagnosis, there were 66 cases (66%) of leukoplakia epithelial hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis (leukoplakia) and 30 cases (30%) of lichen planus. Seventy eight clinically diagnosed cases (78%) correlated with the histopathological diagnosis and 22 cases (22%) did not correlate. The total discrepancy index was 22%. A clinician needs to be aware of oral white, non scrapable lesions. Due to the overlapping of many clinical features in some of these lesions and also due to their malignant potential, a histopathological confirmative diagnosis is recommended.

  12. Oral mucosal lesions and HIV viral load in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, D; Komaroff, E; Redford, M; Phelan, J A; Navazesh, M; Alves, M E; Kamrath, H; Mulligan, R; Barr, C E; Greenspan, J S

    2000-09-01

    The prevalence of oral lesions was assessed in a five-center subset of the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) and correlated with other features of HIV disease. Oral examinations were performed by dental examiners on 729 women (577 HIV-positive and 152 HIV-negative) during baseline examination. Significant differences between the groups were found for the following oral lesions: pseudomembranous candidiasis, 6.1% and 2.0%, respectively; erythematous candidiasis, 6.41% and 0.7%, respectively; all oral candidiasis, pseudomembranous and/or erythematous, 13.7% and 3.3%, respectively. Hairy leukoplakia was observed in 6.1% of HIV-positive women. No significant differences were found for recurrent aphthous ulcers, herpes simplex lesions, or papillomas. Kaposi's sarcoma was seen in 0.5% of HIV-positive and 0% of HIV-negative women. Using multiple logistic regression models controlling for use of antiretrovirals and antifungals, in HIV-positive women the presence of oral candidiasis was associated with a CD4 count <200 cells/microl, cigarette smoking, and heroin/methadone use; the presence of hairy leukoplakia was not related to CD4 count but was associated with high viral load. Oral candidiasis and hairy leukoplakia are confirmed as being common features of HIV infection in women and appear to be associated with HIV viral load, immunosuppression, and various other behaviorally determined variables.

  13. Oral mucosal lesions in a Chilean elderly population: A retrospective study with a systematic review from thirteen countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droguett, Daniel; Arenas-Márquez, María-Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Background The oral examination is an essential part of the multidisciplinary medical care in elderly people. Oral mucosal lesions and normal variations of oral anatomy (OMLs) are very common in this people, but few studies have examined the frequency and prevalence of these conditions worldwide and less in Chile. The aim of this research was to evaluate the frequency of OMLs in a Chilean elderly population. Material and Methods It was conducted a retrospective study (Talca, Chile). Two hundred seventy-seven OMLs were classified in groups and anatomical sites. In order to contextualize our numbers, we made a systematic review using Publish or Perish software, Google Scholar and InteractiVenn. Results The most prevalent OMLs groups were soft tissue tumors, epithelial pathology, facial pain and neuromuscular diseases, and dermatologic diseases. The most frequent OMLs included irritation fibroma (30 patients, 10.8%), hemangioma (20, 7.2%), burning mouth syndrome (20 cases, 7.2%), oral lichen planus (12, 4.3%) and epulis fissuratum (12, 4.3%). In the systematic review, 75 OMLs were relevant and the more studied pathologies were traumatic ulcerations (11 of 15 articles), oral lichen planus (10/15), irritation fibroma, melanotic pigmentations, and recurrent aphthous stomatitis (9/10, respectively). Considering all included articles, most frequent OMLs in elderly people included denture-related stomatitis (13.3%), irritation fibroma (8.7%) and fissured tongue (6.3%). Conclusions The results reflect the frequency of OMLs diagnosed in a specialized service in south of Chile and many countries around the world. These numbers will allow the establishment of preventive politics and adequacy of the clinical services. Key words:Oral mucosal lesions, elderly people, Chilean population, frequency, systematic review. PMID:28210449

  14. The utility of toluidine blue staining and brush cytology as adjuncts in clinical examination of suspicious oral mucosal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güneri, P; Epstein, J B; Kaya, A; Veral, A; Kazandı, A; Boyacioglu, H

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the utility of toluidine blue and brush cytology in patients with clinically detected oral mucosal lesions. Clinical examination of 35 patients was completed before toluidine blue application, oral brush cytology and scalpel biopsy. Lesions were photographed before and after stain application; followed by brush cytology. All findings were compared with histopathologic results. Severe dysplasia and carcinoma-in-situ were determined as 'positive'; no dysplasia and mild to moderate dysplasia were defined as 'negative'. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of clinical examination and toluidine blue were the same: 0.923, 0.433, 0.414, and 0.929, respectively. Those of brush cytology were 0.923, 0.517, 0.462, and 0.938. The concordance of all methods was 30% for benign and 61% for malignant lesions. Adjuncts identified 92% of carcinoma-in-situ and squamous cell carcinoma as confirmed by histopathology, in contrast to clinical findings alone in which 62% of these lesions were identified (p=0.046). In conclusion, adjunct diagnostic methods decreased the level of uncertainty for the diagnosis of oral malignancies and lichenoid dysplasias when applied as adjuncts to clinical examination.

  15. Prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in dental patients with tobacco smoking, chewing, and mixed habits: A cross-sectional study in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant B Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A variety of oral mucosal lesions and conditions are associated with the habit of smoking and chewing tobacco, and many of these carry a potential risk for the development of cancer. There have been no studies that report the prevalence of habits and associated oral changes in the population in Dharwad region, of Karnataka, south India. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based, cross-sectional study was carried out at SDM Dental College (Dharwad, Karnataka. A total of 2400 subjects (1200 subjects with and 1200 subjects without habits attending the dental hospital were interviewed and examined by trained professionals to assess any oral mucosal changes. Results: Oral mucosal lesions were found in 322 (26.8% subjects who had tobacco smoking and chewing habits as compared to 34 (2.8% subjects without those habits. Oral leukoplakia (8.2% and oral submucous fibrosis (OSF (7.1% were the prevalent oral mucosal lesions found in subjects who had those habits, while the other lesions (1.7% namely; oral candidiasis, median rhomboid glossitis, recurrent apthous ulcer, frictional keratosis, and oral lichen planus (0.9% were frequently reported among individuals without those habits. The odds of developing oral lesions in subjects with tobacco habits was nearly 11.92 times that of abstainers (odds ratio, OR = 11.92, 95% confidence intervals, CI = 10.61-14.59%. Conclusion: The study showed that the risk of the development of oral lesions associated with tobacco smoking, chewing, or both is quite high. Males who had one or more of these habits showed more frequent oral changes than females. The study reinforces the association of OSF with gutkha and areca nut chewing, and leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and oral cancer with tobacco smoking, chewing, or mixed habits.

  16. Oral mucosal lesions in skin diseased patients attending a dermatologic clinic: a cross-sectional study in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Hussein

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far there have been no studies focusing on the prevalence of a wide spectrum of oral mucosal lesions (OML in patients with dermatologic diseases. This is noteworthy as skin lesions are strongly associated with oral lesions and could easily be neglected by dentists. This study aimed to estimate the frequency and socio-behavioural correlates of OML in skin diseased patients attending outpatient's facility of Khartoum Teaching Hospital - Dermatology Clinic, Sudan. Methods A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted in Khartoum from October 2008 to January 2009. A total of 588 patients (mean age 37.2 ± 16 years, 50.3% females completed an oral examination and a personal interview of which 544 patients (mean age 37.1 ± 15.9 years, 50% females with confirmed skin disease diagnosis were included for further analyses. OML were recorded using the World Health Organization criteria (WHO. Biopsy and smear were used as adjuvant techniques for confirmation. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Science (Version 15.0.1. Cross tabulation and Chi-square with Fisher's exact test were used. Results A total of 438 OML were registered in 315 (57.9%, males: 54.6% versus females: 45.6%, p Tongue lesions were the most frequently diagnosed OML (23.3%, followed in descending order by white lesions (19.1%, red and blue lesions (11% and vesiculobullous diseases (6%. OML in various skin diseases were; vesiculobullous reaction pattern (72.2%, lichenoid reaction pattern (60.5%, infectious lesions (56.5%, psoriasiform reaction pattern (56.7%, and spongiotic reaction pattern (46.8%. Presence of OML in skin diseased patients was most frequent in older age groups (62.4% older versus 52.7% younger, p Conclusions OML were frequently diagnosed in skin diseased patients and varied systematically with age, gender, systemic condition and use of toombak. The high prevalence of OML emphasizes the importance of routine examination

  17. Oral mucosal lesions, microbial changes, and taste disturbances induced by adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Mouridsen, Henning T.; Bergmann, Olav Jonas

    2008-01-01

    (n = 7, 16%). Five patients (11%) were diagnosed with oral candidosis. Scores of dental bacterial plaque and gingival inflammation increased during CT and the oral microbial composition changed towards a more acidophilic flora. Taste disturbances were experienced by 84% (n = 38) of the patients...

  18. Increased of Langerhans Cells in Smokeless Tobacco-Associated Oral Mucosal Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    and Eacute;rica Dorigatti de and Aacute;vila

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the changes in the number of Langerhans Cells (LC observed in the epithelium of smokeless tobacco (SLT-induced lesions. Methods: Microscopic sections from biopsies carried out in the buccal mucosa of twenty patients, who were chronic users of smokeless tobacco (SLT, were utilized. For the control group, twenty non-SLT users of SLT with normal mucosa were selected. The sections were studied with routine coloring and were immunostained for S-100, CD1a, Ki-67 and p63. These data were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test to investigate the differences in the expression of immune markers in normal mucosa and in SLT-induced leukoplakia lesions. Results: There was a significant difference in the immunolabeling of all markers between normal mucosa and SLT-induced lesions (p<0.001. The leukoplakia lesions in chronic SLT users demonstrated a significant increase in the number of Langerhans cells and in the absence of epithelial dysplasia. Conclusion: The increase in the number of these cells represents the initial stage of leukoplakia. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 85-93

  19. DMFT index and oral mucosal lesions associated with HIV infection: cross-sectional study in Porto Velho, Amazonian region - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Queiroz Aleixo

    Full Text Available We evaluated the DMFT (decayed, missing and filled teeth index and the prevalence of candidiasis, linear gingival erythema, oral hairy leukoplakia, herpes simplex, aphthous ulcers, Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphoma, as well as the association with TCD4 count, viral load (VL and antiretroviral therapy (ART in 140 HIV-infected adult individuals. A standardized examination to determine the DMFT index and the presence of oral lesions was conducted. Demographic data, TCD4 count and use of ART were obtained from medical records. A high number of decayed teeth detected among patients undergoing ART resulted in a mean DMFT of 16.9 teeth. It was observed that 24.2% of the individuals had at least one oral lesion. Candidiasis was the most frequent lesion and was associated with the TCD4 count. Oral hairy leukoplakia was associated with an increased VL. Regular use of ART was inversely associated with the occurrence of lesions. Overall, the studied population showed low prevalence of oral lesions and high DMFT index. The use of ART seems to reduce the occurrence of these lesions. Higher TCD4 count and a lower VL were associated with an improved oral health status in HIV + individuals

  20. DMFT index and oral mucosal lesions associated with HIV infection: cross-sectional study in Porto Velho, Amazonian region - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Queiroz Aleixo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the DMFT (decayed, missing and filled teeth index and the prevalence of candidiasis, linear gingival erythema, oral hairy leukoplakia, herpes simplex, aphthous ulcers, Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphoma, as well as the association with TCD4 count, viral load (VL and antiretroviral therapy (ART in 140 HIV-infected adult individuals. A standardized examination to determine the DMFT index and the presence of oral lesions was conducted. Demographic data, TCD4 count and use of ART were obtained from medical records. A high number of decayed teeth detected among patients undergoing ART resulted in a mean DMFT of 16.9 teeth. It was observed that 24.2% of the individuals had at least one oral lesion. Candidiasis was the most frequent lesion and was associated with the TCD4 count. Oral hairy leukoplakia was associated with an increased VL. Regular use of ART was inversely associated with the occurrence of lesions. Overall, the studied population showed low prevalence of oral lesions and high DMFT index. The use of ART seems to reduce the occurrence of these lesions. Higher TCD4 count and a lower VL were associated with an improved oral health status in HIV + individuals

  1. Clinicopathological analysis of 782 cases of elderly oral mucosal lesions%老年口腔黏膜病变782例临床病理分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何文波

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过对老年人口腔分泌物检查,了解老年黏膜病变的规律及特点,为防治老年口腔疾病的提供参考.方法 分析某院2008年6月~2011年6月4250例老年门诊及住院患者口腔黏膜检查报告,其中186例口腔黏膜活检检验报告.结果 4250例老年门诊及住院患者口腔检查及活检情况显示,共检出口腔黏膜病变782例,占18.4%;从病变情况显示,以念珠菌口腔炎为主,占9.69%,其排列顺位依次是念珠菌口腔炎、口照溃疡、口腔黏膜白斑、口腔黏膜慢性炎症、口腔扁平苔藓、口腔黏膜囊肿、灼口综合症、白色角化病、幽门螺杆菌感染、口腔癌.从各年龄段老年口腔黏膜病变情况显示,口腔黏膜病变与年龄无关,各年龄段发病率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).吸烟、饮洒患者中口腔黏膜病变发病率明显高于不吸烟、不饮洒患者,且差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 老年口腔黏膜病变病理变化复杂多样.在老年人群中发病率高,为减少老年口腔黏膜病变的发病率,应加强口腔健康教育,养成良好的口腔卫生习惯和生活习惯、戒烟、戒酒等可有效预防口腔黏膜病变的发生.%OBJECTIVE To check on elderly patients with oral secretions, to understand the rules and characteristics of the elderly mucosal lesions, to provide a reference for the prevention of age-related oral diseases. METHODS We analyzed inspection reports on oral mucosa of 4 250 cases of elderly outpatients and inpatients in our hospital from June 2008 to June 2011, including biopsy test reports on oral mucosa of 186 cases. RESULTS The oral examination and biopsy situation of 4 250 cases of this group of elderly outpatients and inpatients shoed oral mucosal lesions were detected in 782 cases, accounting for 18.4%; Candida stomatitis, accounting for 9.69 percent from the lesions, followed by Candida stomatitis, oral ulcers, oral leukoplaki-a, chronic inflammation of the

  2. High prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral mucosal lesions of patients at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    RIBEIRO, Mariana Goveia Melo; MARCOLINO, Larissa Doddi; RAMOS, Bruna Ribeiro de Andrade; MIRANDA, Elaine Alves; TRENTO, Cleverson Luciano; JAIN, Sona; GURGEL, Ricardo Queiroz; da SILVA, Márcia Guimarães; DOLABELLA, Silvio Santana

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral carcinogenesis is still controversial as detection rates of the virus in oral cavity reported in the literature varies greatly. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of HPV infection and its genotypes in patients with oral lesions at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil. Material and Methods We conducted a molecular study with 21 patients (15 females) aged from two to 83 years with clinically detectable oral lesions. Samples were collected through exfoliation of lesions and HPV-DNA was identified using MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ primers. Genotyping was performed by multiplex PCR. Results Benign, premalignant and malignant lesions were diagnosed by histopathology. HPV was detected in 17 samples. Of these, HPV-6 was detected in 10 samples, HPV-18 in four and HPV-16 in one sample. When samples were categorized by lesion types, HPV was detected in two papilloma cases (2/3), five carcinomas (5/6), one hyperplasia (1/1) and nine dysplasia cases (9/11). Conclusion Unlike other studies in the literature, we reported high occurrence of HPV in oral lesions. Further studies are required to enhance the comprehension of natural history of oral lesions. PMID:28198978

  3. High prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral mucosal lesions of patients at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Mariana Goveia Melo; Marcolino, Larissa Doddi; Ramos, Bruna Ribeiro de Andrade; Miranda, Elaine Alves; Trento, Cleverson Luciano; Jain, Sona; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz; Silva, Márcia Guimarães da; Dolabella, Silvio Santana

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of HPV infection and its genotypes in patients with oral lesions at the Ambulatory of Oral Diagnosis of the Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil. We conducted a molecular study with 21 patients (15 females) aged from two to 83 years with clinically detectable oral lesions. Samples were collected through exfoliation of lesions and HPV-DNA was identified using MY09/11 and GP5+/6+ primers. Genotyping was performed by multiplex PCR. Benign, premalignant and malignant lesions were diagnosed by histopathology. HPV was detected in 17 samples. Of these, HPV-6 was detected in 10 samples, HPV-18 in four and HPV-16 in one sample. When samples were categorized by lesion types, HPV was detected in two papilloma cases (2/3), five carcinomas (5/6), one hyperplasia (1/1) and nine dysplasia cases (9/11). Unlike other studies in the literature, we reported high occurrence of HPV in oral lesions. Further studies are required to enhance the comprehension of natural history of oral lesions.

  4. Oral mucosal alterations among the institutionalized elderly in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Conceição Ferreira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the prevalence of oral mucosal alterations and associated factors among the institutionalized elderly in Brazil. Data were collected through a structured questionnaire, a review of their medical records and an intra-oral examination. A sample of 335 individuals over 60 years of age was randomly selected. In total, 646 alterations were diagnosed; 59.1% were variations of the normal oral mucosa. The most frequent variation consisted of sublingual varicosities (51.6%. Denture stomatitis (15.2% and denture hyperplasia (12.8% were the most frequent lesions. Elderly patients who wore dentures had a significantly higher prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (p = 0.00 than those that didn't wear dentures. There was a high prevalence of variations of the normal oral mucosa and of mucosal lesions, especially denture-induced lesions, among the institutionalized elderly.

  5. Oral lichen planus and lichenoid mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine

    2014-04-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is commonly found in middle-aged women. Although the cause is unknown, research points to several complex immunologic events and cells that are responsible for the inflammatory destruction and chronicity of these lesions. Biopsy for histologic diagnosis is recommended. The mainstay of treatment remains topical corticosteroids; however, newer therapies such as immunomodulating agents are available for recalcitrant lesions. In cases of lichenoid mucositis or reactions, treatment should be directed at identifying and removing the presumed cause. Given the apparent risk of squamous cell carcinoma in these patients, frequent follow-up and repeat biopsy are vital.

  6. Distribución de condiciones y lesiones de la mucosa bucal en pacientes adultos mexicanos Distribution for gender and age of oral mucosal alterations in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Donohué Cornejo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar la distribución de condiciones y lesiones de la mucosa bucal de pacientes que asistieron a las clínicas de admisión de la Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. El examen clínico lo realizaron 5 especialistas en Patología Bucal previamente calibrados. El total de pacientes examinados fue de 1 152 en un período de 9 meses: 754 mujeres (65,45 % y 398 hombres (34,55 %, con un rango de edad entre 18 y 84 años (39 años como promedio. Se incluyeron en el estudio32 condiciones y lesiones; las definiciones operacionales se basaron en los criterios establecidos en la Guide to epidemiology and diagnosis of oral mucosal diseases and conditions de la OMS. Del total de pacientes, únicamente 18 (1,6 % no presentaron ninguna alteración. Las lesiones más frecuentemente diagnosticadas fueron: lesión blanca friccional con 354 casos (30,72 %, úlceras traumáticas con 132 (11,45 % y aumento tisular con causa aparente con 103 (11,28 %. Las condiciones más comunes fueron: melanosis racial con 694 casos (60,24 %, gránulos de Fordyce 634 (55,03 % y lengua fisurada 428 (37,15 %. En este estudio encontramos que las condiciones y lesiones se incrementan con la edad observándolas entre la 3ra. y 5ta. décadas de la vida.The aim of this study is to record prevalence of oral mucosal alterations in adult patients , who were attended in the clinics of the faculty of Odontology , National Autonomous University of México in México City. Clinical examination were made by specialists in Oral Pathology, this sample consisted in 1152 subjects reviewed in 9 months duration clinical trial; 754 patients were females (64.45% and 398 males (34.55% age range 18-84 yr. and a mean age of 39 yr ±15.12. We record 32 different diagnosis, 18 patients (1.6% had any lesion. The more prevalent lesions were: White fricctional lesions 354 cases (30.72%, traumatic ulcer 132 (11.45% and tissue growing as

  7. Oral mucositis - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer treatment - mucositis; Cancer treatment - mouth pain; Cancer treatment - mouth sores; Chemotherapy - mucositis; Chemotherapy - mouth pain; Chemotherapy - mouth sores; Radiation therapy - mucositis; Radiation therapy - mouth pain; Radiation ...

  8. Age, gender, dentures and oral mucosal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEntee, M I; Glick, N; Stolar, E

    1998-03-01

    The numbers of participants over 75 years of age in previous studies of oral health have not been sufficient to permit a full investigation of the influence of age on the mouth. In this study a disproportionate stratified random sample of 255 independent elders was selected from a list of urban voters to provide similar numbers of men and women in three age groups. The subjects were interviewed and examined, and nearly half of them had mucosal disorders. There was a significant (P angular cheilitis in particular were associated significantly with men and with the use of defective dentures. Logistic regression revealed that neither age alone nor the quality of dentures predispose to mucosal lesions, but that the odds of finding stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular increased about three-fold in denture-users, and almost doubled in men.

  9. Can the oral microflora affect oral ulcerative mucositis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; de Soet, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review: Oral mucositis is one of the most prevalent toxicities after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Mucositis is initiated by the chemotherapy or radiotherapy preceding the transplantation. It is commonly accepted that microorganisms play a role in the process of oral mucositis.

  10. A practical method for clinical diagnosis of oral mucosal melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Azañero, Wilson A; Mosqueda Taylor, Adalberto

    2003-01-01

    To present a practical and technically simple method for clinical diagnosis of oral melanomas that allows to differentiate this neoplasm from other pigmented lesions. Thirteen oral pigmented lesions with suspected diagnosis of mucosal melanomas were submitted to a test named "rubbing with a gauze" the surface of the lesion. The test was considered positive when the gauze stained dark brown or black due to the presence of melanin-laden cells on the epithelial surface. In all cases definite diagnosis was confirmed by biopsy. Positive results were obtained in 11 out of 13 cases (84.6%). Our results establish that the test "rubbing with gauze" the surface of oral pigmented lesions demonstrates a high sensitivity to anticipate clinically the diagnosis of mucosal melanomas. However, a negative result does not exclude this neoplasm, since there are some cases in which malignant cells have not invaded the superficial epithelial layers. In every case the final diagnosis must be established by histopathologic or immunohistochemical analysis.

  11. Potential Benefits of Oral Cryotherapy for Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodzinski, Amelia

    2016-10-01

    Mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies that causes painful, erythematous lesions to develop in the gastrointestinal tract. These lesions can lead to malnutrition, increased risk for serious infection, prolonged hospital stays, and reduced quality of life. Oral cryotherapy, or the use of ice chips to cool the mucous membranes during bolus chemotherapy infusions (e.g., 5-fluorouracil [Adrucil®] and melphalan [Alkeran®]), is the most readily accessible and cost-effective intervention available. Although many factors may contribute to the development of mucositis during cancer treatment, studies have found a reduction in the incidence and the severity of mucositis with the use of oral cryotherapy.


  12. Comparative cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells in normal, tobacco users, oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadoon Nivia

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The cytomorphometric changes observed in samples from oral SCC and oral leukoplakia were consistent with the current diagnostic features. Hence, the semi-automated cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells can be used as an objective adjunct diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  13. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Spencer W

    2005-08-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies, particularly radiation therapy for head and neck cancer and various forms of chemotherapy. It commonly results in severe oral pain that can compromise the duration and success of cancer management. Hospitalizations are common because patients lose the ability to take anything by mouth due to severe pain and must have alimentation supported during this period. Pain management usually requires potent narcotic analgesia. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis is commonly described as the most significant and debilitating acute complication associated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Until recently, cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis was thought to be a process involving the epithelium only. Evidence is building that the process of oral mucositis involves far more than just the epithelium, but includes multiple cellular processes of the submucosa as well. Many strategies have been evaluated to prevent oral mucositis, but the data is confusing since it is often conflicting. Therapy with the growth factor, KGF1, appears promising, as it is the only medication currently approved by the FDA. A multifaceted approach that targets the entire mucositis process will probably be needed to optimize overall prevention.

  14. Oral White Lesions Associated with Chewing Khat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorsky Meir

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Khat is a cultivated plant whose leaves when chewed elevate mood. Unlike the chewing of betel nut, no association between the white oral mucosal lesions in khat users and oral malignancies has been reported. Chewing of khat has been documented in many countries and has increased with worldwide migration. The impact of chewing khat upon the oral mucosa is essentially unknown. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the occurrence of oral white changes in chronic khat chewers. Oral mucosal changes in a group of 47 Yemenite Israeli men over 30 years of age, who had chewed khat more than 3 years, were compared to those of 55 Yemenite men who did not chew. Results White lesions were significantly more prevalent in the khat chewers (83% compared to the non chewing individuals (16% (P Discussion This study demonstrated a relationship between khat chewing and oral white lesions, which we attribute to chronic local mechanical and chemical irritation of the mucosa. Our findings also suggest that mucosal changes associated with khat are benign, however, this initial study requires further studies including follow-up of khat users to confirm the current findings, including the likely benign changes associated with chronic use and histologic findings of clinical lesions.

  15. Oral mucosal diseases: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoopler, Eric T; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2014-11-01

    Oral mucosal diseases encompass several common conditions that affect the general population. Some of these disorders present with signs and symptoms that are pathognomonic for the condition, whereas others present with similar features that can make clinical diagnosis difficult to achieve. It is important for physicians to have a clear understanding of these disorders to provide appropriate care to patients. This article reviews clinical aspects of common oral mucosal disorders, including candidiasis, herpes simplex viral infections, aphthous stomatitis, lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris, and mucous membrane pemphigoid.

  16. Epidemiology of the most common oral mucosal diseases in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioboo-Crespo, Maria del Rosario; Planells-del Pozo, Paloma; Rioboo-García, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Dentists who treat children must be alert to the possibility of finding diseases of the oral mucosa, especially in younger children. The present study aimed to review the most updated information and the experience of our group in order to yield epidemiological data that assist diagnosis of the most common diseases of the oral mucosa in children. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown a wide variability in the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in different regions of the world and have led researchers to draw disparate conclusions. Moreover, studies have not been designed using standard criteria, further explaining the wide variability in the percentage of different groups of children with oral lesions, which ranges from 4.1 to 52.6%. The lesions most frequently considered by authors and that most often appear in the different studies are: recurrent aphthous stomatitis (0.9-10.8%), labial herpes (0.78-5.2%), fissured tongue (1.49-23%), geographic tongue (0.60-9.8%), oral candidiasis (0.01-37%) and traumatic injury (0.09%-22.15%). Dentists must be able to detect any of the numerous possible disorders and perform the correct differential diagnosis, key to the treatment plan. The aim of this paper, based on a review of the different national and international studies, is to contribute data on the most important oral mucosal diseases in the paediatric population in terms of prevalence and differential diagnosis.

  17. Management of mucositis in oral irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feber, T. [Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    1996-10-01

    Mucositis significantly affects quality of life and tolerance of treatment in oral irradiation. Effective management of this complication is therefore very important. However, there is a scarcity of up-to-date oral care protocols, with most centres using ritualized regimens. The literature on oral rinses in radiation mucositis is at best inconclusive and at worst confusing. In this study, patients undergoing radical radiotherapy treatment (55-60 Gy in 4 weeks) to more than 50% of the oral cavity and oropharynx were randomized to a research based oral care protocol with either saline 0.9% or hydrogen peroxide 3.5 volumes (HP) as rinses. The results of this study show that, on average, the group receiving saline rinses appeared to do better on some outcomes than the group receiving HP. This suggests that frequent mechanical cleansing of the mouth may be more important than the antiseptic properties of a mouthwash. Antiseptic mouthwashes may be contra-indicated in radiation mucositis. In order to determine best practice in mucositis management, multicentre, multidisciplinary trials should be conducted. (Author).

  18. Topical morphine for oral mucositis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina Nygaard; Aagaard, Gitte; Henneberg, Steen W;

    2012-01-01

    Systemic opioids for painful chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in children often result in unsatisfactory pain relief and a high frequency of side effects. Opioids applied topically can produce analgesia by binding to opioid receptors on peripheral terminals of sensory neurons. These receptors...

  19. Freqüência de Candida sp. em biópsias de lesões da mucosa bucal The frequency of Candida sp. in biopsies of oral mucosal lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Carlos Spolidorio

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse trabalho foi determinar a freqüência da infecção por Candida sp. em biópsias de lesões da mucosa bucal, assim como associar a presença de Candida sp. com lesões malignas e lesões com vários graus de displasia. Foram utilizadas 832 biópsias da mucosa bucal, previamente incluídas em parafinas, cujos blocos foram obtidos dos arquivos da Disciplina de Patologia da Faculdade de Odontologia de Araraquara da UNESP, no período entre 1990-2001. Três cortes seqüenciais foram corados pelo ácido periódico de Schiff (PAS. Do total de biópsias 27,2% foram PAS positivas, dessas 83,25% eram provenientes de pacientes do sexo masculino. Houve associação positiva entre infecção com displasia epitelial leve, moderada, severa, carcinoma espinocelular e hiperqueratose (p Candidosis is the most common fungal infection in the oral cavity, and is usually associated with local and systemic predisposing factors. The ocurrence and relevance of Candidal infection in oral lesions such as liquen planus, leukoplakias and carcinomas are still to be understood. The aim of the present study was to define the frequency of infection by Candida sp. on biopsies of oral mucosal lesions and associate its presence with malignant and dysplastic lesions. Histopathology reports issued between 1990 and 2001 inclusive were reviewed. Three sections of each mucosal biopsy were stained using the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS technique. From the 832 biopsies 27.2% were PAS positive, of which 83.25% were obtained from male patients. There was positive association between fungic infection and mild, moderate and severe epithelial dysplasia, squamous cell carcinoma and hiperqueratosis (p < 0.05. There was no association between fungic infection and inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, lichen planus and pyogenic granuloma (p < 0.05. The frequency of infection in the tongue was significantly higher (p < 0.05 than in the other sites. Our results do not

  20. Oral Mucosal Disorders in Pregnant versus Non-Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Rezazadeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of pregnancy on the Oral Mucosa Disorder (OMD have been sporadically documented in some developed countries. Less known is the status of OMD during pregnancy in less developed/developing countries. Iran is no exception. This study assesses the prevalence of OMD in 200 pregnant women and compares the findings with the findings from a 200 non-pregnant woman of similar age distribution in Iran. The participants had been referred to a clinic to receive reproductive age-related services. Participants suffering from systemic chronic diseases, those on medications/drugs, smokers, needing biopsies, and those with urgent Oral Mucosal Lesion (OML treatments were excluded from the study. Oral mucosal of all 400 participants were examined. The participants’ age ranges were from 17 to 47; with the average age of 33.14 for one group; and 30.23 for the other group. Both groups had the same level of formal education. Out of 400 examined women; 62 had lesions, including 47 pregnant (23.5%; and 15 non-pregnant (7.5% women. This result shows that the OMD rate of occurrence was significantly higher among the pregnant women. Higher OML prevalence in pregnant women, as compared to the non-pregnant women, indicates the importance of timely oral examination of pregnant women and subsequent treatment plans for them.

  1. Oral health as a predictive factor for oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Luiz Coracin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Oral mucositis is a complication frequently associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, decreasing a patient's quality of life and increasing the occurrence of opportunistic infections. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and severity of oral mucositis and to assess the correlation of this disease with the oral health of an individual at the time of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODS: Before transplantation, patients' oral health and inflammatory conditions were determined using the gingival index and the plaque index, which are based on gingival bleeding and the presence of dental plaque, respectively. Additionally, the dental health status was determined using the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index. The monitoring of oral mucositis was based on the World Health Organization grading system and was performed for five periods: from Day 0 to D+5, from D+6 to D+10, from D+11 to D+15, from D+16 to D+20, and from D+21 to D+30. RESULTS: A total of 97 patients (56% male and 44% female who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo between January 2008 and July 2009 were prospectively examined. The incidence of ulcerative mucositis was highest from days +6 to +10 and from days +11 to +15 in the patients who underwent autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, respectively. CONCLUSION: The data, including the dental plaque and periodontal status data, showed that these oral health factors were predictive of the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in a cohort of patients with similar conditioning regimens before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  2. Oral cryotherapy reduced oral mucositis in patients having cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivakovsky, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CANCERLIT, CINAHL, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment compared to usual care, no treatment or other interventions to prevent mucositis. The primary outcome was incidence of mucositis and its severity.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers carried out study assessment and data extraction independently. Treatment effect for continuous data was calculated using mean values and standard deviations and expressed as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Meta-analysis was performed.ResultsFourteen studies with 1280 participants were included. Subgroup analysis was undertaken according to the main cancer treatment type. Cryotherapy reduced the risk of developing mucositis by 39% (RR = 0.61; 95%CI, 0.52 to 0.72) on patients treated with fluorouracil (5FU). For melphalan-based treatment the risk of developing mucositis was reduced by 41% (RR =0.59; 95%CI, 0.35 to 1.01). Oral cryotherapy was shown to be safe, with very low rates of minor adverse effects, such as headaches, chills, numbness/taste disturbance and tooth pain. This appears to contribute to the high rates of compliance seen in the included studies.ConclusionsThere is confidence that oral cryotherapy leads to a large reduction in oral mucositis in adults treated with 5FU. Although there is less certainty on the size of the reduction on patients treated with melphalan, it is certain there is reduction of severe mucositis.

  3. Dexmedetomidine decreases the oral mucosal blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Tanaka, Eri; Togami, Kohei; Tada, Hitoshi; Ganzberg, Steven; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    There is an abundance of blood vessels in the oral cavity, and intraoperative bleeding can disrupt operations. There have been some interesting reports about constriction of vessels in the oral cavity, one of which reported that gingival blood flow in cats is controlled by sympathetic α-adrenergic fibres that are involved with vasoconstriction. Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that acts through the α-2 adrenoceptor, and is expected to have a vasoconstrictive action in the oral cavity. We have focused on the relation between the effects of α-adrenoceptors by dexmedetomidine and vasoconstriction in oral tissues, and assessed the oral mucosal blood flow during sedation with dexmedetomidine. The subjects comprised 13 healthy male volunteers, sedated with dexmedetomidine in a loading dose of 6 μg/kg/h for 10 min and a continuous infusion of 0.7 μg/kg/h for 32 min. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and palatal mucosal blood flow (PMBF) were measured at 0, 5, 10, 12, 22, and 32 min after the start of the infusion. The HR, CO, and PBMF decreased significantly during the infusion even though there were no differences in the SV. The SVR increased significantly but the PMBF decreased significantly. In conclusion, PMBF was reduced by the mediating effect of dexmedetomidine on α-2 adrenoceptors.

  4. Oral mucosal involvement in visceral leishmaniasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunny Garg; Richik Tripathi; Kamlakar Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis affects both the visceral and cutaneous tissues in body.OralMucosal involvement in leishmaniasis is rare and is often overlooked.We present a case17 year old boy from the north east region ofBihar who has a history of visceral leishmaniasis one year back, came to the department of oral surgery for treatment of persistent oral ulcers.Oral examination did not give any diagnostic information while systemic examination revealed enlarged spleen and low grade fever.Patient was screened for leishmaniasis by rK39 based immunochromatographic strip test which came to be positive.Biopsy of the ulcer as well as splenic and bone marrow aspirate confirmed the presence of leishmaniasis.Patient was administeredAmphotericinB for20 days following which significant clinical and haematological improvement followed.

  5. Oral Candida as an aggravating factor of mucositis Induced by radiotherapy; Candida Oral como fator agravante da mucosite radioinduzida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoes, Cristiane Araujo; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de; Cazal, Claudia [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de odontologia

    2011-07-01

    Antineoplastic treatment induces some undesirable consequences in head and neck cancer patients. Often, the emergence of major clinical manifestations, such as oral mucositis, results in temporary interruption of the treatment, decreasing the patients' quality of life, and increasing hospital costs. Radio-induced or chemo-induced oral mucositis is possibly aggravated by opportunist fungal infections, which turn the mucositis more resistant to the conventional treatments. Objective: this study aims to identify the presence of Candida sp. as a possible aggravating factor of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer under antineoplastic treatment. Method: all patients with radio- or chemo-induced oral mucositis from the Cancer Hospital of Pernambuco, treated between October 2008 and April 2009, were selected for the study. The prevalence of Candida sp was measured through the cytological analysis of oral mucosa in patients with oral mucositis. The fungal presence was correlated with the mucositis severity. Results: the results showed a positive association between fungal colonization and more several lesions (degrees III and IV of mucositis). Conclusion: The outcomes shown may contribute to a solution for unconventional mucosites, which do not respond to the usual treatment. (author)

  6. Oral mucosal immunization using glucomannosylated bilosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sanyog; Indulkar, Anura; Harde, Harshad; Agrawal, Ashish K

    2014-06-01

    The present study embarks on the feasibility of GM-bilosomes as a rationally designed vehicle for oral mucosal immunization. Bilosomes containing BSA as a model antigen were found to have vesicle size of 157 +/- 3 nm, PDI of 0.287 +/- 0.045, zeta potential of -21.8 +/- 2.01 mV and entrapment efficiency of 71.3 +/- 4.3%. Bilosomal formulations were freeze dried and entrapped BSA in freeze dried formulations was found to retain its structural and conformational stability as evident by SDS-PAGE and CD analysis. The GM-bilosomes were also found stable in different simulated biological fluids and bile salt solutions of different concentrations. In-vitro drug release revealed that GM-bilosomes were able to sustain drug release up to 24 h. In-vitro cell uptake in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells demonstrated significantly higher uptake of GM-bilosomes in comparison with bilosomes and free antigen. Intestinal uptake studies on excised rat intestinal sections further demonstrated higher uptake of vesicular systems throughout the intestinal region in comparison with free antigen. Significantly higher (p alum adsorbed BSA (BSA-AL) following oral administration. The immune response observed in case of GM-bilosomes was comparable to BSA-AL administered through im route without any significant difference (p > 0.05). More importantly, GM-bilosomes were found capable of inducing mucosal immune response as well as cell mediated immune response which was not induced by im BSA-AL. In conclusion, GM-bilosomes could be considered as promising carrier and adjuvant system for oral mucosal immunization and productively exploited for oral delivery of other candidate antigens.

  7. 老年2型糖尿病患者口腔黏膜病变及危险因素%Investigation of oral mucosal lesions and risk factors in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳玲; 张春舫; 王四宝; 赵丹宁; 高月平; 高媛

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解老年2型糖尿病(T2DM)患者口腔黏膜病变状况及其危险因素,为实施干预提供依据.方法 2011年1月至2012年3月,将纳入某市综合医院门诊的105例老年T2DM患者作为病例组,按照1:1配对的原则,将105例健康老年体检者作为对照组,进行问卷调查,调查内容包括人口学特征、糖尿病史等,并进行口腔黏膜临床检查.结果 病例组有口腔黏膜病变倾向者占86.7%,对照组占l9.0%;病例组患潜在恶性疾病(PMD)者占38.1%,对照组占7.6%;病例组真菌感染者占21.9%,对照组占6.7%;两组上述指标的差异均有统计学意义(x2值分别为18.963、18.976、15.642,P<0.01).多因素条件logistic回归分析结果显示,T2DM并发症(OR=10.607,95% CI:5.027~18.796)、吸烟(OR =3.531,95%CI:1.393~8.788)可增加老年T2DM患者口腔黏膜病变的机会.结论 T2DM并发症和吸烟是老年T2DM患者口腔黏膜病变的危险因素,应定期进行临床检查,以确保老年T2DM患者口腔黏膜病变的早期诊断和及时处理.%Objective To investigate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to identify possible risk factors. Methods During January of 2011 to March of 2012, 105 elderly patients with T2DM from a clinic of comprehensive hospital and 105 healthy controls matched by age and gender were investigated with questionnaire which included demographic data as well as current and former history of diabetes, and the clinical examination of oral mucosa in each subject was conducted. Results The morbidity of oral mucosal lesions in the case group was 86.7 % which was significantly higher than that (19.0 %) in control group(P<0.01). The prevalence of potentially malignant disorder (PMD) in case group was 38.1 % which was obviously higher than that (7.6 %) in control group (P<0.01). The rates of fungal infection in case and control groups were 21.9 % and 6.7 %, respectively

  8. Prevention of acute gastric mucosal lesions by Solcoseryl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, T; Radecki, T; Sendur, R; Gustaw, P; Konturek, S J

    1987-04-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract from calf blood containing various biologically active substances, has been reported to promote the healing of skin wounds and gastric ulceration In this study, the gastroprotective effects of Solcoseryl vis-a-vis acute gastric mucosal damage were examined in rats. Solcoseryl significantly reduced the formation of acute lesions induced by intragastric application of absolute ethanol or acidified taurocholate and by water immersion and restraint stress, but failed to affect those caused by acidified aspirin. Since Solcoseryl did not offer protection in the absence of mucosal prostaglandins (PG) e.g. in aspirin-induced gastric damage, it is likely that PG may be involved in the observed gastroprotective activity of the drug. Solcoseryl failed to affect gastric acid or pepsin secretion, but increased mucosal blood flow. Thus PG generated by Solcoseryl might contribute to the maintenance of the observed mucosal microcirculation and the prevention of lesion formation by corrosive substances and stress conditions.

  9. Protective effect of ginsenoside Re on acute gastric mucosal lesion induced by compound 48/80

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Lee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The protective effect of ginsenoside Re, isolated from ginseng berry, against acute gastric mucosal lesions was examined in rats with a single intraperitoneal injection of compound 48/80 (C48/80. Ginsenoside Re (20 mg/kg or 100 mg/kg was orally administered 0.5 h prior to C48/80 treatment. Ginsenoside Re dose-dependently prevented gastric mucosal lesion development 3 h after C48/80 treatment. Increases in the activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO; an index of neutrophil infiltration and xanthine oxidase (XO and the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS; an index of lipid peroxidation and decreases in the contents of hexosamine (a marker of gastric mucus and adherent mucus, which occurred in gastric mucosal tissues after C48/80 treatment, were significantly attenuated by ginsenoside Re. The elevation of Bax expression and the decrease in Bcl2 expression after C48/80 treatment were also attenuated by ginsenoside Re. Ginsenoside Re significantly attenuated all these changes 3 h after C48/80 treatment. These results indicate that orally administered ginsenoside Re protects against C48/80-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions in rats, possibly through its stimulatory action on gastric mucus synthesis and secretion, its inhibitory action on neutrophil infiltration, and enhanced lipid peroxidation in the gastric mucosal tissue.

  10. Peripheral Exophytic Oral Lesions: A Clinical Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mortazavi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of peripheral oral exophytic lesions might be quite challenging. This review article aimed to introduce a decision tree for oral exophytic lesions according to their clinical features. General search engines and specialized databases including PubMed, PubMed Central, Medline Plus, EBSCO, Science Direct, Scopus, Embase, and authenticated textbooks were used to find relevant topics by means of keywords such as “oral soft tissue lesion,” “oral tumor like lesion,” “oral mucosal enlargement,” and “oral exophytic lesion.” Related English-language articles published since 1988 to 2016 in both medical and dental journals were appraised. Upon compilation of data, peripheral oral exophytic lesions were categorized into two major groups according to their surface texture: smooth (mesenchymal or nonsquamous epithelium-originated and rough (squamous epithelium-originated. Lesions with smooth surface were also categorized into three subgroups according to their general frequency: reactive hyperplastic lesions/inflammatory hyperplasia, salivary gland lesions (nonneoplastic and neoplastic, and mesenchymal lesions (benign and malignant neoplasms. In addition, lesions with rough surface were summarized in six more common lesions. In total, 29 entities were organized in the form of a decision tree in order to help clinicians establish a logical diagnosis by a stepwise progression method.

  11. Oral opportunistic infections in HIV-positive individuals: review and role of mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Janet E; Shetty, Kishore; Fidel, Paul L

    2004-08-01

    Oral opportunistic infections in the HIV-positive individual have been documented since the first reports of the epidemic, with many lesions associated with reduced CD4(+) T lymphocyte cell count. The most common oral lesions seen in HIV disease prior to the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were oropharyngeal candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia. However, since the advent of HAART while many oral lesions have decreased significantly the incidence of oral warts has surprisingly increased. Despite the correlation of diminished CD4(+) T lymphocyte count to the occurrence of these lesions, it is rare for the lesions to occur concurrently suggesting that each pathologic lesion type is associated with distinct host immune dysfunctions. To date, the oral opportunistic infection most frequently investigated is oropharyngeal candidiasis, where data suggests that both systemic and local immunity is important for protection against infection. In contrast, recent investigations into the host responses associated with oral hairy leukoplakia and oral warts show little to no evidence of systemic or mucosal immune responsiveness despite the presumed competence of several types of leukocytes other than CD4(+) T cells. Together these data are suggesting that susceptibility to oropharyngeal candidasis in HIV-positive persons is predominantly immune-based, whereas protection or susceptibility to oral hairy leukoplakia and oral warts may be more associated with factors other than mucosal immune function.

  12. Development of oral mucositis model induced by radiation in hamsters: prevention and treatment with low power laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galletta, Vivian C.; Folgosi-Correa, Melissa S.; Zezell, Denise M., E-mail: vivian.galletta@gmail.com, E-mail: melfolgosi@gmail.com, E-mail: zezell@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gouw-Soares, Sheila, E-mail: sheilagouw@hotmail.com [Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul (UNICSUL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia; Correa, Luciana, E-mail: lcorrea@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FO/USP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia

    2013-07-01

    Despite the benefits for the prognosis of patients treated with radiotherapy for oral cancer treatment, it might cause local side effects such as oral mucositis. The oral mucositis is a pathological condition that may appear in affected oral mucosa by ionizing radiation, and the pain related can alter and even stop the antineoplastic treatment, decreasing tumor control rates. Oral mucositis has several treatment modalities, although it remains as a problem since therapies available are not enough to treat efficiently this inflammatory process. Many pharmacological solutions (anti-inflammatory, antibiotics, antiseptic, lubricant agents) are used to alleviate oral mucositis symptoms. Laser treatment has been used as an option, but there is lack of studies to verify the process of laser therapy in oral mucositis caused by ionizing radiation. This work accomplishes follow-up of oral mucositis evolution, comparing laser and benzydamine therapies in an animal model. Forty-two animals were irradiated at head and neck in a single dose of 30 Grays, by means of a Co{sup 60} source. After irradiation, treatments were applied daily, once a day, for 20 days, in which severity of lesions were clinically classified by two calibrated examiners. Histological evaluation was performed to search for mucosal alterations at treated tissues. Statistical analysis of data showed that laser treatment was more efficient than benzydamine treatment, diminishing severity and duration of oral mucosal lesions caused by ionizing irradiation. (author)

  13. Prevalence based epigrammatic study of oral cancer and other mucosal disorders in elderly patients visiting dental institution of Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj T Bhagawati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This report provides the descriptive information about the oral health among the elderly population. The objective is to assess the association of age, medical status, recent use of dental services, habits and dentures with that of oral cancer, and other mucosal disorders. Materials and Methods: Data from the interviews and clinical examination of 285 persons aged above 60 years were obtained. Patients were divided into three groups of 75 patients each with age group of 60-65 years, 66-70 years, and 71 years above, respectively. Patients were examined and questioned regarding the oral health complaints and the presence of cancer and other mucosal disorders. Results: There are no statistically significant differentiates between the three groups in terms of oral health complaint, medical status. The patients in all the three groups gave the history of consumption of betel quid/alcohol/smoking. About 22.1% patients in Group A, 18.9% in Group B, and 37.9% in Group C had associated mucosal lesion like oral cancer, growth, pigmentation, red lesion, ulcer, and white lesions. Association between deleterious habits and oral mucosal lesions was seen in 12, 15, and 16 patients in Groups A, B, and C, respectively. Conclusion: The oral cancer and oral mucosal lesions were associated with oral habits and the use of faulty dentures. Age had minimal influence but coexistence of multiple conditions might further complicate the oral health.

  14. A critical role of gastric mucosal ascorbic acid in the progression of acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by compound 48/80 in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshio Kamiya; Yoshiji Ohta; Yoichiro Imai; Tomiyasu Arisawa; Hiroshi Nakano

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of gastric mucosal ascorbic acid(AA) in the progression of acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by compound 48/80 (C48/80), a mast cell degranulator, in rats.METHODS: C48/80 (0.75 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected to fasted Wistar rats. Oral administration of AA (10, 50 or 100 mg/kg) was performed 0.5 h after C48/80treatment. Determinations for gastric mucosal lesion severity and blood flow, and assays for gastric mucosal total AA, reduced AA, oxidized AA, vitamin E, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), adherent mucus, nitrite/nitrate (NOx), non-protein SH (NPSH), and myeloperoxidase(MPO), and serum total AA, reduced AA, oxidized AA,and NOx were conducted 0.5 and 3 h after C48/80treatment.RESULTS: Gastric mucosal lesions occurred 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment and progressed at 3 h. Gastric mucosal blood flow decreased 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment but the decrease was recovered at 3 h. Gastric mucosal total AA, reduced AA, vitamin E, and adherent mucus concentrations decreased 3 h after C48/80 treatment.Gastric mucosal oxidized AA concentration remained unchanged after C48/80 treatment. Gastric mucosal NPSH concentration decreased 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment,but the decrease was recovered at 3 h. Gastric mucosal TBARS concentration and MPO activity increased 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment and further increased at 3 h.Serum total AA and reduced AA concentrations increased 0.5 h after C48/80 treatment and further increased at 3 h, while serum oxidized AA concentration increased at 0.5 h. Serum and gastric mucosal NOx concentrations increased 3 h after C48/80 treatment. AA administration to C48/80-treated rats at 0.5 h after the treatment prevented the gastric mucosal lesion progression and the changes in gastric mucosal total AA, reduced AA, vitamin E, adherent mucus, NOx, and TBARS concentrations and MPO activity and serum NOx concentration found at 3 h after the treatment dose-dependently. The AA administration to C48/80-treated

  15. Oral mucosal status and major salivary gland function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, A.; Fox, P.C.; Ship, J.A.; Atkinson, J.C.; Macynski, A.A.; Baum, B.J. (National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Normal salivary function is considered to be critical for the maintenance of healthy oral mucosa. However, few studies have examined mucosal changes in patients with objectively documented salivary gland performance. In the present report, the mucosal status of 298 subjects being evaluated in a dry mouth clinic was assessed. A complete oral examination was performed and unstimulated and stimulated salivary samples were collected separately from the parotid and submandibular/sublingual glands. Data were analyzed according to diagnosis and salivary output after the assignment of an oral mucosal rating to each subject. In general, the mucosal surfaces were well preserved and infections were not seen. Patients evaluated for Sjoegren's syndrome and radiation-induced xerostomia had the lowest salivary gland performance but displayed a mucosal status similar to denture-wearing healthy subjects or patients with normal salivary flow who had idiopathic xerostomia. However, those patients with a total lack of salivary flow rarely had normal-appearing oral mucosa. These results confirm a role for saliva in oral mucosal preservation and also suggest that other factors may act to maintain oral mucosal integrity.

  16. A DETAILED REVIEW ON ORAL MUCOSAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Bhati

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal drug delivery system is widely applicable as novel site for administration of drug for immediate and controlled release action by preventing first pass metabolism and enzymatic degradation due to GI microbial flora. Oral mucosal drug delivery system provides local and systemic action. In this review, attention is focused to give regarding physiology of oral mucosal including tissue permeability, barriers to permeation and route of permeation, biopharmaceutics of buccal and sublingual absorption, factors affecting drug absorption, detailed information of penetration enhancers, design of oral mucosal drug delivery system and role of mucoadhesion and various theories of bioadhesion. Evaluation techniques and selection of animal model for in-vivo studies are also discussed.

  17. Disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis diagnosis based on oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Preto Webber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a deep mycosis with primary lung manifestations that may present cutaneous and oral lesions. Oral lesions mimic other infectious diseases or even squamous cell carcinoma, clinically and microscopically. Sometimes, the dentist is the first to detect the disease, because lung lesions are asymptomatic, or even misdiagnosed. An unusual case of PCM with 5 months of evolution presenting pulmonary, oral, and cutaneous lesions that was diagnosed by the dentist based on oral lesions is presented and discussed.

  18. Minimally invasive treatment of oral ranula with a mucosal tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, T; Xing, L; Zhu, F; Jin, X; Liu, L; Tao, J; Chen, Y; Gao, Z; Zhang, H

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a new method for minimally-invasive treatment of uncomplicated oral ranulas using a mucosal tunnel, and we report the clinical outcome. We constructed a mucosal tunnel for each of 35 patients who presented with an oral ranula, by making 2 parallel incisions across the top of the protruding ranula 2-3mm apart, and dissected the soft tissue along the incisions to its wall. The fluid was removed and the cavity irrigated with normal saline. The wall of the ranula was not treated. The first mucosal tunnel was made by suturing the base of the mucosal strip to the deepest part of the wall of the ranula. The mucosal base of the tunnel and the deepest part of the base of the ranula were fixed with absorbable sutures. The two external edges of the incisions were sutured together to form the second mucosal tunnel, and apposing sutures were inserted between the two parallel incisions to form two natural mucosal tunnels. The duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 5 years. One patient was lost to follow-up and 34 patients were cured. Outcomes were satisfactory without relapse during the follow-up period and the patients were satisfied with the outcome. The mucosal tunnel is a safe, effective, simple, and minimally-invasive treatment for oral ranula.

  19. Comparison of centrifuged liquid based cytology method with conventional brush cytology in oral lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Nidhi Dwivedi; Akhil Agarwal; Vineet Raj; Bina Kashyap; Shaleen Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Background: Exfoliative cytology is the study of cells that are shed or scrapped off from mucosal surfaces. Centrifuged Liquid based cytology is a modified technique employed in the present study. Aims: To compare the utility of centrifuged liquid based cytology with conventional cytology in oral lesions after staining with Papanicolaou (PAP) stain. Materials and Methods: 50 cases of oral lesions comprising of normal mucosa (n=14), hyperkeratotic lesions (n=17), ulcerated lesions (n=7) and at...

  20. Herpetiform genital lesions in a heifer with mucosal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabis, J J; Szkudlarek, L; Risatti, G R; Sura, R; Garmendia, A E; Van Kruiningen, H J

    2008-03-01

    A 14-month-old heifer with a 17-day history of unresponsive bloody diarrhea was necropsied. There were focal, pink-red erosions of the nares and hard palate; ulcers and fissures of the tongue; and multiple ulcerative lesions of the alimentary canal. Interdigital skin of both rear limbs was ulcerated and bleeding; and the margins of the vulva contained punctiform red ulcers. The gross lesions were consistent with mucosal disease. Histopathology and laboratory testing ruled out rinderpest, foot-and-mouth disease, and vesicular stomatitis, and identified bovine virus diarrhea virus to be the cause of this disease. Lesions of the vulva similar to those seen in some stages of infectious pustular vulvovaginitis were negative for bovine herpesvirus-1 and tested positive for bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen by immunohistochemistry.

  1. Laser phototherapy as a treatment for radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lino, Maira Doria Martinez da Costa; Carvalho, Fabola Bastos de; Magalhaes, Edval Barreto; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa [Federal University of Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dental School. Center of Biophotonics; Oliveira, Lara Ramalho de [Metropolitan Union of Culture and Education, Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dental School. Oral Diagnosis Specialization Program; Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira, E-mail: lucianaramalho@uol.com.b [Metropolitan Union of Culture and Education (UNIME), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dental School. Lab. of Pathology

    2011-07-01

    Oral mucositis is a harmful side effect of radiotherapy (RT) on the head and neck region. There are encouraging reports on the beneficial aspects of the use of laser light on the treatment of oral mucositis. This paper reports the efficacy of laser phototherapy (LPT) on the treatment of oral mucositis in a patient undergoing RT after surgical removal of a squamous cell carcinoma with osseous invasion of the maxilla. Palatal and commissural lesions were treated with {lambda}660 nm, 40 mW, {phi}=4 mm{sup 2}, in contact mode, 5 x 2.4 J/cm{sup 2} per point, 14.4 J/cm{sup 2} per session. For treating the lesion on the patient's nasal mucosa, LPT ({phi}=4 mm{sup 2}, {lambda}780 nm, 70 mW, 3 x 2.1 J/cm{sup 2} per point, 6.3 J/cm{sup 2} per session, contact mode) was used on the external area of the nose. A single dose (2.4 J/cm{sup 2}) with the {lambda}660 nm laser, as described before, was applied on the entrance of each nostril. LPT was used 3 times/week during 4 weeks. Treatment results indicate that the use of LPT on oral mucositis was effective and allowed the patient to carry on the RT without interruption. However, long-term and controlled clinical trials are necessary to establish both preventive and curative protocols using LPT. (author)

  2. Icing oral mucositis: Oral cryotherapy in multiple myeloma patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joey; Seabrook, Jamie; Fulford, Adrienne; Rajakumar, Irina

    2017-03-01

    Background Up to 70% of patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplant develop oral mucositis as a side effect of high-dose melphalan conditioning chemotherapy. Oral cryotherapy has been documented to be potentially effective in reducing oral mucositis. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the cryotherapy protocol implemented within the hematopoietic stem cell transplant program. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of adult multiple myeloma patients who received high-dose melphalan conditioning therapy for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Primary endpoints were incidence and severity of oral mucositis. Secondary endpoints included duration of oral mucositis, duration of hospital stay, parenteral narcotics use and total parenteral nutrition use. Results One hundred and forty patients were included in the study, 70 patients in both no cryotherapy and cryotherapy groups. Both oral mucositis incidence and severity were found to be significantly lower in the cryotherapy group. Fifty (71.4%) experienced mucositis post cryotherapy compared to 67 (95.7%) in the no cryotherapy group (p < 0.001). The median oral mucositis severity, assessed using the WHO oral toxicity scale from grade 0-4, experienced in the no group was 2.5 vs. 2 in the cryotherapy group (p = 0.03). Oral mucositis duration and use of parenteral narcotics were also significantly reduced. Duration of hospital stay and use of parenteral nutrition were similar between the two groups. Conclusion The cryotherapy protocol resulted in a significantly lower incidence and severity of oral mucositis. These results provide evidence for the continued use of oral cryotherapy, an inexpensive and generally well-tolerated practice.

  3. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotrim, Ana P. [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yoshikawa, Masanobu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baum, Bruce J., E-mail: bbaum@dir.nidcr.nih.gov [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  4. Oral mucosal diseases in children - casuistics from the Department of Dermatology - University of São Paulo - Brazil*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erthal, Aline; Lourenço, Silvia Vanessa; Nico, Marcello Menta Simonsen

    2016-01-01

    There are no studies about pediatric oral mucosal diseases performed by dermatologists in Brazil. This study presents the casuistics of oral mucosal diseases in children examined at the Oral Diseases Clinic at the Department of Dermatology - University of São Paulo - Brazil. Cases were retrospectively studied from the hospital records from 2003 to 2015. A hundredsix children have been examined. Commoner lesions examined included mucoceles and aphthae. Rare and difficult cases were also seen and have been published; this clinic is based in a tertiary hospital center that deals mostly with complex cases. PMID:28099620

  5. Management of oral mucositis in patients with cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, R.; Fliedner, M.C.; Smiet, A.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a distressing toxic effect of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It can increase the need for total parenteral nutrition and opioid analgesics, prolong hospital stays, increase the risk of infection, and greatly diminish a patient's quality of life. Nurses play a critical role in

  6. Histopathology of cutaneous and mucosal lesions in human paracoccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Uribe

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available Biopsies from cutaneous and mucosal lesions from 40 patients with active paracoccidioidomycosis, were studied histopathologically. All cases exhibited chronic granulomatous inflammation and 38 also presented suppuration; this picture corresponded to the mixed mycotic granuloma (MMG. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and the transepidermic (or epithelial elimination of the parasite, were observed in all cases. In paracoccidioidomycosis elimination takes place through formation of progressive edema, accompained by exocytosis. The edema gives rise to spongiosis, microvesicles and microabscesses which not only contain the fungus but also, various cellular elements. Cells in charge of the phagocytic process were essentialy Langhans giant cells; PMN's, epithelioid and foreign body giant cells were poor phagocytes. An additional finding was the presence of fibrosis in most biopsies.

  7. Oral mucosal injury caused by cancer therapies: current management and new frontiers in research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Peterson, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    This invited update is designed to provide a summary of the state-of-the-science regarding oral mucosal injury (oral mucositis) caused by conventional and emerging cancer therapies. Current modeling of oral mucositis pathobiology as well as evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for prevention...

  8. Assessment of oral mucositis in adult and pediatric oncology patients: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, Michele; Cullen, Laura; Dawson, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a frequent side effect of cancer treatment and can lead to delayed treatment, reduced treatment dosage, altered nutrition, dehydration, infections, xerostomia, pain, and higher healthcare costs. Mucositis is defined as "inflammatory lesions of the oral and/or gastrointestinal tract caused by high-dose cancer therapies. Alimentary tract mucositis refers to the expression of mucosal injury across the continuum of oral and gastrointestinal mucosa, from the mouth to the anus" (Peterson, Bensadoun, & Roila, 2008, p. ii122). Evidence demonstrates that oral mucositis is quite distressing for patients. In addition, the majority of oncology nurses are unaware of available guidelines related to the care of oral mucositis. A multidisciplinary Oral Mucositis Committee was formed by the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics to develop evidence-based prevention and treatment strategies for adult and pediatric oncology patients experiencing oral mucositis. The first step was implementing an evidence-based nursing oral assessment. The Iowa Model was used to guide this evidence-based practice initiative. The Oral Assessment Guide (OAG) is reliable and valid, feasible, and sensitive to changing conditions. The OAG was piloted on an Adult Leukemia and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit leading to modification and adaptation. The pilot evaluation found 87% of patients had an abnormal oral assessment involving all categories in the tool. Nursing questionnaires showed that staff (8/23; 35% response) felt they were able to identify at risk patients using the OAG (3.3; 1-4 scale), and the tool accurately identifies mucosal changes (2.9; 1-4 scale). A knowledge assessment found nurses correctly identified OAG components 63% of the time. Unlike results from a national survey, most University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics nurses (63%) were aware of national guidelines for prevention and treatment of oral mucositis. Developing an evidence-based nursing policy and updating

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of Mucosal Biopsy versus Endoscopic Mucosal Resection in Barrett's Esophagus and Related Superficial Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsadek, Hany M; Radwan, Mamdouh M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Endoscopic surveillance for early detection of dysplastic or neoplastic changes in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) depends usually on biopsy. The diagnostic and therapeutic role of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) in BE is rapidly growing. Objective. The aim of this study was to check the accuracy of biopsy for precise histopathologic diagnosis of dysplasia and neoplasia, compared to EMR in patients having BE and related superficial esophageal lesions. Methods. A total of 48 patients with previously diagnosed BE (36 men, 12 women, mean age 49.75 ± 13.3 years) underwent routine surveillance endoscopic examination. Biopsies were taken from superficial lesions, if present, and otherwise from BE segments. Then, EMR was performed within three weeks. Results. Biopsy based histopathologic diagnoses were nondysplastic BE (NDBE), 22 cases; low-grade dysplasia (LGD), 14 cases; high-grade dysplasia (HGD), 8 cases; intramucosal carcinoma (IMC), two cases; and invasive adenocarcinoma (IAC), two cases. EMR based diagnosis differed from biopsy based diagnosis (either upgrading or downgrading) in 20 cases (41.67%), (Kappa = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.170-0.69). Conclusions. Biopsy is not a satisfactory method for accurate diagnosis of dysplastic or neoplastic changes in BE patients with or without suspicious superficial lesions. EMR should therefore be the preferred diagnostic method in such patients.

  10. Natural Outbreak of BVDV-1d-Induced Mucosal Disease Lacking Intestinal Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M V; Konradt, G; de Souza, S O; Bassuino, D M; Silveira, S; Mósena, A C S; Canal, C W; Pavarini, S P; Driemeier, D

    2017-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) belongs to the Pestivirus genus, which is further divided into subgenotypes (1a-1u and 2a-c). When persistent infection occurs, the calf will be immunotolerant to BVDV and possibly develop mucosal disease. This study describes an outbreak of BVDV-1d-induced mucosal disease lacking intestinal lesions. Eleven calves presented with anorexia, sialorrhea, lameness, recumbency, and death. Three calves were necropsied, showing ulceration of the interdigital skin and the oral and nasal mucosa; linear ulcers in the tongue, esophagus, and rumen; and rounded ulcers in the abomasum. Microscopically, mucosa and skin had superficial necrosis, with single-cell necrosis and vacuolation in epithelial cells, and severe parakeratosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed BVDV antigen in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells in skin and mucosa. All 11 dead calves were positive upon reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of Pestivirus along with another 11 live calves from the herd, which were positive again by RT-PCR and IHC after a 4-week interval. Sequencing of the 5' untranslated region and N-terminal protease showed that viruses from these 22 calves were homologous and of subgenotype BVDV-1d. Cytopathic BVDV was isolated from 8 of 11 dead calves, but only noncytopathic BVDV was isolated from the 11 live animals. The findings indicate that this was an outbreak of mucosal disease caused by BVDV-1d, with high morbidity, and lesions restricted to the upper alimentary system and skin and absent from intestine. Thus, the epidemiological and pathological features in this form of mucosal disease may be similar to vesicular diseases, including foot and mouth disease.

  11. Oral lesions among HIV-infected children on antiretroviral treatment in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meless, David; Ba, Boubacar; Faye, Malick; Diby, Jean-Serge; N’zoré, Serge; Datté, Sébastien; Diecket, Lucrèce; N’Diaye, Clémentine; Aka, Edmond Addi; Kouakou, Kouadio; Ba, Abou; Ekouévi, Didier Koumavi; Dabis, François; Shiboski, Caroline; Arrivé, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of oral mucosal diseases and dental caries among HIV-infected children receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) in West Africa, and to identify factors associated with the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions. Methods Multi-center cross-sectional survey in 5 pediatric HIV clinics in Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Sénégal. A standardized examination was performed by trained dentists on a random sample of HIV-infected children aged 5 to 15 years receiving ART. The prevalence of oral and dental lesions and mean number of decayed, missing/extracted and filled teeth (DMFdefT) in temporary and permanent dentition were estimated with their 95% confidence interval (95%CI). We used logistic regression to explore the association between children’s characteristics and the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions, expressed as prevalence odds ratio (POR). Results The median age of the 420 children (47% females) enrolled was 10.4 years (interquartile range [IQR]=8.3–12.6). The median duration on ART was 4.6 years (IQR=2.6–6.2); 84 (20.0%) had CD4 countoral mucosal lesions (24 were candidiasis); 86.0% (95%CI=82.6–89.3) of children had DMFdefT≥1. The presence of oral mucosal lesions was independently associated with CD4 countoral hygiene (POR=2.69, 95%CI=1.07–6.76). Conclusions Oral mucosal lesions still occur in HIV-infected African children despite ART, but rarely. However, dental caries were common and severe in this population, reflecting the need to include oral health in the comprehensive care of HIV. PMID:24386972

  12. Common oral lesions associated with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, M; Lucatorto, F

    1993-09-01

    More than 40 different lesions involving head and neck areas have been associated with HIV infection. The oral cavity may manifest the first sign of HIV infection. Early detection of these conditions can lead to early diagnosis of HIV infection and subsequent appropriate management. Signs, symptoms and management of the most common HIV-associated oral lesions are discussed.

  13. Natural Products for Management of Oral Mucositis Induced by Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohamamdi, Azar; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2016-03-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of systemic chemotherapy and radiotherapy of head and neck in patients with cancer. Severe oral mucositis is painful and affects oral functions, including intake of food and medications and speech. Prevention of oral mucositis affects the life quality of patients. Recent studies have been focused on natural products to improve or reduce this complication. Many clinical trials have been performed to assess natural products for treatment of mucositis and their results are promising. The authors reviewed the evidence for natural products in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

  14. Photobiomodulation reduces oral mucositis by modulating NF-kB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curra, Marina; Pellicioli, Ana Carolina Amorim; Filho, Nélson Alexandre Kretzmann; Ochs, Gustavo; Matte, Úrsula; Filho, Manoel Sant'Ana; Martins, Marco Antonio Trevizani; Martins, Manoela Domingues

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate NF-kB during 5-fluorouracil (FU)-induced oral mucositis and ascertain whether photobiomodulation (PBM), as a preventive and/or therapeutic modality, influences this transcription factor. Ninety-six male golden Syrian hamsters were allocated into four groups: control (no treatment); PBM therapeutic, PBM preventive, and PBM combined. Animals received an injection of 5-FU on days 0 and 2. On days 3 and 4, the buccal mucosa was scratched. Irradiation was carried out using a 660-nm, 40-mW diode laser at 6 J/cm2 during 6 s/point, 0.24 J/point, for a total dose of 1.44 J/day of application. Animals were euthanized on days 0, 5, 10, and 15 (n=6). Buccal mucosa was removed for protein quantification by Western blot. Clinical analysis revealed that PBM groups exhibited less mucositis than controls on day 10. Control animals exhibited lower levels of NF-kB during mucositis development and healing. The preventive and combined protocols were associated with higher NF-kB levels at day 5; however, the therapeutic group had higher levels at days 10 and 15. These findings suggest that the preventive and/or therapeutic PBM protocols reduced the severity of oral mucositis by activating the NF-kB pathway.

  15. Novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hairui; Yu, Yuan; Faraji Dana, Sara; Li, Bo; Lee, Chi-Ying; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-08-01

    Technological advances in drug discovery have resulted in increasing number of molecules including proteins and peptides as drug candidates. However, how to deliver drugs with satisfactory therapeutic effect, minimal side effects and increased patient compliance is a question posted before researchers, especially for those drugs with poor solubility, large molecular weight or instability. Microfabrication technology, polymer science and bioconjugate chemistry combine to address these problems and generate a number of novel engineered drug delivery systems. Injection routes usually have poor patient compliance due to their invasive nature and potential safety concerns over needle reuse. The alternative non-invasive routes, such as oral, mucosal (pulmonary, nasal, ocular, buccal, rectal, vaginal), and transdermal drug delivery have thus attracted many attentions. Here, we review the applications of the novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

  16. Prevalence of oral lesions and normal variants of the oral mucosa in 12 to 15-year-old students in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbani, Jahanfar; Morse, Douglas E; Alinejad, Halimeh

    2012-03-01

    There are relatively few systematic studies, documenting the prevalence of mucosal disorders in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions in 12- to 15-year olds living in Tehran and to assess the possible relationship between the occurrence of these lesions and gender. A cross-sectional study was designed in which 1020 adolescents were participated. The sample size was based upon an expected oral lesion prevalence of 25%, a precision of 0.05 and a confidence level of 99. Epi-info version 6.0 was used for statistical analysis. Two hundred eighty-six adolescents (28.0%) were diagnosed with at least one oral mucosal lesion at the time of the examination. The prevalence of any oral mucosal lesion was 29.2% among the boys and 26.9% among the girls. With the exception of melanotic macules, there were no statistically significant differences in oral mucosal lesion prevalence by gender. More than 28% of the adolescents were found to have at least one oral mucosal lesion. Melanotic macule was found to be proportionally more common in boys than girls.

  17. NRAS and BRAF mutation frequency in primary oral mucosal melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Buery, R. R.; Siar, C. H.; Katase, N; Gunduz, M; Lefeuvre, M.; Fujii, M.; Inoue, M.; Setsu, K.; Nagatsuka, H

    2011-01-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma (OMM) is a fatal sarcoma of unknown etiology. Histological morphology and genetic events are distinct from those of its cutaneous counterpart. Mutation and up-regulation of c-kit has been identified in OMM which may activate downstream molecules such as RAS and RAF. These molecules are involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway leading to tremendous cell proliferation and survival. NRAS and BRAF mutation and protein expression have been studied in ot...

  18. Relationship of lymphoid lesions to disease course in mucosal feline immunodeficiency virus type C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, L A; Hoover, E A

    2000-09-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection typically has a prolonged and variable disease course in cats, which can limit its usefulness as a model for human immunodeficiency virus infection. A clade C FIV isolate (FIV-C) has been associated with high viral burdens and rapidly progressive disease in cats. FIV-C was transmissible via oral-nasal, vaginal, or rectal mucosal exposure, and infection resulted in one of three disease courses: rapid, conventional/slow, or regressive. The severity of the pathologic changes paralleled the disease course. Thymic depletion was an early lesion and was correlated with detection of FIV RNA in thymocytes by in situ hybridization. The major changes in thymic cell populations were depletion of p55+/S100+ dendritic cells, CD3- cells, CD4+/CD8- cells, and CD4+/CD8+ cells and increases in apoptosis, CD45R+ B cells, and lymphoid follicles. In contrast to thymic depletion, peripheral lymphoid tissues often were hyperplastic. Mucosally transmitted FIV-C is thymotropic and induces a spectrum of lymphoid lesions and disease mirroring that seen with the human and simian immunodeficiency virus infections.

  19. Cancer patients with oral mucositis: challenges for nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Nilkece Mesquita Araújo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze nursing care provided to cancer patients with oral mucositis based on the Nursing Process (NP. METHOD: this exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted with 213 patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in two cancer facilities: one philanthropic and one private service. RESULTS: the participants were mainly female, aged 45.8 years old on average, with up to 11 years of schooling and income of up to one times the minimum wage. Severe mucositis was related to chemotherapy associated with radiotherapy. Only 25.3% of the patients reported having received guidance from nurses during their treatment concerning self-care. The perceptions of patients regarding quality of care did not significantly differ between the private and public facilities. The basic human needs mainly affected were comfort, eating, and hygiene. Based on this finding, one NP was established listing the diagnoses, interventions and expected results to establish an ideal, though individualized, standard of nursing care to be provided to these patients. CONCLUSION: to understand oral mucositis is crucial to establish nursing care that includes prevention based on the implementation of an oral care plan.

  20. Measuring oral mucositis of pediatric patients with cancer: A psychometric evaluation of chinese version of the oral mucositis daily questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karis Kin Fong Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oral mucositis is a frequent clinical condition that has been shown to affect pediatric cancer patients. Oral Mucositis Daily Questionnaire (OMDQ is one of the few available patient-reported outcome measures to assess the extent and impact of oral mucositis. The objectives of the study were to translate the Mouth and Throat Soreness-Related Questions of the OMDQ into Chinese (OMDQ MTS-Ch for children and adolescents aged 6–18 years receiving chemotherapy and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: This was part of a multicenter, prospective cohort study involving two phases. Phase I involved forward-backward translation to fit the cognitive and linguistic age level of the children and adolescents, followed by face and content validation, together with pretesting. In Phase II, which evaluated the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and discriminant validity, a total of 140 patients completed the OMDQ MTS-Ch for 14 days. Results: The OMDQ MTS-Ch had satisfactory face and content validities. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the OMDQ MTS-Ch was 0.984. All of the corrected item-total correlations were higher than 0.90. The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient between consecutive days for the OMDQ MTS-Ch items ranged from 0.576 to 0.983; the only value that was not over 0.70 was that for the paired study days 7 and 8 for the item of talking. The mean area-under-the-curve OMDQ MTS-Ch item scores were significantly different among patients with different degrees of mucositis severity (P < 0.001, supporting the discriminant validity. Conclusions: It has been shown that the OMDQ MTS-Ch has a good level of reliability and discriminant validity and can be completed by children aged ≥6 years and adolescents on a daily basis to measure mucositis and its related functional limitations.

  1. Effect of glutathione on gastric mucosal lesion induced by restraint water-immersion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Li Wan; Chang Liu Wang

    2000-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of glutathione (GSH) on stress gastric mucosal lesion.METHODS The stress gastric mucosal lesion as produced by restraint water-immersion in rats and gastricmucosal lesion, gastric mucosal GSH content, gastric acid secretion and gastric barrier mucus secretion wereexamined. We also observed the effect of GSH on gastric mucosal lesion and the effect of N-ethylmaleimine(NEM) and indomethacin on GSH protection. Comparisons between two groups were made using the Students t test.RESULTS GSH (100 and 200 mg/kg) intraperitoneally protected against stress gastric mucosal lesion(P0.05). The preinjection of NEM (10 mg/kg, sc.), a sulfhydryl-blocking reagent, or indomethacin(5 mg/kg, im.), a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, had no effect on protection of GSH (P>0.05). GSH(100mg/kg) significantly increased secretion of gastric barrier mucus (P0.05).CONCLUSION GSH can inhibit the formation of gastric mucosal lesions induced by restraint water-immersion. The protective effect of GSH was due, in part, to promoting the secretion of gastric barriermucus, but not to suppress the gastric acid secretion. The protection effect of GSH has no relation withgastric mucosal GSH and PGs.

  2. Clinical Effectiveness of Aloe Vera in the Management of Oral Mucosal Diseases- A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Gopakumar Ramachandran; Naidu, Giridhar Seetharam; Jain, Supreet; Makkad, Ramanpal Singh; Jha, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aloe vera is well known for its medicinal properties which lead to its application in treating various diseases. Its use in treating oral lesions has not been much documented in literature. Aim Although, systematic reviews on aloe vera and its extracts have been done earlier, but in relation to oral diseases this is the first systematic review. The aim of the present systematic review was to compile evidence based studies on the effectiveness of Aloe vera in treatment of various oral diseases. Materials and Methods Computerized literature searches were performed to identify all published articles in the subject. The following databases were used: PUBMED [MEDLINE], SCOPUS, COCHRANE DATABASE, EMBASE and SCIENCE DIRECT using specific keywords. The search was limited to articles published in English or with an English Abstract. All articles (or abstracts if available as abstracts) were read in full. Data were extracted in a predefined fashion. Assessment was done using Jadad score. Results Fifteen studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. Population of sample study ranged from 20 patients to 110 patients with clinically diagnosed oral mucosal lesions. Out of 15 studies, five were on patients with oral lichen planus, two on patients with oral submucous fibrosis, other studies were carried on patients with burning mouth syndrome, radiation induced mucositis, candida associated denture stomatitis, xerostomic patients and four were on minor recurrent apthous stomatitis. Most studies showed statistically significant result demonstrating the effectiveness of Aloe vera in treatment of oral diseases. Conclusion Although there are promising results but in future, more controlled clinical trials are required to prove the effectiveness of Aloe vera for management of oral diseases. PMID:27656587

  3. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, D.P.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Allemano, J.; Bossi, P.; Wetering, M.D. van de; Rao, N.G.; Potting, C.M.J.; Cheng, K.K.; Freidank, A.; Brennan, M.T.; Bowen, J.; Dennis, K.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. METHODS: A systematic review of the available literature was

  4. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, D.P.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Allemano, J.; Bossi, P.; Wetering, M.D. van de; Rao, N.G.; Potting, C.M.J.; Cheng, K.K.; Freidank, A.; Brennan, M.T.; Bowen, J.; Dennis, K.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. METHODS: A systematic review of the available literature was con

  5. Reconstruction of a full-thickness collagen-based human oral mucosal equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinikoglu, Beste; Auxenfans, Céline; Pierrillas, Pascal; Justin, Virginie; Breton, Pierre; Burillon, Carole; Hasirci, Vasif; Damour, Odile

    2009-11-01

    Tissue engineered human oral mucosa has the potential to be applied to the closure of surgical wounds after tissue deficits due to facial trauma, malignant lesion surgery or preposthetic procedure. It can also be used to elucidate the biology and pathology of oral mucosa and as a model alternative to animals for safety testing of oral care products. Using the technology previously developed in our laboratory for the production of a skin equivalent, we were able to reconstruct a nonkeratinized full-thickness human oral mucosal equivalent closely mimicking human native oral mucosa. The successive coculture of human lamina propria fibroblasts and human oral epithelial cells isolated from the nonkeratinized region of oral cavity in a porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-chitosan scaffold gave rise to a lamina propria equivalent (LPE) and then to an oral mucosa equivalent (OME). The results of the histology, immunohistology and transmission electron microscopy of this OME demonstrated the presence of a nonkeratinized pluristratified and differentiated epithelium as in native nonkeratinized human oral mucosa expressing both K13 and K3/76. This epithelium was firmly anchored to the LPE by a continuous and ultrastructurally well-organized basement membrane. In the LPE, fibroblasts synthesized new extracellular matrix where the average collagen fibre diameter was 28.4 nm, close to that of native oral mucosa. The proliferative capacity of the basal cells was demonstrated by the expression of Ki67.

  6. Oral Findings and Health Status among Turkish Geriatric Patients with or without Dementia (Oral Lesions and Dementia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakki Oguz Kazancioglu

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Oral mucosal lesions are more common in patients with dementia and dental care should be performed regularly for this group. In addition, because removable prostheses can be lost by patients with dementia, implant-supported fixed prostheses should be preferred for this group.

  7. Oral lesion classification using true-color images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Artur; Mattsson, Ulf; Gustavsson, Tomas

    1999-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate effective image analysis methods for the discrimination of two oral lesions, oral lichenoid reactions and oral leukoplakia, using only color information. Five different color representations (RGB, Irg, HSI, I1I2I3 and La*b*) were studied and their use for color analysis of mucosal images evaluated. Four common classifiers (Fisher's linear discriminant, Gaussian quadratic, kNN-Nearest Neighbor and Multilayer Perceptron) were chosen for the evaluation of classification performance. The feature vector consisted of the mean color difference between abnormal and normal regions extracted from digital color images. Classification accuracy was estimated using resubstitution and 5-fold crossvalidation methods. The best classification results were achieved in HSI color system and using linear discriminant function. In total, 70 out of 74 (94.6%) lichenoid reactions and 14 out of 20 (70.0%) of leukoplakia were correctly classified using only color information.

  8. Langerhans cells and their role in oral mucosal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhi Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are arguably the most potent antigen-presenting cells and may be the only cells capable of initiating the adaptive immune response. The epithelial residents of dendritic cells are Langerhans cells, which serve as the "sentinels" of the mucosa, altering the immune system not only to pathogen entry but also of tolerance to self antigen and commensal microbes. Oral mucosal Langerhans cells are capable of engaging and internalizing a wide variety of pathogens and have been found responsive to nickel in patients with nickel allergies, oral Candida species, oral lichen planus, lichenoid drug eruptions, graft versus host diseases, periodontal diseases median rhomboid glossitis, human immunodeficiency virus infection, hairy leukoplakia of the tongue, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Review focuses on the role of antigen-presenting cells in particular Langerhans cells to better understand the mechanisms underlying immune responses. In this review, comprehensive detail about mucosal diseases has been compiled using the PubMed database and through textbooks.

  9. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T.; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C.

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  10. Precancerous Lesions of the Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oya Gürbüz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review of oral precancerous lesions, leukoplakia, erythroleukoplakia/erythroplakia and the least common variant proliferative verrucous leukoplakia will be focused with their clinical characteristics and their potential to develop oral squamous cell carcinoma and related factors will be discussed.

  11. ORAL MUCOSA LESIONS AND ORAL SYMPTOMS IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno LARANJEIRA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease is known for its extra intestinal manifestations, the oral cavity is no exception. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and oral mucosa lesions and symptoms, and complementary to evaluate their possible relation with oral hygiene, smoking habits, drug therapy, duration and activity of the disease. Methods Patients were selected from the Gastroenterology Clinic of a Portuguese tertiary referral hospital. This sample consisted of 113 patients previously diagnosed with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease along with a control group of 58 healthy individuals that were accompanying the study group patients to their appointments. Clinical interviews and clinical examinations were performed for data collection. Results The patients in the study group were more affected by oral symptoms (P=0.011, and showed a trend towards a higher incidence of oral mucosal lesions, even though statistical significance was not reached (8.8% versus 3.4% in the control group; P=0.159. Patients in active phase were the most affected. No differences were detected between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, or concerning smoking habits. The corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy seemed to increase the incidence of oral symptoms (P=0.052. The oral mucosa lesions increased and the oral symptoms decreased over the course of the disease, however without statistical significance. Conclusion Oral mucosa’s lesions and oral symptoms were positively associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, mainly during disease activity periods and conceivably, associated with corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy.

  12. Reactive Hyperplastic Lesions of the Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamideh Kadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peripheral reactive lesions of soft tissue are common oral lesions that dentists face during routine examinations. Diagnosis and development of a treatment plan is difficult if dentists are not aware of the prevalence and clinical symptoms of these lesions. The frequency of these lesions differs across various populations. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and distribution of oral reactive lesions over a period of 7 years (2006–2012.   Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, available records from the archives of the Department of Pathology, Dental School and the two main hospitals in southeast of Iran (Zahedan over a period of 7 years (2006–2012 were reviewed. Information relating to the type of reactive lesion, age, gender and location was extracted and recorded on data forms. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software (V.18 using the chi-square and Fisher’s exact test.   Results: Of 451 oral lesions, 91 cases (20.2% were reactive hyperplastic lesions. The most common lesions were pyogenic granuloma and irritation fibroma, respectively. These lesions were more frequent in women (60% than men (40%. The most common locations of involvement were the gingiva and alveolar mucosa of the mandible, and lesions were more common in the 21–40-year age group. The relationship between age group and reactive lesions was statistically significant (P=0.01.   Conclusion:  The major findings in this study are broadly similar to the results of previous studies, with differences observed in some cases. However, knowledge of the frequency and distribution of these lesions is beneficial when establishing a diagnosis and treatment plan in clinical practice.

  13. Buccal adhesive nanofibers containing human growth hormone for oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Suk; Han, Suk-Hee; Hyun, Changbaig; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2016-10-01

    Due to a lack of proper drug carriers to deliver treatments for mucositis, many cancer patients suffer from oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We prepared a double-layered electrospun nanofibrous sheets composed of Eudragit and chitosan to accelerate the healing rate of oral mucous ulcer. Human growth hormone (hGH) and Eudragit in a mixture of dimethylacetamide and ethanol were co-electrospun to nanofibrous sheets. The electrospun fibrous mat was subsequently layered with chitosan by a dip-coating method. Chitosan-layered sheets showed attenuated mass erosion while uncoated sheets were instantly melted at the physiological condition. The released hGH was trapped on the chitosan layer by the ionic interaction between positively charged chitosan and negatively charged hGH, and a large number of entrapped proteins remained on the SIS membrane due to the muco-adhesive properties of chitosan. hGH-incorporated sheets significantly increased proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts. In vivo study employing oral ulcers in dogs, the ulcers dressed with chitosan-layered sheets showed enhanced wound recovery and the chitosan layers on the sheet greatly assisted prolonged recovery. Therefore, chitosan-layered Eudragit nanofibrous sheets can be potentially applied to developing muco-adhesive wound dressing materials with pH-dependent drug release by adjusting the thickness of chitosan sheath on the sheets. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1396-1406, 2016.

  14. Necrotic erythema nodosum leprosum with oral mucosal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, J P; Soud, A; Agarwal, S K

    2008-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic, infectious disease with varied clinical presentations. The type 2 lepra reaction / erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) classically involves extremities and face. Besides to the classical lesions of type 2 lepra reaction sometimes rare findings of vesicular lesions with necroticans may be observed. We are reporting a case of lepromatous leprosy with bullous reaction and necroticans involving usual sites along with the unusual involvement of oral cavity, which on first look mimicked necrotizing vasculitis or other bullous disorders. This manifestation of type 2 lepra reaction in oral mucosa should be kept in mind by the physicians while dealing with a case of type 2 lepra reaction.

  15. P16(INK 4a) and Ki-67 expression in human papilloma virus-related head and neck mucosal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gültekin, Sibel Elif; Sengüven, Burcu; Klussmann, Jens Peter; Dienes, Hans Peter

    2015-03-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is postulated as a risk factor in the etiology of some specific mucosal pathologies in the head and neck regions. Despite the frequent use of p16(INK4a) as a surrogate marker for HPV-infection, there is still controversy with respect to its reliability. This study has been undertaken to assess the potential role of p16(INK 4a) and Ki-67 expression in HPV-related lesions. The study was conducted on 71 specimens of oral, tonsillar and laryngeal lesions which comprised 25 dysplasia and 46 papilloma specimens. Specimens were immunohistochemically stained for p16(INK4A) and Ki-67 proteins. HPV DNA was determined by one step multiplex polymerase chain reaction. HPV DNA was detected in 33.8% of all lesions. Tonsil and larynx lesions showed significant differences with oral lesions for HPV positivity (p < 0.001). p16(INK 4a) over-expression was seen in 56.5% of papilloma and 60% of dysplasia specimens. HPV status showed a positive correlation with p16(INK 4a) expression in tonsillar dysplasias (p < 0.001). p16(INK 4a) expression may have a value as a marker in high risk HPV induced dysplasias, but not in low risk infected lesions. The proliferation index is not related to HPV-induced lesions and may be evaluated as an independent marker in head and neck premalignant lesions.

  16. Oral mucosa lesions in Mazahua Indian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banderas, J A; Toshikasu, O; González, M

    1999-01-01

    The epidemiologic data on oral lesions in native Indians remain unknown in many countries around the world. This paper reports the prevalence and distribution of oral congenital anomalies and pathologic lesions found in a survey of 107 schoolchildren (ages 12 to 17), from two isolated communities in the ethnographic Mazahua area in the State of Mexico. The main entities identified were: pigmented lesions (47.6%), lingual anomalies (17.4%) and developmental tooth alterations (6.9%). The remaining 24.4% of the lesions were gingival inflammatory hyperplasia, partial ankilosis of the tongue, lichen planus, focal epithelial hyperplasia and the double lip. The most frequent localization was lips and tongue. These findings suggest the high prevalence of oral anomalies in this Indian population. Therefore, we suggest that health programs should emphasize the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of these pathologies in Indians groups.

  17. Oral mucosal precancer and cancer: A helpful discriminating clinical tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Crispian; Sciubba, James J; Bagan, Jose V

    2015-09-01

    The authors have collaborated with many colleagues in several countries in formulating a useful and practical clinical tool for evaluating oral mucosal findings on routine examination. Consideration of several factors including history, evolution of positive findings and clinical information allows placement of examination results into one of three categories which are graded by a color scheme along a spectrum of concerns (green to red, or no concern to serious concern). Afforded to the clinician is a straightforward grading system as a starting point for office end clinic use for all patients.

  18. Low energy laser in prevention of oral mucositis in patients receiving radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy in Pernambuco Cancer Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelner, Natalie; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de [Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil). Dept. of Clinics and Preventive Dentistry. Discipline of Oral Pathology]. E-mail: jlisboa72@hotmail.com

    2007-07-01

    Oral mucositis induced by antineoplastic therapy causes wide-range pain and discomfort resulting in decreased quality of life. The present study evaluated the benefits of low intensity laser and 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate in the prevention of oral mucositis induced by radiation, associated or not with chemotherapy, and considered degrees/severity, time of appearance of the lesions and functional loss. Eighty-four outpatients were considered and 49 were included in this study and divided into two groups: Group 1 received laser treatments in three stages, starting three days before treatment until the end of therapy. Group 2 was instructed to do daily mouth rinses with chlorhexidine gluconate. The prevalence of clinical mucositis was 49%, and of functional mucositis, 28.6%, when the two groups were considered together. This percentage was smaller in the laser group, 44% for the clinical mucositis group and 24% for the functional. The two protocols were well tolerated and showed benefits, mainly from the point of view of functionality, and delayed the onset and development of mucositis. (author)

  19. Cryotherapy effect on oral mucositis severity among recipients of bone marrow transplantation: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayyem, Abdel-Qader Mahmoud

    2014-08-01

    Oral mucositis is a distressing toxic effect of cancer therapy and one of the major side effects of the myeloablative conditioning used to prepare patients for bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Oral cryotherapy is one of the recent modalities used to prevent and manage oral mucositis. The purpose of this review is to clarify the cryotherapy effect on oral mucositis severity among patients receiving myeloablative conditioning followed by BMT. A literature search was performed using six different electronic databases: CINAHL®, MEDLINE®, Nursing Ovid, PubMed, Springer, and Science Direct. Six articles were deemed relevant and included in this review. Oral mucositis increases mortality rate, length of hospital stay, opioid use, and the need for parenteral nutrition usage. It also decreases patient's quality of life and his or her desire to complete treatment. However, oral cryotherapy significantly minimizes the incidence and severity of oral mucositis and decreases secondary oral mucositis complications. Using oral cryotherapy concurrently with a regular oral care protocol can improve its efficacy for preventing and managing oral mucositis. Additional studies should be conducted to create standard oral cryotherapy protocols.

  20. Oral aphthous-like lesions, PFAPA syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femiano, Felice; Lanza, Alessandro; Buonaiuto, Curzio; Gombos, Fernando; Cirillo, Nicola

    2008-07-01

    Aphthous ulcers are the most common oral mucosal lesions in the general population. Several precipitating factors for aphthous ulcers are suggested to operate on subjects with genetic predisposition. Sometimes aphthous ulcers can be the sign of systemic diseases. Therefore, it is essential to establish a correct diagnosis to determine suitable therapy. There are several diseases potentially responsible for oral ulcers. Sometimes appearance of periodic oral ulcers coincides with periodic fever and other symptoms leading to the diagnosis of a rare childhood disease: PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenopathy) syndrome. PFAPA or Marshall's syndrome is characterized by abrupt onset of periodic episodes of high fever accompanied by aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis, often associated with headache and / or abdominal or joint pain. Owing to the periodic onset of oral symptoms, often an oral physician or pediatric dentist may be the first healthcare worker to evaluate a child with clinical signs compatible with PFAPA syndrome. Children diagnosed with this condition require systematic oral follow-up to monitor for signs of ulceration.

  1. [Efficacy of Rebamipide Gargle against Chemotherapy-induced Oral Mucositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Masato; Onikubo, Toshihide; Nakamura, Kumi

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (CIOM) is a severe adverse event resulting from cancer chemotherapy. Toxic free radicals and pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by anticancer drugs have been reported to be associated with CIOM. Rebamipide has been shown to increase gastric endogenous prostaglandin E2 and I2, to promote gastric epithelial mucin, and to behave as an oxygen free-radical scavenger in addition to other anti-inflammatory actions. We developed a gargle solution of rebamipide, adding ultrahydrogel for mucosal protection and to maintain rebamipide on the oral mucosa. A 300 mL rebamipide gargle solution combines 600 mg rebamipide, 3 g high molecular-weight polyethylene oxide, 1.2 g carrageenan, pineapple flavoring, and water. The efficacy of the rebamipide gargle was evaluated in 175 patients with CIOM from November 2009 to December 2012, each instructed to use the rebamipide gargle 5-6 times daily. The severity of CIOM was assessed according to the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, version 4.0). Their CTCAE scores (3/2/1/0) changed from n=13/64/98/0 to 0/10/103/62, respectively, after initiation of the rebamipide gargle (pRebamipide gargle was well tolerated and demonstrated to have significant therapeutic efficacy against CIOM.

  2. Histopathologic Approach to Oral Cavity Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuyan Demirkesen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of the oral cavity may be either a reflection of system or cutaneous diseases or can be seen as a primary oral lesion. These lesions are inflammatory reactions due to miscellaneous mechanisms, ulceration or erosion, reactive proliferative nodules, precancerous or neoplastic diseases. In this study, microscopic features of the most common diseases, together with their differential diagnosis are discussed. Some of the diseases of the oral cavity have overlapping histopathological findings. In these conditions, ancillary methods such as immunoflourescence or immunohistochemistry can be performed. Deep biopsies from representative areas are essential for proper histopathological diagnosis. Moreover, informing the pathologist about the exact anatomic localization of the biopsy, as well as the clinical findings of the lesion is crucial for a better approach.

  3. A comparison between zinc sulfate and chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwashes in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mehdipour

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "n Background and the Purpose of the Study: Patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy for hematological malignancies are susceptible to development of oral mucositis, and no effective modality has been reported for its prophylaxis and treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of zinc mouthwash on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis lesions. "nMethods: In this double-blind randomized trial, patients under chemotherapy for acute leukemia were divided into two test and control groups of 15 patients each. The groups were homogeneous with respect to medical history, tumor characteristics, and therapeutic details. The test group received 10ml 0.2% zinc sulfate mouthwash, and the control group received 10ml 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash, twice a day for a period of two weeks. Spijkervet scale was used to grade the severity of mucositis at every other week during eight weeks. The severity scores were analyzed with repeated measure ANOVA using SPSS 13.0 computer software. "nResults: Mean severity scores were generally lower in the test group compared to the controls at all four time intervals evaluated; but only, the differences in weeks of 2 and 3 were statistically significant (P=0.025. Conclusion: Zinc mouthwash used in conjunction with chemotherapy may reduce the severity of oral mucositis lesions in patients with leukaemia.

  4. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Oral Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Irani, Soussan; Monsef Esfahani, Alireza; Bidari Zerehpoush, Farahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic gram-negative spiral organism. It is recognized as the etiologic factor for peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Recently, it has been isolated from dental plaque and the dorsum of the tongue. This study was designed to assess the association between H. pylori and oral lesions such as ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and primary lymphoma. Materials and methods. A total of 228 bio...

  5. Oral lichenoid lesions - A review and update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Vishwanath Kamath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lichenoid lesions or reactions (OLLs/OLRs are clinical and histological contemporaries of the classical oral lichen planus (OLP that have generated a lot of debate in literature. In contrast to the idiopathic nature of OLP, OLLs are often associated with a known identifiable inciting factor. A superficial examination of these lesions clinically and histologically often reveals many similarities with OLP, but recent data indicate that distinguishable features do exist and form the basis of most classifications. Aims and Objectives: This paper attempts to collate available data in English literature on OLLs, highlight distinguishing features clinically and histologically and reflect on the malignant transformation potential and treatment modalities of the condition. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive search of medical and dental databases including PubMed, Ovid, Cochrane, Pubget, Researchgate, and non-medical search engines were utilized for the review. The search words included "oral lichen planus", "oral lichenoid lesions", "oral drug reactions", "lichenoid dysplasia", and "adverse effects of dental materials". Review Results: OLLs seem to grossly underrated and most cases were clubbed as OLP. Definite clinical and histological features were uncovered to establish the identity of this lesion. Associations with dental restorative materials, drugs, and medications have been conclusively proven in the etiology of this condition. Specific markers are being utilized to diagnose the condition and monitor its progress. Conclusion: Substantial differentiating features were uncovered to delineate OLLs as a separate entity with definite etiology, pathogenesis, and a high malignant transformation rate compared with OLP.

  6. Documentation of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Scoring Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riesenbeck, D. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie - Radioonkologie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Doerr, W. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Background: Radiation therapy of tumors in the head and neck region is frequently associated with severe side effects in the oral mucosa which often necessitate interruption of the prescribed treatment protocol. In order to compare therapeutic strategies and, more important, in order to perform multicenter studies, generally accepted scoring systems have to be applied for uniform documentation of the oral mucosal response. Methods: Different scoring protocols are found in the literature. The scoring protocols most widely accepted are the CTC classification and the RTOG/EORTC classification. These are compared with more detailed systems. Results: In the CTC classification, grading of stomatitis is included in the responses of the gastrointestinal tract and emphasizes dietary effects. For effects of radiation alone or of radiochemotherapy, the RTOG/EORTC system, focusing on therapeutic interventions, has been established. However, there are only minor differences in the grading of mucositis between these 2 protocols. Based on the RTOG/EORTC classification, Maciejewski et al. introduced a classification system with inclusion of the area affected, but also changed the sensitivity of the scores. The latter may be confusing if the source of the system used is not cited in a report. An alternative system was proposed by Dische, which in addition to objective morphologic criteria also includes the symptoms induced by the mucosal response, and hence includes some subjective aspects reported by the patient. Conclusions: For routine documentation of acute radiation side effects in the oral cavity, the German version of the RTOG/EORTC classification can be recommended. In studies with particular interest in oral mucositis, a more sensitive scoring system may be applied. In any publication concerning mucositis, a table or a detailed description of the system used should be included. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Die Strahlentherapie von Tumoren der Kopf-Hals-Region ist haeufig

  7. [Roxatidine in the treatment of gastroduodenal mucosal lesions in hepatic cirrhosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardini, C; Ventura, P; Abbati, G L; Rigo, G; Cioni, G; Cristani, A; Tincani, E; Ventura, E

    1994-11-01

    In about 50% of patients with liver cirrhosis, upper digestive bleeding is not due to oesaphageal varices rupture, but to a group of peculiar mucosal lesions usually referred as "congestive gastropathy" and "hepatogenic ulcer". The pathogenesis of such mucosal damage is still unclear: an important causative role is commonly thought to be played by portal hypertension, but the role of peptical pathway and of the mucosal barrier impairment must not be underscored as well. Aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of roxatidine in the long-term treatment of mucosal damage in 19 patients with liver cirrhosis. Patients showed a good tolerance and no side effects. The improvement of endoscopic pattern after a three months period of roxatidine therapy was statistically significant; moreover there was no occurrence of digestive bleeding. In conclusion, H2 antagonist may be considered as the drug of choice for the treatment of mucosal damage in patients with liver cirrhosis, for both its safety and effectiveness.

  8. Myofibroblasts in oral lesions: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Soujanya Pinisetti; Ravikanth Manyam; Babburi Suresh; Aparna, V

    2014-01-01

    Myofibroblasts (MFs) are modified fibroblasts that express features of smooth muscle differentiation and were first observed in granulation tissue during wound healing. These cells play a key role in physiologic and pathologic processes like wound healing and tumorigenesis. The presence of MFs has been reported in normal oral tissues and pathologic conditions like reactive lesions, benign tumors, locally aggressive tumors and malignancies affecting the oral cavity. This article briefly review...

  9. Clinical effects of flurbiprofen tooth patch on radiation-induced oral mucositis. A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, MA; Spijkervet, FKL; Burlage, FR; Roodenburg, JLN

    Background: Mucositis is an oral sequela of radiotherapy. In the development of mucositis several mechanisms play a role, such as inflammation and the effect of radiation on the high proliferation rate of oral basal epithelial cells. Therefore, administration of a drug with antiinflammatory and

  10. Gastroprotection studies of Schiff base zinc (II derivative complex against acute superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Golbabapour

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study was carried out to assess the gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II complex against ethanol-induced acute hemorrhagic lesions in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: The animals received their respective pre-treatments dissolved in tween 20 (5% v/v, orally. Ethanol (95% v/v was orally administrated to induce superficial hemorrhagic mucosal lesions. Omeprazole (5.790×10(-5 M/kg was used as a reference medicine. The pre-treatment with the zinc (II complex (2.181×10(-5 and 4.362×10(-5 M/kg protected the gastric mucosa similar to the reference control. They significantly increased the activity levels of nitric oxide, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and prostaglandin E2, and decreased the level of malondialdehyde. The histology assessments confirmed the protection through remarkable reduction of mucosal lesions and increased the production of gastric mucosa. Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis indicated that the complex might induced Hsp70 up-regulation and Bax down-regulation. The complex moderately increased the gastroprotectiveness in fine fettle. The acute toxicity approved the non-toxic characteristic of the complex (<87.241×10(-5 M/kg. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The gastroprotective effect of the zinc (II complex was mainly through its antioxidant activity, enzymatic stimulation of prostaglandins E2, and up-regulation of Hsp70. The gastric wall mucus was also a remarkable protective mechanism.

  11. Antioxidant agents: a future alternative approach in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Cuba, Letícia; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves; Cherubini, Karen; de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a therapeutic modality frequently employed for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). It destroys tumor cells, but it is not selective, also affecting healthy tissues and producing adverse effects. One that stands out is oral mucositis because of the morbidity that it is capable of causing. This lesion is characterized by the presence of erythema, ulcerations, pain, opportunistic infections, and weight loss. These side effects can lead to serious situations that require the interruption of the antineoplastic treatment and can result in hospitalization and even death. The complex mechanisms linked to the pathogenesis of oral mucositis were recently established, and since then, the control of oxidative stress (OS) has been tied to the prevention and management of this disease. The authors have carried out a review of the literature about the use of antioxidant agents in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced oral mucositis, using the PubMed database. This review has shown that the research on use of antioxidants (AOX) has proved insufficient to justify suggesting the products in treatment protocols. Results are promising, however, and AOX may represent a future alternative in the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis.

  12. Pilot study of ice-ball cryotherapy for radiation-induced oral mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyama, Waichiro; Ebihara, Satoshi [National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-02-01

    Oral mucositis caused by radiotherapy is intractable and may worsen the patient`s nutritional condition and interrupt treatment. To reduce the incidence and severity of oral mucositis induced by cancer therapy and promote early improvement of its symptoms, we devised cryotherapy by ice balls using Elase (fibrinolysin and deoxyribonuclease, combined). The therapeutic effect of ice-ball cryotherapy was evaluated in 10 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity and pharynx who were undergoing radiotherapy. Cryotherapy was continued from the development of oral mucositis until its disappearance. The severity of various symptoms of mucositis were reduced by cryotherapy. Healing required 3 to 16 days (median, 7 days) after the end of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was not interrupted in any cases. This preliminary report suggests that ice-ball cryotherapy is an effective treatment for radiation-induced oral mucositis. (author).

  13. Clinical assessment of oral mucositis and candidiasis compare to chemotherapic nadir in transplanted patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patussi, Cleverson; Sassi, Laurindo Moacir; Munhoz, Eduardo Ciliao; Zanicotti, Roberta Targa Stramandinoli; Schussel, Juliana Lucena

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a chief complication in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). It is considered a toxic inflammatory reaction that interferes with the patient's recuperation and quality of life. Oral candidiasis is a common fungal infection observed in dental practice, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of oral mucositis and oral candidiasis in patients who underwent HSCT and their correlation with the chemotherapeutic nadir (lowest possible outcome). We evaluated patients with different diagnoses who underwent HSCT at the Hospital Erasto Gaertner. No chemotherapeutic nadir curves could be associated with mucositis, and patients had different presentations of mucositis. No patient developed oral candidiasis during hospitalization. Together with cell counts, we collected demographic data including age, oral hygiene, habits harmful to health, and the use of oral prostheses. It was observed that patients who smoked cigarettes before hospitalization showed less mucositis, resulting in no feeding problems or other comorbid conditions due to the effect of mucositis. However, the nadir of the chemotherapy curve, in isolation, is not a predictive tool for the appearance (or no appearance) of oral mucositis.

  14. Mucosite bucal rádio e quimioinduzida Radiation therapy and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Evaristo Ricci Volpato

    2007-08-01

    . RESULTS: current studies define oral mucositis as a very frequent and painful inflammation with ulcers on the oral mucosa that are covered by a pseudo membrane. The incidence and severity of lesions are influenced by patient and treatment variables. Oral mucositis is a result of two major mechanisms: direct toxicity on the mucosa and myelosuppression due to the treatment. Its pathofisiology is composed of four interdependent phases: an initial inflammatory/vascular phase; an epithelial phase; an ulcerative/bacteriological phase; and a healing phase. It is considered a potential source of life-threatening infection and often is a dose-limiting factor in anticancer therapy. Some interventions have been shown to be potentially effective to prevent and treat oral mucositis. Further intensive research through well-structured clinical trials to obtain the best scientific evidence over the standard therapy of oral mucositis is necessary to attain ideal parameters for radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  15. The clinical effectiveness of reflectance optical spectroscopy for the in vivo diagnosis of oral lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diana VMessadi; Fariba SYounai; Hong-Hu Liu; Gao Guo; Cun-Yu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy devices are being developed and tested for the screening and diagnosis of oral precancer and cancer lesions. This study reports a device that uses white light for detection of suspicious lesions and green-amber light at 545 nm that detect tissue vascularity on patients with several suspicious oral lesions. The clinical grading of vascularity was compared to the histological grading of the biopsied lesions using specific biomarkers. Such a device, in the hands of dentists and other health professionals, could greatly increase the number of oral cancerous lesions detected in early phase. The purpose of this study is to correlate the clinical grading of tissue vascularity in several oral suspicious lesions using the IdentafiH system with the histological grading of the biopsied lesions using specific vascular markers. Twenty-one patients with various oral lesions were enrolled in the study. The lesions were visualized using IdentafiH device with white light illumination, followed by visualization of tissue autofluorescence and tissue reflectance. Tissue biopsied was obtained from the all lesions and both histopathological and immunohistochemical studies using a vascular endothelial biomarker (CD34) were performed on these tissue samples. The clinical vascular grading using the green-amber light at 545 nm and the expression pattern and intensity of staining for CD34 in the different biopsies varied depending on lesions, grading ranged from 1 to 3. The increase in vascularity was observed in abnormal tissues when compared to normal mucosa, but this increase was not limited to carcinoma only as hyperkeratosis and other oral diseases, such as lichen planus, also showed increase in vascularity. Optical spectroscopy is a promising technology for the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities;however, further investigations with a larger population group is required to evaluate the usefulness of these devices in differentiating benign lesions from

  16. Oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer during postoperative irradiation. An alleviating effect on acute radiation mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsura, Kouji; Masuko, Noriko; Hayashi, Takafumi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Tsuchida, Emiko; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sasamoto, Ryuta

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer on alleviating acute radiation mucositis. Eighteen patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for tongue and oral floor cancer were evaluated. Radiotherapy was given in 2 Gy per fraction, 5 times a week for a total dose of 50 Gy in most patients. Radiation field included the tongue and oral floor. During radiotherapy, 8 patients were treated by dento-maxillofacial radiologists with special concern on oral hygiene (oral hygiene group) and the remaining 10 patients were treated with routine dental care (standard medication group). Mucositis were evaluated using JCOG grade and EORTC/RTOG score by radiotherapists or dento-maxillofacial radiologists at 10 Gy intervals. Oral hygiene plans comprised motivation to maintain oral hygiene and establishing the habits of oral self care 4 times per day. Once a week, oral hygiene and oral cleaning of patients were checked by dento-maxillofacial radiologists. Oral self care included mechanical tooth brushing and a chemical mouthwash. No patients with grade 3 and score 4 mucositis were noted in the oral hygiene group. Severe mucositis occurred less frequently in the oral hygiene group than in the standard medication group. Interruption of radiotherapy due to severe mucositis did not occur in the oral hygiene group. On the other hand, interruption of radiotherapy occurred in four patients in the standard medication group, and in three it was due to severe oral pain. Our results suggested that our method of oral hygiene was more effective for alleviating acute radiation mucositis than other methods so far reported. In addition, our method is considered to be useful in preventing rampant dental caries and severe periodontitis due to the xerostomia induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  17. Adjunctive screening devices for oral lesions: their use by Canadian Dental Hygienists and the need for knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laronde, D M; Corbett, K K

    2015-12-22

    Screening for oral cancer and other mucosal conditions is a knowledge-to-action objective that should be easy: there is supportive evidence, it is fast and non-invasive, and the oral cavity is easy to visualize. However, over 60% of oral cancers are diagnosed late, when treatment is complex and prognosis poor. Adjunctive screening devices (ASDs), e.g. toluidine blue (TB), fluorescence visualization (FV), chemiluminescence (CL) and brush biopsies, were designed to assess risk of oral lesions or aid in identification and localization of oral premalignant and malignant lesions. Little is known on how clinicians feel about using ASDs.

  18. Laser applications for benign oral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, Alice; Tan, Oon T

    2015-10-01

    Different subspecialists treat benign intraoral lesions using various approaches including surgical excision, medical therapy, sclerotherapy, and laser photocoagulation. The goal of this study was to establish whether lasers could effectively target and destroy oral lesions containing endogenous chromophores, while minimizing injury to unaffected adjacent tissues and critical structures. This retrospective study involved 26 cases of benign oral lesions, both vascular and pigmented, which were addressed by means of selective laser treatment. Pathologies were port-wine stains, hereditary hemorragic teleangectasia, hemangiomas, venous and arteriovenous malformations, pyogenic granuloma, and hairy reconstructive flaps. Electronic medical records and photographic documentation were reviewed. Three blinded staff personnel not involved with patient care in this study evaluated photographs taken prior to the first and after the final laser treatments. Observers rated the percentage clearance of the lesions or the ablation of bleeding, and the assessed values were averaged for each patient. An average of 30-95% lightening was observed in the intraoral port-wine stains, 90% in the hemangiomas, 70% in arteriovenous malformations, 81% for venous malformations, 86% for venous lakes, and 100% for the pyogenic granuloma. Bleeding was ablated in all hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia lesions treated using the pulsed dye laser with or without the Alexandrite laser. Intraoral hair growing on the skin paddle of microvascular flaps was completely removed in one of the three cases treated using the Alexandrite laser. In the two remaining cases, some hair removal was achieved, but because the residual hairs were grey or white (absence of melanocytic chromophore), photocoagulation was less effective. Lasers are a safe and effective means to selectively destroy specific chromphores. Such specific targeting ensures complete destruction of pathological tissue, decreasing the possibility

  19. Successful treatment with oral mizoribine in refractory ocular manifestation of mucosal pemphigus vulgaris: A unique response to different immunosuppressive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Noritaka; Togashi, Ari; Nomura, Erika; Kaneko, Fumio

    2016-11-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an acquired autoimmune disease in which the disease characteristic antibodies are directed against the desmosomal transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein 3 (Dsg 3), resulting in flaccid blisters and erosions of skin and mucous membrane. Among various affected sites, ocular involvement may often persist or relapse even after remission of other mucocutaneous lesions, and also represent a higher morbidity. We describe such an example case of mucosal PV, whose oral and ocular manifestations were responded specifically to oral cyclosporine and mizoribine, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first case of the site-specific efficacy of mizoribine in PV.

  20. Comparative assessment of the therapeutic effects of the topical and systemic forms of Hypericum perforatum extract on induced oral mucositis in golden hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanideh, N; Namazi, F; Andisheh Tadbir, A; Ebrahimi, H; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, O

    2014-10-01

    Oral mucositis is a common and irritating complication of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for malignancies. Current treatments have failed to achieve complete remission of this complication. The St. John's wort plant (Hypericum perforatum) has long been known for its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. The current study was designed to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of the topical and systemic administration of H. perforatum extract on oral mucositis. Oral mucositis was induced in 72 male golden hamsters by administration of 5-fluorouracil (60mg/kg), on days 0, 5, and 10 of the study. The cheek pouch was scratched with a sterile needle on days 1 and 2. On days 12-17, H. perforatum extract topical gel 10%, oral H. perforatum extract (300mg/kg), and gel base groups were treated and then compared with a control group. Weights and blood samples were evaluated, biopsies from buccal lesions were examined histopathologically, and tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured. Both of the H. perforatum extract treatment groups saw a significant relief in oral mucositis compared to the control and base gel groups; the systemic form was superior to the topical form. H. perforatum extract, administered orally or topically, expedited the healing of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in hamsters.

  1. Human papillomavirus in oral lesions Virus papiloma humano en lesiones orales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín V. Gónzalez

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests a role for human papillomavirus (HPV in oral cancer; however its involvement is still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency of HPV DNA in a variety of oral lesions in patients from Argentina. A total of 77 oral tissue samples from 66 patients were selected (cases; the clinical-histopathological diagnoses corresponded to: 11 HPV- associated benign lesions, 8 non-HPV associated benign lesions, 33 premalignant lesions and 25 cancers. Sixty exfoliated cell samples from normal oral mucosa were used as controls. HPV detection and typing were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using primers MY09, 11, combined with RFLP or alternatively PCR using primers GP5+, 6+ combined with dot blot hybridization. HPV was detected in 91.0% of HPV- associated benign lesions, 14.3% of non-HPV associated benign lesions, 51.5% of preneoplasias and 60.0% of cancers. No control sample tested HPV positive. In benign HPV- associated lesions, 30.0% of HPV positive samples harbored high-risk types, while in preneoplastic lesions the value rose to 59.9%. In cancer lesions, HPV detection in verrucous carcinoma was 88.9% and in squamous cell carcinoma 43.8%, with high-risk type rates of 75.5% and 85.6%, respectively. The high HPV frequency detected in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions supports an HPV etiological role in at least a subset of oral cancers.Crecientes evidencias sugieren que el virus Papiloma humano (HPV tiene un rol en el cáncer oral; sin embargo su participación es todavía controvertida. Este estudio evalúa la frecuencia de ADN de HPV en una variedad de lesiones orales de pacientes de Argentina. Se seleccionaron 77 muestras de tejido oral de 66 pacientes (casos; el diagnóstico histo-patológico correspondió a: 11 lesiones benignas asociadas a HPV, 8 lesiones benignas no asociadas a HPV, 33 lesiones premalignas y 25 cánceres. Como controles se usaron 60 muestras de células exfoliadas de mucosa oral normal. La

  2. Virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility in enterococci isolated from oral mucosal and deep infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Dahlén

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the presence of virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility among enterococcal isolates from oral mucosal and deep infections. Forty-three enterococcal strains from oral mucosal lesions and 18 from deep infections were isolated from 830 samples that were sent during 2 years to Oral Microbiology, University of Gothenburg, for analysis. The 61 strains were identified by 16S rDNA, and characterized by the presence of the virulence genes efa A (endocarditis gene, gel E (gelatinase gene, ace (collagen binding antigen gene, asa (aggregation substance gene, cyl A (cytolysin activator gene and esp (surface adhesin gene, tested for the production of bacteriocins and presence of plasmids. MIC determination was performed using the E-test method against the most commonly used antibiotics in dentistry, for example, penicillin V, amoxicillin and clindamycin. Vancomycin was included in order to detect vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE strains. Sixty strains were identified as Enterococcus faecalis and one as Enterococcus faecium. All the virulence genes were detected in more than 93.3% (efa A and esp of the E. faecalis strains, while the presence of phenotypic characteristics was much lower (gelatinase 10% and hemolysin 16.7%. Forty-six strains produced bacteriocins and one to six plasmids were detected in half of the isolates. Enterococcal strains from oral infections had a high virulence capacity, showed bacteriocin production and had numerous plasmids. They were generally susceptible to ampicillins but were resistant to clindamycin, commonly used in dentistry, and no VRE-strain was found.

  3. Oral Lesions in Elderly Patients in Referral Centers for Oral Lesions of Bahia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Sarah; Alves, Técia; Santos, Jean; Oliveira, Márcio

    2015-10-01

    Introduction The aging population phenomenon is occurring on a global scale; aging affects all of the structures of organisms, including the oral cavity. Objective To estimate the frequency of oral lesions, according to the clinical and histopathologic diagnoses, and to describe the sociodemographic profile of the elderly treated at the referral centers of oral lesions of public universities in Bahia, Brazil. Methods A descriptive epidemiologic study with transverse characteristics was conducted with elderly patients between August 2010 and January 2012. A form was used to collect data. The descriptive analysis consisted of calculating the simple and relative frequencies of sociodemographic variables and oral lesions. Results The population was predominantly black women, and the minority of elderly people were retired. Fibroid (13%) and squamous cell carcinoma (145%) were more prevalent clinical diagnoses, with squamous cell carcinoma (30.7%) and fibrous hyperplasia more prevalent histopathologic diagnoses. Conclusion A prevention policy needs to be implemented to reduce new cases of oral lesions in Bahia, Brazil and to aid in early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of oral lesions.

  4. Oral vesiculobullous lesions: Consider the platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Steel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral vesiculobullous lesions or "blood blisters" can be found on a routine dental examination and may have many causes. Trauma is often the first diagnosis followed by a variety of bullous conditions, such as pemphigus and pemphigoid. Using a case report, we highlight the other, more serious, possibility of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP to raise awareness to the General Dental Practitioners and the need for prompt treatment.

  5. Study on Translational Medicine of RUNX3 Expression in Oral Precancerous Lesions and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramamurthy Mustafa; Shabil Mohamed Rajaraman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression and distribution characteristics of RUNX3 in the pathological process of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as well as its correlation with clinicopathological features. Methods: Fifteen cases of normal oral mucosal tissues, 37 cases of OSCC tissues and 21 cases of precancerous lesion tissues were respectively collected. The expression and distribution characteristics of RUNX3 were detected using immunohistochemical method, and its relationship with each clinicopathological feature of OSCC was analyzed. Results: The positive rates of RUNX3 expression in normal oral mucosal tissues, precancerous lesion tissues and OSCC tissues were 100% (15/15), 95.24% (20/21) and 54.05% (20/37), and their average optical densities were (0.391±0.07), (0.369±0.03) and (0.263±0.01), respectively. The differences were statistically signiifcant by comparison to the positive rates of RUNX3 expression and their average optical densities in normal oral mucosal tissue, precancerous lesion tissue and OSCC tissue (P0.05), but the difference was statistically signiifcant among the patients with different pathological gradings (P=0.012). Conclusion: The expression of RUNX3 in normal oral mucosal tissues, precancerous lesion tissues and OSCC tissues gradually shows a down-regulating tendency and its frequency of abnormal localization is on the rise. The expression of RUNX3 is closely associated with the degree of histological differentiation. All of these findings indicate that RUNX3, an important action factor in the occurrence and progression of OSCC, can be considered as a key biological indicator for early diagnosis, judgment of malignant degree and prognostic monitoring.

  6. Two cases with nickel-induced oral mucosal hyperplasia: a rare clinical form of allergic contact stomatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkaya, Esen; Babuna, Goncagül

    2011-03-15

    Allergic contact stomatitis (ACS) can occur with variable clinical presentations such as erythematous, erosive, and lichenoid forms. Burning mouth symptoms may also be a result of allergic contact stomatitis. Additionally, gingival hyperplasia has been reported in exceptional cases of ACS caused by dental metals. Here, two rare cases are presented of nickel-induced oral mucosal hyperplasia with gingival and upper palatal involvement from metal-porcelain crowns and metal-acrylic upper denture, respectively. In both cases the diagnosis was made on the basis of the positive patch test results to nickel sulfate and the regression of the lesions after removing the nickel containing dental materials. Nickel-induced ACS should be borne in mind in every case of oral mucosal hyperplasia appearing after dental procedures, especially in the presence of previous allergies and sensitization risks such as ear piercing. It might be further suggested to include this variant within the clinical forms of ACS.

  7. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Yan Yeung; Wai-Tao Chan; Chun-Bin Jiang; Mei-Lien Cheng; Chia-Yuan Liu; Szu-Wen Chang; Jen-Shiu Chiang Chiau; Hung-Chang Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orall...

  8. Oral lichen planus to oral lichenoid lesions: Evolution or revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavin B Dudhia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis between different diseases may be impaired by clinical and histopathologic similarities, as observed in the oral lichen planus (OLP and oral lichenoid lesion (OLL. Inspite of similar clinicopathological features; etiology, diagnosis and prognosis differ which mandates separation of OLL from OLP. Hence, it is essential for the oral physician and oral pathologist to be familiarized with the individual variations among clinicopathological features of OLP and OLL as well as to obtain a thorough history and perform a complete mucocutaneous examination in addition to specific diagnostic testing. The difficulties faced to establish the diagnosis between these two pathologies are widely investigated in the literature with a lack of definite conclusion. This review is an attempt to throw some light on these clinicopathologic entities with the aim to resolve the diagnostic dilemma.

  9. Oral lichen planus to oral lichenoid lesions: Evolution or revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhia, Bhavin B; Dudhia, Sonal B; Patel, Purv S; Jani, Yesha V

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis between different diseases may be impaired by clinical and histopathologic similarities, as observed in the oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesion (OLL). Inspite of similar clinicopathological features; etiology, diagnosis and prognosis differ which mandates separation of OLL from OLP. Hence, it is essential for the oral physician and oral pathologist to be familiarized with the individual variations among clinicopathological features of OLP and OLL as well as to obtain a thorough history and perform a complete mucocutaneous examination in addition to specific diagnostic testing. The difficulties faced to establish the diagnosis between these two pathologies are widely investigated in the literature with a lack of definite conclusion. This review is an attempt to throw some light on these clinicopathologic entities with the aim to resolve the diagnostic dilemma.

  10. Growth factors and cytokines in the prevention and treatment of oral and gastrointestinal mucositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Bultzingslowen, [No Value; Brennan, MT; Spijkervet, Fred K.L.; Logan, R; Stringer, A; Raber-Durlacher, JE; Keefe, D

    Goals of work: Growth factors and cytokines may be useful in preventing chemotherapy (CT)- and radiotherapy (RT)-induced oral and gastrointestinal mucositis. Two systematic reviews of the medical literature on growth factors and cytokines for the amelioration of CT- and RT-induced mucositis

  11. Quantification of oral mucositis due to radiotherapy by determining viability and maturation of epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, MA; Spijkervet, FKL; Wymenga, ANM; Burlage, FR; Timens, W; Roodenburg, JLN; de Vries, EGE

    2002-01-01

    Background: An in-vitro assay has been developed for quantitative assessment of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis. In the present study this method was evaluated for assessment of irradiation mucositis at a cellular level. Methods: Ten patients participated in this consecutive study. All patients

  12. Systematic review of anti-inflammatory agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Sarri, Triantafyllia; Bowen, Joanne; Di Palma, Mario; Kouloulias, Vassilios E.; Niscola, Pasquale; Riesenbeck, Dorothea; Stokman, Monique; Tissing, Wim; Yeoh, Eric; Elad, Sharon; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this project was to review the available literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of anti-inflammatory agents for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients. Materials and methods A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study

  13. Systematic review of amifostine for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Sarri, Triantafyllia; Bowen, Joanne; Di Palma, Mario; Kouloulias, Vassilios E.; Niscola, Pasquale; Riesenbeck, Dorothea; Stokman, Monique; Tissing, Wim; Yeoh, Eric; Elad, Sharon; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    The aim of this study was to review the available literature from 1966 until December 31, 2010 and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of amifostine for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients. A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study Group of

  14. The Potential Effect of Oral Microbiota in the Prediction of Mucositis During Radiotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xia Zhu

    2017-04-01

    Interpretation: Oral microbiota changes correlate with the progression and aggravation of radiotherapy-induced mucositis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Microbiota-based strategies can be used for the early prediction and prevention of the incidence of severe mucositis during radiotherapy.

  15. [Therapeutic effect of rebamipide for oral mucositis associated with FEC therapy for breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enami, Akiko; Masuda, Norikazu; Yamamura, Jun; Mizutani, Makiko; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Shikata, Ayako; Masaoka, Miyuki; Takada, Seiko; Bamba, Nao; Yamamoto, Mie; Abe, Megumi; Makihara, Katsuya

    2014-11-01

    No guidelines for supportive drug therapy have been established for oral mucositis occurring during cancer chemotherapy. We retrospectively examined the progression of oral mucositis in 91 patients with breast cancer who received the 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC)-100 regimen between September 2007 and August 2008. Daily rebamipide was administered to patients with oral mucositis as per hospital protocol to evaluate the hypothesized preventive and mucosal protective effects of rebamipide(Mucosta®). Oral mucositis was observed in 43 patients (47%)during 4 courses of FEC. The median age of the patients was 55 years(range, 32-76 years). Of the 91 patients, 49 patients who did not receive rebamipide during the 4 FEC courses were classified as group A, 14 patients who received rebamipide before the start of FEC were classified as group B, and 28 patients who received rebamipide after developing oral mucositis were classified as group C. The incidence of oral mucositis at the start of FEC with or without rebamipide administration was observed in 5 patients in group B (36%) and 38 patients in groups A and C (49%) (p=0.3472). The mucositis grade was G1 in 4 patients and G2 in 1 patient in group B, and G1 in 20 patients and G2 plus G3 in 18 patients in groups A and C (p=0.2467). In group C, the grade decreased in 25 patients (89%) and did not occur (G0) in 17 patients (61%) during the next course, and 15 patients (54%) continued to the final course without any occurrence of mucositis. These results suggest that rebamipide is effective for the treatment of oral mucositis. Although significant differences were not observed in the groups, rebamipide has the potential to prevent development of oral mucositis and alleviate its symptoms, and seems promising as a new supportive drug therapy. We hope to verify the preventive and protective effects of rebamipide by conducting a prospective, randomized trial while treating oral mucositis with basic oral care

  16. Impact of oral mucosa lesions on the quality of life related to oral health. An etiopathogenic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Vilchis, María-del-Carmen; López-Ríos, Patricia; García, Ixchel-Maya

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the impact of oral mucosa lesions on quality of life related to oral health (QLROH) and additionally to establish whether the etiopathogenicy of oral lesion is associated to the degree of QLROH impact. Material and Methods In this cross-sectional study performed on a non-probability sample of 247 consecutively patients attending the oral medicine and pathology clinic the Spanish version of Oral Health Impact Profile-49 questionnaire (OHIP-49-mx) was applied. Responses were recorded on Likert-type scale whose values ranged from 0 (never) to 4 (always). Values greater than the 50 percentile (median) were considered as indicative of poor quality of life. All patients were orally examined and diagnosed. In accordance to their etiopathogenicy 6 study groups were formed: 4 corresponded to MIND classification for diseases (Metabolic, Inflammatory, Neoplastic, and Development groups), with ≥2 diseases and no-lesion group. To identify possible differences of OHIP-49 values between study groups an ANOVA (one factor) parametric and a chi square tests were performed (SPSS®20.0). Results The OHIP-49-mx values were higher than the 50 percentile (established at 39) in metabolic, inflammatory, development, and ≥2 diseases groups, suggesting that this type of oral lesions negatively impact the quality of life. ≥2 diseasesgroup followed by metabolic and inflammatory diseases group (p 0.001) depicted worst quality of life. Functional limitation (p 0.003), pain, physical inability (p 0.001) and psychological disabilities dimensions exhibited greater values in all groups. Conclusions Injured oral mucosa negatively impacts quality of life, specifically functional limitation, physical inability and psychological disabilities could lead to social isolation.To our knowledge, this is the first time that an association between QLROH and the etiopathogenicy of oral mucosal diseases is established. Key words:Quality of life, quality of life related to oral health

  17. NRAS and BRAF mutation frequency in primary oral mucosal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buery, Rosario Rivera; Siar, Chong Huat; Katase, Naoki; Gunduz, Mehmet; Lefeuvre, Mathieu; Fujii, Masae; Inoue, Masahisa; Setsu, Kojun; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2011-10-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma (OMM) is a fatal sarcoma of unknown etiology. Histological morphology and genetic events are distinct from those of its cutaneous counterpart. Mutation and up-regulation of c-kit has been identified in OMM which may activate downstream molecules such as RAS and RAF. These molecules are involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway leading to tremendous cell proliferation and survival. NRAS and BRAF mutation and protein expression have been studied in other melanoma subtypes. The purpose of this study was to determine RAS protein expression and NRAS and BRAF mutation in 18 primary OMM cases using immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis. Results showed that RAS is intensely expressed in both in situ and invasive OMMs. However, NRAS mutation was only observed in 2/15 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified cases both of which were silent mutations. On the other hand, BRAF missense mutations were observed only in 1/15 cases with PCR amplification. NRAS and BRAF mutations were independent from previously reported c-kit mutations. The classical V600E BRAF mutation was not found; instead a novel V600L was observed suggesting that the oncogenic event in OMM is different from that in skin melanoma. The low frequency of NRAS and BRAF mutations indicate that these genes are not common, but probable events in OMM pathogenesis, most likely independent of c-kit mutation.

  18. Systemic uptake of buprenorphine by cats after oral mucosal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, S A; Taylor, P M; Sear, J W

    2003-05-31

    The plasma concentration of buprenorphine was measured by radioimmunoassay in six female cats after the administration of 0.01 mg/kg (0.033 ml/kg) buprenorphine hydrochloride solution into the side of the cat's mouth. Blood samples were taken through a preplaced jugular catheter before and one, two, four, six, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes, and two, four, six, 12 and 24 hours after the dose was administered. The buprenorphine was accepted well by all the cats and did not cause salivation or vomiting. Its median peak plasma concentration was 7.5 ng/ml and was reached after 15 minutes. The pharmacokinetic data were similar to the pharmacokinetic data obtained after the intramuscular and intravenous administration of buprenorphine to cats from the same colony, suggesting that the mucosal route of administration should be as effective as intravenous and intramuscular injections. In addition, the pH of the oral cavity of 26 cats was measured with pH paper, and 100 cat owners were asked their preferred method of administering drugs to cats. The pH of the cats' mouths was between 8 and 9, and the technique preferred by the cat owners was the use of drops placed in the mouth.

  19. Reactive lesions of oral cavity: A survey of 100 cases in Eluru, West Godavari district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bina Kashyap

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Reactive lesions of the oral cavity are associated with injuries of soft tissue and have high prevalence rates and different involvement patterns in different parts of the world. This study reviews the pathogenesis and analyzes demographic data, histopathological features and compares the clinico-pathologic profiles of the diseases to those previously reported. Materials and Methods:Patient records of the Department of Oral Pathology during one and half year period were reviewed for diagnosis of oral connective tissue reactive hyperplastic lesion. Data including the area involved and the type of lesion were collected and analyzed using descriptive statistical methods and ANOVA test. Results:100 cases (mean age 36 years, male:female ratio 1:2 matched study criterion. The most common affected site was mandibular anterior region and buccal mucosa and the most common lesion was pyogenic granuloma and focal fibrous hyperplasia. All the lesions were more common in the mandible than in the maxilla. PGCG was seen to be equally distributed in males and females. Conclusion: Reactive hyperplastic lesions of the oral connective tissue are more common in females and the majority of the lesions occur in gingiva. This study supports previous assertions that PG and FFH may occur on any oral mucosal site with special preference for the mandibular anterior gingiva and buccal mucosa while PGCG and POF occur exclusively on the mandibular gingiva.

  20. Effect of Oral Insulin on the Severity and Recovery of Methotrexate-induced Gastrointestinal Mucositis in the Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, Nicoline S S; Rings, Edmond H H M; Havinga, Rick; van der Aa, Stijn A J; Groen, Albert K; Tissing, Wim J E

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gastrointestinal (GI) mucositis is a severe side effect of chemo- and radiotherapy. Oral insulin has been suggested as possible intestinal growth factor and possible intervention for GI mucositis. We aimed to determine the effect of oral insulin on the severity and recovery of mucositis

  1. Study on Translational Medicine of RUNX3 Expression in Oral Precancerous Lesions and Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramamurthy Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the expression and distribution characteristics of RUNX3 in the pathological process of oralsquamous cell carcinoma (OSCC as well as its correlation with clinicopathological features. Methods: Fifteen cases of normal oral mucosal tissues, 37 cases of OSCC tissues and 21 cases of precancerous lesion tissues were respectively collected. The expression and distribution characteristics of RUNX3 were detected using immunohistochemical method, and its relationship with each clinicopathological feature of OSCC was analyzed. Results: The positive rates of RUNX3 expression in normal oral mucosal tissues, precancerous lesion tissues and OSCC tissues were 100% (15/15, 95.24% (20/21 and 54.05% (20/37, and their average optical densities were (0.391±0.07, (0.369±0.03 and (0.263±0.01, respectively. The differences were statistically significant by comparison to the positive rates of RUNX3 expression and their average optical densities in normal oral mucosal tissue, precancerous lesion tissue and OSCC tissue (P<0.01. There was no statistical significance regarding RUNX3 expression in the patients with different gender, age and presence or absence of lymph node metastasis (P>0.05, but the difference was statistically significant among the patients with different pathological gradings (P=0.012. Conclusion: The expression of RUNX3 in normal oral mucosal tissues, precancerous lesion tissues and OSCC tissues gradually shows a down-regulating tendency and its frequency of abnormal localization is on the rise. The expression of RUNX3 is closely associated with the degree of histological differentiation. All of these findings indicate that RUNX3, an important action factor in the occurrence and progression of OSCC, can be considered as a key biological indicator for early diagnosis, judgment of malignant degree and prognostic monitoring.

  2. The effect of chewing gum on oral mucositis in children receiving chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ocakcı, Ayşe Ferda; Ayverdi, Didem; Ekim, Ayfer

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Oral mucositis is an important clinical problem, resulting in significant patient morbidity, a change in health-related quality of life, and supportive care. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficiency of chewing gum on children, who are receiving chemotherapy regimens, for prevention and treatment of oral mucositis. Method and Material: The study sample consisted of 60 children (30 study group-30 control group) between the ages 6-...

  3. [Oral medicine 7: white lesions of the oral mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visscher, J G A M; van der Meij, E H; Schepman, K P

    2013-06-01

    White lesions of the oral mucosa may be due to highly diverse disorders. Most of these disorders are benign but some may be a malignant or premalignant condition. The disease is often confined to the oral mucosa. There are also disorders which are accompanied by skin disorders or systemic diseases. Many white oral mucosa disorders have such characteristic clinical aspects that a diagnosis can be made on clinical grounds only. When the clinical diagnosis is not clear, histopathological examination is carried out. Treatment depends on the histological diagnosis. In some cases, treatment is not necessary while in other cases, treatment is not possible since an effective treatment is not available. Potentially malignant disorders are treated.

  4. Mucoadhesive propolis gel for prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Vladimir R A S; Araujo, Gustavo S; Gomes, Rafael T; Iwanaga, Samara H; Barbosa, Maralice C; Abdo, Evandro N; Ferreira e Ferreira, Efigenia; Viana Campos, Ana C; Souza, Alexandre A; Abreu, Sheila R L; Santos, Vagner R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this phase II study was to determine the effectiveness of a mucoadhesive propolis gel in the prevention of radiation-induced oral mucositis. Twenty-four patients who were selected to undergo radiation therapy for oral cancer were included in this open-label trial. They were advised to use a mucoadhesive gel containing propolis 5,0% w/v three times a day starting one day before the course of radiation therapy and concluding after 2 weeks of radiation therapy. A weekly follow-up for evaluation of food intake, pain and grading of mucositis was performed. In order to confirm the absence of Candida-related mucositis in patients who developed mucositis, it was performed exfoliative cytology of buccal mucosa, palate and tongue and the material for Candifast(®) Candida species identification. At the end of the study was made the compliance of patients, quality, appreciation and acceptance of product evaluation. Twenty patients did not develop mucositis, two patients developed grade 1 mucositis and two patients developed grade 2 mucositis. None of the patients discontinued food intake and no pain was observed during the study. Candidosis was not detected in any patient. Mucoadhesive propolis gel could be considered as a potential topical medication for preventing radiation-induced oral mucositis. However, comparative phase III study with larger number of patients should be done for confirmation of the efficacy of the product.

  5. Oral lichenoid lesions: distinguishing the benign from the deadly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Oral lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology or pathogenesis with varied disease severity that waxes and wanes over a long period of time. Although a common oral mucosal disease, accurate diagnosis is often challenging due to the overlapping clinical and histopathological features of oral lichen planus and other mucosal diseases. Other immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases can exhibit lichenoid features including mucous membrane pemphigoid, chronic graft-versus-host disease, and discoid lupus erythematosus. Reactive changes to dental materials or to systemic medications can mimic oral lichen planus both clinically and histologically. In these situations the clinical presentation can be useful, as oral lichen planus presents as a multifocal process and is usually symmetrical and bilateral. Dysplasia of the oral cavity can exhibit a lichenoid histology, which may mask the potentially premalignant features. Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia, an unusual clinical disease, can often mimic oral lichen planus clinically, requiring careful correlation of the clinical and pathologic features.

  6. Use of {sup 60}Co panoramic source in the induction of oral mucositis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Maira F.; Benetti, Carolina; Zezell, Denise M., E-mail: mairandrade@yahoo.com, E-mail: zezell@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Correa, Luciana, E-mail: lcorrea@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FO/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia

    2013-07-01

    Oral Mucositis is a well-known side effect of chemo-radiotherapy in cancer patients or transplant recipients that could induce hospitalization or impairs therapy in different levels of severity. This study is devoted to define the first steps in the research of low level laser treatments in oral mucositis, proposing a {sup 60}Co radiation to experimentally induce oral mucositis in rats using Panoramic gamma irradiator, simulating usual radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. Fifteen male Wistar rats, above 250g, were irradiated at Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes (IPEN - CNEN/SP) and divided in three experimental groups, with different single doses of radiation (30 Gy, 25 Gy and 20 Gy). The animals were observed for a 20 days period. Animals that received 30 Gy and 25 Gy developed greater severity of mucositis and premature euthanasia was performed in these groups on the 7th and 11th day after the irradiation, respectively. The 20 Gy group developed oral mucositis grading from moderated to severe between the days 7 and 11 after irradiation, with progressive body mass loss and decrease in the intake of food and water. These animals recovered from oral mucositis around the 18th day and clinical remission at the 20th day. The single dose of 20 Gy Gamma radiation proved to be efficient way for inducing oral mucositis in rats, allowing the establishment of an experimental model for oral mucositis in rats for future use on interventions of this serious aspect of radiation therapy, such as laser therapy using different wave lengths and power densities. (author)

  7. Gastroprotective Activity of Polygonum chinense Aqueous Leaf Extract on Ethanol-Induced Hemorrhagic Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Iza Farhana; Abdul Majid, Nazia; Kadir, Farkaad A.; Al-Bayaty, Fouad; Awang, Khalijah

    2012-01-01

    Polygonum chinense is a Malaysian ethnic plant with various healing effects. This study was to determine preventive effect of aqueous leaf extract of P. chinense against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into seven groups. The normal and ulcer control groups were orally administered with distilled water. The reference group was orally administered with 20 mg/kg omeprazole. The experimental groups received the extracts 62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg, accordingly. After sixty minutes, distilled water and absolute ethanol were given (5 mL/kg) to the normal control and the others, respectively. In addition to histology, immunohistochemical and periodic acid schiff (PAS) stains, levels of lipid peroxidation, malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidant enzymes, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. The ulcer group exhibited severe mucosal damages. The experimental groups significantly reduced gastric lesions and MDA levels and increased SOD level. Immunohistochemistry of the experimental groups showed upregulation and downregulation of Hsp70 and Bax proteins, respectively. PAS staining in these groups exhibited intense staining as compared to the ulcer group. Acute toxicity study revealed the nontoxic nature of the extract. Our data provide first evidence that P. chinense extract could significantly prevent gastric ulcer. PMID:23365597

  8. Gastroprotective Activity of Polygonum chinense Aqueous Leaf Extract on Ethanol-Induced Hemorrhagic Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iza Farhana Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polygonum chinense is a Malaysian ethnic plant with various healing effects. This study was to determine preventive effect of aqueous leaf extract of P. chinense against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into seven groups. The normal and ulcer control groups were orally administered with distilled water. The reference group was orally administered with 20 mg/kg omeprazole. The experimental groups received the extracts 62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg, accordingly. After sixty minutes, distilled water and absolute ethanol were given (5 mL/kg to the normal control and the others, respectively. In addition to histology, immunohistochemical and periodic acid schiff (PAS stains, levels of lipid peroxidation, malondialdehyde (MDA, antioxidant enzymes, and superoxide dismutase (SOD were measured. The ulcer group exhibited severe mucosal damages. The experimental groups significantly reduced gastric lesions and MDA levels and increased SOD level. Immunohistochemistry of the experimental groups showed upregulation and downregulation of Hsp70 and Bax proteins, respectively. PAS staining in these groups exhibited intense staining as compared to the ulcer group. Acute toxicity study revealed the nontoxic nature of the extract. Our data provide first evidence that P. chinense extract could significantly prevent gastric ulcer.

  9. Systematic review of natural agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarom, Noam; Ariyawardana, Anura; Hovan, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society for Oral Oncology. The body of evidence for each intervention, in each cancer treatment setting, was assigned an evidence level. Based on the evidence level, one of the following three guideline determinations was possible: recommendation......, suggestion, and no guideline possible. RESULTS: A total of 49 papers across 15 interventions were examined. A new suggestion was developed in favor of systemic zinc supplements administered orally in the prevention of oral mucositis in oral cancer patients receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation (Level......Abstract PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to review the available literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of natural agents for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study Group of the Multinational...

  10. The mucosal immune system in the oral cavity-an orchestra of T cell diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Qing Wu; Dun-Fang Zhang; Eric Tu; Qian-Ming Chen; WanJun Chen

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system defends against a vast array of pathogens, yet it exhibits limited responses to commensal microorganisms under healthy conditions. The oral-pharyngeal cavity, the gateway for both the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts, is composed of complex anatomical structures and is constantly challenged by antigens from air and food. The mucosal immune system of the oral-pharyngeal cavity must prevent pathogen entry while maintaining immune homeostasis, which is achieved via a range of mechanisms that are similar or different to those utilized by the gastrointestinal immune system. In this review, we summarize the features of the mucosal immune system, focusing on T cell subsets and their functions. We also discuss our current understanding of the oral-pharyngeal mucosal immune system.

  11. Autofluorescence and Raman microspectroscopy of tissue sections of oral lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Veld, DCG; Schut, TCB; Skurichina, M; Witjes, MJH; Van der Wal, JE; Roodenburg, JLN; Sterenborg, HJCM

    2005-01-01

    Autofluorescence spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been suggested for lesion diagnostics. We investigate the information contained in autofluorescence and Raman spectra recorded from oral tissue slices of various lesion types. Thirty-seven human oral mucosa lesions were biopsied and freeze-dr

  12. Esophageal mucosal lesion with low-dose aspirin and prasugrel mimics malignancy: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Fen Ma; Hong Gao; Shi-Yao Chen

    2011-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy consisting of low-dose aspirin (LDA) and other antiplatelet medications is recommended in patients with coronary heart disease, but it may increase the risk of esophageal lesion and bleeding.We describe a case of esophageal mucosal lesion that was difficult to distinguish from malignancy in a patient with a history of ingesting LDA and prasugrel after implantation of a drug-eluting stent. Multiple auxiliary examinations were performed to make a definite diagnosis. The patient recovered completely after concomitant acid-suppressive therapy. Based on these findings, we strongly argue for the evaluation of the risk of gastrointestinal mucosal injury and hemorrhage if LDA therapy is required, and we stress the paramount importance of using drug combinations in individual patients.

  13. Low-energy laser in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: report of two cases; Laser de baixa intensidade no tratamento da mucosite oral induzida pela radioterapia: relato de casos clinicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelner, Natalie; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Disciplina de Patologia Oral]. E-mail: nataliekelner@yahoo.com.br

    2007-01-15

    Oral mucositis is a common, dose-limiting, and potentially serious complication of cancer therapy. Severe mucositis can lead to modifications of treatment planning and even suspension of therapy, with a negative impact on local tumor control and patient survival, increasing the risk of local and systemic infections. The lesions generally develop in non-keratinized mucosa, which is most vulnerable to this complication. Symptoms can range from a burning sensation to severe pain that impairs nutrient and fluid intake. Low-energy laser has been proposed for treatment of mucositis, with good clinical and functional results, accelerating the healing process and decreasing the pain. The aim of this article, illustrated by two clinical cases at the Pernambuco Cancer Hospital in Recife, Brazil, was to report on the efficacy of low-energy laser in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis.(author)

  14. Effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satheeshkumar P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral care in cancer patients is an important aspect in the quality of life of patients undergoing cancer therpay. Mucositis, trismus, salivary gland dysfunction are the main complications of the cancer therapy, which lead to long-term comlications such as radiation caries, poor oral hygiene and osteoradionecrosis. A timely oral evaluation and intervention in these patients can reduce the severity of the potential complications. Triclosan is an antibacterial agent widely used in periodontal therapy, the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation induced oral mucositis is evaluated here. Aims: 1 To determine the effectiveness of triclosan in the management of radiation-induced oral mucositis. 2 To compare the effectiveness of triclosan mouth rinse with conventional sodium bicarbonate mouth rinse. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four patients who underwent radiation therapy for oral cancer and subsequently developed oral mucositis were included in the study. They were randomly allocated into two groups on noticing grade I mucositis (erythema. The study group was advised to use triclosan mouthwash containing triclosan 0.03% W/V and sodium bicarbonate 2 mg mouth wash for the control group. A weekly follow-up evaluation of body weight, food intake, pain and grading of mucositis were made during the radiation treatment period and post radiation treatment period. Results: Both the groups were statistically identical. All the 24 patients in both the groups passed through grade 3 mucositis on the last day of radiotherapy. However, 10 patients in the control group and only one patient in the study group entered to grade 4 mucositis. A definite change was noticed in the severity of the mucositis, food intake and weight loss. The control group took more than 45 days to resolve while the study group took only less than 28 days. Discussion: The results of the study were evaluated and tried to formulate a hypothesis so as to explain

  15. Preventive Effect of Rebamipide Gargle on Chemoradiotherpy-Induced Oral Mucositis in Patients with Oral Cancer: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yasuda

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the efficacy and safety of rebamipide in preventing chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with oral cancer.Material and Methods: Patients with oral cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy (daily radiotherapy plus docetaxel hydrate once a week were enrolled for this study. They were assigned in a double-blind fashion to receive either rebamipide gargle or placebo on the days of chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using the WHO grading system. The primary endpoint of this study was the incidence of grade 3 - 4 mucositis after exposure to 40 Gy radiation (4 weeks. The secondary endpoint was the effect of rebamipide gargle on tumour response to chemoradiotherapy.Results: Twenty-four patients were randomly assigned to receive rebamipide gargle (n = 12 or placebo-gargle (n = 12 during chemoradiotherapy. The number of patients with severe mucositis (WHO ≥ 3 was higher in the placebo group than in the rebamipide group (83.3% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.036. In addition, no effect of rebamipide gargle on tumour response to chemoradiotherapy was recognized compared with the placebo group.Conclusions: For patients with oral cancer undergoing chemoradiotherapy, rebamipide gargle may contribute to decrease the severity of oral mucositis.

  16. Preventive effect of rebamipide gargle on chemoradiotherpy-induced oral mucositis in patients with oral cancer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Takashi; Chiba, Hiroshige; Satomi, Takafumi; Matsuo, Akira; Kaneko, Tadayoshi; Chikazu, Daichi; Miyamatsu, Hironobu

    2012-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of rebamipide in preventing chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with oral cancer. Patients with oral cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy (daily radiotherapy plus docetaxel hydrate once a week) were enrolled for this study. They were assigned in a double-blind fashion to receive either rebamipide gargle or placebo on the days of chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using the WHO grading system. The primary endpoint of this study was the incidence of grade 3 - 4 mucositis after exposure to 40 Gy radiation (4 weeks). The secondary endpoint was the effect of rebamipide gargle on tumour response to chemoradiotherapy. Twenty-four patients were randomly assigned to receive rebamipide gargle (n = 12) or placebo-gargle (n = 12) during chemoradiotherapy. The number of patients with severe mucositis (WHO ≥ 3) was higher in the placebo group than in the rebamipide group (83.3% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.036). In addition, no effect of rebamipide gargle on tumour response to chemoradiotherapy was recognized compared with the placebo group. For patients with oral cancer undergoing chemoradiotherapy, rebamipide gargle may contribute to decrease the severity of oral mucositis.

  17. Tuberous sclerosis complex diagnosed from oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo de Jesus Araujo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a genetic disease in the group known as neurocutaneous syndromes, with dominant autosomal inheritance. It is characterized by skin and adnexal lesions and central and peripheral nervous system tumors, with neurological and psychiatric findings. It may affect the heart, kidneys, eyes, face, bones, lungs, stomach and dentition. CASE REPORT: We present the case of a 66-year-old man with dermatological signs that included hypopigmented maculae, confetti-like lesions, shagreen plaque, angiofibromas on nasolabial folds, neck and back, nail dystrophy and periungual fibromas on fingers and toes. An electroencephalogram produced normal results, but magnetic resonance imaging showed a nodular image measuring 1.2 x 1.0 cm close to the Monro foramen, which was similar to cerebral parenchyma and compatible with a subependymal giant-cell astrocytoma. A conservative approach was taken, through control imaging examinations on the lesion for seven years, with absence of any expansive process or neurological symptoms. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a solid, heterogenic and echogenic mass with a calcified focus, measuring 4.6 x 3.4 cm, in the rightkidney, compatible with angiomyolipoma. The patient was treated by means of complete nephrectomy because of malignant areas seen on histopathological examination and died one month after the procedure. This case report illustrates the importance of oral clinical findings such as dental enamel pits and angiofibromas in making an early diagnosis of TSC, with subsequent screening examinations, treatment and genetic counseling.

  18. MUCOSITIS PREVENTION BY SELECTIVE ELIMINATION OF ORAL FLORA IN IRRADIATED HEAD AND NECK-CANCER PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPIJKERVET, FKL; VANSAENE, HKF; VANSAENE, JJM; PANDERS, AK; VERMEY, A; MEHTA, DM

    1990-01-01

    Mucositis induced by irradiation is the reactive inflammatory-like process of the oropharyngeal mucous membranes following irradiation. Bacteria colonizing the oral tissues are thought to contribute to this inflammatory process. The eradication of Gram-negative bacilli (selective elimination of oral

  19. Relationship between mucositis and changes in oral microflora during cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napeñas, Joel J; Brennan, Michael T; Bahrani-Mougeot, Farah K; Fox, Philip C; Lockhart, Peter B

    2007-01-01

    It is thought that the incidence and severity of cancer chemotherapy-associated mucositis is caused in part by changes in the oral bacterial microflora. This systematic review examined the role of oral bacterial microflora changes in the development of oral mucositis during chemotherapy. Thirteen prospective clinical trials were identified, involving 300 patients with 13 different cancer diagnoses. There was great variability in patient populations, bacterial sample collection methodology, and oral sample sites. No clear pattern regarding qualitative and quantitative oral flora changes emerged among these studies. The most frequent Gram-negative species isolated during chemotherapy were from the Enterobacteriaceae family, Pseudomonas sp. and E. coli. The most common Gram-positive species isolated were Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. Five studies assessed the role of oral flora changes in the genesis of oral mucosal changes, with no consensus among them. More detailed studies are required to understand the relationship between chemotherapy, alterations in the nature and magnitude of the oral microflora, and the presence of mucositis.

  20. Oral mucositis and the clinical and economic outcomes of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonis, ST; Oster, G; Fuchs, H; Bellm, L; Bradford, WZ; Edelsberg, J; Hayden, [No Value; Eilers, J; Epstein, JB; LeVeque, FG; Miller, C; Peterson, DE; Schubert, MM; Spijkervet, FKL; Horowitz, M

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the relationship between oral mucositis and selected clinical and economic outcomes in blood and marrow transplant patients. Patients and Methods: Subjects consisted of 92 transplant patients from eight centers who participated in a multinational pilot study of a new oral mucosit

  1. MUCOSITIS PREVENTION BY SELECTIVE ELIMINATION OF ORAL FLORA IN IRRADIATED HEAD AND NECK-CANCER PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPIJKERVET, FKL; VANSAENE, HKF; VANSAENE, JJM; PANDERS, AK; VERMEY, A; MEHTA, DM

    1990-01-01

    Mucositis induced by irradiation is the reactive inflammatory-like process of the oropharyngeal mucous membranes following irradiation. Bacteria colonizing the oral tissues are thought to contribute to this inflammatory process. The eradication of Gram-negative bacilli (selective elimination of oral

  2. Comparison of laser and ozone treatments on oral mucositis in an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Suzan; Kazancioglu, Hakki Oguz; Acar, Ahmet Hüseyin; Demirtas, Nihat; Kandas, Nur Ozten

    2017-02-11

    Oral mucositis (OM) induces severe pain and limits fundamental life behaviors such as eating, drinking, and talking for patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In addition, through opportunistic microorganisms, OM frequently leads to systemic infection which then leads to prolonged hospitalization. Severe lesions often adversely affect curative effects in cancer cases. Therefore, the control of OM is important for oral health quality of life and prognosis. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and ozone may be useful to accelerate wound healing. In this study, 24 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups as control, ozone, and laser groups. All groups received 5-fluorouracil intraperitoneally and trauma to the mouth pouch with a needle. After the formation of OM in the mouth, the control group had no treatment; the ozone group was administered ozone, and the laser group, LLLT. Then, all groups were sacrificed and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor (TGF-β), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) were evaluated in all groups. LLLT was determined to be statistically significantly more effective than ozone on FGF and PDGF. However, in respect of TGF-β, no statistically significant difference was observed between the groups. In conclusion, within the limitations of this study, LLLT is more effective than ozone. However, further studies on this subject are required.

  3. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coogan, Maeve M; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J

    2005-01-01

    .... Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma...

  4. Impact of oral mucosa lesions on the quality of life related to oral health. An etiopathogenic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Vilchis, María-del-Carmen; López-Ríos, Patricia; García, Ixchel-Maya; Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis-Alberto

    2016-03-01

    To assess the impact of oral mucosa lesions on quality of life related to oral health (QLROH) and additionally to establish whether the etiopathogenicy of oral lesion is associated to the degree of QLROH impact. In this cross-sectional study performed on a non-probability sample of 247 consecutively patients attending the oral medicine and pathology clinic the Spanish version of Oral Health Impact Profile-49 questionnaire (OHIP-49-mx) was applied. Responses were recorded on Likert-type scale whose values ranged from 0 (never) to 4 (always). Values greater than the 50 percentile (median) were considered as indicative of poor quality of life. All patients were orally examined and diagnosed. In accordance to their etiopathogenicy 6 study groups were formed: 4 corresponded to MIND classification for diseases (Metabolic, Inflammatory, Neoplastic, and Development groups), with ≥2 diseases and no-lesion group. To identify possible differences of OHIP-49 values between study groups an ANOVA (one factor) parametric and a chi square tests were performed (SPSS®20.0). The OHIP-49-mx values were higher than the 50 percentile (established at 39) in metabolic, inflammatory, development, and ≥2 diseases groups, suggesting that this type of oral lesions negatively impact the quality of life. ≥2 diseasesgroup followed by metabolic and inflammatory diseases group (p 0.001) depicted worst quality of life. Functional limitation (p 0.003), pain, physical inability (p 0.001) and psychological disabilities dimensions exhibited greater values in all groups. Injured oral mucosa negatively impacts quality of life, specifically functional limitation, physical inability and psychological disabilities could lead to social isolation.To our knowledge, this is the first time that an association between QLROH and the etiopathogenicy of oral mucosal diseases is established.

  5. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minmin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and cyclooxygenase- (COX- 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models.

  6. Effect of epicatechin against radiation-induced oral mucositis: in vitro and in vivo study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Seob Shin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Radiation-induced oral mucositis limits the delivery of high-dose radiation to head and neck cancer. This study investigated the effectiveness of epicatechin (EC, a component of green tea extracts, on radiation-induced oral mucositis in vitro and in vivo. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The effect of EC on radiation-induced cytotoxicity was analyzed in the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. Radiation-induced apoptosis, change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and changes in the signaling pathway were investigated. In vivo therapeutic effects of EC for oral mucositis were explored in a rat model. Rats were monitored by daily inspections of the oral cavity, amount of oral intake, weight change and survival rate. For histopathologic evaluation, hematoxylin-eosin staining and TUNEL staining were performed. RESULTS: EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis, change of MMP, and intracellular ROS generation in HaCaT cells. EC treatment markedly attenuated the expression of p-JNK, p-38, and cleaved caspase-3 after irradiation in the HaCaT cells. Rats with radiation-induced oral mucositis showed decreased oral intake, weight and survival rate, but oral administration of EC significantly restored all three parameters. Histopathologic changes were significantly decreased in the EC-treated irradiated rats. TUNEL staining of rat oral mucosa revealed that EC treatment significantly decreased radiation-induced apoptotic cells. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that EC significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis in keratinocytes and rat oral mucosa and may be a safe and effective candidate treatment for the prevention of radiation-induced mucositis.

  7. The therapeutic effect of PLAG against oral mucositis in hamster and mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha-Reum Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced mucositis can limit the effectiveness of cancer therapy and increase the risk of infections. However, no specific therapy for protection against mucositis is currently available. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of PLAG (1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-3-acetyl-rac-glycerol, acetylated diglyceride in 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-induced oral mucositis animal models. Hamsters were administered 5-FU (80 mg/kg intraperitoneally on days 0, 6, and 9. The animals’ cheek pouches were then scratched equally with the tip of an 18-gauge needle on days 1, 2, and 7. PLAG was administered daily at 250 mg/kg/day. PLAG administration significantly reduced 5-FU/scratching–induced mucositis. Dramatic reversal of weight loss in PLAG-treated hamsters with mucositis was observed. Histochemical staining data also revealed newly differentiated epidermis and blood vessels in the cheek pouches of PLAG-treated hamsters, indicative of recovery. Whole blood analyses indicated that PLAG prevents 5-FU–induced excessive neutrophil transmigration to the infection site and eventually stabilizes the number of circulating neutrophils. In a mouse mucositis model, mice with 5-FU–induced disease treated with PLAG exhibited resistance to body-weight loss compared with mice that received 5-FU or 5-FU/scratching alone. PLAG also dramatically reversed mucositis-associated weight loss and inhibited mucositis-induced inflammatory responses in the tongue and serum. These data suggest that PLAG enhances recovery from 5-FU–induced oral mucositis and may therefore be a useful therapeutic agent for treating side effects of chemotherapy, such as mucositis and cachexia.

  8. [Oral medicine 9. Lichen planus and lichenoid lesions of the oral mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, E H; Schepman, K P; de Visscher, J G A M

    2013-09-01

    The general dentist is sometimes confronted with white lesions of the oral mucosa. Oral lichen planus is the most common oral white lesion. The diagnosis can usually be made on the basis of the clinical aspect, but is sometimes made more difficult by certain abnormalities in the oral mucosa which clinically resemble oral lichen planus or by abnormalities which cannot be distinguished from oral lichen planus but have a different origin. Those lesions are classified as oral lichenoid lesions. Malignant deterioration has been described in allforms of oral lichen planus lesions and oral lichenoid lesions. There is no known method to predict or prevent malignant transformation. Nor are there any studies examining the efficacy of frequent follow-up visits. It seems sensible, in keeping with the tendency in recent literature, to schedule annual check-ups for patients to be on the safe side. These follow-up visits may reasonably be performed in a general dental practice.

  9. Comparison of efficacy of cryotherapy and chlorhexidine to oral nutrition transition time in chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erden, Y; Ipekcoban, G

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of cryotherapy and chlorhexidine to oral nutrition transition time in chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. This randomised controlled trial with random assignments to the experimental and control groups was conducted with cancer patients. Study data were collected from 90 cancer patients. The first experimental group (n = 30) received chlorhexidine mouthwash, the second experimental group (n = 30) received oral cryotherapy and the control group (n = 30) received routine care. To collect data we used the 'Mucositis Rating Index'. Changes in patients' oral mucosa in each group were checked and oral feeding transition periods were recorded. There was an important statistical difference between the times of transition to oral nutrition for patients (P < 0.01). Oral nutrition transition time of patients in the first experimental group who had applied chlorhexidine was shorter than in other groups. Following the tests, we detected a significant shortening in oral nutrition transition time of patients in first group who used chlorhexidine gargle as compared to the second group and control group. There was no significant difference between cryotherapy application and control group. In parallel with these findings, we detected that the degree of oral mucositis decreased.

  10. Serum zinc levels in 368 patients with oral mucosal diseases: A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Xiao-Wen; Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the serum zinc levels in patients with common oral mucosal diseases by comparing these to healthy controls. Material and Methods A total of 368 patients, which consisted of 156 recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) patients, 57 oral lichen planus (OLP) patients, 55 burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients, 54 atrophic glossitis (AG) patients, 46 xerostomia patients, and 115 sex-and age-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. Serum zinc levels were measured in all participants. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Chi-square test. Results The mean serum zinc level in the healthy control group was significantly higher than the levels of all other groups (p < 0.001). No individual in the healthy control group had a serum zinc level less than the minimum normal value. However, up to 24.7% (13/54) of patients with AG presented with zinc deficiency, while 21.2% (33/156) of patients with RAS, 16.4% (9/55) of patients with BMS, 15.2% (7/46) of patients with xerostomia, and 14.0% (8/57) of patients with OLP were zinc deficient. Altogether, the zinc deficiency rate was 19.02% (70/368) in the oral mucosal diseases (OMD) group (all patients with OMD). The difference between the OMD and healthy control group was significant (p <0.001). Gender differences in serum zinc levels were also present, although not statistically significant. Conclusions Zinc deficiency may be involved in the pathogenesis of common oral mucosal diseases. Zinc supplementation may be a useful treatment for oral mucosal diseases, but this requires further investigation; the optimal serum level of zinc, for the prevention and treatment of oral mucosal diseases, remains to be determined. Key words:Oral mucosal diseases, Zinc deficiency, pathogenesis. PMID:27031065

  11. Quantitative exfoliative cytology of normal and abnormal oral mucosal squames: preliminary communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowpe, J G

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative techniques have been applied to the exfoliative cytology of normal and abnormal human oral mucosal squames. This study is ongoing but early results indicate that a normal baseline for clinically normal oral squames, related to age and site, may be difficult to achieve. However, results obtained for the pathological smears suggest that these techniques may improve the diagnostic sensitivity of cytology in the management of oral cancer. PMID:6389859

  12. Quantitative exfoliative cytology of normal and abnormal oral mucosal squames: preliminary communication.

    OpenAIRE

    Cowpe, J G

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative techniques have been applied to the exfoliative cytology of normal and abnormal human oral mucosal squames. This study is ongoing but early results indicate that a normal baseline for clinically normal oral squames, related to age and site, may be difficult to achieve. However, results obtained for the pathological smears suggest that these techniques may improve the diagnostic sensitivity of cytology in the management of oral cancer.

  13. The role of sucralfate oral suspension in prevention of radiation induced mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Emami

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Mucositis is one of the most common complications of radiotherapy in head and neck cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate sucralfate mouthwash in prevention of radiation induced mucositis.
    • METHODS: A clinical randomized trial performed on 52 patients with head and neck cancers in Sayyed-Al-Shohada Hospital of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. These patients randomly assigned in 2 groups of 26 patients. Placebo and sucralfate was used for control and experimental patients respectiv ly, from the beginning of radiotherapy. Patients were visited weekly until the end of treatment. Grade of the mucositis was evaluated according to WHO grading scale.
    • RESULTS: Sucralfate significantly reduced the mean grade of mucositis in weeks one to four (with P-values of 0.02, 0.02, 0.001 and 0.004, respectively. Development of grade3 mucositis was also lower in sucralfate group (P-value = 0.0001. But, time interval between radiotherapy and appearance of mucositis was not statistically different in the two groups (P-value = 0.9
    • CONCLUSIONS: This study indicated that using oral suspension of sucralfate reduced the grade of radiation-induced mucositis, but did not prevent or delay it.
    • KEYWORDS: Mucositis, radiotherapy, sucralfate, head and neck cancers.

  14. Low-level Laser Therapy: A Review of Its Applications in the Management of Oral Mucosal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro; Cherubini, Karen; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2016-11-01

    Due to its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and biostimulating effects, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been widely used for oral disorders, such as oral lichen planus (OLP), xerostomia, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), herpes labialis, burning mouth syndrome (BMS), and oral mucositis (OM). The research team for the present study has reviewed the literature on the subject, with an emphasis on the applicability of LLLT in general and of its various clinical protocols for the management of those oral disorders. In lesions such as the ones occurring in OM, RAS, herpes labialis, and OLP, the course of wound healing and the pain have been shown to decrease, with a few, or most often, no adverse side effects. The literature shows that LLLT can also be effective in reducing symptoms in patients with BMS. For the treatment of hyposalivation and xerostomia, the use of LLLT has been described in the literature, but no consensus has resulted. Very few controlled clinical studies with well-established therapeutic protocols have occurred, except for OM, for which LLLT has been widely researched. Although information on the use of the laser for some lesions has already been consolidated, further research is needed, especially randomized, controlled clinical trials with long-term follow-up. Those studies will allow the safe use of LLLT, permitting the creation of care protocols for the management of oral disorders.

  15. Protective Effect of Repeatedly Preadministered Brazilian Propolis Ethanol Extract against Stress-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to clarify the protective effect of Brazilian propolis ethanol extract (BPEE against stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. The protective effect of BPEE against gastric mucosal lesions in male Wistar rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS for 6 h was compared between its repeated preadministration (50 mg/kg/day, 7 days and its single preadministration (50 mg/kg. The repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions and gastric mucosal oxidative stress more largely than the single BPEE preadministration. In addition, the repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated neutrophil infiltration in the gastric mucosa of rats exposed to WIRS. The protective effect of the repeated preadministration of BPEE against WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions was similar to that of a single preadministration of vitamin E (250 mg/kg in terms of the extent and manner of protection. From these findings, it is concluded that BPEE preadministered in a repeated manner protects against gastric mucosal lesions in rats exposed to WIRS more effectively than BPEE preadministered in a single manner possibly through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions.

  16. Investigation of trefoil factor expression in saliva and oral mucosal tissues of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Utrawichian, Akasith; Leelayuwat, Chanvit

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aims of our study were to determine levels of trefoil factor (TFF) peptides in saliva and oral mucosal tissues from patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and to evaluate whether individual members of TFFs (TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3) might act as biomarkers of disease....... Materials and methods Saliva samples were from 23 healthy subjects and 23 OSCC patients. Tissue samples were collected from 32 normal oral mucosa (NOM) and 32 OSCC biopsy specimens. ELISA and immunohistochemical methods were used to evaluate the expression of TFF1, TFF2, and TFF3 in saliva and oral mucosal...... progression in OSCC. Quantification of TFF levels in saliva may not be optimal in terms of diagnostic or predictive value for OSCC derived from oral mucosa....

  17. Alteration of the redox state with reactive oxygen species for 5-fluorouracil-induced oral mucositis in hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiko Yoshino

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis.

  18. Establishment of a Single Dose Radiation Model of Oral Mucositis in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seung Hee; Moon, Soo Young; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Song, Si Yeol; Park, Jin Hong; Noh, Young Ju; Lee, Sang Wook [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy to the head and neck area, is a common acute complication and is considered as the most severe symptom for cancer patients in the early stages of treatment. This study was proposed to establish the oral mucositis mouse model induced by a single dose of radiation for the facility of testing therapeutic candidates which can be used for the oral mucositis treatments. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: control, 16 Gy, 18 Gy, and 20 Gy. Oral mucositis was induced by a single dose of radiation to the head and neck using 6 MV x-Ray from linear accelerator. After irradiation, body weight and physical abnormalities were checked daily. Tongue tissues from all groups were taken on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 14, respectively and H and E staining was conducted to examine morphological changes. Results: Body weight dramatically decreased after day 5 in all irradiated mice. In the 16 Gy treatment group, body weight was recovered on day 14. The histology data showed that the thickness of the epithelial cell layer was decreased by the accumulated time after radiation treatment, up to day 9. Severe ulceration was revealed on day 9. Conclusion: A single dose of 16 Gy is sufficient dose to induce oral mucositis in Balb/C mice. Significant changes were observed in the Balb/C mice on days 7 and 9 after radiation. It is suggested that this mouse model might be a useful standard tool for studying oral mucositis induced by radiation.

  19. Oral Mucosal Disorders: Problems and Questions What are the Critical Points?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tülin Mansur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal disorders comprise more than 200 pathological conditions or diseases, grouped in different categories including genetic, inflammatory, infectious and neoplastic. In this report the key points in diagnosis and treatment of oral mucosal disorders are briefly underlined, and indications, precautions, and contraindications are pointed out. In addition, some clues are given to the dermatologists for management of common symptoms of oral disorders, such as pain, dry mouth and halitosis, which greatly disrupt the quality of life. Moreover, the frequently encountered problems in daily practice including contact stomatitis, effects of dental prostheses, dental materials, and topical agents on oral mucosa, and the critical points in surgical interventions of oral disorders are reviewed.

  20. Colposcopy: Gynecological vision in viewing oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh Nayyar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The diagnosis of malignant and potentially malignant epithelial lesions of the oral mucosa cannot be based solely on clinical findings. The histologic evaluation of a representative biopsy specimen thus becomes necessary. The site for biopsy however is always a subjective choice that sometimes raises doubts about its representativeness. So far, no simple and reliable method is available for the selection of the most appropriate area for biopsy. Colposcopy is helpful in the selection of these sites of epithelial dysplasia depending upon the vascular patterns. Aims: This study was planned to assess the role of Colposcopic examination in the selection of biopsy site in patients with varying grades of oral epithelial dysplasia at various sites. Settings and Design: One hundred and eighty patients between the ages of 30 and 60 years clinically diagnosed with leukoplakia and carcinoma buccal mucosa were included in the study. Materials and Methods: For each of the subjects, a thorough clinical examination followed by Colposcopic assessment was carried out for the selection of biopsy site from the involved mucosa. The histopathological findings were then compared in the two cases and results analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analysis was performed using a paired t-test. Results: In our study, sensitivity and specificity for the selection of biopsy site by Colposcopic examination was found to be higher for leukoplakia than for carcinoma buccal mucosa. Conclusions: It was concluded that Colposcopic examination was found to be significant in the selection of biopsy site for leukoplakia while clinical criterion was found to be more appropriate for carcinoma buccal mucosa cases.

  1. Isoniazid Induced Lupus Presenting as Oral Mucosal Ulcers with Pancytopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Ria; Ankale, Padmaraj; Sinha, Kanishk; Iyer, Aparna; Jayalakshmi, T. K.

    2016-01-01

    Drug Induced Lupus Erythematous (DILE) is a rare adverse reaction to a large variety of drugs including Isoniazid (INH), with features resembling idiopathic Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Diagnosis require identification of a temporal relationship between drug administered and symptom. It is an idiosyncratic reaction, with no pre-existing lupus. Our case highlights a rare presentation of isoniazid induced lupus with profound pancytopenia and mucosal ulcers, thus posing a diagnostic chall...

  2. Low level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients: systematic review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sabbagh, Rula Fawzi; Selting, Wayne J.

    2016-03-01

    Oral mucositis is a debilitating and dose limiting side effect of oncotherapy in cancer patients. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is a promising new intervention for the treatment of oral mucositis. Aims and objectives: 1. Perform a systematic review of available literature on the therapeutic effect of LLLT on established oral mucositis. 2. Formulate recommendations for future studies based on results of review. Methods: Electronic search oflow level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis was conducted and eligible studies reviewed. Results: Four studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. A total of 109 patients were included, 59 of which received LLLT as a therapeutic measure. An overall success rate of 81.4% success rate was reported in regard to OM. Conclusion: The review demonstrated the positive therapeutic effect of LLLT on oral mucositis. However, the need for future studies with standardized reporting of parameters and methods is needed to increase the level of evidence of this intervention.

  3. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  4. Association between periapical lesions and maxillary sinus mucosal thickening: a retrospective cone-beam computed tomographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanbhag, Siddharth; Karnik, Prabodh; Shirke, Prashant; Shanbhag, Vivek

    2013-07-01

    Odontogenic infections are a common cause of maxillary sinusitis. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between teeth with periapical lesions or periodontal disease and sinus mucosal thickening using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. CBCT scans of 243 patients (485 sinuses) were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of periapical lesions and/or periodontal disease in posterior maxillary teeth and associated sinus mucosal thickening. Thickening >2 mm was considered pathological and was categorized by degree (2-5 mm, 5-10 mm, and >10 mm) and type (flat or polypoid). Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate statistical analyses were performed. Mucosal thickening >2 mm was observed in 147 (60.5%) patients and 211 (44.6%) sinuses and was mostly of a "flat" type. Bivariate analysis revealed significant associations between mucosal thickening >2 mm and sex (males), age (>60 years), and teeth with periapical lesions and periodontal disease (P ≤ .027). Multivariate regression analysis identified only sex (males, odds ratio = 1.98, P = .004) and teeth with periapical lesions (odds ratio = 9.75, P 2 mm. Sinus mucosal thickening is a common radiographic finding, which is more likely to be observed in males (2×) and in relation to teeth with periapical lesions (9.75×). Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Preventive intervention possibilities in radiotherapy- and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis : Results of meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, M A; Spijkervet, F K L; Boezen, H M; Schouten, J.P.; Roodenburg, J L N; de Vries, E G E

    2006-01-01

    The aim of these meta-analyses was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis in cancer patients treated with head and neck radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, with a focus on randomized clinical trials. A literature search was performed for reports of randomiz

  6. Efficacy of palifermin (keratinocyte growth factor-1 in the amelioration of oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Sonis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephen T SonisBrigham and Women’s Hospital and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USAPurpose: Oral mucositis is a significant toxicity of cytotoxic chemo- and radiation-therapy used to treat cancer. Palifermin is the first pharmaceutical/biological agent approved for the intervention of oral mucositis. The major objective of this review is to evaluate the evidence supporting the use of palifermin.Methods: A literature search was performed using an appropriate keyword search in MEDLINE and PubMed databases.Results: Of 100 full papers and 4 abstracts identified, 12 papers and 3 abstracts were appropriate for analysis. Level 2 evidence supporting palifermin use in patients with hematologic malignancies being treated with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is clear. Level 2 evidence also exists for the use of palifermin in the prevention of oral mucositis in patients with solid tumors (colorectal cancer, head and neck cancer, but is incomplete. Level ≥ 3 data support the use of palifermin in allogeneic HSCT recipients and cycled chemotherapy. A single health economic study concluded that palifermin is essentially cost neutral in the autologous HSCT population.Conclusion: Data supporting the use of palifermin in autologous HSCT recipients with hematologic malignancies is clear. Some data exist demonstrating its efficacy in other oncologic indications. Additional studies are needed to broaden the potential applications of palifermin and to ascertain its economic, but not symptomatic, effectiveness.Keywords: oral mucositis, palifermin, toxicity

  7. Systematic review of cytokines and growth factors for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; von Bültzingslöwen, I.; Logan, R.M.; Bowen, J.; Al-Azri, A.R.; Everaus, H.; Gerber, E.; Gomez, J.G.; Pettersson, B.G.; Soga, Y.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Tissing, W.J.E.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this project was to review the literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of cytokines and growth factor agents for the prevention or treatment of oral mucositis induced by cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Methods A systematic review was conducted by the Mu

  8. Morphine mouthwash for the management of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sarvizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Topical morphine is more effective and more satisfactory to patients than the magic mouthwash in reducing severity of cancer treatment-induced oral mucositis. More studies with larger sample size and longer follow-up are required in this regard.

  9. Differentiating malignant from benign gastric mucosal lesions with quantitative analysis in dual energy spectral computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaoyan; Ni, Cheng; Shen, Yaqi; Hu, Xuemei; Chen, Xiao; Li, Zhen; Hu, Daoyu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the value of quantitative analysis in dual energy spectral computed tomography (DESCT) for differentiating malignant gastric mucosal lesions from benign gastric mucosal lesions (including gastric inflammation [GI] and normal gastric mucosa [NGM]). This study was approved by the ethics committee, and all patients provided written informed consent. A total of 161 consecutive patients (63 with gastric cancer [GC], 48 with GI, and 50 with NGM) who underwent dual-phase contrast enhanced DESCT scans in the arterial phase (AP) and portal venous phase (PVP) were included in this study. Iodine concentration (IC) in lesions was derived from the iodine-based material-decomposition images and normalized to that in the aorta to obtain normalized IC (nIC). The ratios of IC and nIC between the AP and PVP were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for GC and GI was evaluated with reviewing the features including gastric wall thickness, focal, and eccentric on the conventional polychromatic images. All statistical analyses were performed by using statistical software SPSS 17.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL). IC and nIC in GC differed significantly from those in GI and NGM, except for nICAP in comparing GC with GI. Mean nIC values of GC (0.18 ± 0.06 in AP and 0.62 ± 0.16 in PVP) were significantly higher than that of NGM (0.12 ± 0.03 in AP and 0.37 ± 0.08 in PVP) (all P nIC and IC in PVP had high sensitivities of 88.89% and 90.48%, respectively, in differentiating GC from NGM, while the sensitivities were 71.43% and 88.89% during AP. Ratios IC and nIC ratios did not provide adequate diagnostic accuracy with their area under curves less than 0.65. With the conventional features, the diagnostic accuracies for GC and GI were 75.0% and 98.0%, respectively. Quantitative analysis of DESCT imaging parameters for gastric mucosa, such as nIC and IC, is useful for differentiating malignant from benign gastric mucosal lesions. PMID:28079827

  10. Phenytoin mouthwash to treat cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Baharvand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral mucositis is one of the most common side effects of cancer therapy with no definite treatment. Phenytoin has positive effects on healing of mucosal and dermal wounds. In this study efficacy of 1% phenytoin mouthwash on severity of mucositis (on the basis of WHO scale, pain relief (based on Visual Analogue Scale, and improvement of patients' quality of life (on the basis of EORTC-QLQ-H and N35 questionnaire was evaluated. Materials And Methods: In a pilot -double-blind randomized clinical trial, eight patients in study group were given 1% phenytoin mouthwash while eight patients in control group used normal saline. Data analysis was performed by Mann-Whitney and Repeated Measured ANOVA tests. Results: Reduction of mucositis severity was observed, but the difference was not significant. On the other hand, patients on phenytoin therapy had better pain relief (VAS# 6.75 ± 1.58 at the beginning of the study reached to # 3.75 ± 1.16 after 3 weeks in phenytoin group and improvement in quality of life (score of QOL was 70.63 ± 5.5 that reached to 63.61 ± 6.39 in phenytoin group than normal saline group significantly (P < 0.05. Conclusion: One percent phenytoin mouthwash caused pain relief and improvement of life quality significantly in patients with mucositis due to cancer therapy, but it did not reduce the severity of mucositis in a statistically significant scale.

  11. Helicobacter pylori coinfection is a confounder, modulating mucosal inflammation in oral submucous fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral cavity has been considered a potential reservoir for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori , from where the organism causes recurrent gastric infections. Aim: With this case-control study we tried to evaluate the role of H pylori in the etiology of mucosal inflammation, a condition that compounds the morbid state associated with oral submucous fibrosis (OSF. Materials and Methods : Subjects ( n = 150 were selected following institutional regulations on sample collection and grouped into test cases and positive and negative controls based on the presence of mucosal fibrosis and inflammation. The negative controls had none of the clinical signs. All patients underwent an oral examination as well as tests to assess oral hygiene/periodontal disease status; a rapid urease test (RUT of plaque samples was also done to estimate the H pylori bacterial load. We used univariate and mutivariate logistic regression for statistical analysis of the data and calculated the odds ratios to assess the risk posed by the different variables. Results : The RUT results differed significantly between the groups, reflecting the variations in the bacterial loads in each category. The test was positive in 52% in the positive controls (where nonspecific inflammation of oral mucosa was seen unassociated with fibrosis, in 46% of the test cases, and in 18% of the negative controls (healthy volunteers (χ2 = 13.887; P < 0.01. A positive correlation was seen between the oral hygiene/periodontal disease indices and RUT reactivity in all the three groups. Conclusions: The contribution of the H pylori in dental plaque to mucosal inflammation and periodontal disease was significant. Logistic regression analysis showed gastrointestinal disease and poor oral hygiene as being the greatest risk factors for bacterial colonization, irrespective of the subject groups. A positive correlation exists between RUT reactivity and the frequency of mucosal inflammation.

  12. 口腔颌面外科疾病与口腔黏膜病的关系研究%Study on the Relationship Between Oral and Maxillofacial Disease and Oral Mucosal Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙杜斌

    2015-01-01

    This paper in recent years about the oral and maxillofacial surgery and oral mucosal disease summarizes related research reports, from ulcerative oral cavity mucous membrane inflammation, oral and maxillofacial precancerous lesions and malignant lymphoma in the physiology and pathology of three kinds of diseases such as to explore the relationship between the two types of diseases, so as to provide the necessary guidance for clinical treatment.This paper in recent years about the oral and maxillofacial surgery and oral mucosal disease summarizes related research reports, from ulcerative oral cavity mucous membrane inflammation, oral and maxillofacial precancerous lesions and malignant lymphoma in the physiology and pathology of three kinds of diseases such as to explore the relationship between the two types of diseases, so as to provide the necessary guidance for clinical treatment.%本文对近年来有关口腔颌面外科疾病和口腔黏膜病相关研究报道进行总结,从溃疡性口腔黏膜炎、口腔颌面癌前病损和恶性淋巴瘤等三种疾病的生理病理来探讨这两类疾病之间的关系,以期为临床治疗提供必要的指导。

  13. Oral lesions associated with human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Lauren L

    2013-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated oral disease among people living with HIV infection includes oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, oral warts, herpes simplex virus ulcers, major aphthous ulcers or ulcers not otherwise specified, HIV salivary gland disease, and atypical gingival and periodontal diseases. Diagnosis of some oral lesions is based on clinical appearance and behavior, whereas others require biopsy, culture, or imaging for definitive diagnosis. Management strategies including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches are discussed in this article. Dentists also need to be cognizant of the potential oral side effects of HIV antiretroviral medications.

  14. Ketoprofen-loaded Eudragit electrospun nanofibers for the treatment of oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda RI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rana Ihab Reda,1 Ming Ming Wen,2 Amal Hassan El-Kamel1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Drug Manufacturing, Pharos University in Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt Purpose: The purpose of this study was to formulate ketoprofen (KET-loaded Eudragit L and Eudragit S nanofibers (NFs by the electrospinning technique for buccal administration to treat oral mucositis as a safe alternative to orally administered KET, which causes gastrointestinal tract (GIT side effects. Materials and methods: NFs were prepared by electrospinning using Eudragit L and Eudragit S. Several variables were evaluated to optimize NF formulation, such as polymer types and concentrations, applied voltage, flow rate and drug concentrations. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM and analyses of drug contents, hydration capacity, surface pH, drug release and ex vivo permeation were performed to evaluate the NFs. The selected formulation (F1 was evaluated in vivo on induced oral mucositis in rabbits. Results: SEM revealed that 20% polymer formed smooth and bead-free NFs. DSC results confirmed the amorphous nature of KET in the NFs. FTIR confirmed hydrogen bond formation between the drug and polymer, which stabilized the NFs. Both formulations (F1 and F2 had an acceptable surface pH. The drug loading was >90%. The amount of KET released from NF formulations was statistically significantly higher (P≤0.001 than that released from the corresponding solvent-casted films. The complete release of KET from F1 occurred within 2 hours. Ex vivo permeation study revealed that only a small fraction of drug permeated from F1, which was a better candidate than F2 for local buccal delivery. In vivo evaluation of F1 on oral mucositis induced in rabbits demonstrated that F1 reduced the clinical severity of mucositis in

  15. Yellowish lesions of the oral cavity. Suggestion for a classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Iria; Varela, Pablo; Romero, Amparo; García, María José; Suárez, María Mercedes; Seoane, Juan

    2007-08-01

    The colour of a lesion is due to its nature and to its histological substratum. In order to ease diagnosis, oral cavity lesions have been classified according to their colour in: white, red, white and red, bluish and/or purple, brown, grey and/or black lesions. To the best of our knowledge, there is no such a classification for yellow lesions. So, a suggestion for a classification of yellowish lesions according to their semiology is made with the following headings: diffuse macular lesions, papular, hypertrophic, or pustular lesions, together with cysts and nodes. This interpretation of the lesions by its colour is the first step to diagnosis. It should be taken into account that, as happens with any other classification, the yellowish group of lesions includes items with different prognosis as well as possible markers of systemic disorders.

  16. Prevalence of oral lesions and measurement of salivary pH in the different trimesters of pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kanu; Kaur, Harshaminder

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Oral changes observed during pregnancy have been studied for many years, but their magnitude and frequency have not been stressed upon. This study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of oral lesions during different trimesters of pregnancy and their correlation with salivary pH change. METHODS The gingival, simplified oral hygiene, community periodontal and decayed-missing-filled teeth indices were used to assess a total of 120 pregnant women (40 in each trimester group) and 40 nonpregnant women (control group). Salivary pH was measured using a digital pH meter. Presence of any oral lesions was determined via oral examination. RESULTS Scores for all indices increased while salivary pH decreased from the control group to the first trimester group, through to the third. Oral lesions were seen in 44.2% of pregnant women. Lesions were seen in 27.5%, 52.5% and 52.5% of women in the first, second and third trimesters, respectively. The percentage of pregnant women with one oral lesion was highest in the second trimester (47.5%), whereas the third trimester had the highest prevalence (17.5%) of two concurrent oral lesions. The incidence of fissured tongue was highest in the first trimester group, and that of gingival enlargement was highest in the third trimester group. In the second trimester group, there was an almost equal incidence of fissured tongue and gingival/mucosal enlargement. CONCLUSION Most changes in oral tissues during pregnancy can be avoided with good oral hygiene. Salivary pH could be used to assess the prevalence of oral lesions in the different trimesters of pregnancy. PMID:25640100

  17. Efficacy of oral brush cytology in the evaluation of the oral premalignant and malignant lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Babshet, M; Nandimath, K; S K Pervatikar; V G Naikmasur

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, oral brush cytology of premalignant and malignant lesions was performed using tooth brush. The cytopathological diagnosis of brush cytology was compared with that of punch biopsy. The reliability of oral brush cytology using tooth brush was assessed in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Materials and Methods: A total of 67 patients, 32 premalignant lesions and other 35 frank oral carcinomas, were included in the study. All patients underwent oral brush ...

  18. Evaluación de terapias alternativas en mucositis oral experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mora-Montoya

    Full Text Available La mucositis oral es una complicación importante de la terapia antineoplásica En la actualidad, la mucositis es uno de los efectos secundarios del tratamiento del cáncer al cual se le está dedicando un gran esfuerzo terapéutico para encontrar medidas farmacológicas, que reduzcan su incidencia, así como su impacto o gravedad debido a las consecuencias planteadas. El objetivo de este trabajo es revisar la patogénesis de la enfermedad y presentar los resultados de las diferentes alternativas terapéuticas estudiadas de forma experimental.

  19. Preliminary study on radio-chemo-induced oral mucositis and low level laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merigo, Elisabetta; Fontana, Matteo; Fornaini, Carlo; Clini, Fabio; Cella, Luigi; Vescovi, Paolo; Oppici, Aldo

    2012-09-01

    Background: Oral mucositis remains one of the most common and troubling side effects of antineoplastic radiation and drug therapy: its incidence in onco-hematological radio-chemotreated patients is variable between 50 and 100% and its impact on this populations is directly linked with the experience of intense pain causing reduction and modification of therapy regimens, decreased survival rates and increased cost of care. Purpose: Aim of this study is the preliminary evaluation of a Low Level Laser therapy (LLLT) protocol on healing process of oral mucositis and on pain and quality of life of patients experiencing this dramatic side-effect. Materials and methods: Patients were evaluated and treated at the Unita` Operativa Semplice Dipartimentale di Odontostomatologia e Chirurgia Maxillo-Facciale of the Hospital of Piacenza were they were treated for primary disease with protocols of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. LLLT protocol was performed with a diode laser (808 nm -XD Smile - Fotona -Slovenia) on a two weeks-6 treatments schedule with power of 0.5 W and application of 30 seconds. Mucositis grading was scored on the basis of WHO classification by two blind operators at each treatment and at 1 and 2 weeks after treatment. Pain and capability of deglutition were described by patients by means questionnaires based on Visual Analogue Scale, Numerical Rating Scale and Quality of Life. Results: A relevant improvement of healing of oral mucositis, in terms of reduction of grading score, and of pain, swallowing discomfort and quality of life was recorded. Discussion and conclusion: Results of this preliminary study are encouraging for the realization of larger studies focused on the application of LLLT protocols in management of radio-chemotreated patients with oral mucositis.

  20. Novel submicronized rebamipide liquid with moderate viscosity: significant effects on oral mucositis in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Takako; Sako, Nobutomo; Matsuda, Takakuni; Uematsu, Naoya; Sakurai, Kazushi; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at developing a novel rebamipide liquid for an effective treatment of oral mucositis. The healing effects of a variety of liquids comprising submicronized rebamipide crystals were investigated using a rat cauterization-induced oral ulcer model. Whereas 2% rebamipide liquid comprising micro-crystals did not exhibit significant curative effect, 2% rebamipide liquids comprising submicronized crystals with moderate viscosities exhibited healing effects following intra-oral administration. The 2% and 4% optimized rebamipide liquids showed significant healing effects in the rat oral ulcer model (prebamipide liquid significantly reduced the percent area of ulcerated injury (prebamipide liquid with moderate viscosity following intra-oral administration showed better both healing effect in the rat oral ulcer model and preventive effect in the rat irradiation-induced glossitis model.

  1. Enfermedad de la mucosa oral: Penfigoide de las membranas mucosas Oral mucosal disease: Mucouse membrane pemphigoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Discepoli

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Los trastornos vesículobullosos subepiteliales representan desordenes autoinmunitarios que cogen origen de reacciones dirigidas hacia componentes de los hemidesmosomas o bien de las Zonas de la Membrana Basal (ZMB de los epitelios escamosos estratificados. A estos trastornos ha sido conferidoel término de enfermedades ampollosa subepiteliales inmunomediadas (EASIM y el penfigoide de las membranas mucosas (PMM es el más frecuente. Todas las enfermedades subepiteliales vesiculobullosas se presentan como lesiones ampollosas y descamativas, y el diagnostico debe de ser confirmado por una biopsia junta a tinción inmunológica. No hay un único tratamiento capaz de controlar todas las enfermedades subepiteliales vesiculoampollosas; las diferencias inmunológicas entre las EASIM proporciona diferencias en las respuestas al tratamiento. Hoy en día el tratamiento inmunorregulador es usado para controlar la lesión oral de PMM.Subepithelial vesiculobullous conditions are chronic autoimmune disorders that arise from reactions directed against components of the hemidesmosomes or basement membrane zones (BMZ of stratified squamous epithelium to which the term immune-mediated subepithelial blistering diseases (IMSEBD has been given. Mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP is the most common, but variants do exist. All subepithelial vesiculobullous disorders present as blisters and erosions, and diagnosis must be confirmed by biopsy examination with immunostaining, sometimes supplemented by other investigations. No single treatment reliably controls all subepithelial vesiculobullous disorders; the immunological differences within IMSEBD may account for differences in responses to treatment. Currently, as well as improving oral hygiene, immunomodulatory treatment is used to control the oral lesions of MMP, but it is not known if its specific subsets reliably respond to different agents.

  2. Oral cavity lesions: A study of 21 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pudasaini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of lesions in the oral cavity is strongly linked with smoking and alcohol consumption. Non neoplastic lesions are mainly inflammatory conditions. It has been seen that the benign lesions are more common than malignant. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective study carried out in the Department of Histopathology of Helping Hands Community Hospital during a period of one and a half years from January 2009 to June 2010. The study included 21 cases of oral cavity lesions. Results: The most common site was lip with 9 cases (42.8% followed by buccal cavity with 5 cases (23.8%. Out of the 21 cases of oral cavity lesions, 20 cases (95.2% were benign and 1 case (4.8% was malignant. The malignant lesion was a case of squamous cell carcinoma of soft palate. Conclusion: Any oral cavity lesion should have a tissue diagnosis for rational management of the case and to avoid mutilating surgery. Keywords: Oral cavity; Fibroma; Mucocele DOI: 10.3126/jpn.v1i1.4452 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2011 Vol.1, 49-51

  3. Oral Administration of Surface-Deacetylated Chitin Nanofibers and Chitosan Inhibit 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Intestinal Mucositis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Ryo; Azuma, Kazuo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Ochi, Kosuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Osaki, Tomohiro; Ito, Norihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the prophylactic effects of orally administered surface-deacetylated chitin nanofibers (SDACNFs) and chitosan against 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis, which is a common side effect of 5-FU chemotherapy. SDACNFs and chitosan abolished histological abnormalities associated with intestinal mucositis and suppressed hypoproliferation and apoptosis of intestinal crypt cells. These results indicate that SDACNF and chitosan are useful agents for preventing mucositis induced by anti-cancer drugs. PMID:28134832

  4. Effect of oral epidermal growth factor on mucosal healing in rats with duodenal ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jane CJ Chao; Kuo-Yu Liu; Sheng-Hsuan Chen; Chia-Lang Fang; Chih-Wei Tsao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on mucosal healing in rats with duodenal ulcer.METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham operation without EGF, sham operation with EGF, duodenal ulcer without EGF, or duodenal ulcer with EGF groups. Additionally, normal rats without operation served as the control group. Duodenal ulcer was induced in rats by 300 mL/L acetic acid. Rats with EGF were orally administered at a dose of 60 μg/kg/day in drinking water on the next day of operation (day 1). Healing of duodenal ulcer was detected by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Cell growth of damaged mucosa was determined by the contents of nucleic acids and proteins. The level of EGF in duodenal mucosa was measured by ELISA.RESULTS: The pathological results showed that duodenal ulcer rats with EGF improved mucosal healing compared with those without EGF after day 5. Duodenal ulcer rats with EGF significantly increased duodenal DNA content compared with those without EGF on day 15 (6.44±0.54mg/g VS 1.45±0.52 mg/g mucosa, P<0.05). Duodenal RNA and protein contents did not differ between duodenal ulcer rats with and without EGF during the experimental period.Sham operation and duodenal ulcer rats with EGF significantly increased duodenal mucosal EGF content compared with those without EGF on day 5 (76.0±13.7 ng/g VS 35.7±12.9ng/g mucosa in sham operation rats, and 68.3±10.9 ng/gVS 28.3±9.2 ng/g mucosa in duodenal ulcer rats, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Oral EGF can promote mucosal healing of the rats with duodenal ulcer by stimulating mucosal proliferation accompanied by an increase in mucosal EGF content.

  5. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (Pprobiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (Pprobiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in the future. PMID:26406888

  6. Oral administration of a recombinant cholera toxin B subunit promotes mucosal healing in the colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, K J; Royal, J M; Kouokam, J C; Haribabu, B; Jala, V R; Yaddanapudi, K; Hamorsky, K T; Dryden, G W; Matoba, N

    2016-11-02

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is a component of a licensed oral cholera vaccine. However, CTB has pleiotropic immunomodulatory effects whose impacts on the gut are not fully understood. Here, we found that oral administration in mice of a plant-made recombinant CTB (CTBp) significantly increased several immune cell populations in the colon lamina propria. Global gene expression analysis revealed that CTBp had more pronounced impacts on the colon than the small intestine, with significant activation of TGFβ-mediated pathways in the colon epithelium. The clinical relevance of CTBp-induced impacts on colonic mucosa was examined. In a human colon epithelial model using Caco2 cells, CTBp, but not the non-GM1-binding mutant G33D-CTBp, induced TGFβ-mediated wound healing. In a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) acute colitis mouse model, oral administration of CTBp protected against colon mucosal damage as manifested by mitigated body weight loss, decreased histopathological scores, and blunted escalation of inflammatory cytokine levels while inducing wound healing-related genes. Furthermore, biweekly oral administration of CTBp significantly reduced disease severity and tumorigenesis in the azoxymethane/DSS model of ulcerative colitis and colon cancer. Altogether, these results demonstrate CTBp's ability to enhance mucosal healing in the colon, highlighting its potential application in ulcerative colitis therapy besides cholera vaccination.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 2 November 2016. doi:10.1038/mi.2016.95.

  7. Effects of LEDs on oral mucositis prevention in a patient with classic Hodgkin's lymphoma - a case report; Utilizacao de LEDs na prevencao de mucosite oral em paciente com linfoma de Hodgkin classico - estudo de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bicudo, Leticia Lang

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this case report was to evaluate the efficacy of therapy using LEDs (light-emitting diodes), at a wavelength of 880 nm, in the prevention of oral mucositis in a patient with Hodgkin's disease treated with ABVD regimen. Mucositis is a dose limiting complication of cancer treatment, of high incidence, which severity can lead to alterations of treatment planning or even to suspension of cancer therapy, with serious consequences in tumor response and even survival. Lesions develop most commonly on the nonkeratinized mucosa and present symptoms that begin like mild burning and evolve to severe pain. For this reason, low power laser and, recently, LEDs have been considered for preventing and management of oral mucositis, with great results. In this study, a 34-year-old male received intraoral irradiations with an infrared LEDs array (3,6 J/cm{sup 2}, 74 mW), for five consecutive days, starting on the day of chemotherapy. In each chemotherapy cycle, he received ABVD protocol on day 1 and day 15, and received LEDs treatment during five days on each ABVD infusion. To analyze results, the WHO (World Health Organization) scale was used for grading of mucositis and VAS (Visual Analogue Scale) for pain evaluation, on days 1, 3, 7, 10 and 13 post-chemotherapy. The results obtained showed the patient did not develop oral mucositis, during the five chemotherapy cycles and did not present any pain symptom. Therapy with LEDs was a safe and effective method for the prevention of oral mucositis in this case report. However, new studies are needed in order to prove the efficacy of this methodology with more patients, increasing their quality of life. (author)

  8. Serum amyloid P ameliorates radiation-induced oral mucositis and fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Lynne A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the effect of the anti-fibrotic protein serum amyloid P (SAP on radiation-induced oral mucositis (OM and fibrosis in a hamster cheek-pouch model. Experimental Design Hamsters received a single dose of radiation (40 Gy to the left everted cheek pouch to induce significant OM. The protective therapeutic potential of SAP was evaluated using varying dosing regimens. The extent of OM was measured using a validated six-point scoring scheme ranging from 0 (normal tissue, no mucositis to 5 (complete ulceration. Fibrotic remodeling was also visualized histologically and quantified at later time points using collagen gene expression. Results SAP treatment attenuated the profile of radiation-induced oral mucositis by delaying the time of onset, reducing the peak value, and enhancing the resolution of injury. The peak mucositis score was reduced by approximately 0.5 grade in SAP-treated animals. The number of animal days with a score of ≥ 3 was reduced by 48% in the SAP-treated group, compared with the saline control group (P Conclusions SAP treatment significantly attenuated radiation-induced injury. In particular, SAP attenuated the severity of OM and inhibited pathogenic remodeling. This suggests that SAP may be a useful therapy for the palliation of side effects observed during treatment for head and neck cancer.

  9. Oral lesions and dental status among institutionalized orphans in Yemen: A matched case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeq Ali Al-Maweri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (OMLs and dental caries and to evaluate oral health practices among institutionalized orphan-children in Sana′a city, Yemen. Subjects and Methods: A sample of 202 institutionalized male-orphan-children in the main orphanage in Sana′a city, were matched to 202 non-orphan schoolchildren. Clinical examination included assessment of OMLs based on standard international diagnostic criteria and evaluation of dental status using the Decayed/decayed, Missed/missed and Filled/filled (DMFT/dmft index according to World Health Organization recommendations. Demographic data and oral hygiene practices were obtained by interviewing each subject using special questionnaire form. Results: Majority of children were in the 12-15 year age group. Nine types of lesions were reported among orphans; the most common lesions were fissured tongue (24.3%, herpes labialis (7.9% and traumatic ulcers (2.5%. The occurrence of herpes labialis was found to be significantly higher in orphans than in controls (P < 0.01. The prevalence of dental caries was insignificantly lower among the orphans (84.7% compared with the non-orphans (89.61%; P = 0.136. The mean dmft score was significantly lower in orphans than in controls (2.28 vs. 3.82; P = 0.001. Conclusions: The institutionalized children in this orphanage had a high prevalence of OMLs but low prevalence of dental caries, though they revealed poor oral hygiene practices. Effective oral health promotion strategies need to be implemented to improve the oral health and oral health practices of children living in orphanages.

  10. Loss of Aβ-nerve endings associated with the Merkel cell-neurite complex in the lesional oral mucosa epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Daniela Calderón; Korkmaz, Yüksel; Cho, Britta; Kopp, Marion; Bloch, Wilhelm; Addicks, Klaus; Niedermeier, Wilhelm

    2016-03-30

    The Merkel cell-neurite complex initiates the perception of touch and mediates Aβ slowly adapting type I responses. Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease with T-cell-mediated inflammation, whereas hyperkeratosis is characterized with or without epithelial dysplasia in the oral mucosa. To determine the effects of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis on the Merkel cell-neurite complex, healthy oral mucosal epithelium and lesional oral mucosal epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis patients were stained by immunohistochemistry (the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex and double immunofluorescence methods) using pan cytokeratin, cytokeratin 20 (K20, a Merkel cell marker), and neurofilament 200 (NF200, a myelinated Aβ- and Aδ-nerve fibre marker) antibodies. NF200-immunoreactive (ir) nerve fibres in healthy tissues and in the lesional oral mucosa epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis were counted and statistically analysed. In the healthy oral mucosa, K20-positive Merkel cells with and without close association to the intraepithelial NF200-ir nerve fibres were detected. In the lesional oral mucosa of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis patients, extremely rare NF200-ir nerve fibres were detected only in the lamina propria. Compared with healthy tissues, lichen planus and hyperkeratosis tissues had significantly decreased numbers of NF200-ir nerve fibres in the oral mucosal epithelium. Lichen planus and hyperkeratosis were associated with the absence of Aβ-nerve endings in the oral mucosal epithelium. Thus, we conclude that mechanosensation mediated by the Merkel cell-neurite complex in the oral mucosal epithelium is impaired in lichen planus and hyperkeratosis.

  11. Ketoprofen-loaded Eudragit electrospun nanofibers for the treatment of oral mucositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Rana Ihab; Wen, Ming Ming; El-Kamel, Amal Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to formulate ketoprofen (KET)-loaded Eudragit L and Eudragit S nanofibers (NFs) by the electrospinning technique for buccal administration to treat oral mucositis as a safe alternative to orally administered KET, which causes gastrointestinal tract (GIT) side effects. Materials and methods NFs were prepared by electrospinning using Eudragit L and Eudragit S. Several variables were evaluated to optimize NF formulation, such as polymer types and concentrations, applied voltage, flow rate and drug concentrations. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analyses of drug contents, hydration capacity, surface pH, drug release and ex vivo permeation were performed to evaluate the NFs. The selected formulation (F1) was evaluated in vivo on induced oral mucositis in rabbits. Results SEM revealed that 20% polymer formed smooth and bead-free NFs. DSC results confirmed the amorphous nature of KET in the NFs. FTIR confirmed hydrogen bond formation between the drug and polymer, which stabilized the NFs. Both formulations (F1 and F2) had an acceptable surface pH. The drug loading was >90%. The amount of KET released from NF formulations was statistically significantly higher (P≤0.001) than that released from the corresponding solvent-casted films. The complete release of KET from F1 occurred within 2 hours. Ex vivo permeation study revealed that only a small fraction of drug permeated from F1, which was a better candidate than F2 for local buccal delivery. In vivo evaluation of F1 on oral mucositis induced in rabbits demonstrated that F1 reduced the clinical severity of mucositis in rabbits under the current experimental conditions. The attenuated clinical severity was accompanied by a marked reduction in inflammatory infiltrate and re-epithelization of the epithelial layer. Conclusion Eudragit L100 nanofibers (EL-NF) loaded with KET (F1) suppressed

  12. Verrucous lesions of the oral cavity treated with surgery: Analysis of clinico-pathologic features and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivan, Anjana; Thankappan, Krishnakumar; Rajapurkar, Mayuri; Shetty, Sharankumar; Sreehari, Sreekala; Iyer, Subramania

    2012-01-01

    Verrucous lesions of the oral cavity can be of varied histopathology. The present study evaluates the clinico-pathological features of verrucous lesions of the oral cavity and analyzes the treatment outcomes. This is a retrospective study of 15 consecutive patients who presented with verrucous lesions of the oral cavity, during the 5-year period from January 2006 to December 2010. Demographic, clinico-pathological features, treatment details, and outcomes were analyzed. Fifteen patients with verrucous lesions of the oral cavity were treated with surgery as the primary modality. The mean age was 62.8 years (range 35-85 years). Wide excision of the primary lesion with adequate mucosal and soft-tissue margins was carried out. Free-flap reconstruction was done in eight patients. All patients remain loco-regionally controlled with good functional speech and swallowing outcome. Verrucous lesions of the oral cavity are a distinct clinical entity with varied histopathology. A surgical excision with wide margins and appropriate reconstruction is necessary to optimize the disease and functional outcome.

  13. Oral mucosal diseases in anxiety and depression patients: Hospital based observational study from south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Kandagal V; Shenai, Prashanth; Chatra, Laxmikanth; Ronad, Yusuf-Ahammed A; Bilahari, Naduvakattu; Pramod, Redder C; Kumar, Sreeja P

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of different Oral Mucosal diseases in Anxiety and Depression patients. A hospital based observational Study was conducted in the department of Psychiatry and department of Oral Medicine and Radiology. Patients who were diagnosed with Anxiety or Depression by the psychiatrists using Hamilton Anxiety and Depression scale were subjected to complete oral examination to check for oral diseases like Oral Lichen Planus (OLP), Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS), and Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS). Equal number of control group subjects were also included. In this study statistically significant increase in the oral diseases in patients with anxiety and depression than the control group was recorded. Oral diseases were significantly higher in anxiety patients (20.86%) than in depression (9.04%) and control group patients (5.17%). In anxiety patients, the prevalence of RAS was 12%, OLP was 5.7%, and BMS was 2.87%. In depression patients, the prevalence of RAS was 4.02%, OLP was 2.01% and BMS was 3.01%. In control group the prevalence was 2.2%, 1.33% and 1.62% in RAS, OLP and BMS respectively. RAS and OLP were significantly higher in the younger age group (18-49) and BMS was seen between the age group of 50-77 years in both study and control groups. The results of the present study showed a positive association between psychological alterations and changes in the oral mucosa, particularly conditions like OLP, RAS and BMS. Thus psychogenic factors like anxiety and depression may act as a risk factor that could influence the initiation and development of oral mucosal diseases. Hence psychological management should be taken into consideration when treating patients with these oral diseases. Key words:Lichen planus, anxiety, depression, burning mouth syndrome, recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

  14. Absorption of Bupivacaine after Administration of a Lozenge as Topical Treatment for Pain from Oral Mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, Stine; Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Sveinsdóttir, Kolbrún; Treldal, Charlotte; Jensen, Kenneth; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Kristensen, Claus Andrup; Jacobsen, Jette; Kreilgaard, Mads; Petersen, Janne; Andersen, Ove

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to investigate systemic exposure after administration of a novel bupivacaine lozenge in healthy individuals with normal mucosa and in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients with oral mucositis. A lozenge containing 5, 10, 25 and 50 mg bupivacaine, respectively, was administered as single dose to 10 healthy individuals, and a lozenge containing 25 mg bupivacaine was administered as single dose to 10 HNC patients with oral mucositis and as multiple doses to five patients with HNC. Blood samples were collected for 6 hr from the healthy individuals and 3 hr from the patients with HNC, respectively, after administration. The plasma concentration-time profiles of bupivacaine were fitted to pharmacokinetic models using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling, evaluating demographics and health status as covariates. The population pharmacokinetics (PK) of bupivacaine lozenge was best described by a two-compartment distribution model with absorption transit compartments. All the observed plasma concentrations were well below the bupivacaine concentrations (2000-2250 ng/ml) which have caused toxic symptoms. The PK model suggested that relative bioavailability was two times higher in HNC patients with oral mucositis grade 1-2 and three times higher in HNC patients with oral mucositis grade 3-4 than in the healthy individuals. Simulations showed that the plasma concentrations would be below the toxic limit after repeated dosing every second hour with 25 mg bupivacaine for five days. The 25-mg bupivacaine lozenges were safe without systemic toxic levels of bupivacaine or risk of side effects. Based on PK simulations of repeated doses of 25 mg every two hours for 16 hr a day, the lozenges can be administered with minimum risk of exceeding the toxic limit.

  15. The mode of oral bovine lactoferrin administration influences mucosal and systemic immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfeir, Rose Mary; Dubarry, Michel; Boyaka, Prosper N; Rautureau, Michèle; Tomé, Daniel

    2004-02-01

    Food protein intake interacts with the immune system. In earlier nutritional and immunological studies, nutrients, particularly milk whey proteins, were generally administered in soluble form and by gavage. However, orogastric intubation does not represent a natural way of ingesting nutrients such as lactoferrin (Lf). We examined how different modes of oral administration of Lf could affect the regulatory effect of this molecule on intestinal and systemic immune responses. Groups of 10 female BALB/c mice were administered Lf daily for 6 wk. To address the influence of the oral modes of administration, mice were given Lf either in solution, by gastric intubation or in the drinking water, or as a powder, by buccal deposition or in the diet. Mucosal and systemic immune responses, including specific immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion, cell proliferation, and cytokine production, were analyzed and compared with those of naïve mice given water under the same conditions or positive control mice that were administered Lf by i.m. injection. The addition of Lf to the drinking water had no visible effect on the immune status. Gastric intubation, single buccal doses, and continuous doses of Lf in the diet stimulated transient systemic and intestinal antibody responses against Lf. All of these oral modes of Lf exposure biased mucosal and systemic T-cell responses toward Thelper (Th)2-types and elevated IgA production by mucosal cells. However, the less natural gastric intubation also promoted Th1-type responses as evidenced by serum IgG(2a) antibodies and the secretion of Th1 cytokine by mucosal and systemic T cells in vitro. Thus, one should carefully consider the oral mode of administration for understanding regulation of immune responses by food proteins such as Lf.

  16. S-Nitrosoglutathione Accelerates Recovery from 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeff, Maria Adriana; Brito, Gerly A. C.; de Oliveira, Marcelo G.; Braga, Cintia M.; Cavalcante, Matheus M.; Baldim, Victor; Holanda-Afonso, Rosenilde C.; Silva-Boghossian, Carina M.; Colombo, Ana Paula; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A.; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Leitão, Renata F. C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mucositis induced by anti-neoplastic drugs is an important, dose-limiting and costly side-effect of cancer therapy. Aim To evaluate the effect of the topical application of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), a nitric oxide donor, on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced oral mucositis in hamsters. Materials and Methods Oral mucositis was induced in male hamsters by two intraperitoneal administrations of 5-FU on the first and second days of the experiment (60 and 40 mg/kg, respectively) followed by mechanical trauma on the fourth day. Animals received saline, HPMC or HPMC/GSNO (0.1, 0.5 or 2.0 mM) 1 h prior to the 5-FU injection and twice a day for 10 or 14 days. Samples of cheek pouches were harvested for: histopathological analysis, TNF-α and IL-1β levels, immunohistochemical staining for iNOS, TNF-α, IL-1β, Ki67 and TGF-β RII and a TUNEL assay. The presence and levels of 39 bacterial taxa were analyzed using the Checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization method. The profiles of NO released from the HPMC/GSNO formulations were characterized using chemiluminescence. Results The HPMC/GSNO formulations were found to provide sustained release of NO for more than 4 h at concentration-dependent rates of 14 to 80 nmol/mL/h. Treatment with HPMC/GSNO (0.5 mM) significantly reduced mucosal damage, inflammatory alterations and cell death associated with 5-FU-induced oral mucositis on day 14 but not on day 10. HPMC/GSNO administration also reversed the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on cell proliferation on day 14. In addition, we observed that the chemotherapy significantly increased the levels and/or prevalence of several bacterial species. Conclusion Topical HPMC/GSNO accelerates mucosal recovery, reduces inflammatory parameters, speeds up re-epithelization and decreases levels of periodontopathic species in mucosal ulcers. PMID:25478918

  17. Significantly different proliferative potential of oral mucosal epithelial cells between six animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Makoto; Yamato, Masayuki; Takagi, Ryo; Murakami, Daisuke; Namiki, Hideo; Okano, Teruo

    2014-06-01

    There has been an upsurge in regenerative medicine in recent years. In particular, because oral mucosal epithelial cells can be obtained noninvasively, cultured epithelial cell sheets have been used in a number of ectopic transplantations. Additionally, the verification of the properties of experimental animals' cultured cells has accelerated the application of regenerative medicine. In the present study, the properties of oral mucosal epithelial cells were compared between six animal species. The human and pig epithelia were relatively thicker than the epithelia of the other species. The colony-forming efficiency of the rat was the highest, followed by those of the dog, human, rabbit, and pig, whereas the colonies of the mouse cells were all paraclone and uncountable in the colony-forming assay. We also found that the rabbit and pig cells proliferated poorly and were unable to form cell sheets without feeder layers. In contrast, even in the absence of feeder layers and cholera toxin, cultured dog and mouse cells formed contiguous sheets, when the cell seeding density was high. These results indicate that interspecies variation is considerable in oral mucosal epithelial cells and that specific experimental animal or human cells must be chosen according to the intended use. Copyright © 2013 Society of Plastics Engineers.

  18. Effects of Atractylodis Rhizoma Pharmacopuncture on an Acute Gastric Mucosal Lesion Induced by Compound 48/80 in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yun-Kyu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of Atractylodis Rhizoma pharmacopuncture (ARP against acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by compound 48/80 in rats. Methods: The ARP was injected in Joksamni (ST36 and Jungwan (CV12 1 hr before treatment with compound 48/80. The animals were sacrificed under anesthesia 3 hrs after treatment with compound 48/80. The stomachs were removed, and the amounts of gastric adherent mucus, gastric mucosal hexosamine, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, xanthine oxidase (XO, and superoxide dismutase (SOD were measured. Also, histological examination were performed. Results: Gastric adherent mucus, gastric mucosal hexosamine and histological defects of gastric mucosa declined significantly after ARP treatment. Changes in gastric mucosal TBARS were also reduced by ARP treatment, but this result was not statistically significant. ARP treatment did not change the XO and the SOD activities. Conclusions: ARP showed protective effects for acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by compound 48/80 in rats. These results suggest that ARP may have protective effects for gastritis.

  19. Endoscopic mucosal resection in colorectal lesion: a safe and effective procedure even in lesions larger than 2 cm and in carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Oliveira dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Endoscopic mucosal resection is a minimally invasive technique used in the treatment of colorectal neoplasms, including early carcinomas of different size and morphology. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate procedure safety, efficacy, outcomes, and recurrence rate in endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal lesions. METHODS: A total of 172 lesions in 156 patients were analyzed between May 2003 and May 2009. All lesions showed pit pattern suggestive of neoplasia (Kudo types III-V at high-magnification chromocolonoscopy with indigo carmine. The lesions were evaluated for macroscopic classification, size, location, and histopathology. Lesions 20 mm or smaller were resected en bloc and lesions larger than 20 mm were removed using the piecemeal technique. Complications and recurrence were analyzed. Patients were followed up for 18 months. RESULTS: There were 83 (48.2% superficial lesions, 57 (33.1% depressed lesions, 44 (25.6% laterally spreading tumors, and 45 (26.2% protruding lesions. Mean lesion size was 11.5 mm ± 9.6 mm (2 mm-60 mm. Patients' mean age was 61.6 ± 12.5 years (34-93 years. Regarding lesion site, 24 (14.0% lesions were located in the rectum, 68 (39.5% in the left colon, and 80 (46.5% in the right colon (transverse, ascending, and cecum. There were 167 (97.1% neoplasms: 142 (82.5% adenomatous lesions, 24 (14.0% intramucosal carcinomas, and 1 (0.6% invasive carcinoma. En bloc resection was performed in 158 (91.9% cases and piecemeal resection in 14 (8.1%. Bleeding occurred in 5 (2.9% cases. Recurrence was observed in 4.1% (5/122 of cases and was associated with lesions larger than 20 mm (P<0.01, piecemeal resection (P<0.01, advanced neoplasm (P = 0.01, and carcinoma compared to adenoma (P = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal lesions is a safe and effective procedure, with low complication and local recurrence rates. Recurrence is associated with lesions larger than 20 mm and carcinomas.

  20. Computer aided detection of oral lesions on CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galib, S.; Islam, F.; Abir, M.; Lee, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oral lesions are important findings on computed tomography (CT) images. In this study, a fully automatic method to detect oral lesions in mandibular region from dental CT images is proposed. Two methods were developed to recognize two types of lesions namely (1) Close border (CB) lesions and (2) Open border (OB) lesions, which cover most of the lesion types that can be found on CT images. For the detection of CB lesions, fifteen features were extracted from each initial lesion candidates and multi layer perceptron (MLP) neural network was used to classify suspicious regions. Moreover, OB lesions were detected using a rule based image processing method, where no feature extraction or classification algorithm were used. The results were validated using a CT dataset of 52 patients, where 22 patients had abnormalities and 30 patients were normal. Using non-training dataset, CB detection algorithm yielded 71% sensitivity with 0.31 false positives per patient. Furthermore, OB detection algorithm achieved 100% sensitivity with 0.13 false positives per patient. Results suggest that, the proposed framework, which consists of two methods, has the potential to be used in clinical context, and assist radiologists for better diagnosis.

  1. A Novel Peptide to Treat Oral Mucositis Blocks Endothelial and Epithelial Cell Apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xiaoyan; Chen Peili [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sonis, Stephen T. [Division of Oral Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biomodels, Watertown, Massachusetts (United States); Lingen, Mark W. [Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Berger, Ann [NephRx Corporation, Kalamazoo, Michigan (United States); Toback, F. Gary, E-mail: gtoback@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: No effective agents currently exist to treat oral mucositis (OM) in patients receiving chemoradiation for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer. We identified a novel 21-amino acid peptide derived from antrum mucosal protein-18 that is cytoprotective, mitogenic, and motogenic in tissue culture and animal models of gastrointestinal epithelial cell injury. We examined whether administration of antrum mucosal protein peptide (AMP-p) could protect against and/or speed recovery from OM. Methods and Materials: OM was induced in established hamster models by a single dose of radiation, fractionated radiation, or fractionated radiation together with cisplatin to simulate conventional treatments of head-and-neck cancer. Results: Daily subcutaneous administration of AMP-p reduced the occurrence of ulceration and accelerated mucosal recovery in all three models. A delay in the onset of erythema after irradiation was observed, suggesting that a protective effect exists even before injury to mucosal epithelial cells occurs. To test this hypothesis, the effects of AMP-p on tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced apoptosis were studied in an endothelial cell line (human dermal microvascular endothelial cells) as well as an epithelial cell line (human adult low-calcium, high-temperature keratinocytes; HaCaT) used to model the oral mucosa. AMP-p treatment, either before or after cell monolayers were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, protected against development of apoptosis in both cell types when assessed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry or ligase-mediated polymerase chain reaction. Conclusions: These observations suggest that the ability of AMP-p to attenuate radiation-induced OM could be attributable, at least in part, to its antiapoptotic activity.

  2. Loss of Ab-nerve endings associated with the Merkel cell-neurite complex in the lesional oral mucosa epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniela Caldero n Carrio n; Yu ksel Korkmaz; Britta Cho; Marion Kopp; Wilhelm Bloch; Klaus Addicks; Wilhelm Niedermeier

    2016-01-01

    The Merkel cell-neurite complex initiates the perception of touch and mediates Ab slowly adapting type I responses. Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease with T-cell-mediated inflammation, whereas hyperkeratosis is characterized with or without epithelial dysplasia in the oral mucosa. To determine the effects of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis on the Merkel cell-neurite complex, healthy oral mucosal epithelium and lesional oral mucosal epithelium of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis patients were stained by immunohistochemistry (the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex and double immunofluorescence methods) using pan cytokeratin, 20 (K20, a Merkel cell marker), and neurofilament 200 (NF200, a myelinated Ab- and Ad-nerve fibre marker) antibodies. NF200-immunoreactive (ir) nerve fibres in healthy tissues and in the lesional oralmucosa epitheliumof lichen planus and hyperkeratosis were counted and statistically analysed. In the healthy oral mucosa, K20-positive Merkel cells with and without close association to the intraepithelial NF200-ir nerve fibres were detected. In the lesional oral mucosa of lichen planus and hyperkeratosis patients, extremely rare NF200-ir nerve fibres were detected only in the lamina propria. Compared with healthy tissues, lichen planus and hyperkeratosis tissues had significantly decreased numbers of NF200-ir nerve fibres in the oral mucosal epithelium. Lichen planus and hyperkeratosis were associated with the absence of Ab-nerve endings in the oral mucosal epithelium. Thus, we conclude that mechanosensation mediated by the Merkel cell-neurite complex in the oral mucosal epithelium is impaired in lichen planus and hyperkeratosis.

  3. New developments and opportunities in oral mucosal drug delivery for local and systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearnden, Vanessa; Sankar, Vidya; Hull, Katrusha; Juras, Danica Vidović; Greenberg, Martin; Kerr, A Ross; Lockhart, Peter B; Patton, Lauren L; Porter, Stephen; Thornhill, Martin H

    2012-01-01

    The oral mucosa's accessibility, excellent blood supply, by-pass of hepatic first-pass metabolism, rapid repair and permeability profile make it an attractive site for local and systemic drug delivery. Technological advances in mucoadhesives, sustained drug release, permeability enhancers and drug delivery vectors are increasing the efficient delivery of drugs to treat oral and systemic diseases. When treating oral diseases, these advances result in enhanced therapeutic efficacy, reduced drug wastage and the prospect of using biological agents such as genes, peptides and antibodies. These technologies are also increasing the repertoire of drugs that can be delivered across the oral mucosa to treat systemic diseases. Trans-mucosal delivery is now a favoured route for non-parenteral administration of emergency drugs and agents where a rapid onset of action is required. Furthermore, advances in drug delivery technology are bringing forward the likelihood of transmucosal systemic delivery of biological agents.

  4. Prevención de mucositis oral en pacientes sometidos a trasplante de precursores hematopoyéticos

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia del Pilar Bohórquez Ávila; Carolina Marín Restrepo; Liced Álvarez Lozano

    2011-01-01

    La mucositis oral es una complicación de la quimio y/o radioterapia por los efectos citotóxico e inflamatorio sobre la mucosa oral. Hasta el momento las estrategias para la prevención y/o el tratamiento de esta condición no han conseguido un resultado contundente. Se ha establecido que algunas variables dependientes del paciente pueden incidir en la presentación y el curso de la mucositis oral, como altos niveles de placa bacteriana. Objetivo: Elaborar y aplicar un protocolo de cuidado oral p...

  5. Effects of aging on apoptosis gene expression in oral mucosal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Octavio A; Novak, M John; Kirakodu, Sreenatha; Stromberg, Arnold J; Shen, Shu; Orraca, Luis; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2013-03-01

    Apoptotic processes are important for physiologic renewal of an intact epithelial barrier and contribute some antimicrobial resistance for bacteria and viruses, as well as anti-inflammatory effects that benefits the mucosa. The oral cavity presents a model of host-bacterial interactions at mucosal surfaces, in which a panoply of microorganisms colonizes various niches in the oral cavity and creates complex multispecies biofilms that challenge the gingival tissues. This report details gene expression in apoptotic pathways that occur in oral mucosal tissues across the lifespan, using a nonhuman primate model. Macaca mulatta primates from 2 to 23 years of age (n = 23) were used in a cross-sectional study to obtain clinical healthy gingival tissues specimens. Further, mRNA was prepared and evaluated using the Affymetrix Rhesus GeneChip and 88 apoptotic pathway genes were evaluated. The results identified significant positive correlations with age in 12 genes and negative correlations with an additional five genes. The gene effects were predicted to alter apoptosis receptor levels, extrinsic apoptotic pathways through caspases, cytokine effects on apoptotic events, Ca(+2)-induced death signaling, cell cycle checkpoints, and potential effects of survival factors. Both the positively and negatively correlated genes within the apoptotic pathways provided evidence that healthy tissues in aging animals exhibit decreased apoptotic potential compared to younger animals. The results suggested that decreased physiologic apoptotic process in the dynamic septic environment of the oral mucosal tissues could increase the risk of aging tissues to undergo destructive disease processes through dysregulated inflammatory responses to the oral microbial burden.

  6. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia: A review of oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Premraj

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is a histological reactive pattern of surface epithelium in response to various stimuli from the underlying connective tissue which frequently mimics squamous cell carcinoma. So, differentiation of this entity is of utmost important in the view of treatment planning and approach. This review focuses on those lesions which are encountered in the head and neck region and also the recent concepts related to it.

  7. Regression of oral lichenoid lesions after replacement of dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårell, L; Tillberg, A; Widman, L; Bergdahl, J; Berglund, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prognosis and to evaluate the regression of lichenoid contact reactions (LCR) and oral lichen planus (OLP) after replacement of dental restorative materials suspected as causing the lesions. Forty-four referred patients with oral lesions participated in a follow-up study that was initiated an average of 6 years after the first examination at the Department of Odontology, i.e. the baseline examination. The patients underwent odontological clinical examination and answered a questionnaire with questions regarding dental health, medical and psychological health, and treatments undertaken from baseline to follow-up. After exchange of dental materials, regression of oral lesions was significantly higher among patients with LCR than with OLP. As no cases with OLP regressed after an exchange of materials, a proper diagnosis has to be made to avoid unnecessary exchanges of intact restorations on patients with OLP.

  8. Oral verrucous lesions: Controversies in diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, D; Goel, M; Kumar, S; Pandey, R; Ram, Hari

    2012-01-01

    Oral verrucous lesions, typically presenting as slowly enlarging, grey or white, warty, exophytic overgrowths on the buccal mucosa or gingiva may be verrucous carcinoma (VC), verrucous hyperplasia (VH), proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL), or may show the conventional invasive pattern of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This study was undertaken with the aim to report the demography of different types of oral verrucous lesions and evaluate their long-term outcome. This clinical study comprised 15 patients with verrucous lesions of the oral cavity who underwent biopsy for confirmation of diagnosis. Among these, 12 (80%) were male and only three (20%) were female. The age distribution ranged from 32 to 74 years with a median age of 45 years at the time of diagnosis. The most common site of VC within the oral cavity was the buccal mucosa (46.7%). 5 were proven cases of VC, 3 PVL and 7 VH. All cases of VH, PVL were managed by surgical excision, while VC was managed by surgical excision with superficial ostectomy followed by two cycles of chemotherapy additionally, if micro-invasion was observed on histopathological examination. The 2-year overall survival and tumour control rate was 93.4%. Recurrence was not seen in any patient till the time of analysis at a follow up of 3-5 years. Accurate diagnosis of the verrucous lesions is important and should be differentiated from grade I squamous cell carcinoma. Management should be based upon the nature, behaviour and malignant potential of the lesion.

  9. Biochemical evaluation of the therapeutic effectiveness of honey in oral mucosal ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Nergiz; Nisbet, Ozlem; Nisbet, Cevat; Ceylan, Gözlem; Hoşgör, Fatih; Dede, O Doğu

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and quantify the therapeutic value of honey in oral mucosal ulcers healing in comparison with Glyceroloxytriester (TGO). We also aimed to biochemically evaluate the healing effects of honey which had been collected from the Blacksea region flora on mucosal ulcers resulting in material loss.Thirty wistar rats (240+/-30 g) were enrolled in this study. Excisional wounds were performed in all rats for animal oral mucosal ulcer model. They were randomly allocated to three groups: group 1 was treated with Apitherapeutic agent or honey (0,1 ml, 2x1), group 2 was treated with TGO (0,1ml, 2x1) locally, Group 3 served as the control group.Following the surgical procedure on day 7, biopsy specimens were taken from right buccal mucosa and on day 14 biopsy specimens were taken from left bucal mucosa in all rats. Afterwards, hydroxy pyroline levels were measured. Data were analyzed statistically.There was no statistically significant difference between Group 1 and 2, and also between Group 2 and 3, but there was statistically significant difference between Group 1 and 3 on day 7. There was no statistically significant difference between Group 1, 2 and 3 on day 14.

  10. Association between oral health and gastric precancerous lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Christian R.; Francois, Fritz; Li, Yihong; Corby, Patricia; Hays, Rosemary; Leung, Celine; Bedi, Sukhleen; Segers, Stephanie; Queiroz, Erica; SUN, JINGHUA; Wang, Beverly; Ho, Hao; Craig, Ronald; Cruz, Gustavo D.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Although recent studies have suggested that tooth loss is positively related to the risk of gastric non-cardia cancer, the underlying oral health conditions potentially responsible for the association remain unknown. We investigated whether clinical and behavioral measures of oral health are associated with the risk of gastric precancerous lesions. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 131 patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Cases were defined as those with gastric precanc...

  11. Influence of denture plaque biofilm on oral mucosal membrane in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowska, D; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Rolski, D; Swoboda-Kopeć, E

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have the lower airways colonized with pathogenic bacteria in a stable period of the disease and during exacerbations. The etiology of bacterial exacerbations of COPD depends on the underlying disease, the frequency of exacerbations and antibiotic therapy. Microorganisms can be aspirated off the denture plaque biofilm into the lower respiratory tract and could reduce the patient's immunity and cause pneumonia. COPD patients, who are using acrylic dentures in oral cavity, are exposed to denture stomatitis and oral candidiasis. The aim of this study was to establish the composition of denture plaque biofilm and its impact on the oral mucosa in COPD patients. The study included patients in a stable phase of COPD using removable denture and the control group included healthy wearer's appliances. Examinations concerned the oral mucosal membrane and the hygienic condition of prosthetic restorations. Microbiological examinations were performed by taking a direct swab from the surface of acrylic dentures. Seventeen bacterial and fungal strains were isolated from denture plaque of COPD patients, which could be a reservoir of pathogens in the upper and lower airways. The results showed a greater frequency of prosthetic stomatitis complicated by mucosal infections among COPD patients compared to healthy subjects.

  12. Risk factors of HIV-related oral lesions in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Noel Marzano Rodrigues Petruzzi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk factors in the occurrence of oral lesions in HIV-positive adults. METHODS: A retrospective analytical-descriptive survey was conducted using the medical/dental records of 534 patients with oral lesions associated with HIV. The data were collected from five referral centers for managing HIV and associated comorbidities in the city of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil, between 1996 and 2011. Using a standardized form, socio-demographic and clinical data were recorded. Exclusively and definitively diagnosed oral pathologies were included and classified according to ECC criteria on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. For data analysis cross-tabulations, Chi-squared tests and logistic regression models were used where appropriate. RESULTS: CD4+ counts lower than 350 cells/mm³ (p < 0.001, alcohol consumption (p = 0.011 and female gender (p = 0.031 were predisposing factors for oral candidiasis. The occurrence of hairy leukoplakia was independently associated with CD4+ counts below 500 cells/mm³, (p = 0.029 a viral load above 5,000 copies/mm³ (p = 0.003 and smoking (p = 0.005. CONCLUSIONS: Moderate and severe degrees of immunodeficiency and detectable viral loads were risk factors for the onset of oral lesions. Smoking and alcohol consumption also increased susceptibility to the development of opportunistic infections in HIV-positive adults from Porto Alegre, irrespective of the use of antiretroviral therapy.

  13. A Contemporary Approach to Classify Ghost Cells Comprising Oral Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sumit Kumar; Narwal, Anjali; Devi, Anju

    2015-01-01

    Ghost cells are swollen eosinophilic epithelial cells that have lost their nuclei but retain the cellular and nuclear outline. Pathologic ghost cell formation could be the process of aberrant keratinization or the result of coagulative necrosis. Ghost cells have been described in several odontogenic lesions, which include calcifying epithelial odontogenic cysts or tumours like odontomas, ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and ameloblastomas. This article present a view on the formation of ghost cells with proposal/introduction of a classification for ghost cell lesions of the oral cavity in an attempt to organize these lesions for the better understanding and academic purpose. PMID:26501039

  14. The Prospective Oral Mucositis Audit: relationship of severe oral mucositis with clinical and medical resource use outcomes in patients receiving high-dose melphalan or BEAM-conditioning chemotherapy and autologous SCT.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, S.; Schwenkglenks, M.; Bacon, P.; Einsele, H.; D'Addio, A.; Maertens, J.; Niederwieser, D.; Rabitsch, W.; Roosaar, A.; Ruutu, T.; Schouten, H.; Stone, R.; Vorkurka, S.; Quinn, B.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The Prospective Oral Mucositis Audit was an observational study in 197 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) undergoing, respectively, high-dose melphalan or BEAM chemotherapy and autologous SCT at 25 European centres. We evaluated the relationship between severe oral m

  15. Sex differences in upper respiratory symptoms prevalence and oral-respiratory mucosal immunity in endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cheng-Shiun; Bishop, Nicolette C; Handzlik, Michal K; Muhamad, Ayu S; Gleeson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine sex differences in oral-respiratory mucosal immunity and the incidence, severity and duration of upper respiratory symptoms (URS) episodes in endurance athletes during a 16-week winter training period. Blood was collected from 210 subjects (147 men and 63 women) at the start and end of the study for determination of differential leukocyte counts. Timed collections of unstimulated saliva were obtained at the start and at 4-week intervals during the study period. Saliva samples were analysed for salivary antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs). Weekly training and daily illness logs were kept using validated questionnaires. Training loads averaged 11 h/week of moderate-vigorous physical activity and were not different for males and females. The salivary concentration of lysozyme and lactoferrin (both P mucosal immunity may, in part, account for this.

  16. 1H NMR Metabolic Profiling of Biofluids from Rats with Gastric Mucosal Lesion and Electroacupuncture Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric mucosal lesion (GML is a common gastrointestinal disorder with multiple pathogenic mechanisms in clinical practice. In traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, electroacupuncture (EA treatment has been proven as an effective therapy for GML, although the underlying healing mechanism is not yet clear. Here, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance- (1H NMR- based metabolomic method to investigate the metabolic perturbation induced by GML and the therapeutic effect of EA treatment on stomach meridian (SM acupoints. Clear metabolic differences were observed between GML and control groups, and related metabolic pathways were discussed by means of online metabolic network analysis toolbox. By comparing the endogenous metabolites from GML and GML-SM groups, the disturbed pathways were partly recovered towards healthy state via EA treated on SM acupoints. Further comparison of the metabolic variations induced by EA stimulated on SM and the control gallbladder meridian (GM acupoints showed a quite similar metabolite composition except for increased phenylacetylglycine, 3,4-dihydroxymandelate, and meta-hydroxyphenylacetate and decreased N-methylnicotinamide in urine from rats with EA treated on SM acupoints. The current study showed the potential application of metabolomics in providing further insight into the molecular mechanism of acupuncture.

  17. Mucosal disease-like lesions in sheep infected with Border disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monies, R J; Paton, D J; Vilcek, S

    2004-12-11

    An enteric disease characterised by diarrhoea and ill thrift affected 12 of a flock of 700 six- to 12-month-old ewe lambs in Cornwall between December 1996 and September 1997. The affected lambs were undersized, became thin and suffered an unremitting diarrhoea until they died. The illness lasted for three to 14 days, although, with hindsight, the owner considered that the lambs had been below average size before the enteric signs developed. The outbreak ceased only as a result of the dispersal sale of the flock as breeding ewes. The flock had been purchased from different sources, but 11 of the cases occurred in a group of 40 purchased from one source. Postmortem, the alimentary changes resembled mucosal disease in cattle, and immunostaining of histological sections of the affected tissues revealed pestiviral antigen. Non-cytopathic pestiviruses were isolated from the lesions of two of the affected lambs and from the blood of several clinically normal ewe lambs from the same group. All the pestivirus isolates were typed as Border disease virus.

  18. Modulation of radiation-induced oral mucositis by pentoxifylline: Preclinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Sylvia; Bozsaky, Eva [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Schmidt, Margret [Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Dresden; Wolfram, Kathrin; Haagen, Julia; Habelt, Bettina; Puttrich, Martin [Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Technical University of Dresden, Dept. Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-10-29

    Oral mucositis is a frequent early side effect of radio(chemo)therapy of head-and-neck malignancies. The epithelial radiation response is accompanied by inflammatory reactions; their interaction with epithelial processes remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) on the oral mucosal radiation response in the mouse tongue model. Irradiation comprised fractionation (5 fractions of 3 Gy/week) over 1 (days 0-4) or 2 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11), followed by graded local top-up doses (day 7/14), in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. PTX (15 mg/kg subcutaneously) was applied once daily over varying time intervals. Ulceration of mouse tongue epithelium, corresponding to confluent mucositis, was analyzed as the clinically relevant endpoint. With fractionated irradiation over 1 week, PTX administration significantly reduced the incidence of mucosal reactions when initiated before (day - 5) the onset of fractionation; a trend was observed for start of PTX treatment on day 0. Similarly, PTX treatment combined with 2 weeks of fractionation had a significant effect on ulcer incidence in all but one experiment. This clearly illustrates the potential of PTX to ameliorate oral mucositis during daily fractionated irradiation. PTX resulted in a significant reduction of oral mucositis during fractionated irradiation, which may be attributed to stimulation of mucosal repopulation processes. The biological basis of this effect, however, needs to be clarified in further, detailed mechanistic studies. (orig.) [German] Die orale Mukositis ist eine haeufige fruehe Nebenwirkung der Radio(chemo)therapie von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Die epitheliale Strahlenreaktion wird von Entzuendungserscheinungen begleitet; deren Interaktion mit epithelialen Prozessen ist derzeit unklar. Ziel der vorliegenden Untersuchung war die quantitative Erfassung des Effekts einer Behandlung mit Pentoxifyllin (PTX) auf die Strahlenreaktion der Mundschleimhaut

  19. Hypothermia Improves Oral and Gastric Mucosal Microvascular Oxygenation during Hemorrhagic Shock in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Vollmer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothermia is known to improve tissue function in different organs during physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of hypothermia on oral and gastric mucosal microvascular oxygenation (μHbO2 and perfusion (μflow under physiological and hemorrhagic conditions. Five dogs were repeatedly anesthetized. All animals underwent each experimental protocol (randomized cross-over design: hypothermia (34°C, hypothermia during hemorrhage, normothermia, and normothermia during hemorrhage. Microcirculatory and hemodynamic variables were recorded. Systemic (DO2 and oral mucosal (μDO2 oxygen delivery were calculated. Hypothermia increased oral μHbO2 with no effect on gastric μHbO2. Hemorrhage reduced oral and gastric μHbO2 during normothermia (−36 ± 4% and −27 ± 7%; however, this effect was attenuated during additional hypothermia (−15 ± 5% and −11 ± 5%. The improved μHbO2 might be based on an attenuated reduction in μflow during hemorrhage and additional hypothermia (−51 ± 21 aU compared to hemorrhage and normothermia (−106 ± 19 aU. μDO2 was accordingly attenuated under hypothermia during hemorrhage whereas DO2 did not change. Thus, in this study hypothermia alone improves oral μHbO2 and attenuates the effects of hemorrhage on oral and gastric μHbO2. This effect seems to be mediated by an increased μDO2 on the basis of increased μflow.

  20. [Association of oral lesions with HIV serological status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Irigoyen-Camacho, Esther; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; González-Ramírez, Imelda

    2002-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of oral lesions and its association with HIV serological status. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted between 1998 and 1999 in Mexico City, among 512 subjects attending two information centers of Centro Nacional para la Prevención del VIH/SIDA e ITS (CONASIDA, National Center for Prevention of HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections) for HIV serologic testing. The oral examination was performed without knowledge of the HIV status. Statistical analysis was conducted using Student's t test, Fisher's exact test and the chi 2 test; odds ratios and 95% CI were also calculated. A total of 512 individuals were examined, 68 of whom were HIV-positive. HIV-related oral lesions (OL), were evident in 65% (44/68) of the HIV-positive individuals; 95% of them consisted in oral candidosis (OC) and hairy leukoplakia (HL). OC and HL were strongly associated with seropositivity to HIV. OC and HL were the oral lesions most strongly associated to HIV seropositivity. The English version of this paper is available at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html.

  1. Effects of epimedium polysaccharide-propolis flavone oral liquid on mucosal immunity in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolan; Chen, Xingying; Qiu, Shulei; Hu, Yuanliang; Jiang, Chunmao; Wang, Deyun; Fan, Qiang; Zhang, Cunshuai; Huang, Yee; Yu, Yun; Yang, Haifeng; Liu, Cui; Gao, Zhenzhen; Hou, Ranran; Li, Xiuping

    2014-03-01

    A previous study found that epimedium polysaccharide (EP)-propolis flavonoid (PF) injection (EPI) produced reliable immunoenhancement. In this study, we investigate the effects of EP-PF oral liquid (EFO) on mucosal immunity in the chicken small intestine while using EPI, EP and PF as controls. Groups of fourteen-day-old chickens were given EFO orally at one of the three doses when they were vaccinated with ND vaccine. On days 7, 21 and 35 after the first vaccination, six chickens were selected randomly from each group for measurements of the sIgA and IL-17 contents of the washing liquors of the duodenum and jejunum, counts of the lymphocytes in the duodenal endothelium and counts of the IgA(+) cells in the jejunal endothelium and cecum tonsil. The results indicated that EFO significantly promoted the secretion of sIgA and IL-17 and increased the numbers of lymphocyte and IgA(+) cells. Furthermore, EFO was more efficient than EPI at the high and medium doses. These findings indicate that EPO may enhance intestinal mucosal immunity and may be exploited as an oral immunopotentiator.

  2. Regeneration of Vocal Fold Mucosa Using Tissue-Engineered Structures with Oral Mucosal Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mioko Fukahori

    Full Text Available Scarred vocal folds result in irregular vibrations during phonation due to stiffness of the vocal fold mucosa. To date, a completely satisfactory corrective procedure has yet to be achieved. We hypothesize that a potential treatment option for this disease is to replace scarred vocal folds with organotypic mucosa. The purpose of this study is to regenerate vocal fold mucosa using a tissue-engineered structure with autologous oral mucosal cells.Animal experiment using eight beagles (including three controls.A 3 mm by 3 mm specimen of canine oral mucosa was surgically excised and divided into epithelial and subepithelial tissues. Epithelial cells and fibroblasts were isolated and cultured separately. The proliferated epithelial cells were co-cultured on oriented collagen gels containing the proliferated fibroblasts for an additional two weeks. The organotypic cultured tissues were transplanted to the mucosa-deficient vocal folds. Two months after transplantation, vocal fold vibrations and morphological characteristics were observed.A tissue-engineered vocal fold mucosa, consisting of stratified epithelium and lamina propria, was successfully fabricated to closely resemble the normal layered vocal fold mucosa. Laryngeal stroboscopy revealed regular but slightly small mucosal waves at the transplanted site. Immunohistochemically, stratified epithelium expressed cytokeratin, and the distributed cells in the lamina propria expressed vimentin. Elastic Van Gieson staining revealed a decreased number of elastic fibers in the lamina propria of the transplanted site.The fabricated mucosa with autologous oral mucosal cells successfully restored the vocal fold mucosa. This reconstruction technique could offer substantial clinical advantages for treating intractable diseases such as scarring of the vocal folds.

  3. Biphasic effects of histamine on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions: Studies with betahistine, dimaprit, (R). alpha. -methylhistamine and nizatidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, R.E.; Palitzsch, K.D.; Szabo, S. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1991-03-15

    In elucidating further the role that histamine (H) may play in gastroprotection against hemorrhagic mucosal lesions (HML) induced by ethanol (E), fasted S-D rats were treated with subcutaneous (s.c.) H 10, 15, 20 and 30 min before intragastric (i.g.) 100% E or H-agonists betahistine (H1) or dimaprit (H2) i.g. 30 min. before 75% E. All animals were killed 1 hr after E, HML were measured with stereomicrosopic planimetry and expressed as % of glandular stomach. The H2 antagonist nizatidine did not influence the extent of HML. As a follow up to previously reported nizatidine blockade of H2-induced gastroprotection against 75% E, nizatidine + H1 or nizatidine + H3 agonist (R){alpha}-methylhistamine was also tested. The H2 antagonist nizatidine abolished the gastroprotection by H3 but did not influence the H1-induced reduction of HML. H injected s.c. showed a dose- and time-dependent biphasic effect on E-induced gastric mucosal lesions. Both H1- and H2-agonists injected s.c. reduced the E-induced damage. Nizatidine alone failed to influence mucosal lesions, blocked gastroprotection induced by H2 or H3, but not by H1 agonists.

  4. Mucosal lesions may be a minor complication of SAPHO syndrome: a study of 11 Japanese patients with SAPHO syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Hiroki; Ohshima, Hisaji; Takano, Yoji; Koyanagi, Takahiro; Usui, Hiroshi; Nojiri, Kenya; Ochi, Kensuke; Kihara, Michiya; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2010-08-01

    Since the term synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome was proposed by Chamot et al. (Rev Rhum Mal Osteoartic 54:187-196, 1987), clinical reviews concerning this syndrome have been mainly reported from Europe. We carried out a retrospective analysis of 11 Japanese patients with SAPHO syndrome, and reviewed the clinical features of our series in comparison with those in a European large case study. In this study the major features of SAPHO syndrome were chronic osteitis of the anterior chest wall and pustulotic arthro-ostitis with middle age onset, and mucosal lesions seemed to be a minor complication of SAPHO syndrome. The non-erosive peripheral large joints arthritis and the particular HLA types (HLA-B51, B52, or A26), which had been reported to be increased in Behcet's disease, were frequently seen in SAPHO syndrome with mucosal lesions. This study also suggests that SAPHO syndrome with mucosal lesions may be part of a broader disease spectrum including Behcet's disease.

  5. Oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid lesions; a critical appraisal with emphasis on the diagnostic aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, I.

    2009-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) has a prevalence of approximately 1%. The etiopathogenesis is poorly understood. The annual malignant transformation is less than 0.5%. There are no effective means to either predict or to prevent such event. Oral lesions may occur that to some extent look like lichen planus

  6. Mineral derivatives in alleviating oral mucositis during cancer therapy: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Lee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Oral mucositis (mouth ulcers is a cancer therapy side effect. Costly treatment interventions are often neglected in favor of cost-effective agents. This review assessed the general efficacy of mineral derivatives (a cost-effective agent in alleviating oral mucositis (OM during cancer therapy compared to the standard care, or placebo—including a decision tree to aide healthcare workers.Data Sources. Electronic searches of MEDLINE via OVID, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CANCERLIT via PubMed, and CINAHL via EBSCO (year 2000 to 11 September 2014 were undertaken for randomised controlled trials. A meta-search strategy extracted content from aggregate online databases.Review Methods. Randomized controlled trials were assessed (participants, intervention, outcome, results, and risk of bias for inclusion. The author abstracted binary and continuous data synthesised to Hedges’ g in a random effects model. The primary outcome measures were severity (incidence of peak oral mucositis, duration of oral mucositis, and time to onset; secondary outcome measures were the incidence of pain, and analgesic use. Serum mineral levels, total parenteral nutrition, and adverse events were discussed. The decision tree was mapped using sensitivity, specificity, pre-test and post-test Bayesian probability.Results. 1027 citations were identified and 16 studies were included (n = 1120; mean age 49 years. Cancer therapies consisted of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, chemo-radiotherapy, or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Outcome mineral derivatives were zinc (n = 549, calcium phosphate (n = 227, povidone-iodine (n = 228, or selenium (n = 116. Severity was measured across variable OM grading systems: In 13 studies, individuals in treatment groups (n = 958 experienced peak OM less than controls (g = −0.47, 95% CI −0.7 to −0.2, p = 0.0006; time to OM onset was significantly delayed in treatment than controls (g = −0.51, 95% CI−0.8 to −0.2, p = 0.0002; five

  7. Effect of Oral Zinc Sulphate in Preventionof Radiation Induced OropharyngealMucositis During and After Radiotherapyin Patients with Head and Neck Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadianpanah

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Mucositis is a disturbing side effect of radiotherapy treatment forhead and neck cancer. To date, no effective modality for its prophylaxis and treatmenthas been found. We performed this study to evaluate the efficacy of oral zincsulphate in delaying the onset of oral and pharyngeal mucositis and decreasing theirseverity.Materials and Methods: Atotal of 58 patients who were treated for head andneck squamous cell carcinoma with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy wererandomly assigned to receive oral zinc sulphate (220 mg or an oral placebo 3 timesa day during their radiotherapy course. Total radiation dose was 6000 cGy to 7000cGy by conventional radiotherapy. Seventy nine percent of the patients also receivedconcurrent chemotherapy. Oral and pharyngeal mucositis were scored according toan RTOG protocol. Results:Time to onset of mucositis did not vary between the two groups.However, oral mucositis scores were less severe in the zinc group in weeks 4 to 6.The difference was statistically significant and the Pvalues for weeks 4, 5 and 6 were0.02, 0.007, and 0.012, respectively. Treatment interruptions in both groups were thesame (four cases each and all were due to dysphagia (pharyngeal mucositis.Conclusion:Our results suggest that zinc is effective in reducing the severity oforal mucositis but not pharyngeal mucositis. Treatment interruptions were morefrequently caused by pharyngeal mucositis which presented as dysphagia, rather thanoral pain that was a manifestation of oral mucositis.

  8. Dental implants in patients with oral mucosal diseases - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichart, P A; Schmidt-Westhausen, A M; Khongkhunthian, P; Strietzel, F P

    2016-05-01

    To reveal dental implants survival rates in patients with oral mucosal diseases: oral lichen planus (OLP), Sjögren's syndrome (SjS), epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). A systematic literature search using PubMed/Medline and Embase databases, utilising MeSH and search term combinations identified publications on clinical use implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in patients with OLP, SjS, EB, SSc reporting on study design, number, gender and age of patients, follow-up period exceeding 12 months, implant survival rate, published in English between 1980 and May 2015. After a mean observation period (mOP) of 53·9 months (standard deviation [SD] ±18·3), 191 implants in 57 patients with OLP showed a survival rate (SR) of 95·3% (SD ±21·2). For 17 patients with SjS (121 implants, mOP 48·6 ± 28·7 months), 28 patients with EB (165 implants, mOP 38·3 ± 16·9 months) and five patients with SSc (38 implants, mOP 38·3 ± 16·9 months), the respective SR was 91·7 ± 5·97% (SjS), 98·5 ± 2·7% (EB) and 97·4 ± 4·8% (SSc). Heterogeneity of data structure and quality of reporting outcomes did not allow for further comparative data analysis. For implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of patients suffering from OLP, SjS, EB and SSc, no evidence-based treatment guidelines are presently available. However, no strict contraindication for the placement of implants seems to be justified in patients with OLP, SjS, EB nor SSc. Implant survival rates are comparable to those of patients without oral mucosal diseases. Treatment guidelines as for dental implantation in patients with healthy oral mucosa should be followed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Oral mucosal injection of a local anesthetic solution containing epinephrine enhances muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Asako; Terakawa, Yui; Matsuura, Nobuyuki; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how submucosal injection of a clinically relevant dose of a lidocaine hydrochloride solution containing epinephrine affects the muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium bromide. Sixteen patients scheduled for orthognathic surgery participated in this study. All patients were induced with fentanyl citrate, a target-controlled infusion of propofol and rocuronium bromide. Anesthesia was maintained by total intravenous anesthesia. After nasotracheal intubation, an infusion of rocuronium bromide was started at 7 µg/kg/min, and the infusion rate was then adjusted to maintain a train of four (TOF) ratio at 10 to 15%. The TOF ratio just prior to oral mucosal injection of a 1% lidocaine hydrochloride solution containing 10 µg/mL epinephrine (LE) was taken as the baseline. TOF ratio was observed for 20 minutes, with 1-minute intervals following the start of injection. Mean epinephrine dose was 85.6 ± 18.6 µg and mean infusion rate of rocuronium bromide was 6.3 ± 1.6 µg/kg/min. TOF ratio began to decrease 2 minutes after the injection of LE, reached the minimum value at 3.1 ± 3.6% 12 minutes after the injection, and then began to recover. We conclude that oral mucosal injection of LE enhances the muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium bromide.

  10. Low-dose irradiation affects the functional behavior of oral microbiota in the context of mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoecke, Barbara W A; De Ryck, Tine R G; De boel, Kevin; Wiles, Siouxsie; Boterberg, Tom; Van de Wiele, Tom; Swift, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The role of host-microbe interactions in the pathobiology of oral mucositis is still unclear; therefore, this study aimed to unravel the effect of irradiation on behavioral characteristics of oral microbial species in the context of mucositis. Using various experimental in vitro setups, the effects of irradiation on growth and biofilm formation of two Candida spp., Streptococcus salivarius and Klebsiella oxytoca in different culture conditions were evaluated. Irradiation did not affect growth of planktonic cells, but reduced the number of K. oxytoca cells in newly formed biofilms cultured in static conditions. Biofilm formation of K. oxytoca and Candida glabrata was affected by irradiation and depended on the culturing conditions. In the presence of mucins, these effects were lost, indicating the protective nature of mucins. Furthermore, the Galleria melonella model was used to study effects on microbial virulence. Irradiated K. oxytoca microbes were more virulent in G. melonella larvae compared to the nonirradiated ones. Our data indicate that low-dose irradiation can have an impact on functional characteristics of microbial species. Screening for pathogens like K. oxytoca in the context of mucosits could be useful to allow early detection and immediate intervention. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  11. Biomodulation of Inflammatory Cytokines Related to Oral Mucositis by Low-Level Laser Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Fernanda G; Pansani, Taisa N; Soares, Diana G; Scheffel, Débora L; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of LLLT on the expression of inflammatory cytokines related to the development of oral mucositis by gingival fibroblasts. Primary gingival fibroblasts were seeded on 24-well plates (10(5) cells/well) for 24 h. Fresh serum-free culture medium (DMEM) was then added, and cells were placed in contact with LPS (Escherichia coli, 1 μg mL(-1)), followed by LLLT irradiation (LaserTABLE-InGaAsP diode prototype-780 nm, 25 mW) delivering 0, 0.5, 1.5 or 3 J cm(-2)². Cells without contact with LPS were also irradiated with the same energy densities. Gene expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was evaluated by Real-Time PCR, and protein synthesis of these cytokines was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assay. Data were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test, complemented by the Mann-Whitney test (P treatment increased the gene expression and protein synthesis of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8, while the expression of IL-1β was not affected. For LPS-treated groups, LLLT promoted significant decreases in the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 at 1.5 J cm(-2) and 3 J cm(-2). These results demonstrate that LLLT promoted a beneficial biomodulatory effect on the expression of inflammatory cytokines related to oral mucositis by human gingival fibroblasts.

  12. Topical Olive Leaf Extract Improves Healing of Oral Mucositis in Golden Hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Showraki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Oral mucositis (OM is a common side effect of anti-cancer drugs and needs significant attention for its prevention. Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the healing effects of olive leaf extract on 5-fluorouracil-induced OM in golden hamster. Materials and Method: OM was induced in 63 male golden hamsters by the combination of 5-fluorouracil injections (days 0, 5 and 10 and the abrasion of the cheek pouch (days 3 and 4. On day 12, hamsters were received topical olive leaf extract ointment, base of ointment, or no treatment (control for 5 days. Histopathology evaluations, blood examinations, and tissue malondialdehyde level measurement were performed 1, 3 and 5 days after treatments. Results: Histopathology score and tissue malondialdehyde level were significantly lower in olive leaf extract treated group in comparison with control and base groups (p= 0.000. Significant decreases in white blood cell, hemoglobin, hematocrit , and mean corpuscular volume and an increase in mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were observed in olive leaf extract treated group in comparison with control and base groups (p< 0.05. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated that daily application of olive leaf extract ointment had healing effect on 5-fluorouracil induced OM in hamsters. Moreover, the beneficial effect of olive leaf extract on OM might be due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Keywords ● 5- fluorouracil ● Anti-inflammatory ● Antioxidant ● Olive Leaf ● Oral Mucositis

  13. Diagnostic approaches in unsuspected oral lesions of syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, C S; Saturno, J L; de Sousa, S C O M; da Silveira, F R X

    2014-12-01

    Awareness of the increased prevalence of syphilis is essential for early diagnosis and treatment, and to prevent the spread of the disease. Although serological studies are the primary tool used to confirm the diagnosis of secondary syphilis, biopsy of unsuspected oral lesions is not uncommon in the routine oral pathology laboratory. In these cases, histopathological characteristics are likely to indicate the possibility of syphilis, and an immunohistochemical reaction can confirm it. The aim of the present study was to highlight the histological features and test the efficacy of immunohistochemistry in the detection of Treponema pallidum in oral lesions biopsied with the assumption of a non-syphilitic disease. Thirty-nine tissue samples from patients for whom the possibility of syphilis was suggested on the basis of histopathological findings, were retrieved from the surgical oral pathology service files and submitted to immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Eighteen of the tissue samples were positive for T. pallidum. Following this, the contributing clinicians were contacted to check whether they had asked for serological examinations when the diagnostic report was received; for all 18 positive cases, the clinicians confirmed that the patients had tested positive at that time. This study shows the importance of clinical-pathological correlation and the value of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of unsuspected syphilis. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Base-metal dental casting alloy biocompatibility assessment using a human-derived three-dimensional oral mucosal model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGinley, E L

    2012-01-01

    Nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys used in fixed prosthodontics have been associated with type IV Ni-induced hypersensitivity. We hypothesised that the full-thickness human-derived oral mucosa model employed for biocompatibility testing of base-metal dental alloys would provide insights into the mechanisms of Ni-induced toxicity. Primary oral keratinocytes and gingival fibroblasts were seeded onto Alloderm™ and maintained until full thickness was achieved prior to Ni-Cr and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy disc exposure (2-72 h). Biocompatibility assessment involved histological analyses with cell viability measurements, oxidative stress responses, inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity analyses. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis determined elemental ion release levels. We detected adverse morphology with significant reductions in cell viability, significant increases in oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokine expression and cellular toxicity for the Ni-Cr alloy-treated oral mucosal models compared with untreated oral mucosal models, and adverse effects were increased for the Ni-Cr alloy that leached the most Ni. Co-Cr demonstrated significantly enhanced biocompatibility compared with Ni-Cr alloy-treated oral mucosal models. The human-derived full-thickness oral mucosal model discriminated between dental alloys and provided insights into the mechanisms of Ni-induced toxicity, highlighting potential clinical relevance.

  15. Spectrum of Oral Lesions in A Tertiary Care Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Ashok; Kumar, Parbodh

    2015-01-01

    Aim The present study was undertaken to study the spectrum and pattern of various oral cavity lesions in a tertiary care hospital in Rohilkhand region of Uttar Pradesh, India. Background Oral cavity is one of the most common sites for tumour and tumour like lesions especially in males. It has been observed that benign lesions are more common than malignant ones. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital during the period of two years from June 2012 to May 2014. The study included 133 cases of oral cavity lesions. The parameters included in the study were age, gender, site of the lesion and histopathological diagnosis. Special stains and Immunohistochemical markers were applied as and when required. Data collected were analysed. Results A total of 133 cases were included in the present study. The age ranged from 8 to 80 years. Males were affected more often than females with a Male: Female ratio of 3.3:1. The most common involved site was tongue 39 (29.32%) followed by tonsil in 30 (22.56%), buccal mucosa 27(20.32%), floor of mouth 14 (10.53%), palate 12(9.02%), lower lip 8 (6.02%), upper lip 2(1.50%) and vestibule in 1 (0.75%) cases. Of the 133 cases, 63 cases (47.36%) were malignant, 52 non-neoplastic (39.10%) and 18 cases (13.53%) of benign neoplasias. The various lesions included - Squamous cell carcinoma, Verrucous carcinoma, Carcinoma-in-situ, Leukoplakia, Fibroma, Lipoma, Squamous cell papilloma, Lymphoid hyperplasia, Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, Haemangioma, Schwannoma, Atypical Pleomor -phic adenoma, Pleomorphic adenoma, Epidermal cyst, Retention cyst, Parasitic infestation, Tubercular pathology, Granulation tissue, Chronic Sialadenitis and Chronic non-specific inflammatory pathology. A larger epidemiopathological study in this region needs to be carried out for detailed statistical analysis. Conclusion Benign lesions were the predominant pathology. Squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest malignant

  16. [Oral lesions in Kaposi sarcoma: clinical and radiotherapeutic considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberis, M; Brenna Betti, N; Lauritano, D; Sangiani, L; Spadari, F; Villa, S

    1996-01-01

    The epidemic form of Kaposi's sarcoma is the most frequent tumor in sieropositive patients. Every part of the body including oral cavity is affected by these lesions. According to modern acknowledgement in treating oropharynge carcinoma, radiotherapy is used for management of oral Kaposi's sarcoma. This paper reports a study of 10 patients suffering from Kaposi's sarcoma correlated to AIDS (EKS) treated with radiotherapy and chemiotherapy, achieving good results, at the Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori of Milan (Divisone di Radioterapia C) from 1988 to 1992. Treatment has been performed using linear accelerator (6 Mev) or Co 60 unity in order to reach the deepest layer of mucosa lesions. Radiotherapy schedule consisted of 150-200 cGy daily fractions given 5 times/week (w) for 4-5 w in split-course.

  17. DNA damage, apoptosis and cell cycle changes induced by fluoride in rat oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Fei He; Jian-Gang Chen

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of fluoride on oxidativestress,DNA damage and apoptosis as well as cell cycle of rat oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes.METHODS: Ten male SD rats weighing 80~120 g were randomly divided into control group and fluoride group,5 animals each group. The animals in fluoride group had free access to deionized water containing 150 mg/L sodium fluoride (NaF). The animals in control group were given distilled water. Four weeks later, the animals were killed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) in oral mucosa and liver were measured by Fenton reaction, lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde (MDA), was detected by thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reaction, reduced glutathione (GSH) was assayed by dithionitrobenzoic acid (DTNB)reaction. DNA damage in oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes was determined by single cell gel (SCG) electrophoresis or comet assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle in oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes were detected by flow cytometry.RESULTS: The contents of ROS and MDA in oral mucosa and liver tissue of fluoride group were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.01), but the level of GSH was markedly decreased (P<0.01). The contents of ROS, MDA and GSH were (134.73±12.63) U/mg protein,(1.48±0.13) mmol/mg protein and (76.38±6.71) mmol/mg protein in oral mucosa respectively, and (143.45±11.76) U/mg protein, (1.44±0.12) mmol/mg protein and (78.83±7.72) mmol/mg protein in liver tissue respectively. The DNA damage rate in fluoride group was 50.20%in oral mucosal cells and 44.80% in hepatocytes, higher than those in the control group (P<0.01). The apoptosis rate in oral mucosal cells was (13.63±1.81) % in fluoride group, and (12.76±1.67) % in hepatocytes,higher than those in control group. Excess fluoride could differently lower the number of oral mucosal cells and hepatocytes at G0/G1 and S G2/M phases (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Excess fluoride can induce oxidative stress and DNA damage and lead to apoptosis and cell cycle

  18. Mapping of healthy oral mucosal tissue using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: ratiometric-based total hemoglobin comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Razan; Hamadah, Omar; Bachir, Wesam

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to clinically evaluate the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) ratiometric method for differentiation of normal oral mucosal tissues with different histological natures and vascularizations in the oral cavity. Twenty-one healthy patients aged 20-44 years were diagnosed as healthy and probed with a portable DRS system. Diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded in vivo in the range (450-650 nm). In this study, the following three oral mucosal tissues were considered: masticatory mucosa, lining mucosa, and specialized mucosa. Spectral features based on spectral intensity ratios were determined at five specific wavelengths (512, 540, 558, 575, and 620 nm). Total hemoglobin based on spectral ratios for the three anatomical regions have also been evaluated. The three studied groups representing different anatomical regions in the oral cavity were compared using analysis of variance and post hoc least significant difference tests. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in the mean of diffuse spectral ratios between the groups (P spectroscopy might be used for creating a DRS databank of normal oral mucosal tissue with specific spectral ratios featuring the total hemoglobin concentrations. That would further enhance the discrimination of oral tissue for examining the histological nature of oral mucosa and diagnosis of early precancerous changes in the oral cavity based on non-invasive monitoring of neovascularization.

  19. Association between selected oral pathogens and gastric precancerous lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian R Salazar

    Full Text Available We examined whether colonization of selected oral pathogens is associated with gastric precancerous lesions in a cross-sectional study. A total of 119 participants were included, of which 37 were cases of chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, or dysplasia. An oral examination was performed to measure periodontal indices. Plaque and saliva samples were tested with real-time quantitative PCR for DNA levels of pathogens related to periodontal disease (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, Treponema denticola, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and dental caries (Streptococcus mutans and S. sobrinus. There were no consistent associations between DNA levels of selected bacterial species and gastric precancerous lesions, although an elevated but non-significant odds ratio (OR for gastric precancerous lesions was observed in relation to increasing colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 1.36 for one standard deviation increase, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.87-2.12, P. gingivalis (OR = 1.12, 0.67-1.88 and T. denticola (OR = 1.34, 0.83-2.12 measured in plaque. To assess the influence of specific long-term infection, stratified analyses by levels of periodontal indices were conducted. A. actinomycetemcomitans was significantly associated with gastric precancerous lesions (OR = 2.51, 1.13-5.56 among those with ≥ median of percent tooth sites with PD ≥ 3 mm, compared with no association among those below the median (OR = 0.86, 0.43-1.72. A significantly stronger relationship was observed between the cumulative bacterial burden score of periodontal disease-related pathogens and gastric precancerous lesions among those with higher versus lower levels of periodontal disease indices (p-values for interactions: 0.03-0.06. Among individuals with periodontal disease, high levels of colonization of periodontal pathogens are associated with an increased risk of gastric precancerous lesions.

  20. Evaluation of oral mucosal epithelium in diabetic male patients by exfoliative cytology method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Safoura; Feizi, Farideh; Moazzezi, Zoleikhah; Mehdizadeh, Mohammad; Zamani, Babak

    2014-01-01

    The goal of present study is to examine comparatively the epithelium of oral mucosa in persons with diabetes types I and II and the healthy persons by cytomorphometric method. Cytology smear was prepared from oral mucosa epithelium in 24 persons with diabetes and 30 healthy persons were stained by papanicolao method. Its before, from patients were requested acquiring written. The quantitative cytomorphometric characteristics were measured in each group by motic plus 2 software. Also, the qualitative evaluation of cytology slides are performed in three groups. There were decrease in the nuclear and cytoplasmic size, (P < 0.001) and increase in the ratio of nuclear to cytoplasm size in buccal mucosal areas (P = 0.001) and tongue (P = 0.011) of diabetic persons compared to the healthy persons. There was no significantly statistical difference in diabetic persons types I and II in buccal mucosal area (P = 0.15) and tongue (P = 0.86) in quantitative characteristics of cytomoerphometry. In nuclear and cytoplasm size, there was a significant statistical difference in persons with diabetes type I and persons of control I and persons with diabetes type II and persons of control II in buccal mucosa and the tongue (P < 0.001). Bilobed or multi-lobed nuleous, karyorrhexis and vacuolization of cytoplasm were more in diabetic persons compared to the healthy ones (P < 0.001). Diabetes are effective in creating some quantitative and qualitative cytometric alterations in the oral mucosa but the type of diabetes doesn't seem to be effective on these changes.

  1. Impact of oral mucosa lesions on the quality of life related to oral health. An etiopathogenic study

    OpenAIRE

    Villanueva-Vilchis, María-del-Carmen; López-Ríos, Patricia; García, Ixchel-Maya; Gaitán Cepeda, Luis Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the impact of oral mucosa lesions on quality of life related to oral health (QLROH) and additionally to establish whether the etiopathogenicy of oral lesion is associated to the degree of QLROH impact. Material and Methods In this cross-sectional study performed on a non-probability sample of 247 consecutively patients attending the oral medicine and pathology clinic the Spanish version of Oral Health Impact Profile-49 questionnaire (OHIP-49-mx) was applied. Responses wer...

  2. Distinct TRPV1- and TRPA1-based mechanisms underlying enhancement of oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain by 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kiichiro; Ono, Kentaro; Hitomi, Suzuro; Ito, Misa; Nodai, Tomotaka; Goto, Tetsuya; Harano, Nozomu; Watanabe, Seiji; Inoue, Hiromasa; Miyano, Kanako; Uezono, Yasuhito; Matoba, Motohiro; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2016-05-01

    In many patients with cancer, chemotherapy-induced severe oral ulcerative mucositis causes intractable pain, leading to delays and interruptions in therapy. However, the pain mechanism in oral ulcerative mucositis after chemotherapy has not been extensively studied. In this study, we investigated spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia in a preclinical model of oral ulcerative mucositis after systemic administration of the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil, using our proprietary pain assay system for conscious rats. 5-Fluorouracil caused leukopenia but did not induce pain-related behaviors. After 5-fluorouracil administration, oral ulcers were developed with topical acetic acid treatment. Compared with saline-treated rats, 5-fluorouracil-exposed rats showed more severe mucositis with excessive bacterial loading due to a lack of leukocyte infiltration, as well as enhancements of spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia. Antibacterial drugs, the lipid A inhibitor polymyxin B and the TRPV1/TRPA1 channel pore-passing anesthetic QX-314, suppressed both the spontaneous pain and the mechanical allodynia. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin and the TRPV1 antagonist SB-366791 inhibited the spontaneous pain, but not the mechanical allodynia. In contrast, the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 and the N-formylmethionine receptor FPR1 antagonist Boc MLF primarily suppressed the mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that 5-fluorouracil-associated leukopenia allows excessive oral bacterial infection in the oral ulcerative region, resulting in the enhancement of spontaneous pain through continuous TRPV1 activation and cyclooxygenase pathway, and mechanical allodynia through mechanical sensitization of TRPA1 caused by neuronal effects of bacterial toxins. These distinct pain mechanisms explain the difficulties encountered with general treatments for oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain in patients with cancer and suggest more effective approaches.

  3. The effect of a calcium phosphate mouth rinse on (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, M. A.; Burlage, F. R.; Spijkervet, F. K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Promising results of a calcium phosphate (CP) mouth rinse on reduced severity of oral mucositis have been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a CP mouth rinse on the frequency, duration and severity of (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in patients with h

  4. The effect of a calcium phosphate mouth rinse on (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, M. A.; Burlage, F. R.; Spijkervet, F. K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Promising results of a calcium phosphate (CP) mouth rinse on reduced severity of oral mucositis have been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a CP mouth rinse on the frequency, duration and severity of (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in patients with h

  5. Effects of Honey on Oral Mucositis among Pediatric Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemo/Radiotherapy Treatment at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jaouni, Soad K.; Al Muhayawi, Mohammad S.; Hussein, Abear; Elfiki, Iman; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Al Muhayawi, Saad M.; Almasaudi, Saad

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common complications of cancer chemotherapy is oral mucositis. This study evaluates the therapeutic effects of honey with the focus on grade III and IV oral mucositis, reduction of bacterial and fungal infections, duration of episodes of oral mucositis, and body weight in pediatric leukemic patients undergoing chemo/radiotherapy. This is an open labeled randomized controlled study conducted at our hospital on 40 pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemo/radiotherapy. All the 40 patients included in this study experienced a sum total of 390 episodes of fever and neutropenia associated with oral mucositis. A significant reduction of oral mucositis, associated Candida, and aerobic pathogenic bacterial infections was noted in patients in the honey treatment group. Also, there is a significant decrease in the duration of hospitalization for all those in the treatment group combined with a significant increase of body weight, delayed onset, and decreased severity of pain related to oral mucositis. Complications of oral mucositis can be tremendously reduced by the topical application of local Saudi honey and honey should be used as an integrative approach in prophylaxis and treatment of chemo/radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in pediatric cancer patients. Further research is needed to elucidate and better understand the underlying mechanism.

  6. Symptomatic oral lesions may be associated with contact allergy to substances in oral hygiene products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Røn; Johansen, J D; Reibel, J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dental materials and oral hygiene products may be responsible for oral contact allergic reactions. We aimed to determine the occurrence of allergies in patients with symptomatic oral lichen planus (OLP), oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs) and stomatitis and investigate if patch testing could...... identify contact allergies to dental materials and oral hygiene products in these patients. METHODS: Forty-nine patients (7 men, 42 women) aged 31 to 77 years (61 ± 10.3 years) with symptomatic OLP, OLL or stomatitis and 29 healthy age- and gender-matched control subjects were included. They underwent.......01). Avoidance cleared symptoms in all cases. CONCLUSION/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Allergic reactions to aroma substances in oral hygiene products are common in patients with symptomatic OLP, OLL and stomatitis....

  7. Enhanced mucosal and systemic immune response with squalane oil-containing multiple emulsions upon intranasal and oral administration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahiwala, Aliasgar; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate squalane oil-containing water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple emulsion for mucosal administration of ovalbumin (OVA) as a model candidate vaccine in BALB/c mice. Control and optimized OVA-containing W/O/W emulsion (OVA-Emul) and chitosan-modified W/O/W emulsion (OVA-Emul-Chi) formulations were administered intranasally and orally at an OVA dose of 100 mug. The mucosal and systemic immune responses were evaluated after the first and second immunization. The OVA-Emul formulations resulted in higher immunoglobulin-G (IgG) and immunoglobulin-A (IgA) responses as compared with aqueous solution. In addition, significant IgG and IgA responses were observed after the second immunization dose using the emulsions with both routes of administration. Intranasal vaccination was more effective in generating the systemic OVA-specific IgG response than the mucosal OVA-specific IgA response. Oral immunizations, on the other hand, showed a much higher systemic IgG and mucosal IgA responses as compared with the nasally treated groups. The results of this study show that squalane oil-containing W/O/W multiple emulsion formulations can significantly enhance the local and systemic immune responses, especially after oral administration, and may be adopted as a better alternative in mucosal delivery of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines.

  8. Effects of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse) induced by fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Haagen, J.; Noack, R.; Siegemund, A.; Gabriel, P. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, W. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. of Radiation Oncology/Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-04-15

    Oral mucositis is a severe and dose limiting early side effect of radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. This study was initiated to determine the effect of bone marrow- and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse tongue model) induced by fractionated irradiation. Daily fractionated irradiation (5 x 3 Gy/week) was given over 1 (days 0-4) or 3 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11, 14-18). Each protocol was terminated (day 7 or 21) by graded test doses (5 dose groups, 10 animals each) in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. The incidence of mucosal ulceration, corresponding to confluent mucositis grade 3 (RTOG/EORTC), was analyzed as the primary, clinically relevant endpoint. Bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted intravenously at various time points within these fractionation protocols. Transplantation of 6 x 10{sup 6}, but not of 3 x 10{sup 6} bone marrow stem cells on day -1, +4, +8, +11 or +15 significantly increased the ED{sub 50} values (dose, at which an ulcer is expected in 50% of the mice); transplantation on day +2, in contrast, was ineffective. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on day -1, 2 or +8 significantly, and on day +4 marginally increased the ED{sub 50} values. Transplantation of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells has the potential to modulate radiation-induced oral mucositis during fractionated radiotherapy. The effect is dependent on the timing of the transplantation. The mechanisms require further investigation. (orig.)

  9. Treatment for Cancer Patients with Oral Mucositis: Assessment Based on the Mucositis Study Group of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer in International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) in 2013 and Proposal of Possible Novel Treatment with a Japanese Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Kanako; Ueno, Takao; Yatsuoka, Wakako; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    The cancer patients who received chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplant and terminal care often have a wide range of stomatitis, which induces severe pain and limits fundamental life behaviors such as "eating, drinking and talking". In addition, oral mucositis frequently leads to systemic infection through opportunistic microorganisms, which causes extension of hospitalization. Severe oral mucositis often causes cancer patients to partially or completely discontinue/modify cancer therapy regimen, which adversely affects the curative effects of cancer. Therefore, the control of oral mucositis is important and indispensable for improvement of quality of life and prognosis. In this review, we introduce recent trends of the oral mucositis management in cancer patients, according to the following sentences; 1) pathophysiological mechanisms of oral mucositis, 2) assessment, 3) risk factors, 4) prevention and treatment, and 5) development of novel therapy for oral mucositis.

  10. Effect of class IV laser therapy on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a clinical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Giulia; Gobbo, Margherita; Sturnega, Mauro; Martinelli, Valentina; Mano, Miguel; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Bussani, Rossana; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Long, Carlin S; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Giacca, Mauro; Biasotto, Matteo; Zacchigna, Serena

    2013-12-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a serious and acute side effect in patients with cancer who receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, often leading to the suspension of therapy and a need for opioid analgesic and enteral/parenteral nutrition, with an effect on patient survival. Among the various interventions proposed in OM management, laser therapy is becoming a recommended treatment option but has limitations due to its heterogeneous laser parameters. Here, we report on our successful clinical experience on the use of class IV laser therapy to treat OM induced by different chemotherapy regimens. To shed light on the mechanisms of action of laser therapy in improving OM resolution, we have developed an animal model of chemotherapy-induced OM, in which we compare the efficacy of the standard low-power laser therapy protocol with an innovative protocol, defined as high-power laser therapy. We show that high-power laser therapy is more effective than low-power laser therapy in improving OM lesion healing, reducing the inflammatory burden, and preserving tissue integrity. In addition, high-power laser therapy has been particularly effective in promoting the formation of new arterioles within the granulation tissue. Our results provide important insights into the mechanism of action of biostimulating laser therapy on OM in vivo and pave a way for clinical experimentation with the use of high-power laser therapy.

  11. Oral mucosal diseases in the office setting--part I: Aphthous stomatitis and herpes simplex infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciubba, James J

    2007-01-01

    This article is an update and review of the most common nontraumatic ulcerative and vesicular lesions of the oral cavity. Details concerning their etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, and management are included. Comparisons are made between the various forms of aphthous ulcerations and their viral counterparts. Lesions of herpes simplex origin are described for both primary and recurrent or secondary forms and differentiation from aphthous ulcerations is made. Treatment options for both the chronic and more acute forms of this condition are discussed.

  12. Early inflammatory changes in radiation-induced oral mucositis. Effect of pentoxifylline in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Sylvia; Bozsaky, Eva; Roitinger, Eva; Schwarz, Karoline [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Applied and Translational Radiobiology, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Vienna (Austria); Schmidt, Margret [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dept. Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Applied and Translational Radiobiology, Dept. Radiation Oncology/CD Lab. Med. Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Vienna (Austria); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dept. Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Early inflammation is a major factor of mucosal reactions to radiotherapy. Pentoxifylline administration resulted in a significant amelioration of radiation-induced oral mucositis in the mouse tongue model. The underlying mechanisms may be related to the immunomodulatory properties of the drug. The present study hence focuses on the manifestation of early inflammatory changes in mouse tongue during daily fractionated irradiation and their potential modulation by pentoxifylline. Daily fractionated irradiation with 5 fractions of 3 Gy/week (days 0-4, 7-11) was given to the snouts of mice. Groups of 3 animals per day were euthanized every second day between day 0 and 14. Pentoxifylline (15 mg/kg, s. c.) was administered daily from day 5 to the day before sacrifice. The expression of the inflammatory proteins TNFα, NF-κB, and IL-1β were analysed. Fractionated irradiation increased the expression of all inflammatory markers. Pentoxifylline significantly reduced the expression of TNFα and IL-1β, but not NF-κB. Early inflammation, as indicated by the expression of the inflammatory markers TNFα, NF-κB, and IL-1β, is an essential component of early radiogenic oral mucositis. Pentoxifylline differentially modulated the expression of different inflammatory markers. The mucoprotective effect of pentoxifylline does not appear to be based on modulation of NF-κB-associated inflammation. (orig.) [German] Fruehe entzuendliche Veraenderungen sind ein bedeutender Faktor waehrend der Strahlenreaktion der Schleimhaut. Die Behandlung mit Pentoxifyllin erzielte eine signifikante Minderung strahleninduzierter oraler Mukositis im Mauszungenmodel. Die zugrundeliegenden Mechanismen sind potenziell auf die immunomodulatorischen Eigenschaften des Wirkstoffs zurueckzufuehren. Die vorliegenden Untersuchungen fokussieren daher auf die Manifestation frueher entzuendlicher Veraenderungen in der Mauszunge waehrend taeglich fraktionierter Bestrahlung und deren potenzieller Modifikation

  13. Concise review: transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells for treating limbal stem cell deficiency-current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2015-06-01

    A number of diseases and external factors can deplete limbal stem cells, causing pain and visual loss. Ten years have passed since the first transplantation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial cells in humans, representing the first autologous cell-based therapy for severe bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency. Its steady increase in popularity since then can be attributed to the accumulating evidence of its efficacy in reverting limbal stem cell deficiency. In this review, the focus is on clinical, and to a lesser degree laboratory, features of cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplants over the past 10 years. Comparisons with other available technologies are made. Avenues for research to stimulate further improvements in clinical results and allow worldwide distribution of limbal stem cell therapy based on oral mucosal cells are discussed. These include storage and transportation of cultured oral mucosal epithelial sheets and in vivo culture of oral mucosal epithelial cells.

  14. Effects of human oral mucosal tissue, saliva, and oral microflora on intraoral metabolism and bioactivation of black raspberry anthocyanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, Susan R; Budendorf, Deric E; Larsen, Matthew P; Pei, Ping; Tong, Meng; Holpuch, Andrew S; Larsen, Peter E; Stoner, Gary D; Fields, Henry W; Chan, Kenneth K; Ling, Yonghua; Liu, Zhongfa

    2011-08-01

    Our oral cancer chemoprevention trial data implied that patient-specific differences in local retention and metabolism of freeze-dried components of black raspberries (BRB) affected therapeutic responsiveness. Subsequent studies have confirmed that anthocyanins are key contributors to BRB's chemopreventive effects. Consequently, functional assays, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemical analyses to evaluate levels and distribution of BRB anthocyanin-relevant metabolic enzymes in human oral tissues were conducted. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) analyses of time course saliva samples collected following BRB rinses were conducted to assess local pharmacokinetics and compare the capacities of three different BRB rinse formulations to provide sustained intraoral levels of anthocyanins. Protein profiles showed the presence of key metabolic enzymes in all 15 oral mucosal tissues evaluated, whereas immunohistochemistry confirmed these enzymes were distributed within surface oral epithelia and terminal salivary ducts. β-Glucosidase assays confirmed that whole and microflora-reduced saliva can deglycosylate BRB anthocyanins, enabling generation of the bioactive aglycone, cyanidin. LC/MS-MS analyses showed retention of parent anthocyanins and their functional, stable metabolite, protocatechuic acid, in saliva for up to 4 hours after rinsing. Furthermore, postrinse saliva samples contained glucuronidated anthocyanin conjugates, consistent with intracellular uptake and phase II conversion of BRB anthocyanins into forms amenable to local recycling. Our data show that comparable to the small intestine, the requisite hydrolytic, phase II and efflux transporting enzymes necessary for local enteric recycling are present and functional in human oral mucosa. Notably, interpatient differences in anthocyanin bioactivation and capacities for enteric recycling would impact treatment as retention of bioactivated chemopreventives at the target site would sustain

  15. [The prevention of mucosal lesions during oropharyngeal irradiation with a dental-filling shield].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schratter-Sehn, A U; Schmidt, W F; Kielhauser, R; Langer, H; Kärcher, K H

    1992-01-01

    In patients with metallic dental fillings radiation therapy to the oral cavity can cause mucous membrane lesions, which are more severe than expected. They appear as circumscribed erosions, opposite to metallic fillings and are caused by an increase in radiation dose through secondary radiation due to the higher density and atomic number of the filling material. This dose increase can be directly measured with 0.1 mm thin sheets of graphite-loaded TLD's (LiF, Vinten). For Co-60 gamma rays a commercial amalgam filling caused a dose increase by a factor of 1.7. The half value layer for this additional radiation was measured to be approximately 0.4 mm tissue. In order to avoid painful mucous membrane ulcerations which are even more a problem if hyperfractionated treatment schedules are used, we constructed individual dental shields for each patient. As shielding material we used a dental impression material (Optosil P+1 Bayer). This method was tested in 35 patients, in all of them circumscribed mucous membrane ulcerations could be avoided. The method proved to be fast and simple and was very well tolerated by all patients.

  16. Systematic review of mucosal immunity induced by oral and inactivated poliovirus vaccines against virus shedding following oral poliovirus challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Hird

    Full Text Available Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV may be used in mass vaccination campaigns during the final stages of polio eradication. It is also likely to be adopted by many countries following the coordinated global cessation of vaccination with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV after eradication. The success of IPV in the control of poliomyelitis outbreaks will depend on the degree of nasopharyngeal and intestinal mucosal immunity induced against poliovirus infection. We performed a systematic review of studies published through May 2011 that recorded the prevalence of poliovirus shedding in stool samples or nasopharyngeal secretions collected 5-30 days after a "challenge" dose of OPV. Studies were combined in a meta-analysis of the odds of shedding among children vaccinated according to IPV, OPV, and combination schedules. We identified 31 studies of shedding in stool and four in nasopharyngeal samples that met the inclusion criteria. Individuals vaccinated with OPV were protected against infection and shedding of poliovirus in stool samples collected after challenge compared with unvaccinated individuals (summary odds ratio [OR] for shedding 0.13 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08-0.24. In contrast, IPV provided no protection against shedding compared with unvaccinated individuals (summary OR 0.81 [95% CI 0.59-1.11] or when given in addition to OPV, compared with individuals given OPV alone (summary OR 1.14 [95% CI 0.82-1.58]. There were insufficient studies of nasopharyngeal shedding to draw a conclusion. IPV does not induce sufficient intestinal mucosal immunity to reduce the prevalence of fecal poliovirus shedding after challenge, although there was some evidence that it can reduce the quantity of virus shed. The impact of IPV on poliovirus transmission in countries where fecal-oral spread is common is unknown but is likely to be limited compared with OPV.

  17. Systematic review of mucosal immunity induced by oral and inactivated poliovirus vaccines against virus shedding following oral poliovirus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hird, Thomas R; Grassly, Nicholas C

    2012-01-01

    Inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) may be used in mass vaccination campaigns during the final stages of polio eradication. It is also likely to be adopted by many countries following the coordinated global cessation of vaccination with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) after eradication. The success of IPV in the control of poliomyelitis outbreaks will depend on the degree of nasopharyngeal and intestinal mucosal immunity induced against poliovirus infection. We performed a systematic review of studies published through May 2011 that recorded the prevalence of poliovirus shedding in stool samples or nasopharyngeal secretions collected 5-30 days after a "challenge" dose of OPV. Studies were combined in a meta-analysis of the odds of shedding among children vaccinated according to IPV, OPV, and combination schedules. We identified 31 studies of shedding in stool and four in nasopharyngeal samples that met the inclusion criteria. Individuals vaccinated with OPV were protected against infection and shedding of poliovirus in stool samples collected after challenge compared with unvaccinated individuals (summary odds ratio [OR] for shedding 0.13 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08-0.24)). In contrast, IPV provided no protection against shedding compared with unvaccinated individuals (summary OR 0.81 [95% CI 0.59-1.11]) or when given in addition to OPV, compared with individuals given OPV alone (summary OR 1.14 [95% CI 0.82-1.58]). There were insufficient studies of nasopharyngeal shedding to draw a conclusion. IPV does not induce sufficient intestinal mucosal immunity to reduce the prevalence of fecal poliovirus shedding after challenge, although there was some evidence that it can reduce the quantity of virus shed. The impact of IPV on poliovirus transmission in countries where fecal-oral spread is common is unknown but is likely to be limited compared with OPV.

  18. A comparative study of candidal invasion in rabbit tongue mucosal explants and reconstituted human oral epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilake, J A M S; Samaranayake, Y H; Samaranayake, L P

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the light and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) features of tissue invasion by three Candida species (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. dubliniensis) in two different tissue culture models: rabbit tongue mucosal explants (RTME) and reconstituted human oral epithelium (RHOE). Tongue mucosal biopsies of healthy New Zealand rabbits were maintained in explant culture using a transwell system. RHOE was obtained from Skinethic Laboratory (Nice, France). RTME and RHOE were inoculated with C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. dubliniensis separately and incubated at 37 degrees C, 5% CO(2), and 100% humidity up to 48 h. Light microscopic and SEM examinations of uninfected (controls) and infected tissues were performed at 24 and 48 h. C. albicans produced characteristic hallmarks of pathological tissue invasion in both tissue models over a period of 48 h. Hyphae penetrated through epithelial cells and intercellular gaps latter resembling thigmotropism. SEM showed cavitations on the epithelial cell surfaces particularly pronounced at sites of hyphal invasion. Some hyphae on RTME showed several clusters of blastospores attached in regular arrangements resembling "appareil sporifere". C. tropicalis and C. dubliniensis produced few hyphae mainly on RTME but they did not penetrate either model. Our findings indicate that multiple host-fungal interactions such as cavitations, thigmotropism, and morphogenesis take place during candidal tissue invasion. RTME described here appears to be useful in investigations of such pathogenic processes of Candida active at the epithelial front.

  19. N-succinyl chitosan as buccal penetration enhancer for delivery of herbal agents in treatment of oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Neha; Kumar, Krishan; Kalia, A N; Arora, Saahil

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is one of the major side effects of cancer chemotherapy (30-76%) and radiotherapy (over 50%). Current palliative treatments of oral mucositis include specialized agents like pelifermin, platelet derived factors etc. or oral hygienic agents which suffered from various drawbacks like systemic side effect, least effect owing to fast wash out of buccal mucosa, patient unfriendly delivery systems, and mere symptomatic relief. In this research work, N-succinyl chitosan gel delivery system of microemulsified eugenol, honey and sodium hyaluronate was prepared to explore their multiple and synergistic effects on various pathological factors of oral mucositis. N-succinyl chitosan was synthesized in our laboratory and loaded with microemulsified eugenol (10% v/v), honey (10% v/v) and sodium hyaluronate (0.2% w/v) to prepare orogel with optimum pH, spreadability, mucoadhesion strength, and viscosity. In vitro eugenol release from N-succinyl chitosan gel after 8 hours in PBS (pH-6.4) was found to be 87.45±0.14%, which was better in comparison to that released from chitosan gel. Ex vivo penetration studies using rat buccal mucosal tissue also suggested better J-efflux of eugenol through N-succinyl chitosan in comparison to chitosan gel with enhancement ratio (ER) of 1.71. The antimicrobial effect of N-succinyl chitosan based orogel against S. aureus and C. albicans efficacy was found to be statistically high in comparison to chitosan based orogel as well as marketed formulation of chlorhexidine (pgel formulation within 15 days. The formulation was successful in elevating the survival and reducing the inflammation in the oral mucosa of animals compared to disease control (p<0.05) and hence suggesting the potential of N-succinyl chitosan orogel in the treatment of oral mucositis.

  20. Awareness of patients about existing oral precancerous lesions/conditions in Nashik city of Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Sukdeo Ahire

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from premalignant lesions/conditions of oral cavity. Hence, the awareness of such lesions/conditions is important. Aim: To assess the awareness about existing oral precancerous lesions/conditions among patients arriving for dental treatment at a dental hospital, in Nashik city of Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was used to collect information from 80 patients with existing oral precancerous lesions/conditions attending the dental hospital, in Nashik city of Maharashtra. The questionnaire included questions to ascertain information on sociodemographic parameters, awareness, and sources of information about of oral precancerous lesions/conditions, habit of tobacco, areca nut chewing, smoking, alcohol, and combined habits. Results: We found that 40% (n = 32 respondents knew about the existence of lesion in their mouth of which only 50% (out of 40% had thought that it was precancerous lesion/condition. Among all subjects, only 47.5% (n = 38 were aware of oral precancerous lesions/conditions. Television was the major source of information about oral precancerous lesions/conditions almost all the subjects (97.5% wanted more information about oral precancerous lesions/conditions but through television (42.5% and lectures (27.5%. Conclusion: Awareness of patients (coming to hospital about oral precancerous lesions/conditions was found to be low. The people must be made aware of symptoms, signs, and preventive strategies of oral precancerous lesions/conditions through their preferred media – television and lectures.

  1. HPV and oral lesions: preventive possibilities, vaccines and early diagnosis of malignant lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    TESTI, D.; NARDONE, M.; MELONE, P.; CARDELLI, P.; OTTRIA, L.; ARCURI, C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The importance of HPV in world healthy is high, in fact high-risk HPV types contribute significantly to viral associated neoplasms. In this article we will analyze vary expression of HPV in oral cavity both benign and malignant, their prevalence and the importance in early diagnosis and prevention. The classical oral lesions associated with human papillomavirus are squamous cell papilloma, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris and focal epithelial hyperplasia. Overall, HPV types 2, 4, 6, 11, 13 and 32 have been associated with benign oral lesions while HPV types 16 and 18 have been associated with malignant lesions, especially in cancers of the tonsils and elsewhere in the oropharynx. Transmission of the virus can occur with direct contact, genital contact, anal and oral sex; latest studies suggest a salivary transmission and from mother to child during delivery. The number of lifetime sexual partners is an important risk factor for the development of HPV-positive head-neck cancer. Oral/oropharyngeal cancer etiologically associated with HPV having an increased survival and a better prognostic (85%–90% to five years). There is no cure for the virus. There are two commercially available prophylactic vaccines against HPV today: the bivalent (16 and 18) Cervarix® and the tetravalent (6, 11, 16 and 18) Gardasil® and new vaccine Gardasil 9 (6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58) was approved in the United States. To be effective, such vaccination should start before “sexual puberty”. The vaccine could be an important preventive strategy, in fact the scientific community is in agreement on hypothesis that blocking the contagion it may also limit the distance complications as the oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:27555904

  2. Prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a literature review; Prevencao e tratamento da mucosite oral induzida por radioterapia: revisao de literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Ieda Lessa de Souza [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital do Cancer I. Servico de Enfermagem]. E-mail: iedalessa@yahoo.com.br; Camargo, Teresa Caldas [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital do Cancer III. Servico de Enfermagem]. E-mail: tcamargo@inca.gov.br

    2007-04-15

    The prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis have still not been fully defined. The current study thus involved a literature search aimed at identifying preventive and therapeutic measures in relation to oral mucositis in patients submitted to radiotherapy, analyzing the level of evidence in the selected studies, identifying which indications for prevention and treatment in the literature pertain to the field of nursing, and critically analyzing the results and their implications for nursing care. This was a systematic literature survey without a meta analysis, consulting the following databases: BIREME, Medline, CancerLit, Scirus, CAPES, Free medical journal, High wire press, SCIELO, and Medscape, from 2000 to 2005. According to observations, nursing care was capable of improving patient's quality of life, promoting education of patients, implementing and supervising oral care programs, and providing guidance on hygiene, prevention, and treatment of oral mucositis, including pain management. However, no Brazilian nursing publications were found on the subject. Research and publications focusing on nursing experience in the prevention and treatment of radiotherapy-related oral mucositis and the implications for patients and nurses are important to provide evidence-based nursing guidelines. (author)

  3. The effectiveness of commonly used mouthwashes for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.J. Potting (C. M J); R. Uitterhoeve (R.); W.J.M. Scholte op Reimer (Wilma); T. van Achterberg (Theo)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractDaily chlorhexidine mouthwash is often recommended for preventing chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Povidone-iodine, NaCl 0.9%, water salt soda solution and chamomile mouthwash are also recommended. However, the effectiveness of these mouthwashes is unclear. Therefore, we performed a

  4. The effectiveness of commonly used mouthwashes for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potting, C.M.J.; Uitterhoeve, R.J.; Reimer, W.S. op; Achterberg, T. van

    2006-01-01

    Daily chlorhexidine mouthwash is often recommended for preventing chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Povidone-iodine, NaCl 0.9%, water salt soda solution and chamomile mouthwash are also recommended. However, the effectiveness of these mouthwashes is unclear. Therefore, we performed a systematic r

  5. Guidelines for the assessment of oral mucositis in adult chemotherapy, radiotherapy and haematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quinn, B.; Potting, C.M.J.; Stone, R.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Fliedner, M.; Margulies, A.; Sharp, L.

    2008-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a serious consequence of some chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens. A number of reliable instruments are available to assess OM, but none are universally accepted. A unique collaboration of multi-disciplinary experts from Europe was formed to make recommendations on OM asses

  6. Combination of Estrogen and Immunosuppressive Agents to Establish a Mouse Model of Candidiasis with Concurrent Oral and Vaginal Mucosal Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Wang, Chong; Mei, Huan; Shen, Yongnian; Lv, Guixia; Zeng, Rong; Zhan, Ping; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Weida

    2016-02-01

    Mouse model is an appropriate tool for pathogenic determination and study of host defenses during the fungal infection. Here, we established a mouse model of candidiasis with concurrent oral and vaginal mucosal infection. Two C. albicans strains sourced from clinical candidemia (SC5314) and mucosal infection (ATCC62342) were tested in ICR mice. The different combinational panels covering estrogen and immunosuppressive agents, cortisone, prednisolone and cyclophosphamide were used for concurrent oral and vaginal candidiasis establishment. Prednisolone in combination with estrogen proved an optimal mode for concurrent mucosal infection establishment. The model maintained for 1 week with fungal burden reached at least 10(5) cfu/g of tissue. This mouse model was evaluated by in vivo pharmacodynamics of fluconazole and host mucosal immunity of IL-17 and IL-23. Mice infected by SC5314 were cured by fluconazole. An increase in IL-23 in both oral and vaginal homogenates was observed after infection, while IL-17 only had a prominent elevation in oral tissue. This model could properly mimic complicated clinical conditions and provides a valuable means for antifungal assay in vivo and may also provide a useful method for the evaluation of host-fungal interactions.

  7. Oral pyogenic granuloma: one reactive hyperplastic lesion of the gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakanta Narendra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The term pyogenic granuloma refers to a disorder of the skin, oral mucosa and the gingiva, that usually presents as a solitary polypoid capillary hemangioma like growth often resulting from local irritation and trauma. It is manifested as an inflammatory response with similar characteristics to those of a granuloma. Different terminologies are used for this lesion by different investigators like, benign vascular tumor of pregnancy, granuloma pediculatum benignum, granuloma pyogenicum, Crocker and hartzells disease. This lesion even if looks like a tumor, is non neoplastic in nature and present itself in various clinical and histological forms. Lack of association of pyogenic etiopathogenesis does not justify the use of terminology of pyogenic granuloma. In this article we are presenting a case series of pyogenic granuloma in different locations giving an insight into their myriad of etiologies and presenting the review of literature for its inclusion as one classified hyperplastic lesion of oral cavity. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(12.000: 3863-3868

  8. Oral Lesion as the first Clinical Presentation in Sarcoidosis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Azri, Abdul Rahman S.; Logan, Richard M; GOSS, Alastair N.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a common multi-system disease characterized histolopathologically by the formation of non-caseating granulomas in the affected tissues. The oral involvement of sarcoidosis is relatively rare with less than 70 reported cases in literature while an oral lesion as the initial presenting sign is even less common. Oral lesions of sarcoidosis may mimic the lesions of other serious systemic diseases including Crohn’s disease and tuberculosis as well as lesions localized to the orofaci...

  9. Chemotherapy-Induced and/or Radiation Therapy-Induced Oral Mucositis-Complicating the Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddireddy Umameshwar Rao Naidu

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The term mucositis is coined to describe the adverse effects of radiation and chemotherapy treatments. Mucositis is one of the most common adverse reactions encountered in radiation therapy for head and neck cancers, as well as in chemotherapy, in particular with drugs affecting DNA synthesis (Sphase-specific agents such as fluorouracil, methotrexate, and cytarabine. Mucositis may limit the patient's ability to tolerate chemotherapy or radiation therapy, and nutritional status is compromised. It may drastically affect cancer treatment as well as the patient's quality of life. The incidence and severity of mucositis will vary from patient to patient. It will also vary from treatment to treatment. It is estimated that there is 40% incidence of mucositis in patients treated with standard chemotherapy and this will not only increase with the number of treatment cycles but also with previous episodes. Similarly, patients who undergo bone marrow transplantation and who receive high doses of chemotherapy have a 76% chance of getting mucositis. Patients receiving radiation, in particular to head and neck cancers, have a 30% to 60% chance. The exact pathophysiology of development is not known, but it is thought to be divided into direct and indirect mucositis. Chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy will interfere with the normal turnover of epithelial, cells leading to mucosal injury; subsequently, it can also occur due to indirect invasion of Gram-negative bacteria and fungal species because most of the cancer drugs will cause changes in blood counts. With the advancement in cytology, a more precise mechanism has been established. With this understanding, we can select and target particular mediators responsible for the mucositis. Risk factors such as age, nutritional status, type of malignancy, and oral care during treatment will play important roles in the development of mucositis. Many treatment options are available to prevent and treat this

  10. Oral precancerous lesions: Problems of early detection and oral cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gileva, Olga S.; Libik, Tatiana V.; Danilov, Konstantin V.

    2016-08-01

    The study presents the results of the research in the structure, local and systemic risk factors, peculiarities of the clinical manifestation, and quality of primary diagnosis of precancerous oral mucosa lesions (OMLs). In the study a wide range of OMLs and high (25.4%) proportion of oral precancerous lesions (OPLs) in their structure was indicated. The high percentage of different diagnostic errors and the lack of oncological awareness of dental practitioners, as well as the sharp necessity of inclusion of precancer/cancer early detection techniques into their daily practice were noted. The effectiveness of chemilumenescence system of early OPLs and oral cancer detection was demonstrated, the prospects of infrared thermography as a diagnostic tool were also discussed.

  11. Glucocorticoids and gastric mucosal lesions%糖皮质激素与胃黏膜损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马娟; 王启仪; 沙卫红

    2011-01-01

    Hench found glucocorticoids (GCs), defined their roles in controlling rheumatic diseases, and thereby won the 1950 Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine. In the next few decades GCs were widely used in clinical practice; however, they were associated with some side effects, such as gastric mucosal lesions. Currently, it is still controversial whether GC use is a risk factor for peptic ulcer disease and upper gastroduodenal bleeding. This review aims to elucidate the potential role of GCs in inducing gastric mucosal lesions and to highlight possible mechanisms involved.%Hent于1950年发现糖皮质激素(glucocorticoids,GCs),明确了GCs在风湿性疾病治疗上的确切效果,并因此获得诺贝尔奖.此后数十年GCs被广泛应用于临床,但也带来一些胃肠道不良反应.不过,GCs究竟是否为消化性溃疡(pepticulcer disease,PUD)及上消化道出血的危险因素一直有争议,其相关胃黏膜损伤的发生机制也不明了.本文就国内外关于GCs对胃肠道的作用及相关机制的研究进展作一综述.

  12. HIV-Associated Oral Mucosal Melanin Hyperpigmentation: A Clinical Study in a South African Population Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chandran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of HIV-associated oral mucosal melanin hyperpigmentation (HIV-OMH in a specific population of HIV-seropositive South Africans and to analyse the associations between HIV-OMH clinical features and the demographic and immunological characteristics of the study cohort. Material and Methods. This cross-sectional study included 200 HIV-seropositive Black subjects. The collected data comprised age, gender, CD4+ T cell count, viral load, systemic disease, medications, oral site affected by HIV-OMH, extent (localized or generalized, intensity of the pigmentation (dark or light, and smoking and snuff use. Results. Overall, 18.5% of the study cohort had HIV-OMH. Twenty-two and a half percent had OMH that could not with confidence be attributed to HIV infection, and 59% did not have any OMH. There was a significant but weak association between smoking and the presence of HIV-OMH. Conclusions. The prevalence of HIV-OMH in the study population was 18.5%, the gingiva being the most commonly affected site. It appears that the CD4+ T cell count does not play any role in the biopathology of HIV-OMH.

  13. Comparative study of number and distribution of IgG+ cells in oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parichehr Ghalayani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lichen planus is a common mucocutaneous disorder with unknown etiology. While current data suggest that oral lichen planus is a cell-mediated disease, differential diagnosis of this disease and oral lichenoid lesions is very problematic, both clinically and histopathologically. This study aimed to compare immunohistochemical features of these similar diseases. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytic study in which formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tis-sue sections of 30 oral lichen planus and 30 oral lichenoid lesions were immunohistochemically ana-lyzed for number and distribution of IgG + cells. A standard biotin-streptavidin procedure after anti-gen retrieval was used. Data were analyzed in SPSS software using Mann-Whitney U test. Results: There were some significant differences in distribution of IgG + cells among different loca-tions in oral lichen planus and also in oral lichenoid lesions separately; but the differences between distribution of IgG + cells between the two groups of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid lesions were not significant. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in number and distribution of IgG + cells between the two groups. So, this study can suggest that location of IgG is similar in samples of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid lesions and consequently, this marker cannot help us differentiate them from each other. Other markers can be analyzed in further studies in order to find an appropriate distinguisher between the two lesions.

  14. Oral and nasal administration of chicken type Ⅱ collagen suppresses adjuvant arthritis in rats with intestinal lesions induced by meloxicam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Qiu Zheng; Wei Wei; Yu-Xian Shen; Min Dai; Li-Hua Liu

    2004-01-01

    in AA+meloxicam model and the curative effects of nasal CⅡ (20μg/kg) were shown to be more efficient than that of oral CⅡ (20 μg/kg) both in AA model and in AA+meloxicam model (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Oral administration of CⅡ shows the limited efficacy on arthritis in AA rats with intestinal lesions, and nasal administration of CⅡ is more efficient than oral administration of CⅡ to induce mucosal tolerance in AA rats.

  15. Use of electrical impedance spectroscopy to detect malignant and potentially malignant oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murdoch C

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Craig Murdoch,1 Brian H Brown,6 Vanessa Hearnden,1 Paul M Speight,3 Katy D’Apice,1,2 Anne M Hegarty,2 John A Tidy,4 T Jamie Healey,5 Peter E Highfield,7 Martin H Thornhill1,2 1Unit of Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Surgery, University of Sheffield School of Clinical Dentistry, Sheffield, United Kingdom; 2Unit of Oral Medicine, Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sheffield, United Kingdom; 3Unit of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, University of Sheffield School of Clinical Dentistry, Sheffield, United Kingdom; 4Department of Gynaecological Oncology, 5Department of Medical Physics, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, United Kingdom; 6University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, United Kingdom; 7Zilico Ltd., The MedTECH Centre, Rutherford House, Manchester Science Park, Manchester, United Kingdom Abstract: The electrical properties of tissues depend on their architecture and cellular composition. We have previously shown that changes in electrical impedance can be used to differentiate between different degrees of cervical dysplasia and cancer of the cervix. In this proof-of-concept study, we aimed to determine whether electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS could distinguish between normal oral mucosa; benign, potentially malignant lesions (PML; and oral cancer. EIS data were collected from oral cancer (n=10, PML (n=27, and benign (n=10 lesions. EIS from lesions was compared with the EIS reading from the normal mucosa on the contralateral side of the mouth or with reference spectra from mucosal sites of control subjects (n=51. Healthy controls displayed significant differences in the EIS obtained from different oral sites. In addition, there were significant differences in the EIS of cancer and high-risk PML versus low-risk PML and controls. There was no significant difference between benign lesions and normal controls. Study subjects also deemed

  16. Intestinal helminth coinfection is associated with mucosal lesions and poor response to therapy in American tegumentary leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo-Coutinho, Rilza Beatriz G; Pimentel, Maria Inês; Zanini, Graziela Maria; Madeira, Maria F; Cataldo, Jamyra Iglesias; Schubach, Armando O; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira; de Mello, Cintia Xavier; Mendonça, Sergio C F

    2016-02-01

    The most severe clinical form of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) due to Leishmania braziliensis is mucosal leishmaniasis (ML), characterized by destructive lesions in the facial mucosa. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 109 ATL patients from Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, where ATL is caused by L. braziliensis, to evaluate the influence of intestinal parasite coinfections in the clinical course of ATL. Parasitological stool examination (PSE) was performed with samples from all patients by the sedimentation, Kato-Katz and Baermann-Moraes methods. The diagnosis of ATL was made from lesion biopsies by direct observation of amastigotes in Giemsa-stained imprints, isolation of Leishmania promastigotes or histopathological examination. All patients were treated with meglumine antimoniate. Patients with positive PSE had a frequency of mucosal lesions significantly higher than those with negative PSE (pAscaris lumbricoides (p<0.05), but not for protozoan infections. Patients with intestinal parasites had poor response to therapy (therapeutic failure or relapse) significantly more frequently than the patients with negative stool examination (p<0.005). A similar difference (p<0.005) was observed between patients with positive and negative results for intestinal helminths, but not for intestinal protozoa. Patients with positive PSE took significantly longer to heal than those with negative PSE (p<0.005). A similar difference was observed for intestinal helminth infections (p<0.005), but not for protozoan infections. Our results indicate a deleterious influence of intestinal helminth infections in the clinical course of ATL and evidence for the first time an association between ML and these coinfections, particularly with nematodes and A. lumbricoides.

  17. Oral Delivery of a Novel Recombinant Streptococcus mitis Vector Elicits Robust Vaccine Antigen-Specific Oral Mucosal and Systemic Antibody Responses and T Cell Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Xie

    Full Text Available The pioneer human oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus mitis has unique biologic features that make it an attractive mucosal vaccine or therapeutic delivery vector. S. mitis is safe as a natural persistent colonizer of the mouth, throat and nasopharynx and the oral commensal bacterium is capable of inducing mucosal antibody responses. A recombinant S. mitis (rS. mitis that stably expresses HIV envelope protein was generated and tested in the germ-free mouse model to evaluate the potential usefulness of this vector as a mucosal vaccine against HIV. Oral vaccination led to the efficient and persistent bacterial colonization of the mouth and the induction of both salivary and systemic antibody responses. Interestingly, persistently colonized animals developed antigen-specific systemic T cell tolerance. Based on these findings we propose the use of rS. mitis vaccine vector for the induction of mucosal antibodies that will prevent the penetration of the mucosa by pathogens such as HIV. Moreover, the first demonstration of rS. mitis having the ability to elicit T cell tolerance suggest the potential use of rS. mitis as an immunotherapeutic vector to treat inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  18. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carol L Fischer; Katherine S Walters; David R Drake; Deborah V Dawson; Derek R Blanchette; Kim A Brogden; Philip W Wertz

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria;however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  19. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-09-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces.

  20. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency.

  1. Comprehensive Assessment of Host Responses to 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis through Transcriptomic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ta Chang

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy plays an important role in current cancer therapy; however, several problems remain unsolved on the issue of host-therapeutics interaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the host responses after 5-flurouracil (5-FU administration and to find the target genes and their relationship with other cytokines in the 5-FU-induced oral mucositis (OM mouse model through transcriptomic analysis.Thirty-six 6 to 8 week-old male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into the control group and 5-FU-treated group. In the 5-FU group, mice received 5-FU (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally on day 1, day 8, day 15, day 22, and day 29, respectively. We evaluated the oral mucosal change under macroanalysis and histological examination at indicated periods, and then applied transcriptomic analysis of gene expression profile and Immunohistochemical stain to identify the target molecules related to 5-FU-induced OM.The most prominent histological change in this model was observed in the fifth week. The gene expression of Bone gamma-carboxyglutamate protein, related sequence 1 (Bglap-rs1 (-12.69-fold and Chitinase 3-like 4 (Chi3l4 (-6.35-fold were significantly down-regulated in this phase. The quantitative real-time PCR results also revealed the expression levels were 0.62-fold in Bglap-rs1 and 0.13-fold in Chi3l4 compared with the control group. Immunohistochemical stain showed significant expression of cluster of differentiation 11b (p<0.01, interleukin-1β (p<0.001 and tumor necrosis factor-α (p<0.05, and down-regulation of Bglap-rs1 (p<0.01 compared with the control group. By Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis, there were twenty-three pathways significantly participated in this study (p<0.05.Through comprehensively transcriptomic analysis and IHC stain, we discovered several valuable pathways, verified the main pro-inflammatory cytokines, and revealed two significantly down-regulated genes in the 5-FU-induced OM model. These

  2. [Significance of deficient bacterial colonization in the pathogenesis of mucosal lesions in experimental blind loop syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menge, H; Germer, C T; Stössel, R; Simes, G; Wagner, J; Hahn, H; Riecken, E O

    1985-07-20

    A complete evaluation of the bacterial flora in jejunal self-filling blind loops was performed. The results show a significant increase in bacteria of the genera E. coli, Streptococcus and Bacteroides. In further experiments, jejunal self-filling blind loops were created in germ-free animals. In spite of the germ-free state the mucosa displayed marked hyperplasia. The same was true when the blind loops had been contaminated with aerobic bacteria. These results demonstrate that other factors in addition to bacterial overgrowth contribute to the mucosal damage observed in self-filling blind loops.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy and pitfalls of fine needle aspiration cytology and scrape cytology in oral cavity lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Nesreen H. Hafez; Mohamed I. Fahim

    2014-01-01

    Background — The oral cavity can be home for a wide variety of lesions. To date, biopsy has remained the gold standard for diagnosing these lesions. Purpose — This study was carried out to assess the diagnostic accuracy of cytology in the oral lesions and to address the cytologic-histologic correlation. Patients and Methods — This prospective study included 72 patients with intraoral lesions. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) or scrap cytology was performed. The smears were immediate...

  4. Stabilization of serum antibody responses triggered by initial mucosal contact with the antigen independently of oral tolerance induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. Verdolin

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Initial contacts with a T-dependent antigen by mucosal routes may result in oral tolerance, defined as the inhibition of specific antibody formation after subsequent parenteral immunizations with the same antigen. We describe here an additional and permanent consequence of these initial contacts, namely, the blockade of secondary-type responsiveness to subsequent parenteral contacts with the antigen. When repeatedly boosted ip with small doses (3 µg of ovalbumin (OVA (or lysozyme, primed B6D2F1 mice showed progressively higher antibody responses. In contrast, mice primed after a single oral exposure to the antigen, although repeatedly boosted, maintained their secondary antibody titers on a level which was inversely proportional to the dose of antigen in the oral pretreatment. This phenomenon also occurred in situations in which oral tolerance was not induced. For example, senile 70-week-old B6D2F1 mice pretreated with a single gavage of 20 mg OVA did not become tolerant, i.e., they formed the same secondary levels of anti-OVA antibodies as non-pretreated mice. However, after 4 weekly challenges with 3 µg OVA ip, orally pretreated mice maintained the same anti-OVA serum levels, whereas the levels of control mice increased sequentially. This "stabilizing" effect of mucosal exposure was dose dependent, occurred with different proteins and was triggered by single or multiple oral or nasal exposures to the antigen.

  5. Oral lesions and immune status of HIV infected adults from eastern Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu, S. Giridhar; Thakur, Rachana; Singh, Asutosh Kumar; Rajbhandary, Srijana; Mishra, Rajeev Kumar; Sagtani, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To document the prevalence, age and gender distribution of oral lesions in HIV infected adults and the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy and correlate them to the immune status of the patients. Materials and Methods: Oral lesions were diagnosed by a detailed physical examination by trained and calibrated examiners according to the case definitions established by the Oral HIV/AIDS research alliance. Demographic details, risk behavior patterns and oral symptoms and ha...

  6. Screening for oral precancer with noninvasive genetic cytology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, J.F.; Graveland, A.P.; Brink, A.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Kuik, D.J.; Leemans, C.R.; Bloemena, E.; van der Waal, I.; Brakenhoff, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas develop in precancerous fields consisting of genetically altered mucosal epithelial cells. These precancerous fields may appear as clinically visible lesions, in particular, oral leukoplakia, but the large majority remains clinically undetectable. The aim of this study

  7. Impacto de lesiones orales sobre la calidad de vida en pacientes adultos

    OpenAIRE

    S. Díaz Cárdenas

    2016-01-01

    Objetivo: Evaluar el impacto de lesiones orales sobre la calidad de vida relacionada con la Salud Oral (CVRSB) en adultos. Materiales y métodos: Estudio analítico transversal, muestra a conveniencia de 292 pacientes, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Cartagena, con lesiones orales en los últimos 3 meses y diligenciaron el Índice de Salud Oral General, GOHAI para evaluar CVRSB. Dos examinadores fueron calibrados para evaluar lesiones orales. Fue realizado análisis univariado y multivaria...

  8. Therapeutic management of radiation-induced oral mucositis; Therapeutische Beeinflussung der radiogenen oralen Mukositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, W. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Doelling-Jochem, I. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Baumann, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Herrmann, T. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    Background: Acute reactions of oral mucosa are a frequent side effect of radiotherapy, which often necessitates interruption of the treatment. Marked proliferation of tumor stem cells during treatment interruptions may occur in squamous cell carcinomata, which represent the majority of tumors in the head and neck area. Hence a fatal consequence of treatment breaks may be a significant decrease in tumor cure rates. Furthermore, marked acute responses frequently result in increased late sequelae (`consequential damage`). Therefore, amelioration of the mucosal response aiming at avoiding treatment breaks and at reduction of late reactions coul definitely increase the therapeutic success of radiation treatment. Results: A variety of prophylactic and therapeutic methods have been proposed for the management of acute radiation reactions of the oral mucosa. Frequently, their efficiacy has been established for chemotherapy or in combination with other immunosuppressive treatments. Hence, systemical rather than local effects have to be considered. Conclusions: In general, prophylaxis of oral mucositis is mainly based on dental restoration or edentation, in combination with frequent oral hygienic measures after the meals and with antiseptic mouthwashes. Intensive personal care is recommended. The necessity of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostoma is dependent on the status of the patient and on size and localization of the treatment area, i.e. the impairment of food uptake which is to be expected. Therapeutic intervention is restricted to local or systemic treatment of pain and local application of antimycotics and antibiotics. (orig./VHE) [Deutsch] Die akute Reaktion der Mundschleimhaut ist eine regelmaessige Nebenwirkung der klinischen Strahlentherapie von Kopf-Hals-Tumoren, die in vielen Faellen eine Unterbrechung der Behandlung erzwingt. In den Behandlungspausen besteht gerade bei den im Kopf-Hals-Bereich haeufigen Plattenepithelkarzinomen die Gefahr der verstaerkten

  9. Clinical, biological, histological features and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy: a literature review; Aspectos clinicos, biologicos, histopatologicos e tratamentos propostos para a mucosite oral induzida por radioterapia: revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonan, Paulo Rogerio Ferreti [Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros e Faculdades Unidas do Norte de Minas, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Odontologia]. E-mail: pbonan@yahoo.com; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Almeida, Oslei Paes de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Diagnostico Oral; Alves, Fabio de Abreu [Hospital do Cancer AC Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Estomatologia

    2005-07-01

    The oral mucositis is a main side effect of radiotherapy on head and neck, initiating two weeks after the beginning of the treatment. It is characterized by sensation of local burning to intense pain, leading in several cases, to the interruption of the treatment. The purpose of this work is to review the main published studies that discuss the clinical, biological and histopathological features of oral mucositis induced by radiation therapy and to describe the main approaches recommended to prevent or to treat it. Although the clinical features of mucositis are intensively described in the literature, few studies address the histopathological alterations in oral mucositis and only recently, its biological processes have been investigated. The biological mechanisms involved in the radiation tissue damage have been only recently discussed and there is no consensus among treatment modalities. Yet, the progressive knowledge in the histopathology and biological characteristics of oral mucositis probably will lead to more effective in prevention and control strategies. (author)

  10. Culture of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells for the Purpose of Treating Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Paaske Utheim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The cornea is critical for normal vision as it allows allowing light transmission to the retina. The corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial cells (LEC, which are located in the periphery of the cornea, the limbus. Damage or disease involving LEC may lead to various clinical presentations of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD. Both severe pain and blindness may result. Transplantation of cultured autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS represents the first use of a cultured non-limbal autologous cell type to treat this disease. Among non-limbal cell types, CAOMECS and conjunctival epithelial cells are the only laboratory cultured cell sources that have been explored in humans. Thus far, the expression of p63 is the only predictor of clinical outcome following transplantation to correct LSCD. The optimal culture method and substrate for CAOMECS is not established. The present review focuses on cell culture methods, with particular emphasis on substrates. Most culture protocols for CAOMECS used amniotic membrane as a substrate and included the xenogeneic components fetal bovine serum and murine 3T3 fibroblasts. However, it has been demonstrated that tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheet grafts can be successfully fabricated using temperature-responsive culture surfaces and autologous serum. In the studies using different substrates for culture of CAOMECS, the quantitative expression of p63 was generally poorly reported; thus, more research is warranted with quantification of phenotypic data. Further research is required to develop a culture system for CAOMECS that mimics the natural environment of oral/limbal/corneal epithelial cells without the need for undefined foreign materials such as serum and feeder cells.

  11. Culture of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells for the Purpose of Treating Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utheim, Tor Paaske; Utheim, Øygunn Aass; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Sehic, Amer

    2016-03-01

    The cornea is critical for normal vision as it allows allowing light transmission to the retina. The corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial cells (LEC), which are located in the periphery of the cornea, the limbus. Damage or disease involving LEC may lead to various clinical presentations of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Both severe pain and blindness may result. Transplantation of cultured autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) represents the first use of a cultured non-limbal autologous cell type to treat this disease. Among non-limbal cell types, CAOMECS and conjunctival epithelial cells are the only laboratory cultured cell sources that have been explored in humans. Thus far, the expression of p63 is the only predictor of clinical outcome following transplantation to correct LSCD. The optimal culture method and substrate for CAOMECS is not established. The present review focuses on cell culture methods, with particular emphasis on substrates. Most culture protocols for CAOMECS used amniotic membrane as a substrate and included the xenogeneic components fetal bovine serum and murine 3T3 fibroblasts. However, it has been demonstrated that tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheet grafts can be successfully fabricated using temperature-responsive culture surfaces and autologous serum. In the studies using different substrates for culture of CAOMECS, the quantitative expression of p63 was generally poorly reported; thus, more research is warranted with quantification of phenotypic data. Further research is required to develop a culture system for CAOMECS that mimics the natural environment of oral/limbal/corneal epithelial cells without the need for undefined foreign materials such as serum and feeder cells.

  12. Topical Olive Leaf Extract Improves Healing of Oral Mucositis in Golden Hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showraki, Najmeh; Mardani, Maryam; Emamghoreishi, Masoumeh; Andishe-Tadbir, Azadeh; Aram, Alireza; Mehriar, Peiman; Omidi, Mahmoud; Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Tanideh, Nader

    2016-12-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a common side effect of anti-cancer drugs and needs significant attention for its prevention. This study aimed to evaluate the healing effects of olive leaf extract on 5-fluorouracil-induced OM in golden hamster. OM was induced in 63 male golden hamsters by the combination of 5-fluorouracil injections (days 0, 5 and 10) and the abrasion of the cheek pouch (days 3 and 4). On day 12, hamsters were received topical olive leaf extract ointment, base of ointment, or no treatment (control) for 5 days. Histopathology evaluations, blood examinations, and tissue malondialdehyde level measurement were performed 1, 3 and 5 days after treatments. Histopathology score and tissue malondialdehyde level were significantly lower in olive leaf extract treated group in comparison with control and base groups (p= 0.000). Significant decreases in white blood cell, hemoglobin, hematocrit , and mean corpuscular volume and an increase in mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were observed in olive leaf extract treated group in comparison with control and base groups (p< 0.05). Our findings demonstrated that daily application of olive leaf extract ointment had healing effect on 5-fluorouracil induced OM in hamsters. Moreover, the beneficial effect of olive leaf extract on OM might be due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  13. Adverse event management of oral mucositis in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Sabine; Kosse, Jens; Loibl, Sibylle; Jackisch, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a clinically important and frequent adverse event (AE) associated with cancer treatment with conventional chemotherapy as well as new targeted agents. Incidence and severity of OM vary from treatment to treatment and from patient to patient. The pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced OM can be divided into 5 phases. OM induced by targeted therapies differs among other things in appearance, course, concomitant AEs and toxicity, and thus could be perceived as an entity distinct from chemotherapy-induced OM with an innate pathogenic mechanism. OM has a severe impact on a patient's quality of life (QoL) by causing complications such as pain and discomfort. Even more important are associated restrictions in nutrition and hydration. Thus, the efficacy of cancer therapy might be impaired due to the necessity of dose delays and dose reductions. Numerous preventive and therapeutic approaches have been evaluated, but currently no single agent has changed the standard of care in preventing and treating OM. Thus, the current management has evolved from clinical experience rather than clinical evidence. This article will review the AE 'OM' induced by breast cancer treatment with chemotherapy and targeted agents in order to provide practical guidance for management and prevention.

  14. Dosimetric study of photobiomodulation therapy in 5-FU-induced oral mucositis in hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotomacio, Claudia Carrara; Campos, Luana; Nesadal de Souza, Douglas; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Simões, Alyne

    2017-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a debilitating consequence of cancer treatment that could be treated with photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT); however, there is no consensus about its dosimetric parameters for OM healing. The aim of this study was to compare different PBMT protocols on OM treatment, through clinical and histological analysis. Thirty hamsters were used, in an induced model of OM by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and superficial scratching, in seven days of follow-up. The animals were divided into five groups: control (C), which received only anesthesia and chemotherapeutic vehicle; chemotherapy (Ch), which received anesthesia, 5-FU, and scratches; laser 1 (L1), the same as Ch group, PBMT 6 J/cm2 and 0.24 J (one point); laser 2 (L2), the same as Ch group, PBMT 25 J/cm2 and 1 J (one point); and laser 3 (L3), the same as Ch group, PBMT 4 points of 0.24 J and 6 J/cm2 each. The laser used has λ=660 nm, 0.04 cm2 of spot area, and 40 mW. The best PBMT protocol to maintain lowest OM levels compared to Ch group was L1, followed by L2 and L3. Our results suggest that the application mode of PBMT and the energy delivered per area could interfere with the OM healing.

  15. Topical Olive Leaf Extract Improves Healing of Oral Mucositis in Golden Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showraki, Najmeh; Mardani, Maryam; Emamghoreishi, Masoumeh; Andishe-Tadbir, Azadeh; Aram, Alireza; Mehriar, Peiman; Omidi, Mahmoud; Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Tanideh, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Oral mucositis (OM) is a common side effect of anti-cancer drugs and needs significant attention for its prevention. Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the healing effects of olive leaf extract on 5-fluorouracil-induced OM in golden hamster. Materials and Method: OM was induced in 63 male golden hamsters by the combination of 5-fluorouracil injections (days 0, 5 and 10) and the abrasion of the cheek pouch (days 3 and 4). On day 12, hamsters were received topical olive leaf extract ointment, base of ointment, or no treatment (control) for 5 days. Histopathology evaluations, blood examinations, and tissue malondialdehyde level measurement were performed 1, 3 and 5 days after treatments. Results: Histopathology score and tissue malondialdehyde level were significantly lower in olive leaf extract treated group in comparison with control and base groups (p= 0.000). Significant decreases in white blood cell, hemoglobin, hematocrit , and mean corpuscular volume and an increase in mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were observed in olive leaf extract treated group in comparison with control and base groups (phamsters. Moreover, the beneficial effect of olive leaf extract on OM might be due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:27942549

  16. Evolutionary Developments in Interpreting the Gluten-Induced Mucosal Celiac Lesion: An Archimedian Heuristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Michael N.; Heal, Calvin J.

    2017-01-01

    The evolving history of the small intestinal biopsy and its interpretation—and misinterpretations—are described in this paper. Certain interpretative errors in the technical approaches to histological assessment are highlighted—even though we may never be rid of them. For example, mucosal “flattening” does not reduce individual villi to their cores, as still seems to be widely believed. Neither is the mucosa undergoing an atrophic process—since it can recover structurally. Rather, the intestinal mucosa manifests a vast hypertrophic response resulting in the formation of large plateaus formed from partially reduced villi and their amalgamation with the now increased height and width of the inter-villous ridges: this is associated with considerable increases in crypt volumes. Sections through mosaic plateaus gives an erroneous impression of the presence of stunted, flat-topped villi which continues to encourage both the continued use of irrelevant “atrophy” terminologies and a marked failure to perceive what random sections through mosaic plateaus actually look like. While reviewing the extensive 40+ year literature on mucosal analysis, we extracted data on intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) counts from 607 biopsies, and applied receiver-operating characteristic (ROC)-curve analysis. From that perspective, it appears that counting IEL/100 enterocyte nuclei in routine haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) sections provides the most useful discriminator of celiac mucosae at histological level, with an effective cut-off of 27 IEL, and offering a very high sensitivity with few false negatives. ROC-curve analysis also revealed the somewhat lesser accuracies of either CD3+ or γδ+ IEL counts. Current official guidelines seem to be somewhat inadequate in clearly defining the spectrum of gluten-induced mucosal pathologies and how they could be optimally interpreted, as well as in promoting the ideal manner for physicians and pathologists to interact in interpreting

  17. Divalent toxoids loaded stable chitosan-glucomannan nanoassemblies for efficient systemic, mucosal and cellular immunostimulatory response following oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harde, Harshad; Siddhapura, Krupa; Agrawal, Ashish Kumar; Jain, Sanyog

    2015-06-20

    The present study reports dual tetanus and diphtheria toxoids loaded stable chitosan-glucomannan nanoassemblies (sCh-GM-NAs) formulated using tandem ionic gelation technique for oral mucosal immunization. The stable, lyophilized sCh-GM-NAs exhibited ~152 nm particle size and ~85% EE of both the toxoids. The lyophilized sCh-GM-NAs displayed excellent stability in biomimetic media and preserved chemical, conformation and biological stability of encapsulated toxoids. The higher intracellular APCs uptake of sCh-GM-NAs was concentration and time dependent which may be attributed to the receptor mediated endocytosis via mannose and glucose receptor. The higher Caco-2 uptake of sCh-GM-NAs was further confirmed by ex vivo intestinal uptake studies. The in vivo evaluation revealed that sCh-GM-NAs posed significantly (p<0.001) higher humoral, mucosal and cellular immune response than other counterparts by eliciting complete protective levels of anti-TT and anti-DT (~0.1 IU/mL) antibodies. Importantly, commercial 'Dual antigen' vaccine administered through oral or intramuscular route was unable to elicit all type of immune response. Conclusively, sCh-GM-NAs could be considered as promising vaccine adjuvant for oral mucosal immunization.

  18. Absorption and tolerability of fentanyl buccal soluble film (FBSF in patients with cancer in the presence of oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn AL

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrew L Finn1, WD Charlie Hill2, Ignacio Tagarro3, Larry N Gever41Product Development, BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Co-founding partner, InVisions Consultants, LLC, San Antonio, TX, USA; 3Marketing Centre CIP CNS, Meda Pharma S.A.U., Madrid, Spain; 4Medical Affairs, Meda Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Somerset, NJ, USAPurpose: Fentanyl buccal soluble film (FBSF consists of a small, bilayered, water-soluble polymer film that adheres to the buccal mucosa and rapidly delivers fentanyl into the systemic circulation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the absorption of fentanyl from FBSF in patients with cancer, with and without grade 1 oral mucositis, and to assess the tolerability of FBSF in this patient population.Patients and methods: In an open-label, single-dose study, two groups of opioid-naive patients (ie, not receiving opioids on a regular basis with cancer received a 200 µg dose of FBSF. Patients in cohort I (n = 7 had grade 1 mucositis, and patients in cohort II (n = 7 were age- and gender-matched controls without mucositis. The FBSF dose was placed on the area of mucositis in cohort I and on a matching location in cohort II. Blood samples were collected up to 4 hours after administration, and safety assessments were made throughout the study.Results: Peak plasma concentration and area under the concentration–time curve from time 0 to 4 hours post-dose values of patients in the grade 1 mucositis cohort were lower than those observed in patients without mucositis. There was no application site irritation reported in any patient, regardless of mucositis status. Mild somnolence was reported by two patients with mucositis. There were no deaths or serious adverse events reported in this study.Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that application of FBSF to an area of grade 1 mucositis does not result in increased fentanyl exposure or irritation of the mucosa. The 200 µg dose of FBSF was well

  19. Immunoexpression of Interleukin-22 and Interleukin-23 in Oral and Cutaneous Lichen Planus Lesions: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin- (IL- 22 is the signature cytokine of T-helper (Th 22 cells, and IL-23 is required for IL-22 production. The objective of this study was to examine the immunoexpression of IL-22 and IL-23 in archival paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens from oral LP (n=42 and cutaneous LP (n=38 against normal control tissues. The results showed that the percentage of cells expressing IL-22 and IL-23 in LP were significantly higher in LP compared to controls, respectively (both P<0.001. The correlation between IL-22 and IL-23 expression was significant (P<0.05. Moreover, the percentage of cells expressing IL-22 and IL-23 in oral LP were significantly higher than cutaneous LP (P<0.05. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that the increased expression of IL-22 and IL-23 in LP lesions could play roles in the pathogenesis of LP. Moreover, oral LP expressing IL-22 and IL-23 was higher than cutaneous LP, probably due to Th22 cells as an important component of oral mucosal host defense against oral microbiota and tissue antigens. This may be associated with the difference in clinical behaviour of the two variants of the disease.

  20. Oral mucosal manifestations in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and dry mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Błochowiak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : One of the most important symptoms of Sjögren syndrome is xerostomia. The oral cavity deprived of saliva and its natural lubricative, protective and antibacterial properties is prone to a number of unfavourable consequences. Aim : To present the most important lesions on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and in dry mouth syndrome. Material and methods: The study group comprised 55 patients including 52 women and 3 men aged 20–72 years (average: 28.25 years. Results : Basing on the accepted criteria, primary Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed in 22 (40% patients, secondary Sjögren syndrome in 18 (32.7% patients, and dry mouth syndrome in 15 (27.27% patients. The physical examination and the examination of the mouth were performed and history was elicited from every patient. Conclusions : The most common pathologies appearing on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome are angular cheilitis, cheilitis, increased lip dryness as well as non-specific ulcerations, aphthae and aphthoid conditions.

  1. Oral mucosal manifestations in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and dry mouth syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olewicz-Gawlik, Anna; Polańska, Adriana; Nowak-Gabryel, Michalina; Kocięcki, Jarosław; Witmanowski, Henryk; Sokalski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the most important symptoms of Sjögren syndrome is xerostomia. The oral cavity deprived of saliva and its natural lubricative, protective and antibacterial properties is prone to a number of unfavourable consequences. Aim To present the most important lesions on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and in dry mouth syndrome. Material and methods The study group comprised 55 patients including 52 women and 3 men aged 20–72 years (average: 28.25 years). Results Basing on the accepted criteria, primary Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed in 22 (40%) patients, secondary Sjögren syndrome in 18 (32.7%) patients, and dry mouth syndrome in 15 (27.27%) patients. The physical examination and the examination of the mouth were performed and history was elicited from every patient. Conclusions The most common pathologies appearing on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome are angular cheilitis, cheilitis, increased lip dryness as well as non-specific ulcerations, aphthae and aphthoid conditions. PMID:26985175

  2. Prediction of Acute Radiation Mucositis using an Oral Mucosal Dose Surface Model in Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Musha

    Full Text Available To evaluate the dose-response relationship for development of acute radiation mucositis (ARM using an oral mucosal dose surface model (OMDS-model in carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT for head and neck tumors.Thirty-nine patients receiving C-ion RT for head and neck cancer were evaluated for ARM (once per week for 6 weeks according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, version 4.0, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG scoring systems. The irradiation schedule typically used was 64 Gy [relative biological effectiveness (RBE] in 16 fractions for 4 weeks. Maximum point doses in the palate and tongue were compared with ARM in each patient.The location of the ARM coincided with the high-dose area in the OMDS-model. There was a clear dose-response relationship between maximum point dose and ARM grade assessed using the RTOG criteria but not the CTCAE. The threshold doses for grade 2-3 ARM in the palate and tongue were 43.0 Gy(RBE and 54.3 Gy(RBE, respectively.The OMDS-model was useful for predicting the location and severity of ARM. Maximum point doses in the model correlated well with grade 2-3 ARM.

  3. Biomarkers in the assessment of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normando, Ana Gabriela Costa; Rocha, Camila Lopes; de Toledo, Isabela Porto; de Souza Figueiredo, Paulo Tadeu; Dos Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of biomarkers to predict the risk of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients, as well as to assess the correlation between these biomarkers and the severity of mucositis. The search was performed at LILACS, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, and Web of Science. A search of the gray literature was performed on Google Scholar, OpenGrey, and ProQuest. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (MAStARI) tool, and the evidence quality was assessed by the Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. After a two-step selection process, 26 studies met the eligibility criteria. In total, 27 biomarkers were evaluated, and the most frequent were the epidermal growth factor (EGF), C-reactive protein (CRP), genetic polymorphisms, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). The meta-analysis showed an expression of polymorphisms in XRCC1 (32.66%), XRCC3 (31.00%), and RAD51 (39.16%) genes, as well as an expression of protein biomarkers (39.57%), in patients with an increased risk of developing oral mucositis. Dosing biomarkers before starting radiation therapy may be a promising method to predict the risk of developing mucositis and allow radiosensitive patients to have a customized treatment. Although there is currently limited evidence to confirm the putative implementation of serum and salivary biomarkers to assess the correlation between them and the severity of mucositis, this current review provides new research directions.

  4. A morphometric study of the protective effect of cryotherapy on oral mucositis in cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeli, M; Aldemir, M N; Bingol, F; Dogan, C; Kara, A

    2016-10-01

    We investigated cytological changes in oral mucosa smears from patients treated with cryotherapy to determine whether cryotherapy prevented mucositis caused by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) therapy. Patients with gastrointestinal malignancies were divided into four groups; control patients before 5-FU therapy, patients after 5-FU therapy without cryotherapy, patients with cryotherapy before 5-FU therapy and patients with cryotherapy after 5-FU therapy. Oral mucosa samples from all patients were assessed at the beginning and on day 14 of chemotherapy. We used exfoliative cytology to evaluate cellular changes in the oral mucosa that were caused by 5-FU. Smears from each patient were stained using the Papanicolaou method and analyzed using stereology. Smears were taken from each group before and after 5-FU infusion. We found that nuclear volume was decreased significantly in cells of the 5-FU therapy after cryotherapy patients compared to the 5-FU therapy before cryotherapy patients. We also found significantly decreased cytoplasmic volumes in the 5-FU therapy after cryotherapy patients compared to the 5-FU therapy before cryotherapy patients. The results of cytomorphometric estimations revealed that cryotherapy may be used to prevent damage to oral tissue and may decrease the frequency and duration of oral mucositis caused by 5-FU.

  5. Narrow band (light) imaging of oral mucosa in routine dental patients. Part I: Assessment of value in detection of mucosal changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelove, Edmond L; Dean, David; Maltby, Samuel; Griffith, Matthew; Huggins, Kimberly; Griffith, Mickealla; Taylor, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the value of adding narrow band (light) imaging (NBI) to the standard oral soft tissue examination process used to detect mucosal change. A total of 620 dental patients who came to the clinic for regular dental evaluation or for treatment of acute dental problems were given a standard oral soft tissue examination by dental students under faculty supervision. The results of the white light examination were recorded after the tissues were examined with NBI, at which point areas with a loss of fluorescence (LOF) were recorded. The nature of the tissue change was classified clinically as normal variation, inflammatory, traumatic, dysplastic, or other, and patients were categorized depending on their clinical findings: normal, need follow-up visit, or immediate biopsy. Risk factors related to oral dysplasia also were recorded. The addition of NBI added between one and two minutes to the examination process. Of the 620 examinations, an area with an LOF suggestive of pathology was detected in 69 subjects (11.1%). After a second immediate evaluation, 28 of the 69 subjects were scheduled for follow-up or biopsy. None of the lesions discovered in these 28 subjects had been detected using standard (white light) examination. Adding NBI to the routine clinical examination resulted in detection of changes not seen with white light examination in 11.1% of patients; of these, a small but important number were found to have otherwise undetected persistent changes representing inflammatory lesions or potentially dangerous oral dysplasia. Adding NBI as an adjunctive diagnostic procedure improved the quality and outcome of the examination process.

  6. Honey and a mixture of honey, beeswax, and olive oil-propolis extract in treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrhman, Mamdouh; Elbarbary, Nancy Samir; Ahmed Amin, Dina; Saeid Ebrahim, Rania

    2012-04-01

    In spite of being one of the most investigated subjects among supportive care in cancer, no therapy has been found effective in treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Based on the observations that honey bees products have anti-inflammatory and wound healing effects, the present study tried to evaluate the effect of topical application of honey and a mixture of honey, olive oil-propolis extract, and beeswax (HOPE) in treatment of oral mucositis. This was a randomized controlled clinical trial conducted on 90 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and oral mucositis grades 2 and 3. The mean age of enrolled patients was 6.9 years. The patients were assigned into 3 equal treatment groups: Honey, HOPE, and control groups. Topical treatment for each patient consists of honey, HOPE, and benzocaine gel for honey, HOPE, and control groups, respectively. Recovery time in grade 2 mucositis was significantly reduced in the honey group as compared with either HOPE or controls (P < .05). In grade 3 mucositis, recovery time did not differ significantly between honey and HOPE (P = 0.61) but compared with controls, healing was faster with either honey or HOPE (P < .01). Generally, in both grades of mucositis, honey produced faster healing than either HOPE or controls (P < .05). Based on our results that showed that honey produced faster healing in patients with grade 2/3 chemotherapy-induced mucositis, we recommend using honey and possibly other bee products and olive oil in future therapeutic trials targeting chemotherapy-induced mucositis.

  7. Clinicopathologic Correlation of Oral Lichen Planus and Oral Lichenoid Lesions: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinka Mravak-Stipetić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral lichen planus (OLP and oral lichenoid lesions (OLL are clinically and histologically similar lesions but their treatment planning and prognosis are different. The review of the literature indicates numerous criteria to distinguish these two lesions; however there is a lot of inconsistency. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the correlation of histopathology and clinical OLP and OLL diagnosis and to clarify which histopathologic criteria could best distinguish these two diagnoses. A retrospective study showed that clinically diagnosed 92 OLPs and 14 OLLs have been confirmed histopathologically in 52.2% and 42.9% of cases, respectively. In addition, histopathology showed statistically significant more eosinophils (P<0.0005, plasma cells (P<0.0005, and granulocytes (P<0.05 in OLL than OLP. To establish histopathological diagnosis of OLP and OLL it should be mandatory to define the type of cells in mononuclear infiltrate, which can be associated more accurately with clinical feature and patient history. Therefore, currently accepted diagnostic criteria for OLP and OLL should be modified and validated on a larger number of patients taking into account particular distinguishing histopathological features.

  8. Voice disorders in mucosal leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Nunes Ruas

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Leishmaniasis is considered as one of the six most important infectious diseases because of its high detection coefficient and ability to produce deformities. In most cases, mucosal leishmaniasis (ML occurs as a consequence of cutaneous leishmaniasis. If left untreated, mucosal lesions can leave sequelae, interfering in the swallowing, breathing, voice and speech processes and requiring rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: To describe the anatomical characteristics and voice quality of ML patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A descriptive transversal study was conducted in a cohort of ML patients treated at the Laboratory for Leishmaniasis Surveillance of the Evandro Chagas National Institute of Infectious Diseases-Fiocruz, between 2010 and 2013. The patients were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic clinical examination by endoscopy of the upper airways and digestive tract and to speech-language assessment through directed anamnesis, auditory perception, phonation times and vocal acoustic analysis. The variables of interest were epidemiologic (sex and age and clinic (lesion location, associated symptoms and voice quality. RESULTS: 26 patients under ML treatment and monitored by speech therapists were studied. 21 (81% were male and five (19% female, with ages ranging from 15 to 78 years (54.5+15.0 years. The lesions were distributed in the following structures 88.5% nasal, 38.5% oral, 34.6% pharyngeal and 19.2% laryngeal, with some patients presenting lesions in more than one anatomic site. The main complaint was nasal obstruction (73.1%, followed by dysphonia (38.5%, odynophagia (30.8% and dysphagia (26.9%. 23 patients (84.6% presented voice quality perturbations. Dysphonia was significantly associated to lesions in the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity. CONCLUSION: We observed that vocal quality perturbations are frequent in patients with mucosal leishmaniasis, even without laryngeal lesions; they are probably associated to disorders of some

  9. [Use of laser for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head and neck cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; González-Nieto, Almudena; López-Pintor Muñoz, Rosa María

    2014-08-19

    One of the complications of radiotherapy and chemotherapy is oral mucositis. Since the low energy laser is one of the most frequently recommended interventions by authors and international societies, the aim of this study is to review the scientific evidence on the use of lasers as a preventive and therapeutic in oral mucositis associated with treatment of cancer. We performed a literature search in PubMed and The Cochrane Collaboration Library, limiting the search to the last 20 years. We finally included 29 articles that contained 30 studies. Low energy laser phototherapy seems a promising intervention in both the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis associated with cancer treatment. Virtually all studies reviewed showed good results with no adverse effects and reductions in both incidence and severity of mucositis in all types of cancer treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effective prevention of indomethacin-induced gastroduodenal mucosal lesions with roxatidine acetate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammann, H G; Wolf, N; Burkhardt, F

    1995-08-01

    In this randomized single-blind cross-over study the gastroduodenal damaging effect of indometacin 75 mg bid alone and in combination with roxatidine acetate (CAS 78628-28-1, Roxit) 75 mg nocte or 75 mg bid was evaluated in 12 healthy male volunteers. Prior to the start of the three therapeutic periods subjects underwent endoscopic examination to exclude gastroduodenal mucosa lesions. On days 7 and 14 of therapy 2 h after the application of the last indometacin dose subjects underwent endoscopy again. The 7- and 14-days administration of indometacin 75 mg bid, indometacin 75 mg bid plus roxatidine 75 mg nocte and indometacin 75 mg bid plus roxatidine 75 mg bid led to gastroduodenal mucosa lesion scores of 1.67 +/- 0.40 and 2.00 +/- 0.35, 1.33 +/- 0.28 and 1.50 +/- 0.29, 0.42 +/- 0.23 and 1.00 +/- 0.33 (mean +/- SEM), respectively. These differences were statistically significant when comparing indometacin 75 mg bid versus indometacin 75 mg bid plus roxatidine 75 mg bid (p roxatidine acetate represents an effective alternative in the prophylaxis of NSAID-induced gastroduodenal mucosa lesions.

  11. Role of Bcr1-activated genes Hwp1 and Hyr1 in Candida albicans oral mucosal biofilms and neutrophil evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Prabhat; Thompson, Angela; Xie, Zhihong; Kashleva, Helena; Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2011-01-25

    Candida albicans triggers recurrent infections of the oropharyngeal mucosa that result from biofilm growth. Prior studies have indicated that the transcription factor Bcr1 regulates biofilm formation in a catheter model, both in vitro and in vivo. We thus hypothesized that Bcr1 plays similar roles in the formation of oral mucosal biofilms and tested this hypothesis in a mouse model of oral infection. We found that a bcr1/bcr1 mutant did not form significant biofilm on the tongues of immunocompromised mice, in contrast to reference and reconstituted strains that formed pseudomembranes covering most of the tongue dorsal surface. Overexpression of HWP1, which specifies an epithelial adhesin that is under the transcriptional control of Bcr1, partly but significantly rescued the bcr1/bcr1 biofilm phenotype in vivo. Since HWP1 overexpression only partly reversed the biofilm phenotype, we investigated whether additional mechanisms, besides adhesin down-regulation, were responsible for the reduced virulence of this mutant. We discovered that the bcr1/bcr1 mutant was more susceptible to damage by human leukocytes when grown on plastic or on the surface of a human oral mucosa tissue analogue. Overexpression of HYR1, but not HWP1, significantly rescued this phenotype. Furthermore a hyr1/hyr1 mutant had significantly attenuated virulence in the mouse oral biofilm model of infection. These discoveries show that Bcr1 is critical for mucosal biofilm infection via regulation of epithelial cell adhesin and neutrophil function.

  12. Assessment of indomethacin oral spray for the treatment of oropharyngeal mucositis-induced pain during anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momo, Kenji; Nagaoka, Hiroka; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Bukawa, Hiroki; Chiba, Shigeru; Kohda, Yukinao; Homma, Masato

    2017-07-15

    The efficacy and safety of indomethacin (IM) oral spray (OS) as a pain control therapy for oropharyngeal mucositis due to anticancer chemo- and radiotherapy were assessed in patients with head and neck carcinomas and haematological tumours. We observed 35 patients (male/female, 20/15; 53 ± 17 years) with oropharyngeal mucositis who were treated with IM-OS preparation for pain relief at University of Tsukuba Hospital, Japan. Analgesic effects were assessed using the six-grade face scale for pain in 28 patients at the start of IM oral spray treatment. Systemic exposure was assessed by determining urinary excretions of IM in seven patients. Pain relief was achieved in 26 (93%) patients at 25 (5-60) min after applying the IM-OS preparation (15.6 ± 3.4 μg/kg) and analgesic effects were maintained for 120 (10-360) min. The pain was significantly decreased after using the spray (3.6 ± 0.7 vs. 2.4 ± 0.9, p < 0.01). Moreover, urinary IM excretion rates after applying the IM spray preparation were 1.8 ± 0.8% of the IM oral spray dose (130.5 ± 77.7 μg/kg/day), which was markedly lower than that following oral administration of IM (60%). No adverse events were observed following application of the spray. The present IM spray is an effective and safe preparation for pain relief and can be used as an alternative therapeutic option for oropharyngeal mucositis in cancer patients.

  13. Evaluation of mast cell counts and microvessel density in reactive lesions of the oral cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Tahamtan, Shabnam

    2016-01-01

    Background. Reliable immunohistochemical assays to assess the definitive role of mast cells (MCs) and angiogenesis in the pathogenesis of oral reactive lesions are generally not available. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mast cell counts (MCC) and microvessel density (MVD) in oral reactive lesions and determine the correlation between MCC and MVD. Methods. Seventy-five cases of reactive lesions of the oral cavity, including pyogenic granuloma, fibroma, peripheral giant cell granuloma, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, peripheral ossifying fibroma (15 for each category) were immunohisto-chemically stained with MC tryptase and CD31. Fifteen cases of normal gingival tissue were considered as the control group. The mean MCC and MVD in superficial and deep connective tissues were assessed and total MCC and MVD was computed for each lesion. Results. Statistically significant differences were observed in MCC and MVD between the study groups (P < 0.001). MC tryptase and CD31 expression increased in the superficial connective tissue of each lesion in comparison to the deep con-nective tissue. A significant negative correlation was not found between MCC and MVD in oral reactive lesions (P < 0.001, r = -0.458). Conclusion. Although MCs were present in the reactive lesions of the oral cavity, a direct correlation between MCC and MVD was not found in these lesions. Therefore, a significant interaction between MCs and endothelial cells and an active role for MCs in the growth of oral reactive lesions was not found in this study. PMID:28096950

  14. Oral lesions in HIV+/AIDS adolescents perinatally infected undergoing HAART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán-Cepeda, Luis-Alberto; Domínguez-Sánchez, Anitza; Pavía-Ruz, Noris; Muñoz-Hernández, Rocío; Verdugo-Díaz, Roberto; Valles-Medina, Ana-María; Meráz-Acosta, Héctor

    2010-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of the oral lesions related to HIV-infection (HIV-OL) in HIV+/AIDS adolescents (=13 years old), and the differences with HIV+/AIDS children (=3 - orally examined. HIV-OL was diagnosed in accordance with EC-Clearinghouse-World Health Organization. The patients were classifies with respect to their immune status in relation with the CD4+ cell counts as moderately immunodeficient; mildly immunodeficient and severely immunodeficient in accordance to the revised surveillance case definitions for HIV infection among adults, adolescents, and children aged 0.05). Oral candidiasis was the most prevalent oral lesion in both groups. Association (poral candidiasis with a high viral load was observed in both study groups. Adolescents perinatally HIV-infected have a high prevalence of HIV-OL. Oral Candidiasis still is the most frequent oral opportunistic infection. Oral lesions could have association to viral failure in HIV+/AIDS adolescents undergoing HAART.

  15. Oral pigmentation: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, C; Ramakrishnan, K; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations.

  16. Oral ingestion of Streptococcus thermophilus does not affect mucositis severity or tumor progression in the tumor-bearing rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Katie L; Howarth, Gordon S; Lymn, Kerry A; Lawrence, Andrew; Butler, Ross N

    2011-07-15

    Preventative or adjunctive agents for the amelioration of small intestinal chemotherapy-induced mucositis are not currently available for clinical use. We have previously demonstrated that oral ingestion of Streptococcus thermophilus (TH-4) partially attenuated chemotherapy-induced mucositis in the rat. Here we assess the effects of TH-4 on small intestinal damage and tumor progression in tumor-bearing rats with experimentally-induced mucositis. Female Dark Agouti tumor-bearing (mammary adenocarcinoma) rats (n = 36; 139 ± 1 g) had small intestinal damage induced via the administration of methotrexate (MTX). Rats were administered MTX; (1.5 mg/kg intramuscular) or saline at 0 and 24 h; with daily gavage administration of TH-4 (109 cfu/mL) or skim milk from -48 to +96 h post-MTX. Rats were allocated to groups (n=9): saline control, TH-4 control, MTX control or TH-4+MTX. The non-invasive ( 13) C-sucrose breath test (SBT) was conducted prior to tumor inoculation, pre-MTX (-24 h) and prior to sacrifice (96 h) to monitor gut function. At sacrifice small intestinal segments were excised and assessed for sucrase and myeloperoxidase activity as well as histological damage. Irrespective of TH-4 treatment, MTX-treated rats had a significant decrease in bodyweight, SBT levels, sucrase and myeloperoxidase activity, and histological damage score (p 0.05) but failed to alleviate mucositis indices. Although TH-4, at a dose of 109 cfu/mL, yielded neither protection nor amelioration of chemotherapy-induced mucositis, progression of mammary adenocarcinoma was unaffected.

  17. Herpes simplex virus detection in oral mucosa lesions in patients undergoing oncologic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda Tebache, Ester; Brethauer Meier, Ursula; Jiménez Moraga, Marco; Morales Figueroa, Rocío; Rojas Castro, Jaime; Le Fort Canales, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The presence of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) has been a frequent detection in gingivitis and ulcerations of oral mucosa in patients undergoing oncologic therapy. In these patients, lesions tend to show atypical clinical patterns, leading to misdiagnosis. To detect HSV, using an ELISA test, in oral lesions of patients under oncologic therapy, to determine localization of these lesions in the oral cavity, to relate their presence with the general diagnosis of the patient and to compare the test results with the previous clinical diagnosis of the lesions. Thirty lesions where examined in nineteen pediatric patients under oncologic therapy. Direct samples of all lesions were taken and an ELISA test for HSV type I and II was applied to them. General diagnosis of the patients was consigned, as well as localization of the lesions in the oral cavity and clinical diagnosis of them. A database was elaborated with all the information. 33% of lesions were positive to the test, most of them in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Localization of lesions was not restricted to areas of mucosa attached to periosteum, but also in areas like the dorsum of the tongue. Positive predictivity of clinical diagnosis was 56,25% and negative predictive index was 92,86%. Sensitivity of the test was 90% and specificity was 65%. It is very important to corroborate clinical diagnosis of gingivitis and ulcerative lesions of the oral cavity of patients under oncologic therapy with laboratory tests, because of the atypical clinical presentation that can lead to misdiagnosis.

  18. Molecular detection of avian pox virus from nodular skin and mucosal fibrinonecrotic lesions of Iranian backyard poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami-Ahangaran, Majid; Zia-Jahromi, Noosha; Namjoo, Abdolrasul

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, some outbreaks of skin lesions suspected to be avian pox were observed in the backyard poultry in different parts of western areas in Iran. Consequently, 328 backyard poultries with suspected signs of avian pox virus infection were sampled. All birds showed nodular lesions on unfeathered head skin and/or fibronecrotic lesions on mucus membrane of the oral cavity and upper respiratory tract. For histopathological analysis, the sections of tissue samples from cutaneous lesions of examined birds were stained with H&E method. For PCR, after DNA extraction a 578-bp fragment of avian pox virus from 4b core protein gene was amplified. Results showed 217 and 265 out of 328 (66.1 and 80.7%, respectively) samples were positive for avian pox virus on histopathological and PCR examination, respectively. In this study, the samples that had intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies on pathologic examination were PCR positive. This study revealed that PCR is a valuable tool for identification of an avian pox virus and that the frequency of pox infection in backyard poultry in western areas of Iran is high.

  19. Efficacy of ozonized olive oil in the management of oral lesions and conditions: A clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The oral cavity is an open ecosystem that shows a dynamic balance between the entrance of microorganisms (bacterial, viral or fungal, colonization modalities, nutritional balance, and host defenses against their removal. The oral lesions including aphthous ulcerations, herpes labialis, oral candidiasis, oral lichen planus, and angular cheilitis some of the common entities encountered in the clinical practice. A variety of treatment options is available in the literature for all of these lesions and conditions. Topical ozone therapy is a minimally invasive technique that can be used for these conditions without any side effects. Aim and Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of ozonized olive oil in the treatment of oral lesions and conditions. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal study was carried out on 50 patients (aphthous ulcerations, herpes labialis, oral candidiasis, oral lichen planus, and angular cheilitis. The ozonized olive oil was applied twice daily until the lesion regresses for a maximum of 6 months. Results: All the lesions regress in patients with aphthous ulcerations, herpes labialis, oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis or showed improvement in the signs and symptoms in oral lichen planus patients. No toxicity or side effect was observed in any of the patients. Conclusion: Ozone therapy though requires a gaseous form to be more effective, but topical form can also bring out the positive results without any toxicity or side effect. Hence, it can be considered as a minimally invasive therapy for the oral infective and immunological conditions.

  20. Efficacy of ozonized olive oil in the management of oral lesions and conditions: A clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Tarun; Arora, Neha; Puri, Gagan; Aravinda, Konidena; Dixit, Avani; Jatti, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    The oral cavity is an open ecosystem that shows a dynamic balance between the entrance of microorganisms (bacterial, viral or fungal), colonization modalities, nutritional balance, and host defenses against their removal. The oral lesions including aphthous ulcerations, herpes labialis, oral candidiasis, oral lichen planus, and angular cheilitis some of the common entities encountered in the clinical practice. A variety of treatment options is available in the literature for all of these lesions and conditions. Topical ozone therapy is a minimally invasive technique that can be used for these conditions without any side effects. Aim and Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of ozonized olive oil in the treatment of oral lesions and conditions. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal study was carried out on 50 patients (aphthous ulcerations, herpes labialis, oral candidiasis, oral lichen planus, and angular cheilitis). The ozonized olive oil was applied twice daily until the lesion regresses for a maximum of 6 months. Results: All the lesions regress in patients with aphthous ulcerations, herpes labialis, oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis or showed improvement in the signs and symptoms in oral lichen planus patients. No toxicity or side effect was observed in any of the patients. Conclusion: Ozone therapy though requires a gaseous form to be more effective, but topical form can also bring out the positive results without any toxicity or side effect. Hence, it can be considered as a minimally invasive therapy for the oral infective and immunological conditions. PMID:27041901

  1. Epidemiological survey of oral lesions in children and adolescents in a Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessôa, Camila Porto; Alves, Técia Daltro Borges; dos Santos, Nilton César Nogueira; dos Santos, Heloísa Laís Rosário; Azevedo, Alana de Cássia Silva; dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Oliveira, Márcio Campos

    2015-11-01

    To identify the most frequent oral lesions in children and adolescents in Reference Units of Oral Lesions of Public Universities of Bahia, Brazil, in the period between 1996 and 2010, and estimate the association between socio-demographic factors and type of oral lesions found. Cross-sectional study using secondary data obtained from medical records, records of requests and reports of biopsies from patients aged between 0 and 19 years treated in Reference Units of Oral Lesions of Public Universities in Bahia, Brazil, in the period between 1996 and 2010. For data analysis, we used descriptive analysis of the variables, bivariate analysis by calculating the prevalence ratios (PR) to assess the association between oral lesions and gender, age and skin color, and the analysis of potential modifying and confounding effects by logistic regression modeling. To calculate the p-value of associations, we used the chi-square test, and plesions. The most prevalent lesions were mucoceles (14.2%), fibroma (5.6%) and pyogenic granuloma (5.3%). The variable "age" was the only socio-demographic characteristics among those analyzed that showed a statistically significant association with both neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions, according to bivariate analysis, considering the rates adjusted for potential confounders. Neoplastic lesions appeared more often in the age group 0-9 years, while the non-neoplastic lesions were more prevalent in individuals 10-19 years. There was no effect modification noted in the predictive models analyzed. The study identified the existence of a broad range of oral lesions affecting children and adolescents. Most of the lesions found were of the non-neoplastic type. The age of individuals was associated with the type of oral lesion found. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical evaluation of buccal mucosal lesions in hospitalized children from 3 to 12 years-old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Amado Libério

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the presence of oral mucosa alterations in children from 3 to 12 year of age, hospitalized in the period from January to May 2004. Methods: A clinical evaluation was made of the oral mucosa alterations in 165 hospitalized children from 3 to 12 of age, in the period from January to May 2004, of both genders, interned in the three wings of the mother and child ospital “Hospital Universitário Materno Infantil” of the Federal University of Maranhão.Results: The most frequent alterations were encrusted tongue (61.82%, pseudomembranous candidiasis (5.45% and recurrent herpeticinfection (3.64%, no difference being found with regard to their presence in the age groups (3 to 6 years of age and 7 to 12 years ofage, however, boys were more affected (85.90% than girls (71.26%.Conclusion: Of the 165 children examined, 78.18% exhibited alterations and in certain cases, more than one alteration was observed at the time of the exam.

  3. Photobiomodulation with polarized light in the treatment of cutaneous and mucosal ulcerative lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragona, S E; Grassi, F R; Nardi, G; Lotti, J; Mereghetti, G; Canavesi, E; Equizi, E; Puccio, A M; Lotti, T

    In recent decades, regenerative medicine has achieved an important evolution at both a conceptual level and scientific production, which explains the current and future possibilities of therapy and daily clinical practice. The main aim of regenerative medicine is the complex system of repair/regeneration. The current literature on the subject demonstrates the advantage of visible light therapy for skin injuries and diseases with the photobiomodulation in which light at low energy levels modulates intra- and extra-cellular photoreceptors by molecular and cellular processes that can stimulate both anti-inflammatory mechanisms and cell proliferative response. The irradiation effects are activated soon after exposure. The anti-inflammatory action on some classes of cytokines and cells (e.g. mast cells and macrophages) is completed with the stimulation of the nitric oxide production, which has an anti-inflammatory and vasodilation action, and gives analgesic relief. Our attention focused on photobiomodulator medical device emitting polarized light. 30 patients (19 women and 11 men) were enrolled in the present study. They were treated for chronic lesions using Bioptron® Light Therapy System device. Patients were initially subjected to Bioptron® light for 20 min after cleansing of the lesion. The operating protocol provides 24 sessions: twice per week for 12 weeks. Twenty patients have been studied for symptoms, histological samples and ulcer characteristics. After 2 months, a reduction of 50% of the lesions was recorded in 18 patients (60%), while in the remaining patients a slower healing was observed. The total wound healing was achieved after 3 months in 13 patients (43%). The examined parameters of the symptom were exudation, pain and signs of infection. Results at 1 and 3 months were, Exudation: at 1 month reduction and positive modulation was observed in 16 patients (53%) and in 25 patients at 3 months; Pain: (evaluated with Vas scale), decreased in 21 patients

  4. Oral mucositis caused by Candida glabrata biofilms: failure of the concomitant use of fluconazole and ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Célia F.; Henriques, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Candida glabrata is becoming one of the most prevalent pathogenic yeasts in cases of oral diseases. Mucositis is an recurrent oral infection in immunocompromised patients, and the actual guidelines recommend the use of fluconazole (Flu) for many cases. However, the azole resistance by C. glabrata is renowned, causing a reduced therapeutic response, especially when it occurs in biofilms. In this study, we performed an in vitro evaluation of an alternative pharmacotherapy for C. glabrata biofilm infections, combining ascorbic acid (AA) with Flu. AA is recognized for degrading β-glucans, an important compound of the biofilm matrices, which prevent drug diffusion. Materials and Methods: Routine clinical 30 or 40 mg/l doses of Flu were applied to C. glabrata biofilms simultaneously with 200 or 300 mg/l of AA. Results: The results showed that this combination effectively promoted the degradation of the biofilm network, but unfortunately, also stimulated the growth of the yeasts population due to release of several glucose monomers during β-glucans hydrolysis. Discussion: AA lead to the hydrolysis of the β-glucans of the matrix, liberating glucose molecules which are used as carbon souce by the yeasts, thus suppressing the desired antifungal effect of the drug combination with Flu. Conclusions: Unlike to what happens in treatment of bacterial infection, AA should not be used together with Flu in the treating oral mucositis caused by Candida. PMID:28357061

  5. Chitosan and gelatin based prototype delivery systems for the treatment of oral mucositis: from material to performance in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchyonok, V Tamara; Zhang, Shengmiao; Oberholzer, Theunis

    2013-02-01

    In this study we developed and evaluated a prototype of an effective occlusive mucoadhesive system for prophylaxis and/or treatment of oral mucositis based on chitosan and gelatine models together with nystatin as a prophylactic agent incorporated into the formulation and investigated drug release in-vitro. Results of in vitro studies showed that chitosan and gelatine based gels posses properties that makes them excellent candidates for treatment of oral mucositis. These properties include not only the palliative effects of an occlusive dressing but also the potential for delivering therapeutic compounds with chitosan gels providing drug concentrations above their minimum inhibition concentration and extending the retention time in the oral cavity due to their bioadhesive properties. Chitosan also offers an advantage over suspensions because of its inherent antimicrobial properties. The performance of gelatin-based gels highlights the novel, non-toxic, in situ forming gelatine based hydrogel. The results of in vitro drug release experiments demonstrated that all the hydrogel showed sustained release properties.

  6. Diagnosis of HIV-Associated Oral Lesions in Relation to Early versus Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from the CIPRA HT001 Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batavia, Ashita S.; Secours, Rode; Espinosa, Patrice; Jean Juste, Marc Antoine; Severe, Patrice; Pape, Jean William; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal lesions that are associated with HIV infection can play an important role in guiding the decision to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART). The incidence of these lesions relative to the timing of ART initiation has not been well characterized. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the GHESKIO Center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti between 2004 and 2009. 816 HIV-infected ART-naïve participants with CD4 T cell counts between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 were randomized to either immediate ART initiation (early group; N = 408), or initiation when CD4 T cell count was less than or equal 200 cells/mm3 or with the development of an AIDS-defining condition (delayed group; N = 408). Every 3 months, all participants underwent an oral examination. The incidence of oral lesions was 4.10 in the early group and 17.85 in the delayed group (p-value herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex in the delayed group. The incidence of oral warts in delayed group was 0.97 before therapy and 4.27 post-ART initiation (p-value herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex indicate immune suppression and the need to start ART. In contrast, oral warts are a sign of immune reconstitution following ART initiation. PMID:26930571

  7. Phenylbutyrate Mouthwash Mitigates Oral Mucositis During Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, Sang-Hue; Wang, Ling-Wei [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yi-Hsien [Division of Radiotherapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Yih-Lin, E-mail: ylchung@kfsyscc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Deleterious oral mucositis (OM) develops during radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients. There are currently no effective cytoprotective treatments for OM without a potential risk of tumor protection. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study aimed to determine the therapeutic safety and efficacy of phenylbutyrate (an antitumor histone deacetylase inhibitor and chemical chaperone) 5% mouthwash for treating OM caused by cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2005 and June 2006, 36 HNC patients were randomized to standard oral care plus 5 mL of either phenylbutyrate 5% mouthwash (n = 17) or placebo (mouthwash vehicle, n = 19) taken four times daily (swish and spit). Treatment began when mild mucositis (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1) occurred, and ended 4 weeks after RT completion. Safety and efficacy were based on adverse events, physical examination, laboratory determinations, vital signs, Oral Mucosa Assessment Scale (OMAS) and World Health Organization scores, the ability to eat, body weight change, local control, and survival. Results: We found no severe drug-related side effect. At RT doses of 5500-7500 cGy, phenylbutyrate significantly mitigated the severity of mucositis compared with placebo, based on both the WHO score (severity {>=} 3; p = 0.0262) and the OMAS scale (ulceration score {>=} 2; p = 0.0049). The Kaplan-Meier estimates for 2- and 3-year local control, and overall survival were 100% and 80.8%, and 78.6% and 64.3%, respectively, in the phenylbutyrate group and 74.2% and 74.2%, and 57.4% and 50.2%, respectively, in the placebo group. Conclusions: This pilot trial suggested that phenylbutyrate mouthwash significantly decreased the impact of OM in HNC patients receiving RT or chemoradiotherapy and did not confront the tumor control. Larger Phase II randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  8. How to prevent contamination with Candida albicans during the fabrication of transplantable oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Takagi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have utilized patients' own oral mucosa as a cell source for the fabrication of transplantable epithelial cell sheets to treat limbal stem cell deficiency and mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection of esophageal cancer. Because there are abundant microbiotas in the human oral cavity, the oral mucosa was sterilized and 40 μg/mL gentamicin and 0.27 μg/mL amphotericin B were added to the culture medium in our protocol. Although an oral surgeon carefully checked each patient's oral cavity and although candidiasis was not observed before taking the biopsy, contamination with Candida albicans (C. albicans was detected in the conditioned medium during cell sheet fabrication. After adding 1 μg/mL amphotericin B to the transportation medium during transport from Nagasaki University Hospital to Tokyo Women's Medical University, which are 1200 km apart, no proliferation of C. albicans was observed. These results indicated that the supplementation of transportation medium with antimycotics would be useful for preventing contamination with C. albicans derived from the oral mucosa without hampering cell proliferation.

  9. New photobiomodulation protocol prevents oral mucositis in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients-a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissheimer, Camila; Curra, Marina; Gregianin, Lauro J; Daudt, Liane E; Wagner, Vivian P; Martins, Marco Antonio T; Martins, Manoela D

    2017-08-24

    Oral mucositis (OM) is an adverse side effect among hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the preventive effect of photobiomodulation (PBM) applied three times per week versus seven times per week in patients undergoing HSCT. The risk factors related to the incidence and severity of OM were also assessed. This was a retrospective study that evaluated 99 HSCT recipients who received different PBM protocols. Group I received three sessions per week, and group II received daily treatment. PBM was applied using a continuous-wave diode laser (InGaAlP; MM Optics, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) at a wavelength of 660 nm (visible-red) and a total radiant energy of 0.24 J per point. The baseline disease, type of transplant, type of conditioning, prophylaxis against graft-versus-host disease, OM grade, absolute leukocyte and platelet counts, and levels of liver and renal function markers were collected from medical records. The patients' age ranged from 13 to 71 years (mean/SD, 40.54 ± 16.45). No significant difference was observed between groups I and II regarding sex, age, ethnic, diagnosis, donor type, and conditioning treatment. Both PBM protocols were equally efficient in preventing OM (p = 0.34, ANOVA). Independent of the PBM protocol used, patients who received allogeneic transplant (p < 0.01-Fischer's exact test), total body irradiation (TBI-12Gy) (p = 0.01-chi-square test), busulfan + cyclophosphamide (p < 0.01-chi-square test), or methotrexate-containing regimens (p < 0.01-Fischer's exact test) demonstrated higher OM incidence and severity. Myelosuppression (p < 0.01-Mann-Whitney test) and impaired renal function (p = 0.02-Mann-Whitney test) were also considered risk factors for OM. Based on this retrospective data, PBM was effective in preventing OM in patients undergoing HSCT even when it was applied three times a week. A prospective study might be necessary to confirm

  10. Identifying cell and molecular stress after radiation in a three-dimensional (3-D) model of oral mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambros, Maria Polikandritou, E-mail: mlambros@westernu.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Parsa, Cyrus [Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Mulamalla, HariChandana [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Orlando, Robert [Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Lau, Bernard [Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Huang, Ying [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Pon, Doreen [Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Chow, Moses [Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States)

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} We irradiated a 3-D human oral cell culture of keratinocytes and fibroblasts with 12 and 2 Gy. {yields} 6 h after irradiation the histopathology and apoptosis of the 3-D culture were evaluated. Microarrays were used to assess the gene expression in the irradiated 3-D tissue. {yields} 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic changes and cellular apoptosis. {yields} 12 Gy significantly affected genes of the NF-kB pathway, inflammatory cytokines and DAMPs. -- Abstract: Mucositis is a debilitating adverse effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. It is important to develop a simple and reliable in vitro model, which can routinely be used to screen new drugs for prevention and treatment of mucositis. Furthermore, identifying cell and molecular stresses especially in the initiation phase of mucositis in this model will help towards this end. We evaluated a three-dimensional (3-D) human oral cell culture that consisted of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts as a model of oral mucositis. The 3-D cell culture model was irradiated with 12 or 2 Gy. Six hours after the irradiation we evaluated microscopic sections of the cell culture for evidence of morphologic changes including apoptosis. We used microarrays to compare the expression of several genes from the irradiated tissue with identical genes from tissue that was not irradiated. We found that irradiation with 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic effects including cellular apoptosis. Irradiation significantly affected the expression of several genes of the NF-kB pathway and several inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1B, 1L-8, NF-kB1, and FOS compared to tissue that was not irradiated. We identified significant upregulation of several genes that belong to damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as HMB1, S100A13, SA10014, and SA10016 in the 3-D tissues that received 12 Gy but not in tissues that received 2 Gy. In conclusion, this model quantifies radiation damage and this

  11. Mucositis oral: decisiones sobre el cuidado bucal en pacientes sometidos a radioterapia y quimioterapia conforme a la evidencia.

    OpenAIRE

    Tejada Domínguez, FJ.; Ruíz Domínguez, MR.

    2010-01-01

    La finalidad de este estudio fue identificar la evidencia científica existente en la literatura indexada en diferentes bases de datos respecto a las intervenciones preventivas y de tratamiento específico de la mucositis oral inducida por los tratamientos antineoplásicos como son la radioterapia y la quimioterapia. Para conseguir respuestas que clarificaran este problema se realizó una búsqueda en las siguientes bases de datos: Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library Plus, Cuiden, Scielo, Bibliot...

  12. Combined Oral and Intravenous Immunization Stimulates Strong IgA Responses in Both Systemic and Mucosal Compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Zhao, Qing; Gao, Yun-An; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the influence of immunization routes onIgG, IgA and IgM production in systemic and mucosal compartments, we immunized mice with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) via oral, intranasal (i.n.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) routes alone or combined with the intravenous (i.v.) route. We found that administering antigen intravenously could affect antibody production and formation of antibody secreting cells (ASCs) depending on the immunization route previously used. Combined oral/i.v. immunization but not s.c./i.v. immunization caused a great increase of IgA ASCs in the spleen and enhanced IgA production in the small intestine and serum. Combined i.n./i.v. immunization could also increase IgA ASCs in the spleen and enhance IgA production in serum but had no effect on IgA production in the small intestine. Oral/i.v. immunization caused increase of IgG ASCs in both the spleen and bone marrow. In comparison, combined i.n./i.v. and s.c./i.v. immunization could increase IgG ASCs in the spleen but not in bone marrow. Intravenous administration of KLH in mice that had been immunized via oral, i.n. or s.c. routes caused some increase of IgM ASCs in the spleen but not in bone marrow. In conclusion, combined oral and i.v. administration of an antigen can induce fast and strong immune responses, especially for IgA, in both systemic and mucosal compartments.

  13. Risk factors of HIV-related oral lesions in adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petruzzi, Maria Noel Marzano Rodrigues; Cherubini, Karen; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves; Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro De

    2013-01-01

    .... Using a standardized form, socio-demographic and clinical data were recorded. Exclusively and definitively diagnosed oral pathologies were included and classified according to ECC criteria on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection...

  14. Management of chemo- and radiotherapy induced oral mucositis with low-energy laser: initial results of A.C. Camargo Hospital Manejo da mucosite oral induzida por quimioterapia e radioterapia com laser de baixa potência: resultados iniciais do Hospital A.C. Camargo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Lazari Sandoval

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oral mucositis is a common complication of some malignancies treatment, causing therapeutic modifications due to patient's debilitation, which often interferes with the prognosis of the disease. Many attempts have been made to find an optimal treatment or preventive method to minimize the severity of oral mucositis. Several studies have shown good results with the use of low-energy laser, with the aim of accelerating the process of wound healing and promoting pain relief. Methods. Patients (n=18 who developed oral mucositis during chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy were submitted to low-energy laser applications until cessation of symptoms. Mucositis severity was scored by an oral mucositis scale based on clinical features and by an oral toxicity scale from the National Cancer Institute based on the ability to swallow; pain severity was scored by subjects on a visual analogue scale before and after the applications. Results. Immediate pain relief was achieved in 66.6% of the patients after the first application. Based on the functional scale, mucositis grade III (not capable to eat solids was reduced in 42.85% of the cases. According to the scale based on the clinical features, mucositis grade IV (ulcerative lesions was reduced in 75% of the patients that presented this grade of mucositis at the beginning of laser therapy. Conclusions. Low-energy laser was well-tolerated and showed beneficial effects on the management of oral mucositis, improving the quality of life during the oncologic treatment.Mucosite é a complicação oral mais comum do tratamento de algumas doenças malignas, podendo causar a necessidade de modificações terapêuticas, o que pode interferir com o prognóstico da doença. Muitas tentativas têm sido feitas com o intuito de desenvolver um tratamento ou método preventivo para minimizar a severidade da mucosite oral. Vários estudos têm mostrado bons resultados com o uso do laser de baixa potência, devido

  15. The effect of three mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies: A randomized control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Kumar P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The present study was done to assess the effect of three alcohol-free mouthwashes on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck malignancies. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with head and neck malignancies, scheduled to undergo curative radiotherapy, were randomly assigned to receive one of the three alcohol-free test mouthwashes (0.12% chlorhexidine, 1% povidone-iodine, or salt/soda or a control. The patients were instructed to rinse with 10 ml of the mouthwash, twice a day, for a period of 6 weeks. Mucositis was assessed at baseline and at weekly intervals during radiation therapy, using the World Health Organization criteria for grading of mucositis. The baseline demography of the four groups was matched for age, sex, stage of cancer, and whether the patient had cancer of oral or extraoral regions. A post hoc test for repeated measures was used to find the difference of mean mucositis scores between the groups at various week intervals. Results: Among the 76 patients who completed the study, patients in the povidone-iodine group had significantly lower mucositis scores when compared to the control group from the first week of radiotherapy. Their scores were also significantly lower when compared to the salt/soda and chlorhexidine groups from the fourth and fifth week, respectively, after radiotherapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that use of alcohol-free povidone-iodine mouthwash can reduce the severity and delay the onset of oral mucositis due to antineoplastic radiotherapy.

  16. Efficacy of Sucralfate Mouth Wash in Prevention of 5-fluorouracil Induced Oral Mucositis: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala, Shahram; Saeedi, Majid; Janbabai, Ghasem; Ganji, Reza; Azhdari, Elham; Shiva, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Sucralfate has been used for the prevention and treatment of radiotherapy- and chemotherapy-induced stomatitis and mucositis in a number of studies, but the results are contradictory. To answer such discrepancies, the present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of sucralfate mouthwash in prevention of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced oral mucositis in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies. Patients with gastrointestinal cancers receiving 5-FU-based chemotherapy regimens were included in this randomized, blinded, controlled trial and were randomly allocated to either sucralfate mouthwash (every 6 h) or placebo. The patients were visited at fifth and tenth day of trial; the presence and severity of oral mucositis and the intensity of pain were assessed. The patients receiving sucralfate experienced lower frequency and severity of mucositis (76% vs. 38.5%, P = 0.005 and 84 vs. 38.5%, P oral mucositis in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies compared with placebo, indicating its efficacy in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced mucositis.

  17. Oral symptoms and salivary findings in oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and stomatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Roen; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Reibel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    salivary concentration of total protein and sIgA than cases without contact allergy and healthy controls. METHODS: Forty-nine patients (42 women, aged 61.0 ± 10.3 years) and 29 healthy age- and gender-matched subjects underwent a standardised questionnaire on general and oral health, assessment......, but not associated with salivary gland hypofunction, numbers of systemic diseases or medications, contact allergy, age, or gender. Salivary sIgA levels were higher in patients than in healthy controls, but did not differ between patient groups. The total salivary protein concentration was lower in unstimulated...... in patients (46.9%) than in healthy controls, whereas the saliva flow rates did not differ. The patients had higher sIgA levels in unstimulated and chewing-stimulated saliva than the healthy controls. The total protein concentration in saliva was lower in the unstimulated saliva samples whereas it was higher...

  18. Oral symptoms and salivary findings in oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesions and stomatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristine Røn; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Reibel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    salivary concentration of total protein and sIgA than cases without contact allergy and healthy controls. Methods: 49 patients (42 women, aged 61.0±10.3 years) and 29 healthy age- and gender-matched subjects underwent a standardised questionnaire on general and oral health, assessment of xerostomia......, but not associated with salivary gland hypofunction, numbers of systemic diseases or medications, contact allergy, age, or gender. Salivary sIgA levels were higher in patients than in healthy controls, but did not differ between patient groups. The total salivary protein concentration was lower in unstimulated.......9%) than in healthy controls, whereas the saliva flow rates did not differ. The patients had higher sIgA levels in unstimulated and chewing-stimulated saliva than the healthy controls. The total protein concentration in saliva was lower in the unstimulated saliva samples whereas it was higher...

  19. The effects of swallowing disorders, dysgeusia, oral mucositis and xerostomia on nutritional status, oral intake and weight loss in head and neck cancer patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Valentina; Stevanin, Simone; Bianchi, Monica; Aleo, Giuseppe; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Sasso, Loredana

    2016-04-01

    Combined-modality treatment of head and neck cancer is becoming more common, driven by the idea that organ(s) preservation should maintain patient appearance and the function of organ(s) involved. Even if treatments have improved, they can still be associated with acute and late adverse effects. The aim of this systematic review was to retrieve current data on how swallowing disorders, dysgeusia, oral mucositis, and xerostomia affect nutritional status, oral intake and weight loss in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. A systematic literature search covered four relevant electronic databases from January 2005 to May 2015. Retrieved papers were categorised and evaluated considering their methodological quality. Two independent reviewers reviewed manuscripts and abstracted data using a standardised form. Quality assessment of the included studies was performed using the Edwards Method Score. Of the 1459 abstracts reviewed, a total of 25 studies were included. The most studied symptom was dysphagia, even if symptoms were interconnected and affected one other. In most of the selected studies the level of evidence was between 2 and 3, and their quality level was from medium to low. There are limited data about dysgeusia, oral mucositis and xerostomia outcomes available for HNC patients. There is a lack of well-designed clinical trials and multicenter-prospective cohort studies, therefore further research is needed to ascertain which aspects of these symptoms should be measured. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fine needle aspiration cytology in lesions of oral and maxillofacial region: Diagnostic pitfalls

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Sunita; Garg, Natasha; Gupta, Sumiti; Marwah, Nisha; Kalra, Rajneesh; Singh, Virender; Sen, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    ... for the diagnosis of tumor and tumor like lesions of oral and maxillofacial region. In addition, we sought to highlight probable causes of errors in the cases showing lack of correlation between cytological and histological diagnoses...

  1. 口腔黏膜病患者牙周健康状况调查分析%Epidemiological survey and analysis on periodontal heath status of patients with oral mucosal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小凤; 王越; 靳赢; 林晓萍

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the periodontal health in patients with oral mucosal diseases through epidemiology investigation methods and provide a basis for the prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases. Methods 766 patients from Department of Sto⁃matology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University were given periodontal specialist examinations and then filled in the question⁃naire. Results were statistically analyzed with SPSS software. Results The rates of the periodontal health of patients with oral mucosal diseases were fewer than 10.70%. Oral hygiene and periodontal heath were significantly affected by different genders, ages, education and oral care. The two oral mucosal diseases with the highest visiting rates were recurrent aphthous ulcer ( 34. 20%) and oral lichen planus ( 32. 64%) . The higher periodontitis prevalence rates of recurrent aphthous ulcer and oral lichen planus were 95. 42% and 92.80%, respectively. Conclusion Periodontal health is related to the onset and development of oral mucosal diseases. Reasons for bad oral conditions of patients with oral mucosal diseases and whether bad periodontal health has adverse effect on oral mucosal lesions should be analyzed from various perspectives, and active prevention measures should be taken.%目的:通过流行病学调查方法了解口腔黏膜病患者牙周健康状况,为口腔黏膜病患者牙周病的预防与治疗提供依据。方法对中国医科大学附属盛京医院口腔科门诊的黏膜病患者766人进行牙周专科检查,填写调查问卷,检查结果采用SPSS 13.0软件进行统计学分析。结果口腔黏膜病患者牙周健康者只有10.70%。不同性别、年龄、学历、口腔护理情况显著影响口腔卫生及口腔健康情况;口腔黏膜病中,患者就诊率最高的是口腔溃疡(34.20%),其次为扁平苔癣(32.64%);口腔溃疡及扁平苔藓的牙周炎患病率均较高,分别是95.42%和92

  2. A regenerative approach towards mucosal fenestration closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandi, Padma; Anumala, Naveen; Reddy, Amarender; Chandra, Rampalli Viswa

    2013-06-06

    Mucosal fenestration is an opening or an interstice through the oral mucosa. A lesion which occurs with greater frequency than generally realised, its occurrence is attributed to a myriad of causes. Mucogingival procedures including connective tissue grafts, free gingival grafts and lateral pedicle grafts are generally considered to be the treatment of choice in the closure of a mucosal fenestration. More often, these procedures are performed in conjunction with other procedures such as periradicular surgery and with bone grafts. However, the concomitant use of gingival grafts and bone grafts in mucosal fenestrations secondary to infections in sites exhibiting severe bone loss is highly debatable. In this article, we report two cases of mucosal fenestrations secondary to trauma and their management by regenerative periodontal surgery with the placement of guided tissue regeneration membrane and bone graft. The final outcome was a complete closure of the fenestration in both the cases.

  3. Preliminary study in a new protocol for the treatment of oral mucositis in pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and chemotherapy (CT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Marina Consuelo; Modaffari, Carola; Decembrino, Nunzia; Zhou, Feng Xiao; Zecca, Marco; Defabianis, Patrizia

    2017-08-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a debilitating and serious side effect in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and chemotherapy (CT). Laser therapy is becoming a promising treatment option in these patients, avoiding the necessity of enteral/parenteral nutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of laser therapy in patients affected by oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy and HSCT. Sixteen onco-hematological pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, affected by oral mucositis, were enrolled in this study. They were divided in two randomized groups: the laser group and the placebo-control group. Patients in the laser group were treated with HPLT (970 ± 15 nm, 3.2 W (50%), 35-6000 Hz, 240 s) for four consecutive days, once a day; and placebo group underwent sham treatment. The assessment of mucositis was recorded through WHO Oral Mucositis Grading Objective Scale, and pain was evaluated through Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Patients were monitored and evaluated 3, 7, and 11 days after the first day of laser therapy. Once OM was diagnosed, the patients had mucositis grading assessments before laser or sham application at day 3, 7, and 11 after first application. All patients of laser group demonstrated improvement in pain sensation from day 3 after first application of laser (p < 0.05), ulcerations reduced their dimensions and erythema disappeared. The patients of placebo group had improvement from day 7. In laser group, all mucositis were fully resolved from day 7 (p < 0.05). Oral mucositis negatively impacts on nutritional intake, oral hygiene, and quality of life. Laser therapy appears to be a safe and innovative approach in the management of oral mucositis. In this preliminary study, HPLT encourages to consider laser therapy as a part of onco-hematological protocol, providing to decrease pain and duration of OM induced by CT and HSCT. Further researches will be needed

  4. Chimeric plant virus particles administered nasally or orally induce systemic and mucosal immune responses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brennan, F.R.; Bellaby, T.; Helliwell, S.M.;

    1999-01-01

    The humoral immune responses to the D2 peptide of fibronectin-binding protein B (FnBP) of Staphylococcus aureus, expressed on the plant virus cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), were evaluated after mucosal delivery to mice. Intranasal immunization of these chimeric virus particles (CVPs), either alone o...

  5. Molecular Characteristics of High-Dose Melphalan Associated Oral Mucositis in Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Mette; Bødker, Julie Støve; Christensen, Heidi Søgaard

    2017-01-01

    after therapy, at two days after melphalan treatment, we found gene regulation in the p53 and TNF pathways (MDM2, INPPD5, TIGAR), which favored anti-apoptotic defense, and upregulation of immunoregulatory genes (TREM2, LAMP3) in mucosal dendritic cells. This upregulation was independent of clinical...

  6. Diagnosis of HIV-Associated Oral Lesions in Relation to Early versus Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from the CIPRA HT001 Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batavia, Ashita S; Secours, Rode; Espinosa, Patrice; Jean Juste, Marc Antoine; Severe, Patrice; Pape, Jean William; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosal lesions that are associated with HIV infection can play an important role in guiding the decision to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART). The incidence of these lesions relative to the timing of ART initiation has not been well characterized. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the GHESKIO Center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti between 2004 and 2009. 816 HIV-infected ART-naïve participants with CD4 T cell counts between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 were randomized to either immediate ART initiation (early group; N = 408), or initiation when CD4 T cell count was less than or equal 200 cells/mm3 or with the development of an AIDS-defining condition (delayed group; N = 408). Every 3 months, all participants underwent an oral examination. The incidence of oral lesions was 4.10 in the early group and 17.85 in the delayed group (p-value candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex in the delayed group. The incidence of oral warts in delayed group was 0.97 before therapy and 4.27 post-ART initiation (p-value oral warts post-ART initiation was significantly higher than that seen in the early group (4.27 versus 1.09; p-value oral warts increased after ART was initiated, and relative to the early group there was a four-fold increase in oral warts if ART was initiated following an AIDS diagnosis. Based upon our findings, candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex indicate immune suppression and the need to start ART. In contrast, oral warts are a sign of immune reconstitution following ART initiation.

  7. Diagnosis of HIV-Associated Oral Lesions in Relation to Early versus Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from the CIPRA HT001 Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashita S Batavia

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal lesions that are associated with HIV infection can play an important role in guiding the decision to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART. The incidence of these lesions relative to the timing of ART initiation has not been well characterized. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the GHESKIO Center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti between 2004 and 2009. 816 HIV-infected ART-naïve participants with CD4 T cell counts between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 were randomized to either immediate ART initiation (early group; N = 408, or initiation when CD4 T cell count was less than or equal 200 cells/mm3 or with the development of an AIDS-defining condition (delayed group; N = 408. Every 3 months, all participants underwent an oral examination. The incidence of oral lesions was 4.10 in the early group and 17.85 in the delayed group (p-value <0.01. In comparison to the early group, there was a significantly higher incidence of candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex in the delayed group. The incidence of oral warts in delayed group was 0.97 before therapy and 4.27 post-ART initiation (p-value <0.01. In the delayed group the incidence of oral warts post-ART initiation was significantly higher than that seen in the early group (4.27 versus 1.09; p-value <0.01. The incidence of oral warts increased after ART was initiated, and relative to the early group there was a four-fold increase in oral warts if ART was initiated following an AIDS diagnosis. Based upon our findings, candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, herpes labialis, and recurrent herpes simplex indicate immune suppression and the need to start ART. In contrast, oral warts are a sign of immune reconstitution following ART initiation.

  8. Effect of acid secretion blockade on acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxin in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Júnio Rios; de Araújo, Gnana Keith Marques; da Luz, Magda Maria Profeta; da Conceição, Sérgio Alexandre; Lisboa, Felipe Assis; Moraes-Santos, Tasso; Cunha-Melo, José Renan

    2006-10-01

    Scorpion venom (TX) promotes gastric acid and pepsin secretion leading to acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML), when injected in animals. The goal of the present study was to observe the effects of acid gastric secretion blockers over the incidence of TX-induced AGML in vivo. To verify this model, we used male albino rats, fasted 18-20 h (n=122) and anaesthetized with urethane (1.4 g/kg, i.p.). Their trachea and left femoral vein were both cannulated; the first to avoid airway obstructions during scorpion intoxication and the second for administration of saline, TX and acid blockers. Following the surgical procedure, the animals were divided in 10 groups of at least 10 animals each. Control groups were injected with NaCl 0.9% 1 ml/kg (n=10) or TX 375 microg/kg (n=32). Test groups (n=10, each) received atropine 5 mg/kg, cimetidine 10mg/kg, ranitidine 2.5mg/kg, ranitidine 5mg/kg, omeprazol 1 mg/kg, omeprazol 4 mg/kg, octreotide 80 and octreotide 100 microg/kg 10 min before the TX was injected. After 1h of intoxication, the stomach was resected for macroscopic study and the gastric secretion was collected for volume, pH and acid output assessment. We observed that all blockers were able to completely or partially prevent the TX-induced acid secretion as well as the AGML (p<0.05). Our data suggest the TX-induced AGML can be prevented by different class of acid blockers injected before the intoxication.

  9. Reactive lesions of the oral cavity: A retrospective study on 2068 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Jalayer Naderi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Peripheral giant cell granuloma was the most prevalent reactive lesion of the oral cavity. The reactive lesions were more common in males, gingival, and the third decade. Some differences have been found between the findings of the present study and previous reports.

  10. Neurogenic tumors and tumor-like lesions of the oral and maxillofacial region: A clinicopathological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohoud Alotaibi

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: This analysis showed that neural lesions affecting the oral and maxillofacial region were rare and mostly benign in nature. Such lesions should be carefully diagnosed because of their association with life-threatening syndromes and the possibility of malignant transformation.

  11. Oral lichenoid lesions: clinico-pathological mimicry and its diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Santhosh Kumar S; Kale, Alka D; Charantimath, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Oral cavity is commonly affected by number of lichenoid lesions, whose clinical and histopathologic features overlap due to the presence of inflammatory cells in connective tissue. Segregation of these lichenoid lesions is mandatory as each may embody a distinct disease entity in terms of cause, diagnosis and prognosis. The literature discussed in the article is an attempt to segregate individual lichenoid lesions by defining clinical and histopathologic variations among each other, which avoids the diagnostic problem.

  12. Oral lichenoid lesions: Clinico-pathological mimicry and its diagnostic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Kumar S Hiremath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cavity is commonly affected by number of lichenoid lesions, whose clinical and histopathologic features overlap due to the presence of inflammatory cells in connective tissue. Segregation of these lichenoid lesions is mandatory as each may embody a distinct disease entity in terms of cause, diagnosis and prognosis. The literature discussed in the article is an attempt to segregate individual lichenoid lesions by defining clinical and histopathologic variations among each other, which avoids the diagnostic problem.

  13. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Villar, Rosangela Correa [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Gilberto de, E-mail: gilberto.castro@usp.br [Department of Clinical Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Antequera, Reynaldo [Divisao de Odontologia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  14. Clinical effectiveness of palifermin in prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia:a case-control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorina Lauritano; Massimo Petruzzi; Dario Di Stasio; Alberta Lucchese

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of palifermin, an N-terminal truncated version of endogenous keratinocyte growth factor, in the control of oral mucositis during antiblastic therapy. Twenty patients undergoing allogeneic stem-cell transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia were treated with palifermin, and compared to a control group with the same number of subjects and similar inclusion criteria. Statistical analysis were performed to compare the outcomes in the treatment vs. control groups. In the treatment group, we found a statistically significant reduction in the duration of parenteral nutrition (P50.002), duration of mucositis (P50.003) and the average grade of mucositis (P50.03). The statistical analysis showed that the drug was able to decrease the severity of mucositis. These data, although preliminary, suggest that palifermin could be a valid therapeutic adjuvant to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from leukaemia.

  15. Observer variability in the histologic assessment of oral premalignant lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabulut, A; Reibel, J; Therkildsen, M H

    1995-01-01

    Histopathologic examination of oral leukoplakias has a major impact on the assessment of prognosis and treatment planning. We investigated the extent of agreement in grading epithelial dysplasia between pathologists with the same or different educational backgrounds. Two general pathologists and ...

  16. Molecular Characteristics of High-Dose Melphalan Associated Oral Mucositis in Patients with Multiple Myeloma: A Gene Expression Study on Human Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcussen, Mette; Bødker, Julie Støve; Christensen, Heidi Søgaard; Johansen, Preben; Nielsen, Søren; Christiansen, Ilse; Bergmann, Olav Jonas; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen; Vyberg, Mogens; Johnsen, Hans Erik

    2017-01-01

    Toxicity of the oral and gastrointestinal mucosa induced by high-dose melphalan is a clinical challenge with no documented prophylactic interventions or predictive tests. The aim of this study was to describe molecular changes in human oral mucosa and to identify biomarkers correlated with the grade of clinical mucositis. Ten patients with multiple myeloma (MM) were included. For each patient, we acquired three buccal biopsies, one before, one at 2 days, and one at 20 days after high-dose melphalan administration. We also acquired buccal biopsies from 10 healthy individuals that served as controls. We analyzed the biopsies for global gene expression and performed an immunohistochemical analysis to determine HLA-DRB5 expression. We evaluated associations between clinical mucositis and gene expression profiles. Compared to gene expression levels before and 20 days after therapy, at two days after melphalan treatment, we found gene regulation in the p53 and TNF pathways (MDM2, INPPD5, TIGAR), which favored anti-apoptotic defense, and upregulation of immunoregulatory genes (TREM2, LAMP3) in mucosal dendritic cells. This upregulation was independent of clinical mucositis. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB5 (surface receptors on dendritic cells) were expressed at low levels in all patients with MM, in the subgroup of patients with ulcerative mucositis (UM), and in controls; in contrast, the subgroup with low-grade mucositis (NM) displayed 5-6 fold increases in HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB5 expression in the first two biopsies, independent of melphalan treatment. Moreover, different splice variants of HLA-DRB1 were expressed in the UM and NM subgroups. Our results revealed that, among patients with MM, immunoregulatory genes and genes involved in defense against apoptosis were affected immediately after melphalan administration, independent of the presence of clinical mucositis. Furthermore, our results suggested that the expression levels of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB5 may serve as potential

  17. The Impact Of Oral Vitamin E In Preventing Mucositis (Bucal Mucous Inflammation Resulting From The Radiotherapy In Tumors Of Head And Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mucositis [bucal Mucous inflamation] is the most common complication resulting from the radiotherapy in tumors of head and neck. These malignancies are often curable through radiotherapy. This complication, however, may impair the treatment process and cause malnutrition. So far no medicine has been Known to prevent this complication. Vitamin E is a stabilizer of cell membrane and is also used in mucositis treatment. The survey of oral vitamin E effect on mucositis prophylaxis in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients afflicted with head and neck malignancies referring to Imam Khomeini Hospital were randomly divided into 2groups, two of whom died during treatment process. The first group (The case group consisting of 34 patients Consumed oral vitamin E 200 mg daily for seven days. The second group (The control group did not use any medicine at all. The two group underwent radiotherapy. They were compared and contrasted as to mucositis severity and dysphagia during treatment. Results: In the first group, since the fourth week up to the end of the treatment, there was a lower frequency and grade of mucositis in contrast with the control group. In the fourth week, the grade two mucositis in the first group (Case group was 20.6% and 47.5% in the control group the difference was statistically significant (P=0.024. There was also a lower frequency and grade of dysphagia in the case group since the fourth week versus the control group. In the fourth week, moderate dysphagia was 29.4% in the case group and 55.9% in the control group. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.023. Conclusion: Oral vitamin E has Proved to be effective in the Prophylaxis of Moderate and severe mucositis and dysphagia resulting from radiotherapy. It is advisable to conduct more research with more cases, lengthier duration and heavier doses.

  18. The clinical and microbiological effects of a novel acidified sodium chlorite mouthrinse on oral bacterial mucosal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Naglik, L; Downes, J; Shirlaw, P; Wilson, R; Challacombe, S J; Kemp, G K; Wade, W G

    2001-09-01

    Acidified sodium chlorite mouthrinses have been shown to have equivalent anti-plaque activity to those containing chlorhexidine, the current 'gold standard'. In this study, sodium chlorite mouthrinses (ASC) acidified with either malic or gluconic acids were compared to each other and with a chlorhexidine rinse and sterile water for their effect on salivary bacterial counts. Sixteen subjects participated in the study, which had a cross-over Latin square design. In a second study, a sodium chlorite/gluconic acid rinse was compared with chlorhexidine for its clinical and microbiological effects in 36 patients with oral mucosal infections. The sodium chlorite rinses acidified with malic and gluconic acids and the chlorhexidine rinse caused significant reductions in salivary bacterial counts up to 7 h after a single rinse compared with water. There were no significant differences between the three active treatments. In the mucosal infection study, there was a significant reduction in erythema in the chlorhexidine group compared with the ASC group. Patients who received the ASC rinse reported significantly less discomfort following treatment than those receiving the chlorhexidine rinse. Staphylococcus aureus counts were significantly reduced in the group who received the sodium chlorite rinse. There were no other significant differences between the treatments. ASC appears to be an effective alternative to chlorhexidine mouthrinse.

  19. Comparison of Gene Expression in Peri-implant Soft Tissue and Oral Mucosal Tissue by Microarray Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makabe, Yasushi; Sasaki, Hodaka; Mori, Gentaro; Sekine, Hideshi; Yoshinari, Masao; Yajima, Yasutomo

    2015-01-01

    Implant placement entails disruption of the epithelial continuity, which can lead to various complications. Therefore, the area of mucosal penetration is of particular interest clinically. The goal of the present study was to compare gene expression in peri-implant soft tissue (PIST) with that in oral mucosal tissue (OMT) using microarray analysis, and to investigate which genes were specifically expressed in PIST. The bilateral upper first molars were extracted from 4-week-old rats and titanium alloy implants placed only in the left-side extraction sockets. Four weeks after surgery, samples were harvested from the left-side PIST and right-side OMT and total RNA samples isolated. Microarray analysis was used to compare gene expression in PIST and OMT, which was then confirmed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical staining was also performed to confirm protein level expression. The number of genes expressed with more than a twofold change in PIST compared with OMT was 1,102, of which 750 genes were upregulated and 352 genes were downregulated. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of three selected genes-Ceacam1, Ifitm1, and MUC4-were more significantly expressed in PIST than in OMT(P microarray analysis showed that, because of implant placement, 750 genes were upregulated in PIST compared with OMT. CEACAM1, IFITM1, and MUC4 were specifically upregulated in PIST.

  20. Effects of orally ingested Bifidobacterium longum on the mucosal IgA response of mice to dietary antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T; Nakagawa, E; Nara, T; Yajima, T; Kuwata, T

    1998-01-01

    To study the effects of lactic acid bacteria on the mucosal defence against dietary protein antigens, we compared the mucosal IgA responses to beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) of two groups of mice fed a whey protein diet with and without a culture condensate of Bifidobacterium longum. Both total IgA and anti-beta-LG IgA levels in tissue extracts of the small intestinal wall were significantly higher in mice fed the B. longum diet for 2 weeks than in control ones. Peyer's patch (PP) cells from B. longum-fed mice had a much larger increase in in vitro IgA production than ones from control mice. Furthermore, the in vitro IgA response to beta-LG was detected only when PP cells from B. longum-fed mice were assayed. These results suggest that orally ingested lactic acid bacteria may protect a host from invasion of the intestinal mucosa by dietary antigens that have escaped enzymatic digestion in the intestine.

  1. Multisystem Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting as an oral lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kallarakkal Thomas George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare proliferative disorder in which the pathologic Langerhans cells infiltrate and destroy the tissues. Patients with LCH present varied clinical manifestations. Cutaneous lesions in LCH manifest as vesiculopapular eruptions that often mimic various infectious diseases particularly in infants. We present a case of a female infant with an ulcerative lesion intraorally. The baby was asymptomatic otherwise. A detailed history revealed the presence of cutaneous lesions that was overlooked by her parents. Conclusion: This report tries to briefly discuss the current concepts regarding the etiology of LCH. An attempt has been made to emphasis the need for a through systemic examination. The protocol of investigative procedures to be adopted in LCH is also discussed.

  2. Significant mucosal sIgA production after a single oral or parenteral administration using in vivo CD40 targeting in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wen-Ko; Chen, Chang-Hsin; Vuong, Christine N; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Waghela, Suryakant D; Mwangi, Waithaka; Bielke, Lisa R; Hargis, Billy M; Berghman, Luc R

    2016-10-01

    Many pathogens enter the host through mucosal surfaces and spread rapidly via the circulation. The most effective way to prevent disease is to establish mucosal and systemic immunity against the pathogen. However, current vaccination programs in poultry industry require repeated administrations of live-attenuated virus or large amounts (10 to 100μg) of antigen together with adjuvant to induce specific secretory IgA immune responses at the mucosal effector sites. In the present study, we show that a single administration of 0.4μg of oligopeptide complexed with an agonistic anti-chicken CD40 (chCD40) monoclonal antibody (Mab) effectively targets antigen-presenting cells of the bird's mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue in vivo, and induces peptide-specific secretory IgA (sIgA) in the trachea 7days post administration. Anti-chCD40 Mab-peptide complex was administered once to four-week old male Leghorns via various mucosal routes (orally, via cloacal drinking, or oculo-nasally) or via subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization. Immunization through any of the three mucosal induction routes induced significant peptide-specific mucosal sIgA responses 7 and 14days after immunization. Interestingly, s.c. injection of the complex also induced mucosal sIgA. Our data suggest in vivo targeting of CD40 as a potential adjuvant platform, particularly for the purpose of enhancing and speeding up mucosal vaccine responses in chickens, and potentially other food animals. This is the first study able to elicit specific sIgA immune responses in remote mucosal sites with a single administration of only 0.4μg of antigen.

  3. Application of cytology and molecular biology in diagnosing premalignant or malignant oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Mamta

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Early detection of a premalignant or cancerous oral lesion promises to improve the survival and the morbidity of patients suffering from these conditions. Cytological study of oral cells is a non-aggressive technique that is well accepted by the patient, and is therefore an attractive option for the early diagnosis of oral cancer, including epithelial atypia and squamous cell carcinoma. However its usage has been limited so far due to poor sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing oral malignancies. Lately it has re-emerged due to improved methods and it's application in oral precancer and cancer as a diagnostic and predictive method as well as for monitoring patients. Newer diagnostic techniques such as "brush biopsy" and molecular studies have been developed. Recent advances in cytological techniques and novel aspects of applications of scraped or exfoliative cytology for detecting these lesions and predicting their progression or recurrence are reviewed here.

  4. Application of cytology and molecular biology in diagnosing premalignant or malignant oral lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Ravi; Gupta, Anurag; Singh, Mamta; Ibrahim, Rahela

    2006-01-01

    Early detection of a premalignant or cancerous oral lesion promises to improve the survival and the morbidity of patients suffering from these conditions. Cytological study of oral cells is a non-aggressive technique that is well accepted by the patient, and is therefore an attractive option for the early diagnosis of oral cancer, including epithelial atypia and squamous cell carcinoma. However its usage has been limited so far due to poor sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing oral malignancies. Lately it has re-emerged due to improved methods and it's application in oral precancer and cancer as a diagnostic and predictive method as well as for monitoring patients. Newer diagnostic techniques such as "brush biopsy" and molecular studies have been developed. Recent advances in cytological techniques and novel aspects of applications of scraped or exfoliative cytology for detecting these lesions and predicting their progression or recurrence are reviewed here. PMID:16556320

  5. Application of cytology and molecular biology in diagnosing premalignant or malignant oral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Ravi; Gupta, Anurag; Singh, Mamta; Ibrahim, Rahela

    2006-03-23

    Early detection of a premalignant or cancerous oral lesion promises to improve the survival and the morbidity of patients suffering from these conditions. Cytological study of oral cells is a non-aggressive technique that is well accepted by the patient, and is therefore an attractive option for the early diagnosis of oral cancer, including epithelial atypia and squamous cell carcinoma. However its usage has been limited so far due to poor sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing oral malignancies. Lately it has re-emerged due to improved methods and it's application in oral precancer and cancer as a diagnostic and predictive method as well as for monitoring patients. Newer diagnostic techniques such as "brush biopsy" and molecular studies have been developed. Recent advances in cytological techniques and novel aspects of applications of scraped or exfoliative cytology for detecting these lesions and predicting their progression or recurrence are reviewed here.

  6. Endoscopic mucosal resection for proximal superficial lesions: efficacy and safety study in 59 consecutive resections Resección endoscópica mucosa de lesiones superficiales altas: estudio de su eficacia y seguridad en 59 resecciones consecutivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Albéniz-Arbizu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: endoscopic mucosal resection is an accepted technique for the treatment of proximal gastrointestinal tract superficial lesions. Objectives: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this procedure in the proximal gastrointestinal tract. Material and methods: forty one consecutive patients (23 males and 18 females, mean age of 61 ± 11.5 years were included in our study. Fifty nine resections were performed in these patients in 69 sessions. Lesions treated consisted of elevated lesions with high grade dysplasia in the context of Barrett's esophagus (group A, high grade dysplasia appearing in random biopsies taken during the follow-up of Barrett's esophagus (group B and superficial gastroduodenal lesions (group C. Snare resection after submucosal injection, band ligator-assisted or cap-assisted mucosal resection were the chosen techniques. Results: we resected 7 elevated lesions with high grade dysplasia in the context of Barrett's esophagus, 6 complete Barrett's esophagus with high grade dysplasia in 16 sequential sessions and 46 gastroduodenal superficial lesions (10 adenomas, 9 gastric superficial carcinomas, 18 carcinoid tumours and 9 lesions of different histological nature. Resections in the two first groups were complete in 100% of the cases, and in 97.9% of the cases in group C. Complications included 2 cases of limited deferred bleeding (groups A and B and another two cases of stenosis with little clinical relevance in Group B. Conclusions: a endoscopic mucosal resection is an efficient technique for the treatment of proximal gastrointestinal tract superficial lesions; b it is a safe procedure with a low percentage of complications, which can generally be managed endoscopically; and c in contrast with other ablative techniques, endoscopic mucosal resection offers the possibility of a pathologic analysis of the samples.Introducción: la resección endoscópica mucosa es una técnica aceptada en el tratamiento de lesiones

  7. Mucoadhesive fenretinide patches for site-specific chemoprevention of oral cancer: enhancement of oral mucosal permeation of fenretinide by coincorporation of propylene glycol and menthol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao; Desai, Kashappa-Goud H; Mallery, Susan R; Holpuch, Andrew S; Phelps, Maynard P; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2012-04-02

    The objective of this study was to enhance oral mucosal permeation of fenretinide by coincorporation of propylene glycol (PG) and menthol in fenretinide/Eudragit RL PO mucoadhesive patches. Fenretinide is an extremely hydrophobic chemopreventive compound with poor tissue permeability. Coincorporation of 5-10 wt % PG (mean J(s) = 16-23 μg cm⁻² h⁻¹; 158-171 μg of fenretinide/g of tissue) or 1-10 wt % PG + 5 wt % menthol (mean J(s) = 18-40 μg cm⁻² h⁻¹; 172-241 μg of fenretinide/g of tissue) in fenretinide/Eudragit RL PO patches led to significant ex vivo fenretinide permeation enhancement (p < 0.001). Addition of PG above 2.5 wt % in the patch resulted in significant cellular swelling in the buccal mucosal tissues. These alterations were ameliorated by combining both enhancers and reducing PG level. After buccal administration of patches in rabbits, in vivo permeation of fenretinide across the oral mucosa was greater (∼43 μg fenretinide/g tissue) from patches that contained optimized permeation enhancer content (2.5 wt % PG + 5 wt % menthol) relative to permeation obtained from enhancer-free patch (∼17 μg fenretinide/g tissue) (p < 0.001). In vitro and in vivo release of fenretinide from patch was not significantly increased by coincorporation of permeation enhancers, indicating that mass transfer across the tissue, and not the patch, largely determined the permeation rate control in vivo. As a result of its improved permeation and its lack of deleterious local effects, the mucoadhesive fenretinide patch coincorporated with 2.5 wt % PG + 5 wt % menthol represents an important step in the further preclinical evaluation of oral site-specific chemoprevention strategies with fenretinide.

  8. Effective vitamin B12 treatment can reduce serum antigastric parietal cell antibody titer in patients with oral mucosal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Andy; Chang, Julia Yu-Fong; Wang, Yi-Ping; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Chiang, Chun-Pin

    2016-10-01

    Patients with serum antigastric parietal cell antibody (GPCA) positivity may have vitamin B12 deficiency and some oral symptoms. This study assessed the changes of serum GPCA titer in GPCA-positive patients after effective vitamin B12 treatment. Two hundred and ten GPCA-positive oral mucosal disease patients became oral symptom free (complete response) after 1.0-67.1 months of treatment with regular and continuous intramuscular injection of vitamin B12 once per week. The changes of serum GPCA titers after treatment were evaluated in these 210 patients. We found a significant drop of the GPCA positive rate from 100% to 42.9% in our 210 complete response patients after effective vitamin B12 treatment (p vitamin BC capsules (containing 10 μg of vitamin B12) plus deficient hematinic supplements per day after a follow-up period of 2.7-27 months. A maintenance vitamin B12 treatment once a month could retain the GPCA-negative status in 87% of treated-to GPCA-negative patients compared with those (10%) without further maintenance vitamin B12 treatment. Regular and continuous effective vitamin B12 treatment can reduce the relatively higher serum GPCA titers to significantly lower or undetectable levels in GPCA-positive patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  10. Structural specificity of mucosal-cell transport and metabolism of peptide drugs: implication for oral peptide drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. P.; Amidon, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The brush border membrane of intestinal mucosal cells contains a peptide carrier system with rather broad substrate specificity and various endo- and exopeptidase activities. Small peptide (di-/tripeptide)-type drugs with or without an N-terminal alpha-amino group, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, are transported by the peptide transporter. Polypeptide drugs are hydrolyzed by brush border membrane proteolytic enzymes to di-/tripeptides and amino acids. Therefore, while the intestinal brush border membrane has a carrier system facilitating the absorption of di-/tripeptide drugs, it is a major barrier limiting oral availability of polypeptide drugs. In this paper, the specificity of peptide transport and metabolism in the intestinal brush border membrane is reviewed.

  11. [Injury and reparative regeneration of the oral mucosal epithelium after cytostatic drugs administration (tissue, cell and molecular mechanisms)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, V L; Leont'eva, I V

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the systematized summary of current literature data and the authors' own findings on the regularities of human and animal surface oral mucosal epithelium (OME) injury caused by cytostatic drugs (CSD) administration, and on the ways of its regeneration after the cytostatic chemotherapy (CSCT) discontinuation. Tissue, cell and molecular mechanisms of CSCT effects on OME, are described. The direct effects of CSD included the epithelial layer attenuation with the derangement of its architecture, epitheliocyte proliferation suppression, apoptosis activation, and differentiation disturbances (involving the broad spectrum of cytological, cytochemical, ultrastructural and molecular-biological changes). In severe cases, these processes resulted in the loss of the epithelial layer integrity with the development of ulceration. Complete epithelial regeneration requires a long period after the CSCT discontinuation. Indirect effects of CSD on OME are associated with the microbial invasion and the diffusion of microbial vital activity products into the epithelium with concurrent leukopenia, immunosuppression and decreased salivary secretion.

  12. GWAS of 972 autologous stem cell recipients with multiple myeloma identifies 11 genetic variants associated with chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coleman, Elizabeth Ann; Lee, Jeannette Y; Erickson, Stephen W;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) to treat multiple myeloma (MM) and other cancers carries the risk of oral mucositis (OM) with sequelae including impaired nutritional and fluid intake, pain, and infectious complications. As a result of these problems, can...

  13. [Clinical features of oral lesions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Guangxi autonomous region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Xiangzhi; Jiang, Lanlan; Lu, Xiangchan; Liu, Wei; Wu, Nianning; Tao, Renchuan

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the features of oral lesions in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). A total of 127 HIV-seropositive patients were interviewed for health information and examined for their HIV-related oral lesions according to the EC Clearing House Criteria on Oral Problems related to HIV-Infection (1992). The examinations were conducted by dental specialist and HIV specialist. The CD4 T cell count in peripheral blood of the patients was tested by flow cytometry. The patients were divided into HIV- infected group (42) and AIDS group (85) according to CDC Classification System for HIV- Infected Adults and Adolescents (revised in 1993). Chi-square test was used to test the relationship between systemic disease and oral lesions, and the difference of the prevalence of oral lesions between the two groups. Among the 127 patients, oral candidiasis (51/127), oral hairy leukoplakia (24/127) were common oral manifestation. There was no relationship between the oral manifestation and systemic disease (P = 0.397). The occurrence of oral lesions and oral candidiasis was significantly different between the two groups (χ² = 7.684, P = 0.006; χ² = 14.410, P < 0.001). The CD4 count was related to the prevalence of oral lesions (P = 0.006) and oral candidasis (P = 0.003). Most oral lesions appeared before the appearance of systemic disease. Oral candidiasis and oral hairy leukoplakia were the most common lesions.Oral lesions had no relationship with systemic disease but could be still an indicator for disease progress.

  14. [Efficacy of oral cavity care in preventing stomatitis (mucositis) in cancer chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshino, Miki; Sakai, Chie; Ogura, Takafumi; Kawasaki, Akiko; Fukuzato, Fumiko; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro

    2009-03-01

    Stomatitis is a common side effect during cancer chemotherapy. We hypothesized that careful oral cavity care using patient guidance and cleanliness index prevents stomatitis in cancer chemotherapy. We introduced oral care patient guidance including teaching good brushing methods, O'Leary's Plaque Control Record(PCR)as a cleanliness index, and Eilers' Oral Assessment Guide(OAG)as an overall index after April 2006. We evaluated the incidence of stomatitis in 20 patients(10 patients between April 2004 to May 2006 and 10 patients after April 2006)with esophageal cancer who received chemotherapy including 5-FU and CDDP. Patients receiving brushing training after 2006 were evaluated regarding cleanliness of their oral cavities using PCR index and OAG index. The rates of stomatitis were 60%(6/10)and 40%(4/10)before and after the introduction of oral care patient guidance. The average of PCR index decreased from 82% to 46% after teaching good brushing method to the patients. The average of OAG index after brushing training was 9.14 which was better score compared with previous reports. Introduction of oral care patient guidance decreased the incidence of stomatitis. Both PCR and OAG indexes were useful in evaluating the objective condition of the oral cavity and in sharing patients' information among a medical team. These indexes encouraged the patients to clean their oral cavities.

  15. The role of cytology in oral lesions: a review of recent improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Historically, sensitivity and specificity of oral cytology is poor. Using conventional oral cytology for the diagnosis of cancer and its precursors has not had the success that cytologists had hoped for; however, with improved methodology, oral cytology has enjoyed a resurgence of interest. This renewed interest is partly due to the introduction of a specialized brush that collects a full-thickness epithelial sample and not just superficially sloughed cells, as well as analysis of that sample with computer assistance; in addition, a variety of adjunctive techniques have been introduced to potentially enhance the diagnosis of the cytologic specimens including DNA analysis, immunocytochemistry, molecular analysis, and liquid-based preparations. An increase in sensitivity (>96%) and specificity (>90%) of the oral brush biopsy with computer-assisted diagnosis has been reported for identification of malignant and premalignant lesions. Brush cytology is valuable to prevent misdiagnosing doubtful oral lesions, i.e., those lesions without a definitive etiology, diagnosing large lesions where excision of the entire tissue is not possible or practicable, evaluating patients with recurrent malignancies, and monitoring premalignant lesions.

  16. [Lesiones de mucosa bucal. Factores asociados en población infantil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares-Vieyra, Celia; Meza-Sánchez, Julieta Del Carmen; González-Guevara, Martha Beatriz; Murrieta-Pruneda, José Francisco; Salgado-Rodríguez, Sandra Jessica; Morales-Jaimes, Rosalba

    2013-01-01

    there are few systematic studies reporting the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in children. The reported prevalence is ranging from 4.1 % to 52.6 %, probably due to differences in methodology and population. The aim was to identify the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in children population. a cross, descriptive, retrospective study in children who attended the dental clinic San Lorenzo Atemoaya was done (January 2006-July 2009); the data was obtained from medical records. Oral mucosal lesions were recorded. Descriptive analysis and unconditional logistic regression were conducted. the sample was 367; there were 200 males (54.5 %). The median age was six years. The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions was 66.2 %. The most common lesions were cheilitis simple (41.1 %), melanotic macule (18.3 %), petechiae (16.9 %) and traumatic ulcer (12 %), without difference between sexes. The sucking lip was associated with cheilitis simple (OR 1.7, p = 0.013) and recurrent ulcers with onychophagia (OR 15.75, p = 0.026). it was observed a higher prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in children than reported in other papers. Association is confirmed between parafunctional habits and oral mucosal lesions.

  17. Efficacy of Oral Cryotherapy on Oral Mucositis Prevention in Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ruiren; Zhao, Shasha; Luo, Lan; Li, Dandan; Zhao, Xiaoli; Wei, Huaping; Pang, Zhaoxia; Wang, Lili; Liu, Daihong; Wang, Quanshun; Gao, Chunji

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Controversy exists regarding whether oral cryotherapy can prevent oral mucositis (OM) in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of oral cryotherapy for OM prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing HSCT. Methods PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched through October 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effect of oral cryotherapy with no treatment or with other interventions for OM in patients undergoing HSCT were included. The primary outcomes were the incidence, severity, and duration of OM. The secondary outcomes included length of analgesic use, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) use, and length of hospital stay. Results Seven RCTs involving eight articles analyzing 458 patients were included. Oral cryotherapy significantly decreased the incidence of severe OM (RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.99) and OM severity (SMD = -2.07, 95% CI = -3.90 to -0.25). In addition, the duration of TPN use and the length of hospitalization were markedly reduced (SMD = -0.56, 95% CI = -0.92 to -0.19; SMD = -0.44, 95% CI = -0.76 to -0.13; respectively). However, the pooled results were uncertain for the duration of OM and analgesic use (SMD = -0.13, 95% CI = -0.41 to 0.15; SMD = -1.15, 95% CI = -2.57 to 0.27; respectively). Conclusions Oral cryotherapy is a readily applicable and cost-effective prophylaxis for OM in patients undergoing HSCT. PMID:26024220

  18. Efficacy of oral cryotherapy on oral mucositis prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Controversy exists regarding whether oral cryotherapy can prevent oral mucositis (OM in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of oral cryotherapy for OM prevention in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing HSCT.PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched through October 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing the effect of oral cryotherapy with no treatment or with other interventions for OM in patients undergoing HSCT were included. The primary outcomes were the incidence, severity, and duration of OM. The secondary outcomes included length of analgesic use, total parenteral nutrition (TPN use, and length of hospital stay.Seven RCTs involving eight articles analyzing 458 patients were included. Oral cryotherapy significantly decreased the incidence of severe OM (RR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.99 and OM severity (SMD = -2.07, 95% CI = -3.90 to -0.25. In addition, the duration of TPN use and the length of hospitalization were markedly reduced (SMD = -0.56, 95% CI = -0.92 to -0.19; SMD = -0.44, 95% CI = -0.76 to -0.13; respectively. However, the pooled results were uncertain for the duration of OM and analgesic use (SMD = -0.13, 95% CI = -0.41 to 0.15; SMD = -1.15, 95% CI = -2.57 to 0.27; respectively.Oral cryotherapy is a readily applicable and cost-effective prophylaxis for OM in patients undergoing HSCT.

  19. Histological Diagnosis of Oral Lesions with Cutting Needle Biopsy: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Rossi dos Santos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cutting needle biopsy in the diagnosis of solid oral lesions.Material and Methods: The biopsies were carried out on seven patients who presented with solid oral lesions with sizes ranging from 2 to 6 cm. Specimens were obtained from each lesion before conventional biopsies using a cutting needle with 18-gauge x 9 cm (MD TECH, Gainesville, FL, USA. A total of 64 specimens processed by hematoxylin-eosin staining method, were obtained. Afterwards, the analysis was performed by an oral pathologist, in two different stages, with and without the clinical history of each lesion. Then, these answers were compared with the final histological diagnosis.Results: Results presented by the descriptive analysis showed that the correct diagnosis using cutting needle biopsy without the clinical history of lesions was registered in 37.5% of cases, while with the clinical history in 76.6%.Conclusions: Despite the promising results as a potential technique for biopsies and histological diagnosis of oral lesions, the cutting needle biopsy should be analyzed carefully in those cases.

  20. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection and Oral Lesions in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Dental Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Katia; Kazimiroff, Julie; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Smith, Richard V.; Wiltz, Mauricio; Polanco, Jacqueline; Grossberg, Robert M.; Belbin, Thomas J.; Strickler, Howard D.; Burk, Robert D.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the risk factors associated with oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and oral lesions in 161 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive patients and 128 HIV-negative patients presenting for oral examination at 2 urban healthcare centers. Patients were interviewed on risk factors and provided oral-rinse samples for HPV DNA typing by polymerase chain reaction. Statistical associations were assessed by logistic regression. Oral HPV was prevalent in 32% and 16% of HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative patients, respectively, including high-risk HPV type 16 (8% and 2%, respectively; P = .049) and uncommon HPV types 32/42 (6% and 5%, respectively; P = .715). Among HIV-negative patients, significant risk factors for oral HPV included multiple sex partners (≥21 vs ≤5; odds ratio [OR], 9.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–49.3), heavy tobacco smoking (>20 pack-years vs none; OR, 9.2; 95% CI, 1.4–59.4), and marijuana use (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.3–12.4). Among HIV-positive patients, lower CD4+ T-cell count only was associated with oral HPV detection (≤200 vs ≥500 cells/mm3; OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.3–15.5). Detection of high-risk HPV was also associated with concurrent detection of potentially cancerous oral lesions among HIV-negative patients but not among HIV-positive patients. The observed risk factor associations with oral HPV in HIV-negative patients are consistent with sexual transmission and local immunity, whereas in HIV-positive patients, oral HPV detection is strongly associated with low CD4+ T-cell counts. PMID:25681375

  1. Randomized DoubleBlind PlaceboControlled Trial of Propolis for Oral Mucositis in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AkhavanKarbassi, Mohammad Hasan; Yazdi, Mohammad Forat; Ahadian, Hakimeh; SadrAbad, Maryam Jalili

    2016-01-01

    Propolis based preparations have a wide range of applications in various specialties of dentistry. The aim of this clinical trial was to test the efficacy of propolis as a mouthwash in the reduction of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis (OM) in a single center. In this randomised, controlled study patients undergoing chemotherapy were included consecutively and randomised to an experimental group receiving propolis mouthwash (n = 20) and a control group receiving diluted water (n=20). Oral mucositis, erythema and eating and drink ability were assessed at baseline and after 3 and 7 days using the World Health Organization (WHO) scale and the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). There were significant differences in OM, wound and erythema in propolis group compared to placebo, but no significant difference in eating and drink ability. However, it was interesting that 65% of the patients in the propolis group were completely healed at day 7 of the trial. No significant adverse events were reported by the patients. This study found that oral care with propolis as mouthwash for patients undergoing chemotherapy is an effective intervention to improve oral health. Our findings shouldlencourage health practitioners to apply propolis mouth rinse for the oral care of patients under chemotherapy.

  2. Optical fiber Raman-based spectroscopy for oral lesions characterization: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Oliveira, Inajara P.; Rangel, João. Lucas; Ferreira, Isabelle; Kitakawa, Dárcio; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    In the clinical daily life various lesions of the oral cavity have shown different aspects, generating an inconclusive or doubtful diagnosis. In general, oral injuries are diagnosed by histopathological analysis from biopsy, which is an invasive procedure and does not gives immediate results. In the other hand, Raman spectroscopy technique it is a real time and minimal invasive analytical tool, with notable diagnostic capability. This study aims to characterize, by optical fiber Raman-based spectroscopy (OFRS), normal, inflammatory, potentially malignant, benign and malign oral lesions. Raman data were collected by a Holospec f / 1.8 spectrograph (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber, with a 785nm laser line source and a CCD Detector. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis and compared to the histopalogical results. Samples of described oral pathological processes were used in the study. The OFRS was efficient to characterized oral lesions and normal mucosa, in which biochemical information related to vibrational modes of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and carbohydrates were observed. The technique (OFRS) is able to demonstrate biochemical information concern different types of oral lesions showing that Raman spectroscopy could be useful for an early and minimal invasive diagnosis.

  3. Habits with killer instincts: in vivo analysis on the severity of oral mucosal alterations using autofluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazeer Shaiju, S.; Ariya, Saraswathy; Asish, Rajasekharan; Salim Haris, Padippurakkakath; Anita, Balan; Arun Kumar, Gupta; Jayasree, Ramapurath S.

    2011-08-01

    Oral habits like chewing and smoking are main causes of oral cancer, which has a higher mortality rate than many other cancer forms. Currently, the long term survival rate of oral cancer is less than 50%, as a majority of cases are detected very late. The clinician's main challenge is to differentiate among a multitude of red, white, or ulcerated lesions. Hence, new noninvasive, reliable, and fast techniques for the discrimination of oral cavity disorders are to be developed. This study includes autofluorescence spectroscopic screening of normal volunteers with and without lifestyle oral habits and patients with oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). The spectra from different sites of habitués, non-habitués, and OSF patients were analyzed using the intensity ratio, redox ratio, and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). The spectral disparities among these groups are well demonstrated in the emission regions of collagen and Flavin adenine dinucleotide. We observed that LDA gives better efficiency of classification than the intensity ratio technique. Even the differentiation of habitués and non-habitués could be well established with LDA. The study concludes that the clinical application of autofluorescence spectroscopy along with LDA, yields spontaneous screening among individuals, facilitating better patient management for clinicians and better quality of life for patients.

  4. Oral lesions following radiation therapy and their preventive considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghavam M

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancers account for a relatively high percent of neoplasms in the elderly population. Treatment protocols often include anti-neoplastic pharmaco-therapeutics, irradiation of the head and neck region, and surgery. These treatments, specially radiation, have detrimental effects on oral hard and soft tissues. Salivary glands undergo a distinct and longterm dysfunction, which leads to decrease in salivary How. Xerostomia is a common clinical problem in these patients which contributes to dry mouth, mucosites, change in oral ecosystem and dental caries, followed by difficulties in speech, swallowing and use of dentures which cause malnutrition. This phenomenon has an irreversible weakening effect on the patient's health. To prevent this negative impact on oral health in this group of patients, definitive dental treatments prior to the initiation of medical therapies is imperative, and will decrease the morbidity rates. Today's dentistry benefits from improved methods and materials, which enable us to give these patients a better preventive dental treatment. Consultation between dentist and medical team would be the best way to help our sufferer patients.

  5. Low-level laser therapy in the prevention of radiotherapy-induced xerostomia and oral mucositis; Prevencao da xerostomia e da musosite oral induzidas por radioterapia com uso do laser de baixa potencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Carlos de Oliveira [Instituto de Radioterapia do Vale do Paraiba Ltda., Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: colopes@uol.com.br; Mas, Josepa Rigau I. [Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona (Spain). Facultat Medicine i la Ciencies Salut; Zangaro, Renato Amaro [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento

    2006-03-15

    Objective: to verify if the use of InGaAIP laser with 685 nm wave length can reduce the xerostomy incidence, the oral mucositis severity and the pain related to mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer submitted to radiotherapy. Objective: sixty patients presenting head and neck carcinoma were submitted to radiotherapy with daily doses of 1.8 to 2.0 Gy and a final dose of 45 to 72 Gy. The salivary volume was evaluated in the first and fifteenth days, at the end of the treatment and after 15 and 30 days. The oral mucositis was evaluated on a weekly basis. Twenty-nine patients were submitted to radiotherapy without laser and 31 were submitted to radiotherapy and laser with daily doses of 2 joules/cm{sup 2} in predetermined areas of the oral mucosa and the parotid and submandibular glands. Results: in the group submitted to radiotherapy and laser the incidence of mucositis (p < 0.001) and pain (p < 0.016) was significantly lower and the salivary volume (p < 0.001) was kept higher during and after the treatment. Conclusion: the group of patients submitted to radiotherapy and laser had lower incidence of xerostomy, oral mucositis and pain when compared to the group treated with radiotherapy without laser, producing statistically significant results. (author)

  6. Linear IgA dermatosis adult variant with oral manifestation: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Isaac Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA dermatosis (LAD is a rare autoimmune disorder that presents as a vesiculo-bullous lesion with cutaneous manifestations, but rare oral mucosal involvement. Here we discuss a case of a vesiculobullous lesion with severe oral and ocular mucosal involvement mimicking pemphigoid with histopathological evidence of subepithelial blisters. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF confirmed the lesion as LAD of adult variant, although with atypical clinical features.

  7. Linear IgA dermatosis adult variant with oral manifestation: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, T Isaac; Sathyan, Pradeesh; Goma Kumar, K U

    2015-01-01

    Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) dermatosis (LAD) is a rare autoimmune disorder that presents as a vesiculo-bullous lesion with cutaneous manifestations, but rare oral mucosal involvement. Here we discuss a case of a vesiculobullous lesion with severe oral and ocular mucosal involvement mimicking pemphigoid with histopathological evidence of subepithelial blisters. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) confirmed the lesion as LAD of adult variant, although with atypical clinical features.

  8. Oral inflammation in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommer, Milinda J

    2013-05-01

    The oral cavity can be affected by a wide variety of disorders characterized by inflammation of the gingiva and/or oral mucosa. In dogs and cats, differential diagnoses for generalized oral inflammatory disorders include plaque-reactive mucositis, chronic gingivostomatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex, pemphigus and pemphigoid disorders, erythema multiforme, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, endodontic or periodontal abscesses, infectious conditions, reactive lesions, and neoplastic conditions may initially present with localized or generalized inflammation of the oral mucosa. Determination of the underlying cause of an oral inflammatory condition relies on a thorough history, complete physical and oral examination, and incisional biopsy and histopathologic examination of lesions.

  9. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropha...

  10. Effect of Preventive Oral Hygiene Measures on the Development of New Carious lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Malka; Bidoosi, Mervat; Levin, Liran

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of preventive oral hygiene measures on the development of new carious lesions. Children regularly and irregularly attending recall appointments in a paediatric dental clinic were interviewed regarding their preventive measures performance. Newly developed carious lesions were also recorded. The files of 651 children were analysed. A significant negative correlation was found between newly developed carious lesions and total number (P carious lesions: brushing regularly twice a day, concentration of fluoride in the toothpaste greater than 1100 ppm and frequency of follow-ups. Regular toothbrushing twice a day is of high importance for caries prevention. Fluoride concentration of > 1100 ppm in toothpaste should be recommended for children (considering the child's age) in order to maximise the fluoride protective effect. The importance of attending periodic recall appointments in order to maintain long term oral health should be emphasised.

  11. Experience of laser radiation for treatment of oral mucous lesions of different etiologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosesyants, Elvira N.; Zazulevskaya, Lidiya Y.; Shevtsova, Elena

    1997-05-01

    Laser irradiation use for treatment of different manifestations of oral mucous diseases during the last 10 years. The aim of this research was study of the results of use He-Ne laser radiation in combination with main therapy for treatment of oral mucous lesions of different aetiology. He-Ne laser irradiation use for radiation of lesions were caused by different aetiology reasons. Under the observation was 116 patients 20 - 64 years old, who had and hadn't background pathology. There were biochemical, immunological controls. Data of research confirmed positive effect of use He-Ne laser radiation.

  12. An unusual oral squamous cell carcinoma of the mandible, mimicked inflammatory hyperplastic lesions: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Hosseinkazemi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract   Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is the most common malignant tumors of oral cavity. The ratio of men to women is about 2: 1. Generally, it   is admitted that 60% of carcinoma of the mandibular gingival are located in the posterior of premolars. Gingiva is one of the less common sites of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Due to the variable clinical and behavioral presentations, it can easily be misdiagnosed as benign neoplasms or other inflammatory reactions. We encountered a 76-year-old woman with an unusual OSCC on the anterior mandibular ridge, imitating inflammatory hyperplastic (IH lesion in May 2013. She complained that her denture was not seated suitably because of a mandibular lesion. After biopsy of the lesion, the surgeon noticed that real bone resorption was not visible in the x-ray image. Then histopathological evaluation detected the OSCC. Patient was referred to the CT-Scan and MRI. Three months later, the lesion recurred, enlarged and extended rapidly and she was emphasized the importance of a secondary surgery in a timely fashion.. She did not accept and then underwent radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In November 2013, the patient passed away because of the progress of OSCC. This case reminded us to keep the possibility of oral SCC in mind while examining every intra-oral lesion.

  13. 社区常见口腔黏膜疾病的诊治%Diagnose and treatment of the community common oral mucosal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯靳秋

    2012-01-01

      The oral mucosal disease is a general term that the diseases occur on the oral mucosa and its soft tissue, which are related with the immune function, diet and living habits, genetic and mental factors and others. This article elaborates the causes of aphthous, lichen planus and leukoplakia, the clinical manifestation and treatment of the oral mucosal disease in detail.%  口腔黏膜病是指发生在口腔黏膜及软组织上的疾病总称,与免疫功能、饮食生活习惯、遗传因素、精神因素等相关。本文对口腔黏膜病中常见的阿弗他溃疡、扁平苔藓、白斑的病因、临床表现和治疗进行了详细的阐述。

  14. Oral Lichenoid Contact Lesions to Mercury and Dental Amalgam—A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Helen McParland; Saman Warnakulasuriya

    2012-01-01

    Human oral mucosa is subjected to many noxious stimuli. One of these substances, in those who have restorations, is dental amalgam which contains mercury. This paper focuses on the local toxic effects of amalgam and mercury from dental restorations. Components of amalgam may, in rare instances, cause local side effects or allergic reactions referred to as oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs). OLLs to amalgams are recognised as hypersensitivity reactions to low-level mercury exposure. The use of patc...

  15. Evaluation of ploidy status using DNA-image cytometry of exfoliated mucosal cells in oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Teja Chitturi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lichen planus (OLP is one of the potentially malignant disorders (PMDs with a malignancy rate of 0.2-2%. Aneuploidy is considered to be one of the important markers for malignant transformation and DNA-image cytometry (DIC has been successfully employed in oral mucosal PMDs and also in tumors of the cervix, lung and biliary tract. Aims: In this study, we intend to assess the ploidy status of exfoliated cells in OLP using DIC. Materials and Methods: Exfoliated cells from 48 patients with different subtypes of OLP (reticular, plaque type, erosive and atrophic and 10 controls were stained using Feulgen reaction and assessed for integrated optical density using image analysis software and the ploidy status was assessed. Results: All the patients in the control group and most of the patients (93.5% who had reticular or plaque type of OLP (29 out of 31 exhibited diploid nuclei in the smears, whereas 11 patients who had erosive or atrophic types of OLP showed aneuploid nuclei. Conclusions: The patients with erosive or atrophic types of OLP are at more risk and assessment of ploidy status by exfoliative cytology can be used as an adjuvant for diagnosis.

  16. Tetanus toxoid-loaded layer-by-layer nanoassemblies for efficient systemic, mucosal, and cellular immunostimulatory response following oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harde, Harshad; Agrawal, Ashish Kumar; Jain, Sanyog

    2015-10-01

    The present study reports the tetanus toxoid (TT)-loaded layer-by-layer nanoassemblies (layersomes) with enhanced protection, permeation, and presentation for comprehensive oral immunization. The stable and lyophilized TT-loaded layersomes were prepared by a thin-film hydration method followed by alternate layer-by-layer coating of an electrolyte. The developed system was assessed for in vitro stability of antigen and formulation, cellular uptake, ex vivo intestinal uptake, and immunostimulatory response using a suitable experimental protocol. Layersomes improved the stability in simulated biological media as well as protected the integrity/conformation and native 3D structure of TT as confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. The cell culture studies demonstrated a 3.8-fold higher permeation of layersomes in Caco-2 cells and an 8.5-fold higher uptake by antigen-presenting cells (RAW 264.7). The TT-loaded layersomes elicited a complete immunostimulatory profile consisting of higher systemic (serum IgG titer), mucosal (sIgA titer), and cellular (interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels) immune response after peroral administration in mice. The modified TT inhibition assay further confirmed the elicitation of complete protective levels of anti-TT antibody (>0.1 IU/mL) by layersomes. In conclusion, the proposed strategy is expected to contribute significantly in the field of stable liposome technology for mass immunization through the oral route.

  17. ONCOLOGICAL PATIENTS AND THE NURSING FIELD: RATION BETWEEN THE ORAL MUCOSITIS GRADE AND THE IMPLEMENTED THERAPEUTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Nilkece Araújo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Caracterizar a mucosite oral em pacientes em tratamento oncológico. Métodos: Estudo exploratório descritivo com abordagem quantitativa com 50 pacientes em um Hospital Filantrópico em Teresina-PI, de agosto a outubro de 2010. Resultados: Os achados apontaram a prevalência de mucosite oral no gênero masculino e nas faixas etárias inferiores a 17 e superiores a 60 anos. Os diagnósticos oncológicos mais freqüentes foram as leucemias e os cânceres das vias aerodigestivas superiores, cujos tratamentos se concentravam na quimiorradiação, determinando predominantemente graus 1 e 2 de mucosite oral. Os quimioterápicos mais associados à afecção foram a cisplatina, a citarabina, o metotrexate, sulfato de vincristina, etoposídeo e cloridrato de doxorrubicina. Conclusão: Conclui-se que há necessidade da inserção da enfermagem no fomento às ações preventivas e de controle da mucosite oral para manutenção do bem estar, otimização da resposta terapêutica e melhoria da qualidade de vida do paciente oncológico. DESCRITORES: Mucosite oral, Oncologia, Enfermagem.

  18. Oral Immunization with a Recombinant Lactococcus lactis-Expressing HIV-1 Antigen on Group A Streptococcus Pilus Induces Strong Mucosal Immunity in the Gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamcha, Venkateswarlu; Jones, Andrew; Quigley, Bernard R; Scott, June R; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-11-15

    The induction of a potent humoral and cellular immune response in mucosal tissue is important for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. Most of the current HIV vaccines under development use the i.m. route for immunization, which is relatively poor in generating potent and long-lived mucosal immune responses. In this article, we explore the ability of an oral vaccination with a probiotic organism, Lactococcus lactis, to elicit HIV-specific immune responses in the mucosal and systemic compartments of BALB/c mice. We expressed the HIV-1 Gag-p24 on the tip of the T3 pilus of Streptococcus pyogenes as a fusion to the Cpa protein (LL-Gag). After four monthly LL-Gag oral immunizations, we observed strong Gag-specific IgG and IgA responses in serum, feces, and vaginal secretions. However, the Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses in the blood were at or below our detection limit. After an i.m. modified vaccinia Ankara/Gag boost, we observed robust Gag-specific CD8 T cell responses both in systemic and in mucosal tissues, including intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes of the small intestine, Peyer's patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Consistent with strong immunogenicity, the LL-Gag induced activation of CD11c(+) CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the Peyer's patches after oral immunization. Our results demonstrate that oral immunization with L. lactis expressing an Ag on the tip of the group A Streptococcus pilus serves as an excellent vaccine platform to induce strong mucosal humoral and cellular immunity against HIV.

  19. Laser phototherapy as topical prophylaxis against head and neck cancer radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis: comparison between low and high/low power lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Alyne; Eduardo, Fernanda P; Luiz, Ana Claudia; Campos, Luana; Sá, Pedro Henrique R N; Cristófaro, Márcio; Marques, Márcia M; Eduardo, Carlos P

    2009-04-01

    Oral mucositis is a dose-limiting and painful side effect of radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy in cancer patients. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the effect of different protocols of laser phototherapy (LPT) on the grade of mucositis and degree of pain in patients under RT. Thirty-nine patients were divided into three groups: G1, where the irradiations were done three times a week using low power laser; G2, where combined high and low power lasers were used three time a week; and G3, where patients received low power laser irradiation once a week. The low power LPT was done using an InGaAlP laser (660 nm/40 mW/6 J cm(-2)/0.24 J per point). In the combined protocol, the high power LPT was done using a GaAlAs laser (808 nm, 1 W/cm(2)). Oral mucositis was assessed at each LPT session in accordance to the oral-mucositis scale of the National Institute of the Cancer-Common Toxicity criteria (NIC-CTC). The patient self-assessed pain was measured by means of the visual analogue scale. All protocols of LPT led to the maintenance of oral mucositis scores in the same levels until the last RT session. Moreover, LPT three times a week also maintained the pain levels. However, the patients submitted to the once a week LPT had significant pain increase; and the association of low/high LPT led to increased healing time. These findings are desired when dealing with oncologic patients under RT avoiding unplanned radiation treatment breaks and additional hospital costs.

  20. Systematic review of miscellaneous agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Jarvis, Virginia; Zadik, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    : A total of 32 papers across 10 interventions were examined. New suggestions were developed against the use of systemic pilocarpine administered orally for prevention of OM during RT in head and neck cancer patients and in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy, with or without total body irradiation......, prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A suggestion was also made against the use of systemic pentoxifylline administered orally for the prevention of OM in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. No guideline was possible for any other agent reviewed due to inadequate and...

  1. White Lesions Of The Oral Ca vity -diagnostic appraisal & management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available White lesions of the oral cavity constitute a rather common group of lesions that areencountered during routine clinical dental practice. The process of clinical diagnosis and treatmentplanning is of great concern to the patient as it determines the nature of future follow up care.There is a strong felt need for a rational and functional classification which will enable betterunderstanding of the basic disease process as well as in formulating a differential diagnosis. Clinicaldiagnostic skills and good judgment forms the key to successful management of white lesions of theoral cavity.

  2. Outcomes of oral squamous cell carcinoma arising from oral epithelial dysplasia: rationale for monitoring premalignant oral lesions in a multidisciplinary clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, M W; Field, E A; Field, J K; Risk, J M; Rajlawat, B P; Rogers, S N; Steele, J C; Triantafyllou, A; Woolgar, J A; Lowe, D; Shaw, R J

    2013-10-01

    Surveillance of oral epithelial dysplasia results in a number of newly diagnosed cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The clinical stage of oral SCC at diagnosis influences the magnitude of treatment required and the prognosis. We aimed to document the stage, treatment, and outcome of oral SCC that arose in patients who were being monitored for oral epithelial dysplasia in a dedicated multidisciplinary clinic. Those with histologically diagnosed lesions were enrolled on an ethically approved protocol and molecular biomarker study. Details of clinical and pathological TNM, operation, radiotherapy, recurrence, second primary tumour, and prognosis, were recorded in patients whose lesions underwent malignant transformation. Of the 91 patients reviewed (median follow-up 48 months, IQR 18-96), 23 (25%) had malignant transformation. All were presented to the multidisciplinary team with stage 1 disease (cT1N0M0). Of these, 21 were initially treated by wide local excision, 2 required resection of tumour and reconstruction, and 2 required adjuvant radiotherapy. At follow-up 3 had local recurrence, one had regional recurrence, one had metachronous lung cancer, and 5 had second primary oral SCC. There were further diagnoses of oral dysplasia in 5 during follow-up, and it is estimated that 76% of patients will have one or other event in 5 years. Disease-specific survival was 100% and overall survival was 96% (22/23). Median follow-up after diagnosis of oral SCC was 24 months (IQR 11-58). Specialist monitoring of oral epithelial dysplasia by a multidisciplinary team allows oral SCC to be detected at an early stage, and enables largely curative treatment with simple and usually minor surgical intervention. The high incidence of second primary oral SCC in high-risk patients with oral epithelial dysplasia further supports intensive targeted surveillance in this group.

  3. Cytomorphometric Analysis of Oral Premalignant and Malignant Lesions Using Feulgen Stain and Exfoliative Brush Cytology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Shirish Joshi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and accounting for 90% of cancers of oral cavity. Tobacco abuse has been proved to be the major risk factor in the development of OSCC. Despite advances in surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, the five year survival rate for oral cancer has not improved significantly over the past several decades and it remains at about 50 to 55%. Cytobrush sampling is more frequently used nowadays for exfoliative cytology, since it maximizes the number of cells obtained, and facilitates their uniform distribution onto the microscope slide, thus probably improving sensitivity.Our study was therefore carried out to analyze the cytomorphometric features of cells obtained by cytobrush and stained with Feulgen stain from oral premalignant and malignant lesions and to find out whether these features could be used to detect dysplasia and malignancy in their early stages. Aims: To analyze the cytomorphological features of cells in smears of oral premalignant and malignant lesions obtained from exfoliative brush cytology using Feulgen stain and to assess the efficacy of the same in detecting dysplasia and malignancy. Methods: Our study comprised of clinically and histopathologically diagnosed sixty cases which were grouped into twenty cases each of tobacco users with lesions (Leukoplakia and Erythroplakia (Group I; tobacco users without lesions (Group II; Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC lesions (Group III; and normal mucosa (Group IV. The epithelial cells from the lesion were collected with a cytobrush and smears were stained with Feulgen stain. The cells were measured using software for their nuclear area, nuclear diameter, cellular area, cellular diameter and nuclear to cellular area ratio (N:C. Results: The exfoliated cells showed similar alterations as those occuring in histopathological sections of premalignant and malignant lesions. The N:C ratio, mean nuclear area and

  4. Altered β-catenin expression in oral mucosal dysplasia: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunno Santos de Freitas SILVA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective The current study aimed to investigate the β-catenin expression in oral leukoplakia (OL with different degrees of epithelial dysplasia and normal oral mucosa.Material and Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 39 OL (mild dysplasia n=19, moderate dysplasia n=13, and severe dysplasia n=7, and 10 normal oral mucosa (control group were submitted to immunohistochemical reactions to anti-β-catenin primary antibody. A qualitative β-catenin analysis was performed based on the percentage of positive cells. The cellular location and the epithelial layer were also considered. The Chi-square test and the Fisher’s exact test were used to verify possible differences in the β-catenin expression among the OL groups. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results Membranous expression of β-catenin in parabasal and basal layers was gradually lost in the higher degrees of epithelial dysplasia. In normal oral mucosa, β-catenin was detected only in the cytoplasmic membrane. However, a significant increase in cytoplasmic β-catenin could be observed between mild and moderate dysplasia (Fisher Exact test - p<0.001 and between mild and severe dysplasia (p<0.001.Conclusions The β-catenin cytoplasmic expression observed in this study may represent the initial stage of modifications in the E-cadherin-catenin complex, along with morphological cellular changes.

  5. Research status quo of oral cavity cold therapy to prevent oral cavity mucositis caused by chemotherapy%口腔冷疗预防放化疗所致口腔黏膜炎研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆茵; 徐桂华; 金胜姬

    2011-01-01

    综述了口腔冷疗预防放化疗所致口腔黏膜炎研究现状,指出应对口腔冷疗方法、时间及应用范围进行进一步深入分析,以更好地发挥口腔冷疗对放化疗所致口腔黏膜炎的预防作用.%It summarized the research status quo of oral cavity cold therapy to prevent oral cavity mucositis of patients caused by chemotherapy.And it pointed out that method, time and application of oral cavity cold therapy should be further analyzed so as to play a preventive role better in oral cavity mucositis caused by chemotherapy.

  6. Increased cytogenetic abnormalities in exfoliated oral mucosal cells of South Indian foundry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravelu, Saranya Ramalingam; Sellappa, Sudha

    2015-02-01

    Biomonitoring offers a valuable tool to estimate the genetic risk as of exposure to genotoxic agents. Here, we intend to assess the potential cytogenetic damage related with occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by evaluating the genetic damages in exfoliated buccal epithelial cells of foundry workers via counting micronucleus (MNs) and other nuclear abnormalities (NAs). This was a cross-sectional study and all study subjects were male . Exfoliated buccal mucosal cells were obtained from 100 subjects involved in either foundry molding or melting processes, and 100 controls matched for sex, age, and smoking from the area of Coimbatore city, Southern India. For each individual, 2000 exfoliated buccal cells were analyzed. Significantly, there was a higher frequency of MN in the exposed workers than in the controls (P Smoking was associated with the increased frequencies of micronuclei and NAs in the buccal epithelium of both the control and the exposed groups. Smoking represented significant factors in terms of increasing the production of MN when the control and the exposed groups were compared (P periodical biological monitoring and proper care which is essential for them.

  7. Diagnostic Features of Common Oral Ulcerative Lesions: An Updated Decision Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Yaser

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of oral ulcerative lesions might be quite challenging. This narrative review article aims to introduce an updated decision tree for diagnosing oral ulcerative lesions on the basis of their diagnostic features. Various general search engines and specialized databases including PubMed, PubMed Central, Medline Plus, EBSCO, Science Direct, Scopus, Embase, and authenticated textbooks were used to find relevant topics by means of MeSH keywords such as “oral ulcer,” “stomatitis,” and “mouth diseases.” Thereafter, English-language articles published since 1983 to 2015 in both medical and dental journals including reviews, meta-analyses, original papers, and case reports were appraised. Upon compilation of the relevant data, oral ulcerative lesions were categorized into three major groups: acute, chronic, and recurrent ulcers and into five subgroups: solitary acute, multiple acute, solitary chronic, multiple chronic, and solitary/multiple recurrent, based on the number and duration of lesions. In total, 29 entities were organized in the form of a decision tree in order to help clinicians establish a logical diagnosis by stepwise progression. PMID:27781066

  8. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to treat chemotherapy-induced oral lesions: Report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Breno Amaral; Melo Filho, Mário Rodrigues; Simões, Alyne

    2016-03-01

    The development of Angular Cheilitis and the reactivation of Herpes Simplex Virus, could be related to a decrease in the resistance of the immune system in the infected host, being common in cancer patients receiving antineoplastic chemotherapy. The objective of the present manuscript is to report Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy as a treatment of infected oral lesions of patients submitted to chemotherapy.

  9. 口腔黏膜病临床特点及解决对策研究%The clinical features of oral mucosal disease and Countermeasures Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永莲

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究口腔黏膜病的临床特点及解决对策。方法选取2014年4月~2015年4月我院收治的口腔粘膜病患者2640例,分析口腔黏膜病的临床特点、发病趋势及相应的解决对策。结果随着年龄的增长,口腔黏膜病发生率出现上升趋势,多发老年患者;口腔黏膜发病因素相对较多,主要有扁平苔藓类、溃疡类、口炎类等。结论福建地区口腔黏膜病发生率较高,疾病类型相对较多,应加强患者护理干预和宣传教育,降低口腔黏膜疾病发生率。%ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features of oral mucosal diseases and Solutions. Methods2640 cases of patient data from April 2014 to April 2015 in our hospital were analyzed, analysis of the clinical features of oral mucosal disease incidence trends and corresponding solutions.Results2640 cases of patients with mucosal statistical analysis see: As age, mucosal disease occurs upward trend, and the highest incidence in the elderly; oral relatively more vulnerable to disease, the top three were : Flat mosses, ulcers, stomatitis, etc.ConclusionThe incidence of oral disease in Fujian higher, and the type of disease is relatively large, should strengthen patient care interventions and public education to reduce the incidence of oral disease.

  10. The impact of oral herpes simplex virus infection and candidiasis on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis among patients with hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-K; Hou, H-A; Chow, J-M; Chen, Y-C; Hsueh, P-R; Tien, H-F

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of oral candidiasis and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections in chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (OM). The medical records of 424 consecutive patients with hematological malignancies who had received chemotherapy at a medical center in Taiwan from January 2006 to November 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. The results of swab cultures of fungus and HSV-1 for OM were correlated with associated clinical features. Younger age, myeloid malignancies, and disease status other than complete remission before chemotherapy were significantly correlated with the development of OM. Risks of fever (p < 0.001) and bacteremia were higher in patients with OM. Among 467 episodes of OM with both swab cultures available, 221 were non-infection (47.3%) and 246 were related to either fungal infections, HSV-1 infections, or both (52.7%); of the 246 episodes, 102 were associated with fungal infections alone (21.8%), 98 with HSV-1 infections alone (21%), and 46 with both infections (9.9%). Patients who had received antifungal agents prior to OM occurrence tended to have HSV-1 infection (p < 0.001). Our results suggest that Candida albicans and HSV-1 play an important role in chemotherapy-induced OM in patients with hematological malignancies.

  11. Exfoliative cytology and cytocentrifuge preparation of oral premalignant and malignant lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pushpak; Deshmukh, Revati

    2012-01-01

    Oral exfoliative cytology is a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for the early diagnosis of oral cancer. Traditional exfoliative cytology, though popular, has limitations which could be overcome using cytocentrifuge preparations. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of cytocentrifuged specimens with that of conventionally prepared smears in the diagnosis of oral premalignancy and malignancy. Exfoliative cytology was performed on 30 patients with oral premalignant and malignant lesions. The yield was smeared immediately onto a slide for conventional exfoliative cytology (group A). The lesion was then scraped again and the yield was suspended in a bottle containing a fixative solution for cytocentrifuge apparatus-assisted smearing (group B). Both smears were stained with rapid Papanicolaou stain and assessed for cellularity, cellular and nuclear morphology, evaluation of mitosis and background. All the criteria assessed were statistically significant (p value of <0.001) in group B except for mitosis, which was significant in group A. Cytocentrifuge preparations can preserve the cellular details and reduce the overlapping of cells, enabling precise interpretation and thus aiding in the diagnosis of premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Impacto de lesiones orales sobre la calidad de vida en pacientes adultos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Díaz Cárdenas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar el impacto de lesiones orales sobre la calidad de vida relacionada con la Salud Oral (CVRSB en adultos. Materiales y métodos: Estudio analítico transversal, muestra a conveniencia de 292 pacientes, Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Cartagena, con lesiones orales en los últimos 3 meses y diligenciaron el Índice de Salud Oral General, GOHAI para evaluar CVRSB. Dos examinadores fueron calibrados para evaluar lesiones orales. Fue reali