WorldWideScience

Sample records for oral manifestations

  1. Oral Manifestations of Menopause

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oral manifestations may vary for each patient in the form of burning mouth syndrome .... as chlorhexidine aids in reduction of the accumulation of dental plaque.[5,10 ... women with missing teeth may have a higher risk of hypertension and ...

  2. Oral manifestations of acute leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukaemia is the most common form of chilhood cancer. The aim of this paper was to underline the importance of oral manifestations in children with acute leukaemia. The disease and its treatment can directly or indirectly affect oral health. Oral manifestations are gingival inflammation and enlargement. Leukaemic cells are capable of infiltrating the gingiva and the deeper periodontal tissues which leads to ulceration and infection of oral tissues. Gingival bleeding is a common sign in patients with leukaemia. Symptoms include local lymphadenopathy, mucous membrane Petechiae and ecchymoses. Cytotoxic drugs have direct effects like mucositis, involving atrophy, desquamation and ulceration of the mucosa, with increasing the risk for local and systemic infections. Leukaemia can directly influence dental care and dental treatment, while oral lesions may have life-threatening consequences. Knowledge and skills among dentists may also not be adequate to treat children with acute leukaemia. It is therefore imperative that all stomatologists be aware of dental problems that occur in leukaemia in order to be able to effectively carry out appropriate measures to mitigate these problems.

  3. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  4. Oral manifestations of syphilis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Soares

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis is an infectious disease presenting stages associated with specific oral lesions. Therefore, health professionals should be familiar with the different syphilis oral manifestations at each stage and be prepared to refer any suspected patient for further evaluation. This report describes the most important clinical factors of each stage, emphasizing the oral manifestations.

  5. Systemic manifestations of oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    N Chaitanya Babu; Andrea Joan Gomes

    2011-01-01

    The oral cavity is the site of much infectious and inflammatory disease which has been associated with systemic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and pre-term low births. This article emphasizes on the oral-systemic disease connection which is now a rapidly advancing area of research. The possible systemic diseases which arise from oral microorganisms are hereby focused.

  6. Current oral manifestations of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, M

    2001-02-01

    The oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus infection have changed drastically since the introduction of the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in developed countries. Recent studies have documented significant reductions in morbidity and mortality rates among HIV-infected patients on HAART. This article focuses on the latest information about the oral manifestations of HIV infection and will discuss the impact of HAART.

  7. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS AMONG ROMANIAN HIV PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela ARBUNE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to evaluate the oral health problems on HIV youth patients from Galati. Materials and method. A cross-sectional study assessed 102 patients with mean age 22. The most frequent oral manifestations on HIV infected youth under ART are erythema marginatum, periodontitis, candidosis and hypertrophia gingivalis. Results and discussion. Dental decay-missing-filled index on HIV patients is high. Viral HIV replication, long time pediatric exposure on HIV, male sex, smoking, and oral inflamation are related to dental poor condition. Exodontic therapy is comon among HIV youth. However, persistence of some associated oral infections is related to individual or behavioral risk factors, but also to some newly found mechanisms, such as disfunctional immune reconstruction. Seeing to antiretroviral treatment, the severity and frequency of oral manifestations decreased among HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment. Conclusions. Developing medical, social and educational programs is imperative for improving the oral health of HIV youth of Galati.

  8. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir E. Panov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a serious public health problem. New infections continue to occur, and morbidity and mortality are increasing. The date reported that 3% of infected world population are affected.Morbidity associated with hepatitis C virus infection can involve a variety of extrahepatic conditions including the oral region. Some of the oral manifestation are oral disease like lichen planus and Sjögren-like sialadenitis , other affects the dental status, and side effect of the virus therapy. The aim of this review is to summarize the oral sings, accompanying hepatitis C virus.

  9. Oral Manifestations and Complications of Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maskari, Awatif Y.; Al-Maskari, Masoud Y.; Al-Sudairy, Salem

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease affecting all age groups. It is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Many chronic macrovascular and microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported in the literature with few reports about oral complications. This article aims to review and increase the awareness of oral manifestations and complications of diabetes mellitus and to stimulate research on the subject. It treats in depth some of the complications such as periodontal disease, fungal infection and salivary dysfunction while other complications are mentioned briefly. PMID:21969888

  10. Oral manifestations of HIV positive children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, M G; Bueno, D F; Serra, E; Gonçalves, R

    2001-01-01

    Oral manifestations in HIV positive children were observed in thirty-eight HIV infected children that have received care at the Special Care Dentistry Center (SCDC) of the School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo. Results have shown that 52.63% of the children presented at least one oral manifestation related with HIV/AIDS. Angular cheilitis occurred in 28.94%, parotid gland bilateral enlargement, pseudomembranous candidiasis and erythematous candidiasis in 18.42%, conventional gingivitis in 13.15%, herpes simplex in 5.26%, hairy leukoplakia, recurrent aphthous ulcer and condyloma acuminatum in 2.63%. Although enamel hypoplasia occurred in 23.68%, this could not be attributed specifically to HIV infection.

  11. Periodontal and oral manifestations of marijuana use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Swati Y; Tatakis, Dimitris N; Tipton, David A

    2012-01-01

    Marijuana, prepared from the plant Cannabis sativa, is the most widely used illicit drug in the United States. Marijuana use has been associated with adverse psychosocial and health effects, including effects on oral tissues. Periodontal literature has limited references to the periodontal effects of cannabis use. In this report, we present two cases of marijuana-associated gingival enlargement and review the literature on oral complications of marijuana use. Two asymptomatic males, aged 23 and 42 years, presented independently for oral prophylaxis. Both had an unremarkable medical history and related a history of significant marijuana use of 2-16 years duration. Common findings following oral and periodontal examination were nicotinic stomatitis-like lesions, uvulitis and gingival enlargement. Marginal and papillary gingiva of the anterior dentition were the areas primarily affected by gingival enlargement, while some of these areas exhibited a nodular or "pebbly" appearance. Marijuana-associated gingival enlargement was diagnosed in the reported cases. A review of the literature revealed two other reports of marijuana-associated gingival enlargement, all in young adult males with chronic (2 or more years) cannabis use. These authors reported a resemblance to phenytoin-induced enlargement. Biochemical similarities between phenytoin and cannabis active compounds suggest possible common pathogenetic mechanisms. Uvulitis and nicotinic stomatitis appear to be the two most common of the several oral manifestations of marijuana use. Chronic marijuana use may result in gingival enlargement with clinical characteristics similar to phenytoin-induced enlargement.

  12. Oral manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrozzo, Marco; Scally, Kara

    2014-06-28

    Extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect a variety of organ systems with significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most frequently reported EHM of HCV infection, involve the oral region predominantly or exclusively. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is potentially malignant and represents cell-mediated reaction to a variety of extrinsic antigens, altered self-antigens, or super antigens. Robust epidemiological evidence support the link between OLP and HCV. As the virus may replicate in the oral mucosa and attract HCV-specific T lymphocytes, HCV may be implicated in OLP pathogenesis. Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy, characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes and a multitude of other systemic signs and symptoms. SjS patients have also an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with chronic hepatitis C do frequently have histological signs of Sjögren-like sialadenitis with mild or even absent clinical symptoms. However, it is still unclear if HCV may cause a disease mimicking SjS or it is directly responsible for the development of SjS in a specific subset of patients. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral malignant tumour and at least in some part of the world could be linked to HCV.

  13. Oral manifestations in type-2 diabetes and related complications

    OpenAIRE

    Sarita Bajaj; Suresh Prasad; Arvind Gupta; Vijay Bahadur Singh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the wide spectrum of the oral markers of diabetes is imperative as one frequently encounters individuals with undetected, untreated or poorly controlled diabetes. Objectives: The objective was to study the oral manifestations in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and to establish an association between oral manifestations and associated microvascular and macrovascular complications. Materials and Methods: 50 cases of DM were selected who had oral complications. The control...

  14. Photoletter to the editor: Disseminated histoplasmosis with initial oral manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Surabhi; Sardana, Kabir; Vijay K Garg

    2013-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal disease that may present in a variety of clinical manifestations. Involvment of the oral mucosa is very rare and may occur as part of disseminated histoplasmosis or as isolated involvement. We present a patient with disseminated histoplasmosis, in whom oral lesions were the initial manifestation of the disease.

  15. Oral manifestation and salivary changes in renal patients undergoing hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarmand, Marieh; Nakhaee, Alireza; Sargolzaie, Fahimeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Salivary changes in hemodialysis patients may result in various oral manifestations. This research intended to determine oral manifestations and some salivary markers in hemodialysis patients. Material and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 30 hemodialysis patients (the patient group) and 30 healthy individuals (the control group). Saliva urea and calcium levels and pH values of the participants were measured, and oral manifestations such as pale mucosa, xerostomia, halitosis, changes in the sense of taste, increased calculus formation, gingival bleeding, etc. were recorded in the information collection form. The data was analyzed using T-test and chi-square, and pHalitosis, xerostomia, and increased calculus were the most prevalent manifestations, and gum bleeding was the least prevalent among the patients. Conclusions Advanced chronic renal insufficiency can increase salivary urea level, pH value, halitosis, xerostomia, and calculus formation, and may cause pale mucosa. Key words:Renal dialysis, biomarkers, oral manifestation, saliva. PMID:28210437

  16. Oral manifestation and salivary changes in renal patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarmand, Marieh; Farhad-Mollashahi, Leila; Nakhaee, Alireza; Sargolzaie, Fahimeh

    2017-02-01

    Salivary changes in hemodialysis patients may result in various oral manifestations. This research intended to determine oral manifestations and some salivary markers in hemodialysis patients. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 30 hemodialysis patients (the patient group) and 30 healthy individuals (the control group). Saliva urea and calcium levels and pH values of the participants were measured, and oral manifestations such as pale mucosa, xerostomia, halitosis, changes in the sense of taste, increased calculus formation, gingival bleeding, etc. were recorded in the information collection form. The data was analyzed using T-test and chi-square, and pcalculus were the most prevalent manifestations, and gum bleeding was the least prevalent among the patients. Advanced chronic renal insufficiency can increase salivary urea level, pH value, halitosis, xerostomia, and calculus formation, and may cause pale mucosa. Key words:Renal dialysis, biomarkers, oral manifestation, saliva.

  17. Genetic alterations in syndromes with oral manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuthama, Krishnamurthy; Prasad, Harikrishnan; Ramani, Pratibha; Premkumar, Priya; Natesan, Anuja; Sherlin, Herald J

    2013-11-01

    Ever since Gregor Johan Mendel proposed the law of inheritance, genetics has transcended the field of health and has entered all walks of life in its application. Thus, the gene is the pivoting factor for all happenings revolving around it. Knowledge of gene mapping in various diseases would be a valuable tool in prenatally diagnosing the condition and averting the future disability and stigma for the posterity. This article includes an array of genetically determined conditions in patients seen at our college out-patient department with complete manifestation, partial manifestation and array of manifestations not fitting into a particular syndrome.

  18. Genetic alterations in syndromes with oral manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy Anuthama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since Gregor Johan Mendel proposed the law of inheritance, genetics has transcended the field of health and has entered all walks of life in its application. Thus, the gene is the pivoting factor for all happenings revolving around it. Knowledge of gene mapping in various diseases would be a valuable tool in prenatally diagnosing the condition and averting the future disability and stigma for the posterity. This article includes an array of genetically determined conditions in patients seen at our college out-patient department with complete manifestation, partial manifestation and array of manifestations not fitting into a particular syndrome.

  19. Oral manifestations of eating disorders: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Russo, L; Campisi, G; Di Fede, O; Di Liberto, C; Panzarella, V; Lo Muzio, L

    2008-09-01

    Eating disorders (ED) are a group of psychopathological disorders affecting patient relationship with food and her/his own body, which manifests through distorted or chaotic eating behavior; they include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and ED not otherwise specified and may be burdened with life-threatening complications. As oral manifestations of ED can occur in many phases of disease progression, they play a significant role in assessment, characterization and prognosis of ED. Mucosal, dental, and salivary abnormalities associated with ED have been reviewed. Relations between oral menifestations and pathogenesis, management and prognosis of ED have been critically analysed. Oral manifestations of ED include a number of signs and symptoms involving oral mucosa, teeth, periodontium, salivary glands and perioral tissues; differences exist between patients with anorexia and bulimia. Oral manifestations of ED are caused by a number of factors including nutritional deficiencies and consequent metabolic impairment, poor personal hygiene, drugs, modified nutritional habits and underlying psychological disturbances. Oral manifestations of ED can cause impairment of oral function, oral discomfort and pain, and an overall deterioration of aesthetics and quality of life. Their treatment can contribute to overall patient management and prognosis.

  20. Oral manifestations in the American tegumentary leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cesar Silva da Costa

    Full Text Available American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL can affect the skin or mucosa (mucocutaneous leishmaniasis - MCL including the oral cavity. MCL oral lesions are often confused with other oral diseases, delaying diagnosis and specific treatment, and increasing the likelihood of sequelae. Thus, increasing the knowledge of the evolution of ATL oral lesions can facilitate its early diagnosis improving the prognosis of healing.Evaluate the frequency of ATL oral lesion and describe its clinical, laboratory and therapeutic peculiarities.A descriptive transversal study was carried out, using data from medical records of 206 patients with MCL examined at the outpatient clinics-IPEC-Fiocruz between 1989 and 2013. Proportions were calculated for the categorical variables and the association among them was assessed by the Pearson's chi-square test. Measures of central tendency and dispersion were used for the continuous variables and their differences were assessed by both parametric (t test and non parametric (Mann-Whitney tests. P-values <0.05 were considered as significant.The most affected site was the nose, followed by the mouth, pharynx and larynx. Seventy eight (37.9% have oral lesions and the disease presented a lower median of the evolution time than in other mucous sites as well as an increased time to heal. The presence of oral lesion was associated with: the presence of lesions in the other three mucosal sites; a smaller median of the leishmanin skin test values; a longer healing time of the mucosal lesions; a higher recurrence frequency; and a smaller frequency of treatment finishing and healing. When the oral lesion was isolated, it was associated with an age 20 years lower than when the oral lesion was associated with other mucosal sites.Considering the worst therapy results associated with the presence of oral lesions, we suggest that lesions in this location represent a factor of worse prognosis for MCL.

  1. Oral manifestations in type-2 diabetes and related complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Bajaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge of the wide spectrum of the oral markers of diabetes is imperative as one frequently encounters individuals with undetected, untreated or poorly controlled diabetes. Objectives: The objective was to study the oral manifestations in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and to establish an association between oral manifestations and associated microvascular and macrovascular complications. Materials and Methods: 50 cases of DM were selected who had oral complications. The control group comprised 50 age- and sex-matched diabetic patients without any oral complications. Results: Oral manifestations in DM included periodontal disease in 34%, oral candidiasis in 24%, tooth loss in 24%, oral mucosal ulcers in 22%, taste impairment in 20%, xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction in 14%, dental caries in 24%, and burning mouth sensation in 10% cases. Fasting [(FBG (P = 0.003] and postprandial blood glucose [(PPBG (P = 0.0003] levels were significantly higher among cases. The P values for neuropathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, and sepsis were 0.0156, 0.0241, 0.68, 0.4047, 0.0278, and 0.3149, respectively, which were significant for neuropathy, retinopathy, and dyslipidemia. Conclusions: Several oral complications are seen among diabetics. Association of oral markers in DM and microvascular complications suggests that there is a significant association between the two.

  2. Oral manifestations of Diabetes Mellitus. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri-Obradors, E; Estrugo-Devesa, A; Jané-Salas, E; Viñas, M; López-López, J

    2017-09-01

    Diabetes Mellitus has become a global epidemic and presents many complications, usually proportional to the degree and duration of hyperglycemia. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the different oral manifestations associated with Diabetes Mellitus. A MEDLINE search for "Diabetes Mellitus and oral manifestations" was performed. A further search was conducted for "diabetes" and its individual oral manifestation. Inclusion criteria were as follows: human clinical studies with a minimum of 30 patients; studies published in relevant scientific journals between January 1998 and January 2016. Nineteen studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were analyzed, assessing the strength of scientific evidence according to recommendations made by the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, Oxford (OCEBM), which permits adequate assessment of prevalence studies. A total 3,712 patients (2,084 diabetics) were included in the studies reviewed. Of the 19 studies analyzed, 4 were longitudinal studies and 15 cross-sectional studies. Periodontal disease, periapical lesions, xerostomia and taste disturbance were more prevalent among diabetic patients. An association between diabetes and caries and mucosal lesions proved positive in 5 out of 10 studies. Despite multiple oral manifestations associated with DM, awareness of the associations between diabetes, oral health, and general health is inadequate. It is necessary for doctors and dentists to be aware of the various oral manifestations of diabetes in order to make an early diagnosis.

  3. Disseminated histoplasmosis with oral and cutaneous manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Vidyanath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycotic infection caused by the dimorphic fungus, Histoplasma capsulatum. Systemic histoplasmosis has emerged as an important opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients and those in endemic areas. Reported cases of histoplasmosis have been low in India with less than 50 cases being reported. We are reporting a case of disseminated histoplasmosis with oral and cutaneous involvement in an HIV seronegative patient.

  4. Growth hormone insensitivity syndrome: unusual oral manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Siqueira, Carlos Rodrigo Barros; Pedro, Fábio Luis Miranda; Palma, Vinícius Canavarros; Sakai, Vivien Thiemy; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci

    2013-01-01

    Children with significant growth retardation and normal levels of growth hormone are diagnosed with growth hormone insensitivity. The main oral findings observed in patients with growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHIS) are underdeveloped jaws, crowded teeth and delayed eruption of permanent teeth. This manuscript describes a 9-year-old child diagnosed with GHIS, who had delayed eruption of permanent teeth and 14 unerupted supernumerary teeth. All supernumerary teeth were extracted except for two maxillary and one mandibular teeth which were difficult to identify and access. Multiple supernumerary teeth have never been reported before in patients with GHIS.

  5. Alzheimer’s disease: oral manifestations, treatment and preventive measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Ortega-Martínez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of patients with dementia types such as Alzheimer’s, non-current and tough situations are faced. Treatment should be tailored to each stage of the disease and for each patient. In this type of disease, it is very important to involve families and caregivers to improve the patients´ quality of life. The main goal with these patients is prevention. All oral manifestations caused by the lack of inadequate oral hygiene, xerostomia and manifestations derived from taking drugs should be controlled. The aim of this review is to describe the main oral manifestations which can result from this disease and the best treatment options taking into account the patients’ clinical stages.

  6. Oral and systemic manifestations in HIV-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiany Oliveira de Alencar Menezes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of the most frequent oral and systemic manifestations in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1-positive patients. METHODS: The study was conducted on 300 HIV-1 patients attending the Reference Unit Specialized in Special Infectious Parasitic Diseases in Belém, Pará, Brazil. RESULTS: The most prevalent oral conditions were caries (32.6%, candidiasis (32%, and periodontal disease (17%. Among the systemic manifestations, hepatitis (29.2%, gastritis (16%, arterial hypertension (14.7%, and tuberculosis (12% were the most commonly observed. CONCLUSIONS: We here reported on the most prevalent oral and systemic conditions in HIV-1-positive patients. The healthcare professional's knowledge of the various manifestations among these patients is fundamental to ensure prompt and accurate diagnosis and treatment, and for improving the quality of life of these patients.

  7. The tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome: oral manifestations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T; Chetty, M; Stephen, L; Fieggen, K; Beighton, P

    2014-05-01

    Tricho-rhino-phalangeal Syndrome (TRPS) is a rare inherited dysplasia affecting hair, nasal structure and fingers. A literature review indicated that since first described, three types of manifestations have been identified. A Table summarising the oral manifestations demonstrates the variety of presentations. A South African male child presented with the syndrome and was found to show premature eruption of permanent teeth, a finding that has not been previously reported. His oro-facial manifestations also included malaligned and unerupted crowded teeth, bulbosity of the nasal tip and an elongated philtrum and evidence of mild intellectual impairment. A protocol has been developed to guide the future management of these cases.

  8. Oral Manifestations and Complications of Diabetes Mellitus: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Maskari, Awatif Y.; Al-Maskari, Masoud Y; Al-Sudairy, Salem

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease affecting all age groups. It is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Many chronic macrovascular and microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported in the literature with few reports about oral complications. This article aims to review and increase the awareness of oral manifestations and complications of diabetes mellitus and to stimulate research on the subject. It treats in depth some of the complications such as...

  9. Wegener's granulomatosis : description of a case with oral manifestation

    OpenAIRE

    Reboll Ferrer, Rosa María; Zapater Latorre, Enrique; Calabuig Crespo , Consuelo; Basterra Alegría, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Wegener?s granulomatosis is a multisystemic granulomatous vasculitis that predominantly affects the airways and the kidneys, but may affect any organ. Otorhinolaryngological manifestations may be oral ulcers, gingival swelling or septal perforations that can cause saddle nose deformities, rhinitis, sinusitis and hearing loss. The oral ulcers usually occur when the disease is advanced. Renal involvement is characterized by focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, and determines the evolutio...

  10. Urban legends series: oral manifestations of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, L L; Ramirez-Amador, V; Anaya-Saavedra, G; Nittayananta, W; Carrozzo, M; Ranganathan, K

    2013-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-related oral lesions (HIV-OLs), such as oral candidiasis (OC) and oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL), have been recognized as indicators of immune suppression since the beginning of the global HIV epidemic. The diagnosis and management of HIV disease and spectrum of opportunistic infection has changed over the past 30 years as our understanding of the infection has evolved. We investigated the following controversial topics: (i) Are oral manifestations of HIV still relevant after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)? (ii) Can we nowadays still diagnose HIV infection through oral lesions? (iii) Is the actual classification of oral manifestations of HIV adequate or does it need to be reviewed and updated? (iv) Is there any novelty in the treatment of oral manifestations of HIV infection? Results from extensive literature review suggested the following: (i) While HAART has resulted in significant reductions in HIV-OLs, many are still seen in patients with HIV infection, with OC remaining the most common lesion. While the relationship between oral warts and the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is less clear, the malignant potential of oral human papillomavirus infection is gaining increasing attention. (ii) Effective antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV from a fatal illness to a chronic manageable condition and as a result expanded screening policies for HIV are being advocated both in developed and in developing countries. Affordable, reliable, and easy-to-use diagnostic techniques have been recently introduced likely restricting the importance of HIV-OLs in diagnosis. (iii) The 1993 EC-Clearinghouse classification of HIV-OLs is still globally used despite controversy on the relevance of periodontal diseases today. HIV-OL case definitions were updated in 2009 to facilitate the accuracy of HIV-OL diagnoses by non-dental healthcare workers in large-scale epidemiologic studies and clinical trials. (iv

  11. Oral manifestations caused by the linear IgA disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguia del Valle, Asier; Aguirre Urízar, José Manuel; Martínez Sahuquillo, Angel

    2004-01-01

    The Linear IgA deposit related disease or Linear IgA disease (LAD) is a chronic, uncommon and autoimmunological mucocutaneous disease, characterised by linear IgA deposits along the basement membrane zone. In mainly cases, moreover cutaneous lesions, there are oral mucosal and other mucosal lesions. There are also, some cases published of Linear IgA disease limited to oral mucosa. The known of this disease is important for the establishment of a correct differential diagnosis in cases of blistering mucocutaneous diseases. In this paper, we analyze the most important features of this disease, attending specially to the oral manifestations.

  12. Wegener's granulomatosis: description of a case with oral manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboll-Ferrer, Rosa Maria; Zapater-Latorre, Enrique; Calabuig-Crespo, Consuelo; Basterra-Alegría, Jorge

    2010-07-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis is a multisystemic granulomatous vasculitis that predominantly affects the airways and the kidneys, but may affect any organ. Otorhinolaryngological manifestations may be oral ulcers, gingival swelling or septal perforations that can cause saddle nose deformities, rhinitis, sinusitis and hearing loss. The oral ulcers usually occur when the disease is advanced. Renal involvement is characterized by focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, and determines the evolution. The diagnosis is made by clinical symptoms and signs, the presence of c-ANCA and a positive biopsy. The anatomic pathology is characterized by vasculitis, granulomatous inflammation with multinuclear giant cells and necrosis. The prognosis has improved as a result of treatment with immunosuppressants associated with corticosteroids. We report a case of a 53-year-old patient with Wegener's granulomatosis with oral manifestation, which began as chronic mastitis.

  13. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atessa Pakfetrat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center.     Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration.   Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%. The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+.   Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. 

  14. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atessa Pakfetrat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center.     Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV, sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration.   Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%. The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+.   Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia.

  15. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakfetrat, Atessa; Falaki, Farnaz; Delavarian, Zahra; Dalirsani, Zohreh; Sanatkhani, Majid; Zabihi Marani, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center. Materials and Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration. Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%). The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+. Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. PMID:25745611

  16. Oral and mandibular manifestations in the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitakides, John; Tinkle, Brad T

    2017-02-13

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are hereditary disorders that affect the connective tissue and collagen structures in the body. Several types of EDS have been identified. Oral and mandibular structures, which include oral soft tissue, dentition, facial and head pain, and the functioning of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), are variably affected in the various types of EDS. These various manifestations of EDS have been noted for many years, but newer diagnostic techniques and studies are shedding additional light on the challenges faced by EDS patients in the area of oral and mandibular disorders. Further, the impact of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) on musculoskeletal dysfunction and vice versa, make this an important feature to recognize. Oral and mandibular hypermobility of the TMJ with associated consequences of EDS are noted. These features, diagnostic parameters and treatment procedures are presented. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Oral manifestations of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Kalaskar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by short limbs, post-axial polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, edentulous mandibular incisor region, absence of mucobuccal fold, congenitally missing teeth, slight serrations of the alveolar ridge and multiple small alveolar notches. The clinical report not only describes the classical oral and dental manifestations of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome but also presents unusual findings such as single-rooted and funnel-shaped primary first molars, single conical roots of primary second molars and taurodontisum, which must be considered in the differential diagnostic criteria to avoid misdiagnosis of syndromes. The article also discusses the differential diagnosis and preventive and therapeutic oral health care for these patients. The management of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is multidisciplinary and, therefore, the oral health care provider should get updated with latest knowledge for timely referral to prevent the patient from further complications of heart defect and bony deformity.

  18. Oral Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Two Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Manoela Seadi; Munerato, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are known as chronic inflammatory disorders of the digestive tract, represented mainly by Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Among the main oral manifestations of IBD are cobblestoning of the oral mucosa, labial swellings with vertical fissures, pyostomatitis vegetans, angular cheilitis, perioral erythema, and glossitis. In this sense, understanding these nosological entities by dentists would help reach early and differential diagnosis. Thus, two case reports are presented and discussed based on theoretical references obtained by a literature review. The first case report refers to an adult patient whose IBD diagnosis was established after stomatological assessment. The second case was a patient with CD diagnosed in childhood with characteristic oral lesions. PMID:26864508

  19. Oral manifestations of dengue fever: A rarity and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar Bhardwaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a viral infection with fatal potential complications. It is also called break-bone fever. Worldwide, dengue infection is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease. It is caused by vector Aedes aegypti and represents a major public health issue in more than 100 tropical countries. This may be associated with a variety of mucocutaneous manifestations, which may be of help in early diagnosis. Dengue viral infections are characterized by abrupt febrile illness, but can also lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Hence, it requires an early and correct diagnosis. Gingival bleeding is the most common oral manifestation of dengue infections. Many biochemical assays and hematological investigations may aid in the further diagnosis and treatment of the fatal disease. Although oral lesions are uncommon in dengue infections and if occur, may be mistaken for platelet abnormality or hemorrhagic disorders. This review emphasizes the significance of oral lesions as it may be the early indicators of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  20. Oral and craniofacial manifestations of multiple sclerosis: implications for the oral health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G-Q; Meng, Y

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex neurological condition affecting sensory and motor nerve transmission. Its progression and symptoms are unpredictable and vary from person to person as well as over time. Symptoms of orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, spasticity, spasms, tremor, fatigue, depression and progressive disability, impact on the individual's ability to maintain oral health, cope with dental treatment and access dental services. Also, many of the medications used in the symptomatic management of the condition have the potential to cause dry mouth and associated oral disease. There is no cure for multiple sclerosis, and treatment focuses on prevention of disability and maintenance of quality of life. The oral health care team plays an essential role in ensuring that oral health impacts positively on general health. This review highlights the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, oral and craniofacial manifestations and their management, and oral health care considerations in patients with MS.

  1. Oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS in China: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Reichart, Peter A; Song, Yi

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the Chinese-language medical and dental literature from 1982 to 2008 on oral manifestations (OMs) of patients with HIV/AIDS for introducing the spectrum of OMs of the patients in China. All data were extracted from 18 references which had used diagnostic criteria for HIV/AIDS. Four of the references had used the EC-Clearinghouse classification for oral lesions in HIV infection. The feasible overall rate and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) of the data on OMs were calculated. Risk group analysis revealed that, of 203 patients, 64.3% were men and 35.7% were women (age range, 5 months to 64 years; mean age in three studies, 34.0, 34.3, and 36.1 years). Of these patients, 22.2% were infected by sexual contacts, 11.8% by intravenous drug use (IDU), 59.6% by blood or its products, 2.9% by mother to child transmission, and 3.4% were unclear. In 203 patients, oral candidiasis (OC) was the most common lesion (66%, 95%CI = 59.48-72.52%), followed by herpes simplex (HS) (22.2%, 95%CI = 16.48-27.92%), ulcerative stomatitis (14.8%, 95%CI = 9.92-19.68%), salivary gland disease (11.3%, 95%CI = 6.94-15.66%), oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) (9.8%, 95%CI = 5.71-13.89%), necrotizing gingivitis (5.9%, 95%CI = 2.66-9.14%), Kaposi's sarcoma (2.9%, 95%CI = 0.59-5.21%), other malignant tumors (2.9%, 95%CI = 0.59-5.21%), and linear gingival erythema (2.0%, 95%CI = 0.07-3.93%). The spectrum of OMs reported from China is similar to that described in the international literature. Present data are useful to supplement international resources of HIV/AIDS research.

  2. Oral Crohn′s disease without intestinal manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gingisetty Harikishan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn′s disease is a granulomatous inflammatory bowel disease and was described in 1932 as a chronic granulomatous disorder of the terminal ileum and is now considered a distinct member of the inflammatory bowel disease family. It may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Oral Crohn′s disease has been reported frequently in the last three decades with or without intestinal manifestations. In the latter case, it is considered as one of the orofacial granulomatosis. There has been much doubt whether intestinal manifestations of Crohn′s disease will eventually develop in the orofacial granulomatosis. We present a female patient aged 22 years with prominent clinical findings such as persistent swelling of lower and upper lip with fissuring and angular cheilitis, granulomatous gingival enlargement, and cobblestone or corrugated appearance of labial mucosa, which are suggestive of Crohn′s disease, but with no evidence of other gastrointestinal involvement. The patient underwent surgical treatment with external gingivectomy procedure. A 6-month follow-up showed minimal recurrence.

  3. Clinical manifestations and oral findings in Fraser syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Michele Baffi; Lima, Luciana Monti; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; de Paula, Andréia Bolzan; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2007-01-01

    This article is the first known case report of Fraser syndrome in the dental literature. Its purpose was to present the clinical manifestations, oral findings, and dental treatment of a 14-year, 10-month-old female patient. Fraser syndrome is a rare recessive autosomal genetic disorder characterized by multisystemic malformation, usually comprising cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and renal defects. The child presented with: (1) hydrocephaly; (2) face asymmetry; (3) low-inserted ears; (4) flat nose bridge; (5) cryptophthalmos; (6) bilateral absence of eyeballs; (7) hypertelorism; (8) syndactyly on the left fingers and toes; (9) skeletal defects; and (10) lower limb asymmetry. The intraoral examination revealed: (1) complete primary denture; (2) malocclusion; (3) tooth crowding; (4) ogival palate; (5) normal labial frena; (6) absence of lingual frenum (not compromising the tongue movements); (7) parched lips; (8) supragingival calculus adhered to all tooth surfaces; and (9) moderate gingivitis. The dental treatment consisted of periodic monitoring of the patient's oral health status and supragingival scaling associated with topical applications of 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate gel at 2-week intervals to reduce gingivitis.

  4. Fraser Syndrome-Oral Manifestations and a Dental Care Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Lopes de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fraser syndrome is a rare genetic malformation with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance and an incidence of consanguinity ranging from 15% to 25%. A 5-year-old male patient who is a carrier of Fraser syndrome initiated treatment in the pediatric dentistry sector. The patient was fed parenterally since birth, experienced recurring bouts of chronic lung disease, and was referred to the pediatric dentistry sector by the medical team. Radiographic examination revealed the presence of all permanent teeth. Supragingival dental calculus, halitosis, and gingival inflammation were also observed. Dental calculus was removed by manual scraping, and chemotherapeutic agents were used, chlorhexidine 0,12%, chlorhexidine gel 2%, and PVP-I, to control the bacterial flora. The patient is still being monitored after an 8-year follow-up period, the complications associated with periodontal disease decreased, and since the initiation of treatment, the patient has not needed to be hospitalized because of chronic lung disease. This study reports the case of a patient diagnosed with Fraser syndrome and describes the clinical manifestations (general and oral.

  5. Chronic myeloproliferative disorders: A rarest case with oral manifestations and dental management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritesh B Ruparelia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMPD are rarest hematological disorders (malignant myeloid neoplasms. The three most common chronic myeloproliferative disorders are polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis. Clinical manifestations (including oral manifestations of these disorders are overlapping with each other and with other hematologic disorders, which makes the diagnosis of CMPD a challenging task. In this article we report a rare to rarest case of CMPD at dental outpatient department, its oral manifestations and its management in dental clinics.

  6. Oral and periodontal manifestations associated with systemic sclerosis: A case series and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Jagadish

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disorder with a wide range of oral manifestations. This case series reports significant oral and periodontal changes and also makes an attempt to correlate oral and systemic findings in these patients which enable the clinician for a better diagnosis and evolve a comprehensive treatment plan. Six patients with a known diagnosis of systemic sclerosis were included. After obtaining the patient′s informed consent, relevant medical history, oral manifestations including periodontal findings and oral hygiene index simplified index were recorded. In these patients, oral changes included restricted mouth opening and, resorption of the mandible. The periodontal changes observed were gingival recession, absence or minimal gingival bleeding on probing, and widened periodontal ligament space, radiographically. Patients with systemic sclerosis often show wide range of oral manifestations, which is of major concern for the dentist.

  7. Prevalence of oral manifestations in soft tissues during early childhood in Brazilian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Ramos Lima PADOVANI

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at assessing the prevalence of soft tissue oral manifestations in children during early childhood, according to age group, gender, and site in the oral cavity, and at correlating these oral manifestations with systemic alterations. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 586 children from 0 to 3 years of age (12.4 ± 11.8 months, 316 (53.9% male and 270 (46.1% female, in the city of Mauá, SP, Brazil. Examination was performed by a single examiner (Kappa Index = 0.90 according to World Health Organization criteria (WHO, 1997.The prevalence of oral manifestations in the soft tissues of children during early childhood was 34.8%. The age group showing statistical significance was 0-1 months old (56.4%. Epstein’s pearls were significantly present (43.2% in 0-1-month-old babies, and gingivitis in 12-24-month-olds (15.9%. The palate was the most affected region (16.7%. Infectious alterations were the most prevalent systemic alteration (20%. An association was observed between the presence of systemic alterations and the occurrence of oral manifestations. The prevalence of oral manifestations was 34.8%, regardless of gender, and was manifested mostly in 0-1-month-old babies. The palate was the most prevalent region, and the majority of oral manifestations were associated with systemic alterations.

  8. Oral manifestations and related factors of HIV positive patients in south-east of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Saravani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral manifestations can be the first signs of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS and a useful marker for the progression of this disease. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of oral manifestations and examine their relationship with socio-demographic factors in HIV-positive patients in the health centers affiliated to Zahedan University of Medical Sciences (Southeast Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study in addition to determining oral manifestations based on the classification of EC-clearing house (European Commission clearing house, information such as age, gender, marital status, residence, education, occupation, habits, oral hygiene, loss of weight in the last six months. Body Mass Index (BMI, mode of HIV transmission, stage of disease, anti-retroviral therapy (ART, and duration of HIV were gathered through direct question from the patients or the information contained in their records. Then the relationship between various factors and oral manifestations was analyzed using Chi-square, Fisher’s Exact Test, Student T Test, Mann- Whitney tests and logistic regression. Results: Oral examination was performed on 119 HIV-positive patients who were 69.7% male and 30.3% female and had a mean age of 35.4±12.7 years. Oral manifestations were found in 57.1% of the patients. Pseudomembranous candidiasis (34.1% and linear gingival erythema (33% were the most common lesions in these patients. The probability of oral manifestations occurrence increased with age and duration of smoking in smokers with HIV (P=0.036 and P=0.012, respectively. Conclusion: Most oral manifestations were those strongly associated with HIV infection (91%. Timely diagnosis and treatment of oral manifestations in HIV patients should be considered in conjunction with other treatments.

  9. [Cutaneous and oral manifestations in HIV-infected children and adults--169 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Doina; Luca, V; Nicolau, Cristina; Teodorescu, Irina; Prisăcariu, L J; Macovei, Simona

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate cutaneous and oral manifestations in infected HIV patients. We retrospectively analyzed 169 cases admitted in Infectiouse Disease Department of Iaşi in 2001-2002 period. Cutaneous and oral manifestations were: candidiasis (99 cases), herpes virus infectious (36 cases), scabies and straphylococcal/streptococcal skin disease (26 cases), prurigo nodularis, psoriasis and verruca vulgaris (9 cases). Children of 0-13 year old group was 75.73 percent. Classification of HIV infection was related with CD4 count for 166 cases. Twelve cases with oral pharyngitis candidiasis, scabies and streptococcal skin diseases was 2-3 recurrent episodes of manifestations. Etiotrop treatment was associated with HAART therapy. Cutaneous and oral manifestations are occurred frequently in HIV infected patients, with a various etiology, but the severity, persistence and its evolution did not evaluate.

  10. Oral manifestation of HIV/AIDS in Plateau state indigenes, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment Clinic serving referred cases and in-patient. cases hospitalized in the .... other sexually transmitted diseases, access to health care facilities, access to ... country showed that 80% of the oral manifestations seen were of fungal origin”.

  11. Oral manifestations among people living with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabian, F M; Kahabuka, F K; Petersen, P E

    2009-01-01

    associated with low body mass index (BMI). CONCLUSION: This community survey carried out in an African sub-Saharan country showed that oral lesions are frequent among people living with HIV/AIDS. As emphasised by the World Health Organization Global Oral Health Programme, national HIV/AIDS programmes should......BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of various oral and peri-oral manifestations in people living with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania. METHODS: A cross sectional study. A total of 187 persons with HIV infection were recruited from non-governmental organisations serving people living...... with HIV/AIDS, 16.6% were males and females 83.4%. Information on weight and height, as well as extra oral and intra oral examinations for different manifestations were gathered. Treatment and referral for special care were offered. RESULTS: At least one oral lesion was present in 45% of the participants...

  12. Oral manifestations among people living with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabian, F M; Kahabuka, F K; Petersen, P E

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of various oral and peri-oral manifestations in people living with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania. METHODS: A cross sectional study. A total of 187 persons with HIV infection were recruited from non-governmental organisations serving people living...... with HIV/AIDS, 16.6% were males and females 83.4%. Information on weight and height, as well as extra oral and intra oral examinations for different manifestations were gathered. Treatment and referral for special care were offered. RESULTS: At least one oral lesion was present in 45% of the participants...... associated with low body mass index (BMI). CONCLUSION: This community survey carried out in an African sub-Saharan country showed that oral lesions are frequent among people living with HIV/AIDS. As emphasised by the World Health Organization Global Oral Health Programme, national HIV/AIDS programmes should...

  13. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS OF CROHN'S DISEASE: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhvić-Urek Miranda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Crohn´s disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease still with unknown etiology. In 0.5-20 % of patients, extraintestinal lesions in the oral cavity can be presented in forms of orofacial granulomatosis, cobblestone and corrugated oral mucosa, mucosal tags, deep linear ulcerations with hyperplastic folds, pyostomatits vegetans, aphthous ulcers, angular cheilitis, labial/facial edema and gingival erythema/edema. We describe a case of a 28-year-old male who was presented with oral lesions of Crohn´s disease and treatment procedure. The patient was candidate for biologic treatment so dental procedures and preparation of the patient for treatment are described. Good communication and cooperation between the patient's doctor and dentist are important for successful treatment.

  14. Systematic review of oral manifestations related to hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Benjamin; Burian, Egon; Fliefel, Riham; Otto, Sven

    2017-06-14

    We sought to identify oral symptoms found in hyperparathyroidism and compare their rate of occurrence, as well as potential variations in sequelae between primary, secondary, and tertiary hyperparathyroidism. Database searches were performed through EMBASE and PubMed, with a continual handsearch for relevant articles. PRISMA guidelines were followed. Two hundred five articles including 245 patients were analyzed with data extraction. The average age was 34.02 years old (age range 1-83), with 91 male and 154 female patients (1:1.7 M/F ratio). Patients presented with symptoms including facial asymmetry or swelling (167/214 cases; 78.0%), oral pain (30/214; 14.0%), systemic symptoms (25/214; 11.7%), referrals or incidental findings (16/214; 7.5%), and neuropathy (6/214; 2.8%) independently and in combination together. Bony pathology occurred most often in the mandible (100/245 cases; 40.8%), while 72 cases were in the maxilla (29.4%) and 73 cases in both jaw bones (29.8%). Our data collection identifies a wide variation in the presentation of hyperparathyroidism. In order to be more certain of oral maladies from hyperparathyroidism, studies with large patient populations need to be conducted at healthcare centers to clarify the oral outcomes of hyperparathyroidism. What was thought to be a characteristic finding of HPT, mandibular radiolucency occurred in only a minor portion of cases. Furthermore, the pathognomonic sign of HPT on radiograph, loss of lamina dura, was only the third most common presentation. Bone pathology was most commonly reported in literature, but should not be assumed the only oral sequelae of hyperparathyroidism.

  15. Multiple Hamartoma Syndrome with Characteristic Oral and Cutaneous Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanthi Chippagiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To present a case of Cowden's syndrome and emphasize the importance of continued cancer surveillance in these patients. Cowden syndrome is an inherited autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance and a range of expressivity. It is characterized by multiple hamartomas and neoplasms. Mucocutaneous features include trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomatosis, acral keratosis, and palmoplantar keratosis. Here, we report a case of Cowdens syndrome of a 30-year-old female patient who came with a complaint of multiple growths in the oral cavity of a three-month duration. On examination, multiple skin-colored, flat-topped papules over her forehead and right malar bone and multiple papillomatous papules involving all the mucosal surfaces intraorally were observed. This syndrome is associated with the development of several types of malignancies, especially breast carcinoma and thyroid carcinoma, which is why early recognition and regular and vigilant surveillance of individuals with the syndrome are important.

  16. Oral manifestion of Langerhans cell histiocytosis mimicking inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Divya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare idiopathic disease characterized by the clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells. LCH affects five children per million population. The peak incidence is from 1 to 4 years of age. LCH involves the head and neck region quite commonly. Oral soft tissue lesions are also common. The differential diagnosis of oral LCH includes leukemia, neutropenia, prepubertal periodontitis, hypophosphatasia, fibrous dysplasia, and Papillon-Lefevre syndrome. The prognosis of LCH depends on early detection and appropriate management. Surgical management alone is used in 50% of cases with an additional 23% of the lesions being treated with both surgery and radiation therapy. A case of LCH in a 6-year-old girl involving the mid root level of developing first permanent molar with a floating developing tooth bud of permanent second molar mimicking an inflammation is reported.

  17. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carini Francesco; Samir Mallat; Cappello Francesco; Zummo Giovani; Jurjus Abdo; Tomasello Giovanni; Leone Angelo; Di Pasquale Roberto; Saniflippo Beatrice; Sinagra Emanuele; Damiani Provvidenza; Rosalyn Jurjus; Alice Gerges-Geagea; Inaya Hajj Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  18. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HELYCOBACTER PYOLRI INFECTION AND PATHOLOGICAL ORAL MANIFESTATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Carini Francesco; Leone Angelo; Di Pasquale Roberto; Sanfilippo Beatrice; Sinagra Emanuele; Damiani Provvidenza; Rosalyn Jurjus; Alice Gerges-Geagea; Inaya Hajj Hussein; Samir Mallat; Cappello Francesco; Zummo Giovani; Jurjus Abdo; Tomasello Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  19. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carini Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  20. Systemic alterations and their oral manifestations in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva de Araujo Figueiredo, Camilla; Gonçalves Carvalho Rosalem, Cíntia; Costa Cantanhede, Andre Luis; Abreu Fonseca Thomaz, Érika Bárbara; Fontoura Nogueira da Cruz, Maria Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this literature review are: to depict the main oral diseases that are related to pregnancy; to clarify some of the possible systemic mechanisms that are associated with these changes; and to address issues about oral care during pregnancy. A woman's organs undergo various physiological, neurological, and hormonal changes during pregnancy. Such changes occur gradually and are essential for the development of the fetus, providing what is needed for tissue formation and establishment of reserves for uterine and fetal life. In turn, the oral cavity shows some events during this period. Among the changes most frequently cited in the literature are pyogenic granuloma, gingivitis, and periodontitis. The inflammation of the periodontal tissues due to the formation of the biofilm increases dramatically in size and severity during the course of a normal pregnancy, even without changes in the amount of biofilm present. In addition, a decrease in salivary pH is observed in pregnant women and may lead to an increased incidence of dental caries in this period.

  1. Oral manifestations of allograft recipients before and after renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Rezvani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation is considered the best treatment option for patients with end-stage renal disease. In this study, the prevalence of oral lesions was studied in a cohort of renal transplant recipients before and after transplantation. Fifty-nine kidney transplant recipients were examined one week before and four months after transplantation. The information gathered included age, sex, smoking history, duration on dialysis, drugs and their doses. There were 41 males (69.5% and 18 females (30.5% with a mean age of 37 years. Before surgery, two patients had non-specific lesions and two other patients had leukoedema. Following transplantation, 24 patients (40.7% did not have any specific lesion. In six patients, we observed non-specific erythematous lesions (10.2%. Other recorded observations are as follows: Gingival hyperplasia in five patients (8.5%, oral candidiasis of the erythematous type in five patients (8.5%, hairy leukoplakia in four patients (6.8% and leukoedema in seven patients (11.9%. In our study patients, the prevalence of oral lesions increased after transplantation, although it was lower than that reported in other studies. This could be due to the differences in sample size, differences between Iranian race and other races and different pharmaceutical formulation of the drug produced in Iran.

  2. Oral mucoceles and ranulas may be part of initial manifestations of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syebele, Kabunda; Bütow, Kurt-W

    2010-10-01

    It is well documented and generally accepted that enlargement of parotid salivary glands, as part of HIV-related salivary gland diseases (HIV-SGD), may be the initial symptoms/manifestations of the HIV infection. Oral mucoceles and ranulas are also frequently described as oral manifestations, in association with HIV infection. However, little is known about these latter lesions as being the initial symptoms indicative of an HIV infection. This prospective study has investigated the possibility that oral mucoceles in general, and ranulas in particular, could be the initial symptoms of an underlying and undiagnosed HIV infection. A total of 50 patients including cases of oral mucoceles and ranulas were consulted in a tertiary referral hospital set up. Nineteen (63%) out of 30 HIV-positive patients presenting with oral mucoceles/ranulas, did not know their HIV status at the first consultation. Oral mucoceles/ranulas were for these patients, the only motives for visiting the health facility, and they were also the only clinical identifiable features (symptoms). Oral mucoceles and ranulas should, in the context of HIV-salivary gland diseases, be considered as initial symptoms and early manifestations of HIV infection. Routine HIV testing in all patients with oral mucoceles and ranulas is, according to this study, justified and should be recommended.

  3. Prevalence of Oral and Craniofacial Manifestations of Hematological Dyscrasias at Shiraz Nemazee Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janan Ghapanchi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hematological disorders may present with a number of non-specific orofacial manifestations that must be diagnosed and referred to specialists for treatment. Since the orofacial manifestations can be the first clinical presentation which indicates the presence of an underlying disease, it is important for dentists to be aware of these manifestations. The present study aims to evaluate the orofacial presentations of some hematological diseases in order to familiarize dentists with these manifestations. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study evaluated the oral conditions of patients recently hospitalized with histories of blood dyscrasia and bone marrow transplantation in Shiraz Nemazee Hospital during 2010-2011. From 50 patients, there were 33 (66% males and 17 (34% females. The age of participants ranged from 12-77 years of age. Results: Examined patients had the following manifestations: head and neck region lymphadenopathy (42%, hairy tongue, atrophy of the oral mucosa, ulcers, red and white lesions, Candida albicans infection and gingival lesions that included spontaneous gingival bleeding, gingival hypertrophy and ecchymosis, in addition to diffuse herpetic infections on the buccal mucosa and bony lesions. The most common blood dyscrasia in the study patients was acute myeloid leukemia (AML (48%. Our findings determined that lymphadenopathy (42% was the most common orofacial manifestation of hematological diseases. Conclusion:On occasion, dentists maybe the first medical professional to encounter hematological diseases. Since early detection of these disorders can increase patient survival, it is necessary for dentists to become completely familiar with these oral manifestations.

  4. POSSIBLE ORAL MANIFESTATIONS IN HEPATITIS VIRUS C-INFECTED PATIENTS: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Vasile OLTEANU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic liver disease secondary to hepatitis virus C (HVC infection still represents a worldwide health issue, mainly because of the chronic liver sequelae and of their systemic impact - especially in cirrhotic patients. Nevertheless, a variety of extrahepatic manifestations are associated with HVC infection, among which some also involving the oral cavity. The aim of the present literature assessment is to highlight such possible oral manifestations in patients with chronic HVC infection, given the scarce recent and current findings of the field. Among other systemic manifestations, two oral cavity conditions are mainly associated to recent studies with HVC infection: lichen planus and Sjögren-like Sialadenitis. HCV-infected patients may frequently suffer mildly clinically manifested Sjögren-like sialadenitis, however few significant data on lachrymal and salivary flow in such patients is available. Lichen planus of the oral cavity is considered significantly associated with HCV infection, especially in some geographical areas, otherwise independently on the level of endemism of HCV in the general population. Conclusions: Oral lichen planus and sialadenitis may be associated with HCV infection, the pathogenesis of both diseases being related to the virus-related immune response. Given the high global prevalence of HCV infection, a more thorough oral screening may help life quality improvement in a significant number of patients.

  5. Oral manifestations of McCune-Albright syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravinda, Konidena; Ratnakar, Pamula; Srinivas, Kandakurti

    2013-01-01

    McCune- Albright Syndrome (MAS) is a rare fibrosseous lesion, characterized by a classic triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (PFD), café -au-lait macules (CALM) and underlying endocrinopathies. We present the oral findings of an interesting case of MAS with relevant review of literature. A 30-year-old male presented to us with swelling of both jaws over a period of two years. Cutaneous examination revealed café - au - lait macule over the back, crossing the midline. Skeletal survey showed expansile, osteolytic, mixed radiolucent- radiopaque lesions in skull and jaw bones. Serum alkaline phosphatase was elevated (388 IU/L), with normal calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone and 25 hydroxy vitamin D levels. Diagnosis of McCune- Albright syndrome was made and he was treated with parenteral bisphosphonates (intravenous Zoledronate 4 mg) and is under follow up for surgical recontouring of the jaws. Early recognition facilitates better treatment and improves prognosis by reducing the morbidity.

  6. Linear IgA dermatosis adult variant with oral manifestation: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Isaac Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA dermatosis (LAD is a rare autoimmune disorder that presents as a vesiculo-bullous lesion with cutaneous manifestations, but rare oral mucosal involvement. Here we discuss a case of a vesiculobullous lesion with severe oral and ocular mucosal involvement mimicking pemphigoid with histopathological evidence of subepithelial blisters. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF confirmed the lesion as LAD of adult variant, although with atypical clinical features.

  7. Linear IgA dermatosis adult variant with oral manifestation: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, T Isaac; Sathyan, Pradeesh; Goma Kumar, K U

    2015-01-01

    Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) dermatosis (LAD) is a rare autoimmune disorder that presents as a vesiculo-bullous lesion with cutaneous manifestations, but rare oral mucosal involvement. Here we discuss a case of a vesiculobullous lesion with severe oral and ocular mucosal involvement mimicking pemphigoid with histopathological evidence of subepithelial blisters. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) confirmed the lesion as LAD of adult variant, although with atypical clinical features.

  8. Oral manifestations of McCune-Albright syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konidena Aravinda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available McCune- Albright Syndrome (MAS is a rare fibrosseous lesion, characterized by a classic triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia (PFD, cafι -au-lait macules (CALM and underlying endocrinopathies. We present the oral findings of an interesting case of MAS with relevant review of literature. A 30-year-old male presented to us with swelling of both jaws over a period of two years. Cutaneous examination revealed cafι - au - lait macule over the back, crossing the midline. Skeletal survey showed expansile, osteolytic, mixed radiolucent- radiopaque lesions in skull and jaw bones. Serum alkaline phosphatase was elevated (388 IU/L, with normal calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone and 25 hydroxy vitamin D levels. Diagnosis of McCune- Albright syndrome was made and he was treated with parenteral bisphosphonates (intravenous Zoledronate 4 mg and is under follow up for surgical recontouring of the jaws. Early recognition facilitates better treatment and improves prognosis by reducing the morbidity.

  9. Management of the oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS by traditional healers and care givers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Rudolph

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In many communities of South Africa, traditional healers are often the only means of health care delivery available. The level of knowledge and ability to recognize oral lesions of 32 traditional healers and 17 care-givers were assessed after a two-day workshop. The data collection instrument was a structured questionnaire, complimented by enlarged clinical photographs of the common oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. Prior to the workshop, 46 (93.9% of the 49 respondents had never had any formal information on oral health and 43 (87.8% were unfamiliar with the symptoms of oral diseases. Thirty-five (71.4% recognized bleeding gums from A4-size photographs and 11 (22.4% recognized oral thrush. The recognition of other oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS were; oral hairy leukoplakia (41.0%, angular cheilitis (43.6%, herpes virus infection (56.4%, oral ulcerations (56.8%, and in children, parotid enlargement (27.3%, and moluscum contagiosum (56.8%. Traditional healers and caregivers constitute an untapped resource with enormous potential. A positive bridge should be built to link traditional healing with modem medicine in the struggle against HIV/AIDS.

  10. EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS AND CYTOMEGALOVIRUS – TWO HERPES VIRUSES WITH ORAL MANIFESTATIONS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assya Krasteva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Diseases caused by cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus are reported with increasing frequency. Epstein-Barr virus damages usually are due to reactivation of latent infection. while cytomegalovirus disease result from primary or reactivated infection in susceptible hosts. The booth infections can have oral manifestations.

  11. Oral Manifestations of Lamellar Ichthyosıs; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat Akdeniz

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:The name ichthyosis is derived from the Greek ikhthus meaning "fish" and refers to the similarity in appearance of the skin to fish scale. The ichthyoses are a heterogeneous group of disorders. There are few studies about the oral manifestations of these disorders. But early reports of ichthyosis in the Indian and Chinese literature date back to several hundred years. Case Presentation:Oral manifestations of the 14-year-old female patient with ichthyosis are presented. Physical examination revealed thick, brownish scales covering the entire body surface including all larger body flexures and corneae. She had short and dry hair. There were no nail abnormalities and hearing loss. Conclusion:We consider that this patient represents a new manifestation of lamellar ichthyosis disease, because congenitally teeth missing and cephalometric analysis measurements have not been reported before.

  12. Oral manifestations resulting from chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Everton Freitas de; Lira, Jadson Alexandre da Silva; Macedo, Rômulo Augusto de Paiva; Santos, Klaus Steyllon dos; Elias, Cassandra Teixeira Valle; Morais, Maria de Lourdes Silva de Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphocytic leukemia is a type of cancer most common in children and it is characterized by excessive and disordered immature leukocytes in the bone marrow. Identify most frequent oral manifestations in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia under chemotherapy treatment. The research was conducted on the electronic database PubMed/Medline, Science Direct, Scielo and Scopus. It has been sought papers with full presentation, wrote in Portuguese, English and Spanish, published between January 1992 and April 2013. From studies primarily selected, only eight met the criteria of inclusion. All studies performed intraoral examinations to diagnose oral lesions. According to results, the most frequent lesions were mucositis, candidiasis, periodontitis and gingivitis. The oral health condition from acute lymphocytic leukemia carriers varied according oral hygiene of the patient. The results of studies identified such a great part of patients with ALL presented some lesion in oral cavity during or after chemotherapy treatment. The dentist surgeon needs to recognize oral manifestations and intervene in the oral health of patients with ALL, contributing and helping with treatment.

  13. Oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS in clients attending TASO clinics in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirwomwe, J F; Rwenyonyi, C M; Muwazi, L M; Besigye, B; Mboli, F

    2007-09-01

    The objective of the study is to establish the prevalence of oral manifestations and their influence on oral functions. A total of 514 subjects aged 18 to 58 years (mean 42 years) were randomly recruited from five The AIDS Support Organization (TASO) clinics in Uganda. They were clinically examined for oral lesions under field conditions by four trained dentists based on World Health Organization criteria. Women constituted 74.5% of the study population. Oral manifestations were recorded in 72% of the subjects, out of which 70% had candidiasis of pseudomembranous, erythematous, and angular cheilitis variants. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, atypical ulcers, necrotizing periodontitis, and hairy leucoplakia were least frequently observed in the subjects. Of those who had oral lesions (n = 370), 68.4% had some form of discomfort in the mouth. Tooth brushing, chewing, and swallowing were frequently associated with discomfort. Reported forms of discomfort were dry mouth, increased salivation, and burning sensation especially on taking salty and spicy foods or acidic drinks. Only 8.5% (n = 44) of the subjects were taking medications specifically for oral lesions, which included antifungal, antiviral, and antibacterial agents. None of the subjects were on antiretroviral therapy. Oral lesions associated with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in TASO clients is a major public health problem requiring education in recognition and appropriate management.

  14. Idiopathic ulcers as an oral manifestation in pediatric patients with AIDS: multidisciplinary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sandoval, B; Ceballos-Hernández, H; Téllez-Rodríguez, J; Xochihua-Díaz, L; Durán-Ibarra, G; Pozos-Guillen, A J

    2012-01-01

    HIV infection is a major global health problem affecting developing and developed countries alike. HIV infection is associated with multiple oral lesions, some of which are of value in diagnosing the disease. The aim of this report is to describe the clinical manifestations and their multidisciplinary management, in a 6-year-old girl with AIDS. The findings of this case report indicate that, it is essential to be familiar with the early oral manifestations of AIDS in order to understand the patient's dental health needs, apply preventive methods, control caries, and understand the value of oral lesions as diagnostic markers of disease progression in children with HIV infection. A multidisciplinary management is fundamental.

  15. Oral Manifestations of Chronic Kidney Disease and Renal Secondary Hyperparathyroidism: A Comparative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that significant associations exist between oral disease and diseases involving non-oral tissues. Occasionally, the roles may be reversed and the oral cavity can be severely affected by systemic disease originating in another part of the body. Renal secondary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrinopathy that occurs as a consequence of chronic azotemic kidney disease. Renal osteodystrophy, the most dramatic clinical consequence of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism is uncommon, but can result in demineralization of maxillofacial bones, loosening of teeth, and pathological jaw fractures. The purpose of this report is to update the current understanding of the pathophysiology of this endocrine disease and to compare the oral manifestations of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism in humans and companion animals. A 50-year review of the veterinary literature was undertaken to examine the clinical presentation of renal osteodystrophy in dogs, and to determine what clinical consequences of renal secondary hyperparathyroidism have been reported in domestic cats.

  16. Oral manifestations of plummer-vinson syndrome: a classic report with literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Abdul; Mohan, N; Balaji, R V Suresh; Augustine, Dominic; Patil, Shankar Gouda

    2015-03-01

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome (PVS) is a triad of microcytic hypochromic anemia, atrophic glossitis, and esophageal webs or strictures. It is one of the syndromes associated with iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms resulting from anemia predominates the clinical picture, apart from the additional features such as glossitis, angular cheilitis, and dysphagia. Dysphagia is main clinical feature of PVS. PVS carries an increased risk of development of squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus and pharynx. A classic case report of PVS with clinical features, oral manifestations, malignant potential, differential diagnosis, investigation, dental implication, and treatment is discussed here with the literature review from the dentist's point of view. The article carries a message that dental surgeons have to be familiar with the oral manifestations of anemia and be able to suspect PVS to aid in early diagnosis and prompt treatment.

  17. Oral Manifestations of Plummer-Vinson Syndrome: A Classic Report with Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Abdul; Mohan, N; Balaji, R V Suresh; Augustine, Dominic; Patil, Shankar Gouda

    2015-01-01

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome (PVS) is a triad of microcytic hypochromic anemia, atrophic glossitis, and esophageal webs or strictures. It is one of the syndromes associated with iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms resulting from anemia predominates the clinical picture, apart from the additional features such as glossitis, angular cheilitis, and dysphagia. Dysphagia is main clinical feature of PVS. PVS carries an increased risk of development of squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus and pharynx. A classic case report of PVS with clinical features, oral manifestations, malignant potential, differential diagnosis, investigation, dental implication, and treatment is discussed here with the literature review from the dentist’s point of view. The article carries a message that dental surgeons have to be familiar with the oral manifestations of anemia and be able to suspect PVS to aid in early diagnosis and prompt treatment. PMID:25878483

  18. Oral manifestations of chronic disseminated histiocytosis. A report of 10 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mínguez, Ignacio; Mínguez, Juan Manuel; Bonet, Jaime; Peñarrocha, Miguel; Sanchis, José María

    2004-01-01

    Chronic disseminated histiocytosis is a systemic disorder resulting from tumor proliferation of Langerhans-type histiocytic cells. The etiology and pathogenesis are not fully clear, though the clinical manifestations are the result of the accumulation and infiltration of these types of cells in organs and tissues. The present study reports 10 patients (6 boys and 4 girls) with chronic disseminated histiocytosis. The patient age at onset of the disease varied from 4 months to 3.2 years (mean 1.7 years). All patients had oral lesions, and in 5 cases these were the first manifestation of the disease. The most frequent alterations were gingival bleeding (7 cases), aphthae measuring over 1 cm in diameter (6 cases), maxillary osteolytic lesions (6 cases), tooth loss due to expulsive folliculitis (5 cases), oral candidiasis (4 cases), orofacial swelling (3 cases), aphthae measuring under 1 cm in diameter (3 cases), and nonspecific oral pain (2 cases). All the oral lesions disappeared with the treatments prescribed, though some patients developed new outbreaks and exacerbations of the disease.

  19. Oral manifestations of HIV infection by gender and transmission category in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Amador, V; Esquivel-Pedraza, L; Sierra-Madero, J; Ponce-de-Leon, S; Ponce-de-Leon, S

    1998-03-01

    A cross-sectional analysis was conducted in Mexico City from September 1989 to March 1996, to determine the prevalence of HIV-related oral manifestations by gender and route of HIV transmission. The diagnosis of HIV-associated oral lesions was based on preestablished criteria. For the statistical analysis chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were used where appropriate. Odds ratios were calculated as estimates of the relative risks. Control of confounding factors was performed by logistic regression models. Oral lesions were present in 75% of 436 HIV+ patients. Hairy leukoplakia, erythematous and pseudomembranous candidosis, angular cheilitis and oral ulcers were frequently found. Patients who contracted HIV through blood transfusion were more likely to present erythematous candidosis (P=0.005) than subjects who acquired HIV through sexual transmission. Oral ulcers were seen only in men (P=0.02) and in individuals who contracted HIV through sexual transmission (P=0.02). This study brings valuable data in regard to differences in the type and prevalence of HIV-related oral lesions by gender and the risk categories analysed, particularly blood transfusion.

  20. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: literature review and descriptive analysis of oral manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Martínez-Pereda, Cristina; Guerrero-Rodríguez, Vanesa; Guisado-Moya, Blanca; Meniz-García, Cristina

    2009-05-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease, of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by intense and abnormal proliferation of bone marrow-derived histiocytes (Langerhans cells). It can present both local and systemic manifestations involving bone, skin and mucosal tissue, and internal organs. Three basic clinical forms develop: Letterer-Siwe disease (subacute or acute disseminated form), Hand-Schüller-Christian disease (disseminated chronic form) and eosinophilic granuloma (localized chronic form). LCH may manifest orally with single or multiple lesions of the alveolar or basal bone, ulcerated mucosal lesions accompanied by adenopathies and/or periodontal lesions, presenting gingival inflammation, bleeding, recession, necrosis, odontalgia, dental hypermobility and premature loss of teeth. The principal differential diagnoses include advanced periodontal disease or a periapical process of dental or periodontal origin. The odontologist plays a vital role in the diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment of such patients, by performing routine examinations for periodic follow-up of the disease and its possible oral manifestations, bearing in mind that these may be the first or only signs of LCH.

  1. Oral manifestations in Urbach--Wiethe disease (lipoglycoproteinosis; lipoid proteinosis; hyalinosis cutis et mucosae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, P A; Bergenholtz, A

    1975-01-01

    The oral manifestations in 27 patients with Urbach--Wiethe disease (UWD) discovered in Northern Sweden are described. The oral regions most frequently affected are the lips, the back of the tongue, the frenulum of the tongue, the palate and the back wall of the pharynx. The general impression is that older patients usually have more marked manifestations than younger, indicating that the oral lesions may become more severe with increasing age. Histopathologically, the disorder is essentially a microangiopathy in which the walls of small blood vessels are thick and PAS-positive, indicating the presence of glycoproteins. In clinically affected regions there are usually PAS-positive extravascular deposits. In material used of lipid histochemical studies, sudanophil droplets were found in the vessel walls. By staining with osmium tetroxide the osmium is--contrary to previous assumptions--in some way bound to the droplets, but for unknown reasons is not reduced to a coloured product. The binding of osmium was demonstrated by the OTAN (osmium textroxide alpha-naphthylamine) method. The exact significance of this finding awaits further studies. The implications of dental anomalies occurring in UWD are discussed.

  2. Paracoccidioidomicosis: Manifestaciones orales e implicaciones sistémicas Paracoccidioidomicose: Oral manifestations and sistemic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Janete Grando

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La paracoccidioidomicosis es una infección causada por un hongo P. brasiliensis. Se trata de una micosis profunda y sistémica, es considerada una enfermedad endémica en Brasil y en otros países de América Latina. El hongo es adquirido por inhalación, dando lugar a un cuadro clínico pulmonar que puede posteriormente afectar a la piel, mucosa oral, nasal y gastrointestinal; también el bazo y el hígado pueden verse afectados. Es frecuente encontrar linfadenopatías, y verse afectada la glándula suprarrenal y todas las vísceras, causando la muerte del paciente. Las úlceras orales suelen ser lesiones muy dolorosas, por ello el paciente acude a consulta para ser evaluado clínicamente por su odontólogo o estomatólogo. El diagnóstico precoz es la mejor manera de salvar al paciente de las complicaciones de la enfermedad. El número creciente de inmigrantes latinos puede hacer que esta importante enfermedad empiece a ser más prevalente en los países de la Comunidad Europea, por ello conocer en profundidad las características clínicas de esta infección por parte de los odontólogos europeos, es fundamental para llegar a diagnosticarla de forma temprana.Paracoccidioidomycosis is an infection caused by the p. brasiliensis fungus. This is a deep, systemic fungal infection considered endemic in Brazil and some Latin American countries. The fungus is acquired by inhalation, resulting in a pulmonary disease which may also affect the skin, oral, nasal and gastrointestinal mucosa, as well as the spleen and liver. Patients commonly present lymphadenopathy. The resulting adrenal gland and visceral involvement can be fatal. Oral lesions are often very painful leading the patient to the dentist or stomatologist for a clinical evaluation. Early diagnosis is the best way to avoid serious complications of the disease. The growing number of Latin immigrants may increase the prevalence of this important disease in the European Community, therefore, the

  3. Trèlat's beads as oral manifestations in patients with HIV/TB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Magdalena Giovani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a contagious infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Koch's bacillus. Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and TB has reached a significant importance as a public health problem and this association has been recognized as the most significant event that changed “the balance between man and Koch's bacillus” in the last century, and has a large contribution to the risk for disease spreading. Tuberculosis has two main standard categories of clinical manifestations: primary and secondary. Primary TB is responsible for the initial infection with lungs being the involved organ. Oral lesions are observed as a secondary TB clinical manifestation with most frequent sites being hard and soft palate, tongue, lips, gums, tonsils, and salivary glands. A case of classical TB lesions in the oral cavity is reported, and the importance of a correct diagnosis through careful history taking is emphasized. Treatment selection needs to be done assertively, with great determination and building a link between patient and treatment protocol, in order to promote patient's adherence.

  4. Epidemiological and oral manifestations of HIV-positive patients in a specialized service in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Nelo Pedreira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral lesions in HIV-positive patients attending the Specialized Service for Infectious-contagious Diseases and Parasitoses of the Health Secretariat of the State of Pará (URE-DIPE/SESPA, in the city of Belém, PA, Brazil. A total of 79 HIV-positive patients (53 males and 26 females were examined. Clinical and epidemiological evaluations were done by correlating the lesions with gender, race, chronological age, risk behavior and prevailing immune status (CD4+ cells count. Lesion location and the presence of associated factors, such as alcohol use, smoking and denture wearing, were quantified individually for each type of lesion using a diagnostic pattern based on the clinical aspects. Approximately 47% of the patients (n=37 presented some type of oral lesion. Candidiasis (28% and periodontal disease (28% were the most common, followed by cervical-facial lymphadenopathy (17.5%. Other lesions observed were hairy leukoplakia, melanin hyperpigmentation, ulcerative stomatitis (aphthous, herpes simplex, frictional keratosis and pyogenic granuloma. This analysis presented some relevance as to the statistical data. Concerning CD4+ cells, most lesions manifested with the reduction of the CD count. There were a larger number of HIV-positive female heterosexual patients. Alcohol and/or smoking were strongly associated with the occurrence of hairy leukoplakia in these patients. Candidiasis and periodontal disease were the most common oro-regional clinical manifestations in the patients.

  5. Oral manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis. A cross-sectional study of 73 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Bagán, Leticia; Silvestre, Francisco Javier; Bagán, José Vicente

    2016-12-01

    A study is made of the main oral manifestations of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), particularly salivary flow, and of its possible association to periodontal disease. A prospective comparative study was made of 146 patients (73 with RA and 73 controls), recording pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, bleeding index, plaque index, and the DMFT index to assess periodontal and dental alterations. Sialometric measurements were also made to determine resting, stimulated, and parotid salivary flow. The patients with RA had greater periodontal pocket depths (with moderate depths in most cases), as well as greater attachment loss and more bacterial plaque. The resting whole saliva and stimulated parotid saliva rates were also clearly decreased in the RA group compared with the controls. Patients with RA are more likely to present periodontal disease, poorer oral hygiene manifesting as an increased accumulation of bacterial plaque, and decreased salivary flow rates. Vulnerability to periodontitis is confirmed in one of the largest samples ever studied of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Also, there is evidence of hyposialia (decrease in salivary rate) in RA patients without Sjögren's syndrome.

  6. The Canadian Systemic Sclerosis Oral Health Study IV: oral radiographic manifestations in systemic sclerosis compared with the general population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagenais, Marie; MacDonald, David; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Tatibouet, Solène; Steele, Russell; Gravel, Sabrina; Mohit, Shrisha; Sayegh, Tarek El; Pope, Janet; Fontaine, Audrey; Masseto, Ariel; Matthews, Debora; Sutton, Evelyn; Thie, Norman; Jones, Niall; Copete, Maria; Kolbinson, Dean; Markland, Janet; Nogueira-Filho, Getulio; Robinson, David; Gornitsky, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare oral radiologic abnormalities associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc) against abnormalities in the general population. Study Design Patients with SSc and healthy controls were enrolled in a multi-site cross-sectional study. Included in the radiology examination were a panoramic radiograph, four bitewings, and an anterior mandibular periapical radiograph. Radiographs were evaluated by two oral and maxillofacial radiologists tested for interobserver and intraobserver reliability. Chi-squared tests, Fisher exact tests, and Mann Whitney U tests were used to summarize the radiologic manifestations of patients and controls. Results We assessed 163 SSc patients and 231 controls. Widening of the periodontal ligament space (PLS) (P < .001), with higher percentage of teeth with PLS widening (P < .001), was significantly more frequent in patients with SSc than in controls. The most significant differences between the two groups were found in the molars and premolars (P < .001). Moreover, 26% of the patients with SSc had a periapical PLS greater than 0.19 mm compared with 13% of the controls (P = .003). Patients with SSc had significantly more erosions compared with controls (14.5% vs. 3.6%; P < .001), mostly in the condyles (P = .022), coronoid processes (P = .005) and other locations (P = .012). Conclusion Patients with SSc had more teeth with PLS widening and erosions of the mandible compared with controls. PMID:25959972

  7. Langerhans cell histiocytosis with oral manifestations: a rare and unusual case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashoda-Devi, Bk; Rakesh, N; Agarwal, Manjushree

    2012-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), is a rare, proliferative disorder in which the accumulation of pathologic Langerhans cells leads to local tissue infiltration and destruction. We present a case of a 32 years old, completely edentulous female patient who presented with erythema of hard palate, maxillary alveolar mucosa and mucosa over the distobuccal part of mandibular alveolar ridge with foci of ulcerations. Histopathologic features were suggestive of LCH which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry which was CD1a positive, confirmatory for LCH. Bone scan revealed multiple bone involvement. At this stage, disease had already progressed to multisystem involvement with endocrinal abnormalities (primary hypothyroidism and hyperprolactinemia), requiring aggressive treatment. Therefore, this case is a reminder of the possibility of occurrence of this rare disease in the oral cavity which might manifest itself in multiple presentations thus easily leading to the misdiagnosis and therefore, it could be easily overlooked by dentists. Key words:Langerhans cell histiocytosis, immunohistochemistry, bone scan.

  8. Langerhans cell histiocytosis: A case report of a three year old boy with primary oral manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seraj B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disease with formation of granulomatous infiltrations consisting of Langerhans cells, histiocytes, lymphocytes and eosinophilic granulocytes. The ethiopathogenesis of the disease has not been fully clarified yet. It can occur as focal or disseminated form - acute or chronic. Oral manifestations may be the first signs. This article reports a case of a 3 year old boy with LCH suffering from severe dental mobility and foul breathe. Radiographically, the lesions appeared as well-defined radiolucent defects in maxilla and mandible. The microscopic findings consisted of sheet like arrangements of histiocytes with a mixture of eosinophils and other inflammatory cells. Biochemical tests were within normal limits.

  9. Prevalence of Oral Manifestations and Their Association with CD4/CD8 Ratio and HIV Viral Load in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Gaurav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was to determine the prevalence of oral manifestations in an HIV infected population from south India and evaluate their association with HIV viral load and CD4/CD8 ratio. Intraoral examination of 103 patients, whose CD4/CD8 ratio was available, were conducted. HIV viral loads were available for thirty patients only. The prevalence of oral manifestations was 80.6% (83/103. The most common oromucosal lesion was erythematous candidiasis (EC (38.8% followed by melanotic hyperpigmentation (35.9%. Patients having any oral manifestation had a mean CD4/CD8 ratio of 0.24. EC had positive predictive value of 85.0% for CD4/CD8 ratio 20,000 copies/mL (20,000 copies/mL.

  10. Diagnosis and Intralesional Corticotherapy in Oral Ulcers Occurring as the Sole Manifestation of Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis. A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambirazi, Liane; Libório, Tatiana; Nunes, Fábio; Sugaya, Norberto; Migliari, Dante

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a case of oral mucosa lesions as the sole manifestation in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). This is a very uncommon manifestation of LCH since this disease preferably affects the bones with frequent involvement of the jaws. LCH may also involve other organs, particularly the lungs, liver, lymph nodes, and skin. The highlights of this report are the differential diagnosis, immunohistochemical analysis and, mostly, the therapeutic approach. PMID:27398106

  11. Evaluation of Salivary Secretory Immunoglobulin A Levels in Diabetic Patients and Association with Oral and Dental Manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Shahla Kakoei; Bahareh Hosseini; Ali-Akbar Haghdoost; Mojgan Sanjari; Ahmad Gholamhosseinian; Afshar, Vahid F. N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Oral and dental manifestations in diabetic patients can arise due to numerous factors, including elevated salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) levels. This study aimed to evaluate s-IgA concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to investigate the association between s-IgA levels and oral and dental manifestations of T2DM. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out between October 2011 and September 2012 in Kerman, I...

  12. Oral manifestations of selective IgA-deficiency: review and case-report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, L; Croveri, F; Vinci, R; Maurino, V; Boggio, A; Mantegazza, D; Farronato, D; Tagliabue, A; Silvestre-Rangil, J; Tettamanti, L

    2017-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A deficiency is the most common primary immunodeficiency defined as decreased serum level of IgA (less than 7 mg/dl) in the presence of normal levels of other immunoglobulin isotypes. Most individuals with IgA deficiency are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections, allergic disorders and autoimmune manifestations, such as diabetes mellitus, Graves disease and celiac disease. The international literature has not produced any kind of review yet about intra-oral manifestations of selective IgA-deficiency. L.S., a 7-year-old Caucasian girl, was examined at our hospital. After she had undergone a professional dental cleaning, a symmetric, bilateral ulcerative gingivitis developed nearby the upper second primary molars. The gingival ulcers were persistent and did not disappear in the following 3 weeks. In the meantime, the young patient reported the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. IgA serum level was 4.5 mg/dl, while the other isotypes levels were in the common range. The diagnosis of selective IgA-deficiency was formulated and the girl underwent further examination for the specific IgG autoantibodies in celiac disease, which were not present. Consequently, a full prevention program was planned. This case report emphasizes the role of the paediatric dentist in the early detection of systemic disorder, such as the immunological diseases. The oral cavity often reveals to be the first site of manifestation of important systemic diseases. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency is the most common primary immunodeficiency and is defined as a decrease in serum IgA levels in the presence of normal levels of other immunoglobulin isotypes (1). Serum IgA deficiency was first described in children with ataxia-telangiectasia (2) and has since been identified in other patients, including normal patients. The prevalence of IgA deficiency ranges from 1:223 to 1:1000 in community studies and from 1:400 to 1

  13. A comparison of oral and dental manifestations in diabetic and non-diabetic uremic patients receiving hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Murali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the oral and dental findings of uremic patients receiving hemodialysis and to compare the Results between diabetic and non-diabetic groups. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients undergoing hemodialysis were classified into diabetic and non-diabetic groups and examined for uremic oral manifestations, dental caries (DMFT, and periodontal status (CPITN. Mann-Whitney test of significance has been applied for analyzing DMFT score and chi-square test is used for analyzing CPITN score. Results: Of the study group, 46% were diabetic and only 11% of them did not have any oral manifestation. Oral manifestations observed were xerostomia and uremic odor, which contributed to 47 (23% and 37 (17%, respectively. Hyperpigmentation was present in 26 (12%, macroglossia in 23 (11%, and uremic tongue coating in 24 (11%. Mucosal petechiae were seen in 17 patients contributing to 8% of total patients. Eleven patients had tongue pallor (5%, 9 patients had glossitis with depapillation (4%, and 7 patients had dysgeusia (3%. Angular cheilitis and gingival swelling were seen in 5 patients (2%. Conclusion: The oral and dental manifestations were higher in prevalence in the study group. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups.

  14. Oral manifestations of syphilis Manifestações orais da sífilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Carneiro Leão

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The past decade has shown a significant rise in the prevalence of infective syphilis in the developed world, and striking increases in its frequency have occurred in Eastern Europe, particularly the UK, and in the US. Although oral manifestations of syphilis are most likely to be observed during secondary disease, all stages of the disease can give rise to oral lesions. Significant oral lesions such as gumma-associated bony destruction and a possible predisposition to oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with tertiary disease. Since the prevalence of infective syphilis in heterosexuals has been increasing, there has now been a gradual rise in the number of children born with congenital syphilis. Consequently, the congenital disease gives rise to dental anomalies as well as bone, skin, and neurological anomalies of the face. The aim of this report is to review syphilis-related oral lesions, as well as to summarize the relations between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and syphilis.A última década tem mostrado um aumento importante na prevalência de sífilis infecciosa nos países desenvolvidos e epidemias surgiram na Europa ocidental, particularmente no Reino Unido, bem como nos EUA. Embora as manifestações orais da sífilis sejam mais freqüentes na fase secundária da doença, todos os estágios podem apresentar lesões orais. A fase terciária da doença está associada a lesões orais significativas tais como destruição óssea associada à goma sifilítica e uma possível predisposição ao carcinoma espinocelular. Com o aumento da prevalência da sífilis infecciosa, há também um aumento gradual de crianças nascidas com sífilis congênita. Consequentemente esta patologia leva a anomalias faciais de ordem dentária, óssea, dermatológica e neurológica. O objetivo deste artigo é revisar as lesões orais associadas á sífilis, bem como discorrer brevemente sobre a relação entre a infecção pelo vírus da imunodefici

  15. Evaluation of Salivary Secretory Immunoglobulin A Levels in Diabetic Patients and Association with Oral and Dental Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Kakoei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Oral and dental manifestations in diabetic patients can arise due to numerous factors, including elevated salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA levels. This study aimed to evaluate s-IgA concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and to investigate the association between s-IgA levels and oral and dental manifestations of T2DM. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out between October 2011 and September 2012 in Kerman, Iran, and included 260 subjects (128 patients with T2DM and 132 healthy controls. Unstimulated salivary samples were collected from all subjects and s-IgA levels were determined using the immunoturbidimetric method. The oral cavities and teeth of T2DM patients were evaluated for oral and dental manifestations. Results: Both diabetic and control subjects with higher concentrations of s-IgA had significantly higher numbers of decayed, missing or filled teeth (DMFT and periodontal index (PDI scores (P <0.050. s-IgA levels were significantly higher in subjects with oral candidiasis (P <0.050. Among diabetic patients, significantly higher s-IgA levels were concomitant with xerostomia and denture stomatitis (P ≤0.050. There were no significant differences between s-IgA concentrations and other oral or dental manifestations in either group. Conclusion: Individuals with a greater number of DMFT, a higher PDI score and oral candidiasis had significantly higher s-IgA levels. s-IgA levels were not significantly higher among diabetic patients in comparison to the control group. However, significantly higher s-IgA levels occurred with xerostomia and denture stomatitis in diabetic patients. In addition, s-IgA was significantly higher in patients with uncontrolled diabetes compared to those with controlled diabetes.

  16. Evaluation of Salivary Secretory Immunoglobulin A Levels in Diabetic Patients and Association with Oral and Dental Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoei, Shahla; Hosseini, Bahareh; Haghdoost, Ali-Akbar; Sanjari, Mojgan; Gholamhosseinian, Ahmad; Afshar, Vahid F. N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Oral and dental manifestations in diabetic patients can arise due to numerous factors, including elevated salivary secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) levels. This study aimed to evaluate s-IgA concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to investigate the association between s-IgA levels and oral and dental manifestations of T2DM. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out between October 2011 and September 2012 in Kerman, Iran, and included 260 subjects (128 patients with T2DM and 132 healthy controls). Unstimulated salivary samples were collected from all subjects and s-IgA levels were determined using the immunoturbidimetric method. The oral cavities and teeth of T2DM patients were evaluated for oral and dental manifestations. Results: Both diabetic and control subjects with higher concentrations of s-IgA had significantly higher numbers of decayed, missing or filled teeth (DMFT) and periodontal index (PDI) scores (P denture stomatitis (P ≤0.050). There were no significant differences between s-IgA concentrations and other oral or dental manifestations in either group. Conclusion: Individuals with a greater number of DMFT, a higher PDI score and oral candidiasis had significantly higher s-IgA levels. s-IgA levels were not significantly higher among diabetic patients in comparison to the control group. However, significantly higher s-IgA levels occurred with xerostomia and denture stomatitis in diabetic patients. In addition, s-IgA was significantly higher in patients with uncontrolled diabetes compared to those with controlled diabetes. PMID:26629378

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Specific Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Ascertained versus Potential Coeliac Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennio Bramanti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients involved on coeliac disease (CD have atypical symptoms and often remain undiagnosed. Specific oral manifestations are effective risk indicators of CD and for this reason an early diagnosis with a consequent better prognosis can be performed by the dentist. There are not researches analysing the frequency of these oral manifestations in potential coeliac patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the oral hard and soft tissue lesions in potential and ascertained coeliac children in comparison with healthy controls. 50 ascertained children, 21 potential coeliac patients, and 54 controls were recruited and the oral examination was performed. The overall oral lesions were more frequently present in CD patients than in controls. The prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions was 62% in ascertained coeliac, 76.2% in potential coeliac patients, and 12.96% in controls (P<0.05. Clinical dental delayed eruption was observed in 38% of the ascertained coeliac and 42.5% of the potential coeliac versus 11.11% of the controls (P<0.05. The prevalence of specific enamel defects (SED was 48% in ascertained coeliac and 19% in potential coeliac versus 0% in controls (P<0.05; OR=3.923. The SED seem to be genetically related to the histological damage and villous atrophy.

  18. Clinical Evaluation of Specific Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Ascertained versus Potential Coeliac Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matacena, Giada; Costa, Stefano; Magazzù, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Patients involved on coeliac disease (CD) have atypical symptoms and often remain undiagnosed. Specific oral manifestations are effective risk indicators of CD and for this reason an early diagnosis with a consequent better prognosis can be performed by the dentist. There are not researches analysing the frequency of these oral manifestations in potential coeliac patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the oral hard and soft tissue lesions in potential and ascertained coeliac children in comparison with healthy controls. 50 ascertained children, 21 potential coeliac patients, and 54 controls were recruited and the oral examination was performed. The overall oral lesions were more frequently present in CD patients than in controls. The prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions was 62% in ascertained coeliac, 76.2% in potential coeliac patients, and 12.96% in controls (P coeliac and 42.5% of the potential coeliac versus 11.11% of the controls (P coeliac and 19% in potential coeliac versus 0% in controls (P < 0.05; OR = 3.923). The SED seem to be genetically related to the histological damage and villous atrophy. PMID:25197270

  19. Clinical Evaluation of Specific Oral Manifestations in Pediatric Patients with Ascertained versus Potential Coeliac Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramanti, Ennio; Cicciù, Marco; Matacena, Giada; Costa, Stefano; Magazzù, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Patients involved on coeliac disease (CD) have atypical symptoms and often remain undiagnosed. Specific oral manifestations are effective risk indicators of CD and for this reason an early diagnosis with a consequent better prognosis can be performed by the dentist. There are not researches analysing the frequency of these oral manifestations in potential coeliac patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the oral hard and soft tissue lesions in potential and ascertained coeliac children in comparison with healthy controls. 50 ascertained children, 21 potential coeliac patients, and 54 controls were recruited and the oral examination was performed. The overall oral lesions were more frequently present in CD patients than in controls. The prevalence of oral soft tissue lesions was 62% in ascertained coeliac, 76.2% in potential coeliac patients, and 12.96% in controls (P coeliac and 42.5% of the potential coeliac versus 11.11% of the controls (P coeliac and 19% in potential coeliac versus 0% in controls (P villous atrophy.

  20. An overview of herbal supplement utilization with particular emphasis on possible interactions with dental drugs and oral manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Worku

    2003-01-01

    Herbal medication in the United States is a popular form of therapy. This paper provides an overview of the utilization of herbal supplements with particular emphasis on possible interactions with oral health drugs and oral manifestations. Herbal supplements are regulated by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA), which limits their regulation by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A number of studies indicate that there is a progressive increase in the utilization of herbal supplements. The majority of consumers of these products are white, middle-aged women who have some college education. Many of the consumers use pharmaceutical drugs concurrently, but most do not inform their health-care providers about their use of herbal supplements. Various herbal supplements have been reported or are suspected to interact with certain oral health drugs, the most important one being 1) bromelain, cayenne, chamomile, feverfew, dong quai, eleuthro/Seberian ginseng, garlic, ginkgo, ginger, ginseng and licorice interacting with aspirin; 2) aloe latex, ephedra, ginseng, rhubarb, cascara sagrada, licorice, and senna interacting with corticosteriods; 3) kava, St. John's wort, chamomile, and valerian interacting with central nervous system (CNS) depressant drugs; and 4) herbs acting on the gastrointestinal system, altering the absorption of several orally administered drugs. Further, the use of some herbal supplements has been reported to be associated with oral manifestations, including aphthous ulcers, lip and tongue irritation, and swelling with feverfew; gingival bleeding with feverfew and ginkgo; tongue numbness with echinacea; xerostomia with St. John's wort; oral and lingual dyskinesia with kava; and salivation with yohimbe. These potential effects of herbal supplements in conjunction with factors related to regulation restrictions suggest that the use of these products may be associated with various adverse reactions that can affect oral health and

  1. Successful treatment with oral mizoribine in refractory ocular manifestation of mucosal pemphigus vulgaris: A unique response to different immunosuppressive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Noritaka; Togashi, Ari; Nomura, Erika; Kaneko, Fumio

    2016-11-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an acquired autoimmune disease in which the disease characteristic antibodies are directed against the desmosomal transmembrane glycoprotein, desmoglein 3 (Dsg 3), resulting in flaccid blisters and erosions of skin and mucous membrane. Among various affected sites, ocular involvement may often persist or relapse even after remission of other mucocutaneous lesions, and also represent a higher morbidity. We describe such an example case of mucosal PV, whose oral and ocular manifestations were responded specifically to oral cyclosporine and mizoribine, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first case of the site-specific efficacy of mizoribine in PV.

  2. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of oral health care workers in Lesotho regarding the management of patients with oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramphoma, K J; Naidoo, S

    2014-11-01

    Lesotho has the third highest prevalence of HIV in the world with an estimated 23% of the adult population infected. At least 70% of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) have presented with oral manifestation of HIV as the first sign of the disease. Oral health workers regularly encounter patients presenting with oral lesions associated with HIV disease and therefore need to have adequate knowledge of these conditions for diagnosis and management. The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of oral health care workers (OHCW) of Lesotho regarding the management of oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on all 46 OHCW in 26 public and private care facilities in all ten districts of Lesotho. A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information. The response rate was 100%. Nearly all (94.7%) agreed that oral lesions are common in people living with HIV and/or AIDS. The majority (91.3%) named oral candidiasis (OC) as the most common lesion found in PLWHA while Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) (34.7%) and Oral Hairy Leukoplakia (OHL) (32.6%) were mentioned as the least common oral lesions of HIV. Most correctly identified the images of oral candidiasis (97.8%), angular cheilitis (86.9%) and herpes zoster (80.4%). Only 16.7% felt they had comprehensive knowledge of oral HIV lesions, although 84.8% reported having previously received training. Almost three quarters (71%) reported that there was no need to treat HIV positive patients differently from HIV negative patients. OHCW in Lesotho demonstrated high confidence levels in their competence in managing dental patients with oral lesions associated with HIV, however, they lacked an in-depth knowledge in this regard. Amongst this group there is a need for comprehensive training with regards to diagnosis and management of oral lesions of HIV including the training of other cadres of health care workers together with nurses and community

  3. Oral manifestation of HIV/AIDS infections in paediatric Nigerian patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adebola, Adetokunbo Rafel; Adeleke, Solomon Ibiyemi; Mukhtar, Maryam; Osunde, Otasowie Daniel; Akhiwu, Benjamin Idemudia; Ladeinde, Akinola

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the pattern and frequency of oral lesions and to compare the prevalence of HIV-related oral lesions in paediatric Nigerian patients on HAART with those not on HAART...

  4. Evaluation of oral manifestations and oral health status among pediatric human immunodeficiency virus patients-under anti-retroviral therapy: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Aroquiadasse

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV acquired immunodeficiency syndrome disease has evolved to become a social and economic catastrophe, with far-reaching implications affecting every phase of life of the diseased individual. Data on adults and children diagnosed with HIV infection are useful for determining populations needing prevention and treatment services. Oral lesions may be the presenting symptoms of HIV infection and may differ entirely from those manifested in the adult population. Aim and Objective: We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HIV related oral lesions among pediatric HIV patients and to assess the oral health status of HIV infected children residing in a selected childcare facility in Puducherry. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during September 2015 in child care facility for HIV infected children located in Puducherry U.T, India. All children <18 years, who are diagnosed with HIV infection and are put on anti-retroviral therapy (ART or pre-ART care, were included in the study. After obtaining informed consent from the care-givers and assent of the children, they were interviewed and examined by a team comprising a qualified dental surgeon and a trained physician. Results: Majority of the children were under first-line ART (73% and were on ART for more than 4 years. The CD4 count of 23 (52.3 was between 500–1000 cells/μL. The recent viral load assay in 32 (72.7 patients was <150/not detected. Tooth decay was the most common oral manifestation with 28 (63.6 being affected. Nonspecific lymphadenopathy 26 (59.1 was the most common coexisting systemic illness. Conclusion: This study proves that constant surveillance by monitoring the general health status, CD4 counts, viral load coupled with stringent ART care has improved the overall quality of life of these children and consequently resulted in lesser oral manifestations.

  5. Oral Manifestations of Chronic Renal Failure Complicating a Systemic Genetic Disease: Diagnostic Dilemma. Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmoussa, Leila; Renoux, Marion; Radoï, Loredana

    2015-11-01

    Chronic renal failure can give rise to a wide spectrum of oral manifestations, owing mainly to secondary hyperparathyroidism complicating this disease. However, any systemic disease responsible for kidney failure can produce oral manifestations, which can be misdiagnosed. This report describes the case of a 40-year-old male patient referred for oral assessment before kidney and liver transplantation. He had primary hyperoxaluria complicated by end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Panoramic radiography indicated not only external root resorption, but also maxillary and mandibular radiolucencies consistent with brown tumors. Unexpectedly, histologic study of the bone biopsy specimen led to the diagnosis of jaws oxalosis. Primary hyperoxaluria is a systemic genetic disease. The affected genes are involved in glyoxylate metabolism and their deficiency results in overproduction of oxalates. Inability of the kidney to excrete oxalates leads to deposition of these crystals in almost all tissues (oxalosis) and to multiple-organ failure. Several oral findings have been described in patients with oxalosis, such as periodontal disease and root resorptions, but radiolucencies in the jaws have rarely been described. This case report is of particular interest because of the unusual location of oxalate crystal deposition in the jaws, which could be misdiagnosed in a patient with renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  6. Oral and constitutional manifestations of HIV-infected hospital patients in Northern Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tomas O; Tam, Vu V; Mai, Nguyen T

    2005-01-01

    This study reports clinical features, with emphasis on oral lesions and constitutional signs, of 170 patients in a regional hospital in northern Vietnam, of whom 56 were HIV positive. The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship of oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL) and oropharyngeal...

  7. Disease outcome for children who present with oral manifestations of Crohn's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hussey, S

    2011-06-01

    To describe the outcome for children with oral Crohn\\'s disease (OCD) at diagnosis, and to determine if there was a difference in the Paediatric Crohn\\'s Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) scores between those with and those without oral lesions at follow-up.

  8. Oral and systemic manifestations, and dental management of a pediatric patient with Tetralogy of Fallot. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Ayala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital heart disease and the most common cyanotic heart defect in children. It is clinically characterized by a ventricular septal defect, pulmonary stenosis, overriding aorta over ventricular septal defect and right ventricular hypertrophy. There is little or no information about the oral manifestations in patients with this pathology. A report and discussion of a pediatric patient diagnosed with Tetralogy of Fallot, its clinical manifestations, oral findings and dental management are presented. Case Report: A four-year-old male patient diagnosed with Tetralogy of Fallot and epileptic attacks. The patient has deciduous teeth with many severe early childhood caries, stomatitis and cyanotic mucous membranes, root fragments, periapical abscess and noticeable enamel hypoplasia. Conclusions: In agreement with other authors, children with systemic diseases such as Tetralogy of Fallot have a higher rate of caries, poor oral hygiene, high susceptibility to other infections and bacterial endocarditis, cyanotic mucous membranes and enamel hypoplasia. Primary prevention is critical, proper dental hygiene, regular dental check-ups and the use of antibiotic prophylaxis are particularly important, especially in high-risk patients.

  9. Comparison of oral manifestations with CD4 count in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Arun Sontakke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objective: This study was carried out with the primary aim of correlating oral changes and general changes of HIV-infected patients with their CD4 count. Materials and Methods: 124 patients were selected, and after taking their informed consent, they were subjected to detailed history taking and thorough clinical examination. Specific oral lesions and general physical changes were recorded. Every patient was subjected to laboratory investigation for CD4 count. All these findings were tabulated. The clinical observation and laboratory findings were subjected to critical analysis and correlated. Statistical test, i.e. Student′s " t" test, was applied and objective conclusions were drawn. Result: Out of 124 patients, 40 had oral candidiasis, 6 had oral hairy leukoplakia, 12 had periodontal disease, 20 had xerostomia, 30 had melanin pigmentation, while 4 had HSV2, and atypical ulceration. Out of 40 patients with oral candidiasis, 28 patients had CD4 count 500 cell/mm 3 . Oral hairy leukoplakia occurred in equal proportions in group A and B. These periodontal diseases were more commonly in group B; xerostomia and melanin pigmentation was equally seen in group A and B. Conclusion: Oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, and necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis are specific oral indicators which will definitely suggest to the dental surgeon that the disease is running a rapid downhill course and due to this the oral physician is in a position to raise a suspicion and alert the general physician regarding the declining immune status of patient.

  10. Oral manifestations of stress-related disorders in the general population of Ludhiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damanpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral diseases associated with psychological disorders have long been known in medicine. Emotional as well as psychological factors may act as significant risk factors in the initiation and progression of oromucosal diseases. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine a correlation between stress and development of certain oral conditions such as lichen planus, myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome, xerostomia, bruxism, aphthous ulcers, and burning mouth syndrome. Materials and Methods: An observational comparative study was conducted among patients reporting to the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology. A total of 130 patients gave a positive history of oral lesions, out of which 62 were stress related and the other 68 patients served as the control group (oral lesions with no history of stress. All these patients were subjected to routine systemic and oral examination. The results obtained were statistically compared using P value, t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: It was found that lichen planus and burning mouth syndrome were more common in females and myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome was prevalent in males. Xerostomia was found to increase with age. Conclusion: It was concluded that, though the etiology of most oral lesions is not known, the role of stress and other psychogenic factors cannot be ruled out in their occurrence.

  11. Oral manifestation of HIV/AIDS infections in paediatric Nigerian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetokunbo Rafel Adebola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aims of this study were to determine the pattern and frequency of oral lesions and to compare the prevalence of HIV-related oral lesions in paediatric Nigerian patients on HAART with those not on HAART. Materials and Methods: All patients aged 15 years and below attending the Infectious Disease Clinic of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital with a diagnosis of HIV were consecutively examined in a cross-sectional study over a 2-year period. Information was obtained by history, physical examinations, HIV testing, and enumeration of CD+ T cells. The results are presented. A P-value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 105 children comprising 63 males and 42 female who met the inclusion criteria participated in the study, mean age in months was 53.3±42.2, with a mean of 3.4±2.2 for male and 2.8±1.8 for female respectively. Oral lesions occurred in 61.9% of the children Overall, 22 (21.0% had at least one oral lesion, 43 (41.0% had multiple lesion. The most common lesion was oral candidiasis (79.1%. The angular cheilitis (43.8% variant was most frequent. The mean CD4 counts were 1138 cells/mm [3] , 913 cells/mm [3] and 629 cells/mm [3] for those without oral lesion, with single lesion and multiple oral lesions respectively. These differences were not statistically significant (ANOVA: F=0.185, df=2, 80, 82, P=0.831. Patients on HAART comprised about 61.9% and these were found to have reduced risk for development of such oral lesions as angular cheilitis (OR=0.76; 95% CI=0.56-1.02; P=0.03, pseudomembranous candidiasis (OR=0.71; 95% CI=0.54-0.94; P=0.024 and HIV-gingivitis (OR=0.59; 95% CI=0.46-0.75; P=0.001. HAART had some beneficial but insignificant effect on development of HIV-periodonttitis (OR=0.60; 95% CI=0.51-0.70; P=0.09. The chances of occurrence of other oral lesions were not significantly reduced by HAART (Kaposi sarcoma, OR=1.24; 95% CI=0.31-5.01; P=0.47, erythematous candidiasis, OR=1.13; 95% CI=0

  12. Effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy use on oral manifestations in pediatric patients infected with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Ferraz Oliscovicz

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the prevalence of oral lesions was similar between the groups, it was less in patients without AIDS and those under HAART. The duration of HAART usage had a significant influence on the prevalence of these lesions.

  13. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. A unique manifestation of human papillomavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, E A M; Arani, S Fallah; Hegt, V Noordhoek; van Praag, M C G

    2009-03-01

    A 34-year old Creole woman appeared at the dermatology department with white-pink spots on the oral mucosa, which had been there for some time. Histology showed lesions characteristic of focal epithelial hyperplasia. The patient was treated with a CO2 laser. Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare benign lesion and is caused by human papillomavirus subtypes 13 or 32; it only appears on the oral mucosa.

  14. Oral ulcer as primary manifestation of HIV infection in an 80-year-old man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Lene Ugilt Pagter; Søgaard, Ole Schmeltz

    2014-01-01

    Oral lesions such as candidiasis, Kaposi's sarcoma, hairy leukoplakia, herpes simplex infection, and ulcerative periodontitis are associated with HIV infection and may be the primary presentation in persons with undiagnosed HIV. We report a clinical case in which an 80-year-old man presented...

  15. The effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy on the prevalence of oral manifestation in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in Karnataka, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Neelkant; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap; Babaji, Prashant; Ramesh, Dnsv; Jhamb, Kshitij; Sharma, Akanksha Manmohan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a highly lethal, progressively epidemic viral infection characterized by profound impairment of the immune system. Oral manifestations are common in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected AIDS patients, and are usually the first indicator of symptom and disease progression. The main objective of the current study was to compare the prevalence of oral manifestations in HIV patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) with those, not on HAART therapies. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted among 100 patients diagnosed as human immune virus sero-positive. These patients were divided equally into two groups (50 each); Group I patients on HAART and Group II patients who were not on HAART. Information regarding age, sex and cluster of differentiation 4 cell count was obtained from the medical records. Oral examination was done, and findings were recorded by using internationally accepted presumptive clinical criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square statistical test. Results: The presence of oral manifestations was significantly decreased in subjects on HAART (32%) compared to those who are not on HAART (56%). The most common oral lesions detected in patients on HAART were increased oral hyper-pigmentation (14%), recurrent aphthous stomatitis (8%), non-specific ulcerations (4%), pseudo-membranous candidiasis (2%), periodontitis (2%) and xerostomia (2%), whereas in non HAART oral hyperpigmentation (10%), pseudo-membranous candidiasis (8%), angular cheilitis (4%), and erythematous candidiasis (4%) and Periodontitis (14%) were more prevalent. Conclusion: The number and severity of oral manifestation decreased, and even there was a change in the type of oral manifestations on HAART, which may be because of the improvement in immunity gained by the therapy. PMID:25713484

  16. Manifestaciones orales asociadas con la infección por VIH-SIDA ORAL MANIFESTATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH HIV-AIDS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcilia Rodríguez Fuentes

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza una revisión de la clasificación de las lesiones bucales relacionadas con el VIH debido a la importancia de que los profesionales de la salud (médicos y estomatólogos dispongan de conocimientos suficientes sobre estas lesiones. Las manifestaciones orales por la infección del virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH son, en ocasiones, el primer signo de la enfermedad, y en muchos casos un indicador de la progresión de la infección hacia el síndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida (SIDA. Actualmente, gracias a la mejoría de los tratamientos antirretrovirales, y en concreto, tras la aparición de los tratamientos antirretrovirales de gran actividad (TARGA, la prevalencia de las lesiones orales asociadas con el VIH está disminuyendo paulatinamente. Por otro lado, el aumento de la esperanza de vida de estos pacientes está condicionando una mayor presencia en nuestras consultas de pacientes infectados por el VIH, lo que implica una actualización continua en el diagnóstico y tratamiento de estos procesos.A review of the classification the oral injuries related to HIV was made taking into account that it is very important that health professionals (physicians and stomatologists have enough knwoledge on these injuries. The oral manifestations due to the HIV infection are, on ocassions, the first sign of the disease and, in many cases, an indicator of the progression of the infection towards AIDS. At present, thanks to the improvement of the antiretroviral treatments and, basically, to the appearance of antiretroviral treatments of great activity, the prevalence of the oral injuries associated with HIV is gradually decreasing. On the other hand, the increase of the life expectancy of these patients is conditioning a higher presence in our offices of HIV-infected patients, which implies a continuous updating in the diagnosis and treatment of these processes.

  17. Oral and Dental Manifestations of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia: Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Feyza Otan; Gunduz, Kaan; Ozden, Bora; Isci, K. Devrim; Fisgin, Tunc

    2011-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a red cell aplasia characterized with physical abnormalities. The incidence of the disease is reported to be five to seven (5–7) cases per million births in Europe and 4–5 per million live births in the UK and Netherlands with equal sex ratio. It was first recognized in 1938 but an exact pathophysiology of the disease has not been described yet. These abnormalities are well known, however, detailed oral and dental conditions related with the disease have not been described previously. We herein presented two cases of DBA together with oral and dental findings. Our study is first to report the gingival status of the patients with a complete investigation of any orthodontic or dental abnormalities in these kind of patients. A careful follow up and preventive therapies should not be missed in these kind of patients. PMID:21769279

  18. Apert Syndrome: Report of a Case with Emphasis on Oral Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vadiati Saberi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To report the oral findings, including dental anomalies, ectopic eruption of the maxillary permanent first molars and periodontal disease and soft tissue alterations, in a subject with Apert syndrome. Clinical and radiographic examination of a patient with Apert syndrome,aged 21 years old, not previously submitted for orthodontic or orthognathic treatment.Dental anomalies were present in a patient. Intraoral evaluation revealed poor oral hygienewith varying degrees of periodontal involvement, an arched swelling (pseudo cleft configuration,class III malocclusion, anterior open bite, posterior crossbite, supernumerary teeth, ectopic eruption and creamy white enamel opacities, an excessively large appearingtongue and a v-shaped maxillary arch. The occurrence of typical lateral palatal swellings agrees with the literature. The high prevalence of dental anomalies and ectopic eruption may suggest a possible etiologic relationship with the syndrome.

  19. A systematic review of the oral and craniofacial manifestations of cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcuera-Flores, José-Ramón; Casttellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Serrera-Figallo, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Caballero, Ángela; Machuca-Portillo, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is an autosomal disorder. Because it affects few people in the population it is considered a rare disease, yet it is one of the most common autosomal chromosomal syndromes in humans. It entails pathognomonic alterations that affect the craniofacial and oral anatomy of patients. The aim of this study is to review these craniofacial and oral abnormalities in patients with Cri du chat syndrome. The PubMed Medline database was searched using two different strategies. First, we used "Dentistry" and "Cri du chat" as keywords; second, we used "Cri du chat" and "craniofacial." Seven articles in which the main orofacial and cranio-skeletal characteristics of patients with Cri du chat syndrome were described were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Cri du Chat syndrome entails pathognomonic characteristics in the craniofacial area (epicanthus, short philtrum, and wide nasal bridge), the oral area (mandibular retrognathism and anterior open bite) and the cranial region (alterations at the cranial base angle and a small upper airway). However, more studies on larger samples are needed to specify the orofacial and craniofacial characteristics of patients with Cri du chat syndrome more accurately. Clin. Anat. 29:555-560, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Oral mucosal manifestations in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and dry mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Błochowiak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : One of the most important symptoms of Sjögren syndrome is xerostomia. The oral cavity deprived of saliva and its natural lubricative, protective and antibacterial properties is prone to a number of unfavourable consequences. Aim : To present the most important lesions on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and in dry mouth syndrome. Material and methods: The study group comprised 55 patients including 52 women and 3 men aged 20–72 years (average: 28.25 years. Results : Basing on the accepted criteria, primary Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed in 22 (40% patients, secondary Sjögren syndrome in 18 (32.7% patients, and dry mouth syndrome in 15 (27.27% patients. The physical examination and the examination of the mouth were performed and history was elicited from every patient. Conclusions : The most common pathologies appearing on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome are angular cheilitis, cheilitis, increased lip dryness as well as non-specific ulcerations, aphthae and aphthoid conditions.

  1. Oral mucosal manifestations in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and dry mouth syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olewicz-Gawlik, Anna; Polańska, Adriana; Nowak-Gabryel, Michalina; Kocięcki, Jarosław; Witmanowski, Henryk; Sokalski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the most important symptoms of Sjögren syndrome is xerostomia. The oral cavity deprived of saliva and its natural lubricative, protective and antibacterial properties is prone to a number of unfavourable consequences. Aim To present the most important lesions on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and in dry mouth syndrome. Material and methods The study group comprised 55 patients including 52 women and 3 men aged 20–72 years (average: 28.25 years). Results Basing on the accepted criteria, primary Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed in 22 (40%) patients, secondary Sjögren syndrome in 18 (32.7%) patients, and dry mouth syndrome in 15 (27.27%) patients. The physical examination and the examination of the mouth were performed and history was elicited from every patient. Conclusions The most common pathologies appearing on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome are angular cheilitis, cheilitis, increased lip dryness as well as non-specific ulcerations, aphthae and aphthoid conditions. PMID:26985175

  2. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND ORAL MANIFESTATIONS OF HIV-POSITIVE PATIENTS IN A SPECIALIZED SERVICE IN BRAZIL

    OpenAIRE

    Erick Nelo Pedreira; Camila Lopes Cardoso; Éder do Carmo Barroso; Jorge André de Souza Santos; Felipe Paiva Fonseca; Luís Antônio de Assis Taveira

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral lesions in HIV-positive patients attending the Specialized Service for Infectious-contagious Diseases and Parasitoses of the Health Secretariat of the State of Pará (URE-DIPE/SESPA), in the city of Belém, PA, Brazil. A total of 79 HIV-positive patients (53 males and 26 females) were examined. Clinical and epidemiological evaluations were done by correlating the lesions with gender, race, chronological age, risk behavior and prev...

  3. Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (Trevor's disease: a rare case report with oral manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha ML

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica, also known as Trevor's disease, is an extremely rare skeletal developmental disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by an osteocartilaginous outgrowth of one or more epiphyses or of a tarsal bone during childhood. It is a rare skeletal hemimelica disorder characterized by asymmetric growth of cartilage in one or more epiphyses. Due to the unusual presentation and variability of the picture, there is no standardized treatment and outcome is very different. Also such an unusual, unique case with craniofacial manifestations has not been reported in the literature. We report a case of a 14-year-old male, who complained of irregularly placed teeth in upper and lower front teeth region. On general physical examination we noticed some skeletal abnormalities with the patient and hence we subjected him to radiographic investigations. The images were consistent with epiphyseal dysplasia hemimelica. The prognosis of DEH is variable and depends basically on its location and size. Carriers of this unusual dysplasia should be periodically monitored for the risk of recurrence. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 1018-1024

  4. Amalgam tattoo (amalgam pigmentation) of the oral mucosa: clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, A

    2004-07-01

    Amalgam tattoo is an iatrogenic lesion caused by traumatic implantation of dental amalgam into soft tissue. Amalgam tattoo is the most common localized pigmented lesion in the mouth. In a study of a mass screening oral examination in the United States, it was found in about 0.4-0.9% of the adult population and in Sweden in about 8%. Clinically, amalgam tattoo presents as a dark gray or blue, flat macule located adjacent to a restored tooth. Most are located on the gingiva and alveolar mucosa followed by the buccal mucosa and the floor of the mouth. Microscopic examination reveals that amalgam is present in the tissues in two forms: as irregular dark, solid fragments of metal or as numerous, discrete fine, brown or black granules dispersed along collagen bundles and around small blood vessels and nerves. In most lesions, it is presented in both forms. The biologic response to the amalgam is related to particle size, quantity and elemental composition of the amalgam. Large fragments often become surrounded by dense fibrous connective tissue. Smaller particles are associated with mild to moderate chronic inflammatory response with individual macrophages engulfing small amalgam particles. Occasionally, the reaction takes the form of foreign body granuloma in which macrophages and multinucleated giant cells are present. Some of the multinucleated giant cells also contain amalgam particles. Diagnosis of amalgam tattoo is usually obvious from the location and clinical appearance. A radiograph is recommended to confirm the presence of metallic particles, but absence of radiographic evidence does not rule out the possibility, since particles are often too fine or widely dispersed to be visible on radiographs. When there is no radiographic evidence or an adjacent restored tooth, biopsy is recommended to rule out an early melanoma. Once the diagnosis of amalgam tattoo has been established, no additional treatment is necessary except for cosmetic reasons. If the pigmentation

  5. A relationship between CD4 count and oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in urban population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadavalli Vera Venkata Satyakiran

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, eighty patients with HAART from urban population showed very minimal oral findings because of good accessibility for treatment and awareness about HIV infections. The patients who were on long-standing HAART treatment also showed minimal oral manifestation such as pigmentation and xerostomia. Hence, we conclude that recognition, significance and treatment of these lesions in patients with HIV infection do not require elaborate setup and can be treated with basic primary health care.

  6. A relationship between CD4 count and oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in urban population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyakiran, Gadavalli Vera Venkata; Bavle, Radhika Manoj; Alexander, Glory; Rao, Saritha; Venugopal, Reshma; Hosthor, Sreelatha S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection gradually destroys the body's immune system, which makes it harder for the body to fight infections. HIV infection causes a quantitative and qualitative depletion of CD4 lymphocyte count, which increases the risk of opportunistic infections. Thus, CD4 count is one of the key factors in determining both the urgency of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation and the need of prophylaxis for opportunistic infections. Aim: This study aims to evaluate the prevalence and variations in the oral manifestations of HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients on HAART therapy in urban population and their association with CD4 count. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted by screening eighty patients who were HIV positive in an urban location. Both adult and pediatric patients were screened for oral manifestations and simultaneously CD4 count was also evaluated. Patients with HIV infection for variable time period who are under HAART were considered. Statistical Analysis: Measures of central tendency were used to analyse the data. Results: HIV infection destroys the immune system of an individual, making the patient susceptible to various infections and malignancies. With the advent of antiretroviral therapy, the scenario has changed drastically. We have observed that patients with CD4 counts between 164 and 1286 show relatively few oral manifestations. Long-term HAART therapy causes pigmentation, xerostomia and angular cheilitis but is taken up quite well by the patients. Conclusion: In this study, eighty patients with HAART from urban population showed very minimal oral findings because of good accessibility for treatment and awareness about HIV infections. The patients who were on long-standing HAART treatment also showed minimal oral manifestation such as pigmentation and xerostomia. Hence, we conclude that recognition, significance and treatment of these lesions in patients with HIV

  7. Efecto de los tratamientos antirretrovirales en las manifestaciones orales de los pacientes VIH+ Effects of antiretrovial treatments on oral manifestations in HIV+patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jané-Salas

    2006-12-01

    antiretroviral treatment (HAART. Also, in these patients the CD4 count and bimodal viral load was measured, at the start of the disease process and at the time of visit. Theoral cavity was examined at this time, in search of lesions associated with AIDS according to the classification by Pindborg et al, 1989. The most prevalent pathology found in this study was the sensation of dry mouth or xerostomia in 47.8%, followed by, in order of frequency, multiple caries (34.4% and erythematous candidiasis (31.1%. Other oral manifestations are very rare, in comparison with the results of other authors in the time before the use of protease inhibitors (PI. There is, for example, only one case of leukoplakia, so characteristic before 1996.

  8. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD) Manifesting in the Oral Cavity of a 13-Year-Old Liver Transplant Recipient (LTx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska-Sławińska, Ewa; Minko-Chojnowska, Izabela; Pawłowska, Joanna; Dembowska-Bagińska, Bożenna; Pronicki, Maciej; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota

    2015-08-18

    BACKGROUND Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a potential complication of solid organ or bone marrow transplants. The main PTLD risk factors are: the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), transplant type, and use of immunosuppressants. It mainly consists of an uncontrolled growth of lymphocytes in transplant recipients under chronic immunosuppressive therapy. About 85% of PTLDs are EBV-containing B-cell proliferations; 14% are T-cell proliferations, of which only 40% contain EBV; and the remaining 1% is NK-cell or plasmocyte proliferations. PTLD may present various clinical manifestations, from non-specific mononucleosis-like syndrome to graft or other organ damage resulting from pathologic lymphocyte infiltration. PTLD may manifest in the oral cavity. CASE REPORT The objective of this study was to present the case of a 13-year-old female living-donor liver transplant recipient, resulting from biliary cirrhosis caused by congenital biliary atresia, with exophytic fibrous lesions on buccal mucosa and tongue. Exophytic and hyperplastic lesion of oral mucosa were removed and histopathological examination revealed polymorphic PTLD. The patient underwent 6 cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and all the oral lesions regressed completely. CONCLUSIONS All oral pathological lesions in organ transplant recipients need to be surgically removed and histopathologically examined because they present an increased risk of neoplastic transformations such as PTLD.

  9. Oral Manifestations of Tropical Infectious Diseases of Central and South America. Part II. Bacterial and Mycotic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-24

    through dissemination of the infection . Although the tonsils and oropharynx are the most frequentl y involve d oral areas, vir tuall y all of the...tationsof orona sal mucosa Hookworm Ancy~fo4toma du.odenate Iron deficiency anemia Oral pallor , atrophyNeca5tw~ aVu~anu4 of lingual p a p l l l a e

  10. Associations of periodontitis and oral manifestations with CD4 counts in HIV-pregnant women in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattrapornnan, Pakkaporn; DeRouen, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the associations of CD4 count with chronic periodontitis and HIV-related oral lesions in pregnant HIV-infected Thai women. Study Design 292 HIV-infected pregnant women were interviewed for health information and examined for their periodontal condition and HIV-related oral lesions during weeks 16-34 of gestation. Logistic regression, t-tests and chi-squared tests were used to examine the associations of CD4 count with oral lesions and periodontal conditions. Results 133 women (45.6%) had at least 1 tooth with a periodontal pocket over 4 mm. Thirty-eight (17.76%) subjects had oral candidiasis and 53 subjects (24.77%) had oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL). Low CD4 count was significantly associated with periodontitis at OR=2.06 with 95%CI [1.00-4.27], p-value 0.05. A significant association was found for low CD4 count with oral hairy leukoplakia with OR 3.57, 95%CI [1.34-9.46], p-value 0.01. Conclusions Chronic periodontitis and OHL were associated with CD4 count lower than 200 cells/mm3 in HIV-infected women. PMID:23790956

  11. Oral and craniofacial manifestations and two novel missense mutations of the NTRK1 gene identified in the patient with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gao

    Full Text Available Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA is a rare inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system resulting from mutations in neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 gene (NTRK1, which encodes the high-affinity nerve growth factor receptor TRKA. Here, we investigated the oral and craniofacial manifestations of a Chinese patient affected by autosomal-recessive CIPA and identified compound heterozygosity in the NTRK1 gene. The affected boy has multisystemic disorder with lack of reaction to pain stimuli accompanied by self-mutilation behavior, the inability to sweat leading to defective thermoregulation, and mental retardation. Oral and craniofacial manifestations included a large number of missing teeth, nasal malformation, submucous cleft palate, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and malocclusion. Histopathological evaluation of the skin sample revealed severe peripheral nerve fiber loss as well as mild loss and absent innervation of sweat glands. Ultrastructural and morphometric studies of a shed tooth revealed dental abnormalities, including hypomineralization, dentin hypoplasia, cementogenesis defects and a dysplastic periodontal ligament. Genetic analysis revealed a compound heterozygosity--c.1561T>C and c.2057G>A in the NTRK1 gene. This report extends the spectrum of NTRK1 mutations observed in patients diagnosed with CIPA and provides additional insight for clinical and molecular diagnosis.

  12. Oral and craniofacial manifestations and two novel missense mutations of the NTRK1 gene identified in the patient with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Guo, Hao; Ye, Nan; Bai, Yudi; Liu, Xin; Yu, Ping; Xue, Yang; Ma, Shufang; Wei, Kewen; Jin, Yan; Wen, Lingying; Xuan, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is a rare inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system resulting from mutations in neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 gene (NTRK1), which encodes the high-affinity nerve growth factor receptor TRKA. Here, we investigated the oral and craniofacial manifestations of a Chinese patient affected by autosomal-recessive CIPA and identified compound heterozygosity in the NTRK1 gene. The affected boy has multisystemic disorder with lack of reaction to pain stimuli accompanied by self-mutilation behavior, the inability to sweat leading to defective thermoregulation, and mental retardation. Oral and craniofacial manifestations included a large number of missing teeth, nasal malformation, submucous cleft palate, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and malocclusion. Histopathological evaluation of the skin sample revealed severe peripheral nerve fiber loss as well as mild loss and absent innervation of sweat glands. Ultrastructural and morphometric studies of a shed tooth revealed dental abnormalities, including hypomineralization, dentin hypoplasia, cementogenesis defects and a dysplastic periodontal ligament. Genetic analysis revealed a compound heterozygosity--c.1561T>C and c.2057G>A in the NTRK1 gene. This report extends the spectrum of NTRK1 mutations observed in patients diagnosed with CIPA and provides additional insight for clinical and molecular diagnosis.

  13. Oral manifestations and their correlation to baseline CD4 count of HIV/AIDS patients in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). People with AIDS are much more vulnerable to infections, including opportunistic infections and tumors, than people with a healthy immune system. The objective of this study was to correlate oral lesions associated with HIV/AIDS and immunosuppression levels by measuring clusters of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell counts among patients living in the middle western regions of Ghana. Materials and Methods A total of 120 patients who visited the HIV clinic at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital and the Regional Hospital Sunyani of Ghana were consecutively enrolled in this prospective and cross-sectional study. Referred patients' baseline CD4 counts were obtained from medical records and each patient received an initial physician assessment. Intraoral diagnoses were based on the classification and diagnostic criteria of the EEC Clearinghouse, 1993. After the initial assessment, extra- and intraoral tissues from each enrolled patient were examined. Data analyses were carried out using simple proportions, frequencies and chi-square tests of significance. Results Our study included 120 patients, and was comprised of 42 (35.0%) males and 78 (65.0%) females, ranging in age from 21 to 67 years with sex-specific mean ages of 39.31 years (males) and 39.28 years (females). Patient CD4 count values ranged from 3 to 985 cells/mL with a mean baseline CD4 count of 291.29 cells/mL for males and 325.92 cells/mL for females. The mean baseline CD4 count for the entire sample was 313.80 cells/mL. Of the 120 patients we examined, 99 (82.5%) were observed to have at least one HIV-associated intraoral lesion while 21 (17.5%) had no intraoral lesions. Oral candidiasis, periodontitis, melanotic hyperpigmentation, gingivitis and xerostomia were the most common oral lesions. Conclusion From a total of nine oral lesions, six lesions that included oral

  14. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS AND PROSTHETIC REHABILITATION IN HEREDITARY SENSORY AND AUTONOMIC NEUROPATHY (HSANTYPE IV:A CASE REPORT*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu OFLUOĞLU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN are rare genetic syndromes of unknown etiology. They are seen in early childhood and are categorized into six different types by their symptoms. HSAN type 4 demonstrates autosomal recessive transmission pattern, with such major characteristics as loss of sense of pain, self-mutilation, anhydrosis and mental retardation. Sympathetic innervations are deficient despite the existence of sweat glands. Sufferers are hypotonic without any tendon reflexes, and neuro-motor development is retarded. In some cases tactile sensation and vibration may be intact. Biting injuries due to lack of pain sensation cause laceration, ulceration and scarring of the tongue, lips and other parts of oral mucosa. Tooth luxation and severe dental attrition have been observed. This case report presents oral and dental findings, surgical treatments and prosthetic rehabilitation of an 11- year-old boy with HSAN type 4.

  15. Manifestaciones orales asociadas con la infección por VIH-SIDA ORAL MANIFESTATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH HIV-AIDS INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Marcilia Rodríguez Fuentes

    2005-01-01

    Se realiza una revisión de la clasificación de las lesiones bucales relacionadas con el VIH debido a la importancia de que los profesionales de la salud (médicos y estomatólogos) dispongan de conocimientos suficientes sobre estas lesiones. Las manifestaciones orales por la infección del virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH) son, en ocasiones, el primer signo de la enfermedad, y en muchos casos un indicador de la progresión de la infección hacia el síndrome de inmunodeficiencia adquirida ...

  16. [Fragile X syndrome with Dandy-Walker variant: a clinical study of oral and written communicative manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamônica, Dionísia Aparecida Cusin; Ferraz, Plínio Marcos Duarte Pinto; Ferreira, Amanda Tragueta; Prado, Lívia Maria do; Abramides, Dagma Venturini Marquez; Gejão, Mariana Germano

    2011-01-01

    The Fragile X syndrome is the most frequent cause of inherited intellectual disability. The Dandy-Walker variant is a specific constellation of neuroradiological findings. The present study reports oral and written communication findings in a 15-year-old boy with clinical and molecular diagnosis of Fragile X syndrome and neuroimaging findings consistent with Dandy-Walker variant. The speech-language pathology and audiology evaluation was carried out using the Communicative Behavior Observation, the Phonology assessment of the ABFW - Child Language Test, the Phonological Abilities Profile, the Test of School Performance, and the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities. Stomatognathic system and hearing assessments were also performed. It was observed: phonological, semantic, pragmatic and morphosyntactic deficits in oral language; deficits in psycholinguistic abilities (auditory reception, verbal expression, combination of sounds, auditory and visual sequential memory, auditory closure, auditory and visual association); and morphological and functional alterations in the stomatognathic system. Difficulties in decoding the graphical symbols were observed in reading. In writing, the subject presented omissions, agglutinations and multiple representations with the predominant use of vowels, besides difficulties in visuo-spatial organization. In mathematics, in spite of the numeric recognition, the participant didn't accomplish arithmetic operations. No alterations were observed in the peripheral hearing evaluation. The constellation of behavioral, cognitive, linguistic and perceptual symptoms described for Fragile X syndrome, in addition to the structural central nervous alterations observed in the Dandy-Walker variant, caused outstanding interferences in the development of communicative abilities, in reading and writing learning, and in the individual's social integration.

  17. Manifestaciones orales del síndrome de Mobius asociado a Poland: descripción de un caso clínico Oral manifestations of Mobius syndrome associated to the Poland anomaly: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Figueiredo

    2009-08-01

    approach focus on the orientations to the carer and in the control of the periodontal and carie diseases, it was realized a significative reduction in the visible plaque index (VPI and gum bleeding index (GBI. Currently, the patient is in maintenance. The syndrome is incurable; therefore, the treatment is based on the control and maintenance of oral manifestations.

  18. Oral manifestations in HIV+ children in Mozambique Manifestações orais em crianças HIV, em Moçambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Helena de Carvalho Sales-Peres

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this study was to identify the prevalence of oral manifestations in HIV+/AIDS patients at the DIA Pediatric Hospital of Maputo. All 90 patients were included in the research. Data on dental caries (dmft/DMFT index, soft tissues and saliva flow were analyzed. Information on diet and hygienic habits was obtained in a semi-structured questionnaire. The t- student and chi-square tests were used for statistical assessment. The most frequent oral lesion was candidiasis (5.5% and upon further oral examination the prevalence of parotid enlargement was 23.0%. The mean dmft 2.6 (SD 3.6 was considerably higher in relation to DMFT of 0.6 (SD 1.6, and the differences between them were statistically significant (PO objetivo deste estudo foi identificar a prevalência das manifestações bucais em pacientes HIV+/SIDA do Hospital Pediátrico DIA de Maputo. Foram incluídos 90 pacientes na pesquisa. Cárie dentária (índice ceod/CPOD, mucosa e fluxo salivar foram avaliados. Informações sobre alimentação e hábitos de higiene bucal foram obtidas por meio de um questionário. Para a análise estatística foram utilizados os testes t-student e qui-quadrado. A lesão oral mais frequente foi a candidíase (5,5% e no exame extra-oral foi observada uma prevalência de alargamento da parótida de 23%. A média do ceod foi 2,6 (± 3,6 dentes, consideravelmente alta em relação ao CPOD que foi de 0,6 (±1,6 dentes, sendo esta diferença estatisticamente significante (p<0,05. A ocorrência de lesões na mucosa bucal foi maior em crianças que não faziam uso da terapia antiretroviral (TRA. O uso da TRA esteve associado com a redução da prevalência de lesões bucais em pacientes HIV+, contudo cáries rampantes foram maiores neste grupo. Pacientes HIV+ mostraram maior risco de cáries na dentadura decídua.

  19. Manifestaciones orales secundarias al tratamiento oncológico: Pautas de actuación odontológica Chemorradiotherapy - induced oral manifestations: Dental management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Sabater Recolons

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El tratamiento del cáncer se basa en la administración de quimiorradioterapia asociada a cirugía, en función del tipo y estadiaje del tumor. La mayor parte de fármacos antineoplásicos actúan de manera indiscriminada sobre las células de la capa basal del epitelio, alterando su capacidad de renovación. Esto conlleva la aparición de una serie de efectos secundarios tanto locales como sistémicos entre los que destacarían: la mielosupresión, la mucositis, las náuseas y vómitos y la alopecia. Asimismo, la administración de determinados citostáticos implica una mayor incidencia y gravedad de estas complicaciones. La afectación de la cavidad bucal en forma de mucositis, es uno de los efectos secundarios más frecuentes del tratamiento oncológico, afectando en ocasiones su calidad de vida. Actualmente no existen protocolos estandarizados para tratar los efectos secundarios bucales de la quimiorradioterapia, aunque se han publicado algunas normas de actuación. En este trabajo se resumirán algunas pautas odontológicas para su manejo.Nowadays cancer treatment is mainly based in administration of chemoradiotherapy. The target of most of the antineoplastic agents are epithelial basal cells. Chemoradiotherapy is associated to local and systemic side effects. Among them, the most frequent are mielosuppression, oral mucositis, nauseas, vomiting and alopecia. Oral cavity is commonly affected, usually in form of mucositis which sometimes affect patient’s quality of life. There are no universally standard therapies to prevent or treat chemoradiotherapy side effects. In this paper we show some dental protocols in order to manage the problem.

  20. Oral manifestations of Albright hereditary Osteodystrophy: a case report Osteodistrofia Hereditária de Albright: relato das manifestações bucais de um caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Fernandes Gomes

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Albright hereditary osteodystrophy is a hereditary metabolic disorder of dominant autosomal etiology that is commonly characterized by short stature, round face, small metacarpus and metatarsus, mental retardation, osteoporosis, subcutaneous calcification, variable hypocalcemia, and hyperphosphatemia. In this study, we report a clinical case of a 17-year-old woman with Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, and we discuss her clinical, radiographic, and laboratory test characteristics together with the oral manifestations, and we correlate them with the characteristics found in the literature. We also discuss the odontological management of treatment of related periodontal disease and planning for corrections of related malocclusions.A Osteodistrofia Hereditária de Albright é uma desordem metabólica de caráter hereditário, de etiologia autossômica dominante, caracterizada geralmente por baixa estatura, face arredondada, metacarpos e metatarsos pequenos, retardo mental, osteoporose, calcificações subcutâneas, hipocalcemia e hiperfosfatemia variáveis. Neste estudo, relatamos um caso clínico de uma jovem de 17 anos com Osterodistrofia Hereditária de Albright e discutimos as suas características clínicas, radiográficas, laboratoriais e manifestações bucais, relacionando-as com as encontradas na literatura, bem como a conduta odontológica pertinente ao tratamento de doenças periodontais e ao planejamento da correção das más oclusões existentes.

  1. Manifestaciones orales en pacientes VIH/SIDA asociadas a tratamiento antirretroviral y el estado inmunológico en dos fundaciones de la ciudad de Cartagena Oral manifestations in HIV/AIDS patients associated with antiretroviral treatment and immune status in two foundations of Cartagena city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Jiménez Malagón

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar la asociación entre las manifestaciones orales de pacientes VIH/SIDA con la terapia antirretroviral y el estado inmunológico. Metodología: Estudio de tipo transversal, en una población de 166 pacientes pertenecientes a dos fundaciones de la ciudad de Cartagena, la información se recolectó a través de un examen estomatológico intraoral teniendo en cuenta los criterios para el diagnóstico clínico de las manifestaciones orales asociadas a VIH establecidos por el Centro Colaborador de la OMS sobre las manifestaciones orales del virus de inmunodeficiencia humana, los datos como niveles de carga viral, CD4 y la terapia antirretroviral se obtuvieron de la historia clínica médica. Resultados: La prevalencia de manifestaciones orales asociadas a VIH fue del 59,5%, la candidiasis fue la manifestación oral más frecuente, con una prevalencia de 35,5%, los pacientes tratados con monoterapia presentaron menos manifestaciones orales que aquellos tratados con biterapia con valores estadísticamente significativo, OR: 0,20, IC: 0,00-0,96 (pObjective: The aim of this study was to determine the association between oral manifestations of AIDS patients with antiretroviral therapy and their immune status. Methodology: a cross-sectional study was done in a population of 166 patients from two Cartagena´s city foundations, the information was collected through an intraoral stomatological examination considering the standard for the clinical diagnosis of oral manifestations associated with AIDS established by the Collaborating Centre WHO about oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus, information such as viral load, CD4 and antiretroviral therapy were obtained from the medical history. Results: The prevalence of oral manifestations associated with AIDS was 59.5%, candidiasis was the most common oral manifestation with a prevalence of 35.5%, the patients treated with oral monotherapy had fewer

  2. The Effect of Recombinant Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor on Oral and Periodontal Manifestations in a Patient with Cyclic Neutropenia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Matarasso

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic Neutropenia (CN is characterized by recurrent infections, fever, oral ulcerations, and severe periodontitis as result of the reduced host defences. The previous studies have established the effectiveness of recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF to increase the number and the function of neutrophils in the peripheral blood in this disease. In a 20-year-old Caucasian female with a diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, oral clinical examination revealed multiple painful ulcerations of the oral mucosa, poor oral hygiene conditions, marginal gingivitis, and moderate periodontitis. The patient received a treatment with G-CSF (Pegfilgrastim, 6 mg/month in order to improve her immunological status. Once a month nonsurgical periodontal treatment was carefully performed when absolute neutrophil count (ANC was ≥500/L. The treatment with G-CSF resulted in a rapid increase of circulating neutrophils that, despite its short duration, leaded to a reduction in infection related events and the resolution of the multiple oral ulcerations. The disappearance of oral pain allowed an efficacy nonsurgical treatment and a normal tooth brushing that determined a reduction of probing depth (PD≤4 mm and an improvement of the oral hygiene conditions recorded at 6-month follow-up.

  3. Manifestações orais associada ao papilomavírus humano (hpv conceitos atuais: revisão bibliográfica Oral manifestations related to papillomavirus (hpv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therezita M.P.G. Castro

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available O papilomavírus (HPV é um DNA vírus do grupo papovavírus, que é altamente transmissível sexualmente, sendo freqüente na região ano-genital e raro na mucosa oral. A sua implantação oral pode ser por auto-inoculação ou pelo contato oro-sexual. As manifestações orais associadas ao HPV são: papiloma, condiloma acuminado, verruga vulgar, hiperplasia epitelial focal, leucoplasias, líquen plano e carcinoma. O diagnóstico é dado pelo exame da lesão e confirmado pela biópsia, com a identificação do tipo de HPV pelas técnicas de biologia molecular (captura híbrida e PCR. O tratamento, dependendo da lesão, pode ser clínico e/ou cirúrgico, obtendo assim a cura clínica, pois o vírus permanece no epitélio da mucosa mesmo após o tratamento.The human papillomavirus (HPV is a DNA virus, of the papovavirus group, that is highly sexually transmittable. It is common in the anal and genital parts and rarely in the oral mucosa. The oral implantation can be by self-inoculation or by oral-sexual contact. The oral manifestations related to HPV are: papilloma, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris, focal epithelial hyperplasia, leukoplasia, lichen planus, and the squamous cell carcinoma. The diagnosis is performed by lesion exam and confirmed by biopsy, showing the HPV genotype by molecular biology techniques (hybrid capture and PCR. The treatment, depending on the lesion, can be clinical or surgical, allowing clinical cure, because the virus remains in the epithelium of the mucosa even after the treatment.

  4. Pediatric HIV-related oral manifestations: a five-year retrospective study Manifestações bucais associadas à infecção pelo HIV em crianças: estudo retrospectivo de cinco anos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Ferreira Soares

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to carry out a five-year retrospective descriptive follow-up of the oral manifestation frequency, systemic condition and type of medication used in HIV-infected children and adolescents after the introduction of combined antiretroviral therapy. Fifty-eight patients were examined in 2001/2002, and their previous medical and dental records (1997 to 2000 were researched from files. There was an occurrence of 7 new cases of AIDS in a sample of 19 children, while 46.5% of the entire sample (n = 58 progressed as to classification of HIV infection. No difference was noted among the frequencies of oral manifestations, categories of the immunosuppression and viral load categories. The oral manifestations in the group of children and adolescents followed up in this study remained stable, even after treatment with combined antiretroviral therapy. However, a downward trend in the frequency of oral candidiasis and parotid enlargement was noted.O objetivo deste estudo foi realizar um acompanhamento descritivo retrospectivo da freqüência de manifestações bucais, da condição sistêmica e do tipo de medicação utilizada em um grupo de crianças e adolescentes infectados pelo HIV após a introdução da terapia anti-retroviral combinada. Cinqüenta e oito pacientes foram examinados em 2001/2002, enquanto seus exames médicos e odontológicos retrospectivos (1997 a 2000 foram pesquisados em prontuário. Foram observados 7 novos casos de AIDS em uma amostra de 19 pacientes, enquanto 46,5% da amostra total (n = 58 progrediram quanto à classificação da infecção pelo HIV. Não foram observadas diferenças entre as freqüências de manifestações bucais, das categorias de imunossupressão e da carga viral. O quadro de manifestações bucais no grupo de crianças e adolescentes acompanhados neste estudo manteve-se estável, mesmo após a introdução da terapia anti-retroviral combinada. Contudo, foi observada uma tendência de

  5. Oral manifestations of HIV infection in children and adults receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy [HAART] in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamza, O.; Matee, M.I.N.; Simon, E.N.; Kikwilu, E.; Moshi, M.J.; Mugusi, F.; Mikx, F.H.M.; Verweij, P.E.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence and types of HIV-related oral lesions between children and adult Tanzanian patients on HAART with those not on HAART and to relate the occurrence of the lesions with anti-HIV drug regimen, clinical stage of HIV disease and CD4+

  6. Clinical analysis of oral mucosa manifestations of 8 patients with syphilis%梅毒在口腔黏膜表现的临床分析——附8例报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈不凡; 柳志文

    2013-01-01

    目的:分析梅毒在口腔黏膜的临床表现.方法:总结8例以口腔梅黏膜病损为首发症状的梅毒患者的临床特征,并结合相关文献进行临床分析.结果:8例梅毒患者中7例表现为梅毒黏膜斑,好发部位为下唇;3例表现为梅毒性黏膜炎.1例在一期梅毒时期被误诊为复发性口疮.l例儿童因父母双方均为梅毒患者而间接感染结论:梅毒在口腔的首发症状以梅毒黏膜斑最为常见.口腔医生应掌握梅毒的口腔病损,并及时对患者家属进行梅毒筛查,以免误诊,漏诊.%Objective:To analyze the clinical feature of oral mucosa and diagnosis of 8 patients with syphilis.Method:A total of 8 cases of syphilis were first diagnosed on presentation with oral lesions,and related literatures were reviewed.Result:The syphilis mucous patch in oral mucosa was found in 7 cases,the most common location was the lower lip.Syphilitic mucositis was found in 3 cases.1 case was misdiagnosed as recurrent aphthous ulcer in the period of primary syphilis.1 cases of a child was infected by his patients.Conclusion:The most common oral manifestation of syphilis is syphilis mucous patch.In order to avoid misdiagnosis,and missed diagnosis,dentists should pay attention to the suspicious oral lesions when patients are first presented in a dental office.

  7. Mucocutaneous manifestations of Cowden's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundoor Vinay Kumar Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden's syndrome is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with variable orofacial and systemic manifestations. Here we present one such classical case of Cowden's syndrome in a 45-year-old female patient with features such as multiple cutaneous papillomatosis, oral fibromas, and fibromas involving multiple organs such as gastrointestinal tract (multiple polyps, thyroid disorders, and breast cancer.

  8. Clinical aspects of cobalamin deficiency in elderly patients. Epidemiology, causes, clinical manifestations, and treatment with special focus on oral cobalamin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrès, Emmanuel; Vidal-Alaball, Josep; Federici, Laure; Loukili, Noureddine Henoun; Zimmer, Jacques; Kaltenbach, Georges

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this work was to review the literature concerning cobalamin deficiency in elderly patients. Articles were identified through searches of PubMed-MEDLINE (January 1990 to June 2006), restricted to: English and French language, human subjects, elderly patients (>65 years), clinical trial, review and guidelines. Additional unpublished data from our cohort with cobalamin deficiency at the University Hospital of Strasbourg, France, were also considered. All of the papers and abstracts were reviewed by at least two senior researchers who selected the data used in the study. In elderly people, the main causes of cobalamin deficiency are pernicious anemia and food-cobalamin malabsorption. The recently identified food-cobalamin malabsorption syndrome is a disorder characterized by the inability to release cobalamin from food or from its binding proteins. This syndrome is usually the consequence of atrophic gastritis, related or not to Helicobacter pylori infection, and of the long-term ingestion of antacids and biguanides (in around 60% of the patients). Management of cobalamin deficiency has been well established with the use of cobalamin injections. However, new routes of cobalamin administration (oral and nasal) are currently being developed, especially the use of oral cobalamin therapy to treat food-cobalamin malabsorption.

  9. Ulcerações orais e genitais como manifestação inicial de leucemia em criança Oral and genital ulcerations as the initial manifestation of leukemia in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Silva

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Alertar o pediatra para a presença de lesões aftosas orais e úlceras genitais como manifestação inicial de leucemia. DESCRIÇÃO DE CASO: Menina de dez anos de idade, com quadro de úlceras orais e genitais e hipótese diagnóstica de doença de Behçet. Em virtude de leucopenia, foram realizados mielogramas que, inicialmente, demonstraram se tratar de síndrome mielodisplásica e que, posteriormente, evoluiu para leucemia mielóide aguda. COMENTÁRIOS: Os autores alertam para a raridade da associação e para a ausência na literatura de casos na faixa etária pediátrica.OBJECTIVE: Increase awareness among pediatricians about the presence of aphtous oral lesions and genital ulcers as an initial manifestation of leukemia. CASE DESCRIPTION: A ten-year-old girl, who presented oral and genital ulcers, with a diagnostic hypothesis of Behcet disease. Due to persistent leucopenia, myelograms were performed and, initially, suggested a myelodysplastic syndrome, which progressed to an acute myeloid leukemia. COMMENTS: The authors would like to alert about the rarity of this association and the absence of similar reported cases in the pediatric literature.

  10. Manifestações orais em pacientes com AIDS em uma população brasileira Oral manifestations in HIV - infected patients in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lélia Batista de SOUZA

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisados l00 pacientes HIV+/AIDS no Hospital Giselda Trigueiro - Natal/RN, Brasil no período de l996-97 quanto a presença de manifestações orais nestes pacientes. Setenta e quatro pacientes eram do sexo masculino e 26 do feminino. A idade média dos pacientes do sexo masculino foi 40 anos, variando de 24 a 67 anos e no feminino 29,8 anos variando de 17 a 48 anos. As manifestações orais mais freqüentes foram candidíase (homens - 79,7%; mulheres - 80,7%, gengivite e periodontite (homens - 79,7%; mulheres - 73,0%, leucoplasia pilosa (homens - 6,7%; mulheres - 3,8%, herpes labial (homens - 5,4%; mulheres - 7,6%, sarcoma de Kaposi (homens - 6,7%.Verificou-se que 62,2% dos homens eram homo- ou bissexuais e 100% das mulheres eram heterossexuais. Nossos resultados revelam semelhanças com outros trabalhos realizados em pacientes de outras regiões do mundo.One hundred HIV+/AIDS Brazilian patients (74 men and 26 women were examined in the Giselda Trigueiro Hospital, in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil in the period from l996 to 1997. The men’s mean age was 40 years, ranging from 24 to 67 years and the women’s was 29.8 years, ranging from 17 to 48 years. One or more oral findings were observed in theses patients. The most common oral lesions were candidiasis (men - 97.2%; women - 80.7%, gingivitis and periodontitis (men - 79.7%; women - 7.3%, hairy leukoplakia (men - 6.7%; women - 3.8%, herpes simplex (men - 5.4%; women - 2.7%, and Kaposi’s sarcoma (men - 6.7%. From the men, 62.1% were homo-/bisexual, and 100% of the women were heterosexual.

  11. Oral manifestations in growth hormone disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Atreja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone is of vital importance for normal growth and development. Individuals with growth hormone deficiency develop pituitary dwarfism with disproportionate delayed growth of skull and facial skeleton giving them a small facial appearance for their age. Both hyper and hypopituitarism have a marked effect on development of oro-facial structures including eruption and shedding patterns of teeth, thus giving an opportunity to treating dental professionals to first see the signs and symptoms of these growth disorders and correctly diagnose the serious underlying disease.

  12. Orofacial manifestations of systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, B J; Jablonski, R Y; Frech, T M; Pauling, J D

    2016-09-23

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem disease of unknown aetiology characterised by microangiopathy, dysregulated immune function and tissue remodelling, which commonly involves the oral cavity. Orofacial manifestations of SSc contribute greatly to overall disease burden and yet are regularly overlooked and under-treated. This may reflect a pre-occupation amongst rheumatology clinicians on potentially life-threatening internal organ involvement, but is also a consequence of insufficient engagement between rheumatologists and dental professionals. A high proportion of SSc patients report difficulty accessing a dentist with knowledge of the disease and there is recognition amongst dentists that this could impact negatively on patient care. This review shall describe the clinical features and burden of orofacial manifestations of SSc and the management of such problems. The case is made for greater collaborative working between rheumatologists and dental professionals with an interest in SSc in both the research and clinical setting.

  13. Cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prejbisz, A.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Eisenhofer, G.; Januszewicz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical expression of phaeochromocytoma may involve numerous cardiovascular manifestations, but usually presents as sustained or paroxysmal hypertension associated with other signs and symptoms of catecholamine excess. Most of the life-threatening cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma,

  14. Cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prejbisz, A.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Eisenhofer, G.; Januszewicz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical expression of phaeochromocytoma may involve numerous cardiovascular manifestations, but usually presents as sustained or paroxysmal hypertension associated with other signs and symptoms of catecholamine excess. Most of the life-threatening cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma,

  15. Perfil Sistêmico e Manifestações Bucais em Pacientes com Hipotireoidismo Perfil sistémico y manifestaciones bucales en pacientes con hipotiroidismo Profile systemic and oral manifestations in patients with hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziele Beanes da Silva Santos

    2012-06-01

    and the dentine, the taurodontism and the delay of dentition as well as the radicular development. Thus, it is essential that stomatologist know on the local or systemic manifestations associated with this endocrine disorder. The aim of present paper is to approach the systemic and oral changes in patients presenting with hypothyroidism, as well as the better management and care applied during the dental treatment. The data collection was thorough the selection of articles published on the oral manifestations in patients presenting with hypothyroidism in large databases like Bireme, Scielo and Medline. The hypothyroidism is a common system disease that occasionally have oral manifestations known by the stomatologists since they are patients needing special care during the stomatologic treatments. Also, must to be considered the drug interaction in these patients, since the drugs regularly prescribed in stomatology may to provoke adverse reactions. It is necessary that surgeon knows on the appropriate procedures in the treatment of hypothyroidism patients.

  16. Extrahepatic manifestations of HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignoli, R; Goossens, N; Negro, F

    2015-03-01

    The hepatic consequences of an infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are well recognised, but extrahepatic manifestations of HCV may be just as severe. Here we have reviewed various extrahepatic manifestations of HCV such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, lymphoma, metabolic features and neurologic consequences and we discuss pathogenesis and management of these clinical problems. We concluded with important aspects of therapy with novel anti-HCV agents and its effects on extrahepatic manifestations.

  17. A gingival manifestation of histoplasmosis leading diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tullio Brazão-Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a world-wide distributed deep mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum which has been endemic in many countries. We present a case involving an immunocompetent man evidencing the necessity of a multidisciplinary approach and rational requisition of exams. The disease has started as a pulmonary disease mimicking tuberculosis, although the exams have been negative. Immunodiffusion test indicate histoplasmosis, not confirmed by culture of sputum. After days the patient was forwarded by a private doctor for evaluation of oral lesions at our Department of Stomatology. An incisional biopsy revealed a nonspecific granulomatous inflammation and the Grocott-Gomori methenamine silver stain identified scarce oval structures that could represent fungal yeast. Sampling oral lesions with swab, it was observed the typical growth of H. capsulatum on culture. This case highlights the importance of doctor′s integration diagnosing histoplasmosis, while a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations should be expected. Oral lesions may be the critical manifestation leading diagnosis.

  18. Systemic manifestations of hepatitis C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lydia; Marcell, Lauren; Kottilil, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (HCV) is a common infection affecting 185 million people worldwide. The most common manifestation of chronic HCV is progressive liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, several systemic manifestations of HCV have been recognized and reported in the literature. The purpose of this review is to assimilate published literature based on evidence to categorize these extrahepatic manifestations with the likelihood of a causal association with HCV. Exciting recent developments have resulted in simple all oral interferon-free highly effective therapy for HCV. However, this treatment is also expensive and less accessible to most affected individuals as treatment recommendations are based on stage of liver fibrosis. Expanding the scope of HCV therapy to those with extrahepatic manifestations beyond what is currently recommended will significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality in this aging population.

  19. Mucocutaneous manifestations of HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobhana A

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is associated with various mucocutaneous features, which may be the first pointer towards the existence of HIV infection. This study was done to note the different mucocutaneous lesions present in the HIV population in eastern India. METHODS: Four hundred and ten HIV seropositive patients attending the outpatient and inpatient departments were included in the study. RESULTS: Out of 410 HIV positives, 40% had mucocutaneous involvement at presentation. The mean age of the study population was 29 years and male to female ratio was 2.5:1. The common mucocutaneous morbidities included oral candidiasis (36%, dermatophytosis and gingivitis (13% each, herpes zoster (6%, herpes simplex and scabies (5% each. A striking feature, noted in 36% males, was straightening of hairs. Genital herpes was the commonest genital ulcer disease. Lesions associated with declining immunity included oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia and herpes zoster with median CD4 counts of 98, 62 and 198/ L respectively. CONCLUSION: Early recognition of mucocutaneous manifestations and associated STDs help in better management of HIV/AIDS.

  20. PARANEOPLASTIC MANIFESTATIONS IN CHILDREN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEGRAAF, JH; TAMMINGA, RYJ; KAMPS, WA

    1994-01-01

    Paraneoplastic manifestations are signs and symptoms observed in patients with cancer, distant from the tumour or its metastases and not caused by invasion, obstruction or bulk mass. In children with cancer, paraneoplastic manifestations are rare and distinct from those observed in adults. Knowledge

  1. Atypical manifestations of leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Balaji, Krishan; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2015-05-01

    Leptospirosis is an illness with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and severe illness affects nearly all organ systems. Serious and potentially life-threatening clinical manifestations of acute leptospirosis are caused by both direct tissue invasion by spirochaetes and by the host immune responses. In its severe form, leptospirosis can cause multi-organ dysfunction and death in a matter of days. Therefore it is critical to suspect and recognize the disease early, in order to initiate timely treatment. While the classical presentation of the disease is easily recognized by experienced clinicians practising in endemic regions, rarer manifestations can be easily missed. In this systematic review, we summarize the atypical manifestations reported in literature in patients with confirmed leptospirosis. Awareness of these unusual manifestations would hopefully guide clinicians towards early diagnosis.

  2. Ocular manifestations of candidemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Lashof, A.M.L.; Rothova, A.; Sobel, J.D.; Ruhnke, M.; Pappas, P.G.; Viscoli, C.; Schlamm, H.T.; Oborska, I.T.; Rex, J.H.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ocular candidiasis is a major complication of candidemia. The incidence, risk factors, and outcome of eye involvement during candidemia are largely unknown. We prospectively studied the ocular manifestations of candidemia in a large, worldwide, randomized multicenter trial that compared

  3. Cardiovascular manifestations in hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vairamani Kandan

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: This study shows that cardiovascular manifestations are quite common and varied in hyperthyroidism which are to be looked for in the management. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(7.000: 3032-3038

  4. [Buccal manifestations in patients submitted to chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespanhol, Fernando Luiz; Tinoco, Eduardo Muniz Barretto; Teixeira, Henrique Guilherme de Castro; Falabella, Márcio Eduardo Vieira; Assis, Neuza Maria de Souza Picorelli

    2010-06-01

    Several changes in the oral cavity due to chemotherapy can be observed and can lead to important systemic complications, increasing the time of the patient in hospital and the costs of the treatment as well as affect the quality of life of the patients. The aim of this study was to assess the oral manifestation in patients treated with chemotherapy according to sex, age and tumor type. Data was collected in an oncology hospital in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais State, from patients' records that were submitted to oncologic treatment. It was possible to verify that mucositis, associated or not to other type of lesions, was the most common lesion in both sex of all ages (15.5%). Xerostomia and other lesions, such as Candida infection and aphthous lesions, were also present. It is possible to improve the quality of life of the patient during and after anti-neoplastic therapies through a protocol of odontological assistance that includes changes of the oral environment previous to chemotherapy such as profilaxis, caries removal, treatment of periodontal and periapical lesions, oral hygiene instructions, diet orientation and laser therapy. It is very important the insertion of the dentist in the oncologic medical team for the early diagnosis of the oral manifestation and follow-up during treatment time.

  5. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  6. Haematological manifestations of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  7. The comparison of clinical manifestation of organophosphorus pesticide poisoning (OPP) between oral exposure and occupational exposure in field work%田间作业致有机磷农药中毒与口服中毒的临床比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡雪珍; 卢中秋; 孙来芳; 王征

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨田间作业中毒和口服有机磷农药中毒在临床表现及治疗上的差异.方法 回顾性分析我院2007年7月至2010年7月收治的85例中、重度急性有机磷农药中毒患者的临床资料,按中毒途径分为口服组(51例)和非口服组(34例),比较不同途径中毒后的临床表现、治疗特点及预后.结果 口服组中度中毒患者的肌颤肌痉挛和共济失调的发生率(86.4%、90.9%)均明显高于非口服组(50.0%、55.0%),差异有统计学意义(P<0.05,P<0.01);口服组重度中毒患者的肺水肿、肌颤肌痉挛及昏迷的发生率(100.0%、89.7%、93.1%)均明显高于非口服组(71.4%、64.3%、50.0%),差异有统计学意义(P<0.05 ).非口服组解毒时间[中度:(35.0±6.2)h、重度:(45.0±11.1)h]较口服组[中度:(49.0±7.7)h、重度:(77.0±10.3)h]明显缩短,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).治疗后24、48、72 h,中、重度非口服组胆碱酯酶活力明显高于口服组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01);中、重度非口服组的氯磷定用量、阿托品化用量及阿托品总量明显低于口服组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01).结论 田间作业有机磷农药中毒在临床表现上与口服中毒不尽相同,且治疗的阿托品及氯磷定用量相对较少,胆碱酯酶活力恢复较快.%Objective To investigate the differences of clinical manifestation and therapy of organophosphorus pesticide poisoning (OPP) between oral exposure and occupational exposure in field work. Methods From July 2007 to July 2010, 85 patients with acute severe OPP were treated in a hospital, which were divided into oral poisoning group (51 cases) and non-oral poisoning group (34 cases). The differences of clinical manifestations, curative effects and prognosis between two groups were compared. Results The rates of myoclonus and ataxia in cases with moderate poisoning of oral poisoning group were 86.4% and 90.9%, which were significantly higher than those (50

  8. Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Luís; Miguel, Diana; Pinheiro, Catarina; Freitas, João Pedro; Marques Gomes, Manuel; Filipe, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of unknown etiology with many clinical manifestations. The skin is one of the target organs most variably affected by the disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) established 11 criteria as a classificatory instrument to operationalise the definition of SLE in clinical trials. They were not intended to be used to diagnose individuals and do not do well in that capacity. Cutaneous lesions account for four of these 11 revised criteria of SLE. Skin lesions in patients with lupus may be specific or nonspecific. This paper covers the SLE-specific cutaneous changes: malar rash, discoid rash, photosensitivity, and oral mucosal lesions as well as SLE nonspecific skin manifestations, their pathophysiology, and management. A deeper thorough understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of SLE is essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and efficient management. Thus, dermatologists should cooperate with other specialties to provide optimal care of SLE patient. PMID:22888407

  9. [Unusual Migraine Manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Sivan; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Sandor, Peter S

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a complex neurologic disorder by which several systems of the central nervous system (autonomous system, affective, cognitive, sensoric and motoric system) may be affected on different levels. Around a fourth of the patients have migraine aura. The most common aura is the visual aura, followed by sensoric aura. But motoric deficits as well as deficits of higher cortical centers (disorders of thinking, orientation, coherence or concentration) may occur as well. In analogy with a headache calendar, an aura calendar can deliver important help in the diagnostic process of rare migraine manifestations and prevent underdiagnosis of unusual migraine manifestations. Complex migraine manifestations are diagnoses of exlusion, and a broad diagnostic work-up is warranted in order to exclude dangerous neurologic pathologies. There are no specific therapeutic recommendations, as there is a lack of randomized controlled studies.

  10. Pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Gulati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has a spectrum of presentation which ranges from mild disease to a severe form comprising of jaundice and renal failure. Involvement of the lung can vary from subtle clinical features to deadly pulmonary hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Of late, it has been identified that leptospirosis can present atypically with predominant pulmonary manifestations. This can delay diagnosis making and hence optimum treatment. The purpose of this review is to bring together all the reported pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis and the recent trends in the management.

  11. Orofacial manifestations of hematological disorders: Anemia and hemostatic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titilope A Adeyemo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to review the literature and identify orofacial manifestations of hematological diseases, with particular reference to anemias and disorders of hemostasis. A computerized literature search using MEDLINE was conducted for published articles on orofacial manifestations of hematological diseases, with emphasis on anemia. Mesh phrases used in the search were: oral diseases AND anaemia; orofacial diseases AND anaemia; orofacial lesions AND anaemia; orofacial manifestations AND disorders of haemostasis. The Boolean operator "AND" was used to combine and narrow the searches. Anemic disorders associated with orofacial signs and symptoms include iron deficiency anemia, Plummer-Vinson syndrome, megaloblastic anemia, sickle cell anemia, thalassaemia and aplastic anemia. The manifestations include conjunctiva and facial pallor, atrophic glossitis, angular stomatitis, dysphagia, magenta tongue, midfacial overgrowth, osteoclerosis, osteomyelitis and paraesthesia/anesthesia of the mental nerve. Orofacial petechiae, conjunctivae hemorrhage, nose-bleeding, spontaneous and post-traumatic gingival hemorrhage and prolonged post-extraction bleeding are common orofacial manifestations of inherited hemostatic disorders such as von Willebrand′s disease and hemophilia. A wide array of anemic and hemostatic disorders encountered in internal medicine has manifestations in the oral cavity and the facial region. Most of these manifestations are non-specific, but should alert the hematologist and the dental surgeon to the possibilities of a concurrent disease of hemopoiesis or hemostasis or a latent one that may subsequently manifest itself.

  12. Inflammatory Manifestations of Lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L. Ly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema results from lymphatic insufficiency leading to a progressive inflammatory process that ultimately manifests as discomfort, recurrent infections, and, at times, secondary malignancy. Collectively, these morbidities contribute to an overall poor quality of life. Although there have been recent advances in microsurgical interventions, a conservative palliative approach remains the mainstay of treatment for this disabling disease. The absence of a cure is due to an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological changes that result in lymphedema. A histological hallmark of lymphedema is inflammatory cell infiltration and recent studies with animal models and clinical biopsy specimens have suggested that this response plays a key role in the pathology of the disease. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the ongoing research in and the current understanding of the inflammatory manifestations of lymphedema.

  13. Inflammatory Manifestations of Lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Catherine L.; Kataru, Raghu P.; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2017-01-01

    Lymphedema results from lymphatic insufficiency leading to a progressive inflammatory process that ultimately manifests as discomfort, recurrent infections, and, at times, secondary malignancy. Collectively, these morbidities contribute to an overall poor quality of life. Although there have been recent advances in microsurgical interventions, a conservative palliative approach remains the mainstay of treatment for this disabling disease. The absence of a cure is due to an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological changes that result in lymphedema. A histological hallmark of lymphedema is inflammatory cell infiltration and recent studies with animal models and clinical biopsy specimens have suggested that this response plays a key role in the pathology of the disease. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the ongoing research in and the current understanding of the inflammatory manifestations of lymphedema. PMID:28106728

  14. Achondroplasia: manifestations and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Eric D; Ain, Michael C

    2009-04-01

    Achondroplasia, the most common skeletal dysplasia, is caused by a mutation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-3. This disorder is characterized by frontal bossing, midface hypoplasia, otolaryngeal system dysfunction, and rhizomelic short stature. Orthopaedic manifestations are exhibited in the spine and the extremities. In the infant with achondroplasia, foramen magnum stenosis may result in brainstem compression with apnea and sudden death. Thoracolumbar kyphosis is seen in most infants, but typically it resolves when the child begins to walk. Anatomic anomalies of the vertebral column place the patient at risk for spinal stenosis as early as the first decade and especially during adulthood. Radial head dislocation is one manifestation in the upper extremity. Lower extremity alignment often is characterized by genu varum, which may require correction osteotomy. Medical and surgical options are available to increase patient height, but indications are controversial, and treatment often consumes a large portion of the child's life.

  15. MANIFEST OF DEPTH SOCIOPSYCHOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    ZELITCHENKO ALEXANDER

    2013-01-01

    The observations of motives of activity of big groups (nations, confessions etc.) as a whole result in discovery of the part of unconscious mind that is common for all members of big group a collective unconscious. Two parts of collective unconscious may be determined: the collective superconscious known first as a group archetype and the collective subconscious, which manifest itself for example in phenomenon of collective trauma. Depth sociopsychology is a science about the collective uncon...

  16. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manif...

  17. Orofacial manifestations of achondroplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik, Atul; Kumar, Munish; Rohilla, Smriti; Tanwar, Renu; V C Vinod

    2012-01-01

    Achondroplasia (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [OMIM] 100800), is considered as a form of skeletal dysplasia dwarfism that manifests with stunted stature and disproportionate limb shortening. Achondroplasia is of special interest in the field of dentistry because of its characteristic craniofacial features which include relative macrocephaly, depressed nasal bridge and maxillary hypoplasia. Presence of large head, implanted shunt, airway obstruction and difficulty in head control require...

  18. Ocular manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathinam S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospiral uveitis is a common entity in tropical countries. Ocular manifestations are noted in the second phase of illness, but these remain under-diagnosed mainly because of the prolonged symptom-free period that separates the systemic manifestations from detection of ocular manifestations.Varying ophthalmic presentations and the intrinsic nature of different types of uveitis to mimic one another also challenge the accuracy of the diagnosis. Of the individual ocular signs, the combination of acute, non-granulomatous, panuveitis, hypopyon, vasculitis, optic disc edema, membranous vitreous opacities and absence of choroiditis or retinitis have high predictive value for the clinical diagnosis of leptospiral uveitis. Geographic location of the patient, occupation, socio-economic status, risk factors related to exposure, past history of fever or jaundice also aid in diagnosis.Steroids are the mainstay of treatment for leptospiral uveitis. Depending upon the severity and anatomical location of inflammatory lesion, topical, peri-ocular and/or systemic steroids are given. The prognosis is generally good, even when the inflammation is severe.

  19. Oral pigmentation: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, C; Ramakrishnan, K; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations.

  20. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: neurogenic etiology and manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Swapna; Nair, Prem G; Thomas, Philip; Tyagi, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    To determine the type, severity and manifestation of dysphagia in patients with neurogenic etiology. Clinical documentation was done on the different etiologies, its manifestation, assessment findings and management strategies taken for patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia who were referred for assessment and management of dysphagia over a period of three months in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Flexible endoscopic examination was done in all the patients. The severity of dysphagia in these patients were graded based on Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). A total of 53 patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia were evaluated by an otolaryngologist and a speech language pathologist over a period of three months. The grading of severity based on GUSS for these patients were done. There were 30 patients with recurrent laryngeal nerve injury due to various etiologies, one patient with Neurofibroma-vestibular schwanoma who underwent surgical excision, 16 patients with stroke, two patients with traumatic brain injury, two patients with Parkinsonism and two patients with myasthenia gravis. The manifestation of dysphagia was mainly in the form of prolonged masticatory time, oral transit time, and increased number of swallows required for each bolus, cricopharyngeal spasms and aspiration. Among the dysphagia patients with neurogenic etiology, dysphagia is manifested with a gradual onset and is found to have a progressive course in degenerative disorders. Morbidity and mortality may be reduced with early identification and management of neurogenic dysphagia.

  1. Clinical study of the oral manifestations and related factors in type 2 diabetics patients Estudo clínico das manifestações orais e fatores relacionados em pacientes diabéticos tipo 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Goretti de Menezes Sousa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus (DM is reported with and associated to oral alterations, with conflicting results. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of oral soft tissue alterations in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Socioeconomic variables, gender, heredity, capillary glucose control and local factors (prosthesis, dry mouth sensation were analyzed in 196 diabetic and non-diabetic patients enrolled in HIPERDIA, at 41 Health units of Natal, Brazil. STUDY DESIGN: A case study. RESULTS: The last blood glucose mean was 177.0 mg/dl for diabetics and 89.46 mg/dl for non-diabetics. Mean capillary blood glucose was elevated in diabetics (215.95 mg/dl; it was 102.31 mg/dl in non-diabetics. The family history confirmed the heredity nature of the disease in 68.8% of diabetic patients (n = 66 (p < 0.001; salivary flow was 49% (n = 47 in diabetics, and 34% (n = 34 in non-diabetics. Candidiasis was present in 30.5% of diabetic patients (n=29 and 36% of non-diabetics (n=36. Both groups had lesions in the palate - 81.4% (n = 35 in diabetics, and 71.1% in non-diabetics (n = 27 (p = 0.68. CONCLUSION: The alterations are not related to diabetes and are present independently of having or not type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

  2. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lugo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal.

  3. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Gloria; Pena, Lara; Cordido, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal.

  4. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Gloria; Pena, Lara; Cordido, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal. PMID:22518126

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of HIV-associated manifestations in otolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Iacovou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost 30 years after its first description, HIV still remains a global pandemic. The present paper aims to review the current knowledge on the ear, nose and throat (ENT manifestations of HIV infection, and present the available diagnostic and treatment options. A literature review was conducted in Medline and other available database sources. Information from related books was also included in the data analysis. It is well acknowledged that up to 80% of HIV-infected patients eventually develop ENT manifestations; among which, oral disease appears to be the most common. Oro-pharyngeal manifestations include candidiasis, periodontal and gingival disease, HSV and HPV infection, oral hairy leucoplakia, Kaposi’s sarcoma, and non- Hodgkin’s lymphoma. ENT manifestations in the neck can present as cervical lymphadenopathy or parotid gland enlargement. Respective nasal manifestations include sinusitis (often due to atypical bacteria, and allergic rhinitis. Finally, otological manifestations include otitis (externa, or media, inner ear involvement (sensorineural hearing loss, disequilibrium, and facial nerve palsy (up to 100 times more frequently compared to the general population. Although ENT symptoms are not diagnostic of the disease, they might be suggestive of HIV infection, or related to its progression and the respective treatment failure. ENT doctors should be aware of the ENT manifestations associated with HIV disease, and the respective diagnosis and treatment. A multi-disciplinary approach may be required to provide the appropriate level of care to HIV patients.

  6. Discourse Manifestation of Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Владимир Ильич Карасик

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with approaches to discourse studies. The approaches may be regarded as discourse dimensions associated with models presented and substantiated by M.M. Bakhtin, J. Habermas, Yu.M. Lotman and M.A.K. Halliday. They comprise contents, participants, tonality, channel and communicative actions. The approaches described complement each other and make it possible to synthesize the results achieved in Text Linguistics, Pragmatics, Social Linguistics, and Discourse Studies. They are joined by and oriented towards the concept of Language Personality, i.e. persons who manifest themselves in various kinds of communicative situations. However, each discourse dimension corresponds to a certain type of discourse. A Topic Approach to discourse focuses upon its contents (its referential substance and specifies the correlation between explicit and implicit meaning expression. A Subject Approach to discourse makes it possible to single out and describe two basic types of communication as presented in Personality bound and Status bound discourse, the former diverges into two subtypes - Habitual and Existential communication, whereas the latter is manifested in various kinds of Institutional discourse. A Tonality Approach to discourse highlights different types of stylistic and emotional modes of communication and correspondingly characterizes personality types who are engaged in such situations. A Regime Approach is concentrated on communication channel and technical peculiarities of behavior determined by those restrictions. An Action Approach to discourse gives us a broader understanding of a performative act, i.e. an action incorporated in culture and a situational behavioral interaction.

  7. Rheumatologic Manifestations of Sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweiss, Nadera J.; Patterson, Karen; Sawaqed, Ray; Jabbar, Umair; Korsten, Peter; Hogarth, Kyle; Wollman, Robert; Garcia, Joe G.N.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Baughman, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic, clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by the development of granulomas. Any organ system can be involved, and patients may present with any number of rheumatologic symptoms. There are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved therapies for the treatment of sarcoidosis. Diagnosing sarcoidosis becomes challenging, particularly when its complications cause patients’ symptoms to mimic other conditions, including polymyositis, Sjögren syndrome, or vasculitis. This review presents an overview of the etiology of and biomarkers associated with sarcoidosis. We then provide a detailed description of the rheumatologic manifestations of sarcoidosis and present a treatment algorithm based on current clinical evidence for patients with sarcoid arthritis. The discussion will focus on characteristic findings in patients with sarcoid arthritis, osseous involvement in sarcoidosis, and sarcoid myopathy. Arthritic conditions that sometimes coexist with sarcoidosis are described as well. We present two cases of sarcoidosis with rheumatologic manifestations. Our intent is to encourage a multidisciplinary, translational approach to meet the challenges and difficulties in understanding and treating sarcoidosis. PMID:20665396

  8. Hematologic manifestations of babesiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akel, Tamer; Mobarakai, Neville

    2017-02-15

    Babesiosis, a zoonotic parasitic infection transmitted by the Ixodes tick, has become an emerging health problem in humans that is attracting attention worldwide. Most cases of human babesiosis are reported in the United States and Europe. The disease is caused by the protozoa of the genus Babesia, which invade human erythrocytes and lyse them causing a febrile hemolytic anemia. The infection is usually asymptomatic or self-limited in the immunocompetent host, or follows a persistent, relapsing, and/or life threatening course with multi-organ failure, mainly in the splenectomized or immunosuppressed patients. Hematologic manifestations of the disease are common. They can range from mild anemia, to severe pancytopenia, splenic rupture, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), or even hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). A 70 year old immunocompetent female patient living in New York City presented with a persistent fever, night sweats, and fatigue of 5 days duration. Full evaluation showed a febrile hemolytic anemia along with neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Blood smear revealed intraerythrocytic Babesia, which was confirmed by PCR. Bone marrow biopsy was remarkable for dyserythropoiesis, suggesting possible HLH, supported by other blood workup meeting HLH-2004 trial criteria. Human babesiosis is an increasing healthcare problem in the United States that is being diagnosed more often nowadays. We presented a case of HLH triggered by Babesia microti that was treated successfully. Also, we presented the hematologic manifestations of this disease along with their pathophysiologies.

  9. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement......% of newly diagnosed patients with overt hypothyroidism, and demonstrated reversibility following treatment. The evidence for or against a direct effect on pulmonary function was ambiguous. However, each of the above mentioned areas were only dealt with in a limited number of studies. Therefore, we refrain...

  10. OPHTHALMIC MANIFESTATIONS OF LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Grishina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmic manifestations of leukemia are variable and are predominantly represented by leukemic infiltration of the eye and hemodynamic abnormalities in the retinal vasculature. Leukemic infiltration of the retina should be differentiated from an inflammatory process, such as retinitis, chorioretinitis of viral or fungal origin that are not uncommon in patients with hematological malignancies. Retinal involvement is mainly seen in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia and is less common in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Retinopathy is more frequent during relapses of the underlying disease. Also, retinopathy can be the first sign of the disease. Leukemia should be included into the list for differential diagnosis with disorders that can be associated with optical nerve edema and retinal hemorrhages. Fundus abnormalities correlate with peripheral blood parameters. Retinopathy and leukemic optic neuropathy are predictors of unfavorable prognosis. Early diagnostics and timely and adequate treatment may fully eliminate ocular symptoms and improve quality of life in patients with hemoblastoses.

  11. Genitourinary manifestations of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Gilbert J; Marella, Venkata K

    2003-02-01

    By the 1980s, the availability of antituberculosis chemotherapy reduced the incidence and prevalence of tuberculosis. Changing patterns of population emigration and the development of large pools of immune-compromised individuals reversed the downward trend of tuberculosis. The incidence of genitourinary tuberculosis has remained constant. The manifestations of GU TB can be variable and cause a variety of clinical patterns that mimic other diseases. Adrenal insufficiency, renal disease, obstructive uropathy, and chronic cystitis are not uncommon with TB. The patient with TB may have genital disease that simulates STD or scrotal tumors. Infertility can be caused by GU tuberculosis. Awareness of environmental factors and patient history should alert the urologist to the wide array of clinical findings in the genitourinary system that can be caused by tuberculosis.

  12. [Pulmonary Manifestations of Vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vietinghoff, S

    2016-11-01

    The variable symptoms and signs of pulmonary vasculitis are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Vasculitis should be considered in rapidly progressing, severe and unusual manifestations of pulmonary disease. Clinical examination of other organ systems typically affected by vasculitis such as skin and kidney and autoantibody measurements are complementary approaches to manage this situation. Pulmonary involvement is common in small vessel vasculitis including anti-GBM disease (Goodpasture syndrome) and the ANCA-associated vasculitides. Life threatening pulmonary hemorrhage and irreversible damage of other organs, frequently the kidney, are important complications necessitating rapid diagnosis of these conditions.Vasculitides are rare diseases of multiple organs and therapies including biologics are evolving rapidly, requiring cooperation of specialities and with specialized centres to achieve best patient care. All involved physicians should be aware of typical complications of immunosuppressive therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Hepatitis C: extrahepatic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metts, Julius; Carmichael, Lesley; Kokor, Winfred; Scharffenberg, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with multiple extrahepatic manifestations (EHM) affecting various organs in the body. Approximately 40% to 75% of patients with chronic HCV infection experience at least one clinical EHM during the course of the HCV infection. Mixed cryoglobulinemia (type 2) is the most documented EHM associated with chronic HCV infection. This has been documented in up to 50% of patients. Clinically, it presents as arthralgia, weakness, and cutaneous symptoms. Morphologically, immune complex depositions are identified in small vessels and glomerular capillary walls, leading to leukocytoclastic vasculitis in the skin and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in the kidney. In other EHMs of chronic HCV infection not related to cryoglobulinemia, such as Sjögren syndrome, lichen planus, and autoimmune thyroiditis, autoimmune processes resulting in chronic inflammatory infiltrates are thought to be the underlying mechanism.

  14. Endocrine manifestations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Philip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease can have extra gastrointestinal tract (GIT presentations, most of which are endocrine. The aim of this study was to present patients diagnosed to have celiac disease from an endocrine department and to study the prevalence of endocrinopathies in celiac disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 patients from the endocrinology department (LLRM Medical College, Meerut between January 2011 and July 2012 and who were diagnosed to have celiac disease were included in the study. Results: Short stature was the commonest presentation (25%, other presentations included short stature and delayed puberty (20%, delayed puberty (11%, screening for celiac disease in type-1 DM patients (17%, rickets (6%, anemia not responding to oral therapy (6%, type-1 DM with recurrent hypoglycaemia (6%, and osteomalacia (3%. The endocrine manifestations include (after complete evaluation short stature (58%, delayed puberty (31%, elevated alkaline phospahatase (67%, low calcium (22%, X-rays suggestive of osteomalacia or rickets (8%, capopedal spasm (6%, and night blindness (6%. Anti-TPO antibody positivity was found in 53%, hypothyroidism in 28%, subclinical hypothyroidism in 17%, and type-1 DM in 25% of the patients. A total of 14% patients had no GI symptoms. Conclusion: Celiac disease is an endocrine disrupter as well as the great masquerader having varied presentations including short stature, delayed puberty, and rickets. Some patients who have celiac disease may not have any GI symptoms, making the diagnosis all the more difficult. Also, there is significant incidence of celiac disease with hypothyroidism and type-1 DM, making screening for it important in these diseases.

  15. [Pleuropulmonary manifestations of amebiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, P S; Koffi, N; Camara, P; Burgel, P R; Hovette, P; Klotz, F

    1998-12-01

    Amibiasis is the third leading cause of death due to parasitic infections in the world. Amibiasis is endemic in the warm regions of the world with deficient hygiene and socio-economic situations. Entamoeba histolytica is the causal agent of invasive amibiasis, unlike Entamoeba dispar which is not a pathogen for humans. Amibian colitis and amibian abscess of the liver are the most frequent intestinal and extra-intestinal manifestations. Pleuropulmonary complications almost always occur in patients with a liver abscess, the intrathoracic contamination via transphrenic dissemination predominating. Respiratory signs are inaugural in 80% of the cases. Pleuropulmonary ambiasis designates the localization of the amibian infestation, but the clinical expression may vary: pneumonia, lung abscess, pleurisy, hepatobronchial fistulization and more infrequently pulmonary embolism. The preferential localization is the right hemithorax related to abscess in the right lobe of the liver. Left lobe abscesses lead to left-sided pleuropulmonary complications with the risk of rupture into the pericardium. Chocolate-colored pus from a pleural or abscess puncture or vomitus strongly suggests the diagnosis, which is confirmed by highly-positive serology. Metronidazole is the treatment of choice, providing cure without sequellae. In Africa, mortality and morbidity due to ambiasis are high. In Abidjan, 92% of cured patients have sequella, and mortality reaches 15%, the consequence of late diagnosis.

  16. Pulmonary manifestation of leptospirosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Jung Gi; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan; Lee, Jung Sang; Kim, Suhng Gwon; Han, Yong Chol; Chang, Woo Hyun; Chi, Je Geun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    Authors analysed and present chest X-ray findings of serologically proven leptospirosis from Seoul National University Hospital, either admitted or referred for serological verification, during recent 2 years. Radiological findings were correlated with the lung specimen findings of experimentally induced leptospirosis in guinea pig. The results are as follows: 1. 24 cases (56%) showed positive X-ray findings. 2. Predominant radiological patterns of involved lung were tiny dot, small nodule, rosette density in 11 cases, massive confluent consolidation in 4 cases, and diffuse ill-defined velly increased density in 9 cases. 3. Distribution of pulmonary lesions were bilateral (100%), non-lobar, non-segmental (95%), and there were conspicuous tendency of peripheral lung predominance. 4. Extrapulmonary manifestation, such as pleural effusion or cardiomegaly was rate. 5. Pulmonary lesions resolved completely usually 5 to 10 days after their appearance. 6. From the gross and microscopic findings of serially sacrificed guinea pig's lung and a case of autopsy, authors concluded that fine dot-like density in chest X-ray was due to paleolithic hemorrhage in intraalveolar space at initial stage, growing up to ressette density or confluent consolidation as the pathetic extends to surrounding lung forming purpura and coalescent hemorrhage.

  17. Sturge Weber Syndrome: An Unusual Case with Multisystem Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhi, C; Anuj, C

    2016-03-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare congenital neurocutaneous disorder. It is characterized by the presence of facial port wine stains, neurological abnormalities like seizures and mental retardation, ocular disorders, oral involvement and leptomeningeal angiomas. A 13-year-old boy presented with the chief complaint of swollen, bleeding gums and deposits on the teeth. Detailed medical and dental history, clinical examination and investigations confirmed the diagnosis of Sturge-Weber syndrome. The treatment comprised of a thorough plaque control regimen to reduce the gingival enlargement, and it included oral hygiene instructions, thorough scaling, root planing at regular intervals and plaque index scoring which motivated the patient at each visit. This case illustrates that early intervention in a patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome is quintessential because of its associated gingival vascular features and their complicating manifestations. Furthermore, the need for periodic oral examinations and maintenance of good oral hygiene to prevent any complications from the oral vascular lesions has been highlighted.

  18. Gastrointestinal manifestations of endocrine disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina Maser; Arnbjorn Toset; Sanziana Roman

    2006-01-01

    The hormonal interactions among the systems throughout the body are not fully understood; many vague clinical symptoms may in fact be manifestations of underlying endocrine diseases. The aim of the following review is to discuss gastrointestinal manifestations of surgically correctable endocrine diseases, focusing on abnormalities of thyroid function, cancer and finally autoimmune diseases. We also review manifestations of pancreatic endocrine tumors, and multiple endocrine neoplasia.

  19. [Extrahepatic manifestations in hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risum, Malene

    2011-05-09

    Hepatitis C does not only affect the liver, but also manifests outside the liver. The skin, kidneys and nervous system are often involved due to mixed cryoglobulinaemia. Porphyria cutanea tarda, lymphoma and thyroid diseases among others can also attend a chronic infection, but the exact pathogenesis behind these manifestations is not clearly mapped. Antiviral treatment is reported to induce sustained virological response in more than half of the treated patients with a variable clinical response in the extrahepatic manifestations.

  20. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palekar, Nicole A; Harrison, Stephen A

    2005-10-01

    Hepatitis C affects approximately 170 million people worldwide. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C infection are clinically evident in nearly 40% of patients. Much research has been done over the last decade to better understand their incidence, clinical presentation, mechanism of disease, and the role of antiviral therapy in their treatment. Of the commonly reported manifestations, cryoglobulinemia, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and porphyria cutanea tarda remain the best understood manifestations. More recently, the association of insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus with chronic hepatitis C has been demonstrated. This paper serves to review the growing body of literature detailing the extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C.

  1. Respiratory manifestations in amyloidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ling; CAI Bai-qiang; ZHONG Xu; ZHU Yuan-jue

    2005-01-01

    Background Amyloidosis is a collection of diseases in which different proteins are deposited. Amyloid deposits occur in systemic and organ-limited forms. In both systemic and localized forms of the disease, lung can be involved. The aim of this study was to explore the different respiratory manifestations of amyloidosis. Methods Chest radiology, clinical presentations, bronchoscopic/laryngoscopic findings and lung function data of 59 patients with amyloidosis involving respiratory tract collected during January 1986 to March 2005, were analysed.Results Of the 16 cases with localized respiratory tract amyloidosis, 8 had the lesions in the trachea and the bronchi, 2 in the larynx and the trachea, 5 in the larynx and/or the pharynx, and 1 in the lung parenchyma. Of 43 systemic amyloidosis with respiratory tract involvement, 3 had the lesions in bronchi, 13 in lung parenchyma, 33 in pleura, 8 in mediastina, 1 in nose and 1 in pharynx. Chest X-rays were normal in most cases of tracheobronchial amyloidosis. CT, unlike chest X-rays, showed irregular luminal narrowing, airway wall thickening with calcifications and soft tissue shadows in airway lumen. Localized lung parenchymal amyloidosis presented as multiple nodules. Multiple nodular opacities, patch shadows and reticular opacities were the main radiological findings in systemic amyloidosis with lung parenchymal involvement. In pleural amyloidosis, pleural effusions and pleural thickening were detected. Mediastinal and/or hilar adenopathy were also a form of lung involvement in systemic amyloidosis. The major bronchoscopic findings of tracheobronchial amyloidosis were narrowing of airway lumen, while nodular, 'tumour like' or 'bubble like' masses, with missing or vague cartilaginous rings, were detected in about half of the patients.Conclusions Localized respiratory tract amyloidosis mostly affects the trachea and the bronchi. Chest X-rays are not sensitive to detect these lesions. Systemic amyloidosis often involves

  2. Dermatologic Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedania, Bhavtosh; Wu, George Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects millions of people worldwide, and an estimated 3.2 million people in the United States. HCV is a hepatotropic and lymphotropic virus that causes not only liver disease, but also a significant number of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs). Up to 74% of patients affected by HCV will have HCV-related EHMs of some severity in their lifetime. The EHMs vary from simple cutaneous palpable purpura to complex lymphoproliferative disorders, including lymphomas and immune-complex deposit diseases causing local and/or systemic complications. Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is manifested by multiple systemic organ involvement, mainly skin, kidney, peripheral nerves, and salivary glands, and less frequently causes widespread vasculitis and malignant lymphoma. MC affects up to 3% of HCV-infected patients with cryoglobulinemia of clinical significance, i.e. >6%. Severe disease requires immunosuppressive or plasma exchange therapy. HCV prevalence in the United States in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) was reported to be 66%, much higher than that in general population. Therefore, all patients with PCT should be screened for HCV. The skin rash of PCT varies from large blisters to small vesicles and/or milia on the hands. Skin manifestations due to PCT usually respond to anti‐HCV treatment together with reducing skin sun exposure, avoiding triggers, having routine phlebotomy (especially for people with chronic iron overload states), and using chloroquine. Lichen planus (LP), which typically affects both the skin and oral mucosa is a chronic inflammatory disease of squamous cell origin affecting about 1% of the worldwide population. The prevalence of HCV in patients with LP varies based on geographic location. We review here the basic pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of dermatologic manifestations of HCV. PMID:26357639

  3. Dermatologic Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedania, Bhavtosh; Wu, George Y

    2015-06-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects millions of people worldwide, and an estimated 3.2 million people in the United States. HCV is a hepatotropic and lymphotropic virus that causes not only liver disease, but also a significant number of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs). Up to 74% of patients affected by HCV will have HCV-related EHMs of some severity in their lifetime. The EHMs vary from simple cutaneous palpable purpura to complex lymphoproliferative disorders, including lymphomas and immune-complex deposit diseases causing local and/or systemic complications. Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is manifested by multiple systemic organ involvement, mainly skin, kidney, peripheral nerves, and salivary glands, and less frequently causes widespread vasculitis and malignant lymphoma. MC affects up to 3% of HCV-infected patients with cryoglobulinemia of clinical significance, i.e. >6%. Severe disease requires immunosuppressive or plasma exchange therapy. HCV prevalence in the United States in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) was reported to be 66%, much higher than that in general population. Therefore, all patients with PCT should be screened for HCV. The skin rash of PCT varies from large blisters to small vesicles and/or milia on the hands. Skin manifestations due to PCT usually respond to anti-HCV treatment together with reducing skin sun exposure, avoiding triggers, having routine phlebotomy (especially for people with chronic iron overload states), and using chloroquine. Lichen planus (LP), which typically affects both the skin and oral mucosa is a chronic inflammatory disease of squamous cell origin affecting about 1% of the worldwide population. The prevalence of HCV in patients with LP varies based on geographic location. We review here the basic pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of dermatologic manifestations of HCV.

  4. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  5. Cerebrovascular manifestations following scorpion sting

    OpenAIRE

    Nataraja P; Naveen Prasad SV; Obulareddy G; Anil Ch; Naveen T; Vengamma B

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion sting is a common clinical problem in Rayalaseema area of Andhra Pradesh State in India. Clilnical presentation of scorpion envenomation can range from mild local pain to systemic manifestations involving almost all systems. Cerebrovascular manifestations of scorpion sting have been sparsely documented. We report two cases who presented with ischaemic stroke and haemorrhagic stroke following scorpion sting.

  6. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay K Mahajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi characterized by focal or disseminated vasculitis and perivasculitis which may involve the lungs, heart, liver, spleen and central nervous system. It was thought to have been eradicated from India. Recently it is being reported from many areas of India. The clinical picture and severity of the symptoms varies widely. The neurological manifestations of scrub typhus are not uncommon but are diverse. Meningoencephalitis is classical manifestation of scrub typhus but cerebellitis, cranial nerve palsies, plexopathy, transverse myelitis, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and Guillan-Barré syndrome are other manifestations reported in literature. The availability of literature on the neurological manifestations of scrub typhus is limited to case reports mainly. This article reviews various neurological manifestations of scrub typhus reported in literature.

  7. Oral Malignant Melanoma in a Ferret ( Mustela putorius furo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ovidio, Dario; Rossi, Giacomo; Meomartino, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    Oral malignant melanomas are one of the most common oral malignant neoplasms in dogs but are rare in other domesticated species. This case report describes the clinical manifestations and histological appearance of oral melanoma in a ferret ( Mustela putorius furo). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first published description of a clinical case and histopathological findings of oral melanoma in this species.

  8. Disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis diagnosis based on oral lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Preto Webber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a deep mycosis with primary lung manifestations that may present cutaneous and oral lesions. Oral lesions mimic other infectious diseases or even squamous cell carcinoma, clinically and microscopically. Sometimes, the dentist is the first to detect the disease, because lung lesions are asymptomatic, or even misdiagnosed. An unusual case of PCM with 5 months of evolution presenting pulmonary, oral, and cutaneous lesions that was diagnosed by the dentist based on oral lesions is presented and discussed.

  9. Cutaneous Manifestations of Crohn Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Joshua W; Swoger, Jason M; Grandinetti, Lisa M

    2015-07-01

    Awareness of the extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn disease is increasing in dermatology and gastroenterology, with enhanced identification of entities that range from granulomatous diseases recapitulating the underlying inflammatory bowel disease to reactive conditions and associated dermatoses. In this review, the underlying etiopathology of Crohn disease is discussed, and how this mirrors certain skin manifestations that present in a subset of patients is explored. The array of extraintestinal manifestations that do not share a similar pathology, but which are often seen in association with inflammatory bowel disease, is also discussed. Treatment and pathogenetic mechanisms, where available, are discussed.

  10. Ocular manifestations of feline herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, S E

    2001-03-01

    Feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) infection is ubiquitous in the domestic cat population worldwide. The most common clinical ocular manifestations of infection with FHV-1 are conjunctivitis and keratitis. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of feline herpesvirus-1 and discusses the various clinical ocular manifestations, diagnostic techniques and treatment of FHV-1-induced diseases. Ocular manifestations include: conjunctivitis, keratitis, stromal keratitis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, ophthalmia neonatorium, symblepharon, corneal sequestrum, eosinophilic keratitis and anterior uveitis. Diagnostic techniques discussed include: virus isolation, fluorescent antibody testing, serum neutralising titers, ELISA and polymerase chain reaction. Various therapies are also discussed.

  11. Renal (Kidney) Manifestations in TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... International TSC Research Conference Text Size Get Involved RENAL (KIDNEY) MANIFESTATIONS IN TSC Download a PDF of ... sclerosis complex (TSC) will develop some form of renal (kidney) disease during their lifetime. There are three ...

  12. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  13. Oral complications of HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair C. Leao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS.

  14. Nail manifestations in pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahali Juliana Burihan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Nail involvement in pemphigus vulgaris is rare. We describe 5 patients with pemphigus vulgaris presenting nail involvement. In this disease, nail manifestations present, by order of frequency, as chronic paronychia, onychomadesis, onycholysis, Beau's lines and trachyonychia. All our 5 cases presented with paronychia, and 1 of them also had Beau's lines. Treatment with prednisone and/or cyclophosphamide controlled mucocutaneous and nail manifestations in all cases.

  15. Manifestaciones orales asociadas a la infección por el VIH/sida en la etapa de expansión de la terapéutica antirretroviral: una década en revisión (2000-2010) / Oral Manifestations Associated to HIV Infection under ART/HAART: Review of a Decade 2000-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada Montoya, John Harold; Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia; Ramírez Rojas, Diego Alejandro; Universidad Nacional de Colombia

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo: identificar los indicadores epidemiológicos de manifestaciones orales asociadas con la infección por virus de inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH) en la etapa de expansión terapéutica antirretroviral. Métodos: se revisó literatura en las bases bibliográficas disponibles en la Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Se utilizó un proceso de revisión con base en la evidencia. Cumplieron los criterios de inclusión 52 artículos publicados entre 2000 y 2010. Resultados: después de la introducción de...

  16. Mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somenath Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism is a disorder of calcium and phosphorus metabolism due to decreased secretion of parathyroid hormone. Hypoparathyroidism can be hereditary and acquired. Acquired hypoparathyroidism usually occurs following neck surgery (thyroid surgery or parathyroid surgery. Along with systemic manifestations, hypoparathyroidism produces some skin manifestations. Lack of study regarding mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism prompted us to undertake this study. To evaluate the mucocutaneous manifestations of acquired hypoparathyroidism. An observational study done in a tertiary care hospital of Kolkata by comprehensive history taking, through clinical examination and relevant laboratory investigations. Twenty-one patients were included in the study. The commonest form of acquired hypoparathyroidism was neck surgery (thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy operation. Mucocutaneous manifestations were present in 76.19% of patients. The most frequent mucocutaneous manifestation was found in the hairs like the loss of axillary hair (61.9%, loss of pubic hair (52.38%, coarsening of body hair (47.62%, and alopecia areata (9.52%. The nail changes noted were brittle and ridged nail, followed by onycholysis, onychosezia, and onychomedesis. The most common skin features were xerotic skin in 11 patients (52.38%, followed by pellagra-like skin pigmentation, pustular psoriasis and acne form eruption, bullous impetigo, etc. Mucosa was normal in all the cases excepting the one which showed oral candidiasis.

  17. A CLINICAL STUDY OF MUCOCUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Mucocutaneous manifestations are extremely common and varied in HIV infected patients. The present study was done to know the overall prevalence of mucocutaneous manifestations in HIV infected patients and to know the frequency of individual manifestations. METHODS: A total of 150 HIV seropositive patients from voluntary counseling and testing center were included in the study. Detailed history, thorough physical examination and relevant investigations were done to confirm the mucocutaneous manifestations when present. RESULTS: Ninety two percent (92% of 150 positives had mucocutaneous manifestations at presentation. Majority (75.34% of the patients belonged to the age group 25 – 49 years and male to female ratio was 1.08:1. Oral candidiasis was the most common (33.33% manifestation. Other common infectious conditions seen were HSV (16.67% dermatophytosis (12.67%, genital candidiasis (9.33%, herpes genitalis (10%. Common non-infectious disorders included generalized xerosis and ichthyosis (14.66%, generalized hyperpigmentation (11.33% and seborrheic dermatitis (6.67%. Hair and nail changes included diffuse alopecia (18%, trichomegaly (6.67% and melanonychia (32%.Pruritic papular dermatitis was seen in 16%. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSION: This study thus emphasizes the need for dermatological evaluation of all patients with HIV infection for early management and improved quality of life.

  18. Disseminated Histoplasmosis with Oral Manifestation in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aishwarya; Agarwal, Manoj; Mathur, Meetu; Mathur, Setu; Mallikarjun, R.; Banerjee, Subrata

    2017-01-01

    A case of disseminated histoplasmosis (DH) in a 60-year-old female patient is reported from Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. The patient presented with multiple papules on the skin surrounding the lips, face, torso, trunk, and back. She also complained of growth in the palate. Histoplasmosis was confirmed by biopsy and histopathology of skin and palatal lesions. This case report highlights the presenting features and occurrence of histoplasmosis in nonendemic region in India. PMID:28255468

  19. Menopause and the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Mutneja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is associated with a large number of symptoms ranging from physical to psychological. These symptoms may unfavorably affect oral health and treatment needs requiring dentists to be aware of the symptoms and health care needs of peri-menopausal/menopausal/postmenopausal women. This article attempts to provide an insight into the multifarious oral manifestations at menopause along with the relevant prosthodontic implications.

  20. Oroal manifestations in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajales González Hilda María

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by the presence of acute focal inflammatory demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis. It affects predominantly in young adults between 20 and 40 years of age; it is infrequent in the pediatric age. A observational, retrospective and descriptive cohort research was conducted between May 1999 and January 2012 to assess demographic characteristics, and pathological manifestations in the oral cav- ity of children with this condition. Records of 17 patients, under 18 years of age, of either sex were included, who had been evaluated in the Department of Stomatology. Data recorded were age, sex, State of origin, oral and facial pathological features, focal cavity infections and ceod index. There were no patients with trigeminal neuralgia or facial paralysis; a 5.7% ceod index was identified. Most of the patients were under immunopressive treatment. A protocol for stomatological follow-up in patients with multiple sclerosis does not exist. The medical profession must be sensibilized to establish strategies for an integral follow-up in patients with this condition.

  1. Oral Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  2. Oral myiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Thalaimalai Saravanan; Mathan A Mohan; Meera Thinakaran; Saneem Ahammed

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability ...

  3. Cutaneous manifestations of human toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavignet, Béatrice; Piarroux, Renaud; Aubin, François; Millon, Laurence; Humbert, Philippe

    2008-12-01

    Human toxocariasis is a parasitic disease characterized by the presence of larvae of the genus Toxocara in human tissues. T canis and T cati, the adult roundworms of which are found in dog and cat intestines, respectively, are the most common causative agents of the disease. Toxocaral larvae usually cause two severe syndromes: visceral larva migrans and ocular larva migrans, depending on the location of the larvae. Two other syndromes, covert toxocariasis and common toxocariasis, which are less typical and not as severe, have also been described. During the last two decades, cutaneous manifestations such as chronic urticaria, chronic pruritus, and miscellaneous eczema, in patients with Toxocara antibodies, have been studied by different authors. In some cases, these cutaneous manifestations are the only signs indicating the presence of the disease, and they are cured after antihelmintic treatment when there is good patient compliance. In this review, we focus on these particular skin manifestations regarding their clinical description, diagnosis, and treatment.

  4. [Cardiovascular manifestations of human toxocariasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolívar-Mejía, Adrián; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto E; Delgado, Olinda

    2013-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a parasitic infection produced by helminths that cannot reach their adult stage in humans. For their etiological species (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), man is a paratenic host. Infection by such helminths can produce a variety of clinical manifestations, such as: visceral larvae migrans syndrome, ocular larvae migrans syndrome and covert toxocariasis. In the visceral larvae migrans syndrome, the organs that are mainly involved include liver, lungs, skin, nervous system, muscles, kidneys and the heart. Regarding the latter, the importance of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, as well as its clinical relevance, has increasingly begun to be recognized. The current article is based on a systematic information search, focused mainly on the clinical and pathological aspects of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, including its pathophysiology, laboratory findings, diagnosis and therapeutical options, with the objective of highlighting its importance as a zoonosis and its relevance to the fields of cardiovascular medicine in adults and children.

  5. RHEUMATIC MANIFESTATIONS IN VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Anan'eva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune reactions are of primary importance in the development of extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis, among which there are rheumatic symptoms and syndromes. The incidence of clinically significant extrahepatic manifestations is shown to be relatively low, but they may be in the foreground in the clinical picture of the disease and are noted for severity. It is concluded that due to the high prevalence of hepatitis and the systemic pattern of their chronic forms, patients with extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis may be encountered in the practice of a therapist and a rheumatologist. The onset of the infection caused by hepatitis viruses may be accompanied by articular lesion therefore the rheumatologist may be the first physician such a patient may resort to.

  6. RHEUMATIC MANIFESTATIONS IN VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Anan'eva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune reactions are of primary importance in the development of extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis, among which there are rheumatic symptoms and syndromes. The incidence of clinically significant extrahepatic manifestations is shown to be relatively low, but they may be in the foreground in the clinical picture of the disease and are noted for severity. It is concluded that due to the high prevalence of hepatitis and the systemic pattern of their chronic forms, patients with extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis may be encountered in the practice of a therapist and a rheumatologist. The onset of the infection caused by hepatitis viruses may be accompanied by articular lesion therefore the rheumatologist may be the first physician such a patient may resort to.

  7. Cutaneous manifestations of viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Ahmed; Said, Adnan

    2015-02-01

    There are several extrahepatic cutaneous manifestations associated with hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infection. Serum sickness and polyarteritis nodosa are predominantly associated with hepatitis B infection, whereas mixed cryoglobulinemia associated vasculitis and porphyria cutanea tarda are more frequently seen in hepatitis C infection. The clinico-pathogenic associations of these skin conditions are not completely defined but appear to involve activation of the host immune system including the complement system. Management of the aforementioned cutaneous manifestations of viral hepatitis is often similar to that done in cases without viral hepatitis, with control of immune activation being a key strategy. In cases associated with hepatitis B and C, control of viral replication with specific antiviral therapy is also important and associated with improvement in most of the associated clinical manifestations.

  8. Quantum manifestations of Nekhoroshev stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanari, Daniele, E-mail: fontanari@purple.univ-littoral.fr [Département de physique, Université du Littoral – Côte d' Opale, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Fassò, Francesco, E-mail: fasso@math.unipd.it [Università di Padova, Dipartimento di Matematica, Via Trieste 63, Padova 35121 (Italy); Sadovskií, Dmitrií A., E-mail: sadovski@univ-littoral.fr [Département de physique, Université du Littoral – Côte d' Opale, 59140 Dunkerque (France)

    2016-09-16

    We uncover quantum manifestations of classical Nekhoroshev theory of resonant dynamics using a simple quantum system of two coupled angular momenta with conserved equal magnitudes which corresponds to a perturbed classical integrable anisochronous Hamiltonian system. - Highlights: • Basic quantum manifestations of classical Nekhoroshev theory are studied. • A simple anisochronous convex system with two degrees of freedom is proposed. • Zones are uncovered in the joint expectation value spectrum of quantized actions. • The width of the zones is given by the Nekhoroshev resonant normal forms.

  9. Cutaneous manifestations in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L Abenavoli; G Addolorato; I Proietti; L Leggio; A Ferrulli; L Vonghia; R Capizzi; M Rotoli; PL Amerio; G Gasbarrini

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune gluten-dependent enteropathy characterized by atrophy of intestinal villi that improves after gluten-free diet (GFD). CD is often associated with extra-intestinal manifestations;among them, several skin diseases are described in CD patients. The present review reports all CD-associated skin manifestations described in the literature and tries to analyze the possible mechanisms involved in this association. The opportunity to evaluate the possible presence of CD in patients affected by skin disorders is discussed.

  10. Dermatologic Manifestations of Systemic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Maryn Anne; Isamah, Nwamaka; Northway, Rebecca M

    2015-12-01

    Dermatologic complaints are encountered frequently by the primary care provider. Patients often are required as well as want to see their primary care provider before referral to a specialist. Therefore, primary care providers must be skilled in a variety of topics including dermatology. Certain dermatologic manifestations are associated with, or indicative of, systemic diseases. Primary care providers must be knowledgeable in diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of dermatologic conditions, as well as when to appropriately refer. This article reviews common dermatologic manifestations of systemic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of Oral Health in Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rathy Ravindran; M.G. Deepa; A.K. Sruthi; Cherian Kuruvila; Priya, S.; S.Sunil; Joseph Edward; G Roopesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral cav ity re flects the general health status of a person and diagnosing and treating oral manifestations of systemic disease pose a greater challenge. Even though there is strong evidence that supports the relationship between oral health and diabetes mellitus, oral health awareness is lacking among diabetic patients and health professionals. The present study was undertaken to determine the oral health status in type II diabetic patients and also...

  12. Oral pregnancy tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh M Gondivkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granuloma is one of the inflammatory hyperplasias seen in the oral cavity. This term is a misnomer because the lesion is unrelated to infection and in reality arises in response to various stimuli such as low-grade local irritation, traumatic injury, or hormonal factors. It predominantly occurs in the second decade of life in young females, possibly because of the vascular effects of female hormones. Clinically, oral pyogenic granuloma is a smooth or lobulated exophytic lesion manifesting as small, red erythematous growth on a pedunculated or sometimes sessile base, which is usually hemorrhagic. Although excisional surgery is the treatment of choice , some other treatment protocols such as the use of Nd:YAG laser, flash lamp pulsed dye laser, cryosurgery, intralesional injection of ethanol or corticosteroids, and sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy have been proposed. We present the case of a 25-year-old pregnant woman with large oral pyogenic granuloma.

  13. Common oral lesions associated with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, M; Lucatorto, F

    1993-09-01

    More than 40 different lesions involving head and neck areas have been associated with HIV infection. The oral cavity may manifest the first sign of HIV infection. Early detection of these conditions can lead to early diagnosis of HIV infection and subsequent appropriate management. Signs, symptoms and management of the most common HIV-associated oral lesions are discussed.

  14. Amiloidosis oral nodular Oral nodular amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Martos Díaz

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La amiloidosis constituye una entidad marcada por el depósito de amiloide en diferentes tejidos. En la cavidad oral se manifiesta habitualmente en forma de macroglosia, y más raramente, como nódulos dispuestos en la superficie. Caso clínico. Varón afecto de Mieloma Múltiple, que comienza con lesiones nodulares en labio inferior y lengua. A raíz de estas lesiones, mediante estudio histológico, es diagnosticado de Amiloidosis Sistémica. Discusión. Los nódulos amiloideos en la cavidad oral, constituyen una manifestación rara de la amiloidosis sistémica. Su aparición conlleva la necesidad de realizar un diagnostico diferencial con otras entidades y el diagnostico de certeza se obtiene mediante el análisis histológico.Introduction. Amyloidosis is a condition characterized by the deposit of amyloid in different tissues. In the oral cavity it is usually manifested as macroglossia and, more rarely, as nodules on the surface. Clinical case. A man had multiple myeloma that began with nodular lesions of the lower lip and tongue. As a result of these lesions, the patient was diagnosed of systemic amyloidosis by histological study. Discussion. Amyloid nodules in the oral cavity are a rare manifestation of systemic amyloidosis. Its appearance entails the necessity to make I diagnose differential with other organizations and I diagnose of certainty is obtained by means of the histological analysis.

  15. Cardiac Manifestation in Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Mohit; Patil, Rekha S

    2016-07-01

    To study the cardiac manifestations of the dengue fever. This one year descriptive study was undertaken at KLES Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belgaum under the Department of Medicine. A total of 120 patients with either dengue IgM or IgM and IgG were studied. The assessment of cardiac manifestations was done based on electrocardiogram, 2D echocardiography and cardiac enzymes. Of the 120 patients, 85 (70.83%) were males and the male to female ratio was 2.4:1. The mean age of the patients was 33.02 ± 12.71 years. The commonest clinical presentation was myalgia (97.5%) followed by fever (92.5%). On clinical examination 33.33% of the patients had petecheia and only 9 patients having active bleeding manifestation at the time of presentation. A raised CK-MB and Troponin I was observed in 33.3% and 26.7% patients ECG findings revealed normal rhythm among 95% with 15.8% of them having an abnormal heart rate. Rhythm disturbance was noted in 5% of the patients with AV block being the most common (66.67%). Cardiac manifestation in the form of myocarditis was observed in 37.50% of the patients with a positive correlation with the severity of the dengue fever defined as by W.H.O. criteria. Patients with dengue fever are at high risk of developing myocarditis and rhythm disturbance and therefore require a close cardiac monitoring.

  16. Neurological Manifestations of Takayasu Arteritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-xin Zhou; Jun Ni; Shan Gao; Bin Peng; Li-ying Cui

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical neurological manifestations of Takayasu arteritis (TA).Methods A retrospective study was conducted with 63 consecutive TA cases admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 2009 to May 2010.All the patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of TA by the American College of Rheumatology.Among the 63 TA patients,27 with neurological manifestations were included in the present study.All the patients were evaluated using standardized neurological examination,sonography,computed tomography (CT) angiography,and cerebral CT or magnetic resonance imaging.Results Dizziness and visual disturbance were the most common symptoms,which occurred in 20 (74.1%) and 16 (59.3%) patients respectively.Another common symptom was headache,observed in 15 (55.6%) patients.Six (22.2%) patients had suffered from ischemic stroke; 7 (25.9%) patients had epileptic seizures.Two (7.4%) patients were diagnosed as reversible posterior encephalopathy syndrome (RPES) based on typical clinical and imaging manifestations.Conclusions Neurological manifestations are common symptoms in TA patients in the chronic phase,including dizziness,visual disturbance,headache,ischemic stroke,seizures,and some unusual ones such as RPES.We suggested RPES be included into the differential diagnosis of acute neurological changes in TA.

  17. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases.

  18. Oral Health and Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Leite, Renata S.; Marlow, Nicole M.; Fernandes, Jyotika K.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been described as a new epidemic. Approximately 285 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, and this number is predicted to increase by about 50% by year 2030.This article will review oral health manifestations of diabetes, and discuss associations between periodontal disease and diabetes. Although there is a strong body of evidence that supports the relationship between oral health and T2DM, oral health awareness is lacking among patients with diabe...

  19. Oral health-related quality of life in diabetic patients: comparison of the Persian version of Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index and Oral Health Impact Profile: A descriptive-analytic study

    OpenAIRE

    Nikbin, Ava; Bayani, Mohammadali; Jenabian, Niloofar; Khafri, Soraya; Motallebnejad, Mina

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is one of the systemic disease which is show important oral manifestation and influence oral health. This study describes how diabetes mellitus affects oral health and oral health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral health and oral health-related quality of life of diabetic patients and compare the discriminative capability of Persian versions of two GOHAI and OHIP-14 questionnaires in these patients. Methods A total of 350 pati...

  20. 40 CFR 262.21 - Manifest tracking numbers, manifest printing, and obtaining manifests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The... paragraph (c) of this section, EPA will provide the registrant an electronic file of the manifest... for Transporters” on Copy 5; and (C) The “Instructions for Treatment, Storage, and Disposal...

  1. Cardiopulmonary Manifestations of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Mahnaz; Taylor, Nora; Tehrani, Mahsa

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory condition that usually affects young men. Cardiac dysfunction and pulmonary disease are well-known and commonly reported extra-articular manifestation, associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). AS has also been reported to be specifically associated with aortitis, aortic valve diseases, conduction disturbances, cardiomyopathy and ischemic heart disease. The pulmonary manifestations of the disease include fibrosis of the upper lobes, interstitial lung disease, ventilatory impairment due to chest wall restriction, sleep apnea, and spontaneous pneumothorax. They are many reports detailing pathophysiology, hypothesized mechanisms leading to these derangements, and estimated prevalence of such findings in the AS populations. At this time, there are no clear guidelines regarding a stepwise approach to screen these patients for cardiovascular and pulmonary complications. PMID:21547038

  2. Unusual clinical manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has protean clinical manifestations. The classical presentation of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile illness with or without jaundice. Unusual clinical manifestations may result from involvement of pulmonary, cardiovascular, neural, gastrointestinal, ocular and other systems. Immunological phenomena secondary to antigenic mimicry may also be an important component of many clinical features and may be responsible for reactive arthritis. Leptospirosis in early pregnancy may lead to fetal loss. There are a few reports of leptospirosis in HIV- infected individuals but no generalisation can be made due to paucity of data. It is important to bear in mind that leptospiral illness may be a significant component in cases of dual infections or in simultaneous infections with more than two pathogens.

  3. Digestive manifestations of parathyroid disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bassam Abboud; Ronald Daher; Joe Boujaoude

    2011-01-01

    The parathyroid glands are the main regulator of plasma calcium and have a direct influence on the digestive tract. Parathyroid disturbances often result in unknown long-standing symptoms. The main manifestation of hypoparathyroidism is steatorrhea due to a deficit in exocrine pancreas secretion. The association with celiac sprue may contribute to malabsorption. Hyperparathyroidism causes smooth-muscle atony, with upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, heartburn and constipation. Hyperparathyroidism and peptic ulcer were strongly linked before the advent of proton pump inhibitors. Nowadays, this association remains likely only in the particular context of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1/Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. In contrast to chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis due to primary hyperparathyroidism is one of the most studied topics. The causative effect of high calcium level is confirmed and the distinction from secondary hyperparathyroidism is mandatory. The digestive manifestations of parathyroid malfunction are often overlooked and serum calcium level must be included in the routine workup for abdominal symptoms.

  4. Cardiopulmonary Manifestations of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Momeni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory condition that usually affects young men. Cardiac dysfunction and pulmonary disease are well-known and commonly reported extra-articular manifestation, associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS. AS has also been reported to be specifically associated with aortitis, aortic valve diseases, conduction disturbances, cardiomyopathy and ischemic heart disease. The pulmonary manifestations of the disease include fibrosis of the upper lobes, interstitial lung disease, ventilatory impairment due to chest wall restriction, sleep apnea, and spontaneous pneumothorax. They are many reports detailing pathophysiology, hypothesized mechanisms leading to these derangements, and estimated prevalence of such findings in the AS populations. At this time, there are no clear guidelines regarding a stepwise approach to screen these patients for cardiovascular and pulmonary complications.

  5. ORBITAL MANIFESTATIONS OF SINUS DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothirmayi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM : To study the orbital manifestations in patients with sinus disease. METHODS : Patients wit h paranasal sinus disease presenting to OPD at Government ENT Hospital, AMC, Visakhapatnam from January 2012 to June 2014 were screened for orbital manifestations. Out of these, thirteen patients with orbital disease were referred to GREH, AMC, Visakhapatn am and were thoroughly investigated and managed appropriately. RESULTS : Out of the 14 patients 4 were female and 10 were male. Age ranged from 19 years to 70 years. 5 had maxillary sinus disease (4 - carcinoma and 1 case of mucormycosis. Frontal sinus dis ease was seen in two patients, one fibrous dysplasia and one malignancy. Five patients had ethmoidal sinus disease of which three patients were found to have ethmoidal sinus tumour (Malignant melanoma, Squamous cell Carcinoma. More than two sinuses were i nvolved in 2 patients. CONCLUSIONS : Early screening of patients with sinus disease by an Ophthalmologist can help in preventing severe vision threatening orbital complications.

  6. Some Manifestations of Japanese Exclusionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Morita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese subscribe to ethnic nationalism, which is an ideology with the aim to develop an ethnically exclusive and homogeneous nationhood. One manifestation of ethnic nationalism is the belief that Japan is, or should be, a mono-ethnic society. Ethnic nationalism is manifested in the exclusionary attitude or opinion of the Japanese. In the context of foreigners living in Japan, the exclusionary attitude or opinion of the Japanese often translates into the insistence that foreigners should do things the Japanese way. This is unfriendly to foreigners living in Japan, to say the least. This article illustrates how unwelcoming and inconvenient Japanese exclusionism can be by using two examples that directly affect foreigners: housing and discrimination against foreigners.

  7. Breast manifestations of systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilaveri CA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Christina A Dilaveri, Maire Brid Mac Bride, Nicole P Sandhu, Lonzetta Neal, Karthik Ghosh, Dietlind L Wahner-RoedlerDivision of General Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Although much emphasis has been placed on the primary presentations of breast cancer, little focus has been placed on how systemic illnesses may affect the breast. In this article, we discuss systemic illnesses that can manifest in the breast. We summarize the clinical features, imaging, histopathology, and treatment recommendations for endocrine, vascular, systemic inflammatory, infectious, and hematologic diseases, as well as for the extramammary malignancies that can present in the breast. Despite the rarity of these manifestations of systemic disease, knowledge of these conditions is critical to the appropriate evaluation and treatment of patients presenting with breast symptoms.Keywords: breast, endocrine, hematologic, infectious, vascular

  8. Diverse clinical manifestations of pheochromocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badui, E; Mancilla, R; Szymanski, J J; Garcia-Rubi, D; Estañol, B

    1982-03-01

    Many difficulties are encountered by clinicians in attempting to diagnose pheochromocytomas. We describe several patients with unusual clinical features. These include sudden death, cerebral hemorrhage, refractory congestive heart failure, acute abdominal pain, and hypercalcemia. In 2 patients, the rare association of this tumor and pregnancy was observed. Two subjects had sudden death, 1 during a pneumoencephalogram and another during an epidural block. The clinicians should be aware of these manifestations of pheochromocytomas.

  9. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Stansbury, Robert C.; Strollo, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests tha...

  10. Infrequent cardiac manifestations of sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Said; Briasoulis, Alexandros; Afonso, Luis

    Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is found in 2-7% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis (SS). Its diagnosis and treatment is challenging, notwithstanding the poor prognosis and treatment. Hereby, we present a case of systemic sarcoidosis with rare cardiac manifestations of severe mitral incompetence and large coronary aneurysm in a previously healthy woman. She underwent successful mitral valve replacement and coronary artery bypass surgery and was maintained on low dose glucocorticoid therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Systemic diseases with cutaneous manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, S R; Taboada, J

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to briefly discuss the following cutaneous manifestations of selected systemic diseases: poxvirus; feline leukemia virus (FeLV); feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV); herpesvirus; calcivirus; pseudorabies; plague; tularemia; toxoplasmosis; leishmania; hypothyroidism; hyperthyroidism; hyperadrenocorticism; diabetes mellitus; acromegaly; thallium poisoning; pancreatic disease; hypereosinophilic syndrome; mucopolysaccharidosis; and pansteatitis. Recognition of these cutaneous signs may help alert the clinician to the possibility of an internal disorder so that the appropriate diagnostic tests can be considered.

  12. Rheumatic manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebiedz-Odrobina, Dorota; Kay, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    DM is associated with various musculoskeletal manifestations. The strength of this relationship varies among the various musculoskeletal disorders; the associations are based mostly on epidemiologic data. For most of these conditions, definitive pathophysiologic correlates are lacking.Hand and shoulder disorders occur more frequently than other musculoskeletal manifestations of DM. Recognition of the association between DM and shoulder adhesive capsulitis, DD, and stenosing flexor tenosynovitis facilitates their correct diagnosis in the setting of DM and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment, which may include optimizing glycemic control. Conversely, awareness and identification of the characteristic musculoskeletal manifestations of DM may facilitate earlier diagnosis of DM and initiation of glucose-lowering therapy to retard the development of diabetic complications.Much less has been published about the musculoskeletal complications of DM than about its micro- and macrovascular complications. Prospective case-control cohort studies are needed to establish the true prevalence of musculoskeletal complications of DM and the metabolic syndrome, especially in this era of tighter glycemic control.The potential relationship between DM and the development of OA needs to be clarified in large, prospective, case-control cohort studies. The effect on musculoskeletal manifestations of various therapeutic regimens to manage DM should be studied prospectively. Treatment regimens for some musculoskeletal conditions associated with DM, such as DISH, should be studied in larger prospective, randomized,controlled clinical trials.At the molecular level, further studies are warranted to clarify the potential contribution of AGEs and adipokines to the development of OA and diabetic musculoskeletal syndromes, such as shoulder adhesive capsulitis, DD, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, and LJM. Identification of such molecular targets for therapy would promote the development of

  13. Respiratory manifestations in endocrine diseases

    OpenAIRE

    LENCU, CODRU?A; ALEXESCU, TEODORA; PETRULEA, MIRELA; LENCU, MONICA

    2016-01-01

    The control mechanisms of respiration as a vital function are complex: voluntary ? cortical, and involuntary ? metabolic, neural, emotional and endocrine. Hormones and hypothalamic neuropeptides (that act as neurotrasmitters and neuromodulators in the central nervous system) play a role in the regulation of respiration and in bronchopulmonary morphology. This article presents respiratory manifestations in adult endocrine diseases that evolve with hormone deficit or hypersecretion. In hyperthy...

  14. Imaging Manifestations of Thoracic Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Carlos Santiago; Katre, Rashmi; Mumbower, Amy

    2016-05-01

    Despite significant improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis achieved during the last 3 decades, tuberculosis still remains one of the deadliest communicable diseases worldwide. Tuberculosis is still present in all regions of the world, with a more significant impact in developing countries. This article reviews the most common imaging manifestations of primary and postprimary tuberculosis, their complications, and the critical role of imaging in the diagnosis and follow-up of affected patients.

  15. What rheumatologists should know about orofacial manifestations of autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lauria Pires Abrão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Orofacial manifestations occur frequently in rheumatic diseases and usually represent early signs of disease or of its activity that are still neglected in clinical practice. Among the autoimmune rheumatic diseases with potential for oral manifestations, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, inflammatory myopathies (IM, systemic sclerosis (SSc, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, relapsing polychondritis (RP and Sjögren's syndrome (SS can be cited. Signs and symptoms such as oral hyposalivation, xerostomia, temporomandibular joint disorders, lesions of the oral mucosa, periodontal disease, dysphagia, and dysphonia may be the first expression of these rheumatic diseases. This article reviews the main orofacial manifestations of rheumatic diseases that may be of interest to the rheumatologist for diagnosis and monitoring of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

  16. Atypical Neurological Manifestations Of Hypokalemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    pal P K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A part from the well-established syndrome of motor paralysis, hypokalemia may present with atypical neurological manifestations, which are not well documented in literature. Methods: We treated 30 patients of hypokalemia whose neurological manifestations improved after corrections of hypokalemia. A retrospective chart review of the clinical profile was done with emphasis on the evolution of symptoms and occurrence of unusual manifestations. Results: Twenty-eight patients had subacute quadriparesis with duration of symptoms varying from 10hrs to 7 days and two had slowly progressive quadriparesis. Fifty percent of patients had more than one attack of paralysis. Early asymmetric weakness (11, stiffness and abnormal posture of hands (7, predominant bibrachial weakness (4, distal paresthesias (4, hemiparesthesia (1, hyperreflexia(4, early severe weakness of neck muscles (3, chorea (1, trismus (1,and, retention of urine (1 were the unusual features observed. The means level of serum potassium on admission was 2.1+0.6mEq/L.and the serum creatine kinase was elevated in 14 out of 17 patients. All patients except two had complete recovery.

  17. Neurological manifestations of thoracic myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Shota; Kaito, Takashi; Hosono, Noboru; Miwa, Toshitada; Oda, Takenori; Okuda, Shinya; Yamashita, Tomoya; Oshima, Kazuya; Ariga, Kenta; Asano, Masatoshi; Fuchiya, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Nagamoto, Yukitaka; Makino, Takahiro; Yamazaki, Ryoji; Yonenobu, Kazuo

    2014-07-01

    Investigation of preoperative manifestations of thoracic myelopathy in a large population has not been reported. The aim of this study was to identify symptoms specific to anatomical pathology or compressed segments in thoracic myelopathy through investigation of preoperative manifestations. Subjects were 205 patients [143 men, 62 women; mean age, 62.2 (range 21-87 years)] with thoracic myelopathy who underwent surgery at our affiliate institutions from 2000 to 2011. The disease distribution included ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) in 106 patients, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in 17, OLF with OPLL in 17, intervertebral disc herniation (IDH) in 23, OLF with IDH in 3, and spondylosis in 39. We assessed (1) initial and preoperative complaints, (2) neurological findings, (3) Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores (JOA, full score, 11 points), (4) the compressed segments, and (5) preoperative duration. Multivariate analyses were performed to examine potential relationships between preoperative manifestations and anatomical pathology or compressed segments. The multivariate analyses revealed relationships between lower limb muscle weakness and T10/11 anterior compression; lower limb pain and T11/12 anterior compression; low back pain and T11/12 compression; and hyporeflexia in the patellar tendon reflex/foot drop and T12/L1 anterior compression. This study elucidated symptoms specific to anatomical pathology or compressed segments in thoracic myelopathy. These relationships can be helpful in the initial investigation of thoracic diseases, although additional measures such as MRI or CT are necessary for definitive diagnosis.

  18. Toxoplasmosis and its Ocular Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koev Kr.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present review provides general information about the parasitic infection of toxoplasmosis and describes the ways of its transmission. It outlines the importance of the consequences of toxoplasmosis infection and the methods of its prevention. The review traces the harmful effects of the disease on human and animal organisms, the causes and stages of development of the disease. The review specifically focuses on the ocular manifestations of toxoplasmosis which can cause ocular lesions, inflammation and scarring. Herein are described the ways toxoplasmosis can damage the eyes causing chorioretinitis, nystagmus, microphthalmia, etc. Furthermore, the review addresses the problem of how congenital and acquired toxoplasmosis affects eyes. The ocular symptoms of toxoplasmosis include weakened or blurred vision, eyeballs pain, ocular sensitivity to light, etc. The harmful effects of toxoplasmosis to pregnant women and immunocompromised patients have been delineated. Some of the disease manifestations include jaundice, rash, asphyxia, etc. The review traces the diagnostic work-up and comments on common tests for toxoplasmosis, such as taking of blood serum samples. The review ends with the treatment of the disease and of its ocular manifestations in particular, for example application of intravitreous injection. The prevention of the infection is extremely important for pregnant women, immunocompromised patients and patients with AIDS.

  19. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  20. Thoracic manifestation of tuberculosis; Thorakale Manifestation der Tuberkulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzl-Palma, D.; Prosch, H. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Allgemeine Radiologie und Kinderradiologie, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2016-10-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and transmission is via an airborne route by droplet infection. In the majority of cases patients have thoracic TB, which most frequently presents with hilar lymphadenopathy and pulmonary manifestation. Due to the rise in incidence of TB in central Europe to be expected over the coming years, it is essential to be acquainted with the radiological manifestations of pulmonary TB, particularly to be able to discriminate active from inactive TB. Due to the use of molecular techniques entailing DNA fingerprinting, the traditional classification of TB in primary and postprimary TB is being challenged. These genetic studies have revealed that variations in the clinical and radiographic appearance of TB are mainly affected by the immune status of the patients. Due to the low prevalence of TB in central Europe and the wide variation of radiological presentations, the diagnosis and therapy of TB is often delayed. In this article, the radiographic manifestations of thoracic TB are summarized and discussed. Together with the medical history and bacteriological tests, chest X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) play a major role not only in the detection of TB but also in the follow-up during and after therapy. Chest X-radiographs should be the primary diagnostic method in patients with suspected TB in screening as well as for diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The use of CT is more sensitive than chest radiographs and is frequently performed after chest radiographs to obtain detailed information about subtle parenchymal changes or lymph node manifestation. When active TB is suspected CT should be performed. Tree in bud, lobular consolidations, centrilobular nodules, cavities and ground-glass opacification are typical changes in active TB. (orig.) [German] Tuberkulose (Tbc) ist eine durch Troepfchen uebertragene granulomatoese Infektionserkrankung, die durch das Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  1. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  2. [Oral candidiasis: clinical features and control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2010-10-01

    Candidiasis is the most commonly encountered fungal infection, and oral candidiasis is often observed as a local opportunistic infection. Oral candidiasis is clinically divided into three types: acute forms, chronic forms, and Candida-associated lesions. Candida adhesion and multiplication are largely regulated by the local and systemic factors of the host. The local factors include impairment of the oral mucosal integrity, which is usually impaired by hyposalivation, anticancer drugs/radiation for head and neck cancers, denture wearing, a decrease in the oral bacterial population, and poor oral hygiene. Among Candida species, oral candidiasis is mostly caused by Candida albicans (C. albicans), C. glabrata, or C. tropicalis. Oral Candida induces a variety of symptoms, such as oral mucosal inflammation manifesting as an uncomfortable feeling, pain, erythema, erosion, taste abnormalities, and hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. Candida overgrowth in the oral cavity may disseminate to distant organs. Therefore, in order to avoid the sequelae of systemic candidiasis, oral candidiasis should be rapidly controlled. Oral candidiasis is usually treated by the local application of antifungal drugs. However, oral candidiasis occasionally escapes the control of such local treatment due to the development of multi-drug resistant Candida strains and species or due to the suppression of salivation or cellular immune activity. When drug-resistant strains are suspected as the pathogens and when the host is generally compromised, the oral administration of combinations of antifungal drugs, enhancement of cellular immune activity, and improvement of the nutritional condition are recommended.

  3. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepfer, Alain; Scharl, Michael; Lakatos, Peter L.; Navarini, Alexander; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Extraintestinal manifestations (EIM) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are frequent and may occur before or after IBD diagnosis. EIM may impact the quality of life for patients with IBD significantly requiring specific treatment depending on the affected organ(s). They most frequently affect joints, skin, or eyes, but can also less frequently involve other organs such as liver, lungs, or pancreas. Certain EIM, such as peripheral arthritis, oral aphthous ulcers, episcleritis, or erythema nodosum, are frequently associated with active intestinal inflammation and usually improve by treatment of the intestinal activity. Other EIM, such as uveitis or ankylosing spondylitis, usually occur independent of intestinal inflammatory activity. For other not so rare EIM, such as pyoderma gangrenosum and primary sclerosing cholangitis, the association with the activity of the underlying IBD is unclear. Successful therapy of EIM is essential for improving quality of life of patients with IBD. Besides other options, tumor necrosis factor antibody therapy is an important therapy for EIM in patients with IBD. PMID:26154136

  4. A disguised tuberculosis in oral buccal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Kanwar Deep Singh; Mehta, Anurag; Marwaha, Mohita; Kalra, Manpreet; Nanda, Jasmine

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is a chronic granulomatous disease that can affect any part of the body, including the oral cavity. Oral lesions of tuberculosis, though uncommon, are seen in both the primary and secondary stages of the disease. This article presents a case of tuberculosis of the buccal mucosa, manifesting as non-healing, non-painful ulcer. The diagnosis was confirmed based on histopathology, sputum examination and immunological investigation. The patient underwent anti-tuberculosis therapy and her oral and systemic conditions improved rapidly. Although oral manifestations of tuberculosis are rare, clinicians should include them in the differential diagnosis of various types of oral ulcers. An early diagnosis with prompt treatment can prevent complications and potential contaminations.

  5. Pulmonary Nodules as an Initial Manifestation of Behçet's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malekmohammad, M; Emamifar, A

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a systemic vasculopathy, characterized by recurrent oral aphthae, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. Although vascular involvement, including venous and arteries of any size, is a usual manifestation, cases with pulmonary thrombosis as the initial symptom are not ......Behçet's disease (BD) is a systemic vasculopathy, characterized by recurrent oral aphthae, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. Although vascular involvement, including venous and arteries of any size, is a usual manifestation, cases with pulmonary thrombosis as the initial symptom...

  6. Oral Thrush

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feeding mothers In addition to the distinctive white mouth lesions, infants may have trouble feeding or be fussy ... candidiasis (yeast infection) patient information. American Academy of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology. http://www.aaomp.org/public/oral-candidiasis.php. ...

  7. Oral Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 規子; スズキ, ノリコ; Noriko, SUZUKI

    2004-01-01

    The major oral functions can be categorized as mastication, swallowing, speech and respiratory functions. Dysfunction of these results in dysphagia, speech disorders and abnormal respiration (such as Sleep Apnea). These functions relate to dentistry in the occurrence of : (1) oral preparatory and oral phases, (2) articulation disorders and velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI), and (3) mouth breathing, respiratory and blowing disorders. These disorders are related to oral and maxillofacial diseas...

  8. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sevdalina; Lambova

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis(SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography(especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome.

  9. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Robert C; Strollo, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease

  10. Cutaneous manifestations of chikungunya fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharam, K A; Sridevi, K; Vidyasagar, P

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging RNA viral infection produces different cutaneous manifestations in children compared to adults. 52 children with chikungunya fever, confirmed by positive IgM antibody test were seen during 2009-2010. Pigmentary lesions were common (27/52) followed by vesiculobullous lesions (16/52) and maculopapular lesions (14/52). Vesiculobullous lesions were most common in infants, although rarely reported in adults. Psoriasis was exacerbated in 4 children resulting in more severe forms. In 2 children, guttate psoriasis was observed for the first time.

  11. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  12. Gaucher disease and bone manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Gemma; Zimran, Ari; Bembi, Bruno; Kanis, John; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, Renè; Cooper, Cyrus; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-12-01

    Gaucher disease is a relatively rare metabolic disease caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Gaucher disease affects multiple organs, among which is the skeleton. Bone involvement occurs frequently in Gaucher disease, and is one of its most debilitating features, reducing the quality of life of patients. Bone status is an important consideration for treatment to ameliorate symptoms and reduce the risk of irreversible complications. We have conducted a systematic review of all the various aspects of Gaucher disease, focusing on different skeletal manifestations, pathophysiology of bone alterations, clinical symptoms, and current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  13. [Corneal manifestations in systemic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarranz Ventura, J; De Nova, E; Moreno-Montañés, J

    2008-01-01

    Systemic diseases affecting the cornea have a wide range of manifestations. The detailed study of all pathologies that cause corneal alteration is unapproachable, so we have centered our interest in the most prevalent or characteristic of them. In this paper we have divided these pathologies in sections to facilitate their study. Pulmonar and conective tissue (like colagen, rheumatologic and idiopathic inflamatory diseases), dermatologic, cardiovascular, hematologic, digestive and hepatopancreatic diseases with corneal alteration are described. Endocrine and metabolic diseases, malnutrition and carential states are also studied, as well as some otorhinolaryngologic and genetic diseases that affect the cornea. Finally, a brief report of ocular toxicity induced by drugs is referred.

  14. Cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Roujayee Abdulaziz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has many extraintestinal manifestations, and skin lesions are one of the most frequently described extraintestinal findings. Reports indicate an incidence of cutaneous manifestations ranging from 2 to 34%, Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. In this review we aim to address the various cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD, their impact on the disease course, and the treatment options available.

  15. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  16. Cutaneous manifestations of internal malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ayyamperumal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many malignancies affecting the internal organs display cutaneous manifestations which may be either specific (tumor metastases or nonspecific lesions. Aims: The study is aimed at determining the frequency and significance of cutaneous manifestations among patients with internal malignancy. Materials and Methods: 750 cases of proven internal malignancy, who attended a cancer chemotherapy center in South India, were studied. Specific infiltrates were confirmed by histopathology, fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC and marker studies. Results: Out of the 750 patients with internal malignancy, skin changes were seen in a total of 52 (6.93% patients. Conclusion: Cutaneous metastases (specific lesions were seen in 20 patients (2.66%: contiguous in 6 (0.8%, and non-contiguous in 14 (1.86%. Nonspecific skin changes were seen in 32 patients (4.26%. None of our patients presented with more than one type of skin lesions. Herpes zoster was the most common nonspecific lesion noticed in our patients, followed by generalized pruritus, multiple eruptive seborrheic keratoses, bullous disorder, erythroderma, flushing, purpura, pyoderma gangrenosum, insect bite allergy and lichenoid dermatitis.

  17. 40 CFR 761.210 - Manifest discrepancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.210 Manifest discrepancies. (a) Manifest discrepancies are differences between the quantity or type of PCB waste designated on the manifest or shipping paper and the quantity or type of PCB waste actually delivered to and received by a designated facility...

  18. Esophageal Candidiasis as the Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeno, Yukiko; Uryu, Hideki; Iwata, Yuko; Hatada, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Jumpei; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with persistent dysphagia. A gastroendoscopy revealed massive esophageal candidiasis, and oral miconazole was prescribed. Three weeks later, she returned to our hospital without symptomatic improvement. She was febrile, and blood tests showed leukocytosis (137,150 /μL, blast 85%), anemia and thrombocytopenia. She was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She received chemotherapy and antimicrobial agents. During the recovery from the nadir, bilateral ocular candidiasis was detected, suggesting the presence of preceding candidemia. Thus, esophageal candidiasis can be an initial manifestation of AML. Thorough examination to detect systemic candidiasis is strongly recommended when neutropenic patients exhibit local candidiasis prior to chemotherapy.

  19. Familial pellagra-like skin rash with neurological manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, E; Statter, M; Yatziv, S

    1981-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy of Arabic origin presented with a pellagra-like rash and neurological manifestations including ataxia, dysarthria, nystagmus, and coma. There was a striking response to oral nicotinamide. The laboratory findings were not typical of Hartnup disease: aminoaciduris and indicanuria were absent and there was no evidence of tryptophan malabsorption. Tryptophan loading did not induce tryptophanuria nor did it increase excretion of xanthurenic or kynurenic acids. These findings support the possibility of a block in tryptophan degradation. The family history suggests a genetically-determined disorder. PMID:6451201

  20. Gastrointestinal manifestations of food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Jaime Liou; Aceves, Seema S

    2011-04-01

    The rates of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders appear to be increasing. The most common of these is eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) which is a clinicopathologic condition consisting of characteristic symptoms and endoscopic features accompanied by a pan-esophageal, acid resistant epithelial eosinophilia of greater than equal to 15 per high power field. Typical symptoms include dysphagia and abdominal pain. Typical endoscopic features include pallor, plaques, furrows, concentric rings. Complications include food impactions and strictures. EoE resolution with food elimination diets provides evidence that EoE is a food-antigen driven process. In vitro and microarray studies have identified specific immunologic factors underlying EoE pathogenesis. Other gastrointestinal manifestations of food intolerances/allergy include food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome.

  1. Ocular manifestations of mitochondrial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Mathebula

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disease caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA is recognized as one of the most common causes of inherited neurological disease. Neuro-ophthalmic manifestations are a common feature of mitochondrial disease.  Optic atrophy causing central visual loss is the dominant feature of mitochondrial DNA diseases. Nystagmus is also encountered in mitochondrial disease.Although optometrists are not involved with the management of mitochondrial disease, they are likely to see more patients with this disease. Oph-thalmic examination forms part of the clinical assessment of mitochondrial disease. Mitochondrial disease should be suspected in any patient with unexplained optic neuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinopathy or retrochiasmal visual loss. Despite considerable advances in the under-standing of mitochondrial genetics and the patho-genesis of mtDNA diseases, no effective treatment options are currently available for patients withmitochondrial dysfunction. (S Afr Optom 201271(1 46-50

  2. Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations in Syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivars Lleó, M; Clavo Escribano, P; Menéndez Prieto, B

    2016-05-01

    Although the diversity of the clinical manifestations of syphilis is well-known, atypical presentations can also occur. Such atypical presentations are associated with a high risk of transmission as a result of diagnostic confusion and treatment delays owing to the disease's ability to mimic other common skin diseases, deviate from classic clinical presentations, and adopt unique forms. Cases of atypical syphilis have been described most frequently in patients with concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because the incidence of syphilis has been growing over recent years -particularly in patients with HIV co-infection- dermatologists need to be familiar with the less well-known clinical presentations of this venereal disease. Copyright © 2015 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurological manifestations in Fabry disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph Bruno Bidin Brooks; Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare, progressive, multisystem and highly debilitating disease. FD is an X-linked lysosome storage disorder that results in α-galactosidase A deifciency. The subsequent accumulation of glycosphingolipids is more evident in vascular endothelium and smooth-muscle cells. The resulting effect of the deposition is generalized inlfammation and vasculopathy, which can also affect the central and peripheral nervous system. FD progresses with kidney dysfunction, angiokeratoma of the skin, cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular events and neurological disorders. In the present review, the neurological manifestations of FD are summarized with emphasis on cerebral vasculopathy, cochlear nerve dysfunction, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms, autonomic dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy. Enzyme replacement therapy is also discussed in the light of its more prominent effects when administered early in life, which make it essential to diagnose FD as soon as possible.

  4. [Pulmonary manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Justyna; Domysławska, Izabela; Bagrowska, Magdalena; Sierakowski, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by destructive cartilages, bones and other structures formed joints. RA belongs to connective tissue diseases represented by systemic nature, internal illness, extra-articular features and rapidly progress of atherosceirosis. The extra-articular complications cause the reduction of patient longevity. The frequency of symptoms in patient with RA and respiratory disorders occur in 10-20% of cases. Pulmonary complications are the second most common cause of premature of patient deaths. Respiratory disorders associated with RA are devided into 3 groups: infection, lung disease caused by drugs and pulmonary manifestation connected by RA. These last affect interstitial tissue, bronchioli, pulmonary vessels, pleura, also are presented by pulmonary rheumatoid nodules and pulmonary hypertension.

  5. Oropharyngeal dysphagia: manifestations and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Nathalie; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Swallowing disorders (dysphagia) have been recognized by the WHO as a medical disability associated with increased morbidity, mortality and costs of care. With increasing survival rates and ageing of the population, swallowing disorders and their role in causing pulmonary and nutritional pathologies are becoming exceedingly important. Over the past two decades, the study of oropharyngeal dysphagia has been approached from various disciplines with considerable progress in understanding its pathophysiology. This Review describes the most frequent manifestations of oropharyngeal dysphagia and the clinical as well as instrumental techniques that are available to diagnose patients with dysphagia. However, the clinical value of these diagnostic tests and their sensitivity to predict outcomes is limited. Despite considerable clinical research efforts, conventional diagnostic methods for oropharyngeal dysphagia have limited proven accuracy in predicting aspiration and respiratory disease. We contend that incorporation of measurable objective assessments into clinical diagnosis is needed and might be key in developing novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Mucocutaneous manifestations of Chikungunya fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandyopadhyay Debabrata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya fever (CF is an arboviral acute febrile illness transmitted by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. After a quiescence of more than three decades, CF has recently re-emerged as a major public health problem of global scale. CF is characterized by an acute onset of high fever associated with a severe disabling arthritis often accompanied by prominent mucocutaneous manifestations. The disease is usually self-limiting, but the joint symptoms and some of the cutaneous features may persist after the defervescence. A wide range of mucocutaneous changes has been described to occur in association with CF during the current epidemic. Besides a morbilliform erythema, hyperpigmentation, xerosis, excoriated papules, aphthous-like ulcers, vesiculobullous and lichenoid eruptions, and exacerbation of pre-existing or quiescent dermatoses had been observed frequently. These unusual features may help in the clinical differential diagnosis of acute viral exanthems mimicking CF.

  7. Cutaneous manifestations in patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udayakumar P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic renal failure (CRF presents with an array of cutaneous manifestations. Newer changes are being described since the advent of hemodialysis, which prolongs the life expectancy, giving time for these changes to manifest. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dermatologic problems among patients with chronic renal failure (CRF undergoing hemodialysis. Methods: One hundred patients with CRF on hemodialysis were examined for cutaneous changes. Results: Eighty-two per cent patients complained of some skin problem. However, on examination, all patients had at least one skin lesion attributable to CRF. The most prevalent finding was xerosis (79%, followed by pallor (60%, pruritus (53% and cutaneous pigmentation (43%. Other cutaneous manifestations included Kyrle′s disease (21%; fungal (30%, bacterial (13% and viral (12% infections; uremic frost (3%; purpura (9%; gynecomastia (1%; and dermatitis (2%. The nail changes included half and half nail (21%, koilonychia (18%, onychomycosis (19%, subungual hyperkeratosis (12%, onycholysis (10%, splinter hemorrhages (5%, Mees′ lines (7%, Muehrcke′s lines (5% and Beau′s lines (2%. Hair changes included sparse body hair (30%, sparse scalp hair (11% and brittle and lusterless hair (16%. Oral changes included macroglossia with teeth markings (35%, xerostomia (31%, ulcerative stomatitis (29%, angular cheilitis (12% and uremic breath (8%. Some rare manifestations of CRF like uremic frost, gynecomastia and pseudo-Kaposi′s sarcoma were also observed. Conclusions: CRF is associated with a complex array of cutaneous manifestations caused either by the disease or by treatment. The commonest are xerosis and pruritus and the early recognition of cutaneous signs can relieve suffering and decrease morbidity.

  8. ORAL ALLERGY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sergeev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as a set of clinical manifestations caused by IgE-mediated allergic  reactions  that  occur  at  oral  and  pharyngeal  mucosae  in  the  patients  with  pollen  sensitization  after ingestion of certain fruits, vegetables, nuts and spices. OAS arises from cross-reactivity between specific pollen and food allergens, due to similarity of a configuration and amino acid sequence of allergenic molecules. OAS is considered as class II food allergy, being caused by thermo- and chemolabile allergens, and it is rarely combined with generalized manifestations of food allergy. Prevalence and spectrum of the causal allergens depend on a kind of pollen sensitization. In Moscow region, as well as in Northern Europe, allergic sensitization most commonly occurs to the pollen of leaf trees, whereas OAS is mostly connected with ingestion of fruits from Rosaceae family and nuts. Since last years, a newly developed technique of component-resolved molecular diagnosis (CR diagnostics allows of more precise detection of OAS-causing allergen molecules. These data are of extreme importance for administration of adequate nutritional therapy and prediction of SIT efficiency. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 1, pp 17-28

  9. Musculoskeletal manifestations of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steere, A C

    1995-04-24

    Musculoskeletal involvement, particularly arthritis, is a common feature of Lyme disease. Early in the illness, patients may experience migratory musculoskeletal pain in joints, bursae, tendons, muscle, or bone in one or a few locations at a time, frequently lasting only hours or days in a given location. Weeks to months later, after the development of a marked cellular and humoral immune response to the spirochete, untreated patients often have intermittent or chronic monoarticular or oligoarticular arthritis-primarily in large joints, especially the knee-during a period of several years. The diagnosis of Lyme arthritis is usually based on the presence of this characteristic clinical picture, exposure in an endemic area, and an elevated immunoglobulin G antibody response to Borrelia burgdorferi. In addition, spirochetal DNA can often be detected in joint fluid by polymerase chain reaction. Lyme arthritis can usually be treated successfully with 1-month courses of oral doxycycline or amoxicillin or with 2- to 4-week courses of intravenous ceftriaxone. However, patients with certain genetic and immune markers may have persistent arthritis, despite treatment with oral or intravenous antibiotics. B. burgdorferi may occasionally trigger fibromyalgia, a chronic pain syndrome with diffuse joint and muscle symptoms. This syndrome does not appear to respond to antibiotic therapy.

  10. Oral histoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Karthikeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal disease that takes various clinical forms, among which oral lesions are rare. The disseminated form of the disease that usually occurs in association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV is one of the AIDS-defining diseases. Isolated oral histoplasmosis, without systemic involvement, with underlying immunosuppression due to AIDS is very rare. We report one such case of isolated oral histoplasmosis in a HIV-infected patient.

  11. Crohn’s Disease Ocular Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koev Kr.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease which causes inflammation of the digestive tract. Crohn’s disease most frequently affects the ileum and the colon. In the active stage of the disease signs and symptoms may include diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramping, blood in the stools, reduced appetite and weight loss. In patients with severe Crohn’s disease the following signs and symptoms may be observed: fever, fatigue, arthritis, eye inflammation, oral ulcers, skin disorders, inflammation of the liver or bile ducts or delayed growth. Heredity and dysfunctions of the immune system are considered to cause the development of Crohn’s disease. About 10% of people with inflammatory bowel disease have also ocular problems. The most common ocular manifestations of Crohn’s disease are uveitis, iritis, episcleritis, keratopathy, keratoconjunctivitis and retinal vasculitis. Untreated uveitis may cause glaucoma and vision loss. Uveitis and iritis are four times more common in women than in men. In patients in the active stage of the disease, episcleritis also flares. Symptoms of episcleritis include inflammation, bright red spots on the sclera and localized pain. Keratoconjunctivitis in Crohn’s disease is caused by decreased tear production or increased tear film evaporation. Dry eyes can cause itching, burning or infection. Keratopathy usually causes no pain or vision loss, therefore in most cases no treatment is needed. In retinal vasculitis tortuosity of retinal veins, retinal edema at the posterior pole and intraretinal blood near blood vessels are observed. Intravenous fluorescein angiography shows intraretinal neovascularisation and haemorrhage in the posterior pole.

  12. Trismus as a Clinical Manifestation of Tetanus: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadiochos, Ioannis; Papadiochou, Sofia; Petsinis, Vassilis; Goutzanis, Lampros; Atsali, Charikleia; Papadogeorgaki, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Although the incidence of tetanus disease has radically declined in developed countries, both dental practitioners and oral and maxillofacial surgeons should be knowledgeable about its diagnosis since initial manifestations of the disease, such as trismus and dysphagia, are observed in the orofacial region. This study reports on a case of generalized tetanus diagnosed in a middle-aged man. Before the tetanus diagnosis, the patient had sought medical advice from seven different health care professionals, including a dentist and an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. The patient reported trismus and dysphagia as his main complaints. The suspicion of tetanus emerged from the patient's manifestations in conjunction with his history of trauma and his agricultural occupation. The patient underwent successful treatment including administration of muscle relaxants, antibiotics, and booster vaccination doses of tetanus toxoid as well as a tracheostomy and aided mechanical ventilation. This case report highlights the significance of taking a meticulous medical history, thoroughly performing a physical examination, and systematically assessing orofacial signs and symptoms.

  13. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  14. [EEG manifestations in metabolic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2005-09-01

    Normal brain function depends on normal neuronal metabolism, which is closely related to systemic homeostasis of metabolites, such as glucose, electrolytes, amino acids and ammonia. "Metabolic encephalopathy" indicates diffuse brain dysfunction caused by various systemic derangements. Electroencephalogram (EEG) is widely used to evaluate metabolic encephalopathy since 1937, when Berger first observed slow brain activity induced by hypoglycemia. EEG is most useful in differentiating organic from psychiatric conditions, identifying epileptogenicity, and providing information about the degree of cortical or subcortical dysfunction. In metabolic encephalopathy, EEG evolution generally correlates well with the severity of encephalopathy. However, EEG has little specificity in differentiating etiologies in metabolic encephalopathy. For example, though triphasic waves are most frequently mentioned in hepatic encephalopathy, they can also be seen in uremic encephalopathy, or even in aged psychiatric patients treated with lithium. Spike-and-waves may appear in hyper- or hypo-glycemia, uremic encephalopathy, or vitamin deficiencies, etc. Common principles of EEG changes in metabolic encephalopathy are (1) varied degrees of slowing, (2) assorted mixtures of epileptic discharge, (3) high incidence of triphasic waves, and (4), as a rule, reversibility after treatment of underlying causes. There are some exceptions to the above descriptions in specific metabolic disorders and EEG manifestations are highly individualized.

  15. Rheumatic manifestations of pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, S; Kleinberg, D L

    2001-10-01

    Pituitary tumors may cause rheumatologic problems as a result of under production or overproduction of one pituitary hormone. Excessive growth hormone causes destruction of cartilage by a direct action. Facial and acral changes and arthralgias may be some of the first symptoms of acromegaly. The arthritis associated with acromegaly is often devastating. Carpal tunnel syndrome is very common in patients with acromegaly. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) has indirect effects via the action of glucocorticoid on bones, muscles, and the immune system. Proximal muscle weakness is a characteristic feature of Cushing's syndrome. Patients with Cushing's syndrome commonly have osteopenia and osteoporosis that lead to an increase in bone fractures. Avascular necrosis is associated with exogenous steroid administration. The effects of too much glucocorticoid or too rapid withdrawal can be severe. Gonadotropins act via the gonadal steroids and protect bone mass from loss. Prolactin is less involved in rheumatologic disease; the data for which are limited in humans. Pituitary tumors can have manifestations similar to rheumatologic disorders and should be included in the differential diagnosis of these diseases.

  16. Skin manifestations in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Falco, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases encompass a group of inflammatory diseases that are non-infectious, non-allergic, non-autoimmune and non-immunodeficient. The term was initially coined for a small group of familial periodic fever syndromes of which familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common and best known. Genetic and molecular analyses demonstrated for the majority of these diseases an impairment of inflammasomes to cause an increased activity of an interleukin-1-dependent inflammatory response. Over the last years an increasing number of either rare hereditary syndromes or acquired common diseases could be summarized under the designation of autoinflammatory disease, thus creating an emerging new rubric of inflammatory diseases. Many of them display cutaneous manifestations as both concomitant or more rarely main symptoms. To name some of them like erysipelas-like erythema in FMF; urticaria-like rashes in tumor necrosis factor receptor 1- or cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (TRAPS, CAPS), hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome (HIDS) or Schnitzler syndrome; pyoderma gangrenosum and acne in PAPA syndrome; or behçetoid aphthous ulcerations in HIDS and PFAPA syndrome. Based on the new insights into pathogenesis one increasingly realizes the good response of these diseases to IL-1 antagonist therapies.

  17. Respiratory manifestations in endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencu, Codruţa; Alexescu, Teodora; Petrulea, Mirela; Lencu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The control mechanisms of respiration as a vital function are complex: voluntary - cortical, and involuntary - metabolic, neural, emotional and endocrine. Hormones and hypothalamic neuropeptides (that act as neurotrasmitters and neuromodulators in the central nervous system) play a role in the regulation of respiration and in bronchopulmonary morphology. This article presents respiratory manifestations in adult endocrine diseases that evolve with hormone deficit or hypersecretion. In hyperthyroidism, patients develop ventilation disorders, obstructive and central sleep apnea, and pleural collection. The respiratory abnormalities in hyperthyroidism as a result of the hypermetabolic action of thyroid hormones are hyperventilation, myopathy and cardiovascular involvement; recent studies have reported pulmonary arterial hypertension in Graves' disease, as a result of the association of several mechanisms. Thyroid hypertrophy can induce through compression of the upper airways dyspnea, stridor, wheezing and cough. The respiratory disorders in acromegaly are ventilatory dysfunction and sleep apnea, which contribute to an unfavorable evolution of the disease. Respiratory changes in parathyroid, adrenal and reproductive system diseases have been described. Respiratory disorders should be recognized, investigated and monitored by medical practitioners of various specialties (family physicians, internists, endocrinologists, pneumologists, cardiologists). They are frequently severe, causing an unfavorable evolution of the associated endocrine and respiratory disease.

  18. Rheumatological manifestations in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, Angela; Cerinic, Marco Matucci; De Giorgio, Francesca; Minari, Chiara; Rotella, Carlo Maria; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2006-11-01

    Rheumatological manifestations of Diabetes Mellitus may be classified in: non articular, articular and bone conditions. Among non articular conditions, diabetic cheiroarthropathy, frequent in type I diabetes, the most important disorder related to limited joint mobility, results in stiff skin and joint contractures. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, flexor tenosynovitis, and Duputryen's and Peyronie's diseases are also linked to limited joint mobility. Diffuse skeletal hyperostosis, due to calcification at entheses, is frequent and early, particularly in type 2 diabetes. Neuropathies cause some non articular conditions, mainly neuropathic arthritis, a destructive bone and joint condition more common in type I diabetes. Algodistrophy, shoulder-hand and entrapment syndromes are also frequent. Mononeuropathy causes diabetic amyotrophy, characterised by painless muscle weakness. Among muscle conditions, diabetic muscle infarction is a rare, sometimes severe, condition. Among articular conditions, osteoarthritis is frequent and early in diabetes, in which also chondrocalcinosis and gout occur. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diabetes I have a common genetic background and the presence of diabetes gives to RA an unfavourable prognosis. Among bone conditions, osteopenia and osteoporosis may occur early in type 1 diabetes. Contrarily, in type 2 diabetes, bone mineral density is similar or, sometimes, higher than in non diabetic subjects, probably due to hyperinsulinemia.

  19. Extracardiac manifestations of bacterial endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, J E

    1979-08-01

    Bacterial endocarditis is an elusive disease that challenges clinicians' diagnostic capabilities. Because it can present with various combinations of extravalvular signs and symptoms, the underlying primary disease can go unnoticed.A review of the various extracardiac manifestations of bacterial endocarditis suggests three main patterns by which the valvular infection can be obscured. (1) A major clinical event may be so dramatic that subtle evidence of endocarditis is overlooked. The rupture of a mycotic aneurysm may simulate a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a congenital aneurysm. (2) The symptoms of bacterial endocarditis may be constitutional complaints easily attributable to a routine, trivial illness. Symptoms of low-grade fever, myalgias, back pain and anorexia may mimic a viral syndrome. (3) Endocarditis poses a difficult diagnostic dilemma when it generates constellations of findings that are classic for other disorders. Complaints of arthritis and arthralgias accompanied by hematuria and antinuclear antibody may suggest systemic lupus erythematosus; a renal biopsy study showing diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis may support this diagnosis. The combination of fever, petechiae, altered mental status, thrombocytopenia, azotemia and anemia may promote the diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. When the protean guises of bacterial endocarditis create these clinical difficulties, errors in diagnosis occur and appropriate therapy is delayed. Keen awareness of the varied disease presentations will improve success in managing endocarditis by fostering rapid diagnosis and prompt therapy.

  20. EXTRAGASTRIC AND ORODENTAL MANIFESTATIONS IN PEDIATRIC INFECTION WITH HELICOBACTER PYLORI. A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaranda DIACONESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a worlwide spread infection mostly manifested in childhood. Many - both invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests - are now available,. The colonisation effect of gastric mucosa and its consequences are well known and studied. H. pylori can also induce extra-gastric manifestations, like iron-deficiency anemia. The role of oral cavity colonisation is not clearly defined, several studies stating that the oral cavity represents a reservoir for H. pyloris. The presence of this rod in the dental plaque may lead to periodontitis, dental caries, dental calculus and tooth loos. Dental treatment associated with eradication therapy decreases the prevalence of oral H. pylori and improves the eradication rate of gastric H. pylori. Dental treatment in H. pylori infection management should be taken into consideration, especially in children and teens.

  1. Unusual florid skeletal manifestations of primary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashebu, Samuel D.; Dahniya, Mohamed H.; Muhtaseb, Sayeed A.; Aduh, Prosper [Department of Radiology, Al-Adan Hospital (Kuwait)

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) with advanced and unusual skeletal manifestations - a rare occurrence in developed countries nowadays. The literature is briefly reviewed. (orig.)

  2. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamar, Nassim; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques; Dalton, Harry R

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus can cause acute, fulminant and chronic hepatitis and has been associated with a range of extrahepatic manifestations. Guillain-Barré syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy and encephalitis are the main neurological manifestations associated with acute and chronic hepatitis E virus infection. Renal injuries have been also reported, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with or without cryoglobulinemia and membranous glomerulonephritis. Acute pancreatitis, haematological disorders and other autoimmune extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus, such as myocarditis and thyroiditis, have been also reported. In this comprehensive article, we review all published reports describing hepatitis E virus-associated extrahepatic manifestations.

  3. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropharyngeal cancers, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related oral disease and orodental trauma are major public health problems worldwide and poor oral health has a profound effect on general health and quality of life. The diversity in oral disease patterns and development trends across countries and regions reflects distinct risk profiles and the establishment of preventive oral health care programmes. The important role of sociobehavioural and environmental factors in oral health and disease has been shown in a large number of socioepidemiological surveys. In addition to poor living conditions, the major risk factors relate to unhealthy lifestyles (i.e. poor diet, nutrition and oral hygiene and use of tobacco and alcohol), and limited availability and accessibility of oral health services. Several oral diseases are linked to noncommunicable chronic diseases primarily because of common risk factors. Moreover, general diseases often have oral manifestations (e.g. diabetes or HIV/AIDS). Worldwide strengthening of public health programmes through the implementation of effective measures for the prevention of oral disease and promotion of oral health is urgently needed. The challenges of improving oral health are particularly great in developing countries. PMID:16211157

  4. Electrocardiographic Manifestations of Benzodiazepine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Kazemzadeh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the clinical and electrocardiographic (ECG manifestations of benzodiazepines (BZs. Methods: In this retrospective study, all BZ-poisoned patients hospitalized at Loghman Hakim Hospital between September 2010 and March 2011 were evaluated. Patients’ information including age, sex, time elapsed between the ingestion and presentation, and type of the BZ used were extracted from the patients' charts and recorded. ECGs on presentation to the emergency department (ED were evaluated and parameters such as PR interval, QRS duration, corrected QT, amplitude of S wave in lead I, height of R wave and R/S ratio in the lead aVR were also measured and recorded. Results: Oxazepam, chlordiazepoxide, lorazepam, alprazolam, diazepam, and clonazepam were ingested by 9 (3%, 13 (4.4%, 29 (9.9%, 105 (35.8%, 65 (22.2%, and 72 (24.6% patients, respectively. Mean PR interval was reported to be 0.16 ± 0.03 sec and PR interval of greater than 200 msec was detected in 12 (4.5% patients. Mean QRS duration was 0.07 ± 0.01sec and QRS≥120 msec was observed in 7 (2.6% cases. Conclusion: Diazepam is the only BZ that does not cause QRS widening and oxazepam is the only one not causing PR prolongation. It can be concluded that if a patient refers with a decreased level of consciousness and accompanying signs of BZ toxicity, QRS widening in ECG rules out diazepam, whereas PR prolongation rules out oxazepam toxicity.

  5. Gastrointestinal manifestations in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermont, E

    1996-08-01

    CFTR, or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the gene product that is defective in cystic fibrosis, is present in the apical membrane of the epithelial cells from the stomach to the colon. In the foregut, the clinical manifestations are not directly related to the primary defect of the CFTR chloride channel. The most troublesome complaints and symptoms originate from the oesophagus as peptic oesophagitis or oesophageal varices. In the small intestinal wall, the clinical expression of CF depends largely on the decreased secretion of fluid and chloride ions, the increased permeability of the paracellular space between adjacent enterocytes and the sticky mucous cover over the enterocytes. As a rule, the brush border enzyme activities are normal and there is some enhanced active transport as shown for glucose and alanine. The results of continuous enteral feeding of CF patients clearly show that the small intestinal mucosa, in the daily situation, is not functioning at maximal capacity. Although CFTR expression in the colon is lower, the large intestine may be the site of several serious complications such as rectal prolapse, meconium ileus equivalent, intussusception, volvulus and silent appendicitis. In recent years colonic strictures, after the use of high-dose pancreatic enzymes, are being increasingly reported; the condition has recently been called CF fibrosing colonopathy. The CF gastrointestinal content itself differs mainly from the normal condition by the lower acidity in the foregut and the accretion of mucins and proteins, eventually resulting in intestinal obstruction, in the ileum and colon. Better understanding of the CF gastrointestinal phenotype may contribute to improvement of the overall wellbeing of these patients.

  6. Cystic thymic diseases: CT manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Soon Young; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Eui Yong; Jeon, Seok Chol; Seo, Heung Suk; Hahm, Chang Kok [School of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    To describe CT findings and differential points of cystic thymic lesions. We evaluated retrospectively total 19 masses with well marginated cystic lesions at thymic area on CT scans. They were 10 teratomas, 3 congenital thymic cysts, 2 multilocular thymic cysts(associated with thymoma and myasthenia gravis in each), 2 cysts Assciated with thymic Hodgkin's lymphomas an ectopic parathyroid cyst, and an infected thymic cyst. The radiological abnormalities evaluated were thickness of the wall, presence or abscene of septa, mural nodule, solid component, calcification and fat component. All three cases of congenital thymic cysts and an ectopic parathyroid cyst appeared as thin-walled unilocular cyst with homogeneous internal density and without identifiable solid component. In multilocular thymic cyst, there were thick wall and solid components(n =2), thick internal septa and calcifications(n = 1). The cysts of teratomas manifested thick walls(n = 9), internal septa(n = 4), calcifications(n = 6), fat components(n = 4), and solid components(n = 4). Cysts in Hodgkin's diseases appeared as multilocular or unilocular and had thick wall and septa without calcification. Infected thymic cyst presented with multilocular cystic mass with identifiable wall and septa, calcification, and solid components. The thymic diseases with cystic lesion include teratomas, congenital thymic cysts, multilocular thymic cysts, parathyroid cyst, and Hodgkin's disease. Congenital thymic cyst and ectopic parathyroid cyst are thin-walled unilocular cystic lesions. Cystic lesions associated with teratoma, Hodgkin's disease, and multilocular thymic cyst are thick-walled cystic lesions with or without solid component.

  7. Clinical manifestation of myeloperoxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F

    1998-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an iron-containing heme protein localized in the azurophilic granules of neutrophil granulocytes and in the lysosomes of monocytes, is involved in the killing of several micro-organisms and foreign cells, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, red cells, and malignant and nonmalignant nucleated cells. Despite the primary role of the oxygen-dependent MPO system in the destruction of certain phagocytosed microbes, subjects with total or partial MPO deficiency generally do not have an increased frequency of infections, probably because other MPO-independent mechanism(s) for microbicidal activity compensate for the lack of MPO. Infectious diseases, especially with species of Candida, have been observed predominantly in MPO-deficient patients who also have diabetes mellitus, but the frequency of such cases is very low, less than 5% of reported MPO-deficient subjects. Evidence from a number of investigators indicates that individuals with total MPO deficiency show a high incidence of malignant tumors. Since MPO-deficient PMNs exhibit in vitro a depressed lytic action against malignant human cells, it can be speculated that the neutrophil MPO system plays a central role in the tumor surveillance of the host. However, any definitive conclusion on the association between MPO deficiency and the occurrence of cancers needs to be confirmed in further clinical studies. Clinical manifestations of this disorder depend on the nature of the defect; an acquired abnormality associated with other hematological or nonhematological diseases has been occasionally described, but the primary deficiency is the form more commonly reported. Another area of interest pertinent to MPO expression is related to the use of anti-MPO monoclonal antibodies for the lineage assignment of acute leukemic cells, the definition of FAB MO acute myeloid leukemia, the identification of biphenotypic acute leukemias, and their distinction from acute leukemia with minimal phenotypic deviation

  8. Dermoid cyst with respiratory manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calle-Cabanillas MI, Ibañez-Muñoz C, Pérez-Sáez J, Navazo-Eguía AI, Clemente-García A, Sánchez-Hernández JM.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermoid cysts are congenital tumors caused by entrapment of ectoderm during embryogenesis. The most common localization are the gonads and less than 10% are in the head and neck. They are slow growing and generally observed between the second and third decades of life, being unusual in chilhood. Description: We report a case of a 5 year old male with recurrent respiratory infections, mouth breathing and snoring with apneas and daytime sleepiness. On physical examination tonsillar hypertrophy and a 4 cm sublingual tumor are detected. As complementary tests are performed overnight polysomnography with AHI of 18.3 / h and ultrasonography, reported as cystic mass with multiple rounded echogenic structures inside. Results: The patient was diagnosed with severe OSA and tonsillectomy and intraorally enucleation of tumor (as diagnosis and treatment were performed; with histopathological diagnosis of dermoid cyst. In the postoperative control we check the resolution of respiratory events and snoring. Discussion: Dermoid cysts of the oral cavity (where sublingual localization is the most common represent only 0,01% of all cysts and 1,6% of all dermoid cysts. Usually present as slow-growing asymptomatic mass, even if they reach large size can compromise swallowing, speech or breathing and eventually cause, as in our case, a severe OSA. The surgical treatment allows to confirm the diagnosis an avoid the risk of infectious complications and eventual malignant transformation.

  9. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-02-20

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  10. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The idea of identifying oral lesions with a precancerous nature, i.e. in the sense of pertaining to a pathologic process with an increased risk for future malignant development, of course is to prevent frank malignancy to occur in the affected area. The most common oral lesion with a precancerous...... nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  11. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome. Clinical manifestations. Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeni, Ramón A

    2006-01-01

    Clinical manifestation are described in children with epidemic HUS. The intestinal involvement in the prodromic period, is outlined and the most common disturbances such acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, leucocitosis hypertension, neurological, pancreatic and cardiac manifestations are described. We discuss the acid-base and electrolyte disturbances, metabolic acidosis, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia. The etiopathogenic treatment and the control of renal sequelae are also discussed.

  12. Cardiac manifestations of inborn errors of metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evangeliou, A.; Papadopoulou-Legbelou, K.; Daphnis, E.; Ganotakis, E.; Vavouranakis, I.; Michailidou, H.; Hitoglou-Makedou, A.; Nicolaidou, P.; Wevers, R.A.; Varlamis, G.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the frequency and type of cardiac manifestations in a defined group of patients with inborn errors of metabolism. This paper also explores the key role of cardiac manifestations in the diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism in daily practice. METHODS: O

  13. Pulmonary manifestations of the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, H James; Roubey, Robert A S

    2010-09-01

    A broad spectrum of pulmonary disease may occur in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. The most common pulmonary manifestations are pulmonary thromboembolism and pulmonary hypertension. In this article the authors review these manifestations, as well as less common findings including acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar hemorrhage, and pulmonary capillaritis.

  14. Congenital rubella syndrome and delayed manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Several hypotheses of different medical and psychological delayed manifestations among people who have congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) have been discussed. This study tests some of these hypotheses of delayed manifestations. Methods: Gathering information about 35 individuals who hav...... which people with CRS face must primarily be understood in relation to congenital deafblindness and dual sensory and communicative deprivation....

  15. 21 CFR 11.50 - Signature manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature manifestations. 11.50 Section 11.50 Food... RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Records § 11.50 Signature manifestations. (a) Signed electronic...: (1) The printed name of the signer; (2) The date and time when the signature was executed; and...

  16. NEUROLOGIC MANIFESTATION OF ORGANIC ACADEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inborn errors of organic acid metabolism are relatively recently recognized diseases with a wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms: ranging from asymptomatic, normal appearing children to death during first few days of life.In my presentation I will try to explain some of the most common clinical presentation of these disorder with stress on neurologic findings. Organic acidemia usually have three clinical manifestations Severe neonatal form, Intermittent late-onset form and chronic progressive form. Recurrent coma, The main feature of these disorders is due to accumulation of toxic metabolites in Central Nervous system with direct effect on the function, while chronic accumulation of these materials may interfere with CNS development or cerebral metabolism leading to developmental delay.Severe neonatal formsFollowing a symptom free interval of a few days from birth, poor sucking and difficult feeding appears in the newborn, followed by unexplained and progressive coma. Seizures may appear during the course of the disease and EEG may show a burst-suppression pattern. During this stage most infants have axial hypotonia with peripheral dystonia, choreoathetosis, episodic opisthotonus and some repetitive bicycling and boxing movements.Associated biochemical abnormalities including metabolic acidosis, ketonuria and hyperammonemia also is usually present. The overall short-term prognosis with recent advances in medical care is improving. But later in life acute intercurrent episodes triggered by a stress often occur, which can be occasionally fatal.bulging fontanelle and cerebral edema may mimic CNS infection in these babies.Intermittent late-onset formsRecurrent attacks of coma or lethargy with ataxia can occur in childhood or even in adolescence or adulthood. These episodes may be frequent, though in between these the child is entirely normal. These attacks are precipitated by conditions that enhance protein catabolism (trauma, infection etc

  17. Pyknodysostosis: Oral findings and differential diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyknodysostosis is a rare, genetic, autosomal recessive condition characterized by short stature, generalized bone sclerosis, and oral manifestations such as maxillary atresia and an increase of the mandibular angle. The main purpose of this article was to report a case of pyknodysostosis, describing the characteristic orofacial findings of the disease and discussing the differential diagnosis.

  18. Oral pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  19. Herpes - oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000606.htm Herpes - oral To use the sharing features on this page, ... 374. Read More Atopic dermatitis Cancer Fever Genital herpes Mouth ulcers Vesicles Review Date 8/14/2015 Updated ...

  20. Otolaryngologic manifestations among Hiv/Aids patients in a Nigerian tertiary health institution: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumai, Akande Halima

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim:This study is to determine these manifestations among HIV/AIDS patients in Ilorin to update on previous study. Method:This was a prospective study of all consecutive new patients confirmed to be HIV positive attending the HIV clinic of the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Kwara state, Nigeria between January and July, 2009. These patients were on HAART anti retroviral drug treatment. The information retrieved included the biodata, clinical presentation, otolaryngologic clinical findings, as well as their hearing assessment with Pure tone audiometry. Results:74 out of the 89 HIV patients(82.8% had otorhinolaryngological manifestations with the age range of 3 to 62 years (Mean of 36.4 yrs, SD=2.45±0.02. The modal age range was 21-40 years (59.6% 51males (57.3% and 38 females (42.7% and a sex ratio of 1.3:1. Commonest otorhinolaryngological features included nasal in 45.6% (chronic rhinosinusitis, oral/oropharyngeal in 23.9% (oral candidiasis, otological in 21.5% (Serous otitis media and cervical adenopathy in 9%. Conclusion: Otorhinolaryngological manifestations were found in 74 patients (82.8% and commonest features included chronic sinusitis, oral/pharyngeal candidiasis, serous otitis media with cervical adeopathy in that order. It is important for otolaryngologists to be aware of otolaryngological manifestations, so early diagnosis and timely intervention alongside appropriate anti-retroviral therapy be instituted to improve survival rates.

  1. Disparities in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020: Oral Health Objectives Site Map Disparities in Oral Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Oral health ... to get and keep dental insurance. Disparities in Oral Health Some of the oral health disparities that exist ...

  2. Dermatological manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus infected / acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients in a referral hospital of Central Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Criton S

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of skin diseases are described in association with HIV infection/AIDS. In the present study the frequency of various skin manifestations among HIV infected / AIDS patients are noted. Generalised pruritus and dry skin were the common manifestations encountered. There was a significant absence of Kaposi′s sarcoma, multi-dermatomal herpes zoster and oral hairy leukoplakia. A prominent hyperpigmented band on finger nails was seen.

  3. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  4. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  5. Cutaneous manifestations of marantic endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimyai-Asadi, A; Usman, A; Milani, F

    2000-04-01

    cerebral infarctions in three distinct areas of the brain. These included the left occipitotemporal area, the right parieto-occipital area, and the right posterior frontal region. The regions affected were in the distribution of both the anterior and posterior circulation. No evidence of hemorrhage was noted. The patient subsequently complained of abdominal discomfort. A computerized tomogram of the abdomen with oral and intravenous contrast revealed a 4-cm x 3-cm irregular mass in the tail of the pancreas with several low-attenuation lesions throughout the liver which were consistent with infarctions or metastases. Several splenic infarctions were also present. A biopsy of the tumor revealed pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The patient's carcinoembryonic antigen level was 18. 4 ng/mL (0-3) and the CA 19-9 antigen level was 207,000 U/mL (0-36). The alpha-fetoprotein level was normal. Other significant laboratory findings included a prothrombin time of 16.7 (international normalized ratio, 1.4), an activated partial thromboplastin time of 32 (ratio, 1.3), and a platelet count of 85,000/mm3. The Russell viper venom time, sedimentation rate, and C3 levels were normal, and the patient was negative for antinuclear antibodies, anticardiolipin antibodies, and antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens. Of note, the patient was not receiving any anticoagulation. Blood cultures for mycobacteria and fungi, human immunodeficiency virus serology, and urinalysis and culture were negative. The patient subsequently developed an inferior wall myocardial infarction and was transferred to the coronary care unit. In line with the family's request, aggressive care was ceased and the patient expired. The patient's family refused an autopsy.

  6. Estomatologic manifestations in HIV/AIDS patients

    OpenAIRE

    Garibay Rodríguez, Lorena Elvira; CD. Práctica privada.; Cisneros Zárate, Luis; Departamento Académico Médico Quirúrgico. Facultad de Odontología, UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    The study was carried out at Hospital Nacional Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, on 128 patients infected by the human inmunodefense virus. The aim of the investigation was to study the frecuency, and location of oral lesions, in relation with age and sex, also to establish the relationship between CD4 cells counts with oral lesions detected. The sample were selected in a probabilistic way; the data was recorded in a special designed format. 74 subjects of the sample were male and 57 female. Oral ...

  7. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis as a manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Shigetsuna; Honma, Masaru; Igawa, Satomi; Tsuji, Hitomi; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Migita, Kiyoshi; Ida, Hiroaki; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease, which is characterized by recurrent and paroxysmal fever, peritonitis, arthritis, myalgia, and skin rashes. Although various skin lesions such as "erysipelas-like erythema", urticaria, nonspecific purpura, and subcutaneous nodules have been described, cutaneous vasculitis is rare. We report a Japanese case of sporadic FMF accompanied by cutaneous arteritis at the time of febrile attacks of FMF. Gene analysis revealed M694I mutation in a single allele of the MEFV gene, and oral colchicine successfully controlled both periodic fever and subcutaneous nodules of arteritis. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis repeatedly emerging with febrile attacks should be included among the skin manifestations of FMF. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Splenorenal Manifestations of Bartonella henselae Infection in a Pediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Rising

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartonella henselae is a bacterium which can cause a wide range of clinical manifestations, ranging from fever of unknown origin to a potentially fatal endocarditis. We report a case of Bartonella henselae infection in a pediatric-aged patient following a scratch from a kitten. The patient initially presented with a prolonged fever of unknown origin which was unresponsive to antibiotic treatment. The patient was hospitalized with worsening fevers and night sweat. Subsequent ultrasound imaging demonstrated multiple hypoechoic foci within the spleen. A contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis was also obtained which showed hypoattenuating lesions in the spleen and bilateral kidneys. Bartonella henselae IgG and IgM titers were positive, consistent with an acute Bartonella henselae infection. The patient was discharged with a course of oral rifampin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and all symptoms had resolved following two weeks of therapy.

  9. Cow&s milk protein allergy with gastrointestinal manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Ferreira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA is the leading cause of food allergy in children under three years of age, although its gastrointestinal manifestations may occur in all age groups. In the suspicion of CMPA based on the anamnesis and physical examination, an elimination diet should be initiated for a variable length of time according to the clinical picture, followed by an oral food challenge (OFC confi rming or excluding the diagnosis. Complementary exams such as skin prick tests and specifi c IgE may be necessary. Treatment is based on an elimination diet and demands nutritional counselling and growth monitoring. Usually an OFC is repeated after three to 12 months of elimination diet. Tolerance is achieved at three years of age in more than 80% of the children. The aim of this work is to make a brief review and update on CMPA in pediatric age, proposing a management approach based on recent international recommendations.

  10. Moebius syndrome: clinical manifestations in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luciana Monti; Diniz, Michele Baffi; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2009-01-01

    Moebius syndrome is a congenital, nonprogressive disorder clinically characterized by loss of facial expression, impaired stomatognathic system functions, incapacity to close the eyelids, and several oral impairments. The purpose of this paper was to present the clinical manifestations and the dental treatment in a 5-year, 2-month-old male Moebius syndrome patient. The child presented with facial asymmetry, difficulty performing facial mimic movements and pronouncing some letters, and compromised suction, mastication, breathing, and deglutition. An intraoral examination revealed hypofunction of the perioral muscles, cheeks and tongue, ankyloglossia, anterior open bite, and absence of carious lesions and dental anomalies. The dental treatment consisted of frenectomy and further placement of a removable orthodontic appliance with a palatal crib for correction of the anterior open bite. After 12 months of follow-up, anterior open bite decreased and speech, deglutition, and mastication improved.

  11. A study on the cutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous manifestations of diabetes mellitus are varied. We conducted a study of fifty patients having diabetes mellitus coming from the department of dermatology and medicine. The commonest cutaneous feature of diabetes were pyodermas seen in 40% patients, dermatophytosis seen in 36% patients, pruritis diabetic thick skin seen in 20 % patients, diabetic dermopathy seen in 16% patients, diabetic bulla and rubeosis seen in 8% patients each and meralgia paraesthetica and diabetic foot seen in 4% patients each. About the associations of diabetes mellitus, achrchordons were seen in 8% patients, vitiligo and perforating dermatoses were seen in 6% patients each, granuloma annulare, eruptive xanthomas, acanthosis nigricans, necrobiosis lipoidica and oral lichen planus were seen in 4 % patients each and xanthelasma was seen in 2% patients.

  12. Sarcoidosis of the lacrimal gland as a first manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Gómez, M Y; Ávila-Ocampo, K A; Huerta-Velázquez, S; Rivera-Salgado, M I

    2017-06-10

    The first manifestation of sarcoidosis is usually at the pulmonary level. The case is described of a 40-year-old female patient, who presented with an increased volume of the lacrimal gland and mechanical ptosis of upper left eyelid as the first expression of this disease. The diagnosis of systemic sarcoidosis with primary presentation of the lacrimal gland was made after performing several immunological studies with negative results, imaging studies, and taking of glandular and lymph node biopsies. A favourable response was achieved with oral methotrexate treatment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical manifestations of primary syphilis in homosexual men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Bjekić

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of a new millennium, syphilis incidence has been increasing worldwide, occurring primarily among men who have sex with men (MSM. The clinical features of primary syphilis among MSM is described, a case-note review of the primary syphilis (PS patients who attended the Institute of Skin and Venereal Diseases. The diagnosis was assessed based upon the clinical features and positive syphilis serology tests. Among 25 patients with early syphilis referred during 2010, PS was diagnosed in a total of 13 cases. In all patients, unprotected oral sex was the only possible route of transmission, and two out of 13 patients had HIV co-infection. Overall, 77% of men presented with atypical penile manifestation. The VDRL test was positive with low titers. The numerous atypical clinical presentations of PS emphasize the importance of continuing education of non-experienced physicians, especially in countries with lower reported incidence of syphilis.

  14. Clinical manifestations of primary syphilis in homosexual men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Bjekić

    Full Text Available At the beginning of a new millennium, syphilis incidence has been increasing worldwide, occurring primarily among men who have sex with men (MSM. The clinical features of primary syphilis among MSM is described, a case-note review of the primary syphilis (PS patients who attended the Institute of Skin and Venereal Diseases. The diagnosis was assessed based upon the clinical features and positive syphilis serology tests. Among 25 patients with early syphilis referred during 2010, PS was diagnosed in a total of 13 cases. In all patients, unprotected oral sex was the only possible route of transmission, and two out of 13 patients had HIV co-infection. Overall, 77% of men presented with atypical penile manifestation. The VDRL test was positive with low titers. The numerous atypical clinical presentations of PS emphasize the importance of continuing education of non-experienced physicians, especially in countries with lower reported incidence of syphilis.

  15. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-12-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disorders that affect pediatric patients. It is valuable to think about 'endocrine disorder' as a cause of the neurologic manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of hormonal imbalance can rapidly relieve the neurologic symptoms. Better understanding of the interaction between the endocrine system and the nervous system, combined with the knowledge about the pathophysiology of the neurologic manifestations presented in the endocrine disorders might allow earlier diagnosis and better treatment of the endocrine disorders.

  16. Manifest toob klassika taas kinoekraanile / Andri Maimets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Maimets, Andri, 1979-

    2007-01-01

    2.-9. veebr. on kinos "Sõprus" ja 11.-15. veebr. Tartu Sadamateatris 5. kultusfilmide festival Manifest, seekord USA filmid ja teemaks sõnavabadus. Esilinastub ka Urmas E. Liivi dokumentaalfilm "Tervitusi Nõukogude Eestist!"

  17. Mucocutaneous manifestations of helminth infections: Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Omar; Downing, Christopher; Lee, Michael; Pino, Livia; Bravo, Francisco; Giglio, Patricia; Sethi, Aisha; Klaus, Sidney; Sangueza, Omar P; Fuller, Claire; Mendoza, Natalia; Ladizinski, Barry; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Tyring, Stephen K

    2015-12-01

    In the 21st century, despite increased globalization through international travel for business, medical volunteerism, pleasure, and immigration/refugees into the United States, there is little published in the dermatology literature regarding the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections. Approximately 17% of travelers seek medical care because of cutaneous disorders, many related to infectious etiologies. This review will focus on the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections and is divided into 2 parts: part I focuses on nematode infections, and part II focuses on trematode and cestode infections. This review highlights the clinical manifestations, transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of helminth infections. Nematodes are roundworms that cause diseases with cutaneous manifestations, such as cutaneous larval migrans, onchocerciasis, filariasis, gnathostomiasis, loiasis, dracunculiasis, strongyloidiasis, ascariasis, streptocerciasis, dirofilariasis, and trichinosis. Tremadotes, also known as flukes, cause schistosomiasis, paragonimiasis, and fascioliasis. Cestodes (tapeworms) are flat, hermaphroditic parasites that cause diseases such as sparganosis, cysticercosis, and echinococcus.

  18. Musculoskeletal manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldine, M H A; Khamashta, M A; Merashli, M; Sabbouh, T; Hughes, G R V; Uthman, I

    2016-04-01

    The scope of clinical and laboratory manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) has increased dramatically since its discovery in 1983, where any organ system can be involved. Musculoskeletal complications are consistently reported in APS patients, not only causing morbidity and mortality, but also affecting their quality of life. We reviewed all English papers on APS involvement in the musculoskeletal system using Google Scholar and Pubmed; all reports are summarized in a table in this review. The spectrum of manifestations includes arthralgia/arthritis, avascular necrosis of bone, bone marrow necrosis, complex regional pain syndrome type-1, muscle infarction, non-traumatic fractures, and osteoporosis. Some of these manifestations were reported in good quality studies, some of which showed an association between aPL-positivity and the occurrence of these manifestations, while others were merely described in case reports.

  19. Cutaneous manifestations of dermatomyositis and their management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2010-06-01

    Dermatomyositis is a condition with pathognomonic and characteristic cutaneous lesions. This article describes the skin manifestations observed in patients with dermatomyositis, their differential diagnosis, their relationship to internal disease (particularly malignancy), and their management.

  20. Extra-oral halitosis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangerman, A; Winkel, E G

    2010-03-01

    Halitosis can be subdivided into intra-oral and extra-oral halitosis, depending on the place where it originates. Most reports now agree that the most frequent sources of halitosis exist within the oral cavity and include bacterial reservoirs such as the dorsum of the tongue, saliva and periodontal pockets, where anaerobic bacteria degrade sulfur-containing amino acids to produce the foul smelling volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), especially hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH). Tongue coating is considered to be the most important source of VSCs. Oral malodor can now be treated effectively. Special attention in this overview is given to extra-oral halitosis. Extra-oral halitosis can be subdivided into non-blood-borne halitosis, such as halitosis from the upper respiratory tract including the nose and from the lower respiratory tract, and blood-borne halitosis. The majority of patients with extra-oral halitosis have blood-borne halitosis. Blood-borne halitosis is also frequently caused by odorous VSCs, in particular dimethyl sulfide (CH3SCH3). Extra-oral halitosis, covering about 5-10% of all cases of halitosis, might be a manifestation of a serious disease for which treatment is much more complicated than for intra-oral halitosis. It is therefore of utmost importance to differentiate between intra-oral and extra-oral halitosis. Differences between intra-oral and extra-oral halitosis are discussed extensively. The importance of applying odor characterization of various odorants in halitosis research is also highlighted in this article. The use of the odor index, odor threshold values and simulation of bad breath samples is explained.

  1. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Peixinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine dysregulation syndrome.

  2. Hashimoto's Encephalitis: Rare Manifestation of Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutch, Manish; Bhattacharjee, Annesh; Kumar, Sukriti; Pushkar, Durgesh

    2017-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalitis is a rare, heterogeneous and completely treatable form of neuroendocrine disorder manifesting with seizures, stroke-like episodes, encephalopathy, dementia and variable neuropsychiatric manifestations. It is generally associated with a background of Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, and the patient has high titers of antithyroid antibodies, especially antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. This entity responds dramatically to corticosteroids, hence should be always considered and excluded while treating a patient with encephalopathy in the background of a thyroid disease.

  3. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disord...

  4. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Lugo; Lara Pena; Fernando Cordido

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Ac...

  5. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Peixinho, Ana; De Azevedo, Ana Luísa; Simões, Rita Moiron

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine d...

  6. [Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Bernardino

    2004-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus predominantly affects the liver, although it may also produce a number of extrahepatic manifestations, such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, and several types of kidney disease. The pathogenesis of these conditions is not completely understood, but immunologic mechanisms are involved in many cases. In some patients with hepatitis C virus infection, the extrahepatic manifestations predominate and their proper diagnosis and management is very important.

  7. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza SHIARI

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Children with rheumatic disorders may have a wide variety of clinical features ranging from fever or a simple arthritis to complex multisystem autoimmune diseases. Information about the prevalence of neurological manifestations in children with rheumatologic disorders is limited. This review describes the neurologic complications of childhood Rheumatic disease either solely or combined with symptoms of other organs involvement, as a primary manifestation or as a part of other symptoms, additionally.

  8. Fungal infections of the oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, P Anitha

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections in humans occur as a result of defects in the immune system. An increasing emergence in oral Candidal and non-Candidal fungal infections is evident in the past decade owing to the rise in the immunodeficient and immunocompromised population globally. Oral Candidal infection usually involves a compromised host and the compromise may be local or systemic. Local compromising factors include decreased salivation, poor oral hygiene, wearing dentures among others while systemic factors include diabetes mellitus, nutritional deficiency, HIV infection/AIDS and others. Oral candidiasis is generally a localized infection and rarely appears as a systemic fungal disease whereas oral non-Candidal fungal infections are usually signs of disseminated disease. Some of the non-Candidal fungi that were once considered exotic and geographically restricted are now seen worldwide, beyond their natural habitat, probably attributed to globalization and travels. Currently infections from these fungi are more prevalent than before and they may present either as primary oral lesions or as oral manifestations of systemic mycoses. This review discusses the various predisposing factors, clinical presentations, clinical differential diagnosis, diagnosis and management of oral candidiasis, as well as briefly highlights upon a few of the more exotic non-Candidal fungi that infect the oral mucosa.

  9. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options.

  10. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  11. Metabolic and hormonal signatures in pre-manifest and manifest Huntington’s disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eWang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder typified by involuntary body movements, and psychiatric and cognitive abnormalities. Many HD patients also exhibit metabolic changes including progressive weight loss and appetite dysfunction. Here we have investigated metabolic function in pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects to establish an HD subject metabolic hormonal plasma signature. Individuals at risk for HD who have had predictive genetic testing showing the cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG expansion causative of HD, but who do not yet present signs and symptoms sufficient for the diagnosis of manifest HD are said to be pre-manifest. Pre-manifest and manifest HD patients, as well as both familial and non-familial controls, were evaluated for multiple peripheral metabolism signals including circulating levels of hormones, growth factors, lipids and cytokines. Both pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects exhibited significantly reduced levels of circulating growth factors, including growth hormone and prolactin. HD-related changes in the levels of metabolic hormones such as ghrelin, glucagon and amylin were also observed. Total cholesterol, HDL-C and LDL-C were significantly decreased in HD subjects. C-reactive protein was significantly elevated in pre-manifest HD subjects. The observation of metabolic alterations, even in subjects considered to be in the pre-manifest stage of HD, suggests that in addition, and prior, to overt neuronal damage, HD affects metabolic hormone secretion and energy regulation, which may shed light on pathogenesis, and provide opportunities for biomarker development.

  12. Metabolic and hormonal signatures in pre-manifest and manifest Huntington's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Ross, Christopher A; Cai, Huan; Cong, Wei-Na; Daimon, Caitlin M; Carlson, Olga D; Egan, Josephine M; Siddiqui, Sana; Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder typified by involuntary body movements, and psychiatric and cognitive abnormalities. Many HD patients also exhibit metabolic changes including progressive weight loss and appetite dysfunction. Here we have investigated metabolic function in pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects to establish an HD subject metabolic hormonal plasma signature. Individuals at risk for HD who have had predictive genetic testing showing the cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) expansion causative of HD, but who do not yet present signs and symptoms sufficient for the diagnosis of manifest HD are said to be "pre-manifest." Pre-manifest and manifest HD patients, as well as both familial and non-familial controls, were evaluated for multiple peripheral metabolism signals including circulating levels of hormones, growth factors, lipids, and cytokines. Both pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects exhibited significantly reduced levels of circulating growth factors, including growth hormone and prolactin. HD-related changes in the levels of metabolic hormones such as ghrelin, glucagon, and amylin were also observed. Total cholesterol, HDL-C, and LDL-C were significantly decreased in HD subjects. C-reactive protein was significantly elevated in pre-manifest HD subjects. The observation of metabolic alterations, even in subjects considered to be in the pre-manifest stage of HD, suggests that in addition, and prior, to overt neuronal damage, HD affects metabolic hormone secretion and energy regulation, which may shed light on pathogenesis, and provide opportunities for biomarker development.

  13. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrsopoulos, N T; Reddy, K R

    2001-02-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses are well-recognized causes for chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and even for hepatocellular carcinoma. Apart from liver disease, these viral infections are known to be associated with a spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations. The prevalence of clinically significant extrahepatic manifestations is relatively low, but it can be associated with significant morbidity and even mortality. An awareness and recognition of these manifestations is of paramount importance in facilitating early diagnosis and in offering treatment. However, treatments are not necessarily effective, and patients may continue with disabling extrahepatic manifestations. Hepatitis B virus has been well recognized as causing a variety of manifestations that include skin rash, arthritis, arthralgia, glomerulonephritis, polyarteritis nodosa, and papular acrodermatitis. More recently, infection with hepatitis C virus has elicited considerable interest for its role in a spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations. Among the best-reported are cryoglobulinemia, glomerulonephritis, high titer of autoantibodies, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, lichen planus, Mooren's corneal ulcer, Sjögren's syndrome, porphyria cutanea tarda, and necrotizing cutaneous vasculitis. The precise pathogenesis of these extrahepatic complications has not been determined, although the majority represent the clinical expression of autoimmune phenomena.

  14. Cerebral venous thrombosis: Update on clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leys Didier

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that may mimic many other neurological disorders and lead to misdiagnoses. Headache is the most common symptom and may be associated with other symptoms or remain isolated. The other frequent manifestations are focal neurological deficits and diffuse encephalopathies with seizures. The key to the diagnosis is the imaging of the occluded vessel or of the intravascular thrombus, by a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance venography (MRV. Causes and risk factors include medical, surgical and obstetrical causes of deep vein thrombosis, genetic and acquired prothrombotic disorders, cancer and hematological disorders, inflammatory systemic disorders, pregnancy and puerperium, infections and local causes such as tumors, arteriovenous malformations, trauma, central nervous system infections and local infections. The breakdown of causes differs in different parts of the world. A meta-analysis of the most recent prospectively collected series showed an overall 15% case-fatality or dependency rate. Heparin therapy is the standard therapy at the acute stage, followed by 3-6 months of oral anticoagulation. Patients with isolated intracranial hypertension may require a lumbar puncture to remove cerebrospinal fluid before starting heparin when they develop a papilloedema that may threaten the visual acuity or decompressive hemicraniectomy. Patients who develop seizures should receive antiepileptic drugs. Cerebral venous thrombosis - even pregnancy-related - should not contraindicate future pregnancies. The efficacy and safety of local thrombolysis and decompressive hemicraniectomy should be tested

  15. [Nephrotic syndrome as the first manifestation of juvenile systemic scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Saulo B; Sallum, Adriana M; Henriques, Luciana S; Malheiros, Denise M; Silva, Clovis A; Vaisbich, Maria H

    2014-10-22

    Renal involvement occurs in 1%-12% in juvenile systemic sclerosis (JSSc) patients, mainly with arterial hypertension, proteinuria and scleroderma renal crisis. We report herein a patient who presented nephrotic syndrome (NS) as the first manifestation of JSSc with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). A female patient presented steroid-sensitive NS at the age of 12 years. At 14 years, she had orbital and lower limbs edema, arterial hypertension, sclerodactyly and proximal skin sclerosis. Moderate capillary dilation and mild focal devascularization were observed in nailfold capillaroscopy, compatible with early stage of scleroderma (scleroderma pattern). Percutaneous renal biopsy guided by ultrasound revealed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and direct immunofluorescence were negative. Therefore, she fullfilled the provisional classification criteria for JSSc. Patient was treated with oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D (800 IU/day), methotrexate (0.5mg/kg/week) and amlodipin (0.15 mg/kg). Prednisone (60 mg/m(2)/day) was administered for 4 consecutive weeks, followed by alternate-day (40mg/m(2)) for 2 consecutive months, with tapering for 4 months and then stopping this medication. Currently she is being treated with methotrexate 15 mg/week, without edema and proteinuria. In conclusion, we reported a rare case of NS with FSGS as the first manifestation of scleroderma. Therefore, renal biopsy is mandatory in JSSc patients with sustained proteinuria or NS.

  16. The most common otorhinolaryngologic manifestations of granulomatous diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshiki, Rosana Emiko

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Granulomatous diseases result from immunopathologic processes in which there is a failure in the fagocitosis of intracellular organisms. They can cause oral, nasal and pharyngeal mucosa ulcers, vocal cords lesions, otorrhoea and oropharyngeal vegetant lesions. Objective: Describing the most frequent otorhinolaryngologic manifestations in common granulomatous diseases: hanseniasis, paracoccidioidomycosis, leishmaniasis. Method: A retrospective study has been carried out from records of patients diagnosed with the abovementioned diseases between January 1, 2005 and October 31, 2007 in an infectology ambulatory of a tertiary hospital. Results: 142 patients were evaluated; 93 with leishmaniasis, 39 with paracoccidioidomycosis and 10 with hanseniasis. In 93 cases of leishmaniasis, 16 (17.2% had mucosal affection, and the most common signs were septum perforation and nasal mucosal ulcers, both with 8 cases. In paracoccidioidomycosis, oropharyngeal ulcer was the most frequent, with 15 cases (38,4%. Conclusion: Head and neck signs and symptoms are common in patients with leishmaniasis and paracoccidioidomycosis. Nasal manifestations prevail in leishmaniasis and oropharyngeal ones in paracoccidioidomycosis.

  17. Lenalidomide for refractory cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, E Y; Schanberg, L E; Wershba, E C; Rabinovich, C E

    2017-05-01

    Objective Cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus cause significant morbidity. Lenalidomide, a thalidomide analogue, has shown promise treating cutaneous lupus erythematosus in adults. Our objective was to evaluate lenalidomide's efficacy and safety in treating refractory cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 10 adolescents who received lenalidomide for recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Information was gathered at drug initiation and 6-month follow-up. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test was used to assess change in quantitative parameters of disease activity. Results Nine subjects were girls and six were African-American. Indications for lenalidomide treatment included alopecia, nasal and oral ulcers, extensive malar rash, discoid lesions, bullous lesions, panniculitis, cutaneous vasculitis, and Raynaud's phenomenon with digital ulcerations. Within 6 months, all patients demonstrated complete or near resolution based on physician report. Prednisone dose decreased from a mean 23.5 mg (SD± 13.3) to 12.25 mg (SD± 9.2) ( P= 0.008). Sedimentation rate decreased from a mean 29 mm/hour (SD± 31.5) to 17 mm/hour (SD± 18.1) ( P= 0.004). Lenalidomide was well tolerated. Conclusion Lenalidomide is an effective and safe treatment for a spectrum of dermatological conditions in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Its use may allow a reduction in prednisone dose and decreased disfigurement. Prospective study is needed to clarify lenalidomide's role in treating cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  18. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  19. Severe Vaso-occlusive Retinopathy as the Primary Manifestation in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Tsung-Yu; Chung, Yu-Mei; Lee, An-Fei; Tsai, Chang-Youh

    2008-01-01

    Severe vaso-occlusive retinopathy as the initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is rare. We report a 16-year-old female who developed bilateral visual impairment. Fundus examinations showed bilateral “cherry-red spot” appearance, multiple confluent cotton wool spots, and widespread arterial occlusion. Laboratory studies showed leukopenia, antinuclear antibody (+), and anti-double-stranded DNA antibody (+). Malar rashes, oral ulcers, and bilateral knee joint tenderness wer...

  20. [Otolaryngologic manifestations of Churg-Strauss sindrome. Report of a case and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Rivero, V; González Palomino, A; Pantoja Hernández, C G; Trinidad Ruíz, G; Pardo Romero, G; Montero García, C; Blasco Huelva, A

    2006-01-01

    Churg-Strauss Sindrome or allergic granulomatosis is a small vessel systemic vasculitis characterized by asthma, hypereosinophilia and necrotizing vasculitis with extravascular eosinophil granulomas. We describe a case assisted in our hospital who presented pulmonary infiltrates, fever, peripherical neuropathy, weight loss, myalgia, rhinosinusitis, with antecedents of nasal polyposis, and facial edema. Our aim is to review the main otolaryngologic manifestations of this rare illness that is treated with oral corticosteroids, immunosupresor drugs like ciclofosfamide and plasmapheresis.

  1. Evaluation of Oral Health in Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathy Ravindran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral cav ity re flects the general health status of a person and diagnosing and treating oral manifestations of systemic disease pose a greater challenge. Even though there is strong evidence that supports the relationship between oral health and diabetes mellitus, oral health awareness is lacking among diabetic patients and health professionals. The present study was undertaken to determine the oral health status in type II diabetic patients and also to compare the oral changes in controlled diabetes and u ncontrolled diabetes. Materials and methods: Study population consists of 60 diabetic patients w hich is divided into 30 controlled and 30 uncontrolled diabetics; 60 healthy subjects. Each of these diabetic groups were again subdivided according to their duration as patients having a disease duration below 10 years 15 and patients having a disease duration above 10 years. 15 Various oral manifestations were examined and also CPI score and loss of attachment were recorded. Statistical analysis was done. Results: The most frequent oral signs and symptoms obser ved in both controlled and uncontrolled diabetic patients was perio­ dontitis followed by hyposalivation, taste dysfunction, halitosis, fissured tongue, burning mouth, angular cheilitis, ulcer and lichen planus. These oral manifestation showed an increase in distribution in diabetic patients when compared to nondia betic. Community periodo ntal index (CPI scores for assess ing periodontal status showed higher scores in diabetics than nondiabetics and also in uncontrolled diabetes than controlled diabetes. For periodontal s tatus assessment based on disease duration, patient with higher disease duration showed higher CPI scores than those with a lesser disease duration. Assess ment of loss of attachment in our study showed higher values in diabetic patients compared to healthy controls. Conclusion: From our present study, it was clear that oral manifestations in uncontrolled

  2. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Losa, María Del Refugio; Barrera, Ernesto Soria; Herrera-Pech, Verónica; Conde-Ferráez, Laura; Puerto-Solís, Marylin; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ≤ 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%). In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored.

  3. Epidemiology of oral HPV in the oral mucosa in women without signs of oral disease from Yucatan, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Refugio Gonzalez-Losa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV are considered necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, there is no doubt that some types of oral squamous cell carcinoma are associated with HR-HPV. The epidemiology of oral HPV infections in healthy subjects remains unclear due to a lack of knowledge. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections of the oral mucosa without pathology. A cross-sectional study was performed; samples from 390 women seeking prenatal care, Pap smears, family planning or gynecological diseases were studied. Oral cells were collected by direct swab sampling. Information regarding sociodemographic status, sexual behavior, infectious diseases, contraceptive history and tobacco and alcohol consumption were obtained through direct interviews. HPV and genotypes were detected by type-specific polymerase chain reaction. Our results revealed that 14% of the women studied had an oral HPV infection. Women ≤ 20 years of age had the highest HPV prevalence (24.5%. In total, seven genotypes were identified, including the high-risk genotypes 16, 18, 58 and 59 and the low-risk genotypes 6, 81 and 13, the latter of which is a type exclusive to oral mucosa. Sexual behavior was not associated with the presence of genital HPV types in the oral mucosa. Genital HPV types were present in the oral mucosa of women without associated clinical manifestations; however, sexual behavior was not associated with infection, and therefore others routes of transmission should be explored.

  4. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  5. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  6. Musculoskeletal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Fornaciari

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscoloskeletal manifestations are the most common extraintestinal complications of inflammatory bowel disease. Wide ranges in prevalence have been reported, depending on the criteria used to define spondylarthropathy. In 1991, the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group developed classification criteria that included previously neglected cases of undifferentiated spondylarthropathies, which had been ignored in most of the oldest epidemiological studies on inflammatory bowel disease. The spectrum of muscoloskeletal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease patients includes all of the clinical features of spondylarthropathies: peripheral arthritis, inflammatory spinal pain, dactylitis, enthesitis (Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis, buttock pain and anterior chest wall pain. Radiological evidence of sacroiliitis is common but not obligatory. The articular manifestations begin either concomitantly or subsequent to the bowel disease; however, the onset of spinal disease often precedes the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. The prevalence of the different muscoloskeletal manifestations is similar in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Symptoms usually disappear after proctocolectomy. The pathogenetic mechanisms that produce the muscoloskeletal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are unclear. Several arguments favour an important role of the intestinal mucosa in the development of spondylarthropathy. The natural history is characterized by periods of flares and remission; therefore, the efficacy of treatment is difficult to establish. Most patients respond to rest, physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but these drugs may activate bowel disease. Sulphasalazine may be recommended in some patients. There is no indication for the systemic use of steroids.

  7. Articular manifestations in patients with Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-López, María Esther; Díez-Morrondo, Carolina; Sánchez-Andrade, Amalia; Pego-Reigosa, Robustiano; Díaz, Pablo; Castro-Gago, Manuel

    To determine the percentage of Lyme patients with articular manifestations in NW Spain and to know their evolution and response to treatment. A retrospective study (2006-2013) was performed using medical histories of confirmed cases of Lyme disease showing articular manifestations. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, together with the treatment and evolution of the patients, were analysed. Seventeen out of 108 LD confirmed patients (15.7%) showed articular manifestations. Regarding those 17 patients, 64.7%, 29.4% and 5.9% presented arthritis, arthralgia and bursitis, respectively. The knee was the most affected joint. Articular manifestations were often associated to neurological, dermatological and cardiac pathologies. Otherwise, most patients were in Stage III. The 11.8% of the cases progressed to a recurrent chronic arthritis despite the administration of an appropriate treatment. Lyme disease patients showing articular manifestations should be included in the diagnosis of articular affections in areas of high risk of hard tick bite, in order to establish a suitable and early treatment and to avoid sequels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  8. Nocturnal manifestations of atypical parkinsonian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Jitkritsadakul, Onanong; Colosimo, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Although nocturnal disturbances are increasingly recognized as an integral part of the continuum of daytime manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD), there is still little evidence in the medical literature to support the occurrence of these complex phenomena in patients with atypical parkinsonian disorders (APDs). Based on the anatomical substrates in APDs, which are considered to be more extensive outside the basal ganglia than in PD, we might expect that patients with APDs encounter the whole range of nocturnal disturbances, including motor, sleep disorders, autonomic dysfunctions, and neuropsychiatric manifestations at a similar, or even greater, frequency than in PD. This article is a review of the current literature on the problems at nighttime of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, corticobasal degeneration, and dementia with Lewy bodies. MEDLINE, life science journals and online books were searched by querying appropriate key words. Reports were included if the studies were related to nocturnal manifestations in APDs. Forty articles fulfilled the selection criteria. Differences between these symptoms in APDs and PD are highlighted, given the evidence available about each manifestation. This analysis of nocturnal manifestations of APDs suggests the need for future studies to address these issues to improve the quality of life not only of patients with APDs but the caregivers who encounter the challenges of supporting these patients on a daily basis.

  9. RHEUMATOLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurinder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM : To determine the prevalence of rheumatic musculoskeletal manifestations in type 2 diabetic individuals and compare them with non - diabetic individuals. METHODS: 100 type 2 diabetic patients and 100 age and sex matched individuals were included in the study. Complete musculoskeletal examination was carried out which included examinatio n of shoulder joints , hands , back and knees. Patients were also asked to mark the sites of pain on a mannequin. Intensity of pain was marked on a visual analogue scale. These variables were then evaluated using Chi square test . RESULTS : Prevalence of RMS was found to be much higher in case of diabetic individuals except osteoarthritis. 49 patients out of 100 diabetic patients were found to have some form of rheumatic musculoskeletal manifestations. Diabetic cheiroarthropathy was found in the highest number of cases. A significant relation of these manifestations was found with age , duration of diabetes and glycemic control. A significant relation was also found between these manifestations and chronic microangiopathic complications like retinopathy and neph ropathy. CONCLUSION : A detailed examination of musculoskeletal system is an important part of care in patients with type 2 diabetes and some of the manifestations could be a simple and reliable marker of microangiopathic complications like retinopathy and nephropathy.

  10. Flies blown disease - Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis, a term first introduced by Hope (1840, refers to the invasion of tissues and organs of animals and human wounds and certain body cavities by the dipteran larvae which manifests as subcutaneous furunculoid or boillike lesions. Oral myiasis is a rare pathology and a risk to the patient′s life. Higher incidence is seen in rural areas affecting the tropical and sub-tropical zones of Africa and America. Myiasis affecting the oro-dental complex is rare. Here is a case report of oral myiasis in an 18-year-old male patient who is mentally challenged with anterior open bite, incompetent lips, and periodontal disease. The lesion was treated with turpentine oil, which forced larvae out and irrigated with normal saline solution. Follow-up examination revealed complete remission and healing of the lesion.

  11. Novel Cutaneous Manifestations of Pleuroparenchymal Fibroelastosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowther, Christopher M; Morrison, Annie O; Candelario, Nicole M; Khalafbeigi, Sheva; Cockerell, Clay J

    2016-10-01

    Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is a rare progressive disease that manifests as parenchymal fibrosis of the upper lobe and pleura. Approximately 100 cases have been reported. Cutaneous manifestations of PPFE have not previously been described. Diagnosis is dependent on histologic identification of fibrosis with atypical elastic fibers, necessitating an invasive peripheral lung wedge biopsy.A 68-year-old male with a history of pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis presented with an asymptomatic, telangiectatic erythematous eruption on bilateral lower extremities. Biopsies demonstrated a subtle perivascular infiltrate with marked increase in atypical elastic fibers, similar to the elastosis in the patient's lungs.This is the first documented case of cutaneous manifestations in PPFE. Clinicians need to be aware that cutaneous eruptions clinically simulating telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans but lacking a mast cell infiltrate histologically, may have increased abnormal elastic fibers. Thus, early recognition of these lesions in patients with an undefined restrictive lung disorder, may facilitate the diagnosis of PPFE in some patients.

  12. Vertigo as a Predominant Manifestation of Neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasnim F. Imran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology that affects multiple organ systems. Neurological manifestations of sarcoidosis are less common and can include cranial neuropathies and intracranial lesions. We report the case of a 21-year-old man who presented with vertigo and uveitis. Extensive workup including brain imaging revealed enhancing focal lesions. A lacrimal gland biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The patient was initially treated with prednisone, which did not adequately control his symptoms, and then was switched to methotrexate with moderate symptomatic improvement. Our patient had an atypical presentation with vertigo as the predominant manifestation of sarcoidosis. Patients with neurosarcoidosis typically present with systemic involvement of sarcoidosis followed by neurologic involvement. Vertigo is rarely reported as an initial manifestation. This case highlights the importance of consideration of neurosarcoidosis as an entity even in patients that may not have a typical presentation or systemic involvement of disease.

  13. Ocular manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silpa-archa, Sukhum; Lee, Joan J; Foster, C Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can involve many parts of the eye, including the eyelid, ocular adnexa, sclera, cornea, uvea, retina and optic nerve. Ocular manifestations of SLE are common and may lead to permanent blindness from the underlying disease or therapeutic side effects. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca is the most common manifestation. However, vision loss may result from involvement of the retina, choroid and optic nerve. Ocular symptoms are correlated to systemic disease activity and can present as an initial manifestation of SLE. The established treatment includes prompt systemic corticosteroids, steroid-sparing immunosuppressive drugs and biological agents. Local ocular therapies are options with promising efficacy. The early recognition of disease and treatment provides reduction of visual morbidity and mortality.

  14. Extrahepatic Manifestations of Primary Biliary Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalifoux, Sara L; Konyn, Peter G; Choi, Gina; Saab, Sammy

    2017-03-16

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is an autoimmune liver disease characterized by progressive destruction of the intrahepatic bile ducts, leading to cholestasis. PBC is known to have both hepatic and extrahepatic manifestations. Extrahepatic manifestations are seen in up to 73% of patients with PBC, with the most common being Sjogren's syndrome, thyroid dysfunction and systemic sclerosis. It is thought that patients with PBC are at increased risk of developing these extrahepatic manifestations, almost all of which are autoimmune, because patients with autoimmune disease are at higher risk of developing another autoimmune condition. Due to the high prevalence of extrahepatic diseases in patients with PBC, it is important to complete a thorough medical history at the time of diagnosis. Prompt recognition of extrahepatic disease can lead to improved patient outcomes and quality of life. The following review summarizes the most common extrahepatic conditions associated with PBC.

  15. Smoking Habits Among Patients Diagnosed with Oral Lichen Planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasson-Kanfi Haya

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oral lichen planus (OLP is one of the most common dermatologic diseases that manifests in the oral cavity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between smoking habits and the clinical subtypes of OLP. Methods Oral findings and smoking data from 187 charts of OLP patients from an oral medicine clinic was reviewed and compared to data from 76 matched control patients. Results and Discussion Ninety-three patients were diagnosed with reticular OLP, 55 with atrophic and 39 with erosive forms of the disease. Symptomatic OLP occurred in 63.6% of patients. Fewer cases of reticular OLP were symptomatic than erosive OLP (p

  16. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Desai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dirofilaria is parasitic nematodes of domestic and wild animals that can infect humans accidentally via vectors. Its occurrence in the oral cavity is extremely rare. The most frequent presentation of human dirofilariasis is a single submucosal nodule without signs of inflammation. We hereby, report a case of human dirofilariasis affecting the buccal mucosa in a 32-year-old farmer caused by D. repens.

  17. Oral leiomyomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, D D; Neville, B W

    1979-04-01

    Oral leiomyomas are considered to be rare neoplasms, but they may be encountered more frequently than generally believed. Three types of leiomyomas are commonly described: solid leiomyomas, angiomyomas, and epithelioid leiomyomas. Three cases of solid leiomyoma are presented, all of which occurred in the anterior mandibular mucobuccal fold. Leiomyomas can be easily confused with other spindle-cell tumors. The necessity of using special stains, especially Mallory's phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin, is discussed.

  18. Main Ocular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Saray Quignon Santana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is considered an autoimmune disease in which articular and extra articular manifestations are produced and contribute to alter the functional capacity of the individual. This study consists on performing a bibliographical review showing the main ocular manifestations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It is our purpose to give you our experiences to the students as well as the internal medicine, ophthalmology and rheumatologist residents about this topic. The ophthalmological consultation of sick patients contributes to the prevention of ocular illnesses which are characteristic of the base disease and improve the ocular health.

  19. Life-Threatening Cardiac Manifestations of Pheochromocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz R. Leite

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pheochromocytoma is a catecholamine-secreting tumor of the adrenal glands, usually with benign manifestations, whose typical clinical presentation includes the triad of headache, palpitations and diaphoresis. However, a wide range of signs and symptoms may be present. In the cardiovascular system, the most common signs are labile hypertension and sinus tachycardia. Systolic heart failure and ST-segment deviations mimicking myocardial infarction have also been reported, as well as QT interval prolongation and, rarely, ventricular tachycardia. We describe a challenging diagnosis of pheochromocytoma with many cardiovascular manifestations, which could have been missed due to the absence of typical symptoms.

  20. 78 FR 11877 - Announcement of Requirements Gathering Meetings for the Electronic Manifest (e-Manifest) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... such a system, perhaps through the assessment of reasonable service fees or by a similar ``user pays... agency begins the planning stage of the e-Manifest system development process. EPA envisions that e... RCRA Docket is (202) 566- 0270. II. Historical Background on e-Manifest Project For more than a...

  1. 19 CFR 122.75 - Complete manifest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complete manifest. 122.75 Section 122.75 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Documents Required for Clearance and Permission To Depart;...

  2. Rheumatic manifestations associated with lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio Scarpinella Bueno

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic manifestations in the more prevalent lung diseasessuch as asthma, chronic pulmonary disease or pneumonia are notfrequent. Exceptions to this rule are represented by lung cancerand sarcoidosis, where the appearance of the digital clubbing,hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, and arthtritis can correspond to thefi rst symptoms of the illness.

  3. Propylthiouracil induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis: A rare manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Ayturk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Propylthiouracil (PTU is a common drug used in patients with hyperthyroidism. It may cause perinuclearantineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (p-ANCA in few patients with Graves′ disease. This antibody has been associated with different forms of vasculitis. We report a patient who presented with cutaneous manifestations of leukocytoclasticvasculitis with simultaneous development of p-ANCAs during PTU therapy for Graves′ disease.

  4. Imaging the Abdominal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Gillespie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystem disease with a range of abdominal manifestations including those involving the liver, pancreas, and kidneys. Recent advances in management of the respiratory complications of the disease has led to a greater life expectancy in patients with CF. Subsequently, there is increasing focus on the impact of abdominal disease on quality of life and survival. Liver cirrhosis is the most important extrapulmonary cause of death in CF, yet significant challenges remain in the diagnosis of CF related liver disease. The capacity to predict those patients at risk of developing cirrhosis remains a significant challenge. We review representative abdominal imaging findings in patients with CF selected from the records of two academic health centres, with a view to increasing familiarity with the abdominal manifestations of the disease. We review their presentation and expected imaging findings, with a focus on the challenges facing diagnosis of the hepatic manifestations of the disease. An increased familiarity with these abdominal manifestations will facilitate timely diagnosis and management, which is paramount to further improving outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  5. Kerosene poisoning--varied systemic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A L; Shaikh, W A; Patel, H L; Deshmukh, D; Malaviya, A P; Janawar, P; Londhe, V; Dodheja, H

    2004-01-01

    We report here unusual clinical manifestations in a case of kerosene poisoning. The patient presented with encephalopathy and in the course of stay in the hospital developed renal tubular acidosis, delayed first-degree burns and myocarditis. With supportivetherapy the patient recovered completely and was discharged without any sequelae.

  6. [Extra-articular manifestations of seronegative spondylarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammelli, Daniele

    2006-05-01

    Seronegative spondylarthritis are frequently characterised by extra-articular manifestations. They are frequently in recurrent uveitis. Between the cutaneous manifestations should be mentioned erythema nodosum, typical of inflammatory bowel diseases, and keratoderma blenorrhagicum, in the Reiter's syndrome. Cardiac complications in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) include aortic valvular regurgitation and arrhythmia and, more rarely, mitral valvulopathy, cardiomyopathy and pericarditis. Pulmonary involvement in AS includes ventilatory restrictive syndrome and fibro-bullous disease of the apex. Vertebral osteoporosis is a very important extra-articular manifestation because of the possibility of spontaneous fractures of the vertebrae. Central neurological manifestations include medullary compression from cervical sub-luxation while the most important peripheral involvements are lumbar stenosis and the cauda equina syndrome. Type AA amyloidosis is a rare late complication of the AS, possible cause of death especially in patients with aggressive disease. Kidney complications can be observed as consequences of prolonged anti-inflammatory therapy, but the most frequent renal complications are amyloidosis and mesangial IgA segmental and focal glomerulonephritis.

  7. Hepatitis A: clinical manifestations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Lee, Hyo-Suk

    2010-01-01

    Due to improved living conditions and subsequent changes in hepatitis A epidemiology, the disease burden of hepatitis A is increasing in many regions. Recently, Korea has faced a large, community-wide outbreak of hepatitis A, which has prompted a vaccination program. The clinical spectrum of hepatitis A virus infection ranges from asymptomatic infection to fulminant hepatitis. Clinical manifestations depend on the age of the host: less than 30% of infected young children are symptomatic, while about 80% of infected adults manifest severe hepatitis with remarkably elevated serum aminotransferases. Fulminant hepatitis is rare, with a reported incidence from 0.015 to 0.5%. Atypical manifestations include relapsing hepatitis and prolonged cholestasis, and complicated cases with acute kidney injury have been reported. Extrahepatic manifestations, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, pure red cell aplasia, pleural or pericardial effusion, acute reactive arthritis, acute pancreatitis, acalculous cholecystitis, mononeuritis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome, have been rarely reported. Management of hepatitis A includes general supportive care, and critical decisions regarding liver transplantation await further studies on prognostic predictors. Fundamental management of hepatitis A is active vaccination. However, a vaccination program should be adapted to the regional situation, according to differing epidemiology and disease burden.

  8. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zignego, Anna Linda; Craxì, Antonio

    2008-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus may cause hepatic and extrahepatic diseases. Extrahepatic manifestations range from disorders for which a significant association with viral infection is supported by epidemiologic and pathogenetic data, to anecdotal observations without clear proof of causality. This article describes the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases.

  9. The extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Saeeda; Alamgir, Mohiuddin

    2008-07-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) leads to a number of hepatic complications, from acute to chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, is a well-established fact. Upcoming clinical research, over the years, associates numerous extrahepatic manifestations during the acute and chronic episodes of hepatitis B with significant morbidity and mortality. A causal relationship between HBV and serious autoimmune disorders has also been observed among certain susceptible vaccine recipients in a defined temporal period following immunization. The cause of these extrahepatic manifestations is generally believed to be immune mediated. The most commonly described include skin rash, arthritis, arthralgia, glomerulonephritis, polyarteritis nodosa, and papular acrodermatitis etc. The serum-sickness like "arthritis-dermatitis" prodrome has also been observed in approximately one-third of patients acquiring HBV infections. Skin manifestations of HBV infection typically present as palpable purpura reported to be caused by chronic HBV, although this association remains controversial. To consider the relationship between HBV and other clinically significant disorders as well as serious autoimmune disorders among certain vaccine recipients is the topic of this review. Variable factors that influence extrahepatic manifestation are discussed, including possible synergy between hepatitis B virus and the immune system.

  10. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Steven-Huy B

    2004-05-01

    Several extrahepatic manifestations are associated with chronic HBV infection, many with significant morbidity and mortality. The cause of these extrahepatic manifestations is generally believed to be immune mediated. PAN is a rare, but serious, systemic complication of chronic HBV affecting the small- and medium-sized vessels. PAN is seen more frequently in North American and European patients and rarely in Asian patients. PAN ultimately involves multiple organ systems, some with devastating consequences, though the hepatic manifestations are often more mild. The optimal treatment of HBV-associated PAN is thought to include a combination of antiviral and immunosuppressive therapies. HBV-associated GN occurs mainly in children, predominantly males, in HBV endemic areas of the world, but is only occasionally reported in the United States. In children, GN is usually self-limited with only rare progression to renal failure. In adults, the natural disease course of GN may be more relentless, slowly progressing to renal failure. Immunosuppressive therapy in HBV-related GN is not recommended, but antiviral therapy with alpha-interferon has shown promise. The serum-sickness like "arthritis-dermatitis" prodrome is seen in approximately one third of patients acquiring HBV. The joint and skin manifestations are varied, but the syndrome spontaneously resolves at the onset of clinical hepatitis with few significant sequelae. Occasionally, arthritis following the acute prodromal infection may persist; however, joint destruction is rare. The association between HBV and mixed essential cryoglobulinemia remains controversial; but a triad of purpura, arthralgias, and weakness, which can progress to nephritis, pulmonary disease, and generalized vasculitis, has characterized the syndrome. Finally, skin manifestations of HBV infection typically present as palpable purpura. Though papular acrodermatitis of childhood has been reported to be caused by chronic HBV, this association

  11. Oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  12. Paracoccidioidomicosis en cavidad oral Oral cavity paracoccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Antunes Freitas

    2012-02-01

    completamente y el paciente continúa bajo control en el servicio.Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM or South-american Blastomycosis is the most important systemic mycosis in Latin America, is relatively common in Brazil, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador and Argentina. Sporadic cases can also be seen in some other countries, which is a rare progressive and fatal if not treated. It has been regarded as a multifocal disease with oral lesions as the prominent feature. It is caused by a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, which mainly affects the skin, lymph nodes, lungs and mucous membranes, oral, nasal and gastrointestinal. Depending on the specific immunity of the host, the infection can take many forms and affects one or more organs, becoming a serious and potentially fatal disease. It is very important for health professionals worldwide have knowledge about Paracoccidioidomycosis because sometimes the disease only manifests itself many years after you have left the endemic area. To provide useful information about the diagnosis and treatment of disease A case report of case of male patient 48 years old from a rural area of Brazil Oath, presenting multiple painful ulcers on the gums and palate of 3 months duration, referred to chronic smoking history, clinical examination extraoral lesions are discarded in other intraoral examination bodies and multiple ulcers were observed necrotic and granulomatous background located on the gums and palate. We performed an incisional biopsy of the lesion and the material was sent for pathologic examination. The pathology report confirmed the clinical impression of Paracoccidioidomycosis. The patient was treated with the use of sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim - 800/60 mg/day, orally every 12 hours for 30 days. The oral lesions disappeared completely and the patient remains under control in the service.

  13. Dental Eruption: A Survey of its Manifestations in Early Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Cabral de Queiroz SIMEÃO

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify signs and symptoms related to eruption, understand the occurrence of these alterations, and finally, identify the frequency and intensity of their appearance. Method: Questionnaires and surveys were conducted with 100 parents or legal guardians of children between the ages of six months and five years of age, and also with 100 pediatricians in the city of Fortaleza. The factors researched were the incidence of signs and symptoms during dental eruption, aiming to discover which were most common, which methods of treatment were used and other aspects related to the quality of information received by the mothers. Results: Of the pediatricians interviewed, 93.9% reported clinical alterations in their patients during dental eruption. The manifestations most commonly found were, in a decreasing order of frequency, irritability, the habit of taking the hand to the mouth, syalorrhea, anorexia, fever, fitful sleep and diarrhea. A great number of mothers reported visiting a doctor upon occurrence of these alterations, and also using teething rings and ointments. The pediatricians, for the most part, reported giving exclusive orientation as a treatment option, and, in some cases, prescribing symptomatic medication. A small part of these professionals referred the patient to a dentist. The mothers reported having received minimum information with regards to dental eruption during the pre-natal period and showed a low level of satisfaction with the information received. Conclusion: The vast majority of the pediatricians and caregivers demonstrated the presence of systemic oral manifestations. Irritability was reported in a higher percentage, followed by the habit of hand-to-mouth, excessive salivation, anorexia, fever, disturbance in the sleep and diarrhea.

  14. Oral conditions associated with Hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed-Moayed Alavian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in more than 170 million chronically infected patients with no developed preventive vaccine is a globally important issue. In addition to expected hepatic manifestations, a number of extrahepatic manifestations, such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, glomerulonephritis, polyarteritis nodosa, rashes, renal disease, neuropathy, and lymphoma, have been reported following HCV infection, which are believed to be influenced by the virus or the host immune response. HCV combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin might be associated with side effects as well. The association of HCV with special oral conditions has also been reported recurrently; the mechanism of most of which remains unclear. This article reviews the association of HCV infection with some of the oral conditions such as oral health, Sjogren′s syndrome, lichen planus and oral cancer.

  15. Orofacial manifestations in HIV positive children attending Mildmay Clinic in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabbanja, Juliet; Gitta, Sheba; Peterson, Stefan; Rwenyonyi, Charles Mugisha

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the orofacial manifestations and their influence on oral function in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive children attending Mildmay Clinic in Uganda. This was a cross-sectional study based on clinical examination, medical records and a structured questionnaire of 368 children aged between 1.5 and 17 years. The clinical examination for dental caries was based on decayed, extracted and filled teeth (deft) and decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) indices as defined by World Health Organisation. The soft tissue orofacial lesions were assessed using the classification and diagnostic criteria as described by the Collaborative Workgroup on the Oral Manifestations of Pediatric HIV Infections. Approximately 67.4% of the children were on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The majority (77.4%) of the children had at least one orofacial lesion associated with HIV, pseudomembranous candidiasis being the most prevalent. Overall, 61.7% of the children with orofacial lesions reported at least one form of discomfort in the mouth. Discomfort was particularly associated with swallowing. The prevalence of orofacial lesions was significantly higher in children with poor oral hygiene and lower in those on HAART than in their respective counterparts. The CD4+ cell count, age and gender of the children did not significantly influence the distribution of orofacial lesions. The mean deft and DMFT scores were 11.8 and 2.7, respectively. The d- and D-components contributed 54.7 and 42.1%, respectively. Consumption of sugary snacks was directly associated with dental caries. Despite these children attending an HIV care centre of excellence, they have a high prevalence of orofacial manifestations associated with HIV. The majority of the children experienced discomfort in the oral cavity, particularly during swallowing.

  16. Oral breathing and dental malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicari, A M; Albani, F; Ntrekou, P; Rugiano, A; Duse, M; Mattei, A; Marzo, G

    2009-06-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate existing correlations between oral breathing and dental malocclusions. The study was conducted on a paediatric group of 71 oral breathers selected at the Allergology and Paediatric Immunology Department of Umberto I General Hospital, University of Rome "La Sapienza" (Italy). The children were selected based on inclusion/exclusion criteria. Children aged 6 to 12 years with no history of craniofacial malformations or orthodontic treatment were included. The results were compared with a control group composed of 71 patient aged 6 to 12 years with nasal breathing. After their medical history was recorded, all patients underwent orthodontic/otolaryngological clinical examinations. The following diagnostic procedures were then performed: latero-lateral projection teleradiography, orthopantomogram, dental impressions, anterior rhinomanometry before and after administering a local vasoconstrictor, nocturnal home pulse oximetry (NHPO) recording, spirometry test, skin prick test, study cast evaluation and cephalometric analysis following Tweed's principles. The intraoral examination assessed: dental class type, overbite, overjet, midlines, crossbite, and presence of parafunctional oral habits such as atypical swallowing, labial incompetence, finger sucking and sucking of the inner lip. Evaluation of the study casts involved arch perimeter and transpalatal width assessment, and space analysis. The results showed a strong correlation between oral breathing and malocclusions, which manifests itself with both dentoskeletal and functional alterations, leading to a dysfunctional malocclusive pattern. According to the authors' results, dysfunctional malocclusive pattern makes it clear that the association between oral breathing and dental malocclusions represents a self-perpetuating vicious circle in which it is difficult to establish if the primary alteration is respiratory or maxillofacial. Regardless, the problem needs to be addressed and

  17. Clinical Manifestations of the Opiate Withdrawal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faniya Shigakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, substance abuse is one of the most serious problems facing our society. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical manifestations of the opiate withdrawal syndrome (OWS. The study included 112 patients (57 women and 55 men aged from 18 to 64 years with opium addiction according to the DSM-IV. To study the clinical manifestation of OWS, the special 25-score scale with four sections to assess severity of sleep disorders, pain syndrome, autonomic disorders, and affective symptoms was used. Given the diversity of the OWS symptoms, attention was focused on three clinical variants, affective, algic and mixed. The OWS affective variant was registered more frequently in women, while the mixed type of OWS was more typical of men.

  18. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilce Mitiko Matsuda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer.

  19. Cutaneous manifestations of Helicobacter cinaedi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Satoko; Inokuma, Daisuke; Watanabe, Mika; Sakai, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Kikuo; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2013-03-27

    Helicobacter cinaedi causes gastroenteritis and bacter-aemia, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. Although cellulitis is sometimes reported to accompany infection by this pathogen, the cutaneous manifestations are poorly understood. To clarify the characteristic cutaneous features, 47 cases of H. cinaedi bacteraemia experienced at Sapporo City General Hospital as nosocomial infection were retrospectively evaluated. Thirty-four percent (16 cases) of the patients showed cutaneous lesions. They all had sudden onset of erythemas accompanied by high temperature. The most common cutaneous manifestations were found to be superficial cellulitis, which results in painful erythemas or infiltrated erythematous plaques on the extremities. These skin lesions can be an early clinical indicator of H. cinaedi bacteraemia in the setting of nosocomial infection.

  20. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  1. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Julio

    2011-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic disease of the human brain. Modern imaging studies, CT and MRI, have defined the diagnosis and characterization of the disease. Through these studies the therapeutic approach for each case may be individualized with the aid of antihelmintics, steroids, symptomatic medicines, or surgery. The use of one or various therapeutic measures largely depends on the peculiar combination of number, location, and biological stage of lesions as well as the degree of inflammatory response to the parasites. Although there is not a typical clinical picture of NCC, epilepsy is the most frequent manifestation of parenchymal NCC, whereas hydrocephalus is the most frequent manifestation of meningeal NCC. Eradication of cysticercosis is an attainable goal by public education and sanitary improvement in endemic areas.

  2. Atypical Manifestations in Glut1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giorgis, V; Varesio, C; Baldassari, C; Piazza, E; Olivotto, S; Macasaet, J; Balottin, U; Veggiotti, P

    2016-08-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is a genetically determined, treatable, neurologic disorder that is caused by an insufficient transport of glucose into the brain. It is caused by a mutation in the SCL2A1 gene, which is so far the only known to be associated with this condition. Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome consists of a wide clinical spectrum that usually presents with cognitive impairment, epilepsy, paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, acquired microcephaly, hemolytic anemia, gait disturbance, and dyspraxia in different combinations. However, there are other clinical manifestations that we consider equally peculiar but that have so far been poorly described in literature. In this review, supported by a video contribution, we will accurately describe this type of clinical manifestation such as oculogyric crises, weakness, paroxysmal kinesigenic and nonkinesigenic dyskinesia in order to provide an additional instrument for a correct, rapid diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Pattern of cutaneous manifestations in diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus affects individuals of all ages and socioeconomic status. Skin is affected by the acute metabolic derangements as well as by chronic degenerative complications of diabetes. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus. To analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from this region of Western Himalayas. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and having skin lesions, either attending the diabetic clinic or admitted in medical wards were included in this study. Results: The common skin disorders were: x0 erosis (44%, diabetic dermopathy (36%, skin tags (32%, cutaneous infections (31%, and seborrheic keratosis (30%. Conclusion: Skin is involved in diabetes quite often and the manifestations are numerous. High prevalence of xerosis in our diabetic population is perhaps due to cold and dry climatic conditions in the region for most of the time in the year.

  4. Varied Clinical Manifestations of Amebic Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Chad J; Fleming, Rhonda; Boman, Darius A; Zuckerman, Marc J

    2015-11-01

    Invasive amebiasis is common worldwide, but infrequently observed in the United States. It is associated with considerable morbidity in patients residing in or traveling to endemic areas. We review the clinical and endoscopic manifestations of amebic colitis to alert physicians to the varied clinical manifestations of this potentially life-threatening disease. Copyright ©Most patients present with watery or bloody diarrhea. Less common presentations of amebic colitis include abdominal pain, overt gastrointestinal bleeding, exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease, or the incidental association with colon cancer. Amebic liver abscesses are the most frequent complication. Rectosigmoid involvement may be found on colonoscopy; however, most case series have reported that the cecum is the most commonly involved site, followed by the ascending colon. Endoscopic evaluation should be used to assist in the diagnosis, with attention to the observation of colonic inflammation, ulceration, and amebic trophozoites on histopathological examination.

  5. Thoracic manifestations of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, M.F.; Hutton, L.C.; Kaplan, B.R. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    1995-02-01

    In order to determine the thoracic manifestations of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, the medical records and available images of 771 patients who had received gonadotropins to induce superovulation, were reviewed. In 22 patients (3%) severe hyperstimulation syndrome was diagnosed clinically and confirmed with ultrasonography (US). Pleural effusion occurred in five of these (23%), one of whom required thoracentesis. Atelectasis and internal jugular vein thrombosis developed in one patient, and ventilation-perfusion mismatch occurred in another. The study concluded that respiratory distress in patients with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome was most likely due to lung restriction. Pulmonary manifestations formed an important part of this syndrome, and radiologic input were considered necessary for assessment, monitoring and management. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. [Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: physiopathology, clinical manifestations and genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Yudith; Santos, José L; Smalley, Susan V; Maiz, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, caused by genetic deficiency of the 27-hydroxylase enzyme (encoded by CYP27A1). It plays a key role in cholesterol metabolism, especially in bile acid synthesis and in the 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D3 in the liver. Its deficiency causes reduced bile acid synthesis and tissue accumulation of cholestanol. Clinical manifestations are related to the presence of cholestanol deposits and include tendon xanthomas, premature cataracts, chronic diarrhea, progressive neurologic impairment and less frequently coronary heart disease, early onset osteoporosis and abnormalities in the optic disk and retina. An early diagnosis and treatment with quenodeoxycholic acid may prevent further complications, mainly neurological manifestations. This review summarizes cholesterol metabolism related to bile acid synthesis, physiopathology, biochemistry and treatment of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

  7. Cutaneous manifestations of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, N; Velho, G; Horta, M; Martins, A; Massa, A

    2005-09-01

    Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy is an autosomal dominant amyloidosis, characterized by the systemic deposition of amyloid with a particular involvement of the peripheral nerves. The disease generally manifests as a severe sensory, motor and autonomic neuropathy. Cardiomyopathy, nephropathy, vitreous opacities and carpal tunnel syndrome may occur in a variable association with the neuropathy. Trophic dermatological lesions are frequent in the more advanced stages of the disease. We examined the skin of 142 patients. The cutaneous manifestations more frequently observed were: xerosis (81.6%), seborrheic dermatitis (21.8%), traumatic and burn lesions (19.7%), acne (18.3%), neurotrophic ulcers (14%) and onychomycosis (10.5%). Among the hepatic transplanted patients (31%), seborrheic dermatitis and acne were the most frequent diagnoses.

  8. [Multiple sclerosis: pathogenesis and manifestations in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, O; Palin, K; Chateil, J F; Pedespan, J M

    2001-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is rare in children and occurs exceptionally before ten years. Sex ratio (girl/boy) is around 2.5 to 3, higher than in adults. Brain stem dysfunction and meningeal symptoms are more commonly first manifestations of the disease than in adults. Optic neuritis is also a frequent early manifestation. The etiology of the disease remains unclear and none of the advanced hypotheses (infectious, genetic, environmental) can by themselves explain its occurrence. There is a genetic susceptibility which is probably linked to many genes leading to a low related risk (less than two). A viral trigger mechanism in a person with a genetic predisposition is possible. New therapies result from a better understanding of the closed immune mechanisms of the disease.

  9. Extra-pulmonary manifestations of sarcoidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vardhanabhuti, V. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Venkatanarasimha, N. [St Michael' s Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W8 (Canada); Bhatnagar, G.; Maviki, M.; Iyengar, S.; Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Suresh, P., E-mail: sureshpriya2000@yahoo.com [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Although, the diagnosis and evaluation of sarcoidosis has traditionally remained confined to the chest, its multi-system nature has been widely recognized. Radiological features of pulmonary sarcoidosis are well known but extra-pulmonary manifestations can produce a plethora of non-specific imaging findings that can affect subcutaneous tissue, and the neurological, cardiac, gastrointestinal, urological, liver, spleen, and skeletal systems. In the literature, there are various case reports and specific system reviews but there are few reviews that encompass all the extra-pulmonary manifestations. In this paper, we comprehensively review the imaging features of extra-pulmonary sarcoidosis with characteristic features as well as atypical presentations. In addition, we discuss the emerging role of nuclear medicine in sarcoidosis.

  10. Palmse viinaköögi manifest

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1996-01-01

    Manifest. Tõlkijate seminari puhul 17. mail 1996 Palmse viinaköögis Juta Bedia, Eric Dickens, Gyözö Fehérvári, Guntars Godinsh, Maima Grinberga, Irja Grönholm, Leif Hannibal, Cornelius Hasselblatt, Pirkko Huurto, Ivo Iliste, Nora Javorskaja, Gisbert Jänicke, Kaisu Lahikainen, Enel Melberg, Vera Ruber, Arnold Tamm, Leili Tamm, Jonatan Tomesh, Lilia Velic'kova, Marianne Vogel. Inglise k.: Estonian Literary Magazine, autumn 1996, nr. 3

  11. Hypersensitivity manifestations to the fruit mango

    OpenAIRE

    Sareen, Richa; SHAH, ASHOK

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study are 1) To review the published data and document the current knowledge on allergic manifestations to the fruit mango 2) To highlight the two distinct clinical presentations of hypersensitivity reactions caused by mango 3) To discuss the role of cross-reactivity 4) To increase awareness of potentially life threatening complications that can be caused by allergy to mango. An extensive search of the literature was performed in Medline/PubMed with the key terms "mango...

  12. Catatonia: an unusual manifestation of Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Aniruddha; Thanapal, Sivakumar; Sood, Mamta; Khandelwal, Sudhir K

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease, characterized by abnormal copper accumulation in the human body, may present with psychiatric manifestations in about one-fifth of patients. The authors report a patient with Wilson's disease who initially presented with acute psychosis and later developed catatonic symptoms. The atypical presentation led to a delay in diagnosis and institution of appropriate treatment. Wilson's disease can be ruled out in all young patients presenting with psychiatric symptoms for the first time by screening for a Kayser-Fleischer ring.

  13. [Cursive and gelastic manifestations of epilepsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, C A; Silveira, D C; Guerreiro, M M

    1987-12-01

    Seven cases of cursive and two cases of gelastic manifestations of epileptic seizures are presented. The cases were documented with computerized tomography and electroencephalography (EEG). Most of patients with cursive seizures showed temporal lobe epileptiform discharge in EEG. The authors discuss the theme in relation to pathophysiology and conclude that they are not a homogeneous group according to prognosis and nosology. Every case presented complex partial seizures with or without tonic-clonic seizures.

  14. Palmse viinaköögi manifest

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1996-01-01

    Manifest. Tõlkijate seminari puhul 17. mail 1996 Palmse viinaköögis Juta Bedia, Eric Dickens, Gyözö Fehérvári, Guntars Godinsh, Maima Grinberga, Irja Grönholm, Leif Hannibal, Cornelius Hasselblatt, Pirkko Huurto, Ivo Iliste, Nora Javorskaja, Gisbert Jänicke, Kaisu Lahikainen, Enel Melberg, Vera Ruber, Arnold Tamm, Leili Tamm, Jonatan Tomesh, Lilia Velic'kova, Marianne Vogel. Inglise k.: Estonian Literary Magazine, autumn 1996, nr. 3

  15. Tardive Dystonia: Clinical Spectrum and Novel Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jeffrey Davis

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dystonia was identified in 25 patients: involvement of the face and neck was most common; truncal and limb dystonia were also observed. There were 3 cases of laryngospasm and 2 of spasmodic dysphonia. The latter has not been previously reported as a manifestation of tardive dystonia. In all cases, movements typical of classic tardive dyskinesia could be demonstrated. This group illustrates the variety of dystonic disorders that may occur in conjunction with tardive dyskinesia.

  16. Atypical manifestations of multiple myeloma: Radiological appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Thomas [Department of Radiology, St-Vincenz Hospital, Auf dem Schafsberg, D-65549 Limburg (Germany)]. E-mail: t.hess@st-vincenz.de; Egerer, Gerlinde [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kasper, Bernd [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rasul, Kakil Ibrahim [Hamad Medical Center, Moha (Qatar); Goldschmidt, Hartmut [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauffmann, G.W. [Department of Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Diagnostic procedures performed on patients with multiple myeloma typically reveal lytic bone lesions, osteopenia or osteoporosis, bone marrow infiltration by plasma cells as well as overproduction of immunoglobulin or light chains in the serum or urine. Skeletal manifestations are extremely variable and the unusual forms have been described extensively. Extramedullary plasma-cell tumours (plasmocytoma) are found in about 5% of newly diagnosed patients with multiple myelomas. In this paper we present eight patients with atypical forms of multiple myeloma.

  17. [Pulmonary, pleural and pericardial manifestations of rickettsiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piéron, R; Lesobre, B; Mafart, Y; Meyniel, D; Coppin, M

    1976-01-01

    The authors report four observations of rickettsioses with R. conori (3 cases) or R. mooseri (1 case) with pericardial, pleural or pulmonary manifestations (2 cases). On this occasion, they recall that diagnosis of rickettsiosis can only be made on precise conditions: compatible clinical syndrome, significantly increasing then decreasing antibodies level, negative bacteriological and viral investigations and effectiveness of particular antibiotics. They also recall the main characteristics of pericardites, pleurisies, and pneumopathies produced by rickettsiae, probably more frequently than previously thought.

  18. PULMONARY MANIFESTATION OF LYMPHANGIOLEIOMYOMATOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duara

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM is an uncommon interstitial lung disease that exclusively affects women, usually during their reproductive years. LAM is characterized pathologically by abnormal proliferation of LAM cells in the lungs and in thoracic and retroperitoneal lymphatics. 1 We presented a case of 40-year-old female presented to Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Gauhati Medical College with cough and chest pain for 6 months, which was diagnosed to be pulmonary manifestation of Lymphangioleiomyomatosis in HRCT chest.

  19. Uncommon cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaro, J M; Herrero, C; Hausmann, G

    1997-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus (LE) are, usually, characteristic enough to permit an easy diagnosis. However, some patients may present less typical lesions, associated or not to the classic ones. Therefore, irrespectively of the variety of LE (acute, subacute and chronic), in absence of the typical butterfly rash, erythematosquamous papules or plaques, or any of the characteristic cutaneous alterations, it is important (even though not always easy) to recognize the uncommon and/or atypical changes of the skin.

  20. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatiana Sofía Rodríguez-Reyna; Cynthia Martínez-Reyes; Jesús Kazúo Yamamoto-Furusho

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways,frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation,aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis,with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur,including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis,and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones.Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability,and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine,methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-α blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  1. The radiological manifestations of sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gittamadani@yahoo.com; Papadopoulou, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Holloway, B. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Robins, A. [Department of Paediatrics, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Davis, J. [Department of Radiology, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Murray, D. [Department of Radiology, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited abnormality of the ss-globin chain, which causes a spectrum of haemolytic anaemias. Clinical manifestations in SCD include anaemia, jaundice, recurrent vaso-occlusive crises, and infections (particularly by encapsulated bacteria) due to functional asplenia and cerebrovascular accidents. Radiological investigations play a critical role both in the diagnosis and in the primary prevention of the complications of SCD.

  2. Chronic polyarthritis as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela R. Viola

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Human toxocariasis is a parasitic zoonosis mainly caused by Toxocara canis or Toxocara catiand is acquired by ingestion of the parasite’s embryonated eggs. Arthralgia and/or arthri-tis were reported in up to 17% of the cases, generally with acute duration (less than 6weeks. However, to our knowledge, chronic polyarthritis, as the isolated presentation ofToxocara infection, was not reported. One of the 5809 patients that was followed up at ourservice (0.017% had chronic polyarthritis as the single manifestation of toxocariasis and wasdescribed herein. A 3-year-old girl was referred to our service with severe painful chronicpolyarthritis for a period longer than 10 weeks and morning stiffness of 30 min. Dog contactexposure history in the recreational areas of neighborhood was reported. Her exams showedhigh levels of eosinophils in peripheral blood (29%, bone marrow aspirate revealed markedeosinophilia (32% and Toxocara enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa was positive(1:1280. She was treated with paracetamol (40 mg/kg/day and thiabendazole (25 mg/kg/dayfor 10 days, and all manifestations reduced. After eight months of follow-up, she was onclinical and laboratorial remission. In conclusion, we described a case of chronic polyarthri-tis, as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis, mimicking juvenile idiopathic arthritis andleukemia. Importantly, this zoonosis should be considered in patients with arthritis andeosinophilia.

  3. Chronic polyarthritis as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Gabriela R; Giacomin, Maria Fernanda A; França, Camila M P; Sallum, Adriana M E; Jacob, Cristina M A; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    Human toxocariasis is a parasitic zoonosis mainly caused by Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati and is acquired by ingestion of the parasite's embryonated eggs. Arthralgia and/or arthritis were reported in up to 17% of the cases, generally with acute duration (less than 6 weeks). However, to our knowledge, chronic polyarthritis, as the isolated presentation of Toxocara infection, was not reported. One of the 5809 patients that was followed up at our service (0.017%) had chronic polyarthritis as the single manifestation of toxocariasis and was described herein. A 3-year-old girl was referred to our service with severe painful chronic polyarthritis for a period longer than 10 weeks and morning stiffness of 30min. Dog contact exposure history in the recreational areas of neighborhood was reported. Her exams showed high levels of eosinophils in peripheral blood (29%), bone marrow aspirate revealed marked eosinophilia (32%) and Toxocara enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa) was positive (1:1280). She was treated with paracetamol (40mg/kg/day) and thiabendazole (25mg/kg/day) for 10 days, and all manifestations reduced. After eight months of follow-up, she was on clinical and laboratorial remission. In conclusion, we described a case of chronic polyarthritis, as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis, mimicking juvenile idiopathic arthritis and leukemia. Importantly, this zoonosis should be considered in patients with arthritis and eosinophilia.

  4. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: late skin manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Marckmann, Peter; Rossen, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious disease that occurs in patients with severe renal disease and is believed to be caused by gadolinium-containing contrast agents. A detailed description of the late skin manifestations of NSF is important to help dermatologists and nephr......BACKGROUND: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious disease that occurs in patients with severe renal disease and is believed to be caused by gadolinium-containing contrast agents. A detailed description of the late skin manifestations of NSF is important to help dermatologists...... confluent dermal plaques with thickening and hardening. In contrast, 3 patients presented with wrinkled, redundant skin as seen in cutis laxa. Patients with NSF had significantly poorer scores than control patients on the Daily Life Quality Index (mean [SD], 11. 4 [7.4] vs 1.5 [2. 3]; P ...: This descriptive case series of patients with NSF gives a detailed clinical picture of the skin manifestations late in the disease. It demonstrates that the clinical picture in the late stage has a varied presentation and that NSF has a significant effect on the quality of life....

  5. Hematological manifestations of primary mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef

    2007-01-01

    At onset mitochondrial disorders (MID) frequently manifest as a mono-organic problem but turn into multisystem disease during the disease course in most of the cases. Organs/tissues most frequently affected in MID are the cerebrum, peripheral nerves, and the skeletal muscle. Additionally, most of the inner organs may be affected alone or in combination. Hematological manifestations of MID include aplastic, megaloblastic, or sideroblastic anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. In single cases either permanent or recurrent eosinophilia has been observed. Hematological abnormalities may occur together with syndromic or nonsyndromic MIDs. Syndromic MIDs, in which hematological manifestations predominate, are the Pearson syndrome (pancytopenia), Kearns-Sayre syndrome (anemia), Barth syndrome (neutropenia), and the autosomal recessive mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia syndrome. In single cases with Leigh's syndrome, MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fiber) syndrome, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, and Friedreich's ataxia anemia has been described. Anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, eosinophilia, or pancytopenia can frequently also be found in nonsyndromic MIDs with or without involvement of other tissues. Therapy of blood cell involvement in MID comprises application of antioxidants, vitamins, iron, bone marrow-stimulating factors, or substitution of cells.

  6. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-03-15

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  7. Manifestations or seven acts and one folly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Guilherme Bandeira de Araújo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The theme that inspired the writing of this article was the set of street manifestations that took place in Brazil in July 2013. The manifestations were initially articulated by the problems of urban mobility, but later will acquire immense complexity. The plurality of voices and crossings and the impossibility of a single language to give existence to the complexity of the manifestations is what constitutes the raw material of this text, which causes thinking about generalizations and constraints that are imposed by existing languages to talk space. The text was produced collectively or brokered by members of the Grupo de Pesquisa Modernidade e Cultura of the Instituto de Pesquisa e Planejamento Urbano e Regional, of the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro and was presented as a performance in the panel discussion “In the borders of the major Geography: imagination, strangeness and performance, in the III Colóquio Internacional “A Educação pelas imagens e suas geografias”.

  8. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahija Janardhanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  9. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  10. Oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    Full Text Available A amiloidose é uma doença complexa rara de difícil diagnóstico que ocorre devido à deposição de substância amilóide no meio extracelular. Ao ser diagnosticado na cavidade bucal, deve-se monitorar o paciente a fim de avaliar possíveis complicações sistêmicas da doença. Diante disso, o objetivo do presente estudo é relatar um caso de amiloidose oral em uma paciente do gênero feminino de 72 anos de idade. Baseado nos sinais clínicos observados, a hipótese diagnóstica foi de fibroma traumático. Após realização de biópsia e exame histopatológico, o diagnóstico foi de amiloidose oral, o que foi confirmado com a coloração do espécime com o reagente vermelho congo. Depósitos de amilóide foram encontrados no tecido conjuntivo, na avaliação através da luz polarizada, que apresentou birrefringência. Tal achado foi preocupante, já que a amiloidose geralmente acomete diversos tecidos levando a comprometimentos sistêmicos. Por essa razão a paciente foi encaminhada a procurar atendimento médico. No entanto, houve abandono do tratamento e a mesma veio a óbito 6 meses após o diagnóstico da doença. Lesões orais aparentemente simples podem revelar doenças raras e de difícil tratamento. O diagnóstico preciso e acompanhamentos médicos são fundamentais na sobrevida do paciente.

  11. Radiographic manifestations of teeth and jaw bones in chronic renal failure patients: A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Rai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic renal failure (CRF is an important health problem worldwide with a tendency of annual progression. Renal failure could alter the balance of the stomatognathic system, thus conditioning the prevalence of oral diseases at its different stages. Researchers estimate that up to 90% of renal patients show oral manifestations and a wide range of bony anomalies accounting for 92% of the patients. Aims and Objectives: The aim and objective of this study was to evaluate radiographic manifestations in CRF patients and compare the findings between the stages of CRF. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal study on fifty CRF patients was conducted. Patients were divided into three stages depending on the severity of renal failure. Orthopantomograph was taken for all the subjects. Results: The study showed that 88% of the study group had positive radiographic findings. Stage IV renal failure patients had more severe manifestations as compared to Stages II and III. Conclusion: Majority of the patients had positive radiographic findings which can be one of the diagnostic markers in CRF patients.

  12. Oral health status of diabetes mellitus patients in Southwest Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissong, Mea; Azodo, C C; Agbor, M A; Nkuo-Akenji, T; Fon, P Nde

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually all tissues and organs the body including the hard and soft issues of the oral cavity, manifesting with several complications. To assess the prevalence of oral diseases in diabetics and non-diabetics and to correlate oral diseases with glycaemic control. This was an observational study involving 149 diabetic patients recruited from hospitals in Southwest Region of Cameroon and 102 non-diabetic controls drawn from the general population. The study participants were aged 18 years and above. Data were collected using questionnaires, oral examination and laboratory tests. Oral examination was conducted to assess dental plaque, calculus, dental caries, periodontitis, gingivitis and candidiasis. Glycemic status was assessed by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels using standardized methods. Thirty five out of 149 (23.5%) diabetic patients had gingivitis; 37 (24.8%) had periodontitis; 29 (19.5%) had dental caries and 32 (21.5%) had oral candidiasis. Gingivitis, periodontitis and oral candidiasis was significantly higher in diabetics than non-diabetics (P diabetic patients presented with poor oral hygiene than non-diabetics. Poorly controlled diabetics presented more with gingivitis and candidiasis than well-controlled diabetics and this relationship was statistically significant. The prevalence of oral disease was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetic controls and hyperglycaemia seemed to be a major contributor to oral health in diabetic patients in the study area. Proper management of blood sugar levels might improve on the oral health of diabetes mellitus patients.

  13. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  14. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ... detection and treatment of oral cancers. Note: For materials specific to African American men, please see: Oral ...

  15. Oral Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral lichen planus Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Oral lichen planus (LIE-kun PLAY-nus) is an ongoing (chronic) ... that affects mucous membranes inside your mouth. Oral lichen planus may appear as white, lacy patches; red, ...

  16. Oral Health Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health Mouth Breathing Can Cause Major Health Problems Over ... news feeds delivered directly to your desktop! more... Oral Health Glossary Article Chapters Oral Health Glossary print full ...

  17. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  18. Oro-mandibular manifestations of primary hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Rai

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion : Loss of lamina dura, ground glass appearance, and mandibular cortical width reduction are common findings in primary hyperparathyroidism and these are significantly correlated with elevated parathormone and alkaline phosphatase. However, the presence of brown tumors and oral tori are less commonly encountered features.

  19. Cutaneous Manifestations in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Elif Demirgüneş

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: This study is designed to determine the prevalence and the clinical spectrum of skin diseases in renal transplant recipients (RTRs.Material and Method: In this study RTRs who were referred to our department between 2005 and 2007 for dermatologic examination were evaluated. Dermatologic investigation included direct clinical observation and culture or histolopathological investigation when indicated. Patients were divided into three groups: group A, post-transplantation periods £1 year; group B, post-transplantation periods of 1-5 years; and group C, post-transplantation periods >5 years. Results: In this study 88 (M=50, F=38 RTRs were evaluated. The mean age was 37 ± 12 years and the median interval since transplantation was 38.5 months (range=1 month-27 years. Over a 2-year period 298 cutaneous manifestations were identified. Ninety-five immunosuppressive (IS drug-related manifestations were observed in 58 (%65.9 patients and the most common one was acneiform eruption (n=23. Forty (45.5% patients developed cutaneous viral infections, consisting of verruca vulgaris (n=29, herpes zoster (n=9, herpes simplex (n=5, molluscum (n=2 and varicella (n=1 infections. Superficial fungal infections were observed in 35(39.2% patients, most common lesions were dermatophytosis (n = 23 and pityriasis versicolor (n=17. Bacterial infections were observed in 14 (%16 patients, folliculitis was present in 12 of them. Premalignant and malignant lesions were identified in 12 (%13.6 patients, consisting of actinic keratoses (n=9, basal cell carcinoma (n=2, squamous cell carcinoma (n=1 and Kaposi's sarcoma (n=1. There were more premalignant and malignant lesions in patients receiving azathioprine (p=0.002. Cutaneous viral infections were more common in group C (p=0.023 and IS drug-related manifestations were more common in group A (p=0.003. Conclusion: Most common cutaneous manifestation among RTRs was IS drug-related and seen in early post

  20. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the United States in 1986: etiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and dental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anneroth, G; Anneroth, I; Lynch, D P

    1986-12-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) results from a lymphotropic retrovirus (HTLV-III) infection and is characterized by specific opportunistic infections and malignancies. The virus is transmitted primarily by semen and blood. Infection is limited principally to defined risk groups, i.e., homosexual men and intravenous drug users. Head and neck manifestations include cervical lymphadenopathy and Kaposi's sarcoma. Oral manifestations include Kaposi's sarcoma, candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, precocious periodontal disease, xerostomia, herpes simplex, recurrent aphthae, erythema multiforme, and venereal warts. Although HTLV-III is present in saliva, there are no reported cases of transmission secondary to dental procedures. Appropriate precautions and techniques are recommended in treating patients at risk for AIDS.

  1. Gender differences among oral health care workers in caring for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... among oral health care workers in caring for HIV/AIDS patients in Osun state, Nigeria. ... Health care workers (OHCWs) enlisted in the public dental health clinics. ... HIV/AIDS oral manifestations (p <0.001) and recognition of HIV/AIDS risk ...

  2. The influence of systemic diseases on the diagnosis of oral diseases: a problem-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lockhart, P.B.; Hong, C.H.L.; van Diermen, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    lthough all dentists are taught about the importance of oral health to general health and that systemic disease can manifest in the oral cavity, the 4-year dental school curriculum does not allow time to gain competency in these relationships. Nevertheless, all dentists must have skills in taking a

  3. Role of micronucleus in oral exfoliative cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashikala, R; Indira, A P; Manjunath, G S; Rao, K Arathi; Akshatha, B K

    2015-08-01

    In the last few years, the interest for oral cytology as a diagnostic and prognostic methodology, for monitoring patients in oral potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer has re-emerged substantially. In 1983, buccal mucosal micronuclei assay was first proposed to evaluate genetic instability. There are biomarkers that predict if a potentially malignant disorder is likely to develop into an aggressive tumor. These genotoxic and carcinogenic chemicals have been reported to be potent clastogenic and mutagenic agents which are thought to be responsible for the induction of chromatid/chromosomal aberrations resulting in the production of micronuclei. Various studies have concluded that the gradual increase in micronucleus (MN) counts from normal oral mucosa to potentially malignant disorders to oral carcinoma suggested a link of this biomarker with neoplastic progression. MN scoring can be used as a biomarker to identify different preneoplastic conditions much earlier than the manifestations of clinical features and might specifically be exploited in the screening of high-risk population for a specific cancer. Hence, it can be used as a screening prognostic and educational tool in community centers of oral cancer.

  4. Cutaneous Manifestations in Dermatomyositis: Key Clinical and Serological Features-a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Yoshinao; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Akiyama, Masashi

    2016-12-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a common idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. The pathogenesis is considered to be microangiopathy affecting skin and muscle. The cutaneous manifestations of DM are the most important aspect of this disease, and their correct evaluation is important for early diagnosis. The skin signs are various: Some are pathognomonic or highly characteristic, and others are compatible with DM. Recently, DM has been categorized into several disease subsets based on the various autoantibodies present in patients. Sometimes, characteristic cutaneous manifestations are strongly associated with the presence of specific autoantibodies. For example, anti-Mi-2 antibody is associated with the classic features of DM, including heliotrope rash, Gottron's papules, the V-neck sign, the shawl sign, cuticular overgrowth, and photosensitivity. Frequent cutaneous features in anti-transcriptional intermediary factor 1 gamma (TIF1γ)-positive patients are diffuse photoerythema, including "dusky red face," while skin ulcerations, palmar papules (inverse Gottron), diffuse hair loss, panniculitis, and oral pain and/or ulcers are sometimes associated with anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 product (MDA5) antibody. Here, we review important cutaneous manifestations seen in patients with DM, and we examine the relationship between the skin changes and myositis-associated autoantibodies. Correct evaluation of cutaneous manifestations and myositis-associated autoantibodies should help the clinician in the early diagnosis of DM, for a quick recognition of cutaneous signs that may be the symptom of onset before muscle inflammation.

  5. Urological manifestations of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askeland, Eric J; Arlen, Angela M; Erickson, Bradley A; Mathews, Katherine D; Cooper, Christopher S

    2013-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a dystrophinopathy affecting males that is associated with multiple organ system complications. To our knowledge urological complications of Duchenne muscular dystrophy have been described only anecdotally to date. We reviewed the medical charts of 135 patients with Duchenne or Duchenne-Becker muscular dystrophy for demographics and disease progression, urological diagnoses, intervention and followup. Of 135 patients 67 (50%) had at least 1 documented urological diagnosis and 38 (28%) had multiple manifestations. Lower urinary tract symptoms were the most common urological diagnosis (32% of patients). Survival analysis revealed a median age at onset of lower urinary tract symptoms of 23 years (95% CI 17.7-23.9). Intervention was required in 12 patients (9%), most commonly due to nephrolithiasis. Urological morbidity increased with Duchenne muscular dystrophy progression when stratified by clinical progression. Lower urinary tract symptoms were more common in nonambulatory patients (40.7% vs 19%, p = 0.007), those with a diagnosis of scoliosis (44% vs 19.7%, p = 0.003) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (60% vs 22%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (53% vs 29%, p = 0.046). Likewise, nephrolithiasis was more common in nonambulatory patients (10% vs 0%, p = 0.017), those with scoliosis (12% vs 0%, p = 0.004) and/or scoliosis spine surgery (20% vs 1%, p <0.001), and those on invasive respiratory support (29% vs 3%, p <0.001). Only 28% of patients with a urological manifestation were referred to urology. As these patients transition into adolescence and adulthood, the increased prevalence of urological manifestations warrants increased awareness and referral to urologists. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Psychiatric manifestations in dementia: phenomenologic perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, I

    1993-12-01

    The study of psychiatric manifestations in dementia has long been overshadowed by the more classical manifestations of the disease, such as memory loss and other cognitive deficits. In recent years, however, psychiatric symptoms as part of the demential process have attracted interest and research has become more specific. Clinicians are faced with diagnostic, treatment and management difficulties related to affective or psychotic symptoms, which account for much distress and morbidity. Several studies indicate that the prevalence of psychiatric manifestations in clinical populations of patients suffering from dementia is high: 15% to 30% for hallucinations, 15% to 30% for delusions, ten percent to 20% for major depression and 40% to 50% for depressed mood. These figures tend to confirm the hypothesis that psychiatric features in dementia are neither infrequent nor atypical. Thus, researchers have sought to link psychotic or depressive symptomatology with several clinical characteristics of dementia, namely stage, severity, prognosis or cognitive dysfunction. Some recent studies involving extensive neuropsychological evaluations indicate that subgroups of patients can be defined according to psychiatric criteria, as well as cognitive or neurological criteria. Unfortunately, results are inconsistent. Some of the contradictions in the literature are related to poorly defined terms and symptoms, a lack of reliable operational criteria, absence of validation of instruments and scales and heterogeneity of the populations studied. Ambiguous syndromes, such as pseudodementia, while illustrative of certain clinical situations, have not been helpful in categorizing demented patients. The author suggests that research focused on specific and clearly defined psychiatric symptoms in dementia will better serve our comprehension of mixed syndromes.

  7. Reiki and changes in pattern manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Marcia E

    2009-07-01

    The purposes of this qualitative research study were to describe the changes in pattern manifestations that individuals experienced associated with receiving Reiki, and to present the theoretical understanding of these changes. The unitary field pattern portrait research method was utilized because it was ontologically, epistemologically, and methodologically consistent with the science of unitary human beings. Reiki was found to be associated with changes in awareness from dissonance and turbulence to harmony and well-being by helping individuals knowingly participate in actualizing their own capacities for healing. Reiki was found to be an appropriate voluntary mutual patterning nursing modality.

  8. Research Misconduct—Definitions, Manifestations and Extent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Bornmann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the international scientific community has been rocked by a number of serious cases of research misconduct. In one of these, Woo Suk Hwang, a Korean stem cell researcher published two articles on research with ground-breaking results in Science in 2004 and 2005. Both articles were later revealed to be fakes. This paper provides an overview of what research misconduct is generally understood to be, its manifestations and the extent to which they are thought to exist.

  9. Dermatomal sensory manifestations in lateral medullary infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroki; Tanaka, Yasutaka; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Ryota; Hattori, Nobutaka; Urabe, Takao

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old man who experienced a sudden onset of unstable gait followed by nuchal pain was admitted to our department. The neurologic examination revealed right-sided limb ataxia, right partial ptosis, and decreased sensation to 50% of the normal side to pinprick and temperature stimuli on the left side below the level of the T-6 dermatome. A lateral medullary infarction caused by spontaneous vertebral artery dissection was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography angiography. In conclusion, lateral medullary infarction is an important entity to consider in the differential diagnosis of dermatomal sensory manifestations.

  10. On the history of nuclear matrix manifestation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZBARSKYIB

    1998-01-01

    The nonchromatin proteinous residue of the cell nucleus was revealed in our laboratory as early as in 1948 and then identified by light and electron microscopy as residual nucleoli,intranuclear network and nuclear envelope before 1960,This structure termed afterwards as "nuclear residue","nuclear skeleton","nuclear cage","nuclear carcass"etc.,was much later(in 1974) isolated,studied and entitled as "nuclear matrix" by Berezney and Coffey,to whom the discovery of this residual structure is often wronly ascribed.The real history of nuclear matrix manifestation is reported in this paper.

  11. Paraneoplastic dermatological manifestation of gastrointestinal malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lyubomir A Dourmishev; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Numerous dermatological disorders have been associated with underlining malignancies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Such cutaneous manifestations might have an important diagnostic value if they are the sole expressions of otherwise asymptomatic carcinomas. The recognition of some typical paraneoplastic dermatologic disorders can lead to the prompt diagnosis of the underlying malignancy, timely administration of therapy, and ultimately, better prognosis. In this review we discuss the most common paraneoplastic dermatological syndromes from the perspective of the practicing gastroenterologist. We also outline a comprehensive practical approach for the evaluation for occult malignancy in patients presenting with cutaneous findings potentially associated with GI cancers.

  12. Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kee Hyuk; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Joo, Kyung Bin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Pulmonary involvement is more common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in any other connective tissue disease, and more than half of patients with SLE suffer from respiratory dysfunction during the course of their illness. Although sepsis and renal disease are the most common causes of death in SLE, lung disease is the predominant manifestation and is an indicator of overall prognosis. Respiratory disease may be due to direct involvement of the lung or as a secondary consequence of the effect of the disease on other organ systems.

  13. Norwegian scabies - rare case of atypical manifestation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Karina Corrêa; Alves, Júlia Barazetti; Tomé, Lísias de Araújo; de Moraes, Carlos Floriano; Gaspar, Arianne Ditzel; Franck, Karin Fernanda; Hussein, Mohamad Ali; da Cruz, Lucas Raiser; Ebrahim, Leonardo Duque; Sidney, Luis Felipe de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Human scabies affects all social classes and different races around the world. It is highly contagious, but the exact figures on its prevalence are unknown. A 19-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency room reporting fever (38°C) and multiple lesions throughout the body, except face, soles, and palms. Lesions were non-pruritic, which hampered the initial diagnostic suspicion. Skin biopsy was performed, and the final diagnosis was crusted scabies (Norwegian). It was concluded that human scabies is a significant epidemic disease, due to its different clinical manifestations, and because it is extremely contagious. PMID:28099611

  14. Chronic hepatitis C with extrahepatic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poantă, Laura; Albu, Adriana

    2007-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C is often asymptomatic and is mostly discovered accidentally. The natural course of viral C infection varies considerably from one person to another. Chronic hepatitis C more than other forms of hepatitis is diagnosed because of extrahepatic manifestations associated with the presence of HCV such as thyroiditis, porphyria cutanea tarda, cryoglobulinemia and glomerulonephritis, specifically membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, sicca syndrome, thrombocytopenia, lichen planus, diabetes mellitus and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. We report here a case of a young man with hepatitis C and porphyria cutanea tarda who developed psoriasis after the beginning of systemic interferon therapy.

  15. Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, Mauro; Colombo, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide and is also responsible for extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) involving the skin, kidneys, salivary glands, eyes, thyroid, and immune system. Mixed cryoglobulinemia is the prototype EHM related to HCV infection. Although these HCV-related EHMs may contribute to significant rates of morbidity affecting patient's quality of life and survival, most of these complications can reverse after HCV eradication by interferon therapy. This notwithstanding, individual patients may have an irreversible injury in various organs that is not reversed by a cure of the HCV infection.

  16. Manifestations of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; Mikkelsen, Dorthe; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2014-01-01

    manifestations and the fact that patients are especially sensitive to ionizing radiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome seen at the Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre or at Department of Plastic Surgery, Odense University Hospital......, kyphoscoliosis, rib anomalies, coalitio, cleft lip/palate, eye anomalies, milia and syndactyly. In one family, medulloblastoma and astrocytoma occurred. Traditional treatment principles of basal cell carcinomas were used including radiotherapy performed in six patients. PTCH1 mutations were identified in five...

  17. Treatment of extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C viral infection--a challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tănăsescu, C; Ionescu, R

    2010-01-01

    Often, chronic hepatitis C infection is clinically manifested as extra hepatic disease. Therapy of the extra hepatic manifestations (EHM) is always difficult and based on the optimal and individual association of antiviral treatment, immunosuppressant and plasma cleaning techniques. We observed for 4 years 246 patients admitted to "Colentina" Internal Medicine Clinic, of whom 168 were diagnosed as chronic C hepatitis. 130 of those patients have had at least one EHM. In our experience, the presence of an EHM is significantly correlated with lack of early viral response and sustained viral response, as well. Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis needs to be treated with oral or pulse corticotherapy associated to plasmapheresis. When present, peripheral neuropathy and cryocrit greater than 10% are indicators of need of more than 3 plasmapheresis sessions.

  18. Oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadalagere Lakshmana Girish Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is a malignancy of the bone marrow and blood. It is the most common childhood cancer in India. Advances in the treatment regimens have greatly increased the chances of survival. Both the disease and its treatment change the oral environment. In some cases, oral manifestations are the presenting feature of the disease and it will be the dentist′s responsibility to identify the underlying disorder and guide the diagnosis of the patient. Hence, the aim of present article is to review the literature concerning the oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL.

  19. Relapsing hypocupraemic myelopathy requiring high‐dose oral copper replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Prodan, C.I.; Bottomley, S S; Holland, N R; Lind, S. E.

    2006-01-01

    Adult‐onset copper deficiency with neurological manifestations is a newly recognised syndrome. Long‐term oral copper replacement therapy has been the mainstay of treatment in the literature. A case of relapsing hypocupraemic myelopathy responsive to increased doses of copper replacement is reported. Standard doses of copper may not be sufficient for all patients.

  20. Taking Charge: Teacher Candidates' Preparation for the Oral Proficiency Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, JoAnn Hammadou

    2011-01-01

    Within second language education, concern over teachers' content knowledge has typically manifested itself as concern over the teacher's target language proficiency. In increasing numbers, teacher preparation programs are turning to ACTFL's Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) for measurement of this proficiency and using OPI ratings as high-stakes…

  1. Lipid storage myopathies with unusual clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppin Megha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the clinical presentation, course and pathologic findings found in three adult patients with lipid storage myopathy. Excessive lipid storage was found in Type 1 fibers of muscle. Clinical improvement on oral levo-carnitine therapy suggests the possibility of carnitine deficiency as the most likely etiology in two of the patients and one had mitochondrial myopathy confirmed on genetic analysis.

  2. An uncommon focal epithelial hyperplasia manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida; Pansani, Cyneu Aguiar; Ferrari, Junia; Massucato, Elaine Maria Sgavioli; Spolidório, Luis Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare, contagious disease associated with infection of the oral mucosa by human papillomavirus types 13 or 32, characterized by multiple soft papules of the same color as the adjacent normal mucosa. It mainly affects the lower lip, buccal mucosa, and tongue. The purpose of this case report was to describe a rare verrucal lesion located in the upper gingiva that was clinically and histologically consistent with focal epithelial hyperplasia.

  3. Semen Allergy Manifesting As Chronic Pruritus Vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithran K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A young woman of 24 with personal and family history of atopy development pruritus vulva each time after sexual intercourse with her husband. History of urticaria of sites of contact with semen on her thighs gave suspicion of contact urticaria. Positive wheal and flare response to pin prick test with semen, excellent therapeutic response to topical steroid and oral Cetirizine and non- recurrence of the problem after using condom by her husband confirmed the diagnosis of semen allergy.

  4. 77 FR 54863 - Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs): Revisions to Manifesting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 761 ] RIN 2050-AG71 Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs): Revisions to Manifesting... CFR Part 761 Environmental protection, Hazardous substances, Manifest, Polychlorinated...

  5. Optic neuritis as onset manifestation of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T L; Frederiksen, J L; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik;

    1999-01-01

    To determine the predictive value on survival of optic neuritis (ON) as onset manifestation of MS.......To determine the predictive value on survival of optic neuritis (ON) as onset manifestation of MS....

  6. Diabetic patients: their knowledge and perception of oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziza H. Eldarrat

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The objectives of the study were to: 1 assess the knowledge and awareness of diabetic patients of their risk for systemic and oral diseases as complications associated with diabetes, 2 to assess their attitudes toward sustaining good oral health through proper oral hygiene and regular dental check-ups, and 3 to the extent that they are aware, to determine how they became aware. Methods : Two hundred self-administered questionnaires were distributed to assess the main objectives of the study. Only completed questionnaires were used in the current study data analysis. Results: A majority of the participants had Type 2 diabetes (58%. The awareness of diabetic patients of their increased risk for oral diseases is low compared to their awareness of systemic diseases. Their attitude toward maintaining good oral health was also not to desired standard. Of the participants, 50% brushed their teeth once daily and 66% never used dental floss. Regarding participants’ sources of awareness, 37% learned from dentists and 45% through other media sources. Conclusions : Diabetic patients are found to have little knowledge of their increased risk for oral diseases. In order to promote proper oral health and to reduce the risk of oral diseases, health professionals in both the dental and medical fields need to take the responsibility to develop programs to educate the public about the oral manifestations of diabetes and its complications on oral health.

  7. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  8. Pulmonary manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaude Gajanan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD may cause, trigger or exacerbate many pulmonary diseases. The physiological link between GERD and pulmonary disease has been extensively studied in chronic cough and asthma. A primary care physician often encounters patients with extra esophageal manifestations of GERD in the absence of heartburn. Patients may present with symptoms involving the pulmonary system; noncardiac chest pain; and ear, nose and throat disorders. Local irritation in the esophagus can cause symptoms that vary from indigestion, like chest discomfort and abdominal pain, to coughing and wheezing. If the gastric acid reaches the back of the throat, it may cause a bitter taste in the mouth and/or aspiration of the gastric acid into the lungs. The acid can cause throat irritation, postnasal drip and hoarseness, as well as recurrent cough, chest congestion and lung inflammation leading to asthma and/or bronchitis/ pneumonia. This clinical review examines the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of pulmonary manifestations of GERD. It also reviews relevant clinical information concerning GERD-related chronic cough and asthma. Finally, a potential management strategy for GERD in pulmonary patients is discussed.

  9. Neurological manifestations in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Etemadifar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anti-phospholipids syndrome (APS is considered a non inflammatory auto-immune disease with a significant thrombophilic risk with varied clinical manifestations. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the frequency of thrombotic and non-thrombotic events in patients with APS.In this retrospective study, 102 definite APS subjects were recruited (2007-2011 at Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. The patients were referred to Multiple Sclerosis Clinic with the diagnosis of definite APS according to 2006 Sydney's criteria. Disorders associated with APS such as pregnancy complication, vascular thrombosis and livedo reticularis (LR were assessed. Neurological signs and symptoms such as cognitive dysfunction were recorded. Data analyses were performed using SPSS software and P < 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.Our findings showed that majority of female gender, higher rate of ischemic thrombotic stroke and high miscarriage lied in a large number of APS patients.Overall recurrent miscarriage is a common complication among (antiphospholidpid antibody aPL patients. Furthermore, ischemic stroke is the second common neurological manifestations of APS patients.

  10. Autoimmune Schizophrenia? Psychiatric Manifestations of Hashimoto's Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Ali S; Alam, Maryam; Adetutu, Ebun; Thakur, Richa; Gottlich, Caleb; DeBacker, Danielle L; Marks, Lianne

    2016-07-05

    Hashimoto's encephalitis (HE), also known as steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT), can be a debilitating manifestation of an autoimmune reaction against the thyroid that is often under-diagnosed primarily due to a lack of definitive diagnostic criteria. This is a case of a 52-year-old woman who has been diagnosed with HE after presenting with recurrent and severe psychosis in conjunction with paranoia and a thyroidopathy. Her symptoms are chronic, having first been documented as presenting 15 years prior and showing progressive exacerbation in both frequency and severity. The patient's paranoia often manifested as delusions involving family members or close friends and consequently introduced an opportunity for harm to herself and others. She showed great conviction with self-diagnoses that were proven incorrect, resulting in occasional non-compliance. Between episodes, the patient did not show evidence of symptoms. This patient struggled with several incorrect diagnoses and treatments for several years before the correct diagnosis of HE was made and displayed extreme improvement upon corticosteroid administration. This case illustrates the importance of increasing awareness of HE as well as including HE in a differential diagnosis when any patient presents with psychosis and concurrent thyroidopathy. Hashimoto's encephalitis follows putative characteristics of autoimmune diseases, exhibiting a higher incidence in women as compared to men, presenting with increased titers of autoantibodies, and showing dramatic amelioration when treated with corticosteroids.

  11. Ocular manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Akshay S; Lin, Phoebe

    2016-11-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are numerous and can often involve the eye. This review highlights the ocular complications associated with IBD including the critical role the ophthalmologist can play in the diagnosis of IBD, the pathogenesis of IBD, its ocular complications, and the treatment of ocular inflammation associated with IBD. Polygenic and environmental influences, as well as gut microbial dysbiosis, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. IBD and its EIMs appear to respond well to TNFα-targeted biologics. IBD is thought to be caused by polygenic and environmental influences, including a dysbiotic gut microbiota. It is a systemic immune-mediated disease with varying types of ocular manifestations that can precede, occur simultaneously, or follow intestinal involvement. The diagnosis of IBD can be confused with other seronegative spondyloarthropathies as well as Behçet's disease. Treatment of IBD-associated ocular inflammation can range from corticosteroids to steroid-sparing immunosuppression such as azathioprine or methotrexate. Refractory disease can respond well to TNFα inhibitors.

  12. Neurological manifestations of calcific aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Egorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being thoroughly studied, senile aortic stenosis (AS remains a disease that is frequently underestimated by Russian clinicians. Meanwhile, its manifestations can not only deteriorate quality of life in patients, but can also be poor prognostic signs. The most common sequels of this disease include heart failure and severe arrhythmias. However, there may be also rare, but no less dangerous complications: enteric bleeding associated with common dysembriogenetic backgrounds, infarctions of various organs, the basis for which is spontaneous calcium embolism, and consciousness loss episodes. The latter are manifestations of cardiocerebral syndrome. Apart from syncope, embolic stroke may develop within this syndrome. There is evidence that after syncope occurs, life expectancy averages 3 years. Global practice is elaborating approaches to the intracardiac calcification prevention based on the rapid development of new pathogenetic ideas on this disease. In particular, it is clear that valvular calcification is extraskeletal leaflet ossification rather than commonplace impregnation with calcium salts, i.e. the case in point is the reverse of osteoporosis. This is the basis for a new concept of drug prevention of both calcification and the latter-induced heart disease. But the view of senile AS remains more than conservative in Russia. The paper describes a clinical case of a rare complication as cerebral calcium embolism and discusses the nature of neurological symptoms of the disease, such as vertigo and syncope.

  13. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  14. Citing geospatial feature inventories with XML manifests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, R.; McGarva, G.

    2006-12-01

    Today published scientific papers include a growing number of citations for online information sources that either complement or replace printed journals and books. We anticipate this same trend for cartographic citations used in the geosciences, following advances in web mapping and geographic feature-based services. Instead of using traditional libraries to resolve citations for print material, the geospatial citation life cycle will include requesting inventories of objects or geographic features from distributed geospatial data repositories. Using a case study from the UK Ordnance Survey MasterMap database, which is illustrative of geographic object-based products in general, we propose citing inventories of geographic objects using XML feature manifests. These manifests: (1) serve as a portable listing of sets of versioned features; (2) could be used as citations within the identification portion of an international geospatial metadata standard; (3) could be incorporated into geospatial data transfer formats such as GML; but (4) can be resolved only with comprehensive, curated repositories of current and historic data. This work has implications for any researcher who foresees the need to make or resolve references to online geospatial databases.

  15. The Manifestly Gauge Invariant Exact Renormalisation Group

    CERN Document Server

    Rosten, O J

    2005-01-01

    We construct a manifestly gauge invariant Exact Renormalisation Group (ERG) whose form is suitable for computation in SU(N) Yang-Mills theory, beyond one-loop. An effective cutoff is implemented by embedding the physical SU(N) theory in a spontaneously broken SU(N|N) Yang-Mills theory. To facilitate computations within this scheme, which proceed at every step without fixing the gauge, we develop a set of diagrammatic techniques. As an initial test of the formalism, the one-loop SU(N) Yang-Mills beta-function, beta_1, is computed, and the standard, universal answer is reproduced. It is recognised that the computational technique can be greatly simplified. Using these simplifications, a partial proof is given that, to all orders in perturbation theory, the explicit dependence of perturbative $\\beta$-function coefficients, beta_n, on certain non-universal elements of the manifestly gauge invariant ERG cancels out. This partial proof yields an extremely compact, diagrammatic form for the surviving contributions t...

  16. Radiation therapy of the oral cavity: sequelae and management. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beumer, J. III; Curtis, T.; Harrison, R.E.

    1979-03-01

    This is the first article in a two-part series dealing with the effects and manifestations in the oral cavity of radiation therapy of head and neck tumors. In this section, oral mucous membranes, taste buds, edema and trismus, diet, salivary glands, bone, peridontium, teeth, and composition of oral flora are discussed. Dental management of the dentulous patient is then approached; criteria for preradiation extraction are delineated.

  17. Positive intraluminal bowel contrast on computed tomography following oral ingestion of Kayexelate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R.; Stackievicz, R.; Osadchy, A. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging Meir Medical Center, Kfar-Saba, affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv (Israel)], E-mail: zisinrivka@clalit.org.il; Gayer, G. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging Assaf Harofe Medical Center, Zrifin, affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2008-12-15

    Our study presents the computed tomography (CT) manifestations of orally ingested kayexelate (a powdered form of sodium polystyrene sulphonate) used to treat hyperkalemia. Five patients with whom kayexelate appeared as high-attenuating intraluminal enteric content, similar to oral contrast material or leakage of intravascular contrast, are reported. Radiologists should be familiar with its appearance as it may mimic oral or vascular contrast within the gastrointestinal tract, a finding that may lead to a diagnostic error or misinterpretation. (author)

  18. 40 CFR 761.208 - Use of the manifest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... paper to certify that the PCB waste covered by the manifest or shipping paper was received. (ii) Note... PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.208 Use of the manifest. (a)(1) The generator of PCB waste shall: (i) Sign the manifest certification by hand. (ii) Obtain the handwritten signature of the...

  19. 49 CFR 172.205 - Hazardous waste manifest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Shipping Papers § 172.205 Hazardous waste manifest. (a) No person may offer, transport... waste in the United States; and (iv) Retain one copy of the manifest and rail shipping paper in... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous waste manifest. 172.205 Section 172.205...

  20. 40 CFR 761.209 - Retention of manifest records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shall keep a copy of the manifest and the shipping paper required to accompany the PCB waste for a... PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.209 Retention of manifest records. (a) A generator of PCB waste shall keep a copy of each manifest signed in accordance with § 761.208(a)(1) until the...

  1. ORAL MUCOSA LESIONS AND ORAL SYMPTOMS IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno LARANJEIRA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease is known for its extra intestinal manifestations, the oral cavity is no exception. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and oral mucosa lesions and symptoms, and complementary to evaluate their possible relation with oral hygiene, smoking habits, drug therapy, duration and activity of the disease. Methods Patients were selected from the Gastroenterology Clinic of a Portuguese tertiary referral hospital. This sample consisted of 113 patients previously diagnosed with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease along with a control group of 58 healthy individuals that were accompanying the study group patients to their appointments. Clinical interviews and clinical examinations were performed for data collection. Results The patients in the study group were more affected by oral symptoms (P=0.011, and showed a trend towards a higher incidence of oral mucosal lesions, even though statistical significance was not reached (8.8% versus 3.4% in the control group; P=0.159. Patients in active phase were the most affected. No differences were detected between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, or concerning smoking habits. The corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy seemed to increase the incidence of oral symptoms (P=0.052. The oral mucosa lesions increased and the oral symptoms decreased over the course of the disease, however without statistical significance. Conclusion Oral mucosa’s lesions and oral symptoms were positively associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease, mainly during disease activity periods and conceivably, associated with corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy.

  2. Abnormal Liver Function Tests in an Anorexia Nervosa Patient and an Atypical Manifestation of Refeeding Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vootla, Vamshidhar R; Daniel, Myrta

    2015-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is defined as electrolyte and fluid abnormalities that occur in significantly malnourished patients when they are refed orally, enterally, or parenterally. The principal manifestations include hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, vitamin deficiencies, volume overload and edema. This can affect multiple organ systems, such as the cardiovascular, pulmonary, or neurological systems, secondary to the above-mentioned abnormalities. Rarely, patients may develop gastrointestinal symptoms and show abnormal liver function test results. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman with anorexia nervosa who developed refeeding syndrome and simultaneous elevations of liver function test results, which normalized upon the resolution of the refeeding syndrome.

  3. Abnormal Liver Function Tests in an Anorexia Nervosa Patient and an Atypical Manifestation of Refeeding Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamshidhar R. Vootla

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Refeeding syndrome is defined as electrolyte and fluid abnormalities that occur in significantly malnourished patients when they are refed orally, enterally, or parenterally. The principal manifestations include hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, vitamin deficiencies, volume overload and edema. This can affect multiple organ systems, such as the cardiovascular, pulmonary, or neurological systems, secondary to the above-mentioned abnormalities. Rarely, patients may develop gastrointestinal symptoms and show abnormal liver function test results. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman with anorexia nervosa who developed refeeding syndrome and simultaneous elevations of liver function test results, which normalized upon the resolution of the refeeding syndrome.

  4. Unusual occurrence of dentoalveolar manifestations in a case with beta thalassemia trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alireza, Farhad; Maryam, Allameh

    2014-06-01

    A case of thalassemia minor with dentoalveolar manifestations in a 22-year-old Iranian male is presented. On the basis of patient complaint of upper incisors mobility, radiographic examination was performed which revealed enlarged medullary space, thin lamina dura, prominent antegonial notch, spiky and short roots of upper incisors and a generalized root resorption. This is the second report of dentoalveolar changes in regard to a minor hemoglubinopathy disorder. In this case treatment was carried out with 1 mg per day oral folic acid for 2 months which relived patient complaint as well as some radiographic changes.

  5. Pulmonary Nodules as an Initial Manifestation of Behçet’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Malekmohammad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Behçet’s disease (BD is a systemic vasculopathy, characterized by recurrent oral aphthae, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. Although vascular involvement, including venous and arteries of any size, is a usual manifestation, cases with pulmonary thrombosis as the initial symptom are not common in the absence of pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA. This report describes a 36-year-old man with recurrent fever, nonmassive hemoptysis, and persistent cough with lung nodules in CT scan who had undergone open lung biopsy. On the basis of morphological findings, BD was suggested and more precise evaluation confirmed the diagnosis.

  6. Polyuria with the Concurrent manifestation of Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI) & Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM)

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Jae-ha; Yi, Joo-Hark; Han, Sang-Woong; Kim, Ho-Jung

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare case of the concurrent manifestation of central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A 56 year-old man was diagnosed as a type 2 DM on the basis of hyperglycemia with polyuria and polydipsia at a local clinic two months ago and started an oral hypoglycemic medication, but resulted in no symptomatic improvement at all. Upon admission to the university hospital, the patient's initial fasting blood sugar level was 140 mg/dL, and he showed polydipsic and po...

  7. Convulsions as primary manifestation of nutritional rickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.P. Karunakara

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rickets is diagnosed based on classical clinical features like craniotabes, rachitic rosary, widening of wrist joints, pot belly, hypotonia, bowed legs and supported by the laboratory evidence of hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, and raised alkaline phosphatase. Hypocalcemic convulsions are a rare manifestation of nutritional rickets. Decline in the magnitude of the rickets requires high index of suspicion to identify this treatable condition. Herewith presenting retrospective study of twelve cases of rickets who presented with hypocalcemic seizures as primary manifestation. Materials and methods: A detailed retrospective analysis of diagnosed cases of rickets presenting with convulsions was done. Children who were admitted with hypocalcemic convulsion and subsequently diagnosed to have rickets were included in the study. Children who did not fulfill the criteria for diagnosis of rickets either clinically or biochemically or radiologically were excluded from the study. Details including age at presentation, weight, sex, gestational age and other associated diseases were collected and analyzed. Rickets was diagnosed on the basis of clinical features, biochemical parameters (serum calcium, phosphorous, alkaline phosphatase and radiological findings. Results: A Total of 12 children; 8 male and 4 females constituted the study subjects. Mean age of presentation was 6 months. All children had presented with preceding convulsions or active convulsions. One child who presented with active convulsions was treated with parenteral phenobarbitone. All 12 of them were evaluated for the cause and found to have hypocalcemia without any other cause for convulsions. Further clinical examination revealed features of rickets and were subjected to radiological and biochemical investigations. The mean calcium value was 6.3mg/dl, phosphorus -5.35mg/dl, alkaline phosphatase-890.13 units. All the cases had radiological features of rickets. All 12 were

  8. Primary pulmonary manifestation of Waldenstroem's macroglobulinemia. Primaer pulmonale Manifestation der Makroglobulinaemie Waldenstroem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaa, J.; Deininger, H.K. (Staedtische Kliniken Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.). Strahleninstitut)

    1989-10-01

    A case of Waldenstroem's macroglobulinemia (MGW) is presented with a rare primary pulmonary manifestation. The disease was discovered from abnormal reticulonodular opacities in chest X-ray films, which at first did not have the classic features of MGW. The radiological findings and therapeutic possibilities are discussed with reference to the literature. (orig.).

  9. Profil lesi oral pada penderita penyakit autoimun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Suasani Wahyuni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Oral lesion’s profi le in autoimmune disease. Oral lesions are commonly found in patients with autoimmune diseases as manifestations of the disease or a side effect of the treatment. Oral lesions must be handled properly to prevent secondary infection, relieve pain and improve the patient’s quality of life. The aim of this study is to describe oral lesions profile in patients with autoimmune diseases, including clinical characteristics and location of oral lesions as well as the distribution of age and sex of the patient. The methods were retrospective observation by describing the secondary data from patients with autoimmune handled by Oral Medicine Specialist, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Padjadjaran in dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Dental Clinic. Patient files from August 2010 untill August 2014 (n = 66 were used, with the most often diagnosis were Systemic Lupus erythematosus (SLE, Oral lichen planus (OLP and Pemphigus vulgaris (PV. It is revealed that, the age of patients varied between 9 to 68 years old and there was predominance of female patients. Patients diagnosed with SLE were 26 (39.4%, 12 patients with OLP (18.2% and 28 patients with PV (42.4%. Based on the clinical feature, the most commonly found type of oral lesion was erosion (n=52/78,8%, while the most commonly predilection was in the buccal mucosa (n = 46/69,7%. In conclusion, intra-oral examination should be used as a routine procedure in the comprehensive management of patients with autoimmune diseases. Dentist have a professional role in the diagnosis of oral lesions and provide appropriate therapy in order to improve the quality of life of patients with autoimmune diseases. ABSTRAK Lesi oral biasa ditemukan pada penderita penyakit autoimun sebagai manifestasi penyakit atau efek samping pengobatan kortikosteroid jangka panjang. Lesi oral harus ditangani dengan baik untuk mencegah terjadinya infeksi sekunder, mengatasi rasa sakit dan meningkatkan kualitas hidup

  10. Natural curvature for manifest T-duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poláček, Martin; Siegel, Warren [C. N. Yang Institute for Theoretical PhysicsState University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States)

    2014-01-08

    We reformulate the manifestly T-dual description of the massless sector of the closed bosonic string, directly from the geometry associated with the (left and right) affine Lie algebra of the coset space Poincaré/Lorentz. This construction initially doubles not only the (spacetime) coordinates for translations but also those for Lorentz transformations (and their “dual”). As a result, the Lorentz connection couples directly to the string (as does the vielbein), rather than being introduced ad hoc to the covariant derivative as previously. This not only reproduces the old definition of T-dual torsion, but automatically gives a general, covariant definition of T-dual curvature (but still with some undetermined connections)

  11. Extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio Danese; Stefano Semeraro; Alfredo Papa; Italia Roberto; Franco Scaldaferri; Giuseppe Fedeli; Giovanni Gasbarrini; Antonio Gasbarrini

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) can be really considered to be systemic diseases since they are often associated with extraintestinal manifestations,complications, and other autoimmune disorders. Indeed,physicians who care for patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, the two major forms of IBD, face a new clinical challenge every day, worsened by the very frequent rate of extraintestinal complications. The goal of this review is to provide an overview and an update on the extraintestinal complications occurring in IBD.Indeed, this paper highlights how virtually almost every organ system can be involved, principally eyes, skin,joints, kidneys, liver and biliary tracts, and vasculature (or vascular system) are the most common sites of systemic IBD and their involvement is dependent on different mechanisms.

  12. Neurological manifestations of Chikungunya and Zika infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talys J. Pinheiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The epidemics of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Zika virus (ZIKV infections have been considered the most important epidemiological occurrences in the Americas. The clinical picture of CHIKV infection is characterized by high fever, exanthema, myalgia, headaches, and arthralgia. Besides the typical clinical picture of CHIKV, atypical manifestations of neurological complications have been reported: meningo-encephalitis, meningoencephalo-myeloradiculitis, myeloradiculitis, myelitis, myeloneuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome and others. The diagnosis is based on clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory criteria. The most common symptoms of ZIKV infection are skin rash (mostly maculopapular, fever, arthralgia, myalgia, headache, and conjunctivitis. Some epidemics that have recently occurred in French Polynesia and Brazil, reported the most severe conditions, with involvement of the nervous system (Guillain-Barré syndrome, transverse myelitis, microcephaly and meningitis. The treatment for ZIKV and CHIKV infections are symptomatic and the management for neurological complications depends on the type of affliction. Intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis, and corticosteroid pulse therapy are options.

  13. Atypical Radiological Manifestation of Pulmonary Metastatic Calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun Hae; Kim, Eun Sun; Kim, Chul Hwan; Ham, Soo Youn; Oh, Yu Whan [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification is a condition of calcium deposition in the normal pulmonary parenchyma, and this is secondary to abnormal calcium metabolism without any prior soft tissue damage. The predisposing factors for this condition include chronic renal failure, hypercalcemia and increased tissue alkalinity. The most common radiologic manifestation consists of poorly defined nodular opacities in the upper lung zone. These opacities reflect the deposition of calcium salts in the pulmonary interstitium. We present here a case of metastatic pulmonary calcification in a patient who recovered from pneumonia with sepsis and whose high-resolution CT (HRCT) images demonstrated localized parenchymal airspace calcification that was limited to the bilateral lower lobes. These lower lobes had been involved with pneumonic consolidation without calcification, as seen on the previous CT scan. In summary, we report here on an atypical presentation of metastatic pulmonary calcification that showed dense airspace consolidation localized to the bilateral lower lobes in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism and pneumonia.

  14. Neonatal muscular manifestations in mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulinius, Már; Oldfors, Anders

    2011-08-01

    During the last decade rapid development has occurred in defining nuclear gene mutations causing mitochondrial disease. Some of these newly defined gene mutations cause neonatal or early infantile onset of disease, often associated with severe progressive encephalomyopathy combined with other multi-organ involvement such as cardiomyopathy or hepatopathy and with early death. Findings suggesting myopathy in neonates are hypotonia, muscle weakness and wasting, and arthrogryposis. We aim to describe the clinical findings of patients with mitochondrial disease presenting with muscular manifestations in the neonatal period or in early infancy and in whom the genetic defect has been characterized. The majority of patients with neonatal onset of mitochondrial disease have mutations in nuclear genes causing dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, leading to defective oxidative phosphorylation.

  15. Neurosarcoidosis: Clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Kenkichi; Judson, Marc A

    2012-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic granulomatous disease affecting multiple organs. Neurosarcoidosis, involving the central and/or peripheral nervous systems, is a relatively rare form of sarcoidosis. Its clinical manifestations include cranial neuropathies, meningitis, neuroendocrinological dysfunction, hydrocephalus, seizures, neuropsychiatric symptoms, myelopathy and neuropathies. The diagnosis is problematic, especially when occurring as an isolated form without other organ involvement. Distinguishing neurosarcoidosis from other granulomatous diseases and multiple sclerosis is especially important. Although biopsy of neural tissue is the gold standard for the diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis, this is often not practical and the diagnosis must be inferred though other tests, often coupled with biopsy of extraneural organs. Corticosteroids and other immuno-suppressants are frequently used for the treatment of neurosarcoidosis. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical features, diagnosis, diagnostic tests, diagnostic criteria, and therapy of neurosarcoidosis.

  16. Hereditary angioedema: imaging manifestations and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakhal, Mandip S; Marcotte, Gregory V

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a genetic disorder typically related to insufficient or dysfunctional C1-esterase inhibitor. Patients present with episodic swelling of various body parts, such as the face, neck, bowel, genitals, and extremities. Acute or severe symptoms can lead to patients presenting to the emergency room, particularly when the neck and abdominopelvic regions are affected, which is often accompanied by radiologic imaging evaluation. Patients with hereditary angioedema can pose a diagnostic challenge for emergency department physicians and radiologists at initial presentation, and the correct diagnosis may be missed or delayed, due to lack of clinical awareness of the disease or lack of its consideration in the radiologic differential diagnosis. Timely diagnosis of hereditary angioedema and rapid initiation of appropriate therapy can avoid potentially life-threatening complications. This article focuses on the spectrum of common and characteristic acute imaging manifestations of hereditary angioedema and provides an update on important recent developments in its clinical management and treatment.

  17. MRI manifestations of enlarged superior ophthalmic vein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Rui-li; MA Xiao-ye; CAI Ji-ping; ZHU Huang

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To assess MRI in the evaluation of enlarged superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). Methods: MRI manifestations and etiology of forty-six patients with enlarged SOV were analyzed. Results: SOV enlargement was noted to occur in carotid-cavernous fistula, ophthalmic Graves'disease, Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, inflammation at the apex of the orbit, orbital pseudotumor and thrombosis of cavernous sinus. The dilated vein appeared as signal void tubular shadows on both T1 and T2 weighted images. The diameter of the enlarged vein was 3.5-6.0 mm. Extraocular muscle enlargement, orbital pathologies, enlarged carotid cavernous sinus etc were also revealed by MRI. Conclusion: The dilated SOV may be well demonstrated by MRI. The etiological diagnosis of enlarged SOV can be made in combination with the associated findings.

  18. Tophi as first manifestation of gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koley Sankha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic tophaceous gout classically occurs after 10 years or more of recurrent polyarticular gout. However, tophi can also occur as first sign of the disorder. Here we report a 20-year-old male presenting with multiple subcutaneous nodules on bilateral feet and toes, left palm, right elbow, helix of left ear since last one and half year prior to any other manifestation of gout. He was having mild intermittent arthritis since last six months. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of one tophus showed monosodium urate crystals, which are pathognomonic for gout. His serum uric acid was normal and ultrasound revealed bilateral nephrocalcinosis. So far as we know, this is the first case report from India, demonstrating tophi as the initial clinical presentation of gout.

  19. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  20. Opsoclonus as a manifestation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, R; Mehta, C; Zaher, N; Miller, D

    2012-10-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with early manifestation of opsoclonus associated with gait ataxia as a rare clinical presentation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Empiric use of intravenous immunoglobulin followed by intravenous high dose methylprednisolone was initiated with subsequent remittance of opsoclonus, encephalopathy, ataxia, and tremor. Extensive workup for infectious, autoimmune, and paraneoplastic etiologies were undertaken and all studies were negative. Thyroglobulin antibodies (312 U/mL) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (457 U/mL) were elevated (normal antibodies were retested and found to have decreased considerably. Thus, with steroid therapy, the patient's opsoclonus and encephalopathy improved. We have presented a patient with a rare case of opsoclonus as the principal presenting feature of Hashimoto's encephalopathy that was incompletely responsive to intravenous immunoglobulin and resolved with corticosteroids. This report underscores the importance for clinical practitioners to maintain a high index of suspicion for Hashimoto's encephalopathy in cases of opsoclonus, especially when accompanied by an atypical presentation.