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Sample records for oral insulin delivery

  1. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for oral insulin delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ping; Tan, Angel; Prestidge, Clive A

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the combination of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) and enteric-coated capsules as a potential delivery strategy for oral delivery of insulin. The SNEDDS preconcentrates, loaded with insulin-phospholipid complex at different levels (0, 2.5 and 10% w...

  2. Application of polymeric nanoparticles and micelles in insulin oral delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind Sadashiv Alai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is an endocrine disease in which the pancreas does not produce sufficient insulin or the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. Insulin therapy has been the best choice for the clinical management of diabetes mellitus. The current insulin therapy is via subcutaneous injection, which often fails to mimic the glucose homeostasis that occurs in normal individuals. This provokes numerous attempts to develop a safe and effective noninvasive route for insulin delivery. Oral delivery is the most convenient administration route. However, insulin cannot be well absorbed orally because of its rapid enzymatic degradation in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, nanoparticulate carriers such as polymeric nanoparticles and micelles are employed for the oral delivery of insulin. These nanocarriers protect insulin from degradation and facilitate insulin uptake via a transcellular and/or paracellular pathway. This review article focuses on the application of nanoparticles and micelles in insulin oral delivery. The recent advances in this topic are also reviewed.

  3. Oral insulin delivery: existing barriers and current counter-strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedawy, Ahmed; Martinez, Jorge; Al-Salami, Hani; Dass, Crispin R

    2018-02-01

    The chronic and progressive nature of diabetes is usually associated with micro- and macrovascular complications where failure of pancreatic β-cell function and a general condition of hyperglycaemia is created. One possible factor is failure of the patient to comply with and adhere to the prescribed insulin due to the inconvenient administration route. This review summarizes the rationale for oral insulin administration, existing barriers and some counter-strategies trialled. Oral insulin mimics the physiology of endogenous insulin secreted by pancreas. Following the intestinal absorption of oral insulin, it reaches the liver at high concentration via the portal vein. Oral insulin on the other hand has the potential to protect pancreatic β-cells from autoimmune destruction. Structural modification, targeting a particular tissue/receptor, and the use of innovative pharmaceutical formulations such as nanoparticles represent strategies introduced to improve oral insulin bioavailability. They showed promising results in overcoming the hurdles facing oral insulin delivery, although delivery is far from ideal. The use of advanced pharmaceutical technologies and further research in particulate carrier system delivery predominantly nanoparticle utilization would offer useful tools in delivering insulin via the oral route which in turn would potentially improve diabetic patient compliance to insulin and the overall management of diabetes. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  4. An overview of natural polymers for oral insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonia, T A; Sharma, Chandra P

    2012-07-01

    Current therapy for diabetes mellitus through oral anti-diabetic drugs and subcutaneous administration of insulin suffers from serious disadvantages, such as patient noncompliance and occasional hypoglycemia. Moreover, these approaches doesn't mimic the normal physiological pattern of insulin release. Oral route would be the most convenient and preferred route if it is available. Polymeric nano and/or microparticles, either natural or synthetic have been used as matrices for oral insulin delivery. Natural polymers are of particular interest due to their nontoxic, biocompatible, biodegradable and hydrophilic nature. Among the natural polymers used for oral insulin delivery, chitosan (CS) is widely explored owing to its ease of chemical modification and favorable biological properties. In addition, many advantages such as safety, biodegradability, widespread availability and low cost justify the continuing development of promising insulin delivery system based on CS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Concanavalin A conjugated biodegradable nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery

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    Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Aviral; Jain, Ashish; Shilpi, Satish; Gulbake, Arvind; Jain, Sanjay K.

    2012-11-01

    Major research issues in oral protein delivery include the stabilization of protein in delivery devices which could increase its oral bioavailability. The study deals with development of oral insulin delivery system utilizing biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles and modifying its surface with Concanavalin A to increase lymphatic uptake. Surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles were characterized for conjugation efficiency of ligand, shape and surface morphology, particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, entrapment efficiency, and in vitro drug release. Stability of insulin in the developed formulation was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and integrity of entrapped insulin was assessed using circular dichroism spectrum. Ex vivo study was performed on Wistar rats, which exhibited the higher intestinal uptake of Con A conjugated nanoparticles. In vivo study performed on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats which indicate that a surface-modified nanoparticle reduces blood glucose level effectively within 4 h of its oral administration. In conclusion, the present work resulted in successful production of Con A NPs bearing insulin with sustained release profile, and better absorption and stability. The Con A NPs showed high insulin uptake, due to its relative high affinity for non-reducing carbohydrate residues i.e., fucose present on M cells and have the potential for oral insulin delivery in effective management of Type 1 diabetes condition.

  6. Concanavalin A conjugated biodegradable nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Aviral; Jain, Ashish; Shilpi, Satish; Gulbake, Arvind; Jain, Sanjay K., E-mail: drskjainin@yahoo.com [Dr. Hari Singh Gour Vishwavidyalaya, Pharmaceutics Research Projects Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2012-11-15

    Major research issues in oral protein delivery include the stabilization of protein in delivery devices which could increase its oral bioavailability. The study deals with development of oral insulin delivery system utilizing biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles and modifying its surface with Concanavalin A to increase lymphatic uptake. Surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles were characterized for conjugation efficiency of ligand, shape and surface morphology, particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, entrapment efficiency, and in vitro drug release. Stability of insulin in the developed formulation was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and integrity of entrapped insulin was assessed using circular dichroism spectrum. Ex vivo study was performed on Wistar rats, which exhibited the higher intestinal uptake of Con A conjugated nanoparticles. In vivo study performed on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats which indicate that a surface-modified nanoparticle reduces blood glucose level effectively within 4 h of its oral administration. In conclusion, the present work resulted in successful production of Con A NPs bearing insulin with sustained release profile, and better absorption and stability. The Con A NPs showed high insulin uptake, due to its relative high affinity for non-reducing carbohydrate residues i.e., fucose present on M cells and have the potential for oral insulin delivery in effective management of Type 1 diabetes condition.

  7. Calcium phosphate-PEG-insulin-casein (CAPIC) particles as oral delivery systems for insulin.

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    Morçöl, T; Nagappan, P; Nerenbaum, L; Mitchell, A; Bell, S J D

    2004-06-11

    An oral delivery system for insulin was developed and functional activity was tested in a non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice model. Calcium phosphate particles containing insulin was synthesized in the presence of PEG-3350 and modified by aggregating the particles with caseins to obtain the calcium phosphate-PEG-insulin-casein (CAPIC) oral insulin delivery system. Single doses of CAPIC formulation were tested in NOD mice under fasting or fed conditions to evaluate the glycemic activity. The blood glucose levels were monitored every 1-2h for 12h following the treatments using an ACCU CHECK blood glucose monitoring system. Orally administered and subcutaneously injected free insulin solution served as controls in the study. Based on the results obtained we propose that: (1). the biological activity of insulin is preserved in CAPIC formulation; (2). insulin in CAPIC formulations, but not the free insulin, displays a prolonged hypoglycemic effect after oral administration to diabetic mice; (3). CAPIC formulation protects insulin from degradation while passing through the acidic environment of the GI track until it is released in the less acidic environment of the intestines where it can be absorbed in its biologically active form; (4). CAPIC formulation represents a new and unique oral delivery system for insulin and other macromolecules.

  8. Cyclodextrin-insulin complex encapsulated polymethacrylic acid based nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery.

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    Sajeesh, S; Sharma, Chandra P

    2006-11-15

    Present investigation was aimed at developing an oral insulin delivery system based on hydroxypropyl beta cyclodextrin-insulin (HPbetaCD-I) complex encapsulated polymethacrylic acid-chitosan-polyether (polyethylene glycol-polypropylene glycol copolymer) (PMCP) nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were prepared by the free radical polymerization of methacrylic acid in presence of chitosan and polyether in a solvent/surfactant free medium. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiment was conducted with particles dispersed in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and size distribution curve was observed in the range of 500-800 nm. HPbetaCD was used to prepare non-covalent inclusion complex with insulin and complex was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. HPbetaCD complexed insulin was encapsulated into PMCP nanoparticles by diffusion filling method and their in vitro release profile was evaluated at acidic/alkaline pH. PMCP nanoparticles displayed good insulin encapsulation efficiency and release profile was largely dependent on the pH of the medium. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) study demonstrated that insulin encapsulated inside the particles was biologically active. Trypsin inhibitory effect of PMCP nanoparticles was evaluated using N-alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester (BAEE) and casein as substrates. Mucoadhesive studies of PMCP nanoparticles were conducted using freshly excised rat intestinal mucosa and the particles were found fairly adhesive. From the preliminary studies, cyclodextrin complexed insulin encapsulated mucoadhesive nanoparticles appear to be a good candidate for oral insulin delivery.

  9. Stimuli sensitive polymethacrylic acid microparticles (PMAA)--oral insulin delivery.

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    Victor, Sunita Prem; Sharma, Chandra P

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) microparticles for controlled release of Insulin in oral administration. The microparticles were characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphological studies. The swelling behaviour and drug release profile in various pH media were studied. The % swelling of gels was found to be inversely related to the amount of crosslinker added. Inclusion complex of betaCD and Insulin was studied using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Optimum complexation was obtained in the ratio 100 mg betaCD: 200 IU Insulin. The release pattern of Insulin from Insulin-betaCD complex encapsulated PMAA microparticles showed release of Insulin for more than seven hours.

  10. Nanoencapsulation of Insulin into Zirconium Phosphate for Oral Delivery Applications

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    Díaz, Agustín; David, Amanda; Pérez, Riviam; González, Millie L.; Báez, Adriana; Wark, Stacey E.; Zhang, Paul; Clearfield, Abraham; Colón, Jorge L.

    2010-01-01

    The encapsulation of insulin into different kinds of materials for non-invasive delivery is an important field of study because of the many drawbacks of painful needle and syringe delivery such as physiological stress, infection, and local hypertrophy, among others.1 A stable, robust, non-toxic, and viable non-invasive carrier for insulin delivery is needed. We present a new approach for protein nanoencapsulation using layered zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoparticles produced without any preintercalator present. The use of ZrP without preintercalators produces a highly pure material, without any kinds of contaminants, such as the preintercalator, which can be noxious. Cytotoxicity cell viability in vitro experiments for the ZrP nanoparticles show that ZrP is not toxic, or harmful, in a biological environment, as previously reported for rats.2 Contrary to previous preintercalator-based methods, we show that insulin can be nanoencapsulated in ZrP if a highly hydrate phase of ZrP with an interlayer distance of 10.3 Å (10.3 Å-ZrP or θ-ZrP) is used as precursor. The intercalation of insulin into ZrP produced a new insulin-intercalated ZrP phase with a ca. 27 Å interlayer distance, as determined by X-ray powder diffraction, demonstrating a successful nanoencapsulation of the hormone. The in vitro release profile of the hormone after the intercalation was determined and circular dichroism was used to study the hormone stability upon intercalation and release. The insulin remains stable in the layered material, at room temperature, for a considerable amount of time, improving the shell life of the peptidic hormone. This type of materials represents a strong candidate to develop a non-invasive insulin carrier for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:20707305

  11. Microencapsulation techniques to develop formulations of insulin for oral delivery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Bailón, Fernando; Osorio-Revilla, Guillermo; Gallardo-Velázquez, Tzayhrí

    2013-01-01

    Oral insulin delivery represents one of the most challenging goals for pharmaceutical industry. In general, it is accepted that oral administration of insulin would be more accepted by patients and insulin would be delivered in a more physiological way than the parenteral route. From all strategies to deliverer insulin orally, microencapsulation or nanoencapsulation of insulin are the most promising approaches because these techniques protect insulin from enzymatic degradation in stomach, show a good release profile at intestine pH values, maintain biological activity during formulation and enhance intestinal permeation at certain extent. From different microencapsulation techniques, it seems that complex coacervation, multiple emulsion and internal gelation are the most appropriate techniques to encapsulate insulin due to their relative ease of preparation. Besides that, the use of organic solvents is not required and can be scaled up at low cost; however, relative oral bioavailability still needs to be improved.

  12. Insulin Inclusion into a Tragacanth Hydrogel: An Oral Delivery System for Insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhamad Nur; Todor Vasiljevic

    2018-01-01

    Nanoparticles or microparticles created by physical complexation between two polyelectrolytes may have a prospective use as an excipient for oral insulin administration. Natural polymers such as tragacanth, alginate, dextran, pullulan, hyaluronic acid, gelatin and chitosan can be potential candidates for this purpose. In this research, insulin particles were prepared by the inclusion of insulin into a tragacanth hydrogel. The effect of the pH and concentration relationship involving polyelect...

  13. Self-assembled lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery: preparation and functional evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liyao; Zhou, Cuiping; Xia, Xuejun; Liu, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Here, we investigated the formation and functional properties of self-assembled lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles (L/C NPs) loaded with insulin following insulin–phospholipid complex preparation, with the aim of developing a method for oral insulin delivery. Methods Using a modified solvent-injection method, insulin-loaded L/C NPs were obtained by combining insulin–phospholipid complexes with L/C NPs. The nanoparticle size distribution was determined by dynamic light scattering, and morphologies were analyzed by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis was used to disclose the molecular mechanism of prepared insulin-loaded L/C NPs. Fast ultrafiltration and a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography assay were used to separate free insulin from insulin entrapped in the L/C NPs, as well as to measure the insulin-entrapment and drug-loading efficiencies. The in vitro release profile was obtained, and in vivo hypoglycemic effects were evaluated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Results Our results indicated that insulin-containing L/C NPs had a mean size of 180 nm, an insulin-entrapment efficiency of 94%, and an insulin-loading efficiency of 4.5%. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy observations of insulin-loaded L/C NPs revealed multilamellar structures with a hollow core, encircled by several bilayers. In vitro analysis revealed that insulin release from L/C NPs depended on the L/C ratio. Insulin-loaded L/C NPs orally administered to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats exerted a significant hypoglycemic effect. The relative pharmacological bioavailability following oral administration of L/C NPs was 6.01%. Conclusion With the aid of phospholipid-complexation techniques, some hydrophilic peptides, such as insulin, can be successfully entrapped into L/C NPs, which could improve oral bioavailability, time-dependent release, and therapeutic activity. PMID:26966360

  14. Chitosan/lecithin liposomal nanovesicles as an oral insulin delivery system.

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    Al-Remawi, Mayyas; Elsayed, Amani; Maghrabi, Ibrahim; Hamaidi, Mohammad; Jaber, Nisrein

    2017-05-01

    In the present work, insulin-chitosan polyelectrolyte complexes associated to lecithin liposomes were investigated as a new carrier for oral delivery of insulin. The preparation was characterized in terms of particle size, zeta potential and encapsulation efficiency. Surface tension measurements revealed that insulin-chitosan polyelectrolyte complexes have some degree of hydrophobicity and should be added to lecithin liposomal dispersion and not the vice versa to prevent their adsorption on the surface. Stability of insulin was enhanced when it was associated to liposomes. Significant reduction of blood glucose levels was noticed after oral administration of liposomal preparation to streptozotocin diabetic rats compared to control. The hypoglycemic activity was more prolonged compared to subcutaneously administered insulin.

  15. Self-assembled lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery: preparation and functional evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu LY

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Liyao Liu, Cuiping Zhou, Xuejun Xia, Yuling Liu State Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substance and Function of Natural Medicines, Beijing Key Laboratory of Drug Delivery Technology and Novel Formulations, Department of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Here, we investigated the formation and functional properties of self-assembled lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles (L/C NPs loaded with insulin following insulin–phospholipid complex preparation, with the aim of developing a method for oral insulin delivery.Methods: Using a modified solvent-injection method, insulin-loaded L/C NPs were obtained by combining insulin–phospholipid complexes with L/C NPs. The nanoparticle size distribution was determined by dynamic light scattering, and morphologies were analyzed by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis was used to disclose the molecular mechanism of prepared insulin-loaded L/C NPs. Fast ultrafiltration and a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography assay were used to separate free insulin from insulin entrapped in the L/C NPs, as well as to measure the insulin-entrapment and drug-loading efficiencies. The in vitro release profile was obtained, and in vivo hypoglycemic effects were evaluated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.Results: Our results indicated that insulin-containing L/C NPs had a mean size of 180 nm, an insulin-entrapment efficiency of 94%, and an insulin-loading efficiency of 4.5%. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy observations of insulin-loaded L/C NPs revealed multilamellar structures with a hollow core, encircled by several bilayers. In vitro analysis revealed that insulin release from L/C NPs depended on the L/C ratio. Insulin-loaded L/C NPs orally administered to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats exerted a significant

  16. Novel PLGA-based nanoparticles for the oral delivery of insulin

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    Malathi S

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sampath Malathi,1 Perumal Nandhakumar,2 Velayudham Pandiyan,2 Thomas J Webster,3 Sengottuvelan Balasubramanian1 1Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Guindy Campus, University of Madras, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; 2Department of Veterinary Biochemistry, Madras Veterinary College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; 3Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, USA Background: Insulin is the drug therapy for patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. A number of attempts have been made in the past to overcome the problems associated with the oral delivery of insulin, but with little success. Orally administered insulin has encountered with many difficulties such as rapid degradation and poor intestinal absorption. The potential use of d-α-tocopherol poly(ethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS-emulsified poly(ethylene glycol (PEG-capped poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs was investigated for sustained delivery of insulin (IS.Objective: To investigate the efficacy of TPGS-emulsified PEG-capped PLGA NPs (TPPLG NPs as a potential drug carrier for the oral delivery of insulin.Methods: A series of biodegradable low-molecular-weight PLGA (80/20 [PLG4] and 70/30 [PLG6] copolymers were synthesized by melt polycondensation. The commercial insulin-loaded TPGS-emulsified PEG-capped PLGA NPs (ISTPPLG NPs were synthesized by water–oil–water emulsion solvent evaporation method. The physical and chemical properties of PLGA copolymers, particle size, zeta potential, and morphology of the NPs were examined. The in vivo studies of ISTPPLG NPs were carried out in diabetic rats by oral administration.Results: The maximum encapsulation efficiency of ISTPPLG6 NPs was 78.6%±1.2%, and the mean diameter of the NPs was 180±20 nm. The serum glucose level was significantly (twofold decreased on treatment with ISTPPLG NPs, and there was a threefold decrease with insulin-loaded PLGA (70/30 NPs when compared to that of free

  17. Microparticles, microcapsules and microspheres: A review of recent developments and prospects for oral delivery of insulin.

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    Wong, Chun Y; Al-Salami, Hani; Dass, Crispin R

    2018-02-15

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic health disease affecting the homeostasis of blood sugar levels. However, subcutaneous injection of insulin can lead to patient non-compliance, discomfort, pain and local infection. Sub-micron sized drug delivery systems have gained attention in oral delivery of insulin for diabetes treatment. In most of the recent literature, the terms "microparticles" and "nanoparticle" refer to particles where the dimensions of the particle are measured in micrometers and nanometers respectively. For instance, insulin-loaded particles are defined as microparticles with size larger than 1 μm by most of the research groups. The size difference between nanoparticles and microparticles proffers numerous effects on the drug loading efficiency, aggregation, permeability across the biological membranes, cell entry and tissue retention. For instance, microparticulate drug delivery systems have demonstrated a number of advantages including protective effect against enzymatic degradation, enhancement of peptide stability, site-specific and controlled drug release. Compared to nanoparticulate drug delivery systems, microparticulate formulations can facilitate oral absorption of insulin by paracellular, transcellular and lymphatic routes. In this article, we review the current status of microparticles, microcapsules and microspheres for oral administration of insulin. A number of novel techniques including layer-by-layer coating, self-polymerisation of shell, nanocomposite microparticulate drug delivery system seem to be promising for enhancing the oral bioavailability of insulin. This review draws several conclusions for future directions and challenges to be addressed for optimising the properties of microparticulate drug formulations and enhancing their hypoglycaemic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biomimetic insulin-imprinted polymer nanoparticles as a potential oral drug delivery system

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    Paul Pijush Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs, which form a three-dimensional image of the region at and around the active binding sites of pharmaceutically active insulin or are analogous to b cells bound to insulin. This approach was employed to create a welldefined structure within the nanospace cavities that make up functional monomers by cross-linking. The obtained MIPs exhibited a high adsorption capacity for the target insulin, which showed a significantly higher release of insulin in solution at pH 7.4 than at pH 1.2. In vivo studies on diabetic Wistar rats showed that the fast onset within 2 h is similar to subcutaneous injection with a maximum at 4 h, giving an engaged function responsible for the duration of glucose reduction for up to 24 h. These MIPs, prepared as nanosized material, may open a new horizon for oral insulin delivery.

  19. Potential of insulin nanoparticle formulations for oral delivery and diabetes treatment.

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    Wong, Chun Y; Al-Salami, Hani; Dass, Crispin R

    2017-10-28

    Nanoparticles have demonstrated significant advancements in potential oral delivery of insulin. In this publication, we review the current status of polymeric, inorganic and solid-lipid nanoparticles designed for oral administration of insulin. Firstly, the structure and physiological function of insulin are examined. Then, the efficiency and shortcomings of insulin nanoparticle are discussed. These include the susceptibility to digestive enzyme degradation, instability in the acidic pH environment, poor mucus diffusion and inadequate permeation through the gastrointestinal epithelium. In order to optimise the nanocarriers, the following considerations, including polymer nature, surface charge, size, polydispersity index and morphology of nanoparticles, have to be taken into account. Some novel designs such as chitosan-based glucose-responsive nanoparticles, layer by layer technique-based nanoparticles and zwitterion nanoparticles are being adopted to overcome the physiological challenges. The review ends with some future directions and challenges to be addressed for the success of oral delivery of insulin-loaded nanoparticle formulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Thiol functionalized polymethacrylic acid-based hydrogel microparticles for oral insulin delivery.

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    Sajeesh, S; Vauthier, C; Gueutin, C; Ponchel, G; Sharma, Chandra P

    2010-08-01

    In the present study thiol functionalized polymethacrylic acid-polyethylene glycol-chitosan (PCP)-based hydrogel microparticles were utilized to develop an oral insulin delivery system. Thiol modification was achieved by grafting cysteine to the activated surface carboxyl groups of PCP hydrogels (Cys-PCP). Swelling and insulin loading/release experiments were conducted on these particles. The ability of these particles to inhibit protease enzymes was evaluated under in vitro experimental conditions. Insulin transport experiments were performed on Caco-2 cell monolayers and excised intestinal tissue with an Ussing chamber set-up. Finally, the efficacy of insulin-loaded particles in reducing the blood glucose level in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was investigated. Thiolated hydrogel microparticles showed less swelling and had a lower insulin encapsulation efficiency as compared with unmodified PCP particles. PCP and Cys-PCP microparticles were able to inhibit protease enzymes under in vitro conditions. Thiolation was an effective strategy to improve insulin absorption across Caco-2 cell monolayers, however, the effect was reduced in the experiments using excised rat intestinal tissue. Nevertheless, functionalized microparticles were more effective in eliciting a pharmacological response in diabetic animal, as compared with unmodified PCP microparticles. From these studies thiolation of hydrogel microparticles seems to be a promising approach to improve oral delivery of proteins/peptides. Copyright 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Insulin Inclusion into a Tragacanth Hydrogel: An Oral Delivery System for Insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhamad Nur

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles or microparticles created by physical complexation between two polyelectrolytes may have a prospective use as an excipient for oral insulin administration. Natural polymers such as tragacanth, alginate, dextran, pullulan, hyaluronic acid, gelatin and chitosan can be potential candidates for this purpose. In this research, insulin particles were prepared by the inclusion of insulin into a tragacanth hydrogel. The effect of the pH and concentration relationship involving polyelectrolytes offering individual particle size and zeta potential was assessed by zetasizer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Insulin–tragacanth interactions at varying pH (3.7, 4.3, 4.6, or 6, and concentration (0.1%, 0.5%, or 1% w/w were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and ATR Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR analysis. Individual and smaller particles, approximately 800 nm, were acquired at pH 4.6 with 0.5% of tragacanth. The acid gelation test indicated that insulin could be entrapped in the physical hydrogel of tragacanth. DSC thermograms of insulin–tragacanth showed shifts on the same unloaded tragacanth peaks and suggested polyelectrolyte–protein interactions at a pH close to 4.3–4.6. FTIR spectra of tragacanth–insulin complexes exhibited amide absorption bands featuring in the protein spectra and revealed the creation of a new chemical substance.

  2. Insulin Inclusion into a Tragacanth Hydrogel: An Oral Delivery System for Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiljevic, Todor

    2018-01-01

    Nanoparticles or microparticles created by physical complexation between two polyelectrolytes may have a prospective use as an excipient for oral insulin administration. Natural polymers such as tragacanth, alginate, dextran, pullulan, hyaluronic acid, gelatin and chitosan can be potential candidates for this purpose. In this research, insulin particles were prepared by the inclusion of insulin into a tragacanth hydrogel. The effect of the pH and concentration relationship involving polyelectrolytes offering individual particle size and zeta potential was assessed by zetasizer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Insulin–tragacanth interactions at varying pH (3.7, 4.3, 4.6, or 6), and concentration (0.1%, 0.5%, or 1% w/w) were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and ATR Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) analysis. Individual and smaller particles, approximately 800 nm, were acquired at pH 4.6 with 0.5% of tragacanth. The acid gelation test indicated that insulin could be entrapped in the physical hydrogel of tragacanth. DSC thermograms of insulin–tragacanth showed shifts on the same unloaded tragacanth peaks and suggested polyelectrolyte–protein interactions at a pH close to 4.3–4.6. FTIR spectra of tragacanth–insulin complexes exhibited amide absorption bands featuring in the protein spectra and revealed the creation of a new chemical substance. PMID:29304023

  3. Biotinylated liposomes as potential carriers for the oral delivery of insulin.

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    Zhang, Xingwang; Qi, Jianping; Lu, Yi; He, Wei; Li, Xiaoyang; Wu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore biotinylated liposomes (BLPs) as novel carriers to enhance the oral delivery of insulin. Biotinylation was achieved by incorporating biotin-conjugated phospholipids into the liposome membranes. A significant hypoglycemic effect and enhanced absorption were observed after treating diabetic rats with the BLPs with a relative bioavailability of 12.09% and 8.23%, based on the measurement of the pharmacologic effect and the blood insulin level, respectively; this achieved bioavailability was approximately double that of conventional liposomes. The significance of the biotinylation was confirmed by the facilitated absorption of the BLPs through receptor-mediated endocytosis, as well as by the improved physical stability of the liposomes. Increased cellular uptake and quick gastrointestinal transport further verified the ability of the BLPs to enhance absorption. These results provide a proof of concept that BLPs can be used as potential carriers for the oral delivery of insulin. Diabetes remains a major source of mortality in the Western world, and advances in its management are expected to have substantial socioeconomic impact. In this paper, biotinylated liposomes were utilized as carriers of insulin for local delivery, demonstrating the feasibility of this approach in a rat model. © 2014.

  4. Thiolated Eudragit nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery: preparation, characterization and in vivo evaluation.

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    Zhang, Yan; Wu, Xiaorong; Meng, Lingkuo; Zhang, Yu; Ai, Ruiting; Qi, Na; He, Haibing; Xu, Hui; Tang, Xing

    2012-10-15

    In the present study thiolated Eudragit L100 (Eul) based polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) were employed to develop an oral insulin delivery system. Sulfydryl modification was achieved by grafting cysteine to the carboxylic acid group of Eudragit L100, which displayed maximum conjugate level of 390.3±13.4 μmol thiol groups per gram. Eudragit L100-cysteine (Eul-cys) and Eul nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation method, in which reversible swelling of pH-sensitive material was used for insulin loading and release. Nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their particle size, morphology, loading efficiency (LE%) and in vitro insulin release behavior. The NPs had an average size of 324.2±39.0 nm and 308.8±35.7 nm, maximal LE% of 92.2±1.7% and 96.4±0.5% for Eul-cys and Eul, respectively. The release profile of NPs in vitro showed pH-dependent behavior. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy analysis proved that the secondary structure of the insulin released from NPs was unchanged compared with native insulin. The mucoadhesion study in vitro showed that Eul-cys NPs produced a 3-fold and 2.8-fold increase in rat jejunum and ileum compared with unmodified polymer NPs, respectively, which was due to the immobilization of thiol groups on Eudragit L100. Oral administration of insulin-loaded Eul-cys NPs produced a higher and prolonged hypoglycemic action, and the corresponding relative bioavailability of insulin was found to be 7.33±0.33%, an increase of 2.8-fold compared with Eul NPs (2.65±0.63%). This delivery system is a promising novel tool to improve the absorption of protein and peptide drugs in the intestinal tract. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Drug permeability and mucoadhesion properties of thiolated trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles in oral insulin delivery.

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    Yin, Lichen; Ding, Jieying; He, Chunbai; Cui, Liming; Tang, Cui; Yin, Chunhua

    2009-10-01

    Trimethyl chitosan-cysteine conjugate (TMC-Cys) was synthesized in an attempt to combine the mucoadhesion and the permeation enhancing effects of TMC and thiolated polymers related to different mechanisms for oral absorption. TMC-Cys with various molecular weights (30, 200, and 500 kDa) and quaternization degrees (15 and 30%) was allowed to form polyelectrolyte nanoparticles with insulin through self-assembly, which demonstrated particle size of 100-200 nm, zeta potential of +12 to +18 mV, and high encapsulation efficiency. TMC-Cys/insulin nanoparticles (TMC-Cys NP) showed a 2.1-4.7-fold increase in mucoadhesion compared to TMC/insulin nanoparticles (TMC NP), which might be partly attributed to disulfide formation between TMC-Cys and mucin as evidenced by DSC measurement. Compared to insulin solution and TMC NP, TMC-Cys NP induced increased insulin transport through rat intestine by 3.3-11.7 and 1.7-2.6 folds, promoted Caco-2 cell internalization by 7.5-12.7 and 1.7-3.0 folds, and augmented uptake in Peyer's patches by 14.7-20.9 and 1.7-5.0 folds, respectively. Such results were further confirmed by in vivo experiment with the optimal TMC-Cys NP. Biocompatibility assessment revealed lack of toxicity of TMC-Cys NP. Therefore, self-assembled nanoparticles between TMC-Cys and protein drugs could be an effective and safe oral delivery system.

  6. Poly(ethylene glycol) grafted chitosan as new copolymer material for oral delivery of insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Thanh Ha; Thanh Le, Thi Nu; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Dang, Mau Chien

    2015-01-01

    A new scheme of grafting poly (ethylene glycol) onto chitosan was proposed in this study to give new material for delivery of insulin over oral pathway. First, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) amine (mPEGa MW 2000) were grafted onto chitosan (CS) through multiples steps to synthesize the grafting copolymer PEG-g-CS. After each synthesis step, chitosan and its derivatives were characterized by FTIR, "1H NMR Then, insulin loaded PEG-g-CS nanoparticles were prepared by cross-linking of CS with sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP). Same insulin loaded nanoparticles using unmodified chitosan were also prepared in order to compare with the modified ones. Results showed better protecting capacity of the synthesized copolymer over original CS. CS nanoparticles (10 nm of size) were gel like and high sensible to temperature as well as acidic environment while PEG-g-CS nanoparticles (200 nm of size) were rigid and more thermo and pH stable. (paper)

  7. In vivo evaluation of thiolated chitosan tablets for oral insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millotti, Gioconda; Laffleur, Flavia; Perera, Glen; Vigl, Claudia; Pickl, Karin; Sinner, Frank; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    Chitosan-6-mercaptonicotinic acid (chitosan-6-MNA) is a thiolated chitosan with strong mucoadhesive properties and a pH-independent reactivity. This study aimed to evaluate the in vivo potential for the oral delivery of insulin. The comparison of the nonconjugated chitosan and chitosan-6-MNA was performed on several studies such as mucoadhesion, release, and in vivo studies. Thiolated chitosan formulations were both about 80-fold more mucoadhesive compared with unmodified ones. The thiolated chitosan tablets showed a sustained release for 5 h for the polymer of 20 kDa and 8 h for the polymer of 400 kDa. Human insulin was quantified in rats' plasma by means of ELISA specific for human insulin with no cross-reactivity with the endogenous insulin. In vivo results showed thiolation having a tremendous impact on the absorption of insulin. The absolute bioavailabilities were 0.73% for chitosan-6-MNA of 20 kDa and 0.62% for chitosan-6-MNA 400 kDa. The areas under the concentration-time curves (AUC) of chitosan-6-MNA formulations compared with unmodified chitosan were 4.8-fold improved for the polymer of 20 kDa and 21.02-fold improved for the polymer of 400 kDa. The improvement in the AUC with regard to the most promising aliphatic thiomer was up to 6.8-fold. Therefore, chitosan-6-MNA represents a promising excipient for the oral delivery of insulin. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  8. Combining two technologies: multifunctional polymers and self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) for oral insulin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakloetsakun, Duangkamon; Dünnhaupt, Sarah; Barthelmes, Jan; Perera, Glen; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study is to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) based on thiolated chitosan for oral insulin administration. The preparations were characterized by particle size, entrapment efficiency, stability and drug release. Serum insulin concentrations were determined after oral administration of all formulations. Insulin SNEDDS formulation was served as control. The optimized SNEDDS consists of 65% (w/w) miglyol 840, 25% (w/w) cremophor EL, 10% (w/w) co-solvents (a mixture of DMSO and glycerol). The formulations in the presence or absence of insulin (5mg/mL) were spherical with the size range between 80 and 160 nm. Entrapment efficiency of insulin increased significantly when the thiolated chitosan was employed (95.14±2.96%), in comparison to the insulin SNEDDS (80.38±1.22%). After 30 min, the in vitro release profile of insulin from the nanoemulsions was markedly increased compared to the control. In vivo results showed that insulin/thiolated chitosan SNEDDS displayed a significant increase in serum insulin (p-value=0.02) compared to oral insulin solution. A new strategy to combine SNEDDS and thiolated chitosan described in the study would therefore be a promising and innovative approach to improve oral bioavailability of insulin. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. pH sensitive thiolated cationic hydrogel for oral insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonia, T A; Sharma, Chandra P

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study the efficacy of pH sensitive thiolated Polydimethylaminoethylmethacrylate for oral delivery of insulin. Synthesis of pH sensitive thiolated Polydimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (PDCPA) was carried out by crosslinking Polymethacrylic acid with thiolated Polydimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (PDCys) via carbodiimide chemistry. Prior to in vivo experiment, various physicochemical and biological characterisation were carried out to evaluate the efficacy of PDCPA. Modification was confirmed by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The particle size was found to be 284 nm with a zeta potential of 37.3+/-1.58 mV. Texture analyser measurements showed that PDCPA is more mucoadhesive than the parent polymer. Transepithelial electrical measurements showed a reduction of greater than 50% on incubation with PDCPA particles. Permeation studies showed that PDCPA is more permeable than the parent polymer. On in vivo evaluation on male diabetic rats, insulin loaded PDCPA exhibited a blood glucose reduction of 19%.

  10. Scalable fabrication of size-controlled chitosan nanoparticles for oral delivery of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiyu; Santos, Jose Luis; Tian, Houkuan; Huang, Huahua; Hu, Yizong; Liu, Lixin; Leong, Kam W; Chen, Yongming; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2017-06-01

    Controlled delivery of protein would find diverse therapeutic applications. Formulation of protein nanoparticles by polyelectrolyte complexation between the protein and a natural polymer such as chitosan (CS) is a popular approach. However, the current method of batch-mode mixing faces significant challenges in scaling up while maintaining size control, high uniformity, and high encapsulation efficiency. Here we report a new method, termed flash nanocomplexation (FNC), to fabricate insulin nanoparticles by infusing aqueous solutions of CS, tripolyphosphate (TPP), and insulin under rapid mixing condition (Re > 1600) in a multi-inlet vortex mixer. In comparison with the bulk-mixing method, the optimized FNC process produces CS/TPP/insulin nanoparticles with a smaller size (down to 45 nm) and narrower size distribution, higher encapsulation efficiency (up to 90%), and pH-dependent nanoparticle dissolution and insulin release. The CS/TPP/insulin nanoparticles can be lyophilized and reconstituted without loss of activity, and produced at a throughput of 5.1 g h -1 when a flow rate of 50 mL min -1 is used. Evaluated in a Type I diabetes rat model, the smaller nanoparticles (45 nm and 115 nm) control the blood glucose level through oral administration more effectively than the larger particles (240 nm). This efficient, reproducible and continuous FNC technique is amenable to scale-up in order to address the critical barrier of manufacturing for the translation of protein nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of insulin/zirconium phosphate@TiO2 hybrid composites for enhanced oral insulin delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mostafa; Kamari, Younes; Ghiaci, Mehran; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Mirian, Mina

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a series of composites of insulin (Ins)/zirconium phosphate (ZrP) were synthesized by intercalation method, then, these composites were coated with TiO 2 by sol-gel method to prepare Ins/ZrP@TiO 2 hybrid composites and the drug release of the composites was investigated by using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Ins/ZrP (10, 30, 60 wt%) composites were prepared by intercalation of insulin into the ZrP layers in water. Then Ins/ZrP composites were coated with different amounts of TiO 2 (30, 50, 100 wt %) by using titanium tetra n-butoxide, as precursor. Formation of intercalated Ins/ZrP and Ins/ZrP@TiO 2 hybrid composites was characterized by FT-IR, FE-SEM, BET and XRD analysis. Zeta potential of the optimized Ins/ZrP@TiO 2 hybrid composite was determined -27.2 mV. Cytotoxic effects of the optimized Ins/ZrP@TiO 2 hybrid composite against HeLa and Hek293T cell lines were evaluated using MTT assay and the results showed that designed drug delivery system was not toxic in biological environment. Compared to the Ins/ZrP composites, incorporation of TiO 2 coating enhanced the drug entrapment considerably, and reduced the drug release. The Ins/ZrP composites without TiO 2 coating released the whole drug after 30 min in pH 7.4 (phosphate buffer solution) while the TiO 2 -coated composites released the entrapped drug after 20 h. In addition to increasing the shelf life of hormone, this nanoencapsulation and nanocoating method can convert the insulin utilization from injection to oral and present a painless and more comfortable treatment for diabetics.

  12. pH-sensitive chitosan/alginate core-shell nanoparticles for efficient and safe oral insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Piyasi; Chakraborty, Souma; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Mishra, Roshnara; Kundu, P P

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-alginate (CS/ALG) nanoparticles were prepared by formation of an ionotropic pre-gelation of an alginate (ALG) core entrapping insulin, followed by chitosan (CS) polyelectrolyte complexation, for successful oral insulin administration. Mild preparation process without harsh chemicals is aimed at improving insulin bio-efficiency in in vivo model. The nanoparticles showed an average particle size of 100-200 nm in dynamic light scattering (DLS), with almost spherical or sub-spherical shape and ∼ 85% of insulin encapsulation. Again, retention of almost entire amount of encapsulated insulin in simulated gastric buffer followed by its sustained release in simulated intestinal condition proved its pH sensitivity in in vitro release studies. Significant hypoglycemic effects with improved insulin-relative bioavailability (∼ 8.11%) in in vivo model revealed the efficacy of these core-shell nanoparticles of CS/ALG as an oral insulin carrier. No systemic toxicity was found after its peroral treatment, suggesting these core-shell nanoparticles as a promising device for potential oral insulin delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and in vivo evaluation of an oral insulin-PEG delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calceti, P; Salmaso, S; Walker, G; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2004-07-01

    Insulin-monomethoxypoly(ethylene glycol) derivatives were obtained by preparation of mono- and di-terbutyl carbonate insulin derivatives, reaction of available protein amino groups with activated 750 Da PEG and, finally, amino group de-protection. This procedure allowed for obtaining high yield of insulin-1PEG and insulin-2PEG. In vivo studies carried out by subcutaneous injection into diabetic mice demonstrated that the two bioconjugates maintained the native biological activity. In vitro, PEGylation was found to enhance the hormone stability towards proteases. After 1 h incubation with elastase, native insulin, insulin-1PEG and insulin-2PEG undergo about 70, 30 and 10% degradation, respectively, while in the presence of pepsin protein degradation was 100, 70 and 50%, respectively. The attachment of low molecular weight PEG did not significantly (P >0.05) alter insulin permeation behavior across the intestinal mucosa. Insulin-1PEG was formulated into mucoadhesive tablets constituted by the thiolated polymer poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine. The therapeutic agent was sustained released from these tablets within 5 h. In vivo, by oral administration to diabetic mice, the glucose levels were found to decrease of about 40% since the third hour from administration and the biological activity was maintained up to 30 h. According to these results, the combination of PEGylated insulin with a thiolated polymer used as drug carrier matrix might be a promising strategy for oral insulin administration.

  14. Chitosan-sodium lauryl sulfate nanoparticles as a carrier system for the in vivo delivery of oral insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Amani; Al-Remawi, Mayyas; Qinna, Nidal; Farouk, Asim; Al-Sou'od, Khaldoun A; Badwan, Adnan A

    2011-09-01

    The present work explores the possibility of formulating an oral insulin delivery system using nanoparticulate complexes made from the interaction between biodegradable, natural polymer called chitosan and anionic surfactant called sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). The interaction between chitosan and SLS was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The nanoparticles were prepared by simple gelation method under aqueous-based conditions. The nanoparticles were stable in simulated gastric fluids and could protect the encapsulated insulin from the GIT enzymes. Additionally, the in vivo results clearly indicated that the insulin-loaded nanoparticles could effectively reduce the blood glucose level in a diabetic rat model. However, additional formulation modifications are required to improve insulin oral bioavailability.

  15. pH-sensitive thiolated nanoparticles facilitate the oral delivery of insulin in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Xia; Du, Xuli; Geng, Sicong; Li, Hongren; Sun, Hong; Tang, Xing; Xiao, Wei

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we designed and developed a delivery system composed of enteric Eudragit L100-cysteine/reduced glutathione nanoparticles (Eul-cys/GSH NPs) for oral delivery of insulin. First, interactions between Eul-cys and mucin glycoproteins, which are believed to be the result of disulfide bonds, were confirmed using rheology experiments. Subsequently, the insulin-loaded Eul-cys/GSH NPs were prepared by the diffusion method using the rich gel network multipore structure at the surface of the Eul-cys when the pH was higher than the p Ka of Eul-cys polymer. The Eul-cys/GSH NPs obtained were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The results obtained showed that the average particle size ranged from 240 to 280 nm, and the particles were almost spherical in shape. The in vitro drug release results showed that the Eul-cys/GSH NPs retained a large amount of insulin in simulated gastric fluid, while a significant insulin release was found in simulated intestinal fluid. The in situ release study suggested that NPs released a greater amount of FITC-insulin (49.2 %) into the intestinal mucus layer compared with that of FITC-insulin solution (16.4 %), which facilitating insulin delivery through the intestinal mucosa. Eul-cys/GSH NPs exhibited promising mucoadhesive properties demonstrated using an in vitro cell model. Consequently, NPs were introduced into the ileum loop of healthy rats, thus enhancing the intestinal absorption of insulin and providing a prolonged reduction in blood glucose levels. These results suggest that Eul-cys/GSH NPs may be a promising delivery system for the treatment of diabetes.

  16. pH-sensitive thiolated nanoparticles facilitate the oral delivery of insulin in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan [Shenyang University, Normal College (China); Lin, Xia; Du, Xuli; Geng, Sicong [Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Department of Pharmaceutics (China); Li, Hongren; Sun, Hong [Shenyang University, Normal College (China); Tang, Xing, E-mail: tanglab@126.com [Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Department of Pharmaceutics (China); Xiao, Wei, E-mail: wzhzh-nj@tom.com [Jiangsu Kanion Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd (China)

    2015-02-15

    In this work, we designed and developed a delivery system composed of enteric Eudragit L100-cysteine/reduced glutathione nanoparticles (Eul-cys/GSH NPs) for oral delivery of insulin. First, interactions between Eul-cys and mucin glycoproteins, which are believed to be the result of disulfide bonds, were confirmed using rheology experiments. Subsequently, the insulin-loaded Eul-cys/GSH NPs were prepared by the diffusion method using the rich gel network multipore structure at the surface of the Eul-cys when the pH was higher than the pKa of Eul-cys polymer. The Eul-cys/GSH NPs obtained were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The results obtained showed that the average particle size ranged from 240 to 280 nm, and the particles were almost spherical in shape. The in vitro drug release results showed that the Eul-cys/GSH NPs retained a large amount of insulin in simulated gastric fluid, while a significant insulin release was found in simulated intestinal fluid. The in situ release study suggested that NPs released a greater amount of FITC-insulin (49.2 %) into the intestinal mucus layer compared with that of FITC-insulin solution (16.4 %), which facilitating insulin delivery through the intestinal mucosa. Eul-cys/GSH NPs exhibited promising mucoadhesive properties demonstrated using an in vitro cell model. Consequently, NPs were introduced into the ileum loop of healthy rats, thus enhancing the intestinal absorption of insulin and providing a prolonged reduction in blood glucose levels. These results suggest that Eul-cys/GSH NPs may be a promising delivery system for the treatment of diabetes.

  17. pH-sensitive thiolated nanoparticles facilitate the oral delivery of insulin in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Xia; Du, Xuli; Geng, Sicong; Li, Hongren; Sun, Hong; Tang, Xing; Xiao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we designed and developed a delivery system composed of enteric Eudragit L100-cysteine/reduced glutathione nanoparticles (Eul-cys/GSH NPs) for oral delivery of insulin. First, interactions between Eul-cys and mucin glycoproteins, which are believed to be the result of disulfide bonds, were confirmed using rheology experiments. Subsequently, the insulin-loaded Eul-cys/GSH NPs were prepared by the diffusion method using the rich gel network multipore structure at the surface of the Eul-cys when the pH was higher than the pKa of Eul-cys polymer. The Eul-cys/GSH NPs obtained were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The results obtained showed that the average particle size ranged from 240 to 280 nm, and the particles were almost spherical in shape. The in vitro drug release results showed that the Eul-cys/GSH NPs retained a large amount of insulin in simulated gastric fluid, while a significant insulin release was found in simulated intestinal fluid. The in situ release study suggested that NPs released a greater amount of FITC-insulin (49.2 %) into the intestinal mucus layer compared with that of FITC-insulin solution (16.4 %), which facilitating insulin delivery through the intestinal mucosa. Eul-cys/GSH NPs exhibited promising mucoadhesive properties demonstrated using an in vitro cell model. Consequently, NPs were introduced into the ileum loop of healthy rats, thus enhancing the intestinal absorption of insulin and providing a prolonged reduction in blood glucose levels. These results suggest that Eul-cys/GSH NPs may be a promising delivery system for the treatment of diabetes

  18. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 5. Oral Insulin – Fact or Fiction? - Possibilities of Achieving Oral Delivery of Insulin. K Gowthamarajan Giriraj T Kulkarni. General Article Volume 8 Issue 5 May 2003 pp 38-46 ...

  19. Biodegradable nanoparticles loaded with insulin-phospholipid complex for oral delivery: preparation, in vitro characterization and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fude; Shi, Kai; Zhang, Liqiang; Tao, Anjin; Kawashima, Yoshiaki

    2006-08-28

    Biodegradable nanoparticles loaded with insulin-phospholipid complex were prepared by a novel reverse micelle-solvent evaporation method, in which soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) was employed to improve the liposolubility of insulin, and biodegradable polymers as carrier materials to control drug release. Solubilization study, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis were employed to prove the complex formation. The effects of key parameters such as polymer/SPC weight ratio, organic phase and polymer type on the properties of the nanoparticles were investigated. Spherical particles of 200 nm mean diameter and a narrow size distribution were obtained under optimal conditions. The drug entrapment efficiency was up to 90%. The in vitro drug release was characterized by an initial burst and subsequent delayed release in both pH 6.8 and pH 1.2 dissolution mediums. The specific modality of drug release, i.e., free or SPC-combined, was investigated in the aid of ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration methods. The influence of polymer type on the drug release was also discussed. The pharmacological effects of the nanoparticles made of PLGA 50/50 (Av.Mw 9500) were further evaluated to confirm their potential suitability for oral delivery. Intragastric administration of the 20 IU/kg nanoparticles reduced fasting plasma glucose levels to 57.4% within the first 8 h of administration and this continued for 12 h. PK/PD analysis indicated that 7.7% of oral bioavailability relative to subcutaneous injection was obtained.

  20. New ways of insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, L

    2010-02-01

    When Exubera (EXU), the first inhaled insulin formulation to make it through the clinical development process, was introduced to the market some years ago it was hoped that this would be the first in a series of novel insulin formulations applied by this route. In addition, it was hoped that inhaled insulin would pave the way for other alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA), i.e. oral insulin, nasal insulin or transdermal insulin to mention only some of the different attempts that have been studied in the last 90 years. The failure of EXU, i.e. its withdrawal from the market due to insufficient market success, was followed by the cessation of nearly all other attempts to develop inhaled insulin formulations. Currently there is only one company (MannKind) which moves sturdily ahead with their Technosphere insulin. This company has submitted an NDA for their product recently and hopes to bring it to the market by the end of 2010 or early 2011. Even if the product is able to pass the approval hurdles in the USA and Europe, this does not guarantee that it will become a market success. Many diabetologists were sceptical about the need/advantages of inhaled insulin/EXU from the start and the introduction of this product has raised even more scepticism. Reports about 'side effects' (development of lung cancer in patients treated with EXU) of inhaled insulin are also not helpful, even if the causality of the appearance of cancer with this type of insulin therapy is not proven. One of the very negative consequences of stopping EXU are the huge financial losses to Pfizer. The managers in charge in other pharmaceutical companies and also most venture capitalists are reluctant to invest in ARIA nowadays. This in turn means that many of the small companies that try to develop new forms of insulin administration have issues when they try to find a big brother and/or sufficient financial support. Clearly the economic crisis has further aggravated this issue. One can

  1. Low-cost production of proinsulin in tobacco and lettuce chloroplasts for injectable or oral delivery of functional insulin and C-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyhan, Diane; Daniell, Henry

    2011-06-01

    Current treatment for type I diabetes includes delivery of insulin via injection or pump, which is highly invasive and expensive. The production of chloroplast-derived proinsulin should reduce cost and facilitate oral delivery. Therefore, tobacco and lettuce chloroplasts were transformed with the cholera toxin B subunit fused with human proinsulin (A, B, C peptides) containing three furin cleavage sites (CTB-PFx3). Transplastomic lines were confirmed for site-specific integration of transgene and homoplasmy. Old tobacco leaves accumulated proinsulin up to 47% of total leaf protein (TLP). Old lettuce leaves accumulated proinsulin up to 53% TLP. Accumulation was so stable that up to ~40% proinsulin in TLP was observed even in senescent and dried lettuce leaves, facilitating their processing and storage in the field. Based on the yield of only monomers and dimers of proinsulin (3 mg/g leaf, a significant underestimation), with a 50% loss of protein during the purification process, one acre of tobacco could yield up to 20 million daily doses of insulin per year. Proinsulin from tobacco leaves was purified up to 98% using metal affinity chromatography without any His-tag. Furin protease cleaved insulin peptides in vitro. Oral delivery of unprocessed proinsulin bioencapsulated in plant cells or injectable delivery into mice showed reduction in blood glucose levels similar to processed commercial insulin. C-peptide should aid in long-term treatment of diabetic complications including stimulation of nerve and renal functions. Hyper-expression of functional proinsulin and exceptional stability in dehydrated leaves offer a low-cost platform for oral and injectable delivery of cleavable proinsulin. © 2010 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2010 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. New ways of insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, L

    2011-02-01

    even too short (see postprandial glycaemic excursions with test meals in the publication by Rosenstock et al. in The Lancet (1)). In the end a number of aspects are of relevance for the success of a given product; one key aspect is clearly the price. However, for patients also practical aspects (handling, need for regular pulmonary function test etc.) are of importance. We shall have to see how creatively MannKind will handle all such questions. Until now Al Mann and his colleagues were able to manage a number of challenges during the clinical development process successfully, so one can have hopes for the market success of TI. However, it is clear that at the same time, if TI fails like Exubera did before, this will be the end for pulmonary insulin in general. Not too many original publications presenting data from clinical trials were published in the last year when it comes to oral insulin (OI), nasal insulin or transdermal insulin developments; simply none with transdermal insulin. Also at the last international congresses not many studies about ARIA were presented. At least in part this might be still a reflection of the shockwaves that the failure of Exubera has sent out to pharmaceutical companies and venture capitalists; they are quite reluctant to invest in any of these developments. However, a considerable number of reviews (in some cases more than original papers!) were published about ARIA. These reviews are listed for completeness, but in most cases are not further commented. OI is still the area of research most companies are active in; however, in some cases it is not clear how active they really are (e.g. Diabetology). Nevertheless, at least some companies are quite active and progressed in their clinical development programme close to market approval, e.g. the large Indian company Biocon is in late phase 3 with IN-105 and the small Israel-based company Oramed is in phase 2b. It appears that other interesting OI developments (e.g. Diasome) were not very

  3. Oral delivery of insulin using pH-sensitive hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol grafted with acrylic acid/methacrylic acid by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nho, Young-Chang; Park, Sung-Eun; Kim, Hyung-Il; Hwang, Taek-Sung

    2005-01-01

    The pH-responsive hydrogels were studied as a drug carrier for the protection of insulin from the acidic environment of the stomach before releasing in the small intestine. Hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol) networks grafted with acrylic acid or methacrylic acid were prepared via a two-step process. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels were prepared by gamma ray irradiation (50 kGy) and then followed by grafting either acrylic acid or methacrylic acid onto this poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels with subsequent irradiation (5-20 kGy). These graft hydrogels showed pH-sensitive swelling behavior. These hydrogels were used as carrier for the controlled release of insulin. The in vitro release of insulin was observed for the insulin-loaded hydrogels in a simulated intestinal fluid (pH 6.8) but not in a simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2). The release behavior of insulin in vivo in a rat model confirmed the effectiveness of the oral delivery of insulin to control the level of glucose

  4. Oral delivery of insulin using pH-sensitive hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol grafted with acrylic acid/methacrylic acid by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nho, Young-Chang [Radiation Application Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: ycnho@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Sung-Eun [Radiation Application Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung-Il [College of Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Taek-Sung [College of Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The pH-responsive hydrogels were studied as a drug carrier for the protection of insulin from the acidic environment of the stomach before releasing in the small intestine. Hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol) networks grafted with acrylic acid or methacrylic acid were prepared via a two-step process. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels were prepared by gamma ray irradiation (50 kGy) and then followed by grafting either acrylic acid or methacrylic acid onto this poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels with subsequent irradiation (5-20 kGy). These graft hydrogels showed pH-sensitive swelling behavior. These hydrogels were used as carrier for the controlled release of insulin. The in vitro release of insulin was observed for the insulin-loaded hydrogels in a simulated intestinal fluid (pH 6.8) but not in a simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2). The release behavior of insulin in vivo in a rat model confirmed the effectiveness of the oral delivery of insulin to control the level of glucose.

  5. Oral delivery of bioencapsulated exendin-4 expressed in chloroplasts lowers blood glucose level in mice and stimulates insulin secretion in beta-TC6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Nityanandam, Ramya; New, James S; Daniell, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) increases insulin secretion but is rapidly degraded (half-life: 2 min in circulation). GLP-1 analogue, exenatide (Byetta) has a longer half-life (3.3-4 h) with potent insulinotropic effects but requires cold storage, daily abdominal injections with short shelf life. Because patients with diabetes take >60 000 injections in their life time, alternative delivery methods are highly desired. Exenatide is ideal for oral delivery because insulinotropism is glucose dependent, with reduced risk of hypoglycaemia even at higher doses. Therefore, exendin-4 (EX4) was expressed as a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-fusion protein in tobacco chloroplasts to facilitate bioencapsulation within plant cells and transmucosal delivery in the gut via GM1 receptors present in the intestinal epithelium. The transgene integration was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analysis. Expression level of CTB-EX4 reached up to 14.3% of total leaf protein (TLP). Lyophilization of leaf material increased therapeutic protein concentration by 12- to 24-fold, extended their shelf life up to 15 months when stored at room temperature and eliminated microbes present in fresh leaves. The pentameric structure, disulphide bonds and functionality of CTB-EX4 were well preserved in lyophilized materials. Chloroplast-derived CTB-EX4 showed increased insulin secretion similar to the commercial EX4 in beta-TC6, a mouse pancreatic cell line. Even when 5000-fold excess dose of CTB-EX4 was orally delivered, it stimulated insulin secretion similar to the intraperitoneal injection of commercial EX4 but did not cause hypoglycaemia in mice. Oral delivery of the bioencapsulated EX4 should eliminate injections, increase patient compliance/convenience and significantly lower their cost. © 2012 The Authors Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Functional nanoparticles exploit the bile acid pathway to overcome multiple barriers of the intestinal epithelium for oral insulin delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Weiwei; Xia, Dengning; Zhu, Quanlei

    2018-01-01

    , especially to avoid lysosomal degradation, and basolateral release. Here, the functional material, deoxycholic acid-conjugated chitosan, is synthesized and loaded with the model protein drug insulin into deoxycholic acid-modified nanoparticles (DNPs). The DNPs designed in this study are demonstrated......Oral absorption of protein/peptide-loaded nanoparticles is often limited by multiple barriers of the intestinal epithelium. In addition to mucus translocation and apical endocytosis, highly efficient transepithelial absorption of nanoparticles requires successful intracellular trafficking...... to endolysosomal escape of DNPs. Additionally, DNPs can interact with a cytosolic ileal bile acid-binding protein that facilitates the intracellular trafficking and basolateral release of insulin. In rats, intravital two-photon microscopy also reveals that the transport of DNPs into the intestinal villi...

  7. Enteric-coated capsules filled with mono-disperse micro-particles containing PLGA-lipid-PEG nanoparticles for oral delivery of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Li, Yang; Liu, Chang Sheng; Chen, Qin; Wang, Gui Huan; Guo, Wei; Wu, Xue E; Li, Dong Hui; Wu, Winston Duo; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2015-04-30

    The success of the oral delivery of insulin (INS) as a therapeutic protein drug would significantly improve the quality of life of diabetic patients who would otherwise receive multiple daily INS injections. The oral delivery of INS, however, is still limited in its delivery efficiency, which could be due to the chemical, enzymatic, and adsorption barriers. In this work, in an attempt to improve the delivery efficiency, the INS-loaded polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (INS-PLGA-lipid-PEG NPs) were designed and constructed through a double-emulsion solvent evaporation technique, followed by formulation of the spherical micro-particles using a spray freeze dryer (SFD). This kind of dryers has a uniquely designed microfluidic aerosol nozzle (MFAN), ensuring the formation of uniform particles. The resulted particles of ∼212 μm could easily be reverted to discrete INS-PLGA-lipid-PEG NPs in an aqueous solution. The INS-PLGA-lipid-PEG NPs created in this work showed a highly negative surface charge, excellent entrapment efficiency (92.3%) and a sustained drug release (∼24 h). Confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometer were used to show that the cellular uptake efficiency for the INS-PLGA-lipid-PEG NPs was more effective than the INS in Caco-2 cells. More importantly, the in vivo pharmacodynamics demonstrated that the orally delivered system induced a prolonged decrease in blood glucose levels among diabetic rats. The relative bioavailability of INS compared with subcutaneous injection in diabetic rats was found to be approximately 12%. These results suggested that the encapsulated INS-PLGA-lipid-PEG NPs are promising and should be investigated further in the near future as an effective INS oral delivery system. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Oral Insulin - Fact or Fiction?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    attempts have explored the following options, either singly, or together: • Protecting ... derivative of insulin has been seen to maintain its biological activity and also have .... that in the short future any oral preparation that can achieve consistent ...

  9. New Insulin Delivery Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Anders H; Kreugel, Gillian; Grassi, Giorgio; Halimi, Serge; Hicks, Debbie; Hirsch, Laurence J; Smith, Mike J; Wellhoener, Regine; Bode, Bruce W; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalra, Sanjay; Ji, Linong; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    Many primary care professionals manage injection or infusion therapies in patients with diabetes. Few published guidelines have been available to help such professionals and their patients manage these therapies. Herein, we present new, practical, and comprehensive recommendations for diabetes injections and infusions. These recommendations were informed by a large international survey of current practice and were written and vetted by 183 diabetes experts from 54 countries at the Forum for Injection Technique and Therapy: Expert Recommendations (FITTER) workshop held in Rome, Italy, in 2015. Recommendations are organized around the themes of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, and technology. Key among the recommendations are that the shortest needles (currently the 4-mm pen and 6-mm syringe needles) are safe, effective, and less painful and should be the first-line choice in all patient categories; intramuscular injections should be avoided, especially with long-acting insulins, because severe hypoglycemia may result; lipohypertrophy is a frequent complication of therapy that distorts insulin absorption, and, therefore, injections and infusions should not be given into these lesions and correct site rotation will help prevent them; effective long-term therapy with insulin is critically dependent on addressing psychological hurdles upstream, even before insulin has been started; inappropriate disposal of used sharps poses a risk of infection with blood-borne pathogens; and mitigation is possible with proper training, effective disposal strategies, and the use of safety devices. Adherence to these new recommendations should lead to more effective therapies, improved outcomes, and lower costs for patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Administração oral de peptídios e proteínas: III. Aplicação à insulina Oral delivery systems for peptides and proteins: III. Application to insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Silva

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A insulina é um peptídeo biologicamente ativo, normalmente administrado por via subcutânea, pelos obstáculos que se colocam a sua administração oral. O desenvolvimento de uma forma farmacêutica passível de ser administrada oralmente tem sido razão de uma investigação persistente, acentuada na última década, conforme é descrito. As estratégias utilizadas têm sido muito variadas, a saber, a utilização de inibidores das enzimas proteolíticas, promotores da absorção, modificação química e fórmulas farmacêuticas específicas, como sistemas de partículas, emulsões, sistemas de liberação targeting e sistemas bioadesivos. Embora ainda nenhuma abordagem tenha sido suficientemente eficaz, os resultados são encorajadores. A microencapsulação e, em particular, os métodos que utilizam polímeros naturais, mostram-se promissores neste propósito, pelas características vantajosas que apresentam.Insulin is an important therapeutic protein, generally administered subcutaneously due to the obstacles of oral delivery. A number of different methods have been explored to improve the low oral bioavailability of insulin, particularly in the last decade, namely protease inhibitors, absorption enhancers, chemical modification and the formulation approach which includes particulate systems, emulsions, targeting delivery systems and bioadhesive systems. Although an effective formulation for oral insulin delivery remains to be achieved, the results are encouraging. Microencapsulation has proven to be a promising method of choice, especially when using natural polymers.

  11. Lyophilized insulin nanoparticles prepared from quaternized N-aryl derivatives of chitosan as a new strategy for oral delivery of insulin: in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjub, Reza; Radmehr, Moojan; Dorkoosh, Farid Abedin; Ostad, Seyed Naser; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza

    2014-12-01

    from quaternized aromatic derivatives of chitosan. In vivo data showed significantly higher insulin intestinal absorption in nanoparticles prepared from methylated N-(4-N, N-dimethylaminobenzyl) chitosan nanoparticles compared to trimethyl chitosan. These data obtained demonstrated that as the result of optimized physico-chemical properties, drug release rate, cytotoxicity profile, ex vivo permeation enhancement and increased in vivo absorption, nanoparticles prepared from N-aryl derivatives of chitosan can be considered as valuable method for the oral delivery of insulin.

  12. Future of Automated Insulin Delivery Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castle, Jessica R.; DeVries, J. Hans; Kovatchev, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Advances in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) have brought on a paradigm shift in the management of type 1 diabetes. These advances have enabled the automation of insulin delivery, where an algorithm determines the insulin delivery rate in response to the CGM values. There are multiple automated

  13. Oral insulin reloaded: a structured approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, Eric; Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-05-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion's share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  14. Silica-Coated Liposomes for Insulin Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Dwivedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes coated with silica were explored as protein delivery vehicles for their enhanced stability and improved encapsulation efficiency. Insulin was encapsulated within the fluidic phosphatidylcholine lipid vesicles by thin film hydration at pH 2.5, and layer of silica was formed above lipid bilayer by acid catalysis. The presence of silica coating and encapsulated insulin was identified using confocal and electron microscopy. The native state of insulin present in the formulation was evident from Confocal Micro-Raman spectroscopy. Silica coat enhances the stability of insulin-loaded delivery vehicles. In vivo study shows that these silica coated formulations were biologically active in reducing glucose levels.

  15. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  16. Floating Microparticulate Oral Diltiazem Hydrochloride Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delivery System for Improved Delivery to Heart ... Conclusion: Microparticulate floating (gastroretentive) oral drug delivery system of diltiazem prepared ..... treatment of cardiac disease. ... hydrochloride-loaded mucoadhesive microspheres.

  17. Future of Automated Insulin Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Jessica R; DeVries, J Hans; Kovatchev, Boris

    2017-06-01

    Advances in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) have brought on a paradigm shift in the management of type 1 diabetes. These advances have enabled the automation of insulin delivery, where an algorithm determines the insulin delivery rate in response to the CGM values. There are multiple automated insulin delivery (AID) systems in development. A system that automates basal insulin delivery has already received Food and Drug Administration approval, and more systems are likely to follow. As the field of AID matures, future systems may incorporate additional hormones and/or multiple inputs, such as activity level. All AID systems are impacted by CGM accuracy and future CGM devices must be shown to be sufficiently accurate to be safely incorporated into AID. In this article, we summarize recent achievements in AID development, with a special emphasis on CGM sensor performance, and discuss the future of AID systems from the point of view of their input-output characteristics, form factor, and adaptability.

  18. Silica-Coated Liposomes for Insulin Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Neelam Dwivedi; M. A. Arunagirinathan; Somesh Sharma; Jayesh Bellare

    2010-01-01

    Liposomes coated with silica were explored as protein delivery vehicles for their enhanced stability and improved encapsulation efficiency. Insulin was encapsulated within the fluidic phosphatidylcholine lipid vesicles by thin film hydration at pH 2.5, and layer of silica was formed above lipid bilayer by acid catalysis. The presence of silica coating and encapsulated insulin was identified using confocal and electron microscopy. The native state of insulin present in the formulation was evid...

  19. Psychological insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients regarding oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrak, Frank; Herpertz, Stephan; Stridde, Elmar; Pfützner, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    "Psychological insulin resistance" (PIR) is an obstacle to insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes, and patients' expectations regarding alternative ways of insulin delivery are poorly understood. PIR and beliefs regarding treatment alternatives were analyzed in patients with type 2 diabetes (n=532; mean glycated hemoglobin, 68±12 mmol/mol [8.34±1.5%]) comparing oral antidiabetes treatment, subcutaneous insulin injections, or inhaled insulin. Questionnaires were used to assess barriers to insulin treatment (BIT), generic and diabetes-specific quality of life (Short Form 36 and Problem Areas in Diabetes, German version), diabetes knowledge, locus of control (Questionnaire for the Assessment of Diabetes-Specific Locus of Control, in German), coping styles (Freiburg Questionnaire of Illness Coping, 15-Items Short Form), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, German version), and mental disorders (Patient Health Questionnaire, German version). Patients discussed treatment optimization options with a physician and were asked to make a choice about future diabetes therapy options in a two-step treatment choice scenario. Step 1 included oral antidiabetes drugs or subcutaneous insulin injection (SCI). Step 2 included an additional treatment alternative of inhaled insulin (INH). Subgroups were analyzed according to their treatment choice. Most patients perceived their own diabetes-related behavior as active, problem-focused, internally controlled, and oriented toward their doctors' recommendations, although their diabetes knowledge was limited. In Step 1, rejection of the recommended insulin was 82%, and in Step 2, it was 57%. Fear of hypoglycemia was the most important barrier to insulin treatment. Patients choosing INH (versus SCI) scored higher regarding fear of injection, expected hardship from insulin therapy, and BIT-Sumscore. The acceptance of insulin is very low in type 2 diabetes patients. The option to inhale insulin increases the acceptability for some but

  20. Chitosan nanofibers for transbuccal insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancina, Michael G; Shankar, Roopa Kanakatti; Yang, Hu

    2017-05-01

    In this work, they aimed at producing chitosan based nanofiber mats capable of delivering insulin via the buccal mucosa. Chitosan was electrospun into nanofibers using poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) as a carrier molecule in various feed ratios. The mechanical properties and degradation kinetics of the fibers were measured. Insulin release rates were determined in vitro using an ELISA assay. The bioactivity of released insulin was measured in terms of Akt activation in pre-adipocytes. Insulin permeation across the buccal mucosa was measured in an ex-vivo porcine transbuccal model. Fiber morphology, mechanical properties, and in vitro stability were dependent on PEO feed ratio. Lower PEO content blends produced smaller diameter fibers with significantly faster insulin release kinetics. Insulin showed no reduction in bioactivity due to electrospinning. Buccal permeation of insulin facilitated by high chitosan content blends was significantly higher than that of free insulin. Taken together, the work demonstrates that chitosan-based nanofibers have the potential to serve as a transbuccal insulin delivery vehicle. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1252-1259, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. EFFECT OF ORAL INSULIN IN BLOOP G1UCOSE CONCENTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DJ. FARID

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal tract can not be used as a route for oral administration of polypeptid hormones because"nof their enzymatic degradation."nDegradation of these macromoleculcs in acidic and alkaline conditions determines the need for using"nprotective delivery systems."nIn this research microcmulsions were used for protection of insulin against proteolytic enzymesof"ngastrointestinal tract. Cholestrol and phospholipids of egg yolk have been used as lipid phase as lipid phase"nand Lecithin as surfactant."nInsulin Regular was used as aqueous phase, being entrapped with lipidic phase in W/O manner. Male"nrabbits with body weight of about 1-1.5 KG were accomplished and oral insulin was force fed to them."nBlood collection has been carried out from heart every 15 minutes after oral administration."nReduction in blood glucose level indicates the well being protection of insulin and absorbtion of it through"nepithelium of small intestine. Increasing of glucose level in placebo demonstrates that endogenous"ninsulin has not been responsible for serum glucose reduction."nThis experiment suggests that microemulsions formed with egg Yolk compounds have the ability to be an"nalternate for parenteral administration of insulin and other chemicals sensitive to enzymatic degradation, in"nhuman.

  2. Oral transmucosal delivery of naratriptan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Mohammed; Lane, Majella E

    2016-11-30

    Naratriptan (NAR) is currently used as the hydrochloride salt (NAR.HCl) for the treatment of migraine and is available in tablet dosage forms for oral administration. Buccal drug delivery offers a number of advantages compared with conventional oral delivery including rapid absorption, avoidance of first pass metabolism and improved patient compliance. We have previously prepared and characterised the base form of NAR and shown that it has more favourable properties for buccal delivery compared with NAR.HCl. This study describes the design and evaluation of a range of formulations for oral transmucosal delivery of NAR base. Permeation studies were conducted using excised porcine buccal tissue mounted in Franz cells. Of the neat solvents examined, Transcutol ® P (TC) showed the greatest enhancement effects and was the vehicle in which NAR was most soluble. The mechanisms by which TC might promote permeation were further probed using binary systems containing TC with either buffer or Miglyol 812 ® (MG). Mass balance studies were also conducted for these systems. The permeation of TC as well as NAR was also monitored for TC:MG formulations. Overall, TC appears to promote enhanced membrane permeation of NAR because of its rapid uptake into the buccal tissue. Synergistic enhancement of buccal permeation was observed when TC was combined with MG and this is attributed to the increased thermodynamic activity of NAR in these formulations. Significantly enhanced permeation of NAR was achieved for TC:MG and this was also associated with less TC remaining on the tissue or in the tissue at the end of the experiment. To our knowledge this is the first report where both enhancer and active have been monitored in buccal permeation studies. The findings underline the importance of understanding the fate of vehicle components for rational formulation design of buccal delivery systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Insulin delivery systems combined with microneedle technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuan; Zhu, Dan Dan; Chen, Bo Zhi; Ashfaq, Mohammad; Guo, Xin Dong

    2018-03-29

    Diabetes, a metabolic disorder of glucose, is a serious chronic disease and an important public health problem. Insulin is one of the hormones for modulating blood glucose level and the products of which is indispensable for most diabetes patients. Introducing microneedles (MNs) to insulin delivery is promising to pave the way for modulating glucose level noninvasively of diabetes patients, as which born to be painless, easy to handle and no need of any power supply. In this work, we review the process of insulin delivery systems (IDSs) based on MN technology in terms of two categories: drug free MNs and drug loaded MNs. Drug free MNs include solid MNs ("poke and patch"), hollow MNs ("poke and flow") and reservoir-based swelling MNs ("poke and swell R-type"), and drug loaded MNs include coated MNs ("coat and poke"), dissolving MNs ("poke and release") and insulin incorporated swelling MNs ("poke and swell I-type"). Majority researches of MN-based IDSs have been conducted by using hollow MNs or dissolving MNs, and almost all clinical trials for MN-based IDSs have employed hollow MNs. "Poke and patch" approach dramatically increase skin permeability compared to traditional transdermal patch, but MNs fabricated from silicon or metal may leave sharp waste in the skin and cause a safety issue. "Poke and flow" approach, similar to transitional subcutaneous (SC) injection, is capable of producing faster insulin absorption and action than SC injection but may associate with blockage, leakage and low flow rate. Coated MNs are able of retaining the activity of drug, which loaded in a solid phase, for a long time, however have been relatively less studied for insulin application as the low drug dosing. "Poke and release" approach leaves no biohazardous sharp medical waste and is capable of rapid drug release. "Poke and swell R-type" can be seen as a combination of "poke and flow" and "poke and patch" approach, while "poke and swell I-type" is an approach between "coat and

  4. Design and in vivo evaluation of a patch delivery system for insulin based on thiolated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabovac, Vjera; Föger, Florian; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2008-02-04

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel three-layered oral delivery system for insulin in vivo. The patch system consisted of a mucoadhesive layer, a water insoluble backing layer made of ethylcellulose and an enteric coating made of Eudragit. Drug release studies were performed in media mimicking stomach and intestinal fluids. For in vivo studies patch systems were administered orally to conscious non-diabetic rats. Orally administered insulin in aqueous solution was used as control. After the oral administration of the patch systems a decrease of glucose and increase of insulin blood levels were measured. The mucoadhesive layer, exhibiting a diameter of 2.5mm and a weight of 5mg, comprised polycarbophil-cysteine conjugate (49%), bovine insulin (26%), gluthatione (5%) and mannitol (20%). 74.8+/-4.8% of insulin was released from the delivery system over 6h. Six hours after administration of the patch system mean maximum decrease of blood glucose level of 31.6% of the initial value could be observed. Maximum insulin concentration in blood was 11.3+/-6.2ng/ml and was reached 6h after administration. The relative bioavailability of orally administered patch system versus subcutaneous injection was 2.2%. The results indicate that the patch system provides enhancement of intestinal absorption and thereby offers a promising strategy for peroral peptide delivery.

  5. Thiomers for oral delivery of hydrophilic macromolecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas; Hoffer, Martin H; Kafedjiiski, Krum

    2004-11-01

    In recent years thiolated polymers (thiomers) have appeared as a promising new tool in oral drug delivery. Thiomers are obtained by the immobilisation of thio-bearing ligands to mucoadhesive polymeric excipients. By the formation of disulfide bonds with mucus glycoproteins, the mucoadhesive properties of thiomers are up to 130-fold improved compared with the corresponding unmodified polymers. Owing to the formation of inter- and intramolecular disulfide bonds within the thiomer itself, matrix tablets and particulate delivery systems show strong cohesive properties, resulting in comparatively higher stability, prolonged disintegration times and a more controlled drug release. The permeation of hydrophilic macromolecular drugs through the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa can be improved by the use of thiomers. Furthermore, some thiomers exhibit improved inhibitory properties towards GI peptidases. The efficacy of thiomers in oral drug delivery has been demonstrated by various in vivo studies. A pharmacological efficacy of 1%, for example, was achieved in rats by oral administration of calcitonin tablets comprising a thiomer. Furthermore, tablets comprising a thiomer and pegylated insulin resulted in a pharmacological efficacy of 7% after oral application to diabetic mice. Low-molecular-weight heparin embedded in thiolated polycarbophil led to an absolute bioavailability of > or = 20% after oral administration to rats. In these studies, formulations comprising the corresponding unmodified polymer had only a marginal or no effect. These results indicate drug carrier systems based on thiomers appear to be a promising tool for oral delivery of hydrophilic macromolecular drugs.

  6. Aerosolized liposomes with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine enhance pulmonary insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Sumio; Fukuchi, Rie; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2009-07-20

    The pulmonary insulin delivery characteristics of liposomes were examined. Aerosolized liposomes containing insulin were administered into rat lungs and the enhancing effect on insulin delivery was evaluated by changes of plasma glucose levels. Liposomes with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) enhanced pulmonary insulin delivery in rats, however, liposomes with dilauroyl, dimyristoyl, distearoyl or dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine did not. Liposomes with DPPC also enhanced the in vitro permeation of FITC dextran (Mw 4400, FD-4) through the calu-3 cell monolayer by reducing the transepithelial electrical resistance and did not harm lung tissues in rats. These findings suggest that liposomes with DPPC enhance pulmonary insulin delivery by opening the epithelial cell space in the pulmonary mucosa not mucosal cell damage. Liposomes with DPPC could be useful as a pulmonary delivery system for peptide and protein drugs.

  7. Self-assembling bubble carriers for oral protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Er-Yuan; Lin, Kun-Ju; Lin, Po-Yen; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Mi, Fwu-Long; Hsiao, Hsu-Chan; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2015-09-01

    Successful oral delivery of therapeutic proteins such as insulin can greatly improve the quality of life of patients. This study develops a bubble carrier system by loading diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride, a foaming agent (sodium bicarbonate; SBC), a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), and a protein drug (insulin) in an enteric-coated gelatin capsule. Following oral administration to diabetic rats, the intestinal fluid that has passed through the gelatin capsule saturates the mixture; concomitantly, DTPA dianhydride produces an acidic environment, while SBC decomposes to form CO2 bubbles at acidic pH. The gas bubbles grow among the surfactant molecules (SDS) owing to the expansion of the generated CO2. The walls of the CO2 bubbles consist of a self-assembled film of water that is in nanoscale and may serve as a colloidal carrier to transport insulin and DTPA. The grown gas bubbles continue to expand until they bump into the wall and burst, releasing their transported insulin, DTPA, and SDS into the mucosal layer. The released DTPA and SDS function as protease inhibitors to protect the insulin molecules as well as absorption enhancers to augment their epithelial permeability and eventual absorption into systemic circulation, exerting their hypoglycemic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Floating Microparticulate Oral Diltiazem Hydrochloride Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To formulate and evaluate floating microparticulate oral diltiazem delivery system for possible delivery to the heart. Method: Floating microspheres were prepared using cellulose acetate and Eudragit RS100 polymers by emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The dried floating microspheres were evaluated for ...

  9. An overview of site-specific delivery of orally administered proteins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral delivery of proteins and peptides poses one of the greatest challenges in controlled drug delivery due to degradation by proteolytic enzymes, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. Therapeutic proteins/peptides are useful in correcting metabolic disorders (e.g., insulin in diabetes mellitus), ...

  10. Inkjet printing of insulin microneedles for transdermal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Steven; Scoutaris, Nicolaos; Lamprou, Dimitrios; Mallinson, David; Douroumis, Dennis

    2015-08-01

    Inkjet printing technology was used to apply insulin polymeric layers on metal microneedles for transdermal delivery. A range of various polymers such as gelatin (GLN), polyvinyl caprolactame-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol (SOL), poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (POX) and trehalose (THL) were assessed for their capacity to form thin uniform and homogeneous layers that preserve insulin intact. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed homogeneous insulin-polymer layers without any phase separation while SOL demonstrated the best performance. Circular discroism (CD) analysis of rehydrated films showed that insulin's alpha helices and β-sheet were well preserved for THL and SOL. In contrast, GLN and POX insulin layers revealed small band shifts indicating possible conformational changes. Insulin release in Franz diffusion cells from MNs inserted into porcine skin showed rapid release rates for POX and GLN within the first 20 min. Inkjet printing was proved an effective approach for transdermal delivery of insulin in solid state.

  11. Oral transmucosal drug delivery for pediatric use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jenny K W; Xu, Yingying; Worsley, Alan; Wong, Ian C K

    2014-06-01

    The formulation of medicines for children remains a challenge. An ideal pediatric formulation must allow accurate dose administration and be in a dosage form that can be handled by the target age group. It is also important to consider the choices and the amount of excipients used in the formulation for this vulnerable age group. Although oral formulations are generally acceptable to most pediatric patients, they are not suitable for drugs with poor oral bioavailability or when a rapid clinical effect is required. In recent years, oral transmucosal delivery has emerged as an attractive route of administration for pediatric patients. With this route of administration, a drug is absorbed through the oral mucosa, therefore bypassing hepatic first pass metabolism and thus avoiding drug degradation or metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract. The high blood flow and relatively high permeability of the oral mucosa allow a quick onset of action to be achieved. It is a simple and non-invasive route of drug administration. However, there are several barriers that need to be overcome in the development of oral transmucosal products. This article aims to provide a comprehensive review of the current development of oral transmucosal delivery specifically for the pediatric population in order to achieve systemic drug delivery. The anatomical and physiological properties of the oral mucosa of infants and young children are carefully examined. The different dosage forms and formulation strategies that are suitable for young patients are discussed. © 2013.

  12. Pure Insulin Nanoparticle Agglomerates for Pulmonary Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Mark M.; Gorman, Eric M.; Munson, Eric J.; Berkland, Cory J.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is a set of diseases characterized by defects in insulin utilization, either through autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells (Type I) or insulin resistance (Type II). Treatment options can include regular injections of insulin, which can be painful and inconvenient, often leading to low patient compliance. To overcome this problem, novel formulations of insulin are being investigated, such as inhaled aerosols. Sufficient deposition of powder in the peripheral lung to maximize systemic absorption requires precise control over particle size and density, with particles between 1 and 5 μm in aerodynamic diameter being within the respirable range. Insulin nanoparticles were produced by titrating insulin dissolved at low pH up to the pI of the native protein, and were then further processed into microparticles using solvent displacement. Particle size, crystallinity, dissolution properties, structural stability, and bulk powder density were characterized. We have demonstrated that pure drug insulin microparticles can be produced from nanosuspensions with minimal processing steps without excipients, and with suitable properties for deposition in the peripheral lung. PMID:18959432

  13. Peroral insulin delivery : new concepts and excipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghi, Assal M.M.

    2008-01-01

    A number of chitosan derivatives were synthesized and compared to the previously synthesized derivatives for their permeation enhancing activity. Using these derivatives insulin nanoparticles were prepared and their effect was compared to the free polymer and insulin in Caco-2 cells. The results

  14. Self-regulating insulin delivery systems I. Synthesis and characterization of glycosylated insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeong, Seo Young; Kim, Sung Wan; Eenink, Martinus J.D.; Feijen, Jan

    1984-01-01

    A design for a self-regulating insulin delivery system based on the competitive binding of glucose and glycosylated insulin to the lectin Concanavalin A is proposed. A differnt approach to diabetes therapy is the attempt to effect a permanent cure of the disease by supplementing the patient's

  15. The Relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D Levels, Insulin Sensitivity and Insulin Secretion in Women 3 Years after Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tänczer, Tímea; Magenheim, Rita; Fürst, Ágnes; Domján, Beatrix; Janicsek, Zsófia; Szabó, Eszter; Ferencz, Viktória; Tabák, Ádám G

    2017-12-01

    There is a direct correlation between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, women with gestational diabetes (GDM) may have lower levels of 25(OH)D compared to controls. The present study intended to investigate 25(OH)D levels and their association with insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in women with prior GDM and in controls 3.2 years after delivery. A total of 87 patients with prior GDM and 45 randomly selected controls (age range, 22 to 44 years) with normal glucose tolerance during pregnancy nested within a cohort of all deliveries at Saint Margit Hospital, Budapest, between January 1 2005, and December 31 2006, were examined. Their 25(OH) D levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Insulin sensitivity and fasting insulin secretion were estimated using the homeostasis model asssessment (HOMA) calculator and early insulin secretion by the insulinogenic index based on a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. There was no significant difference in 25(OH)D levels between cases and controls (27.2±13.1 [±SD] vs. 26.9±9.8 ng/L). There was a positive association between HOMA insulin sensitivity and 25(OH)D levels (beta = 0.017; 95% CI 0.001 to 0.034/1 ng/mL) that was robust to adjustment for age and body mass index. There was a nonsignificant association between HOMA insulin secretion and 25(OH)D (p=0.099), while no association was found with the insulinogenic index. Prior GDM status was not associated with 25(OH)D levels; however, 25(OH) D levels were associated with HOMA insulin sensitivity. It is hypothesized that the association between HOMA insulin secretion and 25(OH)D levels is related to the autoregulation of fasting glucose levels because no association between 25(OH)D and insulinogenic index was found. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Solid lipid nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Gong, Tao; Fu, Hualin; Wang, Changguang; Wang, Xiuli; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Qin; He, Qin; Zhang, Zhirong

    2008-05-22

    Growing attention has been given to the potential of pulmonary route as an alternative for non-invasive systemic delivery of therapeutic agents. In this study, novel nebulizer-compatible solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) for pulmonary drug delivery of insulin were developed by reverse micelle-double emulsion method. The influences of the amount of sodium cholate (SC) and soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) on the deposition properties of the nanoparticles were investigated. Under optimal conditions, the entrapment delivery (ED), respirable fraction (RF) and nebulization efficiency (NE) of SLNs could reach 96.53, 82.11 and 63.28%, respectively, and Ins-SLNs remained stable during nebulization. Fasting plasma glucose level was reduced to 39.41% and insulin level was increased to approximately 170 microIU/ml 4h after pulmonary administration of 20 IU/kg Ins-SLNs. A pharmacological bioavailability of 24.33% and a relative bioavailability of 22.33% were obtained using subcutaneous injection as a reference. Incorporating fluorescent-labelled insulin into SLNs, we found that the SLNs were effectively and homogeneously distributed in the lung alveoli. These findings suggested that SLNs could be used as a potential carrier for pulmonary delivery of insulin by improving both in vitro and in vivo stability as well as prolonging hypoglycemic effect, which inevitably resulted in enhanced bioavailability.

  17. Electroreleasing Composite Membranes for Delivery of Insulin and Other Biomacromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-05

    electrochemistry to control the delivery of a chemical or drug (1, 2). The major advantage of electroreleasing systems (over conventional diffusional drug...used to deliver insulin and vitamin B-12. The composite membrane fabrication procedure is shown schematically in Figure 1. An Anopore ( Alltech ) A1203

  18. NovoPen Echo® insulin delivery device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyllested-Winge J

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jacob Hyllested-Winge,1 Thomas Sparre,2 Line Kynemund Pedersen2 1Novo Nordisk Pharma Ltd, Tokyo, Japan; 2Novo Nordisk A/S, Søborg, Denmark Abstract: The introduction of insulin pen devices has provided easier, well-tolerated, and more convenient treatment regimens for patients with diabetes mellitus. When compared with vial and syringe regimens, insulin pens offer a greater clinical efficacy, improved quality of life, and increased dosing accuracy, particularly at low doses. The portable and discreet nature of pen devices reduces the burden on the patient, facilitates adherence, and subsequently contributes to the improvement in glycemic control. NovoPen Echo® is one of the latest members of the NovoPen® family that has been specifically designed for the pediatric population and is the first to combine half-unit increment (=0.5 U of insulin dosing with a simple memory function. The half-unit increment dosing amendments and accurate injection of 0.5 U of insulin are particularly beneficial for children (and insulin-sensitive adults/elders, who often require small insulin doses. The memory function can be used to record the time and amount of the last dose, reducing the fear of double dosing or missing a dose. The memory function also provides parents with extra confidence and security that their child is taking insulin at the correct doses and times. NovoPen Echo is a lightweight, durable insulin delivery pen; it is available in two different colors, which may help to distinguish between different types of insulin, providing more confidence for both users and caregivers. Studies have demonstrated a high level of patient satisfaction, with 80% of users preferring NovoPen Echo to other pediatric insulin pens. Keywords: NovoPen Echo®, memory function, half-unit increment dosing, adherence, children, adolescents 

  19. Loading of microcontainers for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marizza, Paolo

    The pharmaceutical research is facing several obstacles in the development of drug products for the oral delivery. The main problem deals with the intrinsic chemical nature of the new drug candidates, which are often poorly soluble and barely absorbed in the gastro-intestinal tract. Furthermore......, they are usually degraded before they are absorbed. These combined factors considerably reduce the bioavailability of many active ingredients. Several strategies have been developed to overcome these challenges. One of them are microfabricated drug delivery devices. Microreservoir based-systems are characterized...... of UV photolithography was developed. The fabrication of polymer patterns was optimized and loading with both small hydrophobic drugs and proteins was demonstrated. Finally, structural properties of hydrogels were elucidated by rheology and NMR with the perspective of controlling the drug release...

  20. Prediction of clamp-derived insulin sensitivity from the oral glucose insulin sensitivity index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tura, Andrea; Chemello, Gaetano; Szendroedi, Julia

    2018-01-01

    that underwent both a clamp and an OGTT or meal test, thereby allowing calculation of both the M value and OGIS. The population was divided into a training and a validation cohort (n = 359 and n = 154, respectively). After a stepwise selection approach, the best model for M value prediction was applied......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp is the gold-standard method for measuring insulin sensitivity, but is less suitable for large clinical trials. Thus, several indices have been developed for evaluating insulin sensitivity from the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). However......, most of them yield values different from those obtained by the clamp method. The aim of this study was to develop a new index to predict clamp-derived insulin sensitivity (M value) from the OGTT-derived oral glucose insulin sensitivity index (OGIS). METHODS: We analysed datasets of people...

  1. Evaluation of an Ultrasonic Insulin Delivery System in Hyperglycemic Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameneh Sazgarnia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sonophoresis has been assessed as a novel approach to create skin permeability and drug delivery using low frequencies of ultrasound waves in the range of 20 kHz to 3 MHz. In this study, a system including seven 40 kHz piezoelectric transducers and an insulin chamber designed by the Medical Physics Research Center has been evaluated on hyperglycemic rabbits. Materials and Methods: Thirty five rabbits became hyperglycemic through Alloxan monohydrate injection and were divided into five groups. The rabbits were treated in two main groups (with insulin and ultrasound radiation in two radiation periods, one main control group and two further control groups (one group with ultrasound radiation with longer radiation period in absence of insulin and presence of normal saline; and the other group without ultrasound radiation in presence of insulin. By filling the system chamber with insulin and placing it on the skin of the abdomen and activating the piezoelectric transducers, blood samples were drawn from the animals before ultrasound irradiation and after it in specified intervals. The glucose level was measured using a glucometer and the serum insulin level was determined using a radioimmunoassay method. Results: Maximum decrease in glucose level was recorded for a 20 minute irradiation in a 180 minute period, and the highest increase in insulin level was recorded for the10 minute radiation group in a 60 minute period. Discussion and Conclusion: Because rapid uptake and reaching a peak in a short time and its swift decrease make a good scheme for controlling glucose level after meals, the 10 minute radiation seems to be more suitable. Also, it is predicted that irradiation time in the interval between food consumption and use of the instrument is critical.

  2. Electrospun fish protein fibers as a biopolymer-based carrier – implications for oral protein delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Protein-based electrospun fibers have emerged as novel nanostructured materials for tissue engineering and drug delivery due to their unique structural characteristics, biocompatibility and biodegradability. The aim of this study was to explore the use of electrospun fibers based on fish...... sarcoplasmic proteins as an oral delivery platform for biopharmaceuticals, using insulin as a model protein. Methods: Fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP) were isolated from fresh cod and electrospun into nanomicrofibers using insulin as a model payload. The morphology of FSP fibers was characterized using...... differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers was followed by RP-HPLC and ELISA, and the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was measured before and after the experiment. Cell viability was assessed by the MTS/PMS assay. Results: Insulin was encapsulated in the electrospun FSP fibers with high efficiency, high...

  3. Poly(amido amine) dendrimers in oral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellepeddi, Venkata K; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have been extensively investigated for oral delivery applications due to their ability to translocate across the gastrointestinal epithelium. In this Review, we highlight recent advances in the evaluation of PAMAM dendrimers as oral drug delivery carriers. Specifically, toxicity, mechanisms of transepithelial transport, models of the intestinal epithelial barrier including isolated human intestinal tissue model, detection of dendrimers, and surface modification are discussed. We also highlight evaluation of various PAMAM dendrimer-drug conjugates for their ability to transport across gastrointestinal epithelium for improved oral bioavailability. In addition, current challenges and future trends for clinical translation of PAMAM dendrimers as carriers for oral delivery are discussed.

  4. Insulin delivery through nasal route using thiolated microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Tarang; Jain, Ashish; Jain, Aviral; Shilpi, Satish; Gulbake, Arvind; Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of developed thiolated microspheres for insulin delivery through nasal route. In the present study, cysteine was immobilized on carbopol using EDAC. A total of 269.93 µmol free thiol groups per gram polymer were determined. The prepared nonthiolated and thiolated microspheres were studied for particle shape, size, drug content, swellability, mucoadhesion and in vitro insulin release. The thiolated microspheres exhibited higher mucoadhesion due to formation of covalent bonds via disulfide bridges with the mucus gel layer. Drug permeation through goat nasal mucosa of nonthiolated and thiolated microspheres were found as 52.62 ± 2.4% and 78.85 ± 3.1% in 6 h, respectively. Thiolated microspheres bearing insulin showed better reduction in blood glucose level (BGL) in comparison to nonthiolated microspheres as 31.23 ± 2.12% and 75.25 ± 0.93% blood glucose of initial BGL were observed at 6 h after nasal delivery of thiolated and nonthiolated microspheres in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rabbits.

  5. Can natural polymers assist in delivering insulin orally?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Mokhamad; Vasiljevic, Todor

    2017-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most grave and lethal non communicable diseases. Insulin is normally used to medicate diabetes. Due to bioavailability issues, the most regular route of administration is through injection, which may pose compliance problems to treatment. The oral administration thus appears as a suitable alternative, but with several important problems. Low stability of insulin in the gastrointestinal tract and low intestinal permeation are some of the issues. Encapsulation of insulin into polymer-based particles emerges as a plausible strategy. Different encapsulation approaches and polymers have been used in this regard. Polymers with different characteristics from natural or synthetic origin have been assessed to attain this goal, with natural polymers being preferable. Natural polymers studied so far include chitosan, alginate, carrageenan, starch, pectin, casein, tragacanth, dextran, carrageenan, gelatine and cyclodextrin. While some promising knowledge and results have been gained, a polymeric-based particle system to deliver insulin orally has not been introduced onto the market yet. In this review, effectiveness of different natural polymer materials developed so far along with fabrication techniques are evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Insulin delivery route for the artificial pancreas: subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, or intravenous? Pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Eric

    2008-07-01

    Insulin delivery is a crucial component of a closed-loop system aiming at the development of an artificial pancreas. The intravenous route, which has been used in the bedside artificial pancreas model for 30 years, has clear advantages in terms of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but cannot be used in any ambulatory system so far. Subcutaneous (SC) insulin infusion benefits from the broad expansion of insulin pump therapy that promoted the availability of constantly improving technology and fast-acting insulin analog use. However, persistent delays of insulin absorption and action, variability and shortterm stability of insulin infusion from SC-inserted catheters generate effectiveness and safety issues in view of an ambulatory, automated, glucose-controlled, artificial beta cell. Intraperitoneal insulin delivery, although still marginally used in diabetes care, may offer an interesting alternative because of its more-physiological plasma insulin profiles and sustained stability and reliability of insulin delivery.

  7. Oral controlled release drug delivery system and Characterization of oral tablets; A review

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Zaman; Junaid Qureshi; Hira Ejaz; Rai Muhammad Sarfraz; Hafeez ullah Khan; Fazal Rehman Sajid; Muhammad Shafiq ur Rehman

    2016-01-01

    Oral route of drug administration is considered as the safest and easiest route of drug administration. Control release drug delivery system is the emerging trend in the pharmaceuticals and the oral route is most suitable for such kind of drug delivery system. Oral route is more convenient for It all age group including both pediatric and geriatrics. There are various systems which are adopted to deliver drug in a controlled manner to different target sites through oral route. It includes dif...

  8. Insulin monotherapy compared with the addition of oral glucose-lowering agents to insulin for people with type 2 diabetes already on insulin therapy and inadequate glycaemic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Rimke C; van Avendonk, Mariëlle JP; Jansen, Hanneke; Goudswaard, Alexander N; van den Donk, Maureen; Gorter, Kees; Kerssen, Anneloes; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether people with type 2 diabetes mellitus on insulin monotherapy who do not achieve adequate glycaemic control should continue insulin as monotherapy or can benefit from adding oral glucose-lowering agents to the insulin therapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of

  9. Learning From Past Failures of Oral Insulin Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Aaron W; Gottlieb, Peter A

    2018-07-01

    Very recently one of the largest type 1 diabetes prevention trials using daily administration of oral insulin or placebo was completed. After 9 years of study enrollment and follow-up, the randomized controlled trial failed to delay the onset of clinical type 1 diabetes, which was the primary end point. The unfortunate outcome follows the previous large-scale trial, the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1), which again failed to delay diabetes onset with oral insulin or low-dose subcutaneous insulin injections in a randomized controlled trial with relatives at risk for type 1 diabetes. These sobering results raise the important question, "Where does the type 1 diabetes prevention field move next?" In this Perspective, we advocate for a paradigm shift in which smaller mechanistic trials are conducted to define immune mechanisms and potentially identify treatment responders. The stage is set for these interventions in individuals at risk for type 1 diabetes as Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet has identified thousands of relatives with islet autoantibodies and general population screening for type 1 diabetes risk is under way. Mechanistic trials will allow for better trial design and patient selection based upon molecular markers prior to large randomized controlled trials, moving toward a personalized medicine approach for the prevention of type 1 diabetes. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  10. Proximity to Delivery Alters Insulin Sensitivity and Glucose Metabolism in Pregnant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musial, Barbara; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Vaughan, Owen R; Ozanne, Susan E; Voshol, Peter; Sferruzzi-Perri, Amanda N; Fowden, Abigail L

    2016-04-01

    In late pregnancy, maternal insulin resistance occurs to support fetal growth, but little is known about insulin-glucose dynamics close to delivery. This study measured insulin sensitivity in mice in late pregnancy at day 16 (D16) and near term at D19. Nonpregnant (NP) and pregnant mice were assessed for metabolite and hormone concentrations, body composition by DEXA, tissue insulin signaling protein abundance by Western blotting, glucose tolerance and utilization, and insulin sensitivity using acute insulin administration and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps with [(3)H]glucose infusion. Whole-body insulin resistance occurred in D16 pregnant dams in association with basal hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistant endogenous glucose production, and downregulation of several proteins in hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin signaling pathways relative to NP and D19 values. Insulin resistance was less pronounced at D19, with restoration of NP insulin concentrations, improved hepatic insulin sensitivity, and increased abundance of hepatic insulin signaling proteins. At D16, insulin resistance at whole-body, tissue, and molecular levels will favor fetal glucose acquisition, while improved D19 hepatic insulin sensitivity will conserve glucose for maternal use in anticipation of lactation. Tissue sensitivity to insulin, therefore, alters differentially with proximity to delivery in pregnant mice, with implications for human and other species. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. Novel Simple Insulin Delivery Device Reduces Barriers to Insulin Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Norbert; Lilly, Leslie C.; Mader, Julia K.; Aberer, Felix; Ribitsch, Anja; Kojzar, Harald; Warner, Jay; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The PaQ® insulin delivery system is a simple-to-use patch-on device that provides preset basal rates and bolus insulin on demand. In addition to feasibility of use, safety, and efficacy (reported elsewhere), this study analyzed the impact of PaQ on patient-reported outcomes, including barriers to insulin treatment, diabetes-related distress, and attitudes toward insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes on a stable multiple daily injection (MDI) regimen. Methods: This single-center, open-label, single-arm study comprised three 2-week periods: baseline (MDI), transition from MDI to PaQ, and PaQ treatment. Validated questionnaires were administered during the baseline and PaQ treatment periods: Barriers to Insulin Treatment questionnaire (BIT), Insulin Treatment Appraisal Scale (ITAS), and Problem Areas in Diabetes scale (PAID). Results: Eighteen patients (age 59 ± 5 years, diabetes duration 15 ± 7 years, 21% female, HbA1c 7.7 ± 0.7%) completed the questionnaires. There was a strong, significant effect of PaQ use in mean BIT total scores (difference [D] = −5.4 ± 0.7.7, P = .01, effect size [d] = 0.70). Patients perceived less stigmatization by insulin injection (D = −2.2 ± 6.2, P = .18, d = 0.35), increased positive outcome (D = 1.9 ± 6.6, P = .17, d = 0.29), and less fear of injections (1.3 ± 4.8, P = .55, d = 0.28). Mean change in ITAS scores after PaQ device use showed a nonsignificant improvement of 1.71 ± 5.63 but moderate effect size (d = 0.30, P = .14). No increase in PAID scores was seen. Conclusions: The results and moderate to large effects sizes suggest that PaQ device use has beneficial and clinically relevant effects to overcoming barriers to and negative appraisal of insulin treatment, without increasing other diabetes-related distress. PMID:25670847

  12. Animal models for evaluation of oral delivery of biopharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harloff-Helleberg, Stine; Nielsen, Line Hagner; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2017-01-01

    of systems for oral delivery of biopharmaceuticals may result in new treatment modalities to increase the patient compliance and reduce product cost. In the preclinical development phase, use of experimental animal models is essential for evaluation of new formulation designs. In general, the limited oral...... bioavailability of biopharmaceuticals, of just a few percent, is expected, and therefore, the animal models and the experimental settings must be chosen with utmost care. More knowledge and focus on this topic is highly needed, despite experience from the numerous studies evaluating animal models for oral drug...... delivery of small molecule drugs. This review highlights and discusses pros and cons of the most currently used animal models and settings. Additionally, it also looks into the influence of anesthetics and sampling methods for evaluation of drug delivery systems for oral delivery of biopharmaceuticals...

  13. Microcontainers - an oral drug delivery system for poorly soluble drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Petersen, Ritika Singh; Marizza, Paolo

    In oral delivery, it can sometimes be necessary to employ drug delivery systems to achieve targeted delivery to the intestine. Microcontainers are polymeric, cylindrical devices in the micrometer size range (Figure 1), and are suggested as a promising oral drug delivery system [1],[2]. The purpose...... of these studies was to fabricate microcontainers in either SU-8 or biodegradable poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), and fill the microcontainers with poorly soluble drugs. Furthermore, the application of the microcontainers as an oral drug delivery system was investigated in terms of release, in situ intestinal perfusion...... medium at pH 6.5 was observed. In situ intestinal perfusions were performed in rats of the Eudragit-coated ASSF-filled microcontainers and compared to a furosemide solution. At the end of the study, the small intestine was harvested from the rat and imaged under a light microscope. The absorption rate...

  14. Characterization of particulate drug delivery systems for oral delivery of Peptide and protein drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Fano, Mathias; Saaby, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Oral drug delivery is a preferred route because of good patient compliance. However, most peptide/ protein drugs are delivered via parenteral routes because of the absorption barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as enzymatic degradation by proteases and low permeability acrossthe...... delivery of peptide/protein drugs and to provide an overview of formulationand characterization strategies. For a better understanding of the challenges in oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs, the composition of GI fluids and the digestion processes of different kinds of excipients in the GI tract...... biological membranes. To overcome these barriers, different formulation strategies for oral delivery of biomacromolecules have been proposed, including lipid based formulations and polymer-based particulate drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge about oral...

  15. Novel Simple Insulin Delivery Device Reduces Barriers to Insulin Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes: Results From a Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hermanns, Norbert; Lilly, Leslie C.; Mader, Julia K.; Aberer, Felix; Ribitsch, Anja; Kojzar, Harald; Warner, Jay; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The PaQ® insulin delivery system is a simple-to-use patch-on device that provides preset basal rates and bolus insulin on demand. In addition to feasibility of use, safety, and efficacy (reported elsewhere), this study analyzed the impact of PaQ on patient-reported outcomes, including barriers to insulin treatment, diabetes-related distress, and attitudes toward insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes on a stable multiple daily injection (MDI) regimen. Methods: This singl...

  16. PROXIMITY TO DELIVERY ALTERS INSULIN SENSITIVITY AND GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN PREGNANT MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Musial, Barbara; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Vaughan, Owen R.; Ozanne, Susan E.; Voshol, Peter; Sferruzzi-Perri, Amanda N.; Fowden, Abigail L.

    2016-01-01

    In late pregnancy, maternal insulin resistance occurs to support fetal growth but little is known about insulin-glucose dynamics close to delivery. This study measured insulin sensitivity in mice in late pregnancy, day (D) 16, and near term, D19, (term 20.5D). Non-pregnant (NP) and pregnant mice were assessed for metabolite and hormone concentrations, body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, tissue insulin signalling protein abundance by Western blotting, glucose tolerance and ut...

  17. Endothelial Fcγ Receptor IIB Activation Blunts Insulin Delivery to Skeletal Muscle to Cause Insulin Resistance in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigaki, Keiji; Chambliss, Ken L.; Yuhanna, Ivan S.; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Ahmed, Mohamed; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Huang, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Modest elevations in C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with type 2 diabetes. We previously revealed in mice that increased CRP causes insulin resistance and mice globally deficient in the CRP receptor Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) were protected from the disorder. FcγRIIB is expressed in numerous cell types including endothelium and B lymphocytes. Here we investigated how endothelial FcγRIIB influences glucose homeostasis, using mice with elevated CRP expressing or lacking endothelial FcγRIIB. Whereas increased CRP caused insulin resistance in mice expressing endothelial FcγRIIB, mice deficient in the endothelial receptor were protected. The insulin resistance with endothelial FcγRIIB activation was due to impaired skeletal muscle glucose uptake caused by attenuated insulin delivery, and it was associated with blunted endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in skeletal muscle. In culture, CRP suppressed endothelial cell insulin transcytosis via FcγRIIB activation and eNOS antagonism. Furthermore, in knock-in mice harboring constitutively active eNOS, elevated CRP did not invoke insulin resistance. Collectively these findings reveal that by inhibiting eNOS, endothelial FcγRIIB activation by CRP blunts insulin delivery to skeletal muscle to cause insulin resistance. Thus, a series of mechanisms in endothelium that impairs insulin movement has been identified that may contribute to type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:27207525

  18. Thiolated chitosans: useful excipients for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Martin; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2008-03-01

    To improve the bioavailability of orally administered drugs, formulations based on polymers are of great interest for pharmaceutical technologists. Thiolated chitosans are multifunctional polymers that exhibit improved mucoadhesive, cohesive and permeation-enhancing as well as efflux-pump-inhibitory properties. They can be synthesized by derivatization of the primary amino groups of chitosan with coupling reagents bearing thiol functions. Various data gained in-vitro as well as in-vivo studies clearly demonstrate the potential of thiolated chitosans for oral drug delivery. Within the current review, the synthesis and characterization of thiolated chitosans so far developed is summarized. Features of thiolated chitosans important for oral drug delivery are discussed as well. Moreover, different formulation approaches, such as matrix tablets and micro-/nanoparticles, as well as the applicability of thiolated chitosans for the oral delivery of various substance classes including peptides and efflux pump substrates, are highlighted.

  19. Oral transmucosal drug delivery--current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Mohammed; Sayed, Ossama M; Lane, Majella E

    2014-08-25

    Oral transmucosal drug delivery (OTDD) dosage forms have been available since the 1980s. In contrast to the number of actives currently delivered locally to the oral cavity, the number delivered as buccal or sublingual formulations remains relatively low. This is surprising in view of the advantages associated with OTDD, compared with conventional oral drug delivery. This review examines a number of aspects related to OTDD including the anatomy of the oral cavity, models currently used to study OTDD, as well as commercially available formulations and emerging technologies. The limitations of current methodologies to study OTDD are considered as well as recent publications and new approaches which have advanced our understanding of this route of drug delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of particulate drug delivery systems for oral delivery of Peptide and protein drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Fano, Mathias; Saaby, Lasse; Yang, Mingshi; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Mu, Huiling

    2015-01-01

    Oral drug delivery is a preferred route because of good patient compliance. However, most peptide/ protein drugs are delivered via parenteral routes because of the absorption barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as enzymatic degradation by proteases and low permeability acrossthe biological membranes. To overcome these barriers, different formulation strategies for oral delivery of biomacromolecules have been proposed, including lipid based formulations and polymer-based particulate drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge about oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs and to provide an overview of formulationand characterization strategies. For a better understanding of the challenges in oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs, the composition of GI fluids and the digestion processes of different kinds of excipients in the GI tract are summarized. Additionally, the paper provides an overview of recent studies on characterization of solid drug carriers for peptide/protein drugs, drug distribution in particles, drug release and stability in simulated GI fluids, as well as the absorption of peptide/protein drugs in cell-based models. The use of biorelevant media when applicable can increase the knowledge about the quality of DDS for oral protein delivery. Hopefully, the knowledge provided in this review will aid the establishment of improved biorelevant models capable of forecasting the performance of particulate DDS for oral peptide/protein delivery.

  1. Oral controlled release drug delivery system and Characterization of oral tablets; A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral route of drug administration is considered as the safest and easiest route of drug administration. Control release drug delivery system is the emerging trend in the pharmaceuticals and the oral route is most suitable for such kind of drug delivery system. Oral route is more convenient for It all age group including both pediatric and geriatrics. There are various systems which are adopted to deliver drug in a controlled manner to different target sites through oral route. It includes diffusion controlled drug delivery systems; dissolution controlled drug delivery systems, osmotically controlled drug delivery systems, ion-exchange controlled drug delivery systems, hydrodynamically balanced systems, multi-Particulate drug delivery systems and microencapsulated drug delivery system. The systems are formulated using different natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic polymers. The purpose of the review is to provide information about the orally controlled drug delivery system, polymers which are used to formulate these systems and characterizations of one of the most convenient dosage form which is the tablets. 

  2. Determining pancreatic β-cell compensation for changing insulin sensitivity using an oral glucose tolerance test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Malin, Steven K; Karstoft, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide responses during an OGTT are informative for both research and clinical practice in type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to use such information to determine insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion so as to calculate an oral glucose disposition index...

  3. Characterization and Oral Delivery of Proinsulin-Transferrin Fusion Protein Expressed Using ExpressTec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Proinsulin-transferrin fusion protein (ProINS-Tf has been designed and successfully expressed from the mammalian HEK293 cells (HEK-ProINS-Tf. It was found that HEK-ProINS-Tf could be converted into an activated form in the liver. Furthermore, HEK-ProINS-Tf was demonstrated as an extra-long acting insulin analogue with liver-specific insulin action in streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice. However, due to the low production yield from transfected HEK293 cells, there are other interesting features, including the oral bioavailability, which have not been fully explored and characterized. To improve the protein production yield, an alternative protein expression system, ExpressTec using transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L., was used. The intact and active rice-derived ProINS-Tf (ExpressTec-ProINS-Tf was successfully expressed from the transgenic rice expression system. Our results suggested that, although the insulin-like bioactivity of ExpressTec-ProINS-Tf was slightly lower in vitro, its potency of in vivo blood glucose control was considerably stronger than that of HEK-ProINS-Tf. The oral delivery studies in type 1 diabetic mice demonstrated a prolonged control of blood glucose to near-normal levels after oral administration of ExpressTec-ProINS-Tf. Results in this report suggest that ExpressTec-ProINS-Tf is a promising insulin analog with advantages including low cost, prolonged and liver targeting effects, and most importantly, oral bioactivity.

  4. Transmembrane transport of peptide type compounds: prospects for oral delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, E.; Crison, J.; Amidon, G. L.

    1996-01-01

    Synthesis and delivery of potential therapeutic peptides and peptidomimetic compounds has been the focus of intense research over the last 10 years. While it is widely recognized that numerous limitations apply to oral delivery of peptides, some of the limiting factors have been addressed and their mechanisms elucidated, which has lead to promising strategies. This article will briefly summarize the challenges, results and current approaches of oral peptide delivery and give some insight on future strategies. The barriers determining peptide bioavailability after oral administration are intestinal membrane permability, size limitations, intestinal and hepatic metabolism and in some cases solubility limitations. Poor membrane permeabilities of hydrophilic peptides might be overcome by structurally modifying the compounds, thus increasing their membrane partition characteristics and/or their affinity to carrier proteins. Another approach is the site-specific delivery of the peptide to the most permeable parts of the intestine. The current view on size limitation for oral drug delivery has neglected partition considerations. Recent studies suggest that compounds with a molecular weight up to 4000 might be significantly absorbed, assuming appropriate partition behavior and stability. Metabolism, probably the most significant factor in the absorption fate of peptides, might be controlled by coadministration of competitive enzyme inhibitors, structural modifications and administration of the compound as a well absorbed prodrug that is converted into the therapeutically active agent after its absorption. For some peptides poor solubility might present a limitation to oral absorption, an issue that has been addressed by mechanistically defining and therefore improving formulation parameters. Effective oral peptide delivery requires further development in understanding these complex mechanisms in order to maximize the therapeutic potential of this class of compounds.

  5. A review on electrospun nanofibers for oral drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Akhgari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, polymer nanofibers have gained attention due to remarkable characteristics such as high porosity and large surface area to volume ratio. Among their fabrication methods, electrospinning technique has been attracted as a simple and reproducible approach. It is a versatile, simple and cost-effective technique for the production of continuous nanofibers with acceptable characteristics such as high porosity, high surface area to volume ratio, high loading capacity and encapsulation efficiency, delivery of multiple drugs, and enhancement of drug solubility. Due to these properties electrospun nanofibers have been extensively used for different biomedical applications including wound dressing, tissue engineering, enzyme immobilization, artificial organs, and drug delivery. Different synthetic and natural polymers have been successfully electrospun into ultrafine fibers. Using electrospun nanofibers as vehicles for oral drug delivery has been investigated in different release manners- fast, biphasic or sustained release. This article presents a review on application of electrospinning technique in oral drug delivery.

  6. Oral administration of insulin by means of liposomes in animal experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tragl, K.H.; Pohl, A.; Kinast, H.

    1979-01-01

    Liposomes are an effective vehicle for the oral administration of insulin. They are prepared from lipid emulsions by sonication and particles of homogeneous size are generated by elution through sepharose columns. Liposomes are taken up into the gastric mucosa by endocytosis and then transported to the liver via the portal circulation. Oral administration of 10 U insulin/kg body weight to rats is followed by a reduction in blood glucose to 67% of the initial value. When liposome-trapped insulin was injected intravenously a decrease in blood glucose to 40% of the initial value was obtained by the administration of 5 IU insulin/kg body weight. While the effect of orally-administered liposome-trapped insulin is obvious, the problems of standardization of the insulin content of the liposomes and the great variability of liposome uptake into the gastric mucosa by endocytosis remain unsolved. (author)

  7. Submicron Emulsions and Their Applications in Oral Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundada, Veenu; Patel, Mitali; Sawant, Krutika

    2016-01-01

    A "submicron emulsion" is an isotropic mixture of drug, lipids, and surfactants, usually with hydrophilic cosolvents and with droplet diameters ranging from 10 to 500 nm. Submicron emulsions are of increasing interest in medicine due to their kinetic stability, high solubilizing capacity, and tiny globule size. Because of these properties, they have been applied in various fields, such as personal care, cosmetics, health care, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals. Submicron emulsions are by far the most advanced nanoparticulate systems for the systemic delivery of biologically active agents for controlled drug delivery and targeting. They are designed mainly for pharmaceutical formulations suitable for various routes of administration like parenteral, ocular, transdermal, and oral. This review article describes the marked potential of submicron emulsions for oral drug delivery owing to their numerous advantages like reduced first pass metabolism, inhibition of P-glycoprotein efflux system, and enhanced absorption via intestinal lymphatic pathway. To overcome the limitations of liquid dosage forms, submicron emulsions can be formulated into solid dosage forms such as solid self-emulsifying systems. This article covers various types of submicron emulsions like microemulsion, nanoemulsion, and self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS), and their potential pharmaceutical applications in oral delivery with emphasis on their advantages, limitations, and advancements.

  8. Novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hairui; Yu, Yuan; Faraji Dana, Sara; Li, Bo; Lee, Chi-Ying; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-08-01

    Technological advances in drug discovery have resulted in increasing number of molecules including proteins and peptides as drug candidates. However, how to deliver drugs with satisfactory therapeutic effect, minimal side effects and increased patient compliance is a question posted before researchers, especially for those drugs with poor solubility, large molecular weight or instability. Microfabrication technology, polymer science and bioconjugate chemistry combine to address these problems and generate a number of novel engineered drug delivery systems. Injection routes usually have poor patient compliance due to their invasive nature and potential safety concerns over needle reuse. The alternative non-invasive routes, such as oral, mucosal (pulmonary, nasal, ocular, buccal, rectal, vaginal), and transdermal drug delivery have thus attracted many attentions. Here, we review the applications of the novel engineered systems for oral, mucosal and transdermal drug delivery.

  9. Oral delivery of peptides and proteins using lipid-based drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ping; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Müllertz, Anette

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In order to successfully develop lipid-based drug delivery systems (DDS) for oral administration of peptides and proteins, it is important to gain an understanding of the colloid structures formed by these DDS, the mode of peptide and protein incorporation as well as the mechanism...... by which intestinal absorption of peptides and proteins is promoted. AREAS COVERED: The present paper reviews the literature on lipid-based DDS, employed for oral delivery of peptides and proteins and highlights the mechanisms by which the different lipid-based carriers are expected to overcome the two...... and proteins. EXPERT OPINION: Lipid-based DDS are safe and suitable for oral delivery of peptides and proteins. Significant progress has been made in this area with several technologies on clinical trials. However, a better understanding of the mechanism of action in vivo is needed in order to improve...

  10. Incretin hormone and insulin responses to oral versus intravenous lipid administration in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Ola; Carr, Richard D; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2011-01-01

    Context: The incretin effect is responsible for the higher insulin response to oral glucose than to iv glucose at matching glucose levels. It is notknownwhetherthis effect is restricted to glucose only. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine whether insulin and incretin hormone responses ...

  11. MICRONEEDLES AS A WAY TO INCREASE THE TRANSDERMAL INSULIN DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Kuznetsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to prove the possibility of increasing the diffusion of insulin through the skin in vitro with pre-applying microneedles.Materials and methods. Microemulsion for transdermal therapeutic system of insulin has been used in vitro studies. Genetically engineered human insulin has been used in this research. Applicators with silicon microneedles (40 and 150 microns long have been used to enhance the diffusion fl ux of drug substance. The dynamics of insulin release from the transdermal therapeutic systems through the rabbit skin has been studied in glass Franz diffusion cells in analyzer diffusion of drugs HDT 1000 (Copley Scientifi c Ltd., UK. Insulin has been labeled with fl uorescein isothiocyanate to separate the insulin absorption spectrum from the spectra of native skin proteins at spectrophotometer measurements.Results. The amounts of insulin delivered through the skin in vitro after previous application of microneedles of 40 and 150 microns are 282.5 ± 61.1 and 372.3 ± 7.0 microgram, respectively. This is 1.4 and 1.9 times more than in the transdermal system without microneedles.Conclusion. The conditions for increasing the diffusion of insulin through the skin in a model transdermal therapeutic system with microneedles (length – 150 microns, duration of pre-application – 1 hour have been found.

  12. Polymeric Micro- and Nanofabricatced Devices for Oral Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Cade Brylee

    While oral drug administration is by far the most preferred route, it is accompanied by many barriers that limit drug uptake such as the low pH of the stomach, metabolic and proteolytic enzymes, and limited permeability of the intestinal epithelium. As a result, many drugs ranging from small molecules to biological therapeutics have limited oral bioavailability, precluding them from oral administration. To address this issue, microfabrication has been applied to create planar, asymmetric devices capable of binding to the lining of the gastrointestinal tract and releasing drug at high concentrations, thereby increasing oral drug uptake. While the efficacy of these devices has been validated in vitro and in vivo, modifying their surfaces with nanoscale features has potential to refine their properties for enhanced drug delivery. This dissertation first presents an approach to fabricate polymeric microdevices coated with nanowires in a rapid, high throughput manner. The nanowires demonstrate rapid drug localization onto the surface of these devices via capillary action and increased adhesion to epithelial tissue, suggesting that this fabrication technique can be used to create devices with enhanced properties for oral drug delivery. Also presented are microdevices sealed with nanostraw membranes. The nanostraw membranes provide sustained drug release by limiting drug efflux from the devices, prevent drug degradation by limiting influx of outside biomolecules, and enhance device bioadhesion by penetrating into the mucus layer of the intestinal lining. Finally, an approach that dramatically increases the capacity and efficiency of drug loading into microdevices over previous methods is presented. A picoliter-volume printer is used to print drug directly into device reservoirs in an automated fashion. The technologies presented here expand the capabilities of microdevices for oral drug delivery by incorporating nanoscale structures that enhance device bioadhesion

  13. Nose-to-Brain delivery of insulin for Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Stützle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The transport of small molecules, peptides and proteins via the olfactory epithelium and along olfactory and trigeminal nerve pathways from the nasal cavity to the brain is very well known and clinically established for central nervous system (CNS active drugs like oxytocin, sumatriptan or insulin. Insulin is a clinically well-established biopharmaceutical with a validated function in cognition. Central supply with insulin via intranasal administration improves cognition in animal models and in human, making insulin a so-called cognitive enhancer. Furthermore, dysregulation of insulin is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, which is associated with lower levels of insulin in the cerebrospinal fluid and is involved in amyloid-beta (Ab regulation. Clinical trials with intranasal insulin implicate positive effects on learning and memory, but a massive lack of pharmacokinetic and efficacy data hamper a pharmacokinetic – pharmcodynamic relation and a possible clinical development as cognition enhancer. A lack of such data also prevents resolving the mechanisms involved in directing insulin to the central or to the peripheral compartment. Here we discuss the basic mechanism of Nose-to-Brain delivery, evidences for intranasal insulin as cognition enhancer, medical devices for intranasal delivery and safety aspects.

  14. Insulin-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) nanoparticles: efficient, sustained and safe insulin delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Thiago M; Teixeira, Zaine; Barbosa-Sampaio, Helena C; Rezende, Luiz F; Boschero, Antonio C; Durán, Nelson; Höehr, Nelci F

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop an efficient, biodegradable, biocompatible and safe controlled release system using insulin-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanoparticles. The insulin-loaded PCL nanoparticles were prepared by double emulsion method (water-in-oil-in-water) using Pluronic F68 as emulsifier. Using the double emulsion method a high insulin encapsulation efficiency (90.6 +/-1.6%) with a zeta potential of -29 +/-2.7 mV and average particle size of 796 +/-10.5 nm was obtained. Insulin-loaded PCL nanoparticles showed no toxicity to MIN6 cells. Insulin nanoparticles administered subcutaneously and intraperitoneally in rats reduced glycaemia of basal levels after 15 minutes, and presented a sustainable hypoglycemic effect on insulin-dependent type 1 diabetic rats, showing to be more efficient than unencapsulated insulin. Furthermore, these nanoparticles were not hepatotoxic, as evaluated by the effect over liver cell-death and oxidative stress scavenger system in rats. These results suggest that insulin-loaded PCL nanoparticles prepared by water-in-oil-in-water emulsion method are biocompatible, efficient and safe insulin-delivering system with controlled insulin release, which indicates that it may be a powerful tool for insulin-dependent patients care.

  15. Oral delivery of peptides and proteins using lipid-based drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Müllertz, Anette

    2012-10-01

    In order to successfully develop lipid-based drug delivery systems (DDS) for oral administration of peptides and proteins, it is important to gain an understanding of the colloid structures formed by these DDS, the mode of peptide and protein incorporation as well as the mechanism by which intestinal absorption of peptides and proteins is promoted. The present paper reviews the literature on lipid-based DDS, employed for oral delivery of peptides and proteins and highlights the mechanisms by which the different lipid-based carriers are expected to overcome the two most important barriers (extensive enzymatic degradation and poor transmucosal permeability). This paper also gives a clear-cut idea about advantages and drawbacks of using different lipidic colloidal carriers ((micro)emulsions, solid lipid core particles and liposomes) for oral delivery of peptides and proteins. Lipid-based DDS are safe and suitable for oral delivery of peptides and proteins. Significant progress has been made in this area with several technologies on clinical trials. However, a better understanding of the mechanism of action in vivo is needed in order to improve the design and development of lipid-based DDS with the desired bioavailability and therapeutic profile.

  16. V-Go Insulin Delivery System Versus Multiple Daily Insulin Injections for Patients With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Abigail; Lintner, Michaela; Knezevich, Emily

    2015-04-21

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus affects over 29.1 million Americans, diagnosed and undiagnosed. Achieving and maintaining glycemic control for these patients is of extreme importance when working to prevent complications and improve quality of life for patients. The V-Go is a newly developed insulin delivery system. The push of a button inserts a needle into the patient once daily and remains attached for 24 hours. The V-Go is designed to release a set basal rate throughout the day, while allowing patients to provide up to 36 units of on-demand bolus insulin with the manual click of 2 buttons. It is a spring-loaded device filled daily with rapid-acting insulin that runs without the use of batteries or computer software. The main objective of this prospective active comparator study was to observe the A1C lowering effects of multiple daily insulin injections (MDII) versus the use of the V-Go insulin delivery system for patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus over a 3-month period. In addition, the effect on insulin requirement for these patients was assessed with secondary comparisons of weight, blood pressure, prevalence of hypoglycemic events, and quality of life before and after 3 months of intensified insulin therapy with regular monitoring by a clinical pharmacist at an internal medicine clinic. The average A1C lowering experienced by the 3 patients in the V-Go group was 1.5%, while the average A1C change in the 3 patients in the MDII group was an increase of 0.2%. All patients in the V-Go group experienced a decrease in insulin total daily dose (TDD), with an average decrease of 26.3 units. All patients in the MDII group experienced an increase in insulin TDD with an average of 15 units daily to achieve therapeutic goals individualized for each patient. All patients who underwent intensification of insulin therapy experienced an increase in subjective quality of life (QOL) as determined using the Diabetes-39 (D-39) questionnaire, though QOL results lacked

  17. Oral insulin improves metabolic parameters in high fat diet fed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEANDRO C. LIPINSKI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction/Aim: The gut has shown to have a pivotal role on the pathophysiology of metabolic disease. Food stimulation of distal intestinal segments promotes enterohormones secretion influencing insulin metabolism. In diabetic rats, oral insulin has potential to change intestinal epithelium behavior. This macromolecule promotes positive effects on laboratorial metabolic parameters and decreases diabetic intestinal hypertrophy. This study aims to test if oral insulin can influence metabolic parameters and intestinal weight in obese non-diabetic rats. Methods: Twelve weeks old Wistar rats were divided in 3 groups: control (CTRL standard chow group; high fat diet low carbohydrates group (HFD and HFD plus daily oral 20U insulin gavage (HFD+INS. Weight and food consumption were weekly obtained. After eight weeks, fasting blood samples were collected for laboratorial analysis. After euthanasia gut samples were isolated. Results: Rat oral insulin treatment decreased body weight gain (p<0,001, fasting glucose and triglycerides serum levels (p<0,05 an increased intestinal weight of distal ileum (P<0,05. Animal submitted to high fat diet presented higher levels of HOMA-IR although significant difference to CT was not achieved. HOMA-beta were significantly higher (p<0.05 in HFD+INS. Visceral fat was 10% lower in HFD+INS but the difference was not significant. Conclusions: In non-diabetic obese rats, oral insulin improves metabolic malfunction associated to rescue of beta-cell activity.

  18. Oral Delivery of Protein Drugs Bioencapsulated in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry

    2016-08-01

    Plants cells are now approved by the FDA for cost-effective production of protein drugs (PDs) in large-scale current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) hydroponic growth facilities. In lyophilized plant cells, PDs are stable at ambient temperature for several years, maintaining their folding and efficacy. Upon oral delivery, PDs bioencapsulated in plant cells are protected in the stomach from acids and enzymes but are subsequently released into the gut lumen by microbes that digest the plant cell wall. The large mucosal area of the human intestine offers an ideal system for oral drug delivery. When tags (receptor-binding proteins or cell-penetrating peptides) are fused to PDs, they efficiently cross the intestinal epithelium and are delivered to the circulatory or immune system. Unique tags to deliver PDs to human immune or nonimmune cells have been developed recently. After crossing the epithelium, ubiquitous proteases cleave off tags at engineered sites. PDs are also delivered to the brain or retina by crossing the blood-brain or retinal barriers. This review highlights recent advances in PD delivery to treat Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, hypertension, Gaucher's or ocular diseases, as well as the development of affordable drugs by eliminating prohibitively expensive purification, cold chain and sterile delivery.

  19. Development and evaluation of mucoadhesive nanoparticles based on thiolated Eudragit for oral delivery of protein drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zhijie; Hu, Xi; Zhang, Ling; Li, Feng; Li, Meimei; Tang, Xing; Xiao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop pH-sensitive Eudragit L100–cysteine/reduced glutathione (Eul–cys/GSH) nanoparticles (NPs), which provided the mucoadhesion and protection for protein drugs against enzymatic degradation. Insulin was chosen as a model biomolecule for testing this system. The Eul–cys conjugate, which was obtained by grafting cysteine onto the carboxy group of Eudragit L100, was analyzed by HNMR and SEM, and the swelling degree (SD), cation binding, and enzymatic inhibition were also determined. The results obtained showed that the Eul–cys conjugate represent a pH-sensitive delivery system which effectively protected the insulin from being degraded by the proteases, and this is related to the mechanism of Ca 2+ binding. Insulin-loaded Eul–cys/GSH NPs were prepared by a diffusion method involving an electrostatic interaction between the network structure of the polymer and the embedded proteins, including insulin and GSH. TEM images indicated that Eul–cys/GSH existed as smooth and spherical NPs in aqueous solution with particle sizes of 260 ± 20 nm. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) findings showed the presence of amorphous insulin in thiolated NPs and higher free thiol oxidation than the result obtained by Ellman’s reagent method. In addition, thiolated NPs showed excellent binding efficiency to the mucin in rat intestine, indicating that Eul–cys/GSH NPs have great potential to be applied as safe carriers for the oral administration of protein drugs

  20. Development and evaluation of mucoadhesive nanoparticles based on thiolated Eudragit for oral delivery of protein drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan [Shenyang University, Normal College (China); Yang, Zhijie; Hu, Xi; Zhang, Ling [Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Department of Pharmaceutics (China); Li, Feng; Li, Meimei [Shenyang University, Normal College (China); Tang, Xing [Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Department of Pharmaceutics (China); Xiao, Wei, E-mail: wzhzh-nj@tom.com [Jiangsu Kanion Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd (China)

    2015-02-15

    The objective of this study was to develop pH-sensitive Eudragit L100–cysteine/reduced glutathione (Eul–cys/GSH) nanoparticles (NPs), which provided the mucoadhesion and protection for protein drugs against enzymatic degradation. Insulin was chosen as a model biomolecule for testing this system. The Eul–cys conjugate, which was obtained by grafting cysteine onto the carboxy group of Eudragit L100, was analyzed by HNMR and SEM, and the swelling degree (SD), cation binding, and enzymatic inhibition were also determined. The results obtained showed that the Eul–cys conjugate represent a pH-sensitive delivery system which effectively protected the insulin from being degraded by the proteases, and this is related to the mechanism of Ca{sup 2+} binding. Insulin-loaded Eul–cys/GSH NPs were prepared by a diffusion method involving an electrostatic interaction between the network structure of the polymer and the embedded proteins, including insulin and GSH. TEM images indicated that Eul–cys/GSH existed as smooth and spherical NPs in aqueous solution with particle sizes of 260 ± 20 nm. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) findings showed the presence of amorphous insulin in thiolated NPs and higher free thiol oxidation than the result obtained by Ellman’s reagent method. In addition, thiolated NPs showed excellent binding efficiency to the mucin in rat intestine, indicating that Eul–cys/GSH NPs have great potential to be applied as safe carriers for the oral administration of protein drugs.

  1. Development and evaluation of mucoadhesive nanoparticles based on thiolated Eudragit for oral delivery of protein drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zhijie; Hu, Xi; Zhang, Ling; Li, Feng; Li, Meimei; Tang, Xing; Xiao, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop pH-sensitive Eudragit L100-cysteine/reduced glutathione (Eul-cys/GSH) nanoparticles (NPs), which provided the mucoadhesion and protection for protein drugs against enzymatic degradation. Insulin was chosen as a model biomolecule for testing this system. The Eul-cys conjugate, which was obtained by grafting cysteine onto the carboxy group of Eudragit L100, was analyzed by HNMR and SEM, and the swelling degree (SD), cation binding, and enzymatic inhibition were also determined. The results obtained showed that the Eul-cys conjugate represent a pH-sensitive delivery system which effectively protected the insulin from being degraded by the proteases, and this is related to the mechanism of Ca2+ binding. Insulin-loaded Eul-cys/GSH NPs were prepared by a diffusion method involving an electrostatic interaction between the network structure of the polymer and the embedded proteins, including insulin and GSH. TEM images indicated that Eul-cys/GSH existed as smooth and spherical NPs in aqueous solution with particle sizes of 260 ± 20 nm. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) findings showed the presence of amorphous insulin in thiolated NPs and higher free thiol oxidation than the result obtained by Ellman's reagent method. In addition, thiolated NPs showed excellent binding efficiency to the mucin in rat intestine, indicating that Eul-cys/GSH NPs have great potential to be applied as safe carriers for the oral administration of protein drugs.

  2. Increased Incretin But Not Insulin Response after Oral versus Intravenous Branched Chain Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojda, Jan; Straková, Radka; Plíhalová, Andrea; Tůma, Petr; Potočková, Jana; Polák, Jan; Anděl, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are known to exert an insulinotropic effect. Whether this effect is mediated by incretins (glucagon like peptide 1 [GLP-1] or glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide [GIP]) is not known. The aim of this study was to show whether an equivalent dose of BCAA elicits a greater insulin and incretin response when administered orally than intravenously (IV). Eighteen healthy, male subjects participated in 3 tests: IV application of BCAA solution, oral ingestion of BCAA and placebo in an equivalent dose (30.7 ± 1.1 g). Glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, GIP, valine, leucine and isoleucine concentrations were measured. Rise in serum BCAA was achieved in both BCAA tests, with incremental areas under the curve (iAUC) being 2.1 times greater for IV BCAA compared with those of the oral BCAA test (p BCAA induced comparable insulin response greater than placebo (240 min insulin iAUC: oral 3,411 ± 577 vs. IV 2,361 ± 384 vs. placebo 961.2 ± 175 pmol/L, p = 0.0006). Oral BCAA induced higher GLP-1 (p BCAA tests with no change in the placebo group. An equivalent dose of BCAA elicited a comparable insulin and greater incretin response when administered orally and not when administered through IV. We conclude that insulinotropic effects of BCAA are partially incretin dependent. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Oral heparin delivery: design and in vivo evaluation of a stomach-targeted mucoadhesive delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Thierry; Leitner, Verena M; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2005-05-01

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is an agent of choice in the anti-coagulant therapy and prophylaxis of thrombosis and coronary syndromes. However, the therapeutic use is partially limited due to a poor oral bioavailability. It was therefore the aim of this study to design and evaluate a highly efficient stomach-targeted oral delivery system for LMWH. In order to appraise the influence of the molecular weight on the oral bioavailability, mini-tablets comprising 3 kDa (279 IU) and 6 kDa (300 IU) LMWH, respectively, were generated and tested in vivo in rats. The potential of the test formulations based on thiolated polycarbophil, was evaluated in comparison to hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) as control carrier matrix. The plasma levels of LMWH after oral versus subcutaneous administration were determined in order to calculate the relative bioavailability. With the delivery system containing 3 kDa LMWH (279 IU) a relative bioavailability of 19.1% was achieved, offering a significantly (p thiolated polymers are a promising tool for the non-invasive stomach-targeted systemic delivery of LMWH as model for a hydrophilic macromolecular polysaccharide. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  4. Closed-loop controlled noninvasive ultrasonic glucose sensing and insulin delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Joo; Werner, Jacob; Jaiswal, Devina; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2010-03-01

    To prevent complications in diabetes, the proper management of blood glucose levels is essential. Previously, ultrasonic transdermal methods using a light-weight cymbal transducer array has been studied for noninvasive methods of insulin delivery for Type-1 diabetes and glucose level monitoring. In this study, the ultrasound systems of insulin delivery and glucose sensing have been combined by a feedback controller. This study was designed to show the feasibility of the feedback controlled ultrasound system for the noninvasive glucose control. For perspective human application, in vivo experiments were performed on large animals that have a similar size to humans. Four in vivo experiments were performed using about 200 lbs pigs. The cymbal array of 3×3 pattern has been used for insulin delivery at 30 kHz with the spatial-peak temporal-peak intensity (Isptp) of 100 mW/cm2. For glucose sensing, a 2×2 array was operated at 20 kHz with Isptp = 100 mW/cm2. Based on the glucose level determined by biosensors after the ultrasound exposure, the ultrasound system for the insulin delivery was automatically operated. The glucose level of 115 mg/dl was set as a reference value for operating the insulin delivery system. For comparison, the glucose levels of blood samples collected from the ear vein were measured by a commercial glucose meter. Using the ultrasound system operated by the close-loop, feed-back controller, the glucose levels of four pigs were determined every 20 minutes and continuously controlled for 120 minutes. In comparison to the commercial glucose meter, the glucose levels determined by the biosensor were slightly higher. The results of in vivo experiments indicate the feasibility of the feedback controlled ultrasound system using the cymbal array for noninvasive glucose sensing and insulin delivery. Further studies on the extension of the glucose control will be continued for the effective method of glucose control.

  5. Delivery of bioactive peptides and proteins across oral (buccal) mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senel, S; Kremer, M; Nagy, K; Squier, C

    2001-06-01

    The identification of an increasing array of highly potent, endogenous peptide and protein factors termed cytokines, that can be efficiently synthesized using recombinant DNA technology, offers exciting new approaches for drug therapy. However, the physico-chemical and biological properties of these agents impose limitations in formulation and development of optimum drug delivery systems as well as on the routes of delivery. Oral mucosa, including the lining of the cheek (buccal mucosa), floor of mouth and underside of tongue (sublingual mucosa) and gingival mucosa, has received much attention in the last decade because it offers excellent accessibility, is not easily traumatized and avoids degradation of proteins and peptides that occurs as a result of oral administration, gastrointestinal absorption and first-pass hepatic metabolism. Peptide absorption occurs across oral mucosa by passive diffusion and it is unlikely that there is a carrier-mediated transport mechanism. The principal pathway is probably via the intercellular route where the major permeability barrier is represented by organized array of neutral lipids in the superficial layers of the epithelium. The relative role of aqueous as opposed to the lipid pathway in drug transport is still under investigation; penetration is not necessarily enhanced by simply increasing lipophilicity, for other effects, such as charge and molecular size, also play an important role in absorption of peptide and protein drugs. Depending on the pharmacodynamics of the peptides, various oral mucosal delivery systems can be designed. Delivery of peptide/protein drugs by conventional means such as solutions has some limitations. The possibility of excluding a major part of drug from absorption by involuntary swallowing and the continuous dilution due to salivary flow limits a controlled release. However these limitations can be overcome by adhesive dosage forms such as gels, films, tablets, and patches. They can localize the

  6. A sophisticated programmable miniaturised pump for insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, J C; Slama, G

    1980-09-01

    We have conceived a truly pre-programmable infusion system usable for intravenous administration of insulin in diabetic subjects. The original system has been built into a small, commercially available, syringe-pump of which only the case and the mechanical parts have been kept. The computing until has a timer, a programmable memory of 512 words by 8 bits and a digital-to-frequency converter to run the motor which drives the syringe. The memory contains 8 profiles of insulin injections stored in digital form over 64 words. Each profile is selected by the patient before eating according to the carbohydrate content of the planned meal and last about two hours, starting from and returning to the basal rate of insulin, at which it remains until next profile selection. Amount, profiles and duration of insulin injection are either mean values deduced from previous studies with a closed-loop artificial pancreas or personally fitted values; they are stored in an instantly replaceable memory cell. This device allows the patient to choose the time, nature and amount of his food intake.

  7. Brain delivery of insulin boosted by intranasal coadministration with cell-penetrating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-01-10

    Intranasal administration is considered as an alternative route to enable effective drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) by bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Several reports have proved that macromolecules can be transferred directly from the nasal cavity to the brain. However, strategies to enhance the delivery of macromolecules from the nasal cavity to CNS are needed because of their low delivery efficiencies via this route in general. We hypothesized that the delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain parenchyma can be facilitated by increasing the uptake of drugs by the nasal epithelium including supporting and neuronal cells to maximize the potentiality of the intranasal pathway. To test this hypothesis, the CNS-related model peptide insulin was intranasally coadministered with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin to mice. As a result, insulin coadministered with l- or d-penetratin reached the distal regions of the brain from the nasal cavity, including the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem. In particular, d-penetratin could intranasally deliver insulin to the brain with a reduced risk of systemic insulin exposure. Thus, the results obtained in this study suggested that CPPs are potential tools for the brain delivery of peptide- and protein-based pharmaceuticals via intranasal administration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of adrenomedullin gene delivery on insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Y. Henein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is one of the common metabolic disorders that ultimately afflicts large number of individuals. Adrenomedullin (AM is a potent vasodilator peptide; previous studies reported development of insulin resistance in aged AM deficient mice. In this study, we employed a gene delivery approach to explore its potential role in insulin resistance. Four groups were included: control, diabetic, non-diabetic injected with the AM gene and diabetic injected with the AM gene. One week following gene delivery, serum glucose, insulin, triglycerides, leptin, adiponectin and corticosterone were measured as well as the insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR. Soleus muscle glucose uptake and RT-PCR of both AM and glucose transporter-4 (GLUT 4 gene expressions were assessed. A single tail vein injection of adrenomedullin gene in type 2 diabetic rats improved skeletal muscle insulin responsiveness with significant improvement of soleus muscle glucose uptake, HOMA-IR, serum glucose, insulin and triglycerides and significant increase in muscle GLUT 4 gene expression (P < 0.05 compared with the non-injected diabetic rats. The beneficial effects of AM gene delivery were accompanied by a significant increase in the serum level of adiponectin (2.95 ± 0.09 versus 2.33 ± 0.17 μg/ml in the non-injected diabetic group as well as a significant decrease in leptin and corticosterone levels (7.51 ± 0.51 and 262.88 ± 10.34 versus 10.63 ± 1.4 and 275.86 ± 11.19 ng/ml respectively in the non-injected diabetic group. The conclusion of the study is that AM gene delivery can improve insulin resistance and may have significant therapeutic applications in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  9. A Journey to Improved Inpatient Glycemic Control by Redesigning Meal Delivery and Insulin Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Martha; Ferguson, Allison; Fields, Willa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement project was to redesign a hospital meal delivery process in order to shorten the time between blood glucose monitoring and corresponding insulin administration and improve glycemic control. This process change redesigned the workflow of the dietary and nursing departments. Modifications included nursing, rather than dietary, delivering meal trays to patients receiving insulin. Dietary marked the appropriate meal trays and phoned each unit prior to arrival on the unit. The process change was trialed on 2 acute care units prior to implementation hospital wide. Elapsed time between blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration was analyzed before and after process change as well as evaluation of glucometrics: percentage of patients with blood glucose between 70 and 180 mg/dL (percent perfect), blood glucose greater than 300 mg/dL (extreme hyperglycemia), and blood glucose less than 70 mg/dL (hypoglycemia). Percent perfect glucose results improved from 45% to 53%, extreme hyperglycemia (blood glucose >300 mg/dL) fell from 11.7% to 5%. Hypoglycemia demonstrated a downward trend line, demonstrating that with improving glycemic control hypoglycemia rates did not increase. Percentage of patients receiving meal insulin within 30 minutes of blood glucose check increased from 35% to 73%. In the hospital, numerous obstacles were present that interfered with on-time meal insulin delivery. Establishing a meal delivery process with the nurse performing the premeal blood glucose check, delivering the meal, and administering the insulin improves overall blood glucose control. Nurse-led process improvement of blood glucose monitoring, meal tray delivery, and insulin administration does lead to improved glycemic control for the inpatient population.

  10. Fabrication and loading of microcontainers for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ritika Singh

    is an important loop diuretic drug with low solubility and permeability is used as a model drug and embedded in a PCL matrix. The crystallinity of the drug is tailored by the process parameters of spin coating. Release profiles ranging from rapid burst release to sustained zero-order release are obtained......Oral drug delivery is considered as the most patient compliant delivery route. However, it faces many obstacles, especially due to the ever-increasing number of drugs that are poorly soluble and barely absorbed in the gastro-intestinal tract. Moreover, drugs can degrade in the harsh acidic...... in this project. This process utilizes a stamp in connection with the ability to apply heat and pressure to transfer the stamp pattern to a film. Processes have been optimized for fabrication of nickel stamps with two layered, high aspect ratio microstructures. Bosch deep reactive ion etching of Silicon producing...

  11. Radioimmunoassay of Plasma Insulin during Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Thyrotoxicosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-03-15

    Blood glucose and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) were measured during oral glucose tolerance test in 15 thyrotoxic patients and 8 normal controls, to study the glucose metabolism in thyrotoxicosis. Following were the results;1) In thyrotoxicosis, there is noticed late rise and late fall of plasma IRI during oral glucose tolerance test, like as phenomenon of mild diabetes mellitus. 2) When the thyrotoxic patients were divided into normal and abnormal responsive groups after the level of blood glucose by Wilkerson Criteria, no significant difference in plasma IRI levels were noticed between two groups. 3) This result may be interpreted as relative deficiency of insulin secretion from panaceas and suggest genetically related defects.

  12. Emerging technologies to achieve oral delivery of GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwu Ma

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 is a gastrointestinal (GI peptide hormone that stimulates insulin secretion, gene expression and β-cell proliferation, representing a potentially novel and promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of T2DM. DPP-IV-resistant, long-acting GLP-1 analogs have already been approved by FDA as injectable drugs for treating patients with T2DM. Oral delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins would be preferred owing to advantages of lower cost, ease of administration and greater patient adherence. However, oral delivery of proteins can be affected by rapid enzymatic degradation in the GI tract and poor penetration across the intestinal membrane, which may require amounts that exceed practical consideration. Various production strategies have been explored to overcome challenges associated with the oral delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the current state of progress made towards the oral delivery of GLP-1 and its analogs in the treatment of T2DM, with special emphasis on the development of plant and food-grade bacterial delivery systems. Recently, genetically engineered plants and food-grade bacteria have been increasingly explored as novel carrier systems for the oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs. These have a largely unexplored potential to serve both as an expression system and as a delivery vehicle for clinically relevant, cost effective therapeutics. As such, they hold great promise for human biopharmaceuticals and novel therapies against various diseases.

  13. Novel simple insulin delivery device reduces barriers to insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes: results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Norbert; Lilly, Leslie C; Mader, Julia K; Aberer, Felix; Ribitsch, Anja; Kojzar, Harald; Warner, Jay; Pieber, Thomas R

    2015-05-01

    The PaQ® insulin delivery system is a simple-to-use patch-on device that provides preset basal rates and bolus insulin on demand. In addition to feasibility of use, safety, and efficacy (reported elsewhere), this study analyzed the impact of PaQ on patient-reported outcomes, including barriers to insulin treatment, diabetes-related distress, and attitudes toward insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes on a stable multiple daily injection (MDI) regimen. This single-center, open-label, single-arm study comprised three 2-week periods: baseline (MDI), transition from MDI to PaQ, and PaQ treatment. Validated questionnaires were administered during the baseline and PaQ treatment periods: Barriers to Insulin Treatment questionnaire (BIT), Insulin Treatment Appraisal Scale (ITAS), and Problem Areas in Diabetes scale (PAID). Eighteen patients (age 59 ± 5 years, diabetes duration 15 ± 7 years, 21% female, HbA1c 7.7 ± 0.7%) completed the questionnaires. There was a strong, significant effect of PaQ use in mean BIT total scores (difference [D] = -5.4 ± 0.7.7, P = .01, effect size [d] = 0.70). Patients perceived less stigmatization by insulin injection (D = -2.2 ± 6.2, P = .18, d = 0.35), increased positive outcome (D = 1.9 ± 6.6, P = .17, d = 0.29), and less fear of injections (1.3 ± 4.8, P = .55, d = 0.28). Mean change in ITAS scores after PaQ device use showed a nonsignificant improvement of 1.71 ± 5.63 but moderate effect size (d = 0.30, P = .14). No increase in PAID scores was seen. The results and moderate to large effects sizes suggest that PaQ device use has beneficial and clinically relevant effects to overcoming barriers to and negative appraisal of insulin treatment, without increasing other diabetes-related distress. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  14. Formulation of two-layer dissolving polymeric microneedle patches for insulin transdermal delivery in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Chi; Lin, Wei-Ming; Shu, Jwu-Ching; Tsai, Shau-Wei; Chen, Chih-Hao; Tsai, Meng-Tsan

    2017-01-01

    Dissolving microneedles (MNs) display high efficiency in delivering poorly permeable drugs and vaccines. Here, two-layer dissolving polymeric MN patches composed of gelatin and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were fabricated with a two-step casting and centrifuging process to localize the insulin in the needle and achieve efficient transdermal delivery of insulin. In vitro skin insertion capability was determined by staining with tissue-marking dye after insertion, and the real-time penetration depth was monitored using optical coherence tomography. Confocal microscopy images revealed that the rhodamine 6G and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled insulin (insulin-FITC) can gradually diffuse from the puncture sites to deeper tissue. Ex vivo drug-release profiles showed that 50% of the insulin was released and penetrated across the skin after 1 h, and the cumulative permeation reached 80% after 5 h. In vivo and pharmacodynamic studies were then conducted to estimate the feasibility of the administration of insulin-loaded dissolving MN patches on diabetic mice for glucose regulation. The total area above the glucose level versus time curve as an index of hypoglycemic effect was 128.4 ± 28.3 (% h) at 0.25 IU/kg. The relative pharmacologic availability and relative bioavailability (RBA) of insulin from MN patches were 95.6 and 85.7%, respectively. This study verified that the use of gelatin/CMC MN patches for insulin delivery achieved a satisfactory RBA compared to traditional hypodermic injection and presented a promising device to deliver poorly permeable protein drugs for diabetic therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 84-93, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Solidified self-nanoemulsifying formulation for oral delivery of combinatorial therapeutic regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Amit K; Thanki, Kaushik; Jain, Sanyog

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present work reports rationalized development and characterization of solidified self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for oral delivery of combinatorial (tamoxifen and quercetin) therapeutic regimen. METHODS: Suitable oil for the preparation of liquid SNEDDS was selected based...

  16. Physiological parameters for oral delivery and in vitro testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudie, Deanna M; Amidon, Gordon L; Amidon, Gregory E

    2010-10-04

    Pharmaceutical solid oral dosage forms must undergo dissolution in the intestinal fluids of the gastrointestinal tract before they can be absorbed and reach the systemic circulation. Therefore, dissolution is a critical part of the drug-delivery process. The rate and extent of drug dissolution and absorption depend on the characteristics of the active ingredient as well as properties of the dosage form. Just as importantly, characteristics of the physiological environment such as buffer species, pH, bile salts, gastric emptying rate, intestinal motility, and hydrodynamics can significantly impact dissolution and absorption. While significant progress has been made since 1970 when the first compendial dissolution test was introduced (USP apparatus 1), current dissolution testing does not take full advantage of the extensive physiologic information that is available. For quality control purposes, where the question is one of lot-to-lot consistency in performance, using nonphysiologic test conditions that match drug and dosage form properties with practical dissolution media and apparatus may be appropriate. However, where in vitro-in vivo correlations are desired, it is logical to consider and utilize knowledge of the in vivo condition. This publication critically reviews the literature that is relevant to oral human drug delivery. Physiologically relevant information must serve as a basis for the design of dissolution test methods and systems that are more representative of the human condition. As in vitro methods advance in their physiological relevance, better in vitro-in vivo correlations will be possible. This will, in turn, lead to in vitro systems that can be utilized to more effectively design dosage forms that have improved and more consistent oral bioperformance.

  17. Insulin secretion and incretin hormones after oral glucose in non-obese subjects with impaired glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, E; Olsson, T; Söderberg, S

    2004-01-01

    of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, GLP-1, and GIP. Insulin secretion (TIS) and insulin sensitivity (OGIS) were assessed using models describing the relationship between glucose, insulin and C-peptide data. These models allowed estimation also of the hepatic extraction of insulin. The age (54.2 +/- 9.7 [mean......Subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are usually overweight and exhibit insulin resistance with a defective compensation of insulin secretion. In this study, we sought to establish the interrelation between insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity after oral glucose in non-obese subjects...... over the whole 180-minute period was higher in IGT (26.2 +/- 2.4 v 20.0 +/- 2.0 nmol/L; P =.035). Hepatic insulin extraction correlated linearly with OGIS (r = 0.71; P

  18. Orally active insulin mimics: where do we stand now?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    phosphatase; PDGFR, platelet-derived growth factor receptor. J. Biosci. | Vol. 26 | No. ..... that of insulin with the additional benefits of the com- pound's action as an .... being carried out along with a strategy for conversion of the peptide and ...

  19. Drug delivery from the oral cavity: a focus on mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkar, Dattatraya Manohar; Dhake, Avinash Sridhar; Setty, Chitral Mallikarjuna

    2012-01-01

    Since the early 1980s the concept of mucoadhesion has gained considerable interest in pharmaceutical technology. The various advantages associated with these systems made buccal drug delivery as a novel route of drug administration. It prolongs the residence time of the dosage form at the site of application. These systems remain in close contact with the absorption tissue, the mucous membrane, and thus contribute to improved and/or better therapeutic performance of the drug and of both local and systemic effects. This review highlights the anatomy and structure of oral mucosa, mechanism and theories of mucoadhesion, factors affecting mucoadhesion, characteristics and properties of desired mucoadhesive polymers, various types of dosage forms, and general considerations in design of mucoadhesive buccal dosage forms, permeation enhancers, and evaluation methods. Over the past few decades the mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery system has received a great deal of attention to develop mucoadhesive dosage forms to enable the prolonged retention at the site of action, providing a controlled release of drug for improved therapeutic outcome. Mucoadhesive drug delivery gives facility to include a permeation enhancer/enzyme inhibitor or pHmodifier in the formulation and versatility in designing as multidirectional or unidirectional release systems for local and systemic action. Local delivery to tissues of the oral cavity has a number of applications, including treatment of local conditions such as periodontal disease, bacterial and fungal infections, and aphthous stomatitis and vesiculo bullous diseases. For the treatment of chronic diseases, the mucoadhesive buccal drug delivery system allows easily accessibility and is generally well-accepted for administeringdrugs by systemic action.

  20. Closed-Loop Noninvasive Ultrasound Glucose Sensing and Insulin Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    mechanism suggests that ultrasound interacts with the structured lipids within the intracellular channels of the stratum corneum to permeabilize the...R. Prausnitz, “Mechanism of intracellular delivery by acoustic cavitation ,” Ultrasound Med. Biol. 32, 915–924 2006. 14E. Maione, K. K. Shung, R. J...result of cavitation (11– 14). Low frequency ultrasound is capable of generating microbubbles in the water and tissue. These bubbles allow water

  1. A self-adherent, bullet-shaped microneedle patch for controlled transdermal delivery of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Keum-Yong; Seo, Min-Soo; Hwang, Dae Youn; O'Cearbhaill, Eoin D; Sreenan, Seamus; Karp, Jeffrey M; Yang, Seung Yun

    2017-11-10

    Proteins are important biologic therapeutics used for the treatment of various diseases. However, owing to low bioavailability and poor skin permeability, transdermal delivery of protein therapeutics poses a significant challenge. Here, we present a new approach for transdermal protein delivery using bullet-shaped double-layered microneedle (MN) arrays with water-swellable tips. This design enabled the MNs to mechanically interlock with soft tissues by selective distal swelling after skin insertion. Additionally, prolonged release of loaded proteins by passive diffusion through the swollen tips was obtained. The bullet-shaped MNs provided an optimal geometry for mechanical interlocking, thereby achieving significant adhesion strength (~1.6Ncm -2 ) with rat skin. By harnessing the MN's reversible swelling/deswelling property, insulin, a model protein drug, was loaded in the swellable tips using a mild drop/dry procedure. The insulin-loaded MN patch released 60% of insulin when immersed in saline over the course of 12h and approximately 70% of the released insulin appeared to have preserved structural integrity. An in vivo pilot study showed a prolonged release of insulin from swellable MN patches, leading to a gradual decrease in blood glucose levels. This self-adherent transdermal MN platform can be applied to a variety of protein drugs requiring sustained release kinetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Oral Hypoglycemic Agents Added to Insulin Monotherapy for Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Rimke C.; Rutten, Guy E.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical Question: Among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who do not achieve optimal glycemic control with insulin monotherapy, is the addition of oral hypoglycemic agents associated with benefits (measured by lowering of hemoglobin A1c) or adverse effects? Bottom Line: Adding a sulfonylurea

  3. [Enhancing effect of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I modified liposomes on oral insulin absorption in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Ping, Qi-neng; Xu, Wen-fang

    2004-12-01

    To investigate the enhancing effect on insulin absorption through GI. tract in mice by using the Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA1) modified liposomes as the carrier. UEA1 modified phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was prepared by conjugating method of 1-ethyl-3-(3'-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC), then the modified compound (PE-UEA1) was incorporated into the conventional liposomes of insulin to obtain UEA1 modified liposomes. The agglutination test was performed to examine the UEA1 biological activities after synthesis and modification. When liposomes were applied to healthy mice or diabetic mice at insulin dose of 350 u x kg(-1) orally, the hypoglycemic effect was investigated according to the blood glucose level determination. The blood glucose levels of the healthy mice reduced by UEA1 modified liposomes were (84 +/- 15)% at 4 h, (78 +/- 11)% at 8 h and (90 +/- 12)% at 12 h after oral administration. The conventional liposomes and saline showed no effect. The blood glucose levels of the diabetic mice reduced by UEA1 modified liposomes were (73 +/- 7)% at 4 h, (74 +/- 9)% at 8 h, (86 +/- 9)% at 12 h after oral administration. The UEA1 modified liposomes promote the oral absorption of insulin due to the specific-site combination on M cell membrane.

  4. Oral hypoglycaemic agents, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Lund, Søren S; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    This article is a narrative review of the current evidence of the effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) of oral hypoglycaemic agents that increase insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In overweight T2D patients, metformin has been demonstrated to reduce CVD risk, and this......This article is a narrative review of the current evidence of the effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) of oral hypoglycaemic agents that increase insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In overweight T2D patients, metformin has been demonstrated to reduce CVD risk......, and this beneficial effect may be conserved with the combination of metformin and insulin treatment. However, the effect of glitazones on CVD is uncertain. There is conflicting evidence from large randomized trials to support a protective effect against CVD of lowering blood glucose per se but a systematic review...

  5. Insulin response to oral glucose in healthy, lean young women and patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Ganie, Mohammed Ashraf; Praveen, Edavan Pulikkanath; Gupta, Nandita; Lal Khurana, Madan; Seith, Ashu; Dwivedi, Sadanand N; Kumar, Guresh; Ammini, Ariachery C

    2008-11-01

    Insulin resistance and consequent hyperinsulinemia are common among patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Ethnicity and dietary habits affect insulin levels. There is little published information from India on insulin levels in PCOS patients. Thus the present study aimed to determine the insulin response to oral glucose in women with PCOS and healthy women. In a case-control study design, women with PCOS and lean healthy women without a family history of diabetes mellitus underwent oral glucose tolerance testing. Samples were collected at 0, 1 and 2 h after glucose ingestion. Two hundred and eighty-five women with PCOS and 27 lean healthy young women were enrolled into the study. The mean age of controls was 22.8 +/- 4.5 years (range 15-32 years) and their mean body mass index (BMI) was 19.7 +/- 2.6 kg/m(2). Mean blood glucose at 0, 1 and 2 h was 88.2 +/- 7.2, 115.5 +/- 25.5 and 91.8 +/- 20.5 mg/dl, respectively. Corresponding plasma insulin levels were 5.8 +/- 1.1, 32.7 +/- 26.5 and 14.6 +/- 9.6 mIU/l. Peak insulin levels were seen at 1 h and these came down to less than 40% of the peak value by 2 h. Glucose/insulin ratio at 0, 1 and 2 h was 15.6 +/- 3.1, 7.0 +/- 3.1 and 11.4 +/- 7.0. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was 1.2 +/- 0.2. The age of the PCOS women ranged from 15 to 40 years (mean 23.4 +/- 6.2 years) and their BMI ranged from 16.4 to 50.4 kg/m(2) (mean 27.7 +/- 6.3 kg/m(2)). One hundred and seventy-six (62%) PCOS patients had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 39 (14%) had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), 49 (17%) had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and 21 (7%) had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Insulin response was higher in women with PCOS. Peak insulin was observed at 1 h. The difference between 1-h and 2-h post-glucose insulin decreased with worsening glucose tolerance. Both plasma insulin and BMI showed a rising trend from NGT to IFG to IGT. There was no further increase in either insulin or BMI from IGT to T2DM

  6. Solid lipid nanoparticles as insulin inhalation carriers for enhanced pulmonary delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Ru; Shao, Wei; Wang, Qun; Zhang, Na

    2009-02-01

    Growing attentions have been paid to the pulmonary route for systemic delivery of peptide and protein drugs, such as insulin. Advantages of this non-injective route include rapid drug deposition in the target organ, fewer systemic side effects and avoiding first pass metabolism. However, sustained release formulations for pulmonary delivery have not been fully exploited till now. In our study, a novel dry powder inhalation (DPI) system of insulin loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (Ins-SLNs) was investigated for prolonged drug release, improved stability and effective inhalation. Firstly, the drug was incorporated into the lipid carriers for a maximum entrapment efficiency as high as 69.47 +/- 3.27% (n = 3). Secondly, DPI formulation was prepared by spray freeze drying of Ins-SLNs suspension, with optimized lyoprotectant and technique parameters in this procedure. The properties of DPI particles were characterized for their pulmonary delivery potency. Thirdly, the in vivo study of intratracheal instillation of Ins-SLNs to diabetic rats showed prolonged hypoglycemic effect and a relative pharmacological bioavailability of 44.40% could be achieved in the group of 8 IU/kg dosage. These results indicated that SLNs have shown increasing potential as an efficient and non-toxic lipophilic colloidal drug carrier for enhanced pulmonary delivery of insulin.

  7. The Oral Health Care Delivery System in 2040: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailit, Howard L

    2017-09-01

    This executive summary for Section 4 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century" project examines the projected oral health care delivery system in 2040 and the likely impact of system changes on dental education. Dental care is at an early stage of major changes with the decline in solo practice and increase in large group practices. These groups are not consolidated at the state level, but further consolidation is expected as they try to increase their negotiating leverage with dental insurers. At this time, there is limited integration of medical and dental care in terms of financing, regulation, education, and delivery. This pattern may change as health maintenance organizations and integrated medical systems begin to offer dental care to their members. By 2040, it is expected that many dentists will be employed in large group practices and working with allied dental staff with expanded duties and other health professionals, and more dental graduates will seek formal postdoctoral training to obtain better positions in group practices.

  8. Oral delivery of capsaicin using MPEG-PCL nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Jiang, Xin-yi; Zhu, Yuan; Omari-Siaw, E; Deng, Wen-wen; Yu, Jiang-nan; Xu, Xi-ming; Zhang, Wei-ming

    2015-01-01

    To prepare a biodegradable polymeric carrier for oral delivery of a water-insoluble drug capsaicin (CAP) and evaluate its quality. CAP-loaded methoxy poly (ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles (CAP/NPs) were prepared using a modified emulsification solvent diffusion technique. The quality of CAP/NPs were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared techniques. A dialysis method was used to analyze the in vitro release profile of CAP from the CAP/NPs. Adult male rats were orally administered CAP/NPs (35 mg/kg), and the plasma concentrations of CAP were measured with a validated HPLC method. The morphology of rat gastric mucosa was studied with HE staining. CAP/NPs had an average diameter of 82.54 ± 0.51 nm, high drug-loading capacity of 14.0% ± 0.13% and high stability. CAP/NPs showed a biphasic release profile in vitro: the burst release was less than 25% of the loaded drug within 12 h followed by a more sustained release for 60 h. The pharmacokinetics study showed that the mean maximum plasma concentration was observed 4 h after oral administered of CAP/NPs, and approximately 90 ng/mL of CAP was detected in serum after 36 h. The area under the curve for the CAP/NPs group was approximately 6-fold higher than that for raw CAP suspension. Histological studies showed that CAP/NPs markedly reduced CAP-caused gastric mucosa irritation. CAP/NPs significantly enhance the bioavailability of CAP and markedly reduce gastric mucosa irritation in rats.

  9. Plant-based vaccines for oral delivery of type 1 diabetes-related autoantigens: Evaluating oral tolerance mechanisms and disease prevention in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posgai, Amanda L; Wasserfall, Clive H; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry; Schatz, Desmond A; Atkinson, Mark A

    2017-02-13

    Autoantigen-specific immunological tolerance represents a central objective for prevention of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Previous studies demonstrated mucosal antigen administration results in expansion of Foxp3 + and LAP + regulatory T cells (Tregs), suggesting oral delivery of self-antigens might represent an effective means for modulating autoimmune disease. Early preclinical experiments using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model reported mucosal administration of T1D-related autoantigens [proinsulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD)] delayed T1D onset, but published data are conflicting regarding dose, treatment duration, requirement for combinatorial agents, and extent of efficacy. Recently, dogma was challenged in a report demonstrating oral insulin does not prevent T1D in NOD mice, possibly due to antigen digestion prior to mucosal immune exposure. We used transplastomic plants expressing proinsulin and GAD to protect the autoantigens from degradation in an oral vaccine and tested the optimal combination, dose, and treatment duration for the prevention of T1D in NOD mice. Our data suggest oral autoantigen therapy alone does not effectively influence disease incidence or result in antigen-specific tolerance assessed by IL-10 measurement and Treg frequency. A more aggressive approach involving tolerogenic cytokine administration and/or lymphocyte depletion prior to oral antigen-specific immunotherapy will likely be required to impart durable therapeutic efficacy.

  10. [Effect of oral administration of ascorbic acid on insulin sensitivity and lipid profile in obese individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Abundis, E; Pascoe-González, S; González-Ortiz, M; Mora-Martínez, J M; Cabrera-Pivaral, C E

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the effect of an oral ascorbic acid (AA) supplement on lipid profile and insulin sensitivity in obese people. A randomized double-blind clinical trial placebo controlled was performed in 16 obese male volunteers [body mass index (BMI) 30-40 kg/m2]. Eight received orally 1 g of AA daily for four weeks and the other eight volunteers received placebo by the same scheme and period of time. Before and after the pharmacological intervention were measured total cholesterol, high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, creatinine and uric acid. Low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and very-low-density-lipoprotein (VLDL) triglycerides were calculated using formulas. In order to assess insulin sensitivity before and after the intervention, the steady-state glucose (SSG) was calculated from the insulin suppression test modified with octreotide. There were not significant differences in clinical characteristics between both groups. Basal metabolic profile and SSG were similar between both groups. There were not significant differences in both groups between before and after the intervention in metabolic profile and insulin sensitivity. AA did not modify the lipid profile nor insulin sensitivity in the group of obese people studied.

  11. Core-Shell Microneedle Gel for Self-Regulated Insulin Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinqiang; Ye, Yanqi; Yu, Jicheng; Kahkoska, Anna R; Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chao; Sun, Wujin; Corder, Ria D; Chen, Zhaowei; Khan, Saad A; Buse, John B; Gu, Zhen

    2018-03-27

    A bioinspired glucose-responsive insulin delivery system for self-regulation of blood glucose levels is desirable for improving health and quality of life outcomes for patients with type 1 and advanced type 2 diabetes. Here we describe a painless core-shell microneedle array patch consisting of degradable cross-linked gel for smart insulin delivery with rapid responsiveness and excellent biocompatibility. This gel-based device can partially dissociate and subsequently release insulin when triggered by hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) generated during the oxidation of glucose by a glucose-specific enzyme covalently attached inside the gel. Importantly, the H 2 O 2 -responsive microneedles are coated with a thin-layer embedding H 2 O 2 -scavenging enzyme, thus mimicking the complementary function of enzymes in peroxisomes to protect normal tissues from injury caused by oxidative stress. Utilizing a chemically induced type 1 diabetic mouse model, we demonstrated that this smart insulin patch with a bioresponsive core and protective shell could effectively regulate the blood glucose levels within a normal range with improved biocompatibility.

  12. Glucose-Responsive Insulin Delivery by Microneedle-Array Patches Loaded with Hypoxia-Sensitive Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Gu, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the preparation of glucose-responsive vesicles (GRVs) and the fabrication of GRV-loaded microneedle-array patches for insulin delivery. The GRVs were formed of hypoxia-sensitive hyaluronic acid (HS-HA), the synthesis of which is presented in detail. We also describe the procedure to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of this smart patch in a mouse model of chemically induced type 1 diabetes through transcutaneous administration.

  13. Application of in situ polymerization for design and development of oral drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwuluka, Ndidi

    2010-12-01

    Although preformed polymers are commercially available for use in the design and development of drug delivery systems, in situ polymerization has also been employed. In situ polymerization affords the platform to tailor and optimize the drug delivery properties of polymers. This review brings to light the benefits of in situ polymerization for oral drug delivery and the possibilities it provides to overcome the challenges of oral route of administration.

  14. Application of In Situ Polymerization for Design and Development of Oral Drug Delivery Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ngwuluka, Ndidi

    2010-01-01

    Although preformed polymers are commercially available for use in the design and development of drug delivery systems, in situ polymerization has also been employed. In situ polymerization affords the platform to tailor and optimize the drug delivery properties of polymers. This review brings to light the benefits of in situ polymerization for oral drug delivery and the possibilities it provides to overcome the challenges of oral route of administration.

  15. Glucose-responsive insulin delivery for type 1 diabetes: The artificial pancreas story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bally, Lia; Thabit, Hood; Hovorka, Roman

    2018-06-15

    Insulin replacement therapy is integral to the management of type 1 diabetes, which is characterised by absolute insulin deficiency. Optimal glycaemic control, as assessed by glycated haemoglobin, and avoidance of hyper- and hypoglycaemic excursions have been shown to prevent diabetes-related complications. Insulin pump use has increased considerably over the past decade with beneficial effects on glycaemic control, quality of life and treatment satisfaction. The advent and progress of ambulatory glucose sensor technology has enabled continuous glucose monitoring based on real-time glucose levels to be integrated with insulin therapy. Low glucose and predictive low glucose suspend systems are currently used in clinical practice to mitigate against hypoglycaemia, and provide the first step towards feedback glucose control. The more advanced technology approach, an artificial pancreas or a closed-loop system, gradually increases and decreases insulin delivery in a glucose-responsive fashion to mitigate against hyper- and hypoglycaemia. Randomised outpatient clinical trials over the past 5 years have demonstrated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of the approach, and the recent FDA approval of the first single hormone closed-loop system establishes a new standard of care for people with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment duration (persistence) of basal insulin supported oral therapy (BOT) in Type-2 diabetic patients: comparison of insulin glargine with NPH insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinzler, Renate; Ude, Miriam; Franzmann, Alexandra; Feldt, Sandra; Schüssel, Katrin; Leuner, Kristina; Müller, Walter E; Dippel, Franz-Werner; Schulz, Martin

    2012-01-01

    To compare the persistence (treatment duration) of basal insulin supported oral therapy (BOT) using insulin glargine (GLA) or NPH insulin (NPH) in Type-2 diabetic patients. This retrospective cohort study reports results from an analysis of claims data from prescriptions for ambulatory patients within the German Statutory Health Insurance scheme. The study is based on claims data from more than 80% of German community pharmacies. Treatment duration until switching to a basal bolus treatment regimen (intensified conventional insulin therapy: ICT) was determined in insulin-naïve patients who began treatment with BOT using GLA or NPH between 01/2003 and 12/2006. A total of 97,998 patients (61,070 GLA and 36,928 NPH) were included. Within the observation period, 23.5% of GLA patients and 28.0% of NPH patients switched from BOT to ICT. The upper quartile of probability of continuation of therapy (the 75th percentile) was reached after 769 days in GLA patients and after 517 days in NPH patients. Therefore, the risk of switching to ICT was significantly higher with NPH compared to GLA: hazard ratios were 1.34 (99% CI: 1.29-1.38; unadjusted) and 1.22 (99% CI: 1.18-1.27) after adjustment for predefined covariates. Various sensitivity analyses using modified inclusion criteria and endpoint definitions were applied and these confirmed the initial results. Type-2 diabetic patients under BOT with GLA stayed significantly longer on the initial therapy before switching to ICT than patients on BOT using NPH.

  17. In vivo evaluation of a nasal insulin delivery system based on thiolated chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauland, Alexander H; Leitner, Verena M; Grabovac, Vjera; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation and in vivo evaluation of a nasal insulin delivery system based on thiolated chitosan. 2-Iminothiolane was covalently attached to chitosan. The resulting conjugate (chitosan-TBA) exhibited 304.9 +/- 63.5 micromol thiol groups per gram polymer. Microparticles were prepared via a new precipitation-micronization technique. The microparticulate delivery system comprised insulin, reduced glutathione and chitosan-TBA (Chito-TBA/Ins) or unmodified chitosan (Chito/Ins) and control microparticles were composed of insulin and mannitol (Mannitol/Ins). Due to a hydration process the size of Chito-TBA/Ins and Chito/Ins microparticles increased in phosphate buffer pH 6.8 2.6- and 2.2-fold, respectively. Fluorescent-labeled insulin-loaded chitosan-TBA microparticles showed a controlled release over 4 h. Chito-TBA/Ins administered nasally to rats led to an absolute bioavailability of 6.9 +/- 1.5%. The blood glucose level decreased for more than 2 h and the calculated absolute pharmacological efficacy was 4.9 +/- 1.4%. Chito/Ins, in comparison, displayed a bioavailability of 4.2 +/- 1.8% and a pharmacological efficacy of 0.7 +/- 0.6%. Mannitol/Ins showed a bioavailability of 1.6 +/- 0.4% and no reduction of the blood glucose level at all. According to these findings microparticles comprising chitosan-TBA seem to have substantial higher potential for nasal insulin administration than unmodified chitosan. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  18. Improved stability and antidiabetic potential of insulin containing folic acid functionalized polymer stabilized multilayered liposomes following oral administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrawal, Ashish Kumar; Harde, Harshad; Thanki, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports the folic acid (FA) functionalized insulin loaded stable liposomes with improved bioavailability following oral administration. Liposomes were stabilized by alternating coating of negatively charged poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and positively charged poly(allyl amine...

  19. In vitro evaluation of dendrimer prodrugs for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najlah, Mohammad; Freeman, Sally; Attwood, David; D'Emanuele, Antony

    2007-05-04

    Dendrimer-based prodrugs were used to enhance the transepithelial permeability of naproxen, a low solubility model drug. The stability of the dendrimer-naproxen link was assessed. Naproxen was conjugated to G0 polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers either by an amide bond or an ester bond. The stability of G0 prodrugs was evaluated in 80% human plasma and 50% rat liver homogenate. The cytotoxicity of conjugates towards Caco-2 cells was determined and the transport of the conjugates across Caco-2 monolayers (37 degrees C) was reported. In addition, one lauroyl chain (L) was attached to the surface group of G0 PAMAM dendrimer of the diethylene glycol ester conjugate (G0-deg-NAP) to enhance permeability. The lactic ester conjugate, G0-lact-NAP, hydrolyzed slowly in 80% human plasma and in 50% rat liver homogenate (t(1/2)=180 min). G0-deg-NAP was hydrolyzed more rapidly in 80% human plasma (t(1/2)=51 min) and was rapidly cleaved in 50% liver homogenate (t(1/2)=4.7 min). The conjugates were non-toxic when exposed to Caco-2 cells for 3h. Permeability studies showed a significant enhancement in the transport of naproxen when conjugated to dendrimers; L-G0-deg-NAP yielding the highest permeability. Dendrimer-based prodrugs with appropriate linkers have potential as carriers for the oral delivery of low solubility drugs such as naproxen.

  20. Modern Prodrug Design for Targeted Oral Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arik Dahan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular information that became available over the past two decades significantly influenced the field of drug design and delivery at large, and the prodrug approach in particular. While the traditional prodrug approach was aimed at altering various physiochemical parameters, e.g., lipophilicity and charge state, the modern approach to prodrug design considers molecular/cellular factors, e.g., membrane influx/efflux transporters and cellular protein expression and distribution. This novel targeted-prodrug approach is aimed to exploit carrier-mediated transport for enhanced intestinal permeability, as well as specific enzymes to promote activation of the prodrug and liberation of the free parent drug. The purpose of this article is to provide a concise overview of this modern prodrug approach, with useful successful examples for its utilization. In the past the prodrug approach used to be viewed as a last option strategy, after all other possible solutions were exhausted; nowadays this is no longer the case, and in fact, the prodrug approach should be considered already in the very earliest development stages. Indeed, the prodrug approach becomes more and more popular and successful. A mechanistic prodrug design that aims to allow intestinal permeability by specific transporters, as well as activation by specific enzymes, may greatly improve the prodrug efficiency, and allow for novel oral treatment options.

  1. Design, characterization and ex vivo evaluation of chitosan film integrating of insulin nanoparticles composed of thiolated chitosan derivative for buccal delivery of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavian, Elaheh; Dorkoosh, Farid Abedin; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to optimize and characterize of chitosan buccal film for delivery of insulin nanoparticles that were prepared from thiolated dimethyl ethyl chitosan (DMEC-Cys). Insulin nanoparticles composed of chitosan and dimethyl ethyl chitosan (DMEC) were also prepared as control groups. The release of insulin from nanoparticles was studied in vitro in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) pH 7.4. Optimization of chitosan buccal films has been carried out by central composite design (CCD) response surface methodology. Independent variables were different amounts of chitosan and glycerol as mucoadhesive polymer and plasticizer, respectively. Tensile strength and bioadhesion force were considered as dependent variables. Ex vivo study was performed on excised rabbit buccal mucosa. Optimized insulin nanoparticles were obtained with acceptable physicochemical properties. In vitro release profile of insulin nanoparticles revealed that the highest solubility of nanoparticles in aqueous media is related to DMEC-Cys nanoparticles. CCD showed that optimized buccal film containing 4% chitosan and 10% glycerol has 5.81 kg/mm(2) tensile strength and 2.47 N bioadhesion forces. Results of ex vivo study demonstrated that permeation of insulin nanoparticles through rabbit buccal mucosa is 17.1, 67.89 and 97.18% for chitosan, DMEC and DMEC-Cys nanoparticles, respectively. Thus, this study suggests that DMEC-Cys can act as a potential enhancer for buccal delivery of insulin.

  2. Awake intranasal insulin delivery modifies protein complexes and alters memory, anxiety, and olfactory behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, David R; Tucker, Kristal; Cavallin, Melissa A; Mast, Thomas G; Fadool, Debra A

    2009-05-20

    The role of insulin pathways in olfaction is of significant interest with the widespread pathology of diabetes mellitus and its associated metabolic and neuronal comorbidities. The insulin receptor (IR) kinase is expressed at high levels in the olfactory bulb, in which it suppresses a dominant Shaker ion channel (Kv1.3) via tyrosine phosphorylation of critical N- and C-terminal residues. We optimized a 7 d intranasal insulin delivery (IND) in awake mice to ascertain the biochemical and behavioral effects of insulin to this brain region, given that nasal sprays for insulin have been marketed notwithstanding our knowledge of the role of Kv1.3 in olfaction, metabolism, and axon targeting. IND evoked robust phosphorylation of Kv1.3, as well as increased channel protein-protein interactions with IR and postsynaptic density 95. IND-treated mice had an increased short- and long-term object memory recognition, increased anxiolytic behavior, and an increased odor discrimination using an odor habituation protocol but only moderate change in odor threshold using a two-choice paradigm. Unlike Kv1.3 gene-targeted deletion that alters metabolism, adiposity, and axonal targeting to defined olfactory glomeruli, suppression of Kv1.3 via IND had no effect on body weight nor the size and number of M72 glomeruli or the route of its sensory axon projections. There was no evidence of altered expression of sensory neurons in the epithelium. In mice made prediabetic via diet-induced obesity, IND was no longer effective in increasing long-term object memory recognition nor increasing anxiolytic behavior, suggesting state dependency or a degree of insulin resistance related to these behaviors.

  3. Adherence to treatment for diabetes mellitus: validation of instruments for oral antidiabetics and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes-Villas; Lima, Maria Luisa Soares Almeida Pedroso de; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2014-01-01

    to verify the face validity, criterion-related validity and the reliability of two distinct forms of presentation of the instrument Measurement of Adherence to Treatment, one being for ascertaining the adherence to the use of oral antidiabetics and the other for adherence to the use of insulin, as well as to assess differences in adherence between these two modes of drug therapy. a methodological study undertaken with 90 adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. The criterion-related validity was verified using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curves; and for the reliability, the researchers calculated the Cronbach alpha coefficient, the item-total correlation, and the Pearson correlation coefficient. the oral antidiabetics and the other showed sensitivity of 0.84, specificity of 0.35 and a Cronbach correlation coefficient of 0.84. For the adherence to the use of insulin, the values found were, respectively, 0.60, 0.21 and 0.68. A statistically significant difference was found between the final scores of the two forms of the instrument, indicating greater adherence to the use of insulin than to oral antidiabetics. it is concluded that the two forms of the Measurement of Adherence to Treatment instrument are reliable and should be used to evaluate adherence to drug treatment among people with diabetes mellitus.

  4. The relationship between maternal insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF-1, IGF-2) and IGFBP-3 to gestational age and preterm delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooley, Sharon M

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between levels of insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF-1, IGF-2), and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) in antenatal maternal serum and gestational age at delivery.

  5. Novel pH responsive polymethacrylic acid-chitosan-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles for oral peptide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajeesh, S; Sharma, Chandra P

    2006-02-01

    In present study, novel pH sensitive polymethacrylic acid-chitosan-polyethylene glycol (PCP) nanoparticles were prepared under mild aqueous conditions via polyelectrolyte complexation. Free radical polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) was carried out in presence of chitosan (CS) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) using a water-soluble initiator and particles were obtained spontaneously during polymerization without using organic solvents or surfactants/steric stabilizers. Dried particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and particles dispersed in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) were visualized under transmission electron microscope (TEM). SEM studies indicated that PCP particles have an aggregated and irregular morphology, however, TEM revealed that these aggregated particles were composed of smaller fragments with size less than 1 micron. Insulin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model proteins were incorporated into the nanoparticles by diffusion filling method and their in vitro release characteristics were evaluated at pH 1.2 and 7.4. PCP nanoparticles exhibited good protein encapsulation efficiency and pH responsive release profile was observed under in vitro conditions. Trypsin inhibitory effect of these PCP nanoparticles was studied using casein substrate and these particles displayed lesser inhibitory effect than reference polymer carbopol. Preliminary investigation suggests that these particles can serve as good candidate for oral peptide delivery. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Thiolated nanocarriers for oral delivery of hydrophilic macromolecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dünnhaupt, S; Barthelmes, J; Köllner, S; Sakloetsakun, D; Shahnaz, G; Düregger, A; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2015-03-06

    It was the aim of this study to investigate the effect of unmodified as well as thiolated anionic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and cationic chitosan (CS) utilized in free-soluble form and as nanoparticulate system on the absorption of the hydrophilic compound FD4 across intestinal epithelial cell layer with and without a mucus layer. Modifications of these polymers were achieved by conjugation with cysteine to PAA (PAA-Cys) and thioglycolic acid to CS (CS-TGA). Particles were prepared via ionic gelation and characterized based on their amount of thiol groups, particle size and zeta potential. Effects on the cell layer concerning absorption enhancement, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and cytotoxicity were investigated. Permeation enhancement was evaluated with respect to in vitro transport of FD4 across Caco-2 cells, while mucoadhesion was indirectly examined in terms of adsorption behaviour when cells were covered with a mucus layer. Lyophilized particles displayed around 1000 μmol/g of free thiol groups, particle sizes of less than 300 nm and a zeta potential of 18 mV (CS-TGA) and -14 mV (PAA-Cys). Cytotoxicity studies confirmed that all polymer samples were used at nontoxic concentrations (0.5% m/v). Permeation studies revealed that all thiolated formulations had pronounced effects on the paracellular permeability of mucus-free Caco-2 layers and enhanced the permeation of FD4 3.0- to 5.3-fold. Moreover, polymers administered as particles showed a higher permeation enhancement than their corresponding solutions. However, the absorption-enhancing effect of each thiolated formulation was significantly (pthiolated polymers as nanoparticulate delivery systems represent a promising tool for the oral administration of hydrophilic macromolecules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physiological barriers to the oral delivery of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berginc, K; Trontelj, J; Basnet, N Skalko; Kristl, A

    2012-06-01

    Curcumin, a principal component from Curcuma longa, with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities was proposed as a potential candidate for the preventation and/or treatment of cancer and chronic diseases. However, curcumin could not achieve its expected therapeutic outcome in clinical trials due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. The actual intestinal physiological barriers limiting curcumin absorption after oral administration have not been fully investigated. To identify the main barriers curtailing its absorption, in vitro permeability of curcumin and flux of its glucuronide were monitored in rat jejunum and Transwell grown Caco-2 cells. Curcumin was more permeable under acidic conditions, but the permeability was substantially below the permeability of highly permeable standards. Its efflux could not be inhibited by specific Pgp and MRP inhibitors. BCRP was found to participate in curcumin transport, but the Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) did not. The permeability of curcumin significantly increased when the structure of mucus was compromised. The inhibitor of curcumin metabolism, piperin, failed to act as a permeability enhancer. Piperin inhibited Pgp and MRP transporters and decreased the amount of glucuronide transported back into the intestine. Inclusion of piperin in curcumin-containing formulations is highly recommended as to inhibit curcumin glucuronidation and to increase the transport of formed glucuronides into the plasma, therefore increasing the probability of glucuronide distribution into target tissue and inter-convertion to curcumin. It would also be beneficial, if curcumin delivery systems could reversibly compromise the mucous integrity to minimize the non-specific binding of curcumin to its constituents.

  8. In vitro characterization of microcontainers as an oral drug delivery system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Jacobsen, J.

    We here present in vitro studies showing the promise of microcontainers (fabricated in either SU-8 or Poly(lactic acid) (PLLA)) as an oral drug delivery system for the poorly watersoluble drug, furosemide.......We here present in vitro studies showing the promise of microcontainers (fabricated in either SU-8 or Poly(lactic acid) (PLLA)) as an oral drug delivery system for the poorly watersoluble drug, furosemide....

  9. Effects of oral glucose load on endothelial function and on insulin and glucose fluctuations in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Major-Pedersen, A; Ihlemann, N; Hermann, T S

    2008-01-01

    to better understand and cope with the postprandial state in insulin resistant individuals. METHODS: We assessed post-oral glucose load endothelial function (flow mediated dilation), plasma insulin, and blood glucose in 9 healthy subjects. RESULTS: The largest increases in delta FMD values (fasting FMD......BACKGROUND/AIMS: Postprandial hyperglycemia, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. We studied the effect of oral glucose load on insulin and glucose fluctuations, and on postprandial endothelial function in healthy individuals in order...... value subtracted from postprandial FMD value) occurred at 3 hours after both glucose or placebo load, respectively: 4.80 +/- 1.41 (P = .009) and 2.34 +/- 1.47 (P = .15). Glucose and insulin concentrations achieved maximum peaks at one hour post-glucose load. CONCLUSION: Oral glucose load does not induce...

  10. Effects of an oral insulin nanoparticle administration on hepatic glucose metabolism assessed by 13C and 2H isotopomer analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reis, C.P.; Neufeld, R.; Veiga, F.; Figueiredo, I.V.; Jones, J.; Soares, A.F.; Nunes, P.M.; Damg\\'e, C.; Carvalho, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate hepatic glucose metabolism of diabetic induced rats after a daily oral load of insulin nanoparticles over 2 weeks. After the 2-week treatment, an oral glucose tolerance test was performed with [U-��C] glucose and �H2O. Plasma glucose �H and ��C enrichments

  11. Comparison quality of life patients treated with insulin and oral hypoglycemic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, A. W.; Nasution, M. S.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of chronic metabolic diseases with characteristic hyperglycemia that occurs due to abnormalities in insulin secretion, insulin action or both. Improved quality of life is one of the goals of DM management. This study aims to compare thequality of life in40 patients with type 2 diabetes using insulin therapy and 40 patients using oral hypoglycemic drugs in H. Adam Malik Hospital year 2015. This study is an observational study with cross-sectionalstudy designand consecutive sampling method. Evaluation of the patient’s quality of life taken through interviews and questionnaires using the Short Form-36 questionnaire consistingof8 domains of quality of life. Statistical analysis using unpaired t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Results of the quality of life-based on patient characteristics showed significant differences in education factor (p=0.005) and employment factor (p=0.001). Quality of life-based on therapy showed significant differences in domain role of physical (p=0.005) and domain role of emotional (p=0.038).The quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes using insulin better than using hypoglycemic drug significantly in domain role of physical and domain role of emotions.

  12. Nano-microdelivery systems for oral delivery of an active ingredient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A composition for oral delivery of one or more active ingredients in the form of a lipid nano-micro-delivery system comprising a lipid nano-micro-structure comprising at least one lipid and at least one active ingredient, said at least one active ingredient being immobilized in said lipid nano...

  13. Oral ileocolonic drug delivery by the colopulse-system : A bioavailability study in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, R C A; Stellaard, F; Olsder, G G; Woerdenbag, H J; Frijlink, H W; Kosterink, J G W

    2010-01-01

    The release profile of a novel oral ileocolonic drug delivery technology (ColoPulse-technology) was assessed by a combination of conventional kinetics of a marker substance in blood and site-specific signaling by stable isotope technology. Since ileocolonic delivery involves the drug release in a

  14. Design and development of microemulsion drug delivery system of acyclovir for improvement of oral bioavailability

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Pradip Kumar; Majithiya, Rita J.; Umrethia, Manish L.; Murthy, Rayasa S. R.

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of this work was to develop an oral microemulsion formulation for enhancing the bioavailability of acyclovir. A Labrafac-based microemulsion formulation with Labrasol as surfactant and Plurol Oleique as cosurfactant was developed for oral delivery of acyclovir. Phase behavior and solubilization capacity of the microemulsion system were characterized, and in vivo oral absorption of acyclovir from the microemulsion was investigated in rats. A single isotropic region, which was ...

  15. Toward Automation of Insulin Delivery - Management Solutions for Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimri, Revital; Phillip, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, the field of type 1 diabetes was characterized by the efforts to integrate technology into the daily management of diabetes. Automated insulin delivery systems have emerged followed by the improvements in technology of pumps and sensors and automated close-loop systems that were developed around the world for overnight as well as for day and night use. Initially, these closed-loop systems were tested clinically in research centers, then at diabetes camps or hotels, and recently at patients' homes. The systems were tested in a wide range of populations of patients with type 1 diabetes: children, adolescents, adults, newly diagnosed, well and suboptimally controlled patients, the critically ill and pregnant women. The extensive clinical evaluation found these close-loop systems to be safe and efficient in controlling blood glucose levels. Now is the time to take these systems from research to industry and to get a regulatory approval of convenient devices for the use at home. Automated insulin delivery systems have the potential to change the way diabetes is treated and managed for the benefit of patients. This chapter summarizes the recent advances in this field. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Optimising oral systems for the delivery of therapeutic proteins and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therapeutic proteins/peptides are mostly administered as parenteral (injectable) preparations as a result of their poor oral bioavailability which is due to degradation by proteolytic enzymes, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. However, the oral route would be preferred to the parenteral administration ...

  17. Effects of metformin hydrochloride on blood glucose and insulin responses to oral dextrose in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendle, D I; Rutledge, F; Hughes, K J; Heller, J; Durham, A E

    2013-11-01

    Metformin is a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of insulin resistance (IR). In laboratory animals, orally administered metformin reduces intestinal glucose absorption and may therefore affect insulinaemic responses to oral carbohydrate ingestion. To determine whether pretreatment with metformin reduces plasma glucose concentration and insulin responses following consumption of dextrose in horses. Therapeutic cross-over study. Seven healthy Standardbred and Thoroughbred geldings were subjected to an oral dextrose challenge test on 4 occasions: with and without metformin, before and after induction of IR with dexamethasone. Metformin was administered by nasogastric tube at 30 mg/kg bwt 1 h before administration of dextrose. Glucose and insulin concentrations in plasma/serum were measured at regular intervals during each test. Linear mixed models were specified for each predetermined outcome variable, and for each model the 'treatment' was included as a fixed effect with 4 categorical levels (none, metformin, dexamethasone and dexamethasone with metformin) and horse accounted for as a random effect. In healthy horses, the administration of metformin resulted in a statistically significant reduction in peak glucose concentration (P = 0.002), area under the glucose curve (Pdextrose administration (P = 0.011). Following the induction of IR, administration of metformin was associated with significant differences in peak glucose concentration (Pdextrose administration (P = 0.014). Metformin resulted in reduced glycaemic and insulinaemic responses both in healthy horses and in horses with experimentally induced IR. Metformin may benefit horses with naturally acquired IR by reducing glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to dietary nonstructural carbohydrates. Further investigations into the mechanisms of action of metformin in horses and controlled clinical trials are warranted. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  18. pH-Responsive carriers for oral drug delivery: challenges and opportunities of current platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Yao, WenDong; Rao, YueFeng; Lu, XiaoYang; Gao, JianQing

    2017-11-01

    Oral administration is a desirable alternative of parenteral administration due to the convenience and increased compliance to patients, especially for chronic diseases that require frequent administration. The oral drug delivery is a dynamic research field despite the numerous challenges limiting their effective delivery, such as enzyme degradation, hydrolysis and low permeability of intestinal epithelium in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. pH-Responsive carriers offer excellent potential as oral therapeutic systems due to enhancing the stability of drug delivery in stomach and achieving controlled release in intestines. This review provides a wide perspective on current status of pH-responsive oral drug delivery systems prepared mainly with organic polymers or inorganic materials, including the strategies used to overcome GI barriers, the challenges in their development and future prospects, with focus on technology trends to improve the bioavailability of orally delivered drugs, the mechanisms of drug release from pH-responsive oral formulations, and their application for drug delivery, such as protein and peptide therapeutics, vaccination, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and bacterial infections.

  19. The role of insulin-like growth factor in prediction and prevention of preterm delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogavac Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Prediction and prevention of preterm delivery remain great challenge. It is important to include in everyday medical practice determination of certain markers that could help identifying pregnant women with preterm delivery. Insulin like growth factor (IGF is involved in the control mechanism of fetal and placental growth and development. The aim of this study was to examine the presence of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1 in cervicovaginal secretion of pregnant women with symptoms of preterm labor, but with apparently intact fetal membranes and to point out a possible application of the strip test for detection of phIGFBP-1 in diagnosis of preterm premature rupture of total membranes (PPROM in everyday medical practice. Methods. The study was performed at the Department for Obstetrics and Gynecology, Clinical Center of Vojvodina between October 2008 and May 2009. The study included 54 pregnant women between 20-35 weeks of gestation (WG, divided into two groups: the study group (16 pregnant women with symptoms of preterm delivery that gave birth before 37 WG and the control group (38 pregnant women with the normal course of pregnancy that gave birth on term. In cervicovaginal secretion of the examined pregnant women the level of IGFBP-1 was determined by the immunochromatographic assay with monoclonal antibodies 6303 as a detecting antibody (Actim PROM test, Medix Biochemica, Kauniainen, Finland. Results. Gestational age (GA at delivery in the study group was 32.6 WG and in the control group it was 38.4 WG. Weight of newborns in the study group was 2,021 g and in the control group 3,430 g. IGFBP test was positive in 15 women (93.75% of the study group, while in the control group it was positive only in 1 woman (2.63%. Conclusion. Test on phIGFBP-1 in cervicovaginal mucus was positive in 93.75% women with preterm delivery, suggesting that this test could be used in diagnosis of silent rupture of fetal

  20. Once-daily basal insulin glargine versus thrice-daily prandial insulin lispro in people with type 2 diabetes on oral hypoglycaemic agents (APOLLO): an open randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretzel, R.G.; Nuber, U.; Landgraf, W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As type 2 diabetes mellitus progresses, oral hypoglycaemic agents often fail to maintain blood glucose control and insulin is needed. We investigated whether the addition of once-daily insulin glargine is non-inferior to three-times daily prandial insulin lispro in overall glycaemic c...

  1. Recent developments in oral lipid-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N.; Rades, T.; Müllertz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs in development in the pharmaceutical industry has sparked interest in novel drug delivery options such as lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). Several LbDDS have been marketed successfully and have shown superior and more reliable...... bioavailability compared to conventional formulations. However, some reluctance in the broader application of LbDDS still appears, despite the growing commercial interest in lipids as a drug delivery platform. This reluctance might at least in part be related to the complexity associated with the development...... and characterization of LbDDS. In particular, the lack of standardized test protocols can be identified as the major obstacles for the broader application of LbDDS. This review seeks to summarize recent approaches in the field of lipid-based drug delivery that try to elucidate some critical steps in their development...

  2. Polymer nanocomposite particles of S-nitrosoglutathione: A suitable formulation for protection and sustained oral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen; Gaucher, Caroline; Fries, Isabelle; Hu, Xian-Ming; Maincent, Philippe; Sapin-Minet, Anne

    2015-11-10

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is a nitric oxide (NO) donor with therapeutic potential for cardiovascular disease treatment. Chronic oral treatment with GSNO is limited by high drug sensitivity to the environment and limited oral bioavailability, requiring the development of delivery systems able to sustain NO release. The present work describes new platforms based on polymer nanocomposite particles for the delivery of GSNO. Five types of optimized nanocomposite particles have been developed (three based on chitosan, two based on alginate sodium). Those nanocomposite particles encapsulate GSNO with high efficiency from 64% to 70% and an average size of 13 to 61 μm compatible with oral delivery. Sustained release of GSNO in vitro was achieved. Indeed, chitosan nanocomposites discharged their payload within 24h; whereas alginate nanocomposites released GSNO more slowly (10% of GSNO was still remaining in the dosage form after 24h). Their cytocompatibility toward intestinal Caco-2 cells (MTT assay) was acceptable (IC50: 6.07 ± 0.07-9.46 ± 0.08 mg/mL), demonstrating their suitability as oral delivery systems for GSNO. These delivery systems presented efficient GSNO loading and sustained release as well as cytocompatibility, showing their promise as a means of improving the oral bioavailability of GSNO and as a potential new treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Continuous glucose monitoring, oral glucose tolerance, and insulin - glucose parameters in adolescents with simple obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Awwa, A; Soliman, A; Al-Ali, M; Yassin, M; De Sanctis, V

    2012-09-01

    In obese adolescents pancreatic beta-cells may not be able to cope with insulin resistance leading to hyperglycemia and type2 diabetes (T2DM To assess oral glucose tolerance, 72-h continuous blood glucose concentrations (CGM) and calculate homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in 13 adolescents with simple obesity (BMI SDS=4 ± 1.06). OGTT performed in 13 obese adolescents (13.47 ± 3 years) revealed 3 cases (23%) with impaired fasting glucose (IFG: fasting glucose >5.6 mmol/L), 4 cases (30%) with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT: 2h blood glucose >7.8 continuous glucose monitoring system ( CGMS), IFG was detected in 4 cases, the maximum serum blood glucose (BG : 2h or more after meal) was >7.8 and 11.1 mmol/L (diabetes) in one case (7.6%). Five cases had a minimum BG recorded of 2.6 and QUICKI values obese adolescents, CGMS is superior to OGTT and HbA1C in detecting glycemic abnormalities, which appears to be secondary to insulin resistance.

  4. Influence of an oral contraceptive containing drospirenone on insulin sensitivity of healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnacci, Angelo; Piacenti, Ilaria; Zanin, Renata; Xholli, Anjeza; Tirelli, Alessandra

    2014-07-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) containing androgenic second and third generation progestins decrease insulin sensitivity (SI). In this study we investigated whether an oral contraceptive containing the anti-androgenic progestin drospirenone (DRSP) still alters SI. Lipid modifications were investigated as well. Eleven young healthy women were allocated to receive for 6 months ethinyl-estradiol (EE) 30μg plus DRSP (3mg). SI and glucose utilization independent of insulin (Sg) was investigated by the minimal model method. Lipid modifications were also analyzed. SI did not vary during EE/DRSP (from 3.72±2.62 to 3.29±2.93; p=0.73). Similarly, values of Sg did not vary (from 0.03±0.02 to 0.032±0.014; p=0.87). An increase was observed in HDL cholesterol (9.4±9.8mg/dl; p=0.05) and triglycerides (46.9±75.1mg/dl; p=0.046), with no modification in LDL cholesterol (-4.64±1.704mg/dl; p=0.6). EE/DRSP does not deteriorate SI. These results are reassuring for the long-term use of this association. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral Health Care Delivery Within the Accountable Care Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christine; Riggs, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    The accountable care organization (ACO) provides an opportunity to strategically design a comprehensive health system in which oral health works within primary care. A dental hygienist/therapist within the ACO represents value-based health care in action. Inspired by health care reform efforts in Minnesota, a vision of an accountable care organization that integrates oral health into primary health care was developed. Dental hygienists and dental therapists can help accelerate the integration of oral health into primary care, particularly in light of the compelling evidence confirming the cost-effectiveness of care delivered by an allied workforce. A dental insurance Chief Operating Officer and a dental hygiene educator used their unique perspectives and experience to describe the potential of an interdisciplinary team-based approach to individual and population health, including oral health, via an accountable care community. The principles of the patient-centered medical home and the vision for accountable care communities present a paradigm shift from a curative system of care to a prevention-based system that encompasses the behavioral, social, nutritional, economic, and environmental factors that impact health and well-being. Oral health measures embedded in the spectrum of general health care have the potential to ensure a truly comprehensive healthcare system. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Insulin and GH signaling in human skeletal muscle in vivo following exogenous GH exposure: impact of an oral glucose load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Krusenstjerna-Hafstrøm

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available GH induces acute insulin resistance in skeletal muscle in vivo, which in rodent models has been attributed to crosstalk between GH and insulin signaling pathways. Our objective was to characterize time course changes in signaling pathways for GH and insulin in human skeletal muscle in vivo following GH exposure in the presence and absence of an oral glucose load.Eight young men were studied in a single-blinded randomized crossover design on 3 occasions: 1 after an intravenous GH bolus 2 after an intravenous GH bolus plus an oral glucose load (OGTT, and 3 after intravenous saline plus OGTT. Muscle biopsies were taken at t = 0, 30, 60, and 120. Blood was sampled at frequent intervals for assessment of GH, insulin, glucose, and free fatty acids (FFA.GH increased AUC(glucose after an OGTT (p<0.05 without significant changes in serum insulin levels. GH induced phosphorylation of STAT5 independently of the OGTT. Conversely, the OGTT induced acute phosphorylation of the insulin signaling proteins Akt (ser(473 and thr(308, and AS160.The combination of OGTT and GH suppressed Akt activation, whereas the downstream expression of AS160 was amplified by GH. WE CONCLUDED THE FOLLOWING: 1 A physiological GH bolus activates STAT5 signaling pathways in skeletal muscle irrespective of ambient glucose and insulin levels 2 Insulin resistance induced by GH occurs without a distinct suppression of insulin signaling proteins 3 The accentuation of the glucose-stimulated activation of AS 160 by GH does however indicate a potential crosstalk between insulin and GH.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00477997.

  7. Oral delivery of medications to companion animals: palatability considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombre, Avinash G

    2004-06-23

    There is an increased need for highly palatable solid oral dosage forms for companion animals, which are voluntarily accepted by the dog or cat, either from a feeding bowl or from the outstretched hand of the pet owner. Such dosage forms represent an emerging trend in companion animal formulations with major impact on medical needs such as convenience and compliance, particularly for chronically administered medications, and on marketing needs such as product differentiation. This review focuses on the science of taste, food and flavor preferences of dogs and cats, and palatability testing, in the context of applying these principles to the development of an oral palatable tablet for companion animals.

  8. Mucoadhesive hydrogel microparticles based on poly (methacrylic acid-vinyl pyrrolidone)-chitosan for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajeesh, S; Sharma, Chandra P

    2011-05-01

    The study was aimed at the evaluation of N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP) incorporated polymethacrylic acid-chitosan microparticles for oral drug delivery applications. Poly (methacrylic acid)-chitosan (PMC) and poly(methacrylic acid-vinyl pyrrolidone)-chitosan (PMVC) microparticles were prepared by an ionic-gelation method. Mucoadhesion behaviour of these particles was evaluated by ex-vivo adhesion method using freshly excised rat intestinal tissue. Cytotoxicity and absorption enhancing property of PMC and PMVC particles were evaluated on Caco 2 cell monolayers. Protease enzyme inhibition capability and insulin loading/release properties of these hydrogel particles was evaluated under in vitro experimental conditions. Addition of NVP units enhanced the mucoadhesion behavior of PMC particles on isolated rat intestinal tissue. Both PMC and PMVC particles were found non-toxic on Caco 2 cell monolayers and PMC particles was more effective in improving paracellular transport of fluorescent dextran across Caco 2 cell monolayers as compared to PMVC particles. However, protease inhibition efficacy of PMC particles was not significantly affected with NVP addition. NVP incorporation improved the insulin release properties of PMC microparticles at acidic pH. Hydrophilic modification seems to be an interesting approach in improving mucoadhesion capability of PMC microparticles.

  9. Challenges in oral drug delivery in patients with esophageal dysphagia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappelle, W.F.; Siersema, P.D.; Bogte, A.; Vleggaar, F.P.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Esophageal dysphagia is a commonly reported symptom with various benign and malignant causes. Esophageal dysphagia can impede intake of oral medication, which often poses a major challenge for both patients and physicians. The best way to address this challenge depends of the cause of

  10. Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet ... I start having side effects? What is my target blood sugar level? How often should I check ...

  11. Dental care habits and knowledge of oral health in insulin-dependent diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstensson, H; Falk, H; Hugoson, A; Kuylenstierna, J

    1989-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dental care habits and knowledge of oral health in age- and sex-matched adult long and short duration insulin-dependent diabetics and non-diabetics. Ninety-four long and 86 short duration diabetics and 86 non-diabetics, aged 20-70 years, participated in the study. All subjects answered a questionnaire with 38 questions about dental visits, attitudes to and knowledge of dental diseases, toothcleaning, dietary and smoking habits, and oral sensations. Among the diabetics there was a rather large group that did not visit a dentist annually. The diabetics also required more emergency dental care and were not as willing as the non-diabetics to spend time and money on their teeth. The compliance with dietary advice was poor among the diabetics. Oral discomfort such as prickling and burning sensations, metallic and bad taste was rare in both diabetics and non-diabetics. In the diabetics, however, a feeling of mouth dryness was common.

  12. Effectiveness of basal-supported oral therapy (BOT) using insulin glargine in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Umezono, Tomoya; Miyauchi, Masaaki; Kimura, Moritsugu; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Eitaro; Kuriyama, Yusuke; Sato, Hiroki; Miyatake, Han; Kondo, Masumi; Toyoda, Masao; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2012-07-20

    To determine the clinical usefulness of basal-supported oral therapy (BOT) using insulin glargine in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. We compared HbA1c levels, body weight, and insulin doses before the introduction of BOT and in the final month of the observation period in 122 patients with type 2 diabetes who received BOT with insulin glargine between October 2007 and July 2009. To exclude the possible effects of seasonal changes in glycemic control, 57 of the 122 patients were followed-up for one year and examined for changes in HbA1c levels, body weight, and insulin dose. Examination of all cases (n=122) showed a significant decrease in HbA1c (before BOT: 8.7±1.8, after: 7.1±1.1%), but no significant change in body weight (before: 63.1±16.1, after: 63.8±17.0 kg). The mean observation period was 10.5±6.4 months. Insulin doses were significantly increased during the study. HbA1c levels improved significantly in patients on non-insulin-secreting drugs (biguanide, α-glucosidase inhibitor and thiazolidine derivatives) than those on insulin-secreting drugs (SU agents and glinides). BOT with insulin glargine is a useful strategy that can achieve good glycemic control in clinical practice without causing serious hypoglycemia. The introduction of BOT before exhaustion of pancreatic β cells may increase its effectiveness.

  13. TNFα dynamics during the oral glucose tolerance test vary according to the level of insulin resistance in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, Laetitia; Lacroix, Marilyn; Battista, Marie-Claude; Doyon, Myriam; Moreau, Julie; Ménard, Julie; Ardilouze, Jean-Luc; Perron, Patrice; Hivert, Marie-France

    2014-05-01

    TNFα is suspected to play a role in inflammation and insulin resistance leading to higher risk of metabolic impairment. Controversies exist concerning the role of TNFα in gestational insulin resistance. We investigated the interrelations between TNFα and insulin resistance in a large population-based cohort of pregnant women. Women (n = 756) were followed prospectively at 5-16 weeks and 24-28 weeks of pregnancy. Anthropometric measures and blood samples were collected at both visits. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was conducted at the second trimester to assess insulin sensitivity status (homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance and Matsuda index). TNFα was measured at the first trimester (nonfasting) and at each time point of the OGTT. Participants were 28.4 ± 4.4 years old and had a mean body mass index of 25.5 ± 5.5 kg/m(2) at first trimester. Median TNFα levels were 1.56 (interquartile range, 1.18-2.06) pg/mL at first trimester and 1.61 (interquartile range, 1.12-2.13) pg/mL at second trimester (1 h after glucose load). At second trimester, higher TNFα levels were associated with higher insulin resistance index levels (r = 0.37 and -0.30 for homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance and Matsuda index, respectively; P insulin resistance showed a continuing decrease in TNFα levels during the OGTT, whereas women who were more insulin sensitive showed an increase in TNFα at hour 1 and a decrease at hour 2 of the test. Higher insulin resistance is associated with higher levels of circulating TNFα at first and second trimesters of pregnancy. TNFα level dynamics during an OGTT at second trimester vary according to insulin-resistance state.

  14. Effects of Oral Glucose Load on Endothelial Function and on Insulin and Glucose Fluctuations in Healthy Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Major-Pedersen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/aims. Postprandial hyperglycemia, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. We studied the effect of oral glucose load on insulin and glucose fluctuations, and on postprandial endothelial function in healthy individuals in order to better understand and cope with the postprandial state in insulin resistant individuals. Methods. We assessed post-oral glucose load endothelial function (flow mediated dilation, plasma insulin, and blood glucose in 9 healthy subjects. Results. The largest increases in delta FMD values (fasting FMD value subtracted from postprandial FMD value occurred at 3 hours after both glucose or placebo load, respectively: 4.80±1.41 (P = .009 and 2.34±1.47 (P = .15. Glucose and insulin concentrations achieved maximum peaks at one hour post-glucose load. Conclusion. Oral glucose load does not induce endothelial dysfunction in healthy individuals with mean insulin and glucose values of 5.6 mmol/L and 27.2 mmol/L, respectively, 2 hours after glucose load.

  15. Soft-Template-Synthesized Mesoporous Carbon for Oral Drug Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Dipendu [ORNL; Warren, Kaitlyn E [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Template-synthesized mesoporous carbons were successfully used in in vitro investigations of controlled delivery of three model drugs, captopril, furosemide, and ranitidine hydrochloride. Captopril and furosemide exhibited desorption kinetics over 30 40 h, and ranitidine HCl had a complete release time of 5 10 h. As evident from the slow release kinetics, we contend that our mesoporous carbon is an improved drug-delivery medium compared to state-of-the-art porous silica-based substrates. The mesoporous carbons, synthesized from phloroglucinol and lignin, a synthetic and a sustainable precursor, respectively, exhibit BET surface area of 200 400 m2 g-1 and pore volume of 0.2 0.6 cm3 g-1. The phloroglucinol-based carbon has narrower pore widths and higher pore volume than the lignin-derived counterpart and maintains a longer release time. Numerical modeling of the release kinetics data reveals that the diffusivities of all the drugs from lignin-based carbon media are of equivalent magnitude (10-22 to 10-24 m2 s-1). However, a tailored reduction of pore width in the sorbent reduces the diffusivity of smaller drug molecules (captopril) by an order of magnitude. Thus, engineered pore morphology in our synthesized carbon sorbent, along with its potential to tailor the chemistry of its interaction with sorbet, can be exploited for optimal delivery system of a preferred drug within its therapeutic level and below the level of toxicity.

  16. Use of anesthesia dramatically alters the oral glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in C57Bl/6 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Johanne A; Pedersen, Jens; Holst, Jens J

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the impact of anesthesia on oral glucose tolerance in mice. Anesthesia is often used when performing OGTT in mice to avoid the stress of gavage and blood sampling, although anesthesia may influence gastrointestinal motility, blood glucose, and plasma insulin dynamics. C57Bl/6 mice...... in the time frame -15 to +150 min. Plasma insulin concentration was measured at time 0 and 20 min. All four anesthetic regimens resulted in impaired glucose tolerance compared to saline/no anesthesia. (1) hypnorm/midazolam increased insulin concentrations and caused an altered glucose tolerance; (2) ketamine...... regimens altered the oral glucose tolerance, and we conclude that anesthesia should not be used when performing metabolic studies in mice....

  17. Solid Phospholipid Dispersions for Oral Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fong, Sophia Yui Kau; Martins, Susana A. M.; Brandl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Celecoxib (CXB) is a Biopharmaceutical Classification System class II drug in which its oral bioavailability is limited by poor aqueous solubility. Although a range of formulations aiming to increase the solubility of CXB have been developed, it is not completely understood, whether (1) an increase...... the importance of evaluating both, solubility and permeability, and the use of biorelevant medium for testing the candidate-enabling performance of liposomal formulations. Mechanisms at molecular level that may explain the effect of PL formulations on the permeability of CXB are also discussed....

  18. Oral delivery of bioencapsulated proteins across blood-brain and blood-retinal barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Neha; Westerveld, Donevan R; Ayache, Alexandra C; Verma, Amrisha; Shil, Pollob; Prasad, Tuhina; Zhu, Ping; Chan, Sic L; Li, Qiuhong; Daniell, Henry

    2014-03-01

    Delivering neurotherapeutics to target brain-associated diseases is a major challenge. Therefore, we investigated oral delivery of green fluorescence protein (GFP) or myelin basic protein (MBP) fused with the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), expressed in chloroplasts (bioencapsulated within plant cells) to the brain and retinae of triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease (3×TgAD) mice, across the blood-brain barriers (BBB) and blood-retinal barriers (BRB). Human neuroblastoma cells internalized GFP when incubated with CTB-GFP but not with GFP alone. Oral delivery of CTB-MBP in healthy and 3×TgAD mice shows increased MBP levels in different regions of the brain, crossing intact BBB. Thioflavin S-stained amyloid plaque intensity was reduced up to 60% by CTB-MBP incubation with human AD and 3×TgAD mice brain sections ex vivo. Amyloid loads were reduced in vivo by 70% in hippocampus and cortex brain regions of 3×TgAD mice fed with bioencapsulated CTB-MBP, along with reduction in the ratio of insoluble amyloid β 42 (Aβ42) to soluble fractions. CTB-MBP oral delivery reduced Aβ42 accumulation in retinae and prevented loss of retinal ganglion cells in 3×TgAD mice. Lyophilization of leaves increased CTB-MBP concentration by 17-fold and stabilized it during long-term storage in capsules, facilitating low-cost oral delivery of therapeutic proteins across the BBB and BRB.

  19. The use of thiolated polymers as carrier matrix in oral peptide delivery--proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas; Pinter, Yvonne; Guggi, Davide; Kahlbacher, Hermann; Schöffmann, Gudrun; Schuh, Maximilian; Schmerold, Ivo; Del Curto, Maria Dorly; D'Antonio, Mauro; Esposito, Pierandrea; Huck, Christian

    2005-08-18

    It was the aim of this study to develop an oral delivery system for the peptide drug antide. The stability of the therapeutic peptide towards gastrointestinal peptidases was evaluated. The therapeutic agent and the permeation mediator glutathione were embedded in the thiolated polymer chitosan-4-thio-butylamidine conjugate (chitosan-TBA conjugate) and compressed to tablets. Drug release studies were performed in the dissolution test apparatus according to the Pharmacopoeia Europea using the paddle method and demineralized water as release medium. In order to avoid mucoadhesion of these delivery systems already in the oral cavity and oesophagus tablets were coated with a triglyceride. These tablets were orally given to pigs (weight: 50+/-2 kg; Edelschwein Pietrain). Moreover, antide was administered intravenously, subcutaneously and orally in solution. Results showed stability of antide towards pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin. In contrast, antide was rapidly degraded by elastase. Consequently a stomach-targeted delivery system was designed. Drug release studies demonstrated an almost zero-order controlled release of antide over 8 h. In vivo studies demonstrated a relative bioavailability of 34.4% for the subcutaneous administration. Oral administration of antide in solution led to no detectable concentrations of the drug in plasma at all. In contrast, administering antide being incorporated in the thiolated polymer resulted in a significant uptake of the peptide. The absolute and relative bioavailability was determined to be 1.1% and 3.2%, respectively.

  20. On prilled Nanotubes-in-Microgel Oral Systems for protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruif, Jan Kendall; Ledergerber, Gisela; Garofalo, Carla; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Kuentz, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Newly discovered active macromolecules are highly promising for therapy, but poor bioavailability hinders their oral use. Microencapsulation approaches, such as protein prilling into microspheres, may enable protection from gastrointestinal (GI) enzymatic degradation. This would increase bioavailability mainly for local delivery to GI lumen or mucosa. This work's purpose was to design a novel architecture, namely a Nanotubes-in-Microgel Oral System, by prilling for protein delivery. Halloysite nanotubes (HNT) were selected as orally acceptable clay particles and their lumen was enlarged by alkaline etching. This chemical modification increased the luminal volume to a mean of 216.3 μL g(-1) (+40.8%). After loading albumin as model drug, the HNT were entrapped in microgels by prilling. The formation of Nanoparticles-in-Microsphere Oral System (NiMOS) yielded entrapment efficiencies up to 63.2%. NiMOS shape was spherical to toroidal, with a diameter smaller than 320 μm. Release profiles depended largely on the employed system and HNT type. Protein stability was determined throughout prilling and after in vitro enzymatic degradation. Prilling did not harm protein structure, and NiMOS demonstrated higher enzymatic protection than pure nanotubes or microgels, since up to 82% of BSA remained unscathed after in vitro digestion. Therefore, prilled NiMOS was shown to be a promising and flexible multi-compartment system for oral (local) macromolecular delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In-vitro analysis of APA microcapsules for oral delivery of live bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Ouyang, W; Jones, M; Haque, T; Lawuyi, B; Prakash, S

    2005-08-01

    Oral administration of microcapsules containing live bacterial cells has potential as an alternative therapy for several diseases. This article evaluates the suitability of the alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA) microcapsules for oral delivery of live bacterial cells, in-vitro, using a dynamic simulated human gastro-intestinal (GI) model. Results showed that the APA microcapsules were morphologically stable in the simulated stomach conditions, but did not retain their structural integrity after a 3-day exposure in simulated human GI media. The microbial populations of the tested bacterial cells and the activities of the tested enzymes in the simulated human GI suspension were not substantially altered by the presence of the APA microcapsules, suggesting that there were no significant adverse effects of oral administration of the APA microcapsules on the flora of the human gastrointestinal tract. When the APA microcapsules containing Lactobacillus plantarum 80 (LP80) were challenged in the simulated gastric medium (pH = 2.0), 80.0% of the encapsulated cells remained viable after a 5-min incubation; however, the viability decreased considerably (8.3%) after 15 min and dropped to 2.6% after 30 min and lower than 0.2% after 60 min, indicating the limitations of the currently obtainable APA membrane for oral delivery of live bacteria. Further in-vivo studies are required before conclusions can be made concerning the inadequacy of APA microcapsules for oral delivery of live bacterial cells.

  2. The Type 2 Diabetes Associated Minor Allele of rs2237895 KCNQ1 Associates with Reduced Insulin Release Following an Oral Glucose Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren; Holmkvist, J; Banasik, K

    2009-01-01

    , and rs2237897) on estimates of glucose stimulated insulin release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genotypes were examined for associations with serum insulin levels following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a population-based sample of 6,039 middle-aged and treatment-naïve individuals. Insulin...... release indices estimated from the OGTT and the interplay between insulin sensitivity and insulin release were investigated using linear regression and Hotelling T2 analyses. Applying an additive genetic model the minor C-allele of rs2237895 was associated with reduced serum insulin levels 30 min (mean......,568 individuals who were glucose tolerant. Adjustment for the degree of insulin sensitivity had no effect on the measures of reduced insulin release. The rs2237895 genotype had a similar impact in the total sample of treatment-naïve individuals. No association with measures of insulin release were identified...

  3. Functionally engineered nanosized particles in pharmaceutics: improved oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Tetsuya; Tagami, Tatsuaki

    2013-01-01

    The development of drug nanoparticles has attracted substantial attention because of their potential to improve the dissolution rate and oral availability of poorly water-soluble drugs. This review summarizes the recent articles that discussed nanoparticle-based oral drug delivery systems. The preparation methods were categorized as top-down and bottom-up methods, which are common methods for preparing drug nanoparticles. In addition, methods of handling drug nanoparticles (e.g., one-step preparation of nanocomposites which are microparticles containing drug nanoparticles) were introduced for the effective preservation of drug nanoparticles. The carrier-based preparation of drug nanoparticles was also introduced as a potentially promising oral drug delivery system.

  4. PLGA-Chitosan nanoparticle-mediated gene delivery for oral cancer treatment: A brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, L. M.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Doolaanea, A. A.; Ichwan, S. J. A.

    2017-08-01

    Cancer becomes a serious issue on society with increasing of their growth and proliferation, either in well economic developed countries or not. Recent years, oral cancer is one of the most threatening diseases impairing the quality of life of the patient. Scientists have emphasised on application of gene therapy for oral cancer by using nanoparticle as transportation vectors as a new alternative platform in order to overcome the limitations of conventional approaches. In modern medicine, nanotechnologies’ application, such as nanoparticles-mediated gene delivery, is one of promising tool for therapeutic devices. The objective of this article is to present a brief review summarizes on the current progress of nanotechnology-based gene delivery treatment system targeted for oral cancer.

  5. The role of chitosan on oral delivery of peptide-loaded nanoparticle formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chun Y; Al-Salami, Hani; Dass, Crispin R

    2017-12-01

    Therapeutic peptides are conventionally administered via subcutaneous injection. Chitosan-based nanoparticles are gaining increased attention for their ability to serve as a carrier for oral delivery of peptides and vaccination. They offered superior biocompatibiltiy, controlled drug release profile and facilitated gastrointestinal (GI) absorption. The encapsulated peptides can withstand enzymatic degradation and various pH. Chitosan-based nanoparticles can also be modified by ligand conjugation to the surface of nanoparticle for transcellular absorption and specific-targeted delivery of macromolecules to the tissue of interest. Current research suggests that chitosan-based nanoparticles can deliver therapeutic peptide for the treatment of several medical conditions such as diabetes, bacterial infection and cancer. This review summarises the role of chitosan in oral nanoparticle delivery and identifies the clinical application of peptide-loaded chitosan-based nanoparticles.

  6. Spray-freeze-drying of nanosuspensions: the manufacture of insulin particles for needle-free ballistic powder delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffter, Heiko; Condliffe, Jamie; Vonhoff, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of preparing microparticles with high insulin loading suitable for needle-free ballistic drug delivery by spray-freeze-drying (SFD) was examined in this study. The aim was to manufacture dense, robust particles with a diameter of around 50 µm, a narrow size distribution and a high content of insulin. Atomization using ultrasound atomizers showed improved handling of small liquid quantities as well as narrower droplet size distributions over conventional two-fluid nozzle atomization. Insulin nanoparticles were produced by SFD from solutions with a low solid content (ballistic injection, the insulin nanoparticles were suspended in matrix formulations with a high excipient content (>300 mg ml−1) consisting of trehalose, mannitol, dextran (10 kDa) and dextran (150 kDa) (abbreviated to TMDD) in order to maximize particle robustness and density after SFD. With the increase in insulin content, the viscosity of the nanosuspensions increased. Liquid atomization was possible up to a maximum of 250 mg of nano-insulin suspended in a 1.0 g matrix. However, if a narrow size distribution with a good correlation between theoretical and measurable insulin content was desired, no more than 150 mg nano-insulin could be suspended per gram of matrix formulation. Particles were examined by laser light diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tap density testing. Insulin stability was assessed using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), reverse phase chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Densification of the particles could be achieved during primary drying if the product temperature (Tprod) exceeded the glass transition temperature of the freeze concentrate (Tg′) of −29.4°C for TMDD (3∶3∶3∶1) formulations. Particles showed a collapsed and wrinkled morphology owing to viscous flow of the freeze concentrate. With increasing insulin loading, the d (v, 0.5) of the SFD powders increased and particle size distributions got wider

  7. Global oral health inequalities: task group--implementation and delivery of oral health strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheiham, A; Alexander, D; Cohen, L

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the shortcomings of present approaches to reduce oral diseases and inequalities, details the importance of social determinants, and links that to research needs and policies on implementation of strategies to reduce oral health inequalities. Inequalities in health...... their environment. There is a dearth of oral health research on social determinants that cause health-compromising behaviors and on risk factors common to some chronic diseases. The gap between what is known and implemented by other health disciplines and the dental fraternity needs addressing. To re-orient oral...... strategies tailored to determinants and needs of each group along the social gradient. Approaches focusing mainly on downstream lifestyle and behavioral factors have limited success in reducing health inequalities. They fail to address social determinants, for changing people's behaviors requires changing...

  8. Highly stable and degradable multifunctional microgel for self-regulated insulin delivery under physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinjie; Lü, Shaoyu; Gao, Chunmei; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Mingzhu

    2013-06-01

    The response to glucose, pH and temperature, high drug loading capacity, self-regulated drug delivery and degradation in vivo are simultaneously probable by applying a multifunctional microgel under a rational design in a colloid chemistry method. Such multifunctional microgels are fabricated with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm), (2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and 3-acrylamidephenylboronic acid (AAPBA) through a precipitation emulsion method and cross-linked by reductive degradable N,N'-bis(arcyloyl)cystamine (BAC). This novel kind of microgel with a narrow size distribution (~250 nm) is suitable for diabetes because it can adapt to the surrounding medium of different glucose concentrations over a clinically relevant range (0-20 mM), control the release of preloaded insulin and is highly stable under physiological conditions (pH 7.4, 0.15 M NaCl, 37 °C). When synthesized multifunctional microgels regulate drug delivery, they gradually degrade as time passes and, as a result, show enhanced biocompatibility. This exhibits a new proof-of-concept for diabetes treatment that takes advantage of the properties of each building block from a multifunctional micro-object. These highly stable and versatile multifunctional microgels have the potential to be used for self-regulated therapy and monitoring of the response to treatment, or even simultaneous diagnosis as nanobiosensors.The response to glucose, pH and temperature, high drug loading capacity, self-regulated drug delivery and degradation in vivo are simultaneously probable by applying a multifunctional microgel under a rational design in a colloid chemistry method. Such multifunctional microgels are fabricated with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm), (2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and 3-acrylamidephenylboronic acid (AAPBA) through a precipitation emulsion method and cross-linked by reductive degradable N,N'-bis(arcyloyl)cystamine (BAC). This novel kind of microgel with a narrow size

  9. Poly(amido amine) dendrimers as absorption enhancers for oral delivery of camptothecin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadekar, S; Thiagarajan, G; Bartlett, K; Hubbard, D; Ray, A; McGill, L D; Ghandehari, H

    2013-11-01

    Oral delivery of camptothecin has a treatment advantage but is limited by low bioavailability and gastrointestinal toxicity. Poly(amido amine) or PAMAM dendrimers have shown promise as intestinal penetration enhancers, drug solubilizers and drug carriers for oral delivery in vitro and in situ. There have been very limited studies in vivo to evaluate PAMAM dendrimers for oral drug delivery. In this study, camptothecin (5 mg/kg) was formulated and co-delivered with cationic, amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimer generation 4.0 (G4.0) (100 and 300 mg/kg) and anionic, carboxylate-terminated PAMAM generation 3.5 (G3.5) (300 and 1000 mg/kg) in CD-1 mice. Camptothecin associated to a higher extent with G4.0 than G3.5 in the formulation, attributed to an electrostatic interaction on the surface of G4.0. Both PAMAM G4.0 and G3.5 increased camptothecin solubilization in simulated gastric fluid and caused a 2-3 fold increase in oral absorption of camptothecin when delivered at 2 h. PAMAM G4.0 and G3.5 did not increase mannitol transport suggesting that the oral absorption of camptothecin was not due to tight junction modulation. Histologic observations of the epithelial layer of small intestinal segments of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) at 4 h post dosing supported no evidence of toxicity at the evaluated doses of PAMAM dendrimers. This study demonstrates that both cationic (G.4) and anionic (G3.5) PAMAM dendrimers were effective in enhancing the oral absorption of camptothecin. Results suggest that drug inclusion in PAMAM interior controlled solubilization in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, and increased oral bioavailability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel Nanostructured Solid Materials for Modulating Oral Drug Delivery from Solid-State Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) have gained significant attention in recent times, owing to their ability to overcome the challenges limiting the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. Despite the successful commercialization of several LBDDS products over the years, a large discrepancy exists between the number of poorly water-soluble drugs displaying suboptimal in vivo performances and the application of LBDDS to mitigate their various delivery challenges. Conventional LBDDS, including lipid solutions and suspensions, emulsions, and self-emulsifying formulations, suffer from various drawbacks limiting their widespread use and commercialization. Accordingly, solid-state LBDDS, fabricated by adsorbing LBDDS onto a chemically inert solid carrier material, have attracted substantial interest as a viable means of stabilizing LBDDS whilst eliminating some of the various limitations. This review describes the impact of solid carrier choice on LBDDS performance and highlights the importance of appropriate solid carrier material selection when designing hybrid solid-state LBDDS. Specifically, emphasis is placed on discussing the ability of the specific solid carrier to modulate drug release, control lipase action and lipid digestion, and enhance biopharmaceutical performance above the original liquid-state LBDDS. To encourage the interested reader to consider their solid carrier choice on a higher level, various novel materials with the potential for future use as solid carriers for LBDDS are described. This review is highly significant in guiding future research directions in the solid-state LBDDS field and fostering the translation of these delivery systems to the pharmaceutical marketplace.

  11. Kefiran-alginate gel microspheres for oral delivery of ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandón, Lina M; Islan, German A; Castro, Guillermo R; Noseda, Miguel D; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Soccol, Carlos R

    2016-09-01

    Ciprofloxacin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic associated with gastric and intestinal side effects after extended oral administration. Alginate is a biopolymer commonly employed in gel synthesis by ionotropic gelation, but unstable in the presence of biological metal-chelating compounds and/or under dried conditions. Kefiran is a microbial biopolymer able to form gels with the advantage of displaying antimicrobial activity. In the present study, kefiran-alginate gel microspheres were developed to encapsulate ciprofloxacin for antimicrobial controlled release and enhanced bactericidal effect against common pathogens. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the hybrid gel microspheres showed a spherical structure with a smoother surface compared to alginate gel matrices. In vitro release of ciprofloxacin from kefiran-alginate microspheres was less than 3.0% and 5.0% at pH 1.2 (stomach), and 5.0% and 25.0% at pH 7.4 (intestine) in 3 and 21h, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of ciprofloxacin-kefiran showed the displacement of typical bands of ciprofloxacin and kefiran, suggesting a cooperative interaction by hydrogen bridges between both molecules. Additionally, the thermal analysis of ciprofloxacin-kefiran showed a protective effect of the biopolymer against ciprofloxacin degradation at high temperatures. Finally, antimicrobial assays of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhymurium, and Staphylococcus aureus demonstrated the synergic effect between ciprofloxacin and kefiran against the tested microorganisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Challenges in oral drug delivery in patients with esophageal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappelle, Wouter F W; Siersema, Peter D; Bogte, Auke; Vleggaar, Frank P

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal dysphagia is a commonly reported symptom with various benign and malignant causes. Esophageal dysphagia can impede intake of oral medication, which often poses a major challenge for both patients and physicians. The best way to address this challenge depends of the cause of dysphagia. The pathophysiology of esophageal dysphagia is discussed, diagnostic tools to determine its cause are reviewed and recent developments in the treatment of esophageal dysphagia are discussed. Alternative options to administer medication in dysphagia are discussed and the appropriateness of them reviewed. Two ways can be followed to allow medication intake in patients with esophageal dysphagia, i.e. altering medication or resolving dysphagia. The latter is generally preferred, since esophageal dysphagia rarely only impedes medication intake. Esophageal resection is possible in more advanced esophageal cancer stages due to advances in neo-adjuvant therapy. Due to recent improvements in intraluminal radiotherapy, it can be expected that this will be the primary treatment in a palliative setting. Temporary self-expandable metal stent placement is a promising new alternative for bougienage in difficult-to-treat benign strictures.

  13. Spray-freeze-drying of nanosuspensions: the manufacture of insulin particles for needle-free ballistic powder delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffter, Heiko; Condliffe, Jamie; Vonhoff, Sebastian

    2010-08-06

    The feasibility of preparing microparticles with high insulin loading suitable for needle-free ballistic drug delivery by spray-freeze-drying (SFD) was examined in this study. The aim was to manufacture dense, robust particles with a diameter of around 50 microm, a narrow size distribution and a high content of insulin. Atomization using ultrasound atomizers showed improved handling of small liquid quantities as well as narrower droplet size distributions over conventional two-fluid nozzle atomization. Insulin nanoparticles were produced by SFD from solutions with a low solid content (300 mg ml(-1)) consisting of trehalose, mannitol, dextran (10 kDa) and dextran (150 kDa) (abbreviated to TMDD) in order to maximize particle robustness and density after SFD. With the increase in insulin content, the viscosity of the nanosuspensions increased. Liquid atomization was possible up to a maximum of 250 mg of nano-insulin suspended in a 1.0 g matrix. However, if a narrow size distribution with a good correlation between theoretical and measurable insulin content was desired, no more than 150 mg nano-insulin could be suspended per gram of matrix formulation. Particles were examined by laser light diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and tap density testing. Insulin stability was assessed using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), reverse phase chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Densification of the particles could be achieved during primary drying if the product temperature (T(prod)) exceeded the glass transition temperature of the freeze concentrate (T(g)') of -29.4 degrees C for TMDD (3331) formulations. Particles showed a collapsed and wrinkled morphology owing to viscous flow of the freeze concentrate. With increasing insulin loading, the d (v, 0.5) of the SFD powders increased and particle size distributions got wider. Insulin showed a good stability during the particle formation process with a maximum decrease in insulin monomer of

  14. Insulin resistance and lipid profile during an oral glucose tolerance test in women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zx; Wu, Y; Zhu, Xy; Fang, Q; Chen, Dq

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare changes in insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) during pregnancy and those with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Overall, 105 pregnant women between 24 and 28 weeks' gestation, 50 with NGT and 55 with GDM according to NDDG standard, were enrolled into the study. The levels of fasting blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) and the insulin levels, blood glucose levels at 1, 2 and 3 hours post oral glucose administration during an OGTT (5.8, 10.6, 9.2 and 8.1 mmol/L, respectively) were measured. Then, insulin resistance (IR) index was calculated. There was no significant difference in fasting, 3-h insulin levels and 3-h blood glucose levels between those with NGT and those with GDM (P > 0.05). However, 1-h and 2-h insulin levels, fasting and 1-h and 2-h blood glucose levels in women with GDM were significantly higher than those in the NGT group (P < 0.05). Fasting TC and TG levels in the GDM group were significantly higher than those with NGT (P = 0.031 and P = 0.025, respectively). Correlation analysis showed that TG and TC levels were positively correlated with homoeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR) (r = 0.67 and r = 0.78, respectively; P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that insulin sensitivity in women with GDM was significantly lower than that observed in those with NGT. Reducing IR and blood lipids in women with GDM could potentially improve maternal and foetal outcomes.

  15. Critical gases for critical issues: CO2 technologies for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danan, Hana; Esposito, Pierandrea

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, CO2-based technologies have gained considerable interest in the pharmaceutical industry for their potential applications in drug formulation and drug delivery. The exploitation of peculiar properties of gases under supercritical conditions has been studied in the last 20 years with mixed results. Promising drug-delivery technologies, based on supercritical CO2, have mostly failed when facing challenges of industrial scaleability and economical viability. Nevertheless, a 'second generation' of processes, based on CO2 around and below critical point has been developed, possibly offering technology-based solutions to some of the current issues of pharmaceutical development. In this review, we highlight the most recent advancements in this field, with a particular focus on the potential of CO2-based technologies in addressing critical issues in oral delivery, and briefly discuss the future perspectives of dense CO2-assisted processes as enabling technologies in drug delivery.

  16. Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Carriers for Oral Delivery of Biopharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mie; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2016-01-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceuticals, for example peptides and proteins, constitutes a great challenge in drug delivery due to their low chemical stability and poor permeation across the intestinal mucosa, to a large extent limiting the mode of administration to injections, which is not favouring...... patient compliance. Nevertheless, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have shown promising potential as carriers to overcome the epithelium, and this minireview highlights recent knowledge gained within the field of CPP-mediated transepithelial delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins from the intestine...... is to be preferred depends on the physicochemical properties of both the specific CPP and the specific cargo. In addition to the physical epithelial barrier, a metabolic barrier must be overcome in order to obtain CPP-mediated delivery of a cargo drug from the intestine, and a number of strategies have been employed...

  17. Orally-dissolving film for sublingual and buccal delivery of ropinirole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ka Lun; Fang, Yuan; Han, Hao; Li, Qingqing; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Ho Yin; Chow, Shing Fung; Lam, Tai Ning; Lee, Wai Yip Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Ropinirole is a very important treatment option for Parkinson's disease (PD), a major threat to the aging population. However, this drug undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism, resulting in a low oral bioavailability. Moreover, the necessity of frequent administration due to the short half-life of ropinirole may jeopardize patient compliance. Indeed, taking this drug in solid oral dosage forms (e.g. Tablet) can be a challenge because of the tremor, rigidity, limited mobility, and impaired drug absorption experienced by PD patients. In light of these, there is a pressing need to devise formulations for the delivery of ropinirole that allow simple and easy administration and fast drug action, as well as avoidance of first-pass metabolism and overcoming the challenge of impaired absorption due to gastrointestinal dysfunctions, etc. Herein, we seek to overcome all these challenges via sublingual or buccal delivery of orally-dissolving films. Accordingly, we aimed to fabricate and characterize orally-dissolving films of ropinirole and assess their in vivo pharmacokinetics after sublingual and buccal administration. The ropinirole oral film was non-toxic and exhibited fast disintegration and dissolution and was physically stable for at least 28 days. Upon buccal/sublingual administration of the oral films, ropinirole reached the systemic circulation within 15 min and bioavailability was significantly improved, which may be attributable to avoidance of first-pass metabolism via absorption through the oral cavity. In conclusion, our ropinirole oral film improved bioavailability after sublingual or buccal administration. This formulation potentially overcomes biopharmaceutical challenges and provide a convenient means of administration of ropinirole or other anti-PD drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Oral delivery of human biopharmaceuticals, autoantigens and vaccine antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Verma, Dheeraj; Singh, Nameirakpam D; Herzog, Roland; Daniell, Henry

    2013-06-15

    Among 12billion injections administered annually, unsafe delivery leads to >20million infections and >100million reactions. In an emerging new concept, freeze-dried plant cells (lettuce) expressing vaccine antigens/biopharmaceuticals are protected in the stomach from acids/enzymes but are released to the immune or blood circulatory system when plant cell walls are digested by microbes that colonize the gut. Vaccine antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells upon oral delivery after priming, conferred both mucosal and systemic immunity and protection against bacterial, viral or protozoan pathogens or toxin challenge. Oral delivery of autoantigens was effective against complications of type 1 diabetes and hemophilia, by developing tolerance. Oral delivery of proinsulin or exendin-4 expressed in plant cells regulated blood glucose levels similar to injections. Therefore, this new platform offers a low cost alternative to deliver different therapeutic proteins to combat infectious or inherited diseases by eliminating inactivated pathogens, expensive purification, cold storage/transportation and sterile injections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability of iontophoresis to control delivery rates in real time provides added functionality. Third-generation delivery systems target their effects to skin’s barrier layer of stratum corneum using microneedles, thermal ablation, microdermabrasion, electroporation and cavitational ultrasound. Microneedles and thermal ablation are currently progressing through clinical trials for delivery of macromolecules and vaccines, such as insulin, parathyroid hormone and influenza vaccine. Using these novel second- and third-generation enhancement strategies, transdermal delivery is poised to significantly increase impact on medicine. PMID:18997767

  20. Challenges in the local delivery of peptides and proteins for oral mucositis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, João C; Cunha, João D; Ferreira, Domingos C; Reis, Salette; Costa, Paulo J

    2018-04-24

    Oral mucositis, a common inflammatory side effect of oncological treatments, is a disorder of the oral mucosa that can cause painful ulcerations, local motor disabilities, and an increased risk of infections. Due to the discomfort it produces and the associated health risks, it can lead to cancer treatment restrains, such as the need for dose reduction, cycle delays or abandonment. Current mucositis management has low efficiency in prevention and treatment. A topical drug application for a local action can be a more effective approach than systemic routes when addressing oral cavity pathologies. Local delivery of growth factors, antibodies, and anti-inflammatory cytokines have shown promising results. However, due to the peptide and protein nature of these novel agents, and the several anatomic, physiological and environmental challenges of the oral cavity, their local action might be limited when using traditional delivering systems. This review is an awareness of the issues and strategies in the local delivery of macromolecules for the management of oral mucositis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Biosynthesis of insulin-silk fibroin nanoparticles conjugates and in vitro evaluation of a drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Ma, Yong-Lei; Zhou, Li-Xia

    2009-11-01

    Silk fibroin derived from Bombyx mori is a biomacromolecular protein with outstanding biocompatibility. When it was dissolved in highly concentrated CaCl2 solution and then the mixture of the protein and salt was subjected to desalting treatments for long time in flowing water, the resulting liquid silk was water-soluble polypeptides with different molecular masses, ranging from 8 to 70 kDa. When the liquid silk was introduced rapidly into acetone, silk protein nanoparticles with a range of 40-120 nm in diameter could be obtained. The crystalline silk nanoparticles could be conjugated covalently with insulin alone with cross-linking reagent glutaraldehyde. In vitro properties of the insulin-silk fibroin nanoparticles (Ins-SFN) bioconjugates were determined by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). The optimal conditions for the biosynthesis of Ins-SFN bioconjugates were investigated. The Ins-SFN constructs obtained by 8 h of covalent cross-linking with 0.7% cross-linking reagent and the proportion of insulin and SFN being 30 IU: 15 mg showed much higher recoveries (90-115%). When insulin was coupled covalently with silk nanoparticles, the resistance of the modified insulin to trypsin digestion and in vitro stability in human serum were greatly enhanced as compared with insulin alone. The results in human serum indicated that the half-life in vitro of the biosynthesized Ins-SFN derivatives was about 2.5 times more than that of native insulin. Therefore, the silk protein nanoparticles have the potential values for being studied and developed as a new bioconjugate for enzyme/polypeptide drug delivery system.

  2. Oral Drug Delivery Systems Comprising Altered Geometric Configurations for Controlled Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Bawa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix® multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise®, which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix® as well as “release modules assemblage”, which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments.

  3. Effects of sitagliptin and metformin treatment on incretin hormone and insulin secretory responses to oral and "isoglycemic" intravenous glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vardarli, Irfan; Arndt, Elisabeth; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2014-01-01

    ,000 mg/day), sitagliptin (100 mg/day), or their combination, on GLP-1 responses and on the incretin effect in 20 patients with type 2 diabetes, comparing an oral glucose challenge (75 g, day 5) and an "isoglycemic" intravenous glucose infusion (day 6). Fasting total GLP-1 was significantly increased...... by metformin and not changed by sitagliptin. After oral glucose, metformin increased and sitagliptin significantly decreased (by 53%) total GLP-1. Fasting and postload intact GLP-1 increased with sitagliptin but not with metformin. After oral glucose, only sitagliptin, but not metformin, significantly...... the numerical contribution of the incretin effect. Insulin secretion with sitagliptin treatment was similarly stimulated with oral and "isoglycemic" intravenous glucose. This points to an important contribution of small changes in incretin concentrations within the basal range or to additional insulinotropic...

  4. Biodegradable microcontainers as an oral drug delivery system for poorly soluble drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Nagstrup, Johan; Keller, Stephan Sylvest

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To fabricate microcontainers in biodegradable polylactic acid (PLLA) polymer films using hot embossing, and investigate the application of fabricated microcontainers as an oral drug delivery system for a poorly soluble drug. METHODS: For fabrication of the PLLA microcontainers, a film...... (produced by spray drying) using a simplified version of a screen printing technique. An enteric-resistant lid of Eudragit L-100 was subsequently spray coated onto the cavity of the microcontainers. Release of amorphous furosemide salt from the coated microcontainers was investigated using a μ-Diss profiler...... release from microcontainers in gastric medium, and facilitated an immediate release in the intestinal medium. The fabricated microcontainers therefore show considerable future potential as oral drug delivery systems....

  5. 3D printing of a wearable personalized oral delivery device: A first-in-human study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Davide

    2018-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning interest in three-dimensional (3D) printing for the manufacture of customizable oral dosage formulations, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved tablet notwithstanding, the full potential of 3D printing in pharmaceutical sciences has not been realized. In particular, 3D-printed drug-eluting devices offer the possibility for personalization in terms of shape, size, and architecture, but their clinical applications have remained relatively unexplored. We used 3D printing to manufacture a tailored oral drug delivery device with customizable design and tunable release rates in the form of a mouthguard and, subsequently, evaluated the performance of this system in the native setting in a first-in-human study. Our proof-of-concept work demonstrates the immense potential of 3D printing as a platform for the development and translation of next-generation drug delivery devices for personalized therapy. PMID:29750201

  6. Microcontainers as an oral delivery system for spray dried cubosomes containing ovalbumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Rades, Thomas; Boyd, Ben

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare cubosomes encapsulating the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) via spray drying, and to characterise such cubosomes with a view for their potential application in oral vaccine delivery. Furthermore the cubosome formulation was loaded into polymeric...... microcontainers intended as an oral drug delivery system. The cubosomes consisted of commercial glyceryl monooleate, Dimodan®, containing OVA and were surrounded with a dextran shell prepared by spray drying. Cryo-TEM was used to confirm that cubosomes were formed after hydration of the spray dried precursor...... the cubosomes and microcontainers occurred at pH 6.8, releasing 44.1±5.6% of the OVA in 96h. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) revealed that the 'dry' particles possessed an internal ordered lipid structure (lamellar and inverse micellar phase) by virtue of a small amount of residual water, and after...

  7. Hot embossing and mechanical punching of biodegradable microcontainers for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ritika Singh; Mahshid, Rasoul; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard

    2015-01-01

    A process has been developed to fabricate discrete three-dimensional microcontainers for oral drug delivery application in Poly-L-Lactic Acid (PLLA) polymer. The method combines hot embossing for the definition of holes in a PLLA film and mechanical punching to penetrate the polymer layer around...... and shapes of microcontainers. Finally, the process is compatible with roll-to-roll processing that could lead to low cost high volume production. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  8. Polymeric particulate technologies for oral drug delivery and targeting: A pathophysiological perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, A. Christy; Elsom, Jacqueline; Wibroe, Peter Popp

    2012-01-01

    Publication year: 2012 Source:Maturitas, Volume 73, Issue 1 A. Christy Hunter, Jacqueline Elsom, Peter P. Wibroe, S. Moein Moghimi The oral route for delivery of pharmaceuticals is the most widely used and accepted. Nanoparticles and microparticles are increasingly being applied within this arena....... It is the purpose of this review to describe these cutting edge technologies and specifically focus on the interaction and fate of these polymers within the gastrointestinal system....

  9. Nanotechnology in dentistry: drug delivery systems for the control of biofilm-dependent oral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Francisco Fabio Oliveira; Ferraz, Camila; Rodrigues, Lidiany K Arla de Azevedo; Nojosa, Jacqueline de Santiago; Yamauti, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Dental disorders, such as caries, periodontal and endodontic diseases are major public health issues worldwide. In common, they are biofilm-dependent oral diseases, and the specific conditions of oral cavity may develop infectious foci that could affect other physiological systems. Efforts have been made to develop new treatment routes for the treatment of oral diseases, and therefore, for the prevention of some systemic illnesses. New drugs and materials have been challenged to prevent and treat these conditions, especially by means of bacteria elimination. "Recent progresses in understanding the etiology, epidemiology and microbiology of the microbial flora in those circumstances have given insight and motivated the innovation on new therapeutic approaches for the management of the oral diseases progression". Some of the greatest advances in the medical field have been based in nanosized systems, ranging from the drug release with designed nanoparticles to tissue scaffolds based on nanotechnology. These systems offer new possibilities for specific and efficient therapies, been assayed successfully in preventive/curative therapies to the oral cavity, opening new challenges and opportunities to overcome common diseases based on bacterial biofilm development. The aim of this review is to summarize the recent nanotechnological developments in the drug delivery field related to the prevention and treatment of the major biofilm-dependent oral diseases and to identify those systems, which may have higher potential for clinical use.

  10. Self-Micro Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems: a Strategy to Improve Oral Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay K. Sharma

    Full Text Available Aim: Oral route has always been the favorite route of drug administration in many diseases and till today it is the first way investigated in the development of new dosage forms. The major problem in oral drug formulations is low and erratic bioavailability, which mainly results from poor aqueous solubility, thereby pose problems in their formulation. For the therapeutic delivery of lipophilic active moieties (BCS class II drugs, lipid based formulations are inviting increasing attention. Methods: To that aim, from the web sites of PubMed, HCAplus, Thomson, and Registry were used as the main sources to perform the search for the most significant research articles published on the subject. The information was then carefully analyzed, highlighting the most important results in the formulation and development of self-micro emulsifying drug delivery systems as well as its therapeutic activity. Results: Self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS has gained more attention due to enhanced oral bio-availability enabling reduction in dose, more consistent temporal profiles of drug absorption, selective targeting of drug(s toward specific absorption window in GIT, and protection of drug(s from the unreceptive environment in gut. Conclusions: This article gives a complete overview of SMEDDS as a promising approach to effectively deal with the problem of poorly soluble molecules.

  11. Stabilization challenges and formulation strategies associated with oral biologic drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Le, Vu; Lovalenti, Phillip M; Abdul-Fattah, Ahmad M

    2015-10-01

    Delivery of proteins to mucosal tissues of GI tract typically utilize formulations which protect against proteolysis and target the mucosal tissues. Using case studies from literature and the authors' own work, the in-process stability and solid state storage stability of biopharmaceuticals formulated in delivery systems designed for oral delivery to the GI tract will be reviewed. Among the range of delivery systems, biodegradable polymer systems for protection and controlled release of proteins have been the most studied; hence these systems will be covered in greater depth. These delivery systems include polymeric biodegradable microspheres or nanospheres that contain proteins or vaccines, which are designed to reduce the number of administrations/inoculations and the total protein dose required to achieve the desired biological effect. Specifically, this review will include a landscape survey of the systems that have been studied, the manufacturing processes involved, stability through the manufacturing process, key pharmaceutical formulation parameters that impact stability of the encased proteins, and storage stability of the encapsulated proteins in these delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Orally active-targeted drug delivery systems for proteins and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuying; Yu, Miaorong; Fan, Weiwei; Gan, Yong; Hovgaard, Lars; Yang, Mingshi

    2014-09-01

    In the past decade, extensive efforts have been devoted to designing 'active targeted' drug delivery systems (ATDDS) to improve oral absorption of proteins and peptides. Such ATDDS enhance cellular internalization and permeability of proteins and peptides via molecular recognition processes such as ligand-receptor or antigen-antibody interaction, and thus enhance drug absorption. This review focuses on recent advances with orally ATDDS, including ligand-protein conjugates, recombinant ligand-protein fusion proteins and ligand-modified carriers. In addition to traditional intestinal active transport systems of substrates and their corresponding receptors, transporters and carriers, new targets such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and β-integrin are also discussed. ATDDS can improve oral absorption of proteins and peptides. However, currently, no clinical studies on ATDDS for proteins and peptides are underway, perhaps due to the complexity and limited knowledge of transport mechanisms. Therefore, more research is warranted to optimize ATDDS efficiency.

  13. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa, Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; David, Sheba R

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations.

  14. Insulin Initiation in Insulin-Naïve Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients Inadequately Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in Real-World Practice: The Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation (MOTIV study was performed to provide real-world data concerning insulin initiation in Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs.MethodsThis multicenter, non-interventional, prospective, observational study enrolled T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] ≥7.0% who had been on OHAs for ≥3 months and were already decided to introduce basal insulin by their physician prior to the start of the study. All treatment decisions were at the physician's discretion to reflect real-world practice.ResultsA total of 9,196 patients were enrolled, and 8,636 patients were included in the analysis (mean duration of diabetes, 8.9 years; mean HbA1c, 9.2%. Basal insulin plus one OHA was the most frequently (51.0% used regimen. After 6 months of basal insulin treatment, HbA1c decreased to 7.4% and 44.5% of patients reached HbA1c <7%. Body weight increased from 65.2 kg to 65.5 kg, which was not significant. Meanwhile, there was significant increase in the mean daily insulin dose from 16.9 IU at baseline to 24.5 IU at month 6 (P<0.001. Overall, 17.6% of patients experienced at least one hypoglycemic event.ConclusionIn a real-world setting, the initiation of basal insulin is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option in Korean patients with T2DM who are failing to meet targets with OHA therapy.

  15. Evaluating the potential of cubosomal nanoparticles for oral delivery of amphotericin B in treating fungal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Z

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zhiwen Yang,1,3 Meiwan Chen,2 Muhua Yang,1 Jian Chen,1 Weijun Fang,1 Ping Xu11Department of Pharmacy, Songjiang Hospital Affiliated The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 2State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, 3Shanghai Songjiang Hospital Affiliated Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: The oral administration of amphotericin B (AmB has a major drawback of poor bioavailability. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of glyceryl monoolein (GMO cubosomes as lipid nanocarriers to improve the oral efficacy of AmB. Antifungal efficacy was determined in vivo in rats after oral administration, to investigate its therapeutic use. The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2 was used in vitro to evaluate transport across a model of the intestinal barrier. In vivo antifungal results showed that AmB, loaded in GMO cubosomes, could significantly enhance oral efficacy, compared against Fungizone®, and that during a 2 day course of dosage 10 mg/kg the drug reached effective therapeutic concentrations in renal tissue for treating fungal infections. In the Caco-2 transport studies, GMO cubosomes resulted in a significantly larger amount of AmB being transported into Caco-2 cells, via both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, but not macropinocytosis. These results suggest that GMO cubosomes, as lipid nanovectors, could facilitate the oral delivery of AmB.Keywords: glyceryl monoolein cubosomes, oral delivery, amphotericin B, antifungal activity, absorption mechanism

  16. Oral salmon calcitonin enhances insulin action and glucose metabolism in diet-induced obese streptozotocin-diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feigh, Michael; Hjuler, Sara T; Andreassen, Kim V

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that oral delivery of salmon calcitonin (sCT) improved energy and glucose homeostasis and attenuated diabetic progression in animal models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and type 2 diabetes, although the glucoregulatory mode of action was not fully elucidated. In the present...

  17. Visualization and Quantitative Assessment of the Brain Distribution of Insulin through Nose-to-Brain Delivery Based on the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Noncovalent Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Shingaki, Tomotaka; Kanayama, Yousuke; Tanaka, Misa; Zochi, Riyo; Hasegawa, Koki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2016-03-07

    Our recent work suggested that intranasal coadministration with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin increased the brain distribution of the peptide drug insulin. The present study aimed to distinctly certify the ability of penetratin to facilitate the nose-to-brain delivery of insulin by quantitatively evaluating the distribution characteristics in brain using radioactive (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin. Autoradiography and analysis using a gamma counter of brain areas demonstrated that the accumulation of radioactivity was greatest in the olfactory bulb, the anterior part of the brain closest to the administration site, at 15 min after intranasal administration of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with l- or d-penetratin. The brain accumulation of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with penetratin was confirmed by ELISA using unlabeled insulin in which intact insulin was delivered to the brain after intranasal coadministration with l- or d-penetratin. By contrast, quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples showed increased insulin concentration in only the anterior portion of the CSF at 15 min after intranasal coadministration with l-penetratin. This study gives the first concrete proof that penetratin can accelerate the direct transport of insulin from the nasal cavity to the brain parenchyma. Further optimization of intranasal administration with CPP may increase the efficacy of delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain while reducing the risk of systemic drug exposure.

  18. Effect of an Enhanced Nose-to-Brain Delivery of Insulin on Mild and Progressive Memory Loss in the Senescence-Accelerated Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Tanaka, Misa; Choi, Hayoung; Okada, Nobuyuki; Ikeda, Takamasa; Itokazu, Rei; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2017-03-06

    Insulin is now considered to be a new drug candidate for treating dementias, such as Alzheimer's disease, whose pathologies are linked to insulin resistance in the brain. Our recent work has clarified that a noncovalent strategy involving cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can increase the direct transport of insulin from the nasal cavity into the brain parenchyma. The present study aimed to determine whether the brain insulin level increased by intranasal coadministration of insulin with the CPP penetratin has potential for treating dementia. The pharmacological actions of insulin were investigated at different stages of memory impairment using a senescence-accelerated mouse-prone 8 (SAMP8) model. The results of spatial learning tests suggested that chronic intranasal administration of insulin with l-penetratin to SAMP8 slowed the progression of memory loss in the early stage of memory impairment. However, contrary to expectations, this strategy using penetratin was ineffective in recovering the severe cognitive dysfunction in the progressive stage, which involves brain accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ). Immunohistological examination of hippocampal regions of samples from SAMP8 in the progressive stage suggested that accelerated nose-to-brain insulin delivery had a partial neuroprotective function but unexpectedly increased Aβ plaque deposition in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that the efficient nose-to-brain delivery of insulin combined with noncovalent CPP strategy has different effects on dementia during the mild and progressive stages of cognitive dysfunction.

  19. Formulation of avanafil in a solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for enhanced oral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Kareem AbuBakr; Ibrahim, Howida Kamal; Ghorab, Mahmoud Mohammed

    2016-10-10

    Avanafil was incorporated into solid self-nanoemulsifying systems with the aim of improving its oral bioavailability. Labrafil, Labrafac, and Miglyol 812 N were investigated as oils, Tween 80 and Cremophor EL as surfactants, and Transcutol HP as a co-surfactant. Nine formulations produced clear solutions of 13.89-38.09nm globules after aqueous dilution. Adsorption of preconcentrate onto Aeroperl 300 Pharma at a 2:1 ratio had no effect on nanoemulsion particle size. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy indicated that avanafil was molecularly dispersed within the solid nanosystems. A formulation containing 10% Labrafil, 60% Tween 80, and 30% Transcutol HP had the highest drug loading (44.48mg/g) and an acceptable in vitro dissolution profile (96.42% within 30min). This formulation was chemically and physically stable for 6months under accelerated storage conditions and it produced a 3.2-fold increase in bioavailability in rabbits, as compared to conventional commercially available avanafil tablets (Spedra(®)). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Oral delivery of prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor: AKB-4924 promotes localized mucosal healing in a mouse model of colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Ellen; Goggins, Bridie J; Cardona, Jocelle; Cole, Siobhan; Minahan, Kyra; Mateer, Sean; Walker, Marjorie M; Shalwitz, Robert; Keely, Simon

    2015-02-01

    Pharmacological induction of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a global transcriptional regulator of the hypoxic response, by prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors (PHDi) is protective in murine models of colitis, and epithelial cells are critical for the observed therapeutic efficacy. Because systemic HIF activation may lead to potentially negative off-target effects, we hypothesized that targeting epithelial HIF through oral delivery of PHDi would be sufficient to protect against colitis in a mouse model. Using a chemically induced trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid murine model of colitis, we compared the efficacy of oral and intraperitoneal (i.p.) delivery of the PHDi; AKB-4924 in preventing colitis, as measured by endoscopy, histology, barrier integrity, and immune profiling. Furthermore, we measured potential off-target effects, examining HIF and HIF target genes in the heart and kidney, as well as erythropoietin and hematocrit levels. Oral administration of AKB-4924 exhibited mucosal protection comparable i.p. dosing. Oral delivery of PHDi led to reduced colonic epithelial HIF stabilization compared with i.p. delivery, but this was still sufficient to induce transcription of downstream HIF targets. Furthermore, oral delivery of PHDi led to reduced stabilization of HIF and activation of HIF targets in extraintestinal organs. Oral delivery of PHDi therapies to this intestinal mucosa protects against colitis in animal models and represents a potential therapeutic strategy for inflammatory bowel disease, which also precludes unwanted extraintestinal effects.

  1. A review of advanced oral drug delivery technologies facilitating the protection and absorption of protein and peptide molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choonara, Bibi F; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Bijukumar, Divya; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2014-11-15

    The oral delivery of proteins and peptides is a dynamic research field despite the numerous challenges limiting their effective delivery. Successful oral delivery of proteins and peptides requires the accomplishment of three key tasks: protection of the macromolecules from degradation in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), permeation through the intestinal barrier and absorption of molecules into the systemic circulation. Currently, no clinically useful oral formulations have been developed but several attempts have been made to overcome the challenges of low oral bioavailability resulting from poor absorption, poor permeation and enzymatic degradation of the proteins and peptides in the GIT. Present strategies attempt to provide structural protection of the proteins and peptides and improved absorption through the use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers, novel polymeric delivery systems and chemical modification. However, each of these technologies has their limitations despite showing positive results. This review attempts to discuss the physical and chemical barriers of the GIT with particular emphasis on the current approaches employed to overcome these barriers, including the evaluation of other non-parenteral routes of protein and peptide delivery. In addition, this review assimilates oral formulation strategies under development and within the clinical trial stage in relation to their benefits and drawbacks with regard to facilitating optimal protection and absorption of proteins and peptides, as well as pertinent future challenges and opportunities governing oral drug delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Advanced progress of microencapsulation technologies: in vivo and in vitro models for studying oral and transdermal drug deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, P L; Gambari, R

    2014-03-28

    This review provides an overall discussion of microencapsulation systems for both oral and transdermal drug deliveries. Clinically, many drugs, especially proteins and peptides, are susceptible to the gastrointestinal tract and the first-pass metabolism after oral administration while some drugs exhibit low skin permeability through transdermal delivery route. Medicated microcapsules as oral and transdermal drug delivery vehicles are believed to offer an extended drug effect at a relatively low dose and provide a better patient compliance. The polymeric microcapsules can be produced by different microencapsulation methods and the drug microencapsulation technology provides the quality preservation for drug stabilization. The release of the entrapped drug is controlled and prolonged for specific usages. Some recent studies have focused on the evaluation of drug containing microcapsules on potential biological and therapeutic applications. For the oral delivery, in vivo animal models were used for evaluating possible treatment effects of drug containing microcapsules. For the transdermal drug delivery, skin delivery models were introduced to investigate the potential skin delivery of medicated microcapsules. Finally, the challenges and limitations of drug microencapsulation in real life are discussed and the commercially available drug formulations using microencapsulation technology for oral and transdermal applications are shown. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs

  4. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajabalaya R

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Rajan Rajabalaya, Muhammad Nuh Musa, Nurolaini Kifli, Sheba R David PAPRSB Institute of Health Sciences, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Brunei Darussalam Abstract: Liquid crystal (LC dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs, have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations. Keywords: liquid crystal, drug delivery, controlled release, lyotropic, surfactants, drug localization

  5. Permeation enhancing polymers in oral delivery of hydrophilic macromolecules: thiomer/GSH systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernkop-Schnürch, A; Kast, C E; Guggi, D

    2003-12-05

    Thiolated polymers (= thiomers) in combination with reduced glutathione (GSH) were shown to improve the uptake of hydrophilic macromolecules from the GI tract. The mechanism responsible for this permeation enhancing effect seems to be based on the thiol groups of the polymer. These groups inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase, being involved in the closing process of tight junctions, via a GSH-mediated mechanism. The strong permeation enhancing effect of various thiomer/GSH systems such as poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine/GSH or chitosan-4-thio-butylamidine (chitosan-TBA)/GSH could be shown via permeation studies on freshly excised intestinal mucosa in Ussing-type chambers. Furthermore, the efficacy of the system was also shown in vivo. By utilizing poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine/GSH as carrier matrix, an absolute oral bioavailability for low molecular weight heparin of 19.9 +/- 9.3% and a pharmacological efficacy--calculated on the basis of the areas under the reduction in serum glucose levels of the oral formulation versus subcutaneous (s.c.) injection-for orally given insulin of 7% could be achieved. The incorporation of salmon calcitonin in chitosan-TBA/GSH led on the other hand to a pharmacological efficacy based on the areas under the reduction in plasma calcium levels of the oral thiomer formulation versus intravenous (i.v.) injection of 1.3%. Because of this high efficacy (i), the possibility to combine thiomer/GSH systems with additional low molecular weight permeation enhancers acting in other ways (ii) and minimal toxicological risks as these polymers are not absorbed from the GI tract (iii), thiolated polymers represent a promising novel tool for the oral administration of hydrophilic macromolecules.

  6. Insulin hypersecretion together with high luteinizing hormone concentration augments androgen secretion in oral glucose tolerance test in women with polycystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, L; Koskinen, P; Jaatinen, T A; Erkkola, R; Irjala, K; Ruutiainen, K

    1993-08-01

    Female hyperandrogenism is often associated with hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. We evaluated the hormone responses in an oral glucose tolerance test to investigate the interactions of gonadotrophins, insulin, C-peptide and androgens in women with polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD). In 28 patients with ultrasonographically diagnosed PCOD, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance were mainly associated with obesity. Both basal and cumulative sum of insulin to C-peptide ratios were high in obese subjects, suggesting decreasing hepatic removal of insulin caused by obesity. Nevertheless, in some lean PCOD women, despite normal fasting insulin concentrations, insulin hypersecretion existed. The mean concentration of testosterone decreased significantly during the oral glucose tolerance test both in PCOD and control women, and of androstenedione in the PCOD patients only. However, an increase in androgen responses was found in a subgroup of PCOD patients, who had both elevated luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations and hyperinsulinaemic response to oral glucose. In the remaining PCOD patients an inverse correlation between LH and insulin was found. The patients with hyperinsulinaemia together with LH hypersecretion may represent a subgroup of PCOD with deranged regulation of androgen secretion.

  7. A Study of the Insulin and the C-Peptide Responses to Oral Glucose Load in Nondiabetic and Diabetic Subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Sung Jae; Kim, Eung Jin; Koh, Chang Soon; Min, Hun Ki [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1977-03-15

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the significance of the insulin and the C-peptide response to oral glucose loads in normal and diabetic subjects and to establish the effects of the obesity. In this study, the authors have measured plasma insulin and C-peptide by means of radioimmunoassay in 10 nonobese normal, 5 obese normal, 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, 9 obese moderate diabetic patients and 9 severe diabetic patients. The results obtained were as follows; 1) In 10 nonobese normal subjects, the plasma insulin level at fasting state and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after oral glucose loads were 15.7+-3.4, 48.3+-9.8, 40.4+-6.7, 37.4+-6.5 and 26.0+-4.2 uU/ml (Mean+-S.E.) and C-peptide were 1.9+-0.3, 3.9+-0.6, 6.3+-0.6, 5.7+-0.5 and 4.0+-0.5 ng/ml. The change of C-peptide was found to go almost parallel with that of insulin and the insulin value reaches to the highest level at 30 min whereas C-peptide reaches to its peak at 60 min.. 2) The plasma insulin level in 5 obese normal subjects were 38.9+-12.3, 59.5+-12.3, 59.2+-17.1, 56.1+-20.0 and 48.4+-17.2 uU/ml and the C-peptide were 5.5+-0.4, 6.8+-0.5, 7.9+-0.8, 7.9+-0.8 and 7.8+-2.0 ng/ml. The insulin response appeared to be greater than nonobese normal subjects. 3) In 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 27.1+-4.9, 44.1+-6.0, 37.3+-6.6, 35.5+-8.1 and 34.7+-10.7 uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 2.7+-0.4, 4.9+-0.7, 6.5+-0.5, 7.0+-0.3 and 6.7+-1.0 ng/ml. There was little significance compared to nonobese normal groups but delayed pattern is noted. 4) In 9 obese moderated diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 22.1+-7.9, 80.0+-19.3, 108.0+-27.0, 62.0+-17.6 and 55.5+-10.l uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 5.2+-0.4, 8.0+-1.0, 10.4+-1.6, 10.4+-1.7 and 10.1+-1.0 ng/ml and its response was also greater than that of nonobese moderate diabetic patients. 5) The plasma insulin concentrations in 9 severe diabetic subjects were 8.0+-3.8, 12.1+-3.5, 16.8+-4.6, 19

  8. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of cyclosporine A: comparison of various nanoscale drug-delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang K

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Kai Wang,1–3 Jianping Qi,1 Tengfei Weng,1,2 Zhiqiang Tian,1 Yi Lu,1 Kaili Hu,4 Zongning Yin,2 Wei Wu1 1School of Pharmacy, Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Smart Drug Delivery of Ministry of Education, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 3Tropical Crops Genetic Resources Institute, Hainan Provincial Engineering Research Center for Blumea Balsamifera, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, Danzhou, Hainan, People’s Republic of China; 4Murad Research Center for Modernized Chinese Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: A variety of nanoscale delivery systems have been shown to enhance the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. However, the performance of these systems has seldom been evaluated simultaneously. The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability enhancement effect of lipid-based nanocarriers with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs to highlight the importance of the lipid composition, with cyclosporine A (CyA as a model drug. CyA-loaded PLGA NPs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs, and self-microemulsifying drug-delivery systems (SMEDDS were prepared. The particle size of PLGA NPs (182.2±12.8 nm was larger than that of NLCs (89.7±9.0 nm and SMEDDS (26.9±1.9 nm. All vehicles are charged negatively. The entrapment efficiency of PLGA NPs and NLCs was 87.6%±1.6% and 80.3%±0.6%, respectively. In vitro release tests indicated that the cumulative release of CyA was lower than 4% from all vehicles, including Sandimmun Neoral®, according to the dialysis method. Both NLCs and SMEDDS showed high relative oral bioavailability, 111.8% and 73.6%, respectively, after oral gavage administration to beagle dogs, which was not statistically different from commercial Sandimmun Neoral®. However, PLGA NPs

  9. Preserved glucagon-like peptide-1 responses to oral glucose, but reduced incretin effect, insulin secretion and sensitivity in young Asians with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeow, Toh Peng; Pacini, Giovanni; Tura, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    are scarce. We examined the insulin resistance, β-cell function (BC), glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 hormone and incretin effect in Asian YT2DM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This case-control study recruited 25 Asian YT2DM and 15 healthy controls, matched for gender, ethnicity and body mass index. Serum......OBJECTIVE: Youth onset type 2 diabetes mellitus (YT2DM) is a globally rising phenomenon with substantial Asians representation. The understanding of its pathophysiology is derived largely from studies in the obese African-American and Caucasian populations, while studies on incretin effect...... glucose, insulin, C peptide and GLP-1 were sampled during 2-hour oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) and 1-hour intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs). Insulin sensitivity was derived from the Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI), Oral Glucose Insulin Sensitivity Index (OGIS...

  10. Effect of once-daily insulin detemir on oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) use in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, J; Caputo, S; Damci, T; Orozco-Beltran, D; Pan, C; Svendsen, A L; Sølje, K S; Khunti, K

    2014-04-01

    There are acknowledged benefits to continuing metformin when initiating insulin, but there appears to be growing concern over the role of sulphonylureas and thiazolidinediones when used in combination with insulin. This analysis investigates the effects of continuing or discontinuing oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) following the initiation of once-daily insulin detemir. SOLVE is a 24-week, multinational observational study of insulin detemir initiation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with one or more OADs. In the total cohort (n = 17 374), there were significant improvements in HbA1c (-1·3%, 95% CI -1·34; -1·27%) and weight (-0·6 kg, 95% CI -0·65; -0·47 kg), with an increase in the incidence rate of minor hypoglycaemia (+0·256 events ppy, P use either prior to (n = 17 086) or during insulin initiation (n = 16 346). HbA1c reductions were significantly greater in patients continuing treatment with metformin (-1·3% vs. -1·1%, P < 0·01), thiazolidinediones (-1·3% vs. -1·0%, P < 0·01) and DPP-IV inhibitors (-1·3% vs. -0·9%, P < 0·001). Final insulin doses were significantly greater in patients discontinuing treatment with sulphonylureas (0·29 vs. 0·26 IU/kg, P < 0·001), glinides (0·28 vs. 0·26 IU/kg, P < 0·01), thiazolidinediones (0·31 vs. 0·26 IU/kg, P < 0·001) and DPP-IV inhibitors (0·35 vs. 0·29 IU/kg, P < 0·001) compared with patients continuing these respective agents. All patient subgroups had a mean weight loss irrespective of OAD continuation, apart from those continuing thiazolidinediones (+0·2 kg). The largest improvements in weight were seen following the withdrawal of sulphonylureas and thiazolidinediones (-1·1 and -1·1 kg, respectively). Discontinuation (or switching) of OADs at the time of insulin initiation appears to be governed principally by concerns about hypoglycaemia and weight. HbA1c improvements were smaller in patients discontinuing OADs at the time of insulin

  11. Improved oral bioavailability of glyburide by a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongzhuo; Shang, Kuimao; Liu, Weina; Leng, Donglei; Li, Ran; Kong, Ying; Zhang, Tianhong

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at the development and characterisation of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) to improve the oral bioavailability of poorly soluble glyburide. The solubility of glyburide was determined in various oils, surfactants and co-surfactants which were grouped into two different combinations to construct ternary phase diagrams. The formulations were evaluated for emulsification time, droplet size, zeta-potential, electrical conductivity and stability of nanoemulsions. The optimised SNEDDS loading with 5 mg/g glyburide comprised 55% Cremophor® RH 40, 15% propanediol and 30% Miglyol® 812, which rapidly formed fine oil-in-water nanoemulsions with 46 ± 4 nm particle size. Compared with the commercial micronised tablets (Glynase®PresTab®), enhanced in vitro release profiles of SNEDDS were observed, resulting in the 1.5-fold increase of AUC following oral administration of SNEDDS in fasting beagle dogs. These results indicated that SNEDDS is a promising drug delivery system for increasing the oral bioavailability of glyburide.

  12. Progression to insulin for patients with diabetes mellitus on dual oral antidiabetic therapy using the US Department of Defense Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascati, K; Richards, K; Lopez, D; Cheng, L-I; Wilson, J

    2013-10-01

    To compare 'progression to insulin' for three cohorts on oral antidiabetic medication combinations: metformin/sulphonylurea (Met/SU), metformin/thiazolidinedione (Met/TZD) and sulphonylurea/thiazolidinedione (SU/TZD). Retrospective cohort analysis design was used. The subjects were US nationwide members of military and their families. A total of 5608 patients who were on antidiabetic monotherapy for at least 1 year before adding a second agent to their medication regimen between October 2001 and September 2008 participated in this study. Mean age ranged from 64 to 71 years among the cohorts. Cox regression compared the progression to insulin, adjusting for demographics, months of follow-up and co-morbidities [measured with Chronic Disease Score (CDS)]. By the end of the 2- to 6-year follow-up period, 14.3% of the Met/TZD cohort, 23.6% of the Met/SU cohort and 28.2% of the SU/TZD cohort had insulin added to their regimen. Those in the Met/SU cohort had a 1.8 times higher probability of progression to insulin than those in the Met/TZD cohort [odds ratio (OR) = 1.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.51-2.14), and those in the SU/TZD cohort had a 2.5 times higher probability of progression to insulin than those in the Met/TZD cohort (OR = 2.51, 95% CI = 2.04-3.08). When sensitizers were paired (Met/TZD), a lower percentage of patients progressed to insulin during the study period, as opposed to patients who used a combination of a secretagogue with a sensitizer (SU/TZD or Met/SU). © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Efficacy and safety of oral antidiabetic drugs in comparison to insulin in treating gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalinee Poolsup

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy and safety of oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM in comparison to insulin. METHODS: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted. The efficacy and safety of OADs in comparison to insulin in GDM patients were explored. Studies were identified by conducting a literature search using the electronic databases of Medline, CENTRAL, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus and Web of Science in addition to conducting hand search of relevant journals from inception until October 2013. RESULTS: Thirteen studies involving 2,151 patients met the inclusion criteria. These studies were randomized controlled trials of metformin and glyburide in comparison to insulin therapy. Our results indicated a significant increase in the risk for preterm births (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.04-2.19, p = 0.03 with metformin compared to insulin. However, a significant decrease in the risk for gestational hypertension (RR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.31-0.91, p = 0.02 was found. Postprandial glucose levels also decreased significantly in patients receiving metformin (MD, -2.47 mg/dL; 95% CI, -4.00, -0.94, p = 0.002. There was no significant difference between the two groups for the remaining outcomes. There were significant increases in the risks of macrosomia (RR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.18-4.63, p = 0.03 and neonatal hypoglycemia (RR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.27-3.34, p = 0.005 in the glyburide group compared to insulin whereas results for the other analyzed outcomes remained non-significant. CONCLUSION: The available evidence suggests favorable effects of metformin in treating GDM patients. Metformin seems to be an efficacious alternative to insulin and a better choice than glyburide especially those with mild form of disease.

  14. Estimation of glucose rate of appearance from cgs and subcutaneous insulin delivery in type 1 diabetes

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-08-31

    Method and System for providing estimates of Glucose Rate of Appearance from the intestine (GRA) using continuous glucose sensor measurements (CGS) taken from the subcutaneous of a diabetes patient and the amount of insulin administered to the patient.

  15. Delivery of circulating lipoproteins to specific neurons in the Drosophila brain regulates systemic insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankatschk, Marko; Dunst, Sebastian; Nemetschke, Linda; Eaton, Suzanne

    2014-10-02

    The Insulin signaling pathway couples growth, development and lifespan to nutritional conditions. Here, we demonstrate a function for the Drosophila lipoprotein LTP in conveying information about dietary lipid composition to the brain to regulate Insulin signaling. When yeast lipids are present in the diet, free calcium levels rise in Blood Brain Barrier glial cells. This induces transport of LTP across the Blood Brain Barrier by two LDL receptor-related proteins: LRP1 and Megalin. LTP accumulates on specific neurons that connect to cells that produce Insulin-like peptides, and induces their release into the circulation. This increases systemic Insulin signaling and the rate of larval development on yeast-containing food compared with a plant-based food of similar nutritional content.

  16. Estimation of glucose rate of appearance from cgs and subcutaneous insulin delivery in type 1 diabetes

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem; Al-Matouq, Ali Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Method and System for providing estimates of Glucose Rate of Appearance from the intestine (GRA) using continuous glucose sensor measurements (CGS) taken from the subcutaneous of a diabetes patient and the amount of insulin administered

  17. Plasma glucose and insulin response to two oral nutrition supplements in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhmann, Maureen B; Smith, Kristen N; Schwartz, Sherwyn L; Haller, Stacie K; Irvin, Sarah; Cohen, Sarah S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to compare the glucose usage of two oral nutritional supplement (ONS) products and to assess whether a diabetes-specific formulation provides improved glucose stabilization and management compared with a standard formula. A total of 12 subjects with type 2 diabetes (7 males and 5 females) completed a randomized, cross-over design trial. Each subject consumed isocaloric amounts of either the standard ONS or the diabetes-specific formula ONS on different dates, 1 week apart. Glucose and insulin measures were recorded at baseline, and 10, 20, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210 and 240 min after the beverage was consumed and then used to calculate area under the curve (AUC) for each subject. The mean glucose AUC was lower in the diabetes-specific ONS group than in the standard group (p1), but there was not a significant difference observed for mean insulin AUC (p=0.068). A sensitivity analysis of the mean insulin AUC measures was performed by removing a potential outlier from the analysis, and this resulted in a significant difference between the groups (p=0.012). First-phase insulin measures and an insulinogenic index calculated for the beverages showed no significant differences. On the basis of the results of this trial of 12 subjects, the diabetes-specific ONS appears to provide better glucose maintenance in persons with type 2 diabetes when compared to the standard formula ONS. NCT02612675.

  18. Oral bioavailability enhancement and hepatoprotective effects of thymoquinone by self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalam, Mohd Abul; Raish, Mohammad; Ahmed, Ajaz; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Mohsin, Kazi; Alshamsan, Aws; Al-Jenoobi, Fahad I; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Shakeel, Faiyaz

    2017-07-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a poorly water soluble bioactive compound which shows poor oral bioavailability upon oral administration. Due to poor aqueous solubility and bioavailability of TQ, various self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) of TQ were developed and evaluated for enhancement of its hepatoprotective effects and oral bioavailability. Hepatoprotective and pharmacokinetic studies of TQ suspension and TQ-SNEDDS were carried out in rat models. Different SNEDDS formulations of TQ were developed and thermodynamically stable TQ-SNEDDS were characterized for physicochemical parameters and evaluated for drug release studies via dialysis membrane. Optimized SNEDDS formulation of TQ was selected for further evaluation of in vivo evaluation. In vivo hepatoprotective investigations showed significant hepatoprotective effects for optimized TQ-SNEDDS in comparison with TQ suspension. The oral administration of optimized SNEDDS showed significant improvement in in vivo absorption of TQ in comparison with TQ suspension. The relatively bioavailability of TQ was enhanced 3.87-fold by optimized SNEDDS in comparison with TQ suspension. The results of this research work indicated the potential of SNEDDS in enhancing relative bioavailability and therapeutic effects of natural bioactive compounds such as TQ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Self-microemulsifying drug delivery system for improved oral bioavailability of dipyridamole: preparation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Zhong, Haijun; He, Jing; Xie, Baogang; Liu, Fen; Xu, Helin; Liu, Minmin; Xu, Chunlian

    2011-07-01

    Dipyridamole shows poor and variable bioavailability after oral administration due to pHdependent solubility, low biomembrane permeability as well as being a substrate of P-glycoprotein. In order to improve the oral absorption of dipyridamole, a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) for dipyridamole was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The optimum formulation was 18% oleic acid, 12% Labrafac lipophile WL 1349, 42% Solutol HS 15 and 28% isopropyl alcohol. It was found that the performance of self-microemulsification with the combination of oleic acid and Labrafac lipophile WL 1349 increased compared with just one oil. The results obtained from an in vitro dissolution assay indicated that dipyridamole in SMEDDS dissolved rapidly and completely in pH 6.8 aqueous media, while the commercial drug tablet was less soluble. An oral bioavailability study in rats showed that dipyridamole in the SMEDDS formulation had a 2.06-fold increased absorption compared with the simple drug suspension. It was evident that SMEDDS may be an effective approach to improve the oral absorption for drugs having pH-dependent solubility.

  20. An introduction to fast dissolving oral thin film drug delivery systems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, Harsha; Gupte, Aasavari

    2013-12-01

    Many pharmaceutical companies are switching their products from tablets to fast dissolving oral thin films (OTFs). Films have all the advantages of tablets (precise dosage, easy administration) and those of liquid dosage forms (easy swallowing, rapid bioavailability). Statistics have shown that four out of five patients prefer orally disintegrating dosage forms over conventional solid oral dosages forms. Pediatric, geriatric, bedridden, emetic patients and those with Central Nervous System disorders, have difficulty in swallowing or chewing solid dosage forms. Many of these patients are non-compliant in administering solid dosage forms due to fear of choking. OTFs when placed on the tip or the floor of the tongue are instantly wet by saliva. As a result, OTFs rapidly hydrate and then disintegrate and/or dissolve to release the medication for local and/or systemic absorption. This technology provides a good platform for patent non- infringing product development and for increasing the patent life-cycle of the existing products. The application of fast dissolving oral thin films is not only limited to buccal fast dissolving system, but also expands to other applications like gastroretentive, sublingual delivery systems. This review highlights the composition including the details of various types of polymers both natural and synthetic, the different types of manufacturing techniques, packaging materials and evaluation tests for the OTFs.

  1. Abnormal transient rise in hepatic glucose production after oral glucose in non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, A; Litchfield, A; Fabris, S; Proietto, J

    1995-05-01

    A transient rise in hepatic glucose production (HGP) after an oral glucosa load has been reported in some insulin-resistant states such as in obese fa/fa Zucker rats. The aim of this study was to determine whether this rise in HGP also occurs in subjects with established non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Glucose kinetics were measured basally and during a double-label oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 12 NIDDM subjects and 12 non-diabetic 'control' subjects. Twenty minutes after the glucose load, HGP had increased 73% above basal in the NIDDM subjects (7.29 +/- 0.52 to 12.58 +/- 1.86 mumol/kg/min, P < 0.02). A transient rise in glucagon (12 pg/ml above basal, P < 0.004) occurred at a similar time. In contrast, the control subjects showed no rise in HGP or plasma glucagon. HGP began to suppress 40-50 min after the OGTT in both the NIDDM and control subjects. A 27% increase in the rate of gut-derived glucose absorption was also observed in the NIDDM group, which could be the result of increased gut glucose absorption or decreased first pass extraction of glucose by the liver. Therefore, in agreement with data in animal models of NIDDM, a transient rise in HGP partly contributes to the hyperglycemia observed after an oral glucose load in NIDDM subjects.

  2. The challenges and future of oral drug delivery: An interview with David Brayden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayden, David J

    2016-12-01

    David Brayden speaks to Hannah Makin, Commissioning Editor: David Brayden is a Full Professor (Advanced Drug Delivery) at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin (UCD) and also a Fellow of the UCD Conway Institute. Following a PhD in Pharmacology at the University of Cambridge, UK (1989), and a postdoctoral research fellowship at Stanford University, CA, USA, he set up Elan Biotechnology Research's in vitro pharmacology laboratory in Dublin (1991). At Elan, he became a senior scientist and project manager of several of Elan's joint-venture drug delivery research collaborations with US biotech companies. In 2001, he joined UCD as a lecturer in veterinary pharmacology and was appointed Associate Professor in 2006 and Full Professor in 2014. He was a Director of the Science Foundation Ireland Research Cluster (The Irish Drug Delivery Research Network) from 2007 to 2013, is a Deputy Coordinator of an FP7 Consortium on oral peptides in nanoparticles ('TRANS-INT', 2012-2017), and is a Co-Principal Investigator in 'CURAM', Science Foundation Ireland's new Centre for Medical Devices (2014-2020 [ 1 ]). He was made a Fellow of the Controlled Release Society in 2012. He is the author or co-author of >200 research publications and patents. D Brayden serves on the Editorial Advisory Boards of Drug Discovery Today, European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews and the Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, and is an Associate Editor of Therapeutic Delivery. D Brayden works as an independent consultant for drug delivery companies.

  3. Encapsulation of Liposomes within pH Responsive Microspheres for Oral Colonic Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Barea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel liposome-in-microsphere (LIM formulation has been created comprising drug-loaded liposomes within pH responsive Eudragit S100 microspheres. The liposomes contained the model drug 5-ASA and were coated with chitosan in order to protect them during encapsulation within the microspheres and to improve site-specific release characteristics. In vitro drug release studies showed that LIMs prevented drug release within simulated stomach and small intestine conditions with subsequent drug release occurring in large intestine conditions. The formulation therefore has potential for oral colonic drug delivery.

  4. An oral delivery system for indomethicin engineered from cationic lipid emulsions and silica nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovic, Spomenka; Hui, He; Song, Yunmei

    2010-01-01

    We report on a porous silica-lipid hybrid microcapsule (SLH) oral delivery system for indomethacin fabricated from Pickering emulsion templates, where the drug forms an electrostatic complex with cationic lipid present in the oil phase. Dry SLH microcapsules prepared either by spray drying...... (approximately 1-5 microm) or phase coacervation (20-50 microm) exhibit a specific internal porous matrix structure with pore diameters in the range of 20 to 100 nm. Dissolution studies under sink conditions and in the presence of electrolytes revealed a decreased extent of dissolution; this confirms...

  5. Development of coated nifedipine dry elixir as a long acting oral delivery with bioavailability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Yoon; Jin, Su-Eon; Park, Youmie; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Park, Yohan; Maeng, Han-Joo; Kim, Chong-Kook

    2011-10-01

    To develop the long acting nifedipine oral delivery with bioavailability enhancement, a nifedipine dry elixir (NDE) containing nifedipine ethanol solution in dextrin shell was prepared using a spray-dryer, and then coated nifedipine dry elixir (CNDE) was prepared by coating NDE with Eudragit acrylic resin. The physical characteristics and bioavailability of NDE and CNDE were evaluated, and then compared to those of nifedipine powder. NDE and CNDE, which were spherical in shape, had about 6.64 and 8.68-8.75 μm of geometric mean diameters, respectively. The amount of nifedipine dissolved from NDE for 60 min increased about 7- and 40-fold compared to nifedipine powder in pH 1.2 simulated gastric fluid and pH 6.8 simulated intestinal fluid, respectively. Nifedipine released from CNDE was retarded in both dissolution media compared with that from NDE. After oral administration of NDE, the C(max) and AUC(0→8h) of nifedipine in rat increased about 13- and 7-fold, respectively, and the Tmax of nifedipine was reduced significantly compared with those after oral administration of nifedipine powder alone. The AUC(0→8h) and T(max) of nifedipine in CNDE increased markedly and the C(max) of nifedipine in CNDE was significantly reduced compared to those in NDE. It is concluded that CNDE, which could lower the initial burst-out plasma concentration and maintain the plasma level of nifedipine over a longer period with bioavailability enhancement, might be one of potential alternatives to the marketed long acting oral delivery system for nifedipine.

  6. Metabolic and fibrinolytic response to changed insulin sensitivity in users of oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kresten R.; Christiansen, Erik; Madsbad, Sten

    1999-01-01

    systems, are relevant in the evaluation of the risk of developing vascular disorders or diabetes in OC users. We studied insulin sensitivity index (S(I)), glucose effectiveness (S(g)), and insulin response in young, healthy women by frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests before and after...... randomization to 6 months of treatment with ethinyl estradiol in triphasic combination with norgestimate (n = 17) or gestodene (n = 20). Measurements of fasting triglycerides and antigen concentrations of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) were also...... included. Both compounds increased fasting plasma insulin and reduced S(i) but did not affect S(g). The relationships between S(i) and insulin response were unchanged. No consistent correlation between insulin sensitivity and triglycerides, t-PA, or PAI-1 were demonstrated before or during treatment. We...

  7. Using observational data to inform the design of a prospective effectiveness study for a novel insulin delivery device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabner M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Michael Grabner,1 Yong Chen,2 Matthew Nguyen,3 Scott D Abbott,3 Ralph Quimbo1 1HealthCore, Inc., Wilmington, DE, USA; 2Merck and Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA; 3Valeritas, Inc., Bridgewater, NJ, USA Objective: To inform the design and assess the feasibility of a prospective effectiveness study evaluating an insulin delivery device for patients with diabetes mellitus to be conducted within the membership of a large US commercial insurer. Methods: Providers who issued ≥1 insulin prescription between January 1, 2011 and September 30, 2011 were selected from administrative claims contained in the HealthCore Integrated Research DatabaseSM. Adult diabetes patients with visits to these providers were identified. Providers were dichotomized into high- [HVPs] and low-volume providers [LVPs] based on median number of diabetes patients per provider. Results: We identified 15,349 HVPs and 15,313 LVPs (median number of patients = 14. Most HVPs were located in the Midwest (6,291 [41.0%] and South (5,092 [33.2%], while LVPs were evenly distributed across regions. Over 80% (12,769 of HVPs practiced family or internal medicine; 6.4% (989 were endocrinologists. HVPs prescribed insulin to an average of 25% of patients. Patients of HVPs (522,527 had similar characteristics as patients of LVPs (80,669, except for geographical dispersion, which followed that of providers. Approximately 65% of patients were aged 21-64 years and 97% had type 2 diabetes. Among patients with ≥1 available HbA1C result during 2011 (103,992, 48.3% (50,193 had an average HbA1C ≥7.0%. Among patients initiating insulin, 79.6% (22,205 had an average HbA1C ≥7.0%. Conclusion: The observed provider and patient populations support the feasibility of the prospective study. Sampling of patients from HVPs is efficient while minimizing bias as patient characteristics are similar to those from LVPs. The study also highlights unmet needs for improved glycemic control since approximately

  8. Insulin-chitosan polyelectrolyte _anocomplexes: preparation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To formulate chitosan nanoparticles with specific combinations of molecular weight and degree of deacetylation (DDA) that could be developed into an oral insulin delivery system. Methods: This study was conducted at Jordanian Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Company (JPM), Jordan in the period 2006-2009.

  9. Plasma insulin levels are increased by sertraline in rats under oral glucose overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition and control of depression symptoms are important to increase patient compliance with treatment and to improve the quality of life of diabetic patients. Clinical studies indicate that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI are better antidepressants for diabetic patients than other drugs. However, preclinical trials have demonstrated that not all SSRI reduce plasma glucose levels. In fact, fluoxetine increases and sertraline decreases glycemia in diabetic and non-diabetic rats. In the present study we evaluated plasma insulin levels during fasting and after glucose overload after treatment with sertraline. Adult male Wistar rats were fasted and treated with saline or 30 mg/kg sertraline and submitted or not to glucose overload (N = 10. Blood was collected and plasma insulin was measured. The mean insulin levels were: fasting group: 25.9 ± 3.86, sertraline + fasting group: 31.10 ± 2.48, overload group: 34.1 ± 3.40, and overload + sertraline group: 43.73 ± 5.14 µU/ml. Insulinemia was significantly increased in the overload + sertraline group. There were no differences between the other groups. No difference in glucose/insulin ratios could be detected between groups. The overload + sertraline group was the only one in which a significant number of individuals exceeded the upper confidence limit of insulin levels. This study demonstrates that sertraline increases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion without any change in peripheral insulin sensitivity.

  10. Enhancement of glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow by oral glucose load in well controlled insulin-dependent diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl Christiansen, J; Christensen, C K; Hermansen, K

    1986-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) were measured in 27 patients with uncomplicated insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) before and after an oral glucose load of 1.1 g glucose/kg body wt. In the 18 patients showing near-normoglycaemia (blood glucose less than or equal to 8....... No changes in blood pressure or urinary albumin excretion rates took place in either group. The reduction in plasma protein and in plasma growth hormone concentration were similar in the two groups. No change was seen in plasma arginine vasopressin concentration. There was no difference in the qualitative...

  11. Maternal insulin sensitivity is associated with oral glucose-induced changes in fetal brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Katarzyna; Schleger, Franziska; Ketterer, Caroline; Fritsche, Louise; Kiefer-Schmidt, Isabelle; Hennige, Anita; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Preissl, Hubert; Fritsche, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Fetal programming plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether maternal metabolic changes during OGTT influence fetal brain activity. Thirteen healthy pregnant women underwent an OGTT (75 g). Insulin sensitivity was determined by glucose and insulin measurements at 0, 60 and 120 min. At each time point, fetal auditory evoked fields were recorded with a fetal magnetoencephalographic device and response latencies were determined. Maternal insulin increased from a fasting level of 67 ± 25 pmol/l (mean ± SD) to 918 ± 492 pmol/l 60 min after glucose ingestion and glucose levels increased from 4.4 ± 0.3 to 7.4 ± 1.1 mmol/l. Over the same time period, fetal response latencies decreased from 297 ± 99 to 235 ± 84 ms (p = 0.01) and then remained stable until 120 min (235 ± 84 vs 251 ± 91 ms, p = 0.39). There was a negative correlation between maternal insulin sensitivity and fetal response latencies 60 min after glucose ingestion (r = 0.68, p = 0.02). After a median split of the group based on maternal insulin sensitivity, fetuses of insulin-resistant mothers showed a slower response to auditory stimuli (283 ± 79 ms) than those of insulin-sensitive mothers (178 ± 46 ms, p = 0.03). Lower maternal insulin sensitivity is associated with slower fetal brain responses. These findings provide the first evidence of a direct effect of maternal metabolism on fetal brain activity and suggest that central insulin resistance may be programmed during fetal development.

  12. Periodontal Bacteria and Prediabetes Prevalence in ORIGINS: The Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance, and Insulin Resistance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, R T; Jacobs, D R; Singh, R; Zuk, A; Rosenbaum, M; Papapanou, P N; Desvarieux, M

    2015-09-01

    Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to be associated. The relationship between periodontal microbiota and early diabetes risk has not been studied. We investigated the association between periodontal bacteria and prediabetes prevalence among diabetes-free adults. ORIGINS (the Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance Study) cross sectionally enrolled 300 diabetes-free adults aged 20 to 55 y (mean ± SD, 34 ± 10 y; 77% female). Prediabetes was defined as follows: 1) hemoglobin A1c values ranging from 5.7% to 6.4% or 2) fasting plasma glucose ranging from 100 to 125 mg/dL. In 1,188 subgingival plaque samples, 11 bacterial species were assessed at baseline, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Actinomyces naeslundii. Full-mouth clinical periodontal examinations were performed, and participants were defined as having no/mild periodontitis vs. moderate/severe periodontitis per the definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / American Academy of Periodontology. Modified Poisson regression evaluated prediabetes prevalence across bacterial tertiles. Prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for third vs. first tertiles are presented. All analyses were adjusted for cardiometabolic risk factors. All results presented currently arise from the baseline cross section. Prediabetes prevalence was 18%, and 58% of participants had moderate/severe periodontitis. Prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) summarizing associations between bacterial levels and prediabetes were as follows: A. actinomycetemcomitans, 2.48 (1.34, 4.58), P = 0.004; P. gingivalis, 3.41 (1.78, 6.58), P = 0.0003; T. denticola, 1.99 (0.992, 4.00), P = 0.052; T. forsythia, 1.95 (1.0, 3.84), P = 0.05; A. naeslundii, 0.46 (0.25, 0.85), P = 0.01. The prevalence ratio for prediabetes among participants with moderate/severe vs. no/mild periodontitis was 1.47 (0.78, 2.74), P

  13. Analysis of results of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin releasing test in hepatogenic diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Haoming; Fu Qiang; Tian Xiaoping; Su Cainu

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical values of OGTT and insulin releasing test in hepatogenic diabetics. Method: OGTT was performed by enzymes method and insulin releasing test by RIA in 30 patients with hepatogenic diabetes, 31 cases with II diabetes and 35 controls. Results: During OGTT, blood glucose levels at various time were about the same in hepatogenic diabetics and II diabetics (P < 0.05), except at 180 min (P < 0.01). Basal hyperinsulinemia was present is hepatogenic diabetics. Conclusion: OGTT and insulin releasing test had a definite clinical value in the differential diagnosis of hepatogenic diabetics

  14. Future Organization of Oral Health Services Delivery: From 2012 to 2042.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L Jackson

    2017-09-01

    The United States is currently experiencing a vortex of change in both general health and oral health care delivery, the ultimate outcome of which is still not well understood. The specific focus of this article is to examine the future organization of the oral health services delivery system (OHSDS) in the U.S., with special attention given to the role of large group dental practices (LGDPs) in that future. The article describes the various types of LGDPs and their ability to change the economic characteristics of the OHSDS. Large geographically distributed corporate group dental practices (LGDCGDPs) are the type that may expand their market share to the extent that they could change the economic characteristics of the OHSDS. A wide range of scenarios is used to project the expansion of LGDCGDPs into the future. The scenarios modeled are not intended as predictions but rather to present a range of possible OHSDS market structures that may emerge over the next 30 years. The implications of each scenario for the economic competition within the OHSDS are described. Possible implications of these trends for dental education are also discussed. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  15. Solid lipid nanoparticles as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds: Overcoming pharmacokinetic limitations for nutraceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Sara; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Campos, Débora; Sarmento, Bruno; Gomes, Ana Maria; Pintado, Manuela; Reis, Flávio

    2017-06-13

    Drug delivery systems, accompanied by nanoparticle technology, have recently emerged as prominent solutions to improve the pharmacokinetic properties, namely bioavailability, of therapeutic and nutraceutical agents. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have received much attention from researchers due to their potential to protect or improve drug properties. SLNs have been reported to be an alternative system to traditional carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds are widespread in plant-derived foodstuffs and therefore abundant in our diet. Over the last decades, phenolic compounds have received considerable attention due to several health promoting properties, mostly related to their antioxidant activity, which can have important implications for health. However, most of these compounds have been associated with poor bioavailability being poorly absorbed, rapidly metabolized and eliminated, which compromises its biological and pharmacological benefits. This paper provides a systematic review of the use of SLNs as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds, in order to overcome pharmacokinetic limitations of these compounds and improved nutraceutical potential. In vitro studies, as well as works describing topical and oral treatments will be revisited and discussed. The classification, synthesis, and clinical application of these nanomaterials will be also considered in this review article.

  16. Compartmentalized Metabolic Engineering for Artemisinin Biosynthesis and Effective Malaria Treatment by Oral Delivery of Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Karan; Subramaniyan, Mayavan; Rawat, Khushboo; Kalamuddin, Md; Qureshi, M Irfan; Malhotra, Pawan; Mohmmed, Asif; Cornish, Katrina; Daniell, Henry; Kumar, Shashi

    2016-11-07

    Artemisinin is highly effective against drug-resistant malarial parasites, which affects nearly half of the global population and kills >500 000 people each year. The primary cost of artemisinin is the very expensive process used to extract and purify the drug from Artemisia annua. Elimination of this apparently unnecessary step will make this potent antimalarial drug affordable to the global population living in endemic regions. Here we reported the oral delivery of a non-protein drug artemisinin biosynthesized (∼0.8 mg/g dry weight) at clinically meaningful levels in tobacco by engineering two metabolic pathways targeted to three different cellular compartments (chloroplast, nucleus, and mitochondria). The doubly transgenic lines showed a three-fold enhancement of isopentenyl pyrophosphate, and targeting AACPR, DBR2, and CYP71AV1 to chloroplasts resulted in higher expression and an efficient photo-oxidation of dihydroartemisinic acid to artemisinin. Partially purified extracts from the leaves of transgenic tobacco plants inhibited in vitro growth progression of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells. Oral feeding of whole intact plant cells bioencapsulating the artemisinin reduced the parasitemia levels in challenged mice in comparison with commercial drug. Such novel synergistic approaches should facilitate low-cost production and delivery of artemisinin and other drugs through metabolic engineering of edible plants. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Oral fast-dissolving drug delivery membranes prepared from electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone ultrafine fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dengguang; Shen Xiaxia; Zhu Limin; Branford-White, Chris; White, Kenneth; Annie Bligh, S W

    2009-01-01

    Oral fast-dissolving drug delivery membranes (FDMs) for poorly water-soluble drugs were prepared via electrospinning technology with ibuprofen as the model drug and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K30 as the filament-forming polymer and drug carrier. Results from differential scanning calorimetry, x-ray diffraction, and morphological observations demonstrated that ibuprofen was distributed in the ultrafine fibers in the form of nanosolid dispersions and the physical status of drug was an amorphous or molecular form, different from that of the pure drug and a physical mixture of PVP and ibuprofen. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy results illustrated that the main interactions between PVP and ibuprofen were mediated through hydrogen bonding. Pharmacotechnical tests showed that FDMs with different drug contents had almost the same wetting and disintegrating times, about 15 and 8 s, respectively, but significantly different drug dissolution rates due to the different physical status of the drug and the different drug-release-controlled mechanisms. 84.9% and 58.7% of ibuprofen was released in the first 20 s for FDMs with a drug-to-PVP ratio of 1:4 and 1:2, respectively. Electrospun ultrafine fibers have the potential to be used as solid dispersions to improve the dissolution profiles of poorly water-soluble drugs or as oral fast disintegrating drug delivery systems.

  18. Discovery of OSI-906: a selective and orally efficacious dual inhibitor of the IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Mark J; Cooke, Andrew; Rosenfeld-Franklin, Maryland; Buck, Elizabeth; Foreman, Ken; Landfair, Darla; O'Connor, Matthew; Pirritt, Caroline; Sun, Yingchaun; Yao, Yan; Arnold, Lee D; Gibson, Neil W; Ji, Qun-Sheng

    2009-09-01

    The IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) has been implicated in the promotion of tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance to cancer therapies. Therefore, this receptor has become a major focus for the development of anticancer agents. Our lead optimization efforts that blended structure-based design and empirical medicinal chemistry led to the discovery of OSI-906, a novel small-molecule dual IGF-1R/insulin receptor (IR) kinase inhibitor. OSI-906 potently and selectively inhibits autophosphorylation of both human IGF-1R and IR, displays in vitro antiproliferative effects in a variety of tumor cell lines and shows robust in vivo anti-tumor efficacy in an IGF-1R-driven xenograft model when administered orally once daily. OSI-906 is a novel, potent, selective and orally bioavailable dual IGF-1R/IR kinase inhibitor with favorable preclinical drug-like properties, which has demonstrated in vivo efficacy in tumor models and is currently in clinical testing.

  19. Buccal bioadhesive drug delivery--a promising option for orally less efficient drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Yajaman; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo; Bandyopadhyay, A K

    2006-08-10

    Rapid developments in the field of molecular biology and gene technology resulted in generation of many macromolecular drugs including peptides, proteins, polysaccharides and nucleic acids in great number possessing superior pharmacological efficacy with site specificity and devoid of untoward and toxic effects. However, the main impediment for the oral delivery of these drugs as potential therapeutic agents is their extensive presystemic metabolism, instability in acidic environment resulting into inadequate and erratic oral absorption. Parenteral route of administration is the only established route that overcomes all these drawbacks associated with these orally less/inefficient drugs. But, these formulations are costly, have least patient compliance, require repeated administration, in addition to the other hazardous effects associated with this route. Over the last few decades' pharmaceutical scientists throughout the world are trying to explore transdermal and transmucosal routes as an alternative to injections. Among the various transmucosal sites available, mucosa of the buccal cavity was found to be the most convenient and easily accessible site for the delivery of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic delivery as retentive dosage forms, because it has expanse of smooth muscle which is relatively immobile, abundant vascularization, rapid recovery time after exposure to stress and the near absence of langerhans cells. Direct access to the systemic circulation through the internal jugular vein bypasses drugs from the hepatic first pass metabolism leading to high bioavailability. Further, these dosage forms are self-administrable, cheap and have superior patient compliance. Developing a dosage form with the optimum pharmacokinetics is a promising area for continued research as it is enormously important and intellectually challenging. With the right dosage form design, local environment of the mucosa can be controlled and manipulated in order to

  20. Lipid Nanocarriers for Oral Delivery of Serenoa repens CO2 Extract: A Study of Microemulsion and Self-Microemulsifying Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guccione, Clizia; Bergonzi, Maria Camilla; Awada, Khaled M; Piazzini, Vieri; Bilia, Anna Rita

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study was the development and characterization of lipid nanocarriers using food grade components for oral delivery of Serenoa repens CO 2 extract, namely microemulsions (MEs) and self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDSs) to improve the oral absorption. A commercial blend (CB) containing 320 of S. repens CO 2 extract plus the aqueous soluble extracts of nettle root and pineapple stem was formulated in two MEs and two SMEDDSs. The optimized ME loaded with the CB (CBM2) had a very low content of water (only 17.3%). The drug delivery systems were characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a diode-array detector analyses in order to evaluate the size, the homogeneity, the morphology, and the encapsulation efficiency. β -carotene was selected as marker for the quantitative HPLC analysis. Additionally, physical and chemical stabilities were acceptable during 3 wk at 4 °C. Stability of these nanocarriers in simulated stomach and intestinal conditions was proved. Finally, the improvement of oral absorption of S. repens was studied in vitro using parallel artificial membrane permeability assay. An enhancement of oral permeation was found in both CBM2 and CBS2 nanoformulations comparing with the CB and S. repens CO 2 extract. The best performance was obtained by the CBM2 nanoformulation (~ 17%) predicting a 30 - 70% passive oral human absorption in vivo . Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Zein-alginate based oral drug delivery systems: Protection and release of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungmun; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Park, Ji-Ho

    2016-12-30

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) has a great therapeutic potential by scavenging superoxide that is one of ROS; however, in vivo application is limited especially when it is orally administered. SOD is easily degraded in vivo by the harsh conditions of gastrointestinal tract. Here, we design a zein-alginate based oral drug delivery system that protects SOD from the harsh conditions of gastrointestinal tract and releases it in the environment of the small intestine. SOD is encapsulated in zein-alginate nanoparticles (ZAN) via a phase separation method. We demonstrate that ZAN protect SOD from the harsh conditions of the stomach or small intestine condition. ZAN (200:40) at the weight ratio of 200mg zein to 40mg of alginate releases SOD in a pH dependent manner, and it releases 90.8±1.2% of encapsulated SOD at pH 7.4 in 2h, while only 11.4±0.4% of SOD was released at pH 1.3. The encapsulation efficiency of SOD in ZAN (200:40) was 62.1±2.0%. SOD in ZAN (200:40) reduced the intracellular ROS level and it saved 88.9±7.5% of Caco-2 cells from the toxic superoxide in 4 hours. Based on the results, zein-alginate based oral drug delivery systems will have numerous applications to drugs that are easily degradable in the harsh conditions of gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Design of microemulsion system suitable for the oral delivery of poorly aqueous soluble beta-carotene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Svirskis, Darren; Lee, Sung Je; Oey, Indrawati; Kwak, Hae-Soo; Chen, Guanyu; Bunt, Craig; Wen, Jingyuan

    2017-02-14

    Beta-carotene is a potent antioxidant for maintaining human health. However, its oral absorption is low due to poor aqueous solubility of less than 1 μg/ml. A microemulsion delivery system was designed to solubilize beta-carotene toward enhancing its oral bioavailability. From seven pseudoternary diagrams constructed, three systems were selected with large microemulsion areas suitable for oral administration and dilution in the predominately aqueous gastrointestinal fluids. Conductivity and rheology characterization were conducted along four dilution lines within the selected systems. Three pseudoternary-phase diagrams were selected with large microemulsion regions, >60% of the total phase diagram area, which provide microemulsions with higher drug-loading capacity. A phenomenon was observed by which both propylene glycol and Capmul MCM EP stabilize the microstructure of the microemulsions has been proposed based on the characterization studies. An optimal bicontinuous microemulsion formulation was selected comprising 12% orange oil, 24% Capmul MCM, 18% Tween 20, 6% Labrasol, 20% propylene glycol and 20% water, with a high beta-carotene loading capacity of 140.8 μg/ml and droplet size of 117.4 nm. In conclusion, the developed novel microemulsion formulation allows solubilizing beta-carotene and is a promising basis for further development as a functional beverage.

  3. Antibody response in animals immunized after oral delivery of attenuated liver hepatitis a vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Runxiang; Hou Zongliu; Xie Zhongping; Ding Xuefeng; Pan Yue; Huang Cheng; Zhang Ming; Yang Lixian

    2006-01-01

    The microspheres were prepared by encapsulating live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine with PLA/PLG, and the rhesus monkeys and mice were immunized by such microspheres through oral route. Then serum was collected to detect the HAV-IgM, HAV-IgG, HAV-IgA with EIA, so as to find a convenient immunization way. Results showed that HAV-IgG in rhesus monkeys was detected in the 3rd week and reached a peak value (1267mlU/mL), and then decreased by degrees. HAV-IgM titer was 1:4000. After an oral booster was given, the HAV-IgG level increased, and HAV-IgM titer was 1:1000. The level reached 1244mIU/mL after challenge with wild virus strain, and HAV-IgM was 1:100. HAV-IgM was detected in the control group only after challenge with wild virus strain. HAV-IgG in mice was detected in the 2nd week and reached a peak value in the 4th week. HAV S-IgA was detected in the 1st week and reached a peak value in the 4th week. Antibody response was induced in the rhesus monkeys after oral delivery of the biodegradable microspheres containing live attenuated HA vaccine. The results in mice were similar with the report but the anti-HAV was present earlier as compared with rhesus monkeys. (authors)

  4. A review on oral liquid as an emerging technology in controlled drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torne, Sangmesh Raosaheb; Sheela, Angappan; Sarada, N C

    2017-12-03

    The oral liquid drug delivery system (OLDDS) remains as the primary choice of dosage form, though challenging, for the pharmaceutical scientists. In the last two decades, Oral Liquid Controlled Release (OLCR) formulation has gained a lot of attention because of its advantages over the conventional dosage forms. The world of nanotechnology has paved multiple ways to administer the drug through oral cavity in liquid dosage form with an additional advantage of control over the release. In the current study, the various approaches towards the same have been discussed comprehensively to understand the different mechanisms of OLCR. This review also emphasizes on the existing techniques and the developments that have been made to improve on its efficacy including various formulation related factors. It also provides valuable insights into the role of polymers in the development of OLCR formulation that can be used in the management of Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Preparation and evaluation of chitosan-based nanogels/gels for oral delivery of myricetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yashu; Xia, Mengxin; Wang, Huizhen; Li, Guowen; Shen, Hongyi; Ji, Guang; Meng, Qianchao; Xie, Yan

    2016-08-25

    A novel nanogel/gel based on chitosan (CS) for the oral delivery of myricetin (Myr) was developed and evaluated comprehensively. The particle size of the obtained Myr-loaded CS/β-glycerol phosphate (β-GP) nanogels was in the range of 100-300nm. The rheological tests showed that the sol-gel transition happened when the nanogels were exposed to physiological temperatures, and 3D network structures of the gelatinized nanogels (gels) were confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Myr was released from CS/β-GP nanogel/gel in acidic buffers via a Fickian mechanism, and this release was simultaneously accompanied by swelling and erosion. Moreover, the nanogel/gel exhibited no cytotoxicity by MTT assay, and the oral bioavailability of Myr in rats was improved with an accelerated absorption rate after Myr was loaded into CS/β-GP nanogel/gel. In summary, all of the above showed that CS/β-GP nanogel/gel was an excellent system for orally delivering Myr. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of oral food-grade delivery systems: current knowledge and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benshitrit, Revital Cohen; Levi, Carmit Shani; Tal, Sharon Levi; Shimoni, Eyal; Lesmes, Uri

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in the development of new and efficient oral food delivery systems as tools to prevent disease and promote human health and well-being. Such vehicles are sought to protect bioactive ingredients added to food while controlling and targeting their release as they pass through the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT). This review aims to summarize the key concepts of food delivery systems, their characterization and evaluation. Particularly, evaluation of their performance within the human GIT is discussed. To this end an overview of several in vivo and in vitro methods currently applied for the study of such systems is given. Although considered to be still in its infancy, this promising field of research is likely to infiltrate into real products through rational design. In order for such efforts to materialize into real products some challenges still need to be met and are discussed herein. Overall, it seems that adopting a comprehensive pharmacological approach and relevant cutting edge tools are likely to facilitate innovations and help elucidate and perhaps tailor delivery systems' behavior in the human GIT.

  7. In vivo evaluation of an oral salmon calcitonin-delivery system based on a thiolated chitosan carrier matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggi, Davide; Kast, Constantia E; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2003-12-01

    To develop and evaluate an oral delivery system for salmon calcitonin. 2-Iminothiolane was covalently bound to chitosan in order to improve the mucoadhesive and cohesive properties of the polymer. The resulting chitosan-TBA conjugate (chitosan-4-thiobutylamidine conjugate) was homogenized with salmon calcitonin. mannitol, and a chitosan-Bowman-Birk inhibitor conjugate and a chitosan-elastatinal conjugate (6.75 + 0.25 + 1 + 1 + 1). Optionally 0.5% (m/m) reduced glutathione. used as permeation mediator, was added. Each mixture was compressed to 2 mg microtablets and enteric coated with a polymethacrylate. Biofeedback studies were performed in rats by oral administration of the delivery system and determination of the decrease in plasma calcium level as a function of time. Test formulations led to a significant (p thiolated chitosan, chitosan-enzyme-inhibitor conjugates and the permeation mediator glutathione seems to represent a promising strategy for the oral delivery of salmon calcitonin.

  8. The relationship between maternal insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF-1, IGF-2) and IGFBP-3 to gestational age and preterm delivery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooley, Sharon M

    2012-02-01

    AIMS: To investigate the relationship between levels of insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF-1, IGF-2), and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) in antenatal maternal serum and gestational age at delivery. METHODS: Prospective cohort study of 1650 low-risk Caucasian women in a London University teaching hospital. Maternal IGF-1, IGF-2 and IGFBP-3 were measured in maternal blood at booking and analyzed with respect to gestational age at delivery. RESULTS: There was no significant association between maternal IGF-1 or IGF-2 and preterm birth (PTB). A significant reduction in mean IGFBP-3 levels was noted with delivery <32 completed weeks (P=0.02). CONCLUSION: Maternal mean IGFBP-3 levels are significantly reduced in cases complicated by delivery <32 completed weeks.

  9. Effect of formulation variables on insulin localisation within solid lipid nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Thong, Li Ming

    2016-01-01

    There has been a lot of interest on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) as these colloidal submicron drug dosage forms present a promising frontier in drug delivery. It is possible to incorporate susceptible drugs such as protein intended for oral delivery. Here, we aim to develop an oral delivery system based on SLNs to deliver the peptide hormone, insulin using the double emulsion (W/O/W) solvent evaporation technique for formulating the SLNs. The choice of lipids was carefully selected to inc...

  10. Oral contraceptives increase insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 concentration in women with polycystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suikkari, A M; Tiitinen, A; Stenman, U H; Seppälä, M; Laatikainen, T

    1991-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) stimulates ovarian androgen production. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) inhibits IGF actions in vitro. To investigate the effect of oral contraceptive (OC) pills, given for 3 months, on serum gonadotropin, androgen, IGF-I, and IGFBP-1 concentrations, and glucose tolerance in seven women with polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD) and in five healthy control subjects. Seven women with PCOD and five healthy control subjects. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed before and after treatment with OC. After treatment with OC, serum luteinizing hormone, androstenedione, and free testosterone levels decreased, and sex hormone-binding globulin concentration increased in the women with PCOD as well as in the control subjects. The cumulative response of serum insulin to OGTT was larger in the women with PCOD than in the control subjects both before and after treatment. Serum IGF-I concentration, which was unchanged during OGTT, decreased from basal level of 326 +/- 70 micrograms/L to 199 +/- 28 micrograms/L after treatment with OC in the women with PCOD, whereas no change was found in the control subjects (from 235 +/- 11 micrograms/L to 226 +/- 11 micrograms/L). Treatment with OC caused an increase of the mean basal IGFBP-1 concentration from 24 +/- 7 micrograms/L to 73 +/- 14 micrograms/L in the women with PCOD. This increase was constant during the OGTT. In the control subjects, treatment with OC did not result in any significant change in IGFBP-1 concentrations (from 44 +/- 11 micrograms/L to 61 +/- 9 micrograms/L). The combination of decreased total IGF-I concentration and increased IGFBP-1 concentration induced by OC may decrease ovarian androgen production in PCOD.

  11. Studies on Several Hormone Responses Following Intravenous Alimentation: Insulin and growth hormone responses following oral or intravenous alimentation in patient with far advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, H K; Koh, J H; Ryu, Y W; Lee, J O; Lee, C W; Kim, J Y; Lee, J K [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1975-09-15

    Glucose tolerance, insulin and growth hormone responses following glucose for amino acids administration by means of parenteral or oral load were studied in patients with far advanced gastric cancer. Hormone responses following nutrients load showed in patients with gastric cancer were compared to those of healthy subjects. Results were as follows:1) Blood sugar appearance following oral glucose administration was diminished in patients with far advanced gastric cancer. 2) The insulin responses of gastric cancer following oral glucose were also diminished as compared to that of normal subjects and were identical with parenteral route. 3) Parenteral administration of glucose or amino acids to patients with gastric cancer resulted in a increase of plasma growth hormone level. 4) Lower insulin response to amino acids was observed on parenteral administration in patient with gastric cancer as in healthy subjects. 5) Author discussed that the low insulin response after oral glucose administration showed in gastric cancer, and any additional insulin requirement arise when longer periods of parenteral amino acid administration are necessary, as in the patient with malnutrition.

  12. Studies on Several Hormone Responses Following Intravenous Alimentation: Insulin and growth hormone responses following oral or intravenous alimentation in patient with far advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, H. K.; Koh, J. H.; Ryu, Y. W.; Lee, J. O.; Lee, C. W.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    Glucose tolerance, insulin and growth hormone responses following glucose for amino acids administration by means of parenteral or oral load were studied in patients with far advanced gastric cancer. Hormone responses following nutrients load showed in patients with gastric cancer were compared to those of healthy subjects. Results were as follows:1) Blood sugar appearance following oral glucose administration was diminished in patients with far advanced gastric cancer. 2) The insulin responses of gastric cancer following oral glucose were also diminished as compared to that of normal subjects and were identical with parenteral route. 3) Parenteral administration of glucose or amino acids to patients with gastric cancer resulted in a increase of plasma growth hormone level. 4) Lower insulin response to amino acids was observed on parenteral administration in patient with gastric cancer as in healthy subjects. 5) Author discussed that the low insulin response after oral glucose administration showed in gastric cancer, and any additional insulin requirement arise when longer periods of parenteral amino acid administration are necessary, as in the patient with malnutrition.

  13. Nanostructured lipid carriers used for oral delivery of oridonin: an effect of ligand modification on absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xingwang; Ye, Yanghuan; Zhang, Tianpeng; Wang, Huan; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian

    2015-02-20

    Oridonin (Ori) is a natural compound with notable anti-inflammation and anti-cancer activities. However, therapeutic use of this compound is limited by its poor solubility and low bioavailability. Here a novel biotin-modified nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) was developed to enhance the bioavailability of Ori. The effect of ligand (biotin) modification on oral absorption of Ori encapsulated in NLCs was also explored. Ori-loaded NLCs (Ori-NLCs) were prepared by the melt dispersion-high pressure homogenization method. Biotin modification of Ori-NLCs was achieved by EDC and NHS in aqueous phase. The obtained biotin-decorated Ori-NLCs (Bio-Ori-NLCs) were 144.9nm in size with an entrapment efficiency of 49.54% and a drug load of 4.81%. Oral bioavailability was enhanced by use of Bio-Ori-NLCs with a relative bioavailability of 171.01%, while the value of non-modified Ori-NLCs was improved to 143.48%. Intestinal perfusion showed that Ori solution unexpectedly exhibited a moderate permeability, indicating that permeability was not a limiting factor of Ori absorption. Ori could be rapidly metabolized that was the main cause of low bioavailability. However, there was a difference in the enhancement of bioavailability between Bio-Ori-NLCs and conventional NLCs. Although severe lipolyses happened both on Bio-Ori-NLCs and non-modified NLCs, the performance of Bio-Ori-NLCs in the bioavailability improvement was more significant. Overall, Bio-Ori-NLCs can further promote the oral absorption of Ori by a ligand-mediated active transport. It may be a promising carrier for the oral delivery of Ori. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Receptor-mediated oral delivery of a bioencapsulated green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic chloroplasts into the mouse circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Arati; Koya, Vijay; Samsam, Mohtashem; Daniell, Henry

    2006-05-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceutical proteins expressed in plant cells should reduce their cost of production, purification, processing, cold storage, transportation, and delivery. However, poor intestinal absorption of intact proteins is a major challenge. To overcome this limitation, we investigate here the concept of receptor-mediated oral delivery of chloroplast-expressed foreign proteins. Therefore, the transmucosal carrier cholera toxin B-subunit and green fluorescent protein (CTB-GFP), separated by a furin cleavage site, was expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy. Immunoblot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of monomeric and pentameric forms of CTB-GFP, up to 21.3% of total soluble proteins. An in vitro furin cleavage assay confirmed integrity of the engineered furin cleavage site, and a GM1 binding assay confirmed the functionality of CTB-GFP pentamers. Following oral administration of CTB-GFP expressing leaf material to mice, GFP was observed in the mice intestinal mucosa, liver, and spleen in fluorescence and immunohistochemical studies, while CTB remained in the intestinal cell. This report of receptor-mediated oral delivery of a foreign protein into the circulatory system opens the door for low-cost production and delivery of human therapeutic proteins.

  15. Probiotic Ferulic Acid Esterase Active Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221 APA Microcapsules for Oral Delivery: Preparation and in Vitro Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Coussa-Charley, Michael; Kahouli, Imen; Jones, Mitchell L.; Labb?, Alain; Prakash, Satya

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics possess potential therapeutic and preventative effects for various diseases and metabolic disorders. One important limitation for the oral delivery of probiotics is the harsh conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) which challenge bacterial viability and activity. One proposed method to surpass this obstacle is the use of microencapsulation to improve the delivery of bacterial cells to the lower GIT. The aim of this study is to use alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA)...

  16. Development and characterisation of chitosan films impregnated with insulin loaded PEG-b-PLA nanoparticles (NPs): a potential approach for buccal delivery of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovino, Concetta; Ayensu, Isaac; Tetteh, John; Boateng, Joshua S

    2012-05-30

    Mucoadhesive chitosan based films, incorporated with insulin loaded nanoparticles (NPs) made of poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether-block-polylactide (PEG-b-PLA) have been developed and characterised. Blank-NPs were prepared by double emulsion solvent evaporation technique with varying concentrations of the copolymer (5 and 10%, w/v). The optimised formulation was loaded with insulin (model protein) at initial loadings of 2, 5 and 10% with respect to copolymer weight. The developed NPs were analysed for size, size distribution, surface charge, morphology, encapsulation efficiency and drug release. NPs showing negative (ζ)-potential ( 300 nm and a polydispersity index (P.I.) of ≈ 0.2, irrespective of formulation process, were achieved. Insulin encapsulation efficiencies of 70% and 30% for NPs-Insulin-2 and NPs-Insulin-5 were obtained, respectively. The in vitro release behaviour of both formulations showed a classic biphasic sustained release of protein over 5 weeks which was influenced by pH of the release medium. Optimised chitosan films embedded with 3mg of insulin loaded NPs were produced by solvent casting with homogeneous distribution of NPs in the mucoadhesive matrix, which displayed excellent physico-mechanical properties. The drug delivery system has been designed as a novel platform for potential buccal delivery of macromolecules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of oral vancomycin on gut microbiota, bile acid metabolism, and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrieze, Anne; Out, Carolien; Fuentes, Susana

    2014-01-01

    .i.d. At baseline and after 1 week of therapy, fecal microbiota composition (Human Intestinal Tract Chip phylogenetic microarray), fecal and plasma bile acid concentrations as well as insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp using [6,6-(2)H2]-glucose tracer) were measured. RESULTS: Vancomycin reduced...... (pinsulin sensitivity (p... of vancomycin significantly impacts host physiology by decreasing intestinal microbiota diversity, bile acid dehydroxylation and peripheral insulin sensitivity in subjects with metabolic syndrome. These data show that intestinal microbiota, particularly of the Firmicutes phylum contributes to bile acid...

  18. Innovative Models of Dental Care Delivery and Coverage: Patient-Centric Dental Benefits Based on Digital Oral Health Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John; Mills, Shannon; Foley, Mary E

    2018-04-01

    Innovative models of dental care delivery and coverage are emerging across oral health care systems causing changes to treatment and benefit plans. A novel addition to these models is digital risk assessment, which offers a promising new approach that incorporates the use of a cloud-based technology platform to assess an individual patient's risk for oral disease. Risk assessment changes treatment by including risk as a modifier of treatment and as a determinant of preventive services. Benefit plans are being developed to use risk assessment to predetermine preventive benefits for patients identified at elevated risk for oral disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Generation of pH responsive fluorescent nano capsules through simple steps for the oral delivery of low pH susceptible drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakumary, Changerath; Sreenivasan, Kunnatheeri

    2016-11-01

    pH responsive nano capsules are promising as it can encapsulate low pH susceptible drugs like insulin and guard them from the hostile environments in the intestinal tract. The strong acidity of the gastro-intestinal tract and the presence of proteolytic enzymes are the tumbling blocks for the design of drug delivery vehicles through oral route for drugs like insulin. Nano capsules are normally built over templates which are subsequently removed by further steps. Such processes are complex and often lead into deformed and collapsed capsules. In this study, we choose calcium carbonate (CaCO3) nano particles to serve as template. Over CaCO3 nanoparticles, silica layers were built followed by polymethacrylic acid chains to acquire pH responsiveness. During the polymerization process of the methacrylic acid, the calcium carbonate core particles were dissolved leading to the formation of nano hollow capsules having a size that ranges from 225 to 246 nm and thickness from 19 to 58 nm. The methodology is simple and devoid of additional steps. The nano shells exhibited 80% release of the loaded model drug, insulin at pH 7.4 while at pH 2.0 the capsules nearly stopped the release of the drug. Polymethacrylic acid shows pH responsive swelling behavior that it swells at intestinal pH (7.0-7.5) and shrinks at gastric pH (˜2.0) thus enabling the safe unloading of the drug from the nano capsules.

  20. Status of governmental oral health care delivery system in Haryana, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Vashist

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health system should be organized to meet the needs of entire population of the nation. This means that the state has the direct responsibility for the health of its population and improving the quality of life through research, education, and provision of health services. The present study was conducted to evaluate the government oral health care delivery system in Haryana, India. Materials and Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted among 135 dental care units (DCUs of various primary health centers (PHCs, community health centers (CHCs, and general hospitals (GHs existing in the state by employing a cluster random sampling technique. Data regarding the provision of water and electricity supply, dental man power and their qualification, number and type of instruments in the dental operatory unit, etc., were collected on a structured format. Statistical analysis was done using number and percentages (SPSS package version 16. Results: Alternative source of electricity (generator existed in only a few of health centers. About 93.4% (155 of the staff were graduates (BDS and 6.6% (11 were postgraduates (MDS. Ultrasonic scaler was available at dental units of 83.1% (64 of PHCs, 73.1% (19 of CHCs, and 93.8% (30 of GHs. Patient drapes were provided in 48.1% (65 of the DCUs, doctor′s aprons were provided in 74.1% (100 of the places. Conclusion: There is a shortfall in infrastructure and significant problem with the adequacy of working facilities. A great deal of effort is required to harmonize the oral health care delivery system.

  1. Update on Mathematical Modeling Research to Support the Development of Automated Insulin Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    that believed the delay is ≤10–15 min, 50% believed that insulin can cause changes in the blood (i.e., plasma)-to-ISF glucose gradient. Also, 50% still...by the R01HL88448-1 grant, which seeks to establish safe pediatric euglycemia after cardiac surgery in neonates using continuous glucose monitoring...2062–7. 9. Burge MR, Castillo KR, Schade DS. Meal composition is a determinant of lispro-induced hypoglycemia in IDDM. Diabetes Care. 1997;20(2):152–5

  2. Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults: From oral hypoglycemic agents to early insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resham R Poudel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of phenotypic type 2 diabetics have islet autoantibodies and are referred to as having latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA, and they land on early sulfonylurea failure and require insulin. Diagnosing LADA has treatment implications because of high risk of progression to insulin dependency. But often there is delay in insulin therapy, as there are no recommendations for islet antibody testing in adult-onset diabetes currently. LADA clinical risk score can identify adults at high risk who may benefit from antibody testing. The optimal treatment of LADA is not established. Early insulin therapy helps to achieve good metabolic control and better long-term outcomes by preserving b-cells and endogenous C-peptide secretion. Sulfonylureas are better avoided as they exhaust b-cells; glitazones and exenatide have favorable outcomes, whereas metformin needs to be used with caution. Understanding LADA will also bring new windows in managing type 1 diabetes. Information acquisition was done by reviewing the medical literature published since 1987, with particular attention to the natural history, genetic factors, and treatment of LADA.

  3. Dual peptide-mediated targeted delivery of bioactive siRNAs to oral cancer cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Bryant, Angela A; Zhang, Haiwen; Attaway, Christopher C; Pugh, William; Eggart, Laurence; Sansevere, Robert M; Andino, Lourdes M; Dinh, Lu; Cantini, Liliana P; Jakymiw, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Despite significant advances in cancer treatment, the prognosis for oral cancer remains poor in comparison to other cancer types, including breast, skin, and prostate. As a result, more effective therapeutic modalities are needed for the treatment of oral cancer. Consequently, in the present study, we examined the feasibility of using a dual peptide carrier approach, combining an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting peptide with an endosome-disruptive peptide, to mediate targeted delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells and induce silencing of the targeted oncogene, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A). Fluorescence microscopy, real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and in vivo bioimaging of mice containing orthotopic xenograft tumors were used to examine the ability of the dual peptide carrier to mediate specific delivery of bioactive siRNAs into EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells/tissues. Co-complexation of the EGFR-targeting peptide, GE11R9, with the endosome-disruptive 599 peptide facilitated the specific uptake of siRNAs into oral cancer cells overexpressing EGFR in vitro with optimal gene silencing observed at a 60:30:1 (GE11R9:599:siRNA) molar ratio. Furthermore, when administered systemically to mice bearing xenograft oral tumors, this dual peptide complex mediated increased targeted delivery of siRNAs into tumor tissues in comparison to the 599 peptide alone and significantly enhanced CIP2A silencing. Herein we provide the first report demonstrating the clinical potential of a dual peptide strategy for siRNA-based therapeutics by synergistically mediating the effective targeting and delivery of bioactive siRNAs into EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cost of goods sold and total cost of delivery for oral and parenteral vaccine packaging formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedita, Jeff; Perrella, Stefanie; Morio, Matt; Berbari, Michael; Hsu, Jui-Shan; Saxon, Eugene; Jarrahian, Courtney; Rein-Weston, Annie; Zehrung, Darin

    2018-03-14

    Despite limitations of glass packaging for vaccines, the industry has been slow to implement alternative formats. Polymer containers may address many of these limitations, such as breakage and delamination. However, the ability of polymer containers to achieve cost of goods sold (COGS) and total cost of delivery (TCOD) competitive with that of glass containers is unclear, especially for cost-sensitive low- and lower-middle-income countries. COGS and TCOD models for oral and parenteral vaccine packaging formats were developed based on information from subject matter experts, published literature, and Kenya's comprehensive multiyear plan for immunization. Rotavirus and inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPV) were used as representative examples of oral and parenteral vaccines, respectively. Packaging technologies evaluated included glass vials, blow-fill-seal (BFS) containers, preformed polymer containers, and compact prefilled auto-disable (CPAD) devices in both BFS and preformed formats. For oral vaccine packaging, BFS multi-monodose (MMD) ampoules were the least expensive format, with a COGS of $0.12 per dose. In comparison, oral single-dose glass vials had a COGS of $0.40. BFS MMD ampoules had the lowest TCOD of oral vaccine containers at $1.19 per dose delivered, and ten-dose glass vials had a TCOD of $1.61 per dose delivered. For parenteral vaccines, the lowest COGS was achieved with ten-dose glass vials at $0.22 per dose. In contrast, preformed CPAD devices had the highest COGS at $0.60 per dose. Ten-dose glass vials achieved the lowest TCOD of the parenteral vaccine formats at $1.56 per dose delivered. Of the polymer containers for parenteral vaccines, BFS MMD ampoules achieved the lowest TCOD at $1.89 per dose delivered, whereas preformed CPAD devices remained the most expensive format, at $2.25 per dose delivered. Given their potential to address the limitations of glass and reduce COGS and TCOD, polymer containers deserve further consideration as alternative

  5. Potential benefits of chewing gum for the delivery of oral therapeutics and its possible role in oral healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Maitra, Amarnath; Dodds, Michael W. J.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Over the years, chewing gum has developed from a candy towards an oral health-promoting nutraceutical. This review summarizes evidence for the oral health benefits of chewing gum, emphasizing identification of active ingredients in gum that facilitate prevention and removal of oral

  6. Evaluation of synthetic zeolites as oral delivery vehicle for anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Khodaverdi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: In this research, zeolite X and zeolite Y were used as vehicle to prepare intestine targeted oral delivery systems of indomethacin and ibuprofen. Materials and Methods: A soaking procedure was implemented to encapsulate indomethacin or ibuprofen within synthetic zeolites. Gravimetric methods and IR spectra of prepared formulations were used to assess drug loading efficiencies into zeolite structures. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM was also utilized to determine morphologies changes in synthetic zeolites after drug loading. At the next stage, dissolution studies were used to predict the in vivo performance of prepared formulations at HCl 0.1 N and PBS pH 6.5 as simulated gastric fluid (SGF and simulated intestine fluid (SIF, respectively. Results: Drug loadings of prepared formulations was determined between 24-26 % w/w. Dissolution tests at SGF were shown that zeolites could retain acidic model drugs in their porous structures and can be able to limit their release into the stomach. On the other hand, all prepared formulations completely released model drugs during 3 hr in simulated intestine fluid. Conclusion: Obtained results indicated zeolites could potentially be able to release indomethacin and ibuprofen in a sustained and controlled manner and reduced adverse effects commonly accompanying oral administrations of NSAIDs.

  7. An oral oligonucleotide delivery system based on a thiolated polymer: Development and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martien, Ronny; Hoyer, Herbert; Perera, Glen; Schnürch, Andreas Bernkop

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate an oral oligonucleotide delivery system based on a thiolated polymer/reduced glutathione (GSH) system providing a protective effect toward nucleases and permeation enhancement. A polycarbophil-cysteine conjugate (PCP-Cys) was synthesized. Enzymatic degradation of a model oligonucleotide by DNase I and within freshly collected intestinal fluid was investigated in the absence and presence of PCP-Cys. Permeation studies with PCP-Cys/GSH versus control were performed in vitro on Caco-2 cell monolayers and ex vivo on rat intestinal mucosa. PCP-Cys displayed 223 ± 13.8 μmol thiol groups per gram polymer. After 4h, 61% of the free oligonucleotides were degraded by DNase I and 80% within intestinal fluid. In contrast, less than 41% (DNase I) and 60% (intestinal fluid) were degraded in the presence of 0.02% (m/v) PCP-Cys. Permeation studies revealed an 8-fold (Caco-2) and 10-fold (intestinal mucosa) increase in apparent permeability compared to buffer control. Hence, this PCP-Cys/GSH system might be a promising tool for the oral administration of oligonucleotides as it allows a significant protection toward degrading enzymes and facilitates their transport across intestinal membranes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Preparation and characterization of docetaxel self-nanoemulsifying powders (SNEPs): A strategy for improved oral delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkavalli, Sharath; Eedara, Basanth Babu; Janga, Karthik Yadav; Velpula, Ashok; Jukanti, Raju; Bandari, Suresh [St. Peter' s Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Warangal (India)

    2016-03-15

    Liquid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (L-SNEDDS) of docetaxel were prepared using varying ratios of Capmul PG 8 NF (oil), Cremophor EL (surfactant) and Transcutol-P (co-surfactant). The optimized L-SNEDDS (L{sub 11}) was transformed into self-nanoemulsifying powder (SNEP) by physical adsorption on to Neusilin US2 and evaluated for dissolution behavior, in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo oral bioavailability. Optimized L-SNEDDS (L{sub 11}) composed of 50% of oil, 41.7% of surfactant and 8.3% co-surfactant produced stable emulsion with smaller globules (43±3 nm). In vitro dissolution studies showed the rapid drug release within 5min (95.42±1%) from SNEP{sub N}. In vitro cytotoxicity assessed by the MTT assay using MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines revealed that L-SNEDDS significantly reduced the IC{sub 50} value and was 2.3 times lower than the pure docetaxel. Further, the oral bioavailability studies in male Wistar rats showed higher C{sub max} values following treatment with SNEP{sub N} (0.98±0.13 μg/mL) and L-SNEDDS (1.09± 0.06 μg/mL) compared to pure docetaxel (0.37±0.04 μg/mL).

  9. Transepithelial transport and toxicity of PAMAM dendrimers: implications for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadekar, S; Ghandehari, H

    2012-05-01

    This article summarizes efforts to evaluate poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers as carriers for oral drug delivery. Specifically, the effect of PAMAM generation, surface charge and surface modification on toxicity, cellular uptake and transepithelial transport is discussed. Studies on Caco-2 monolayers, as models of intestinal epithelial barrier, show that by engineering surface chemistry of PAMAM dendrimers, it is possible to minimize toxicity while maximizing transepithelial transport. It has been demonstrated that PAMAM dendrimers are transported by a combination of paracellular and transcellular routes. Depending on surface chemistry, PAMAM dendrimers can open the tight junctions of epithelial barriers. This tight junction opening is in part mediated by internalization of the dendrimers. Transcellular transport of PAMAM dendrimers is mediated by a variety of endocytic mechanisms. Attachment or complexation of cytotoxic agents to PAMAM dendrimers enhances the transport of such drugs across epithelial barriers. A remaining challenge is the design and development of linker chemistries that are stable in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and the blood stream, but amenable to cleavage at the target site of action. Recent efforts have focused on the use of PAMAM dendrimers as penetration enhancers. Detailed in vivo oral bioavailability of PAMAM dendrimer-drug conjugates, as a function of physicochemical properties will further need to be assessed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of Electron Irradiation Factor on Haruan Traditional Extract (HTE) for Oral Drug Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim Ijang; Abdul Manan, M.J.; Kamaruddin Hashim

    2014-01-01

    Haruan or Channa striatus is source of protein, Haruan extract is well known in the region for having a medicinal quality and widely consumed. It is great advantage if this product could be administered by oral rather than injection because oral route of drug delivery is still preferred by the vast majority of patients. However protein and peptides can be denatured or degraded by conditions included the acidic pH of the stomach and presence of endogenous enzymes. In order to protect or prevent digestion and degradation of the protein in the stomach and to ensure the protein reach to gastro intestinal (GI) tract, CMS nano gel system was developed using electron irradiation method. However stability of HTE toward radiation needed to be ensured before being used for the next level. In this study, the HTE was radiated with electron radiation. Its stability was analysed in term of physical aspect by looking at the colour difference, melting point by using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and in terms of chemical aspect which include molecular bonds by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). The results of this study were that no apparent colour difference was seen on the HTE before and after irradiation. Those are supported by FTIR and DSC analysis results that showed that there were no change of molecular bonds and melting point, compared between no irradiation and irradiation HTE during electron irradiation up to 10 kGy. Statistically the test showed no significant difference at p<0.005 within melting temperatures. (author)

  11. Influence of Electron Beam Irradiation on Peptide of Haruan Traditional Extract (HTE) for Oral Drug Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim Ijang

    2015-01-01

    Haruan or Channa striatus is source of protein, Haruan extract is well known in the region for having a medicinal quality and widely consumed. It is great advantage if this product could be administered by oral rather than injection because oral route of drug delivery is still preferred by the vast majority of patients. However protein and peptides can be denatured or degraded by conditions included the acidic pH of the stomach and presence of endogenous enzymes. In order to protect or prevent digestion and degradation of the protein in the stomach and to ensure the protein reach to gastro intestinal (GI) tract, CMS nano gel system was developed using electron irradiation method. However stability of HTE toward radiation needed to be ensured before being used for the next level. In this study, the HTE was radiated with electron radiation. Its stability was analysed in term of physical aspect by looking at the colour difference, melting point by using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and in terms of chemical aspect which include molecular bonds by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). The results of this study were that no apparent colour difference was seen on the HTE before and after irradiation. Those are supported by FTIR and DSC analysis results that showed that there were no change of molecular bonds and melting point, compared between no irradiation and irradiation HTE during electron irradiation up to 30 KGy. Statistically the test showed no significant difference at p<0.005 within melting temperatures. (author)

  12. Preparation and physicochemical characterization of supercritically dried insulin-loaded microparticles for pulmonary delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amidi, Maryam; Pellikaan, Hubert C.; de Boer, Anne H.; Crommelin, Daan J. A.; Hennink, Wim E.; Jiskoot, Wim

    In the search for non-invasive delivery options for the increasing number of therapeutic proteins, pulmonary administration is an attractive route. Supercritical fluid (SCF) drying processes offer the possibility to produce dry protein formulations suitable for inhalation. In this study,

  13. A Study of the Insulin and the C-Peptide Responses to Oral Glucose Load in Nondiabetic and Diabetic Subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Sung Jae; Kim, Eung Jin; Koh, Chang Soon; Min, Hun Ki

    1977-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the significance of the insulin and the C-peptide response to oral glucose loads in normal and diabetic subjects and to establish the effects of the obesity. In this study, the authors have measured plasma insulin and C-peptide by means of radioimmunoassay in 10 nonobese normal, 5 obese normal, 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, 9 obese moderate diabetic patients and 9 severe diabetic patients. The results obtained were as follows; 1) In 10 nonobese normal subjects, the plasma insulin level at fasting state and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after oral glucose loads were 15.7±3.4, 48.3±9.8, 40.4±6.7, 37.4±6.5 and 26.0±4.2 uU/ml (Mean±S.E.) and C-peptide were 1.9±0.3, 3.9±0.6, 6.3±0.6, 5.7±0.5 and 4.0±0.5 ng/ml. The change of C-peptide was found to go almost parallel with that of insulin and the insulin value reaches to the highest level at 30 min whereas C-peptide reaches to its peak at 60 min.. 2) The plasma insulin level in 5 obese normal subjects were 38.9±12.3, 59.5±12.3, 59.2±17.1, 56.1±20.0 and 48.4±17.2 uU/ml and the C-peptide were 5.5±0.4, 6.8±0.5, 7.9±0.8, 7.9±0.8 and 7.8±2.0 ng/ml. The insulin response appeared to be greater than nonobese normal subjects. 3) In 13 nonobese moderate diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 27.1±4.9, 44.1±6.0, 37.3±6.6, 35.5±8.1 and 34.7±10.7 uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 2.7±0.4, 4.9±0.7, 6.5±0.5, 7.0±0.3 and 6.7±1.0 ng/ml. There was little significance compared to nonobese normal groups but delayed pattern is noted. 4) In 9 obese moderated diabetic patients, the plasma insulin levels were 22.1±7.9, 80.0±19.3, 108.0±27.0, 62.0±17.6 and 55.5±10.l uU/ml and the C-peptide levels were 5.2±0.4, 8.0±1.0, 10.4±1.6, 10.4±1.7 and 10.1±1.0 ng/ml and its response was also greater than that of nonobese moderate diabetic patients. 5) The plasma insulin concentrations in 9 severe diabetic subjects were 8.0±3.8, 12.1±3.5, 16.8±4.6, 19

  14. Silica-coated flexible liposomes as a nanohybrid delivery system for enhanced oral bioavailability of curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chong Li, Yan Zhang, Tingting Su, Lianlian Feng, Yingying Long, Zhangbao ChenKey Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southwest University, Chongqing, ChinaAbstract: We investigated flexible liposomes as a potential oral drug delivery system. However, enhanced membrane fluidity and structural deformability may necessitate liposomal surface modification when facing the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, silica-coated flexible liposomes loaded with curcumin (CUR-SLs having poor water solubility as a model drug were prepared by a thin-film method with homogenization, followed by the formation of a silica shell by the sol-gel process. We systematically investigated the physical properties, drug release behavior, pharmacodynamics, and bioavailability of CUR-SLs. CUR-SLs had a mean diameter of 157 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.14, while the apparent entrapment efficiency was 90.62%. Compared with curcumin-loaded flexible liposomes (CUR-FLs without silica-coatings, CUR-SLs had significantly higher stability against artificial gastric fluid and showed more sustained drug release in artificial intestinal fluid as determined by in vitro release assays. The bioavailability of CUR-SLs and CUR-FLs was 7.76- and 2.35-fold higher, respectively, than that of curcumin suspensions. Silica coating markedly improved the stability of flexible liposomes, and CUR-SLs exhibited a 3.31-fold increase in bioavailability compared with CUR-FLs, indicating that silica-coated flexible liposomes may be employed as a potential carrier to deliver drugs with poor water solubility via the oral route with improved bioavailability.Keywords: silica, flexible liposome, oral bioavailability, curcumin

  15. Assessing the contribution of the dental care delivery system to oral health care disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourat, Nadereh; Andersen, Ronald M; Marcus, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Existing studies of disparities in access to oral health care for underserved populations often focus on supply measures such as number of dentists. This approach overlooks the importance of other aspects of the dental care delivery system, such as personal and practice characteristics of dentists, that determine the capacity to provide care. This study aims to assess the role of such characteristics in access to care of underserved populations. We merged data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey and a 2003 survey of California dentists in their Medical Study Service Areas (MSSAs). We examined the role of overall supply and other characteristics of dentists in income and racial/ethnic disparities in access, which was measured by annual dental visits and unmet need for dental care due to costs. We found that some characteristics of MSSAs, including higher proportions of dentists who were older, white, busy or overworked, and did not accept public insurance or discounted fees, inhibited access for low-income and minority populations. These findings highlight the importance of monitoring characteristics of dentists in addition to traditional measures of supply such as licensed-dentist-to-population ratios. The findings identify specific aspects of the delivery system such as dentists' participation in Medicaid, provision of discounted care, busyness, age, race/ethnicity, and gender that should be regularly monitored. These data will provide a better understanding of how the dental care delivery system is organized and how this knowledge can be used to develop more narrowly targeted policies to alleviate disparities. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  16. 76 FR 25696 - Guidance for Industry on Dosage Delivery Devices for Orally Ingested OTC Liquid Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... are manufacturing, marketing, or distributing orally ingested over-the-counter (OTC) liquid drug... overdoses that can result from the use of dosage delivery devices with markings that are inconsistent or... because of ongoing concerns about potentially serious accidental drug overdoses that can result from the...

  17. Sex differences in the gastrointestinal tract of rats and the implications for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso-Pereira, Francisco; Dou, Liu; Trenfield, Sarah J; Madla, Christine M; Murdan, Sudaxshina; Sousa, Jõao; Veiga, Francisco; Basit, Abdul W

    2018-03-30

    Pre-clinical research often uses rodents as animal models to guide the selection of appropriate oral drug and dose selection in humans. However, traditionally, such research fails to consider the gastrointestinal differences between the sexes of rats and the impact on oral drug delivery. This study aimed to identify and characterise the potential sex-related differences in the gastrointestinal environment of sacrificed male and female Wistar rats. Their gastrointestinal tracts were excised and segmented into the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon. The respective contents and tissue sections were collected and analysed for pH, buffer capacity, surface tension, osmolality and relative P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. The pH in the stomach of females was found to be lower than in males. Female rats also exhibited a higher buffer capacity in the caecum and colon when compared with their male counterparts. Males were found to have a higher osmolality than females in the duodenum, ileum and colon. Significant sex differences (p < 0.05) in surface tension were observed in the ileum, where females exhibited a higher surface tension. Interestingly, female rats displayed significantly higher relative P-gp expression levels (p < 0.05) when compared with male rats in the duodenum (1.24 ± 0.85 vs. 0.36 ± 0.26), jejunum (1.45 ± 0.88 vs. 0.38 ± 0.26) and ileum (0.92 ± 0.43 vs. 0.40 ± 0.18) but not in the colon (0.5 ± 0.32 vs. 0.33 ± 0.16) segments. The work reported has demonstrated the stark physiological differences between male and female rats at a physiological level, indicating how the 'sex of the gut' could influence oral drug delivery. These findings, therefore, are of critical importance in pre-clinical research and drug development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-assembly of green tea catechin derivatives in nanoparticles for oral lycopene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weikun; Yalcin, Murat; Lin, Qishan; Ardawi, Mohammed-Salleh M; Mousa, Shaker A

    2017-02-28

    Lycopene is a natural anti-oxidant that has attracted much attention due to its varied applications such as protection against loss of bone mass, chronic diseases, skin cancer, prostate cancer, and cardiovascular disease. However, high instability and extremely low oral bioavailability limit its further clinical development. We selected a green tea catechin derivative, oligomerized (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (OEGCG) as a carrier for oral lycopene delivery. Lycopene-loaded OEGCG nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by a nano-precipitation method, followed by coating with chitosan to form a shell. This method not only can easily control the size of the NP to be around 200nm to improve its bioavailability, but also can effectively protect the lycopene against degradation due to EGCG's anti-oxidant property. OEGCG was carefully characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Lycopene-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) NPs were prepared by the same method. Chitosan-coated OEGCG/lycopene NPs had a diameter of 152±32nm and a ζ-potential of 58.3±4.2mv as characterized with transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The loading capacity of lycopene was 9% and encapsulation efficiency was 89%. FT-IR spectral analysis revealed electrostatic interaction between OEGCG and chitosan. Freeze drying of the NPs was also evaluated as a means to improve shelf life. Dynamic light scattering data showed that no aggregation occurred, and the size of the NP increased 1.2 times (S f /S i ratio) in the presence of 10% sucrose after freeze drying. The in vitro release study showed slow release of lycopene in simulated gastric fluid at acidic pH and faster release in simulated intestinal fluid. In an in vivo study in mice, lycopene pharmacokinetic parameters were improved by lycopene/OEGCG/chitosan NPs, but not improved by lycopene/PLGA/chitosan NPs. The self-assembled nanostructure of OEGCG combined with lycopene may be a

  19. A novel nanoemulsion-based method to produce ultrasmall, water-dispersible nanoparticles from chitosan, surface modified with cell-penetrating peptide for oral delivery of proteins and peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbari GR

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ghullam Reza Barbari,1 Farid Abedin Dorkoosh,1 Mohsen Amini,2 Mohammad Sharifzadeh,3 Fateme Atyabi,1 Saeed Balalaie,4 Niyousha Rafiee Tehrani,5 Morteza Rafiee Tehrani1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, 3Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 4Department of Chemistry, Khaje Nasiroddin University, 5Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Abstract: A simple and reproducible water-in-oil (W/O nanoemulsion technique for making ultrasmall (<15 nm, monodispersed and water-dispersible nanoparticles (NPs from chitosan (CS is reported. The nano-sized (50 nm water pools of the W/O nanoemulsion serve as “nano-containers and nano-reactors”. The entrapped polymer chains of CS inside these “nano-reactors” are covalently cross-linked with the chains of polyethylene glycol (PEG, leading to rigidification and formation of NPs. These NPs possess excessive swelling properties in aqueous medium and preserve integrity in all pH ranges due to chemical cross-linking with PEG. A potent and newly developed cell-penetrating peptide (CPP is further chemically conjugated to the surface of the NPs, leading to development of a novel peptide-conjugated derivative of CS with profound tight-junction opening properties. The CPP-conjugated NPs can easily be loaded with almost all kinds of proteins, peptides and nucleotides for oral delivery applications. Feasibility of this nanoparticulate system for oral delivery of a model peptide (insulin is investigated in Caco-2 cell line. The cell culture results for translocation of insulin across the cell monolayer are very promising (15%–19% increase, and animal studies are actively under progress and will be published separately. Keywords: ultrasmall, cell-penetrating peptide, chitosan, oral insulin, nanoemulsion, Caco-2 cell

  20. Administração oral de peptídios e proteínas: I. Estratégias gerais para aumento da biodisponibilidade oral Oral delivery system for peptides and proteins: I. Approaches to improve oral bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Silva

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Existem, atualmente, centenas de peptídios e proteínas com ação terapêutica. Os obstáculos inerentes à sua administração oral têm impulsionado a investigação de estratégias capazes de os ultrapassar. Nesta revisão são abordados estes dois aspectos. A microencapsulação, pela sua versatilidade, sobressai entre as demais estratégias, afirmando-se como escolha potencial na administração oral de fármacos peptídicos.There are hundreds of peptides and proteins clinically relevant. The difficulties associated with their oral administration have been responsible for the major efforts in developing ways to improve oral bioavailability. Both these subjects are described in this review. The potentiality of microencapsulation presents this technique as a privileged approach for the oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs.

  1. Oral Cholera Vaccination Delivery Cost in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: An Analysis Based on Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogasale, Vittal; Ramani, Enusa; Wee, Hyeseung; Kim, Jerome H

    2016-12-01

    Use of the oral cholera vaccine (OCV) is a vital short-term strategy to control cholera in endemic areas with poor water and sanitation infrastructure. Identifying, estimating, and categorizing the delivery costs of OCV campaigns are useful in analyzing cost-effectiveness, understanding vaccine affordability, and in planning and decision making by program managers and policy makers. To review and re-estimate oral cholera vaccination program costs and propose a new standardized categorization that can help in collation, analysis, and comparison of delivery costs across countries. Peer reviewed publications listed in PubMed database, Google Scholar and World Health Organization (WHO) websites and unpublished data from organizations involved in oral cholera vaccination. The publications and reports containing oral cholera vaccination delivery costs, conducted in low- and middle-income countries based on World Bank Classification. Limits are humans and publication date before December 31st, 2014. No participants are involved, only costs are collected. Oral cholera vaccination and cost estimation. A systematic review was conducted using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Cost items were categorized into four main cost groups: vaccination program preparation, vaccine administration, adverse events following immunization and vaccine procurement; the first three groups constituting the vaccine delivery costs. The costs were re-estimated in 2014 US dollars (US$) and in international dollar (I$). Ten studies were identified and included in the analysis. The vaccine delivery costs ranged from US$0.36 to US$ 6.32 (in US$2014) which was equivalent to I$ 0.99 to I$ 16.81 (in I$2014). The vaccine procurement costs ranged from US$ 0.29 to US$ 29.70 (in US$2014), which was equivalent to I$ 0.72 to I$ 78.96 (in I$2014). The delivery costs in routine immunization systems were lowest from US$ 0.36 (in US$2014) equivalent to I$ 0.99 (in I$2014). The reported cost categories

  2. Oral Cholera Vaccination Delivery Cost in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: An Analysis Based on Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Enusa; Wee, Hyeseung; Kim, Jerome H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of the oral cholera vaccine (OCV) is a vital short-term strategy to control cholera in endemic areas with poor water and sanitation infrastructure. Identifying, estimating, and categorizing the delivery costs of OCV campaigns are useful in analyzing cost-effectiveness, understanding vaccine affordability, and in planning and decision making by program managers and policy makers. Objectives To review and re-estimate oral cholera vaccination program costs and propose a new standardized categorization that can help in collation, analysis, and comparison of delivery costs across countries. Data sources Peer reviewed publications listed in PubMed database, Google Scholar and World Health Organization (WHO) websites and unpublished data from organizations involved in oral cholera vaccination. Study eligibility criteria The publications and reports containing oral cholera vaccination delivery costs, conducted in low- and middle-income countries based on World Bank Classification. Limits are humans and publication date before December 31st, 2014. Participants No participants are involved, only costs are collected. Intervention Oral cholera vaccination and cost estimation. Study appraisal and synthesis method A systematic review was conducted using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Cost items were categorized into four main cost groups: vaccination program preparation, vaccine administration, adverse events following immunization and vaccine procurement; the first three groups constituting the vaccine delivery costs. The costs were re-estimated in 2014 US dollars (US$) and in international dollar (I$). Results Ten studies were identified and included in the analysis. The vaccine delivery costs ranged from US$0.36 to US$ 6.32 (in US$2014) which was equivalent to I$ 0.99 to I$ 16.81 (in I$2014). The vaccine procurement costs ranged from US$ 0.29 to US$ 29.70 (in US$2014), which was equivalent to I$ 0.72 to I$ 78.96 (in I$2014). The delivery costs in

  3. Association of oral contraceptive and metformin did not improve insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth Chiharu Iwata

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: Objective: to compare clinical and laboratory parameters in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS using metformin or combined oral contraceptive (COC after 6 months. Methods: retrospective study analyzing records of patients with PCOS using the Androgen Excess and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (AE-PCOS Society criteria. The groups were: I-COC (21 tablets, pause of 7 days; n=16; II-metformin (850mg 12/12h, n=16; III-COC plus metformin (n=9. Body mass index (BMI, acne (% of improvement, modified Ferriman-Gallway index and menstrual cycle index (MCI, luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, total testosterone (TT, androstenedione (A and homeostasis model assessment: insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index were assessed Results: isolated use of COC compared to metformin was better regarding to acne, Ferriman index, MCI, LH, TT and A levels. On the other hand, metformin was better in the HOMA-IR index (4.44 and 1.67 respectively, p=0.0007. The association COC plus metformin, compared to metformin alone shows the maintenance of improvement of acne, Ferriman index, MCI, and testosterone levels. The HOMA-IR index remained lower in the metformin alone group (4.19 and 1.67, respectively; p=0,046. The comparison between COC plus metformin and COC alone, in turn, shows no difference in the improvement of acne, Ferriman index, MCI, LH, TT and A levels, indicating that the inclusion of metformin did not lead to additional benefits in these parameters. Still, the HOMA-IR index was similar in both groups (4.19 and 4.44 respectively; p=0.75, showing that the use of metformin associated with COC may not improve insulin resistance as much as it does if used alone. Conclusion: our data suggest that the combination of metformin and contraceptive does not improve insulin resistance as observed with metformin alone.

  4. The type 2 diabetes associated minor allele of rs2237895 KCNQ1 associates with reduced insulin release following an oral glucose load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Holmkvist

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymorphisms in the potassium channel, voltage-gated, KQT-like subfamily, member 1 (KCNQ1 have recently been reported to associate with type 2 diabetes. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the putative impact of these KCNQ1 polymorphisms (rs2283228, rs2237892, rs2237895, and rs2237897 on estimates of glucose stimulated insulin release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genotypes were examined for associations with serum insulin levels following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in a population-based sample of 6,039 middle-aged and treatment-naïve individuals. Insulin release indices estimated from the OGTT and the interplay between insulin sensitivity and insulin release were investigated using linear regression and Hotelling T2 analyses. Applying an additive genetic model the minor C-allele of rs2237895 was associated with reduced serum insulin levels 30 min (mean+/-SD: (CC 277+/-160 vs. (AC 280+/-164 vs. (AA 299+/-200 pmol/l, p = 0.008 after an oral glucose load, insulinogenic index (29.6+/-17.4 vs. 30.2+/-18.7vs. 32.2+/-22.1, p = 0.007, incremental area under the insulin curve (20,477+/-12,491 vs. 20,503+/-12,386 vs. 21,810+/-14,685, p = 0.02 among the 4,568 individuals who were glucose tolerant. Adjustment for the degree of insulin sensitivity had no effect on the measures of reduced insulin release. The rs2237895 genotype had a similar impact in the total sample of treatment-naïve individuals. No association with measures of insulin release were identified for the less common diabetes risk alleles of rs2237892, rs2237897, or rs2283228. CONCLUSION: The minor C-allele of rs2237895 of KCNQ1, which has a prevalence of about 42% among Caucasians was associated with reduced measures of insulin release following an oral glucose load suggesting that the increased risk of type 2 diabetes, previously reported for this variant, likely is mediated through an impaired beta cell function.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of temperature- and glucose-sensitive nanoparticles based on phenylboronic acid and N-vinylcaprolactam for insulin delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jun-zi [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai, 201620 (China); Bremner, David H. [School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Kydd Building, Abertay University, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Li, He-yu; Sun, Xiao-zhu [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai, 201620 (China); Zhu, Li-Min, E-mail: lzhu@dhu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai, 201620 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Poly N-vinylcaprolactam-co-acrylamidophenylboronic acid p(NVCL-co-AAPBA) was prepared from N-vinylcaprolactam (NVCL) and 3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid (AAPBA), using 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. The synthesis and structure of the polymer were examined by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and {sup 1}H-NMR. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to characterize the nanoparticles, CD spectroscopy was used to determine if there were any changes to the conformation of the insulin, and cell and animal toxicity were also investigated. The prepared nanoparticles were found to be monodisperse submicron particles and were glucose- and temperature-sensitive. In addition, the nanoparticles have good insulin-loading characteristics, do not affect the conformation of the insulin and show low-toxicity to cells and animals. These p(NVCL-co-AAPBA) nanoparticles may have some value for insulin or other hypoglycemic protein delivery. - Highlights: • A comprehensive study of a nanoparticles may have some value for insulin or other hypoglycemic protein delivery. • p(NVCL-co-AAPBA)'s synthetic method is simple, convenient to carry out. • NVCL is low toxic and safe. • The evaluation of acute toxicity and chronic toxicity is the most highlight.

  6. Self-assembled nanoparticles based on amphiphilic chitosan derivative and arginine for oral curcumin delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja MA

    2016-09-01

    compared with free Cur. Furthermore, the in vivo pharmacokinetic results in rats demonstrated that the AN–CS–Arg/Cur NPs could remarkably improve the oral bioavailability of Cur. Therefore, the developed AN–CS–Arg/Cur NPs might be a promising nano-candidate for oral delivery of Cur. Keywords: curcumin, self-assembled, nanoparticles, cytotoxicity, cell uptake studies, oral bioavailability

  7. Layered nanoemulsions as mucoadhesive buccal systems for controlled delivery of oral cancer therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amy Gavin,1 Jimmy TH Pham,2 Dawei Wang,2 Bill Brownlow,3 Tamer A Elbayoumi3 1College of Dental Medicine, 2Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy-Glendale, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ, USA Abstract: Oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers are considered the eighth most common cancer worldwide, with relatively poor prognosis (62% of patients surviving 5 years, after diagnosis. The aim of this study was to develop a proof-of-concept mucoadhesive lozenge/buccal tablet, as a potential platform for direct sustained delivery of therapeutic antimitotic nanomedicines. Our system would serve as an adjuvant therapy for oral cancer patients undergoing full-scale diagnostic and operative treatment plans. We utilized lipid-based nanocarriers, namely nanoemulsions (NEs, containing mixed-polyethoxylated emulsifiers and a tocopheryl moiety–enriched oil phase. Prototype NEs, loaded with the proapoptotic lipophilic drug genistein (Gen, were further processed into buccal tablet formulations. The chitosan polyelectrolyte solution overcoat rendered NE droplets cationic, by acting as a mucoadhesive interfacial NE layer. With approximate size of 110 nm, the positively charged chitosan-layered NE (+25 mV vs negatively charged chitosan-free/primary aqueous NE (-28 mV exhibited a controlled-release profile and effective mucoadhesion for liquid oral spray prototypes. When punch-pressed, porous NE-based buccal tablets were physically evaluated for hardness, friability, and swelling in addition to ex vivo tissue mucoadhesion force and retention time measurements. Chitosan-containing NE tablets were found equivalent to primary NE and placebo tablets in compression tests, yet significantly superior in all ex vivo adhesion and in vitro release assays (P≤0.05. Following biocompatibility screening of prototype chitosan-layered NEs, substantial anticancer activity of selected cationic Gen-loaded NE

  8. The minor C-allele of rs2014355 in ACADS is associated with reduced insulin release following an oral glucose load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornbak, Malene; Banasik, Karina; Justesen, Johanne Marie

    2011-01-01

    -aged Danish individuals (nACADS=4,324; nACADM=4,337). The T2D-case-control study involved a total of ~8,300 Danish individuals (nACADS=8,313; nACADM=8,344). Results In glucose-tolerant individuals the minor C-allele of rs2014355 of ACADS associated with reduced measures of serum insulin at 30 min following...... an oral glucose load (per allele effect (beta)=-3.8% (-6.3%;-1.3%), P=0.003), reduced incremental area under the insulin curve (beta=-3.6% (-6.3%;-0.9%), P=0.009), reduced acute insulin response (beta=-2.2% (-4.2%;0.2%), P=0.03), and with increased insulin sensitivity ISIMatsuda (beta= 2.9% (0.5%;5.2%), P...

  9. Oral treatment with γ-aminobutyric acid improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity by inhibiting inflammation in high fat diet-fed mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jide Tian

    Full Text Available Adipocyte and β-cell dysfunction and macrophage-related chronic inflammation are critical for the development of obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, which can be negatively regulated by Tregs. Our previous studies and those of others have shown that activation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptors inhibits inflammation in mice. However, whether GABA could modulate high fat diet (HFD-induced obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance has not been explored. Here, we show that although oral treatment with GABA does not affect water and food consumption it inhibits the HFD-induced gain in body weights in C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, oral treatment with GABA significantly reduced the concentrations of fasting blood glucose, and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in the HFD-fed mice. More importantly, after the onset of obesity and T2DM, oral treatment with GABA inhibited the continual HFD-induced gain in body weights, reduced the concentrations of fasting blood glucose and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mice. In addition, oral treatment with GABA reduced the epididymal fat mass, adipocyte size, and the frequency of macrophage infiltrates in the adipose tissues of HFD-fed mice. Notably, oral treatment with GABA significantly increased the frequency of CD4(+Foxp3(+ Tregs in mice. Collectively, our data indicated that activation of peripheral GABA receptors inhibited the HFD-induced glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and obesity by inhibiting obesity-related inflammation and up-regulating Treg responses in vivo. Given that GABA is safe for human consumption, activators of GABA receptors may be valuable for the prevention of obesity and intervention of T2DM in the clinic.

  10. Retrospective analysis of insulin responses to standard dosed oral glucose tests (OGTs) via naso-gastric tubing towards definition of an objective cut-off value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnken, Tobias; Delarocque, Julien; Schumacher, Svenja; Huber, Korinna; Feige, Karsten

    2018-01-19

    Insulin dysregulation (ID) with basal or postprandial hyperinsulinemia is one of the key findings in horses and ponies suffering from the equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). Assessment of ID can easily be performed in clinical settings by the use of oral glucose challenge tests. Oral glucose test (OGT) performed with 1 g/kg bodyweight (BW) glucose administered via naso-gastric tube allows the exact administration of a defined glucose dosage in a short time. However, reliable cut-off values have not been available so far. Therefore, the aim of the study was to describe variations in insulin response to OGT via naso-gastric tubing and to provide a clinical useful cut-off value for ID when using the insulin quantification performed with an equine-optimized insulin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data visualization revealed no clear separation in the serum insulin concentration of insulin sensitive and insulin dysregulated horses during OGT. Therefore, a model based clustering method was used to circumvent the use of an arbitrary limit for categorization. This method considered all data-points for the classification, taking into account the individual insulin trajectory during the OGT. With this method two clusters were differentiated, one with low and one with high insulin responses during OGT. The cluster of individuals with low insulin response was consistently detected, independently of the initialization parameters of the algorithm. In this cluster the 97.5% quantile of insulin is 110 µLU/mL at 120 min. We suggest using this insulin concentration of 110 µLU/mL as a cut-off value for samples obtained at 120 min in OGT. OGT performed with 1 g/kg BW glucose and administration via naso-gastric tubing can easily be performed under clinical settings. Application of the cut-off value of 110 µLU/mL at 120 min allows assessment of ID in horses.

  11. In vivo evaluation of a conjugated poly(lactide-ethylene glycol nanoparticle depot formulation for prolonged insulin delivery in the diabetic rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomar L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lomas Tomar,1,2 Charu Tyagi,1,3 Manoj Kumar,2 Pradeep Kumar,1 Harpal Singh,2 Yahya E Choonara,1 Viness Pillay11University of the Witwatersrand, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa; 2Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India; 3VSPG College, Chaudhary Charan Singh University, Meerut, IndiaAbstract: Poly(ethylene glycol (PEG and polylactic acid (PLA-based copolymeric nanoparticles were synthesized and investigated as a carrier for prolonged delivery of insulin via the parenteral route. Insulin loading was simultaneously achieved with particle synthesis using a double emulsion solvent evaporation technique, and the effect of varied PEG chain lengths on particle size and insulin loading efficiency was determined. The synthesized copolymer and nanoparticles were analyzed by standard polymer characterization techniques of gel permeation chromatography, dynamic light scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance, and transmission electron microscopy. In vitro insulin release studies performed under simulated conditions provided a near zero-order release pattern up to 10 days. In vivo animal studies were undertaken with varied insulin loads of nanoparticles administered subcutaneously to fed diabetic rabbits and, of all doses administered, nanoparticles containing 50 IU of insulin load per kg body weight controlled the blood glucose level within the physiologically normal range of 90–140 mg/dL, and had a prolonged effect for more than 7 days. Histopathological evaluation of tissue samples from the site of injection showed no signs of inflammation or aggregation, and established the nontoxic nature of the prepared copolymeric nanoparticles. Further, the reaction profiles for PLA-COOH and NH2-PEGDA-NH2 were elucidated using molecular mechanics energy relationships in vacuum and in a solvated system by exploring the spatial disposition of various

  12. Genetic variation in GIPR influences the glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxena, Richa; Hivert, Marie-France; Langenberg, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Glucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n = 6,958-30,620)......Glucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n = 6...

  13. Update on mathematical modeling research to support the development of automated insulin delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steil, Garry M; Hipszer, Brian; Reifman, Jaques

    2010-05-01

    One year after its initial meeting, the Glycemia Modeling Working Group reconvened during the 2009 Diabetes Technology Meeting in San Francisco, CA. The discussion, involving 39 scientists, again focused on the need for individual investigators to have access to the clinical data required to develop and refine models of glucose metabolism, the need to understand the differences among the distinct models and control algorithms, and the significance of day-to-day subject variability. The key conclusion was that model-based comparisons of different control algorithms, or the models themselves, are limited by the inability to access individual model-patient parameters. It was widely agreed that these parameters, as opposed to the average parameters that are typically reported, are necessary to perform such comparisons. However, the prevailing view was that, if investigators were to make the parameters available, it would limit their ability (and that of their institution) to benefit from the invested work in developing their models. A general agreement was reached regarding the importance of each model having an insulin pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile that is not different from profiles reported in the literature (88% of the respondents agreed that the model should have similar curves or be analyzed separately) and the importance of capturing intraday variance in insulin sensitivity (91% of the respondents indicated that this could result in changes in fasting glucose of >or=15%, with 52% of the respondents believing that the variability could effect changes of >or=30%). Seventy-six percent of the participants indicated that high-fat meals were thought to effect changes in other model parameters in addition to gastric emptying. There was also widespread consensus as to how a closed-loop controller should respond to day-to-day changes in model parameters (with 76% of the participants indicating that fasting glucose should be within 15% of target, with 30% of the

  14. Enhancement of glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow by oral glucose load in well controlled insulin-dependent diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl Christiansen, J; Christensen, C K; Hermansen, K

    1986-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) were measured in 27 patients with uncomplicated insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) before and after an oral glucose load of 1.1 g glucose/kg body wt. In the 18 patients showing near-normoglycaemia (blood glucose less than or equal to 8...... mmol/l) before the glucose challenge the increase in blood glucose from 4.2 +/- 1.7 to 15.2 +/- 2.3 mmol/l was accompanied by an enhancement of GFR from 128 +/- 15 to 132 +/- 14 ml/min X 1.73 m2 (2p = 0.030) and of RPF from 534 +/- 116 to 562 +/- 105 ml/min X 1.73 m2 (2p = 0.023). By contrast oral...... glucose load to the nine patients with hyperglycaemia (greater than 8 mmol/l) during baseline conditions raising blood glucose from 11.9 +/- 2.0 to 19.6 +/- 1.5 mmol/l was accompanied by a reduction in GFR from 149 +/- 15 to 139 +/- 9 ml/min X 1.73 m2 (2p less than 0.001) while RPF was unchanged...

  15. Facile preparation of pH-responsive polyurethane nanocarrier for oral delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabid, Mohammad Reza, E-mail: M-nabid@sbu.ac.ir; Omrani, Ismail

    2016-12-01

    This study reports a novel one pot synthesis of pH-responsive nanocarrier for oral delivery of hydrophobic drug under gastrointestinal tract. Triblock copolymer MPEG-HTPB-MPEG was synthesized coupling of MPEG and HTPB using hexamethylene diisocyanate(HDI) and pH-responsive carboxylic acid group was attached to polybuthadiene backbone by thiol-ene click reaction in a facile and convenient procedure. The MPEG-HTPB (g-COOH)-MPEG block copolymers were self-organized into micelle assemblies in the water. The size and shape of the micelle assemblies were confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nanocarriers have high drug loading ability for poorly water-soluble drug. The pH-responsive profile was demonstrated by pH-dependent swelling and in vitro drug release. < 10.0% IBU was released under artificial gastric fluid after 2 h, whereas an immediate release was observed under artificial intestinal fluid. The XTT assay indicated that the micelle obtained from PEG-HTPB (g-COOH)-PEG triblock copolymer are safe in a wide range of concentrations. The results show that pH-responsive PEG-HTPB (g-COOH)-PEG triblock copolymers are promising nanocarriers for the oral administration of hydrophobic drugs. - Highlights: • A facile method for synthesis of pH-responsive nanocarriers was developed. • pH-responsive amphiphilic polymer was synthesized using a rapid and one-pot procedure. • The nanocarriers have high drug loading ability for poorly water-soluble drug. • The nanocarriers show pH-dependent release profile. • The nanocarriers were stable in the gastric fluid and ruptured to release the loaded drug in intestinal fluid.

  16. Facile preparation of pH-responsive polyurethane nanocarrier for oral delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabid, Mohammad Reza; Omrani, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    This study reports a novel one pot synthesis of pH-responsive nanocarrier for oral delivery of hydrophobic drug under gastrointestinal tract. Triblock copolymer MPEG-HTPB-MPEG was synthesized coupling of MPEG and HTPB using hexamethylene diisocyanate(HDI) and pH-responsive carboxylic acid group was attached to polybuthadiene backbone by thiol-ene click reaction in a facile and convenient procedure. The MPEG-HTPB (g-COOH)-MPEG block copolymers were self-organized into micelle assemblies in the water. The size and shape of the micelle assemblies were confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nanocarriers have high drug loading ability for poorly water-soluble drug. The pH-responsive profile was demonstrated by pH-dependent swelling and in vitro drug release. < 10.0% IBU was released under artificial gastric fluid after 2 h, whereas an immediate release was observed under artificial intestinal fluid. The XTT assay indicated that the micelle obtained from PEG-HTPB (g-COOH)-PEG triblock copolymer are safe in a wide range of concentrations. The results show that pH-responsive PEG-HTPB (g-COOH)-PEG triblock copolymers are promising nanocarriers for the oral administration of hydrophobic drugs. - Highlights: • A facile method for synthesis of pH-responsive nanocarriers was developed. • pH-responsive amphiphilic polymer was synthesized using a rapid and one-pot procedure. • The nanocarriers have high drug loading ability for poorly water-soluble drug. • The nanocarriers show pH-dependent release profile. • The nanocarriers were stable in the gastric fluid and ruptured to release the loaded drug in intestinal fluid.

  17. Preclinical Studies on Intestinal Administration of Antisense Oligonucleotides as a Model for Oral Delivery for Treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike van Putten

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs used to reframe dystrophin mRNA transcripts for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD patients are tested in clinical trials. Here, AONs are administered subcutaneously and intravenously, while the less invasive oral route would be preferred. Oral delivery of encapsulated AONs supplemented with a permeation enhancer, sodium caprate, has been successfully used to target tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α expression in liver. To test the feasibility of orally delivered AONs for DMD, we applied 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate AONs (with or without sodium caprate supplementation directly to the intestine of mdx mice and compared pharmacokinetics and -dynamics with intravenous, intraperitoneal, and subcutaneous delivery. Intestinally infused AONs were taken up, but resulted in lower plasma levels compared to other delivery routes, although bioavailability could be largely improved by supplementation of sodium caprate. After intestinal infusion, AON levels in all tissues were lower than for other administration routes, as were the ratios of target versus nontarget organ levels, except for diaphragm and heart where comparable levels and ratios were observed. For each administration route, low levels of exon skipping in triceps was observed 3 hours post-AON administration. These data suggest that oral administration of naked 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate AONs may be feasible, but only when high AON concentrations are used in combination with sodium caprate.

  18. Development of hydrocortisone succinic acid/and 5-fluorouracil/chitosan microcapsules for oral and topical drug deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Pik-Ling; Lee, Kenneth Ka-Ho; Wong, Raymond Siu-Ming; Cheng, Gregory Yin Ming; Cheng, Shuk Yan; Yuen, Marcus Chun-Wah; Lam, Kim-Hung; Gambari, Roberto; Kok, Stanton Hon-Lung; Chui, Chung-Hin

    2012-05-01

    Recently, we demonstrated the safety use of calendula oil/chitosan microcapsules as a carrier for both oral and topical deliveries. We also reported the improved biological activity towards skin cells and Staphylococcus aureus of phyllanthin containing chitosan microcapsules. However, the possibility of both oral and topical applications was still necessary to be further studied. Here we investigated that both oral and topical applications of chitosan-based microcapsules were tested using hydrocortisone succinic acid (HSA) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), respectively. The drug loading efficiency, particle size, surface morphology and chemical compositions of both drug loaded microcapsules were confirmed by UV-vis spectrophotometer, particle size analyzer, scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The in vitro release studies revealed that both HSA and 5-FU could be released form chitosan microcapsules. The mean adrenocorticotropic hormone concentration in HSA loaded microcapsule mice plasma was detected to be lower than that of water control. One hundred micrograms per milliliter of 5-FU containing microcapsules exhibited a stronger growth inhibition towards skin keratinocytes than that of free 5-FU. In vitro drug delivery model demonstrated the delivery of 5-FU from microcapsule treated textiles into nude mice skin. Further uses of the drug loaded microcapsules may provide an efficiency deliverable tool for both oral and topical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic variation in GIPR influences the glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Saxena (Richa); M.-F. Hivert (Marie-France); C. Langenberg (Claudia); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J.S. Pankow (James); P. Vollenweider (Peter); V. Lyssenko (Valeriya); N. Bouatia-Naji (Nabila); J. Dupuis (Josée); A.U. Jackson (Anne); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); M. Li (Man); N.L. Glazer (Nicole); A.K. Manning (Alisa); J. Anluan (Jian); H.M. Stringham (Heather); I. Prokopenko (Inga); T. Johnson (Toby); N. Grarup (Niels); T.W. Boesgaard (Trine); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); P. Shrader (Peter); J.R. O´Connell; E. Ingelsson (Erik); D.J. Couper (David); K. Rice (Kenneth); K. Song (Kijoung); C.H. Andreasen (Camilla); C. Dina (Christian); A. Köttgen (Anna); O.L. Bacquer (Olivier); F. Pattou (François); J. Taneera (Jalal); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); D. Rybin (Denis); K.G. Ardlie (Kristin); M.J. Sampson (Michael); L. Qi (Lu); M.V. Hoek; M.N. Weedon (Michael); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); B.F. Voight (Benjamin); H. Grallert (Harald); B. Balkau (Beverley); R.N. Bergman (Richard); S.J. Bielinski (Suzette); A. Bonnefond (Amélie); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); K. Borch-Johnsen; Y. Böttcher (Yvonne); E. Brunner (Eric); T.A. Buchanan (Thomas); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); C. Cavalcanti-Proença (Christine); G. Charpentier (Guillaume); Y.D.I. Chen (Yii-Der Ida); P.S. Chines (Peter); F.S. Collins (Francis); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); G. Crawford (Gabe); J. Delplanque (Jerome); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); J.M. Egan (Josephine); M.R. Erdos (Michael); M. Firmann (Mathieu); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); C.S. Fox (Caroline); M. Goodarzi (Mark); J. Graessler (Jürgen); A. Hingorani (Aroon); B. Isomaa (Bo); T. Jørgensen (Torben); M. Kivimaki (Mika); P. Kovacs (Peter); K. Krohn (Knut); M. Kumari (Meena); T. Lauritzen (Torsten); C. Lévy-Marchal (Claire); V. Mayor (Vladimir); J.B. McAteer (Jarred); D. Meyre (David); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); M.A. Morken (Mario); N. Narisu (Narisu); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); R. Pakyz (Ruth); L. Pascoe (Laura); F. Payne (Felicity); D. Pearson (Daniel); W. Rathmann (Wolfgang); A. Sandbaek (Annelli); A.A. Sayer; L.J. Scott (Laura); S.J. Sharp (Stephen); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); A. Singleton (Andrew); D.S. Siscovick (David); N.L. Smith (Nicholas); T. Sparsø (Thomas); A.J. Swift (Amy); H. Syddall (Holly); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); A. Tönjes (Anke); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); T.T. Valle (Timo); G. Waeber (Gérard); A. Walley (Andrew); D. Waterworth (Dawn); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); G. Consortium (Giant); T. Illig (Thomas); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); J.F. Wilson (James); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); F.B. Hu (Frank); A.D. Morris (Andrew); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); P. Nilsson (Peter); A.C. Syvänen; A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); M. Walker (Mark); S.R. Bornstein (Stefan); P. Schwarz (Peter); G.H. Williams (Gordon); D.M. Nathan (David); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); M. Laakso (Markku); C. Cooper (Charles); M. Marmot (Michael); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); V. Mooser (Vincent); M. Stumvoll (Michael); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); D. Altshuler (David); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); T. Hansen (Torben); O. Pedersen (Oluf); J.C. Florez (Jose); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.E. Barroso (Inês); R. Sladek (Rob); P. Froguel (Philippe); J.B. Meigs (James); L. Groop (Leif); N.J. Wareham (Nick); R.M. Watanabe (Richard)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractGlucose levels 2 h after an oral glucose challenge are a clinical measure of glucose tolerance used in the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We report a meta-analysis of nine genome-wide association studies (n = 15,234 nondiabetic individuals) and a follow-up of 29 independent loci (n =

  20. Improved oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble indirubin by a supersaturatable self-microemulsifying drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen ZQ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Zhi-Qiang Chen, Ying Liu, Ji-Hui Zhao, Lan Wang, Nian-Ping FengSchool of Pharmacy, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Indirubin, isolated from the leaves of the Chinese herb Isatis tinctoria L, is a protein kinase inhibitor and promising antitumor agent. However, the poor water solubility of indirubin has limited its application. In this study, a supersaturatable self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (S-SMEDDS was developed to improve the oral bioavailability of indirubin.Methods: A prototype S-SMEDDS was designed using solubility studies and phase diagram construction. Precipitation inhibitors were selected from hydrophilic polymers according to their crystallization-inhibiting capacity through in vitro precipitation tests. In vitro release of indirubin from S-SMEDDS was examined to investigate its likely release behavior in vivo. The in vivo bioavailability of indirubin from S-SMEDDS and from SMEDDS was compared in rats.Results: The prototype formulation of S-SMEDDS comprised Maisine™ 35-1:Cremophor® EL:Transcutol® P (15:40:45, w/w/w. Polyvinylpyrrolidone K17, a hydrophilic polymer, was used as a precipitation inhibitor based on its better crystallization-inhibiting capacity compared with polyethylene glycol 4000 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose. In vitro release analysis showed more rapid drug release from S-SMEDDS than from SMEDDS. In vivo bioavailability analysis in rats indicated that improved oral absorption was achieved and that the relative bioavailability of S-SMEDDS was 129.5% compared with SMEDDS.Conclusion: The novel S-SMEDDS developed in this study increased the dissolution rate and improved the oral bioavailability of indirubin in rats. The results suggest that S-SMEDDS is a superior means of oral delivery of indirubin.Keywords: supersaturatable self-microemulsifying drug delivery system, indirubin, bioavailability, oral drug delivery, hydrophilic polymer

  1. Comparative study of chitosan- and PEG-coated lipid and PLGA nanoparticles as oral delivery systems for cannabinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durán-Lobato, Matilde; Martín-Banderas, Lucía; Gonçalves, Lídia M. D.; Fernández-Arévalo, Mercedes; Almeida, Antonio J.

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid derivative 1-naphthalenyl[4-(pentyloxy)-1-naphthalenyl]methanone (CB13) has an important therapeutic potential as analgesic in chronic pain states that respond poorly to conventional drugs. However, the incidence of its mild-to-moderate and dose-dependent adverse effects, as well as its pharmacokinetic profile, actually holds back its use in humans. Thus, the use of a suitable carrier system for oral delivery of CB13 becomes an attractive strategy to develop a valuable therapy. Polymeric poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) and lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) are widely studied delivery vehicles that improve the bioavailability of lipophilic compounds and present special interest in oral delivery. Their surface can be modified to improve the adhesion of particles to the oral mucosa and increase their circulation time in blood with additives such as chitosan (CS) and polyethylene glycol (PEG), which can be feasibly incorporated onto these particles in a post-production step. In this work, CS- and PEG-modified polymeric PLGA and LNPs were successfully obtained and comparatively evaluated under the same experimental conditions as oral carriers for CB13. All the formulations presented adequate blood compatibility and absence of cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells. Coating with CS led to a higher interaction with Caco-2 cells and a limited uptake in THP1 cells, while coating with PEG led to a limited uptake in Caco-2 cells and strongly prevented THP1 cells uptake. The performance of each formulation is discussed as a comparison of the potential of these carriers as oral delivery systems of CB13

  2. Comparative study of chitosan- and PEG-coated lipid and PLGA nanoparticles as oral delivery systems for cannabinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Lobato, Matilde; Martín-Banderas, Lucía; Gonçalves, Lídia M. D.; Fernández-Arévalo, Mercedes; Almeida, Antonio J.

    2015-02-01

    The cannabinoid derivative 1-naphthalenyl[4-(pentyloxy)-1-naphthalenyl]methanone (CB13) has an important therapeutic potential as analgesic in chronic pain states that respond poorly to conventional drugs. However, the incidence of its mild-to-moderate and dose-dependent adverse effects, as well as its pharmacokinetic profile, actually holds back its use in humans. Thus, the use of a suitable carrier system for oral delivery of CB13 becomes an attractive strategy to develop a valuable therapy. Polymeric poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) and lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) are widely studied delivery vehicles that improve the bioavailability of lipophilic compounds and present special interest in oral delivery. Their surface can be modified to improve the adhesion of particles to the oral mucosa and increase their circulation time in blood with additives such as chitosan (CS) and polyethylene glycol (PEG), which can be feasibly incorporated onto these particles in a post-production step. In this work, CS- and PEG-modified polymeric PLGA and LNPs were successfully obtained and comparatively evaluated under the same experimental conditions as oral carriers for CB13. All the formulations presented adequate blood compatibility and absence of cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells. Coating with CS led to a higher interaction with Caco-2 cells and a limited uptake in THP1 cells, while coating with PEG led to a limited uptake in Caco-2 cells and strongly prevented THP1 cells uptake. The performance of each formulation is discussed as a comparison of the potential of these carriers as oral delivery systems of CB13.

  3. Comparative study of chitosan- and PEG-coated lipid and PLGA nanoparticles as oral delivery systems for cannabinoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durán-Lobato, Matilde; Martín-Banderas, Lucía, E-mail: luciamartin@us.es [Universidad de Sevilla, Departmento Farmacia y Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia (España) (Spain); Gonçalves, Lídia M. D. [Universidade de Lisboa, Research Institute for Medicines and Pharmaceutical Sciences (iMed.UL), Faculdade de Farmácia (Portugal); Fernández-Arévalo, Mercedes [Universidad de Sevilla, Departmento Farmacia y Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia (España) (Spain); Almeida, Antonio J. [Universidade de Lisboa, Research Institute for Medicines and Pharmaceutical Sciences (iMed.UL), Faculdade de Farmácia (Portugal)

    2015-02-15

    The cannabinoid derivative 1-naphthalenyl[4-(pentyloxy)-1-naphthalenyl]methanone (CB13) has an important therapeutic potential as analgesic in chronic pain states that respond poorly to conventional drugs. However, the incidence of its mild-to-moderate and dose-dependent adverse effects, as well as its pharmacokinetic profile, actually holds back its use in humans. Thus, the use of a suitable carrier system for oral delivery of CB13 becomes an attractive strategy to develop a valuable therapy. Polymeric poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) and lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) are widely studied delivery vehicles that improve the bioavailability of lipophilic compounds and present special interest in oral delivery. Their surface can be modified to improve the adhesion of particles to the oral mucosa and increase their circulation time in blood with additives such as chitosan (CS) and polyethylene glycol (PEG), which can be feasibly incorporated onto these particles in a post-production step. In this work, CS- and PEG-modified polymeric PLGA and LNPs were successfully obtained and comparatively evaluated under the same experimental conditions as oral carriers for CB13. All the formulations presented adequate blood compatibility and absence of cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells. Coating with CS led to a higher interaction with Caco-2 cells and a limited uptake in THP1 cells, while coating with PEG led to a limited uptake in Caco-2 cells and strongly prevented THP1 cells uptake. The performance of each formulation is discussed as a comparison of the potential of these carriers as oral delivery systems of CB13.

  4. Oral delivery of Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and Angiotensin-(1-7) bioencapsulated in plant cells attenuates pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Vinayak; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Rathinasabapathy, Anandharajan; Lin, Shina; Jin, Guiying; Song, Chunjuan; Shil, Pollob; Nair, Anand; Qi, Yanfei; Li, Qiuhong; Francis, Joseph; Katovich, Michael J; Daniell, Henry; Raizada, Mohan K

    2014-12-01

    Emerging evidences indicate that diminished activity of the vasoprotective axis of the renin-angiotensin system, constituting angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and its enzymatic product, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, long-term repetitive delivery of ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) would require enhanced protein stability and ease of administration to improve patient compliance. Chloroplast expression of therapeutic proteins enables their bioencapsulation within plant cells to protect against gastric enzymatic degradation and facilitates long-term storage at room temperature. Besides, fusion to a transmucosal carrier helps effective systemic absorption from the intestine on oral delivery. We hypothesized that bioencapsulating ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) fused to the cholera nontoxin B subunit would enable development of an oral delivery system that is effective in treating PH. PH was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats by monocrotaline administration. Subset of animals was simultaneously treated with bioencapsulaed ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) (prevention protocol). In a separate set of experiments, drug treatment was initiated after 2 weeks of PH induction (reversal protocol). Oral feeding of rats with bioencapsulated ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) prevented the development of monocrotaline-induced PH and improved associated cardiopulmonary pathophysiology. Furthermore, in the reversal protocol, oral ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) treatment significantly arrested disease progression, along with improvement in right heart function, and decrease in pulmonary vessel wall thickness. In addition, a combination therapy with ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) augmented the beneficial effects against monocrotaline-induced lung injury. Our study provides proof-of-concept for a novel low-cost oral ACE2 or Ang-(1-7) delivery system using transplastomic technology for pulmonary disease therapeutics. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Insulin degludec versus insulin glargine in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinman, Bernard; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Cariou, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs).......To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs)....

  6. Recent advances in oral delivery of drugs and bioactive natural products using solid lipid nanoparticles as the carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Hung; Chen, Chun-Han; Lin, Zih-Chan; Fang, Jia-You

    2017-04-01

    Chemical and enzymatic barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract hamper the oral delivery of many labile drugs. The GI epithelium also contributes to poor permeability for numerous drugs. Drugs with poor aqueous solubility have difficulty dissolving in the GI tract, resulting in low bioavailability. Nanomedicine provides an opportunity to improve the delivery efficiency of orally administered drugs. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are categorized as a new generation of lipid nanoparticles consisting of a complete solid lipid matrix. SLNs used for oral administration offer several benefits over conventional formulations, including increased solubility, enhanced stability, improved epithelium permeability and bioavailability, prolonged half-life, tissue targeting, and minimal side effects. The nontoxic excipients and sophisticated material engineering of SLNs tailor the controllable physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles for GI penetration via mucosal or lymphatic transport. In this review, we highlight the recent progress in the development of SLNs for disease treatment. Recent application of oral SLNs includes therapies for cancers, central nervous system-related disorders, cardiovascular-related diseases, infection, diabetes, and osteoporosis. In addition to drugs that may be active cargos in SLNs, some natural compounds with pharmacological activity are also suitable for SLN encapsulation to enhance oral bioavailability. In this article, we systematically introduce the concepts and amelioration mechanisms of the nanomedical techniques for drug- and natural compound-loaded SLNs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Recent advances in oral delivery of drugs and bioactive natural products using solid lipid nanoparticles as the carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Lin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and enzymatic barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI tract hamper the oral delivery of many labile drugs. The GI epithelium also contributes to poor permeability for numerous drugs. Drugs with poor aqueous solubility have difficulty dissolving in the GI tract, resulting in low bioavailability. Nanomedicine provides an opportunity to improve the delivery efficiency of orally administered drugs. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs are categorized as a new generation of lipid nanoparticles consisting of a complete solid lipid matrix. SLNs used for oral administration offer several benefits over conventional formulations, including increased solubility, enhanced stability, improved epithelium permeability and bioavailability, prolonged half-life, tissue targeting, and minimal side effects. The nontoxic excipients and sophisticated material engineering of SLNs tailor the controllable physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles for GI penetration via mucosal or lymphatic transport. In this review, we highlight the recent progress in the development of SLNs for disease treatment. Recent application of oral SLNs includes therapies for cancers, central nervous system-related disorders, cardiovascular-related diseases, infection, diabetes, and osteoporosis. In addition to drugs that may be active cargos in SLNs, some natural compounds with pharmacological activity are also suitable for SLN encapsulation to enhance oral bioavailability. In this article, we systematically introduce the concepts and amelioration mechanisms of the nanomedical techniques for drug- and natural compound-loaded SLNs.

  8. Relationship Between β-cell Response and Insulin Sensitivity in Horses based on the Oral Sugar Test and the Euglycemic Hyperinsulinemic Clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindåse, S; Nostell, K; Söder, J; Bröjer, J

    2017-09-01

    A hyperbolic relationship between β-cell response and insulin sensitivity (IS) has been described in several species including rodents, dogs, and humans. This relationship has not been elucidated in the horse. To determine whether the hyperbolic relationship between β-cell response and IS exists in horses by using indices of β-cell response from the oral sugar test (OST) and IS measurements from the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (EHC). A second aim was to compare how well IS estimates from the OST and EHC correlate. Forty-nine horses with different degrees of insulin regulation (normal-to-severe insulin dysregulation). Cross-sectional study. Horses were examined with an OST and an EHC. Decreased IS was associated with increased β-cell response in the horses. Nine of 12 comparisons between indices of β-cell response and IS measures fulfilled the criteria for a hyperbolic relationship. Indices of IS calculated from the OST correlated highly with the insulin-dependent glucose disposal rate (M) and the insulin-dependent glucose disposal rate per unit of insulin (M/I) determined from the EHC (r = 0.81-0.87). A hyperbolic relationship between β-cell response and IS exists in horses, which suggest that horses with insulin dysregulation respond not only with postprandial hyperinsulinemia but are also insulin resistant. The OST is primarily a test for β-cell response rather than a test for IS, but calculated indices of IS from the OST may be useful to estimate IS in horses, especially when the horse is insulin resistant. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. Glucose-reducing effect of the ORMD-0801 oral insulin preparation in patients with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Eldor

    Full Text Available The unpredictable behavior of uncontrolled type 1 diabetes often involves frequent swings in blood glucose levels that impact maintenance of a daily routine. An intensified insulin regimen is often unsuccessful, while other therapeutic options, such as amylin analog injections, use of continuous glucose sensors, and islet or pancreas transplantation are of limited clinical use. In efforts to provide patients with a more compliable treatment method, Oramed Pharmaceuticals tested the capacity of its oral insulin capsule (ORMD-0801, 8 mg insulin in addressing this resistant clinical state. Eight Type I diabetes patients with uncontrolled diabetes (HbA1c: 7.5-10% were monitored throughout the 15-day study period by means of a blind continuous glucose monitoring device. Baseline patient blood glucose behavior was monitored and recorded over a five-day pretreatment screening period. During the ensuing ten-day treatment phase, patients were asked to conduct themselves as usual and to self-administer an oral insulin capsule three times daily, just prior to meal intake. CGM data sufficient for pharmacodynamics analyses were obtained from 6 of the 8 subjects. Treatment with ORMD-0801 was associated with a significant 24.4% reduction in the frequencies of glucose readings >200 mg/dL (60.1 ± 7.9% pretreatment vs. 45.4 ± 4.9% during ORMD-0801 treatment; p = 0.023 and a significant mean 16.6% decrease in glucose area under the curve (AUC (66055 ± 5547 mg/dL/24 hours vs. 55060 ± 3068 mg/dL/24 hours, p = 0.023, with a greater decrease during the early evening hours. In conclusion, ORMD-0801 oral insulin capsules in conjunction with subcutaneous insulin injections, well tolerated and effectively reduced glycemia throughout the day.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00867594.

  10. Investigating Engineered Ribonucleoprotein Particles to Improve Oral RNAi Delivery in Crop Insect Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Gillet

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetically modified (GM crops producing double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs are being investigated largely as an RNA interference (RNAi-based resistance strategy against crop insect pests. However, limitations of this strategy include the sensitivity of dsRNA to insect gut nucleases and its poor insect cell membrane penetration. Working with the insect pest cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis, we showed that the chimeric protein PTD-DRBD (peptide transduction domain—dsRNA binding domain combined with dsRNA forms a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP that improves the effectiveness of the RNAi mechanism in the insect. The RNP slows down nuclease activity, probably by masking the dsRNA. Furthermore, PTD-mediated internalization in insect gut cells is achieved within minutes after plasma membrane contact, limiting the exposure time of the RNPs to gut nucleases. Therefore, the RNP provides an approximately 2-fold increase in the efficiency of insect gene silencing upon oral delivery when compared to naked dsRNA. Taken together, these data demonstrate the role of engineered RNPs in improving dsRNA stability and cellular entry, representing a path toward the design of enhanced RNAi strategies in GM plants against crop insect pests.

  11. Investigating Engineered Ribonucleoprotein Particles to Improve Oral RNAi Delivery in Crop Insect Pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, François-Xavier; Garcia, Rayssa A; Macedo, Leonardo L P; Albuquerque, Erika V S; Silva, Maria C M; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F

    2017-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops producing double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) are being investigated largely as an RNA interference (RNAi)-based resistance strategy against crop insect pests. However, limitations of this strategy include the sensitivity of dsRNA to insect gut nucleases and its poor insect cell membrane penetration. Working with the insect pest cotton boll weevil ( Anthonomus grandis ), we showed that the chimeric protein PTD-DRBD (peptide transduction domain-dsRNA binding domain) combined with dsRNA forms a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP) that improves the effectiveness of the RNAi mechanism in the insect. The RNP slows down nuclease activity, probably by masking the dsRNA. Furthermore, PTD-mediated internalization in insect gut cells is achieved within minutes after plasma membrane contact, limiting the exposure time of the RNPs to gut nucleases. Therefore, the RNP provides an approximately 2-fold increase in the efficiency of insect gene silencing upon oral delivery when compared to naked dsRNA. Taken together, these data demonstrate the role of engineered RNPs in improving dsRNA stability and cellular entry, representing a path toward the design of enhanced RNAi strategies in GM plants against crop insect pests.

  12. Transepithelial transport of PEGylated anionic poly(amidoamine) dendrimers: implications for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Deborah M; Kolhatkar, Rohit B; Ray, Abhijit; Swaan, Peter; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2009-08-19

    The purpose of this work was to assess the impact of PEGylation on transepithelial transport of anionic poly(amidoamine) dendrimers. Cytotoxicity, uptake and transport across Caco-2 cells of PEGylated G3.5 and G4.5 PAMAM dendrimers were studied. Methoxy polyethylene glycol (750 Da) was conjugated to carboxylic acid-terminated PAMAM dendrimers at feed ratios of 1, 2 and 4 PEG per dendrimer. Compared to the control, PEGylation of anionic dendrimers did not significantly alter cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 0.1 mM. PEGylation of G3.5 dendrimers significantly decreased cellular uptake and transepithelial transport while PEGylation of G4.5 dendrimers led to a significant increase in uptake, but also a significant decrease in transport. Dendrimer PEGylation reduced the opening of tight junctions as evidenced by confocal microscopy techniques. Modulation of the tight junctional complex correlated well with changes in PEGylated dendrimer transport and suggests that anionic dendrimers are transported primarily through the paracellular route. PEGylated dendrimers show promise in oral delivery applications where increased functionality for drug conjugation and release is desired.

  13. Formulation and evaluation of gastroretentive microballoons containing baclofen for a floating oral controlled drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, T S; Ranpise, N S; Ranade, A N

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to fabricate and evaluate a multiparticulate oral gastroretentive dosage form of baclofen characterized by a central large cavity (hollow core) promoting unmitigated floatation with practical applications to alleviate the signs and symptoms of spasticity and muscular rigidity. Solvent diffusion and evaporation procedure were applied to prepare floating microspheres with a central large cavity using various combinations of ethylcellulose (release retardant) and HPMC K4M (release modifier) dissolved in a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (2:1). The obtained microspheres (700-1000 µm) exhibit excellent floating ability (86 ± 2.00%) and release characteristics with entrapment efficiency of 95.2 ± 0.32%. Microspheres fabricated with ethylcellulose to HPMC K4M in the ratio 8.5:1.5 released 98.67% of the entrapped drug in 12 h. Muscle relaxation caused by baclofen microspheres impairs the rotarod performance for more than 12 h. Abdominal X-ray images showed that the gastroretention period of the floating barium sulfate- labeled microspheres was no less than 10 h. The buoyant baclofen microspheres provide a promising gastroretentive drug delivery system to deliver baclofen in spastic patients with a sustained release rate.

  14. Surface-functionalized polymethacrylic acid based hydrogel microparticles for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajeesh, S; Bouchemal, K; Sharma, C P; Vauthier, C

    2010-02-01

    Aim of the present work was to develop novel thiol-functionalized hydrogel microparticles based on poly(methacrylic acid)-chitosan-poly(ethylene glycol) (PCP) for oral drug delivery applications. PCP microparticles were prepared by a modified ionic gelation process in aqueous medium. Thiol modification of surface carboxylic acid groups of PCP micro particles was carried out by coupling l-cysteine with a water-soluble carbodiimide. Ellman's method was adopted to quantify the sulfhydryl groups, and dynamic light-scattering technique was used to measure the average particle size. Cytotoxicity of the modified particles was evaluated on Caco 2 cells by MTT assay. Effect of thiol modification on permeability of paracellular marker fluorescence dextran (FD4) was evaluated on Caco 2 cell monolayers and freshly excised rat intestinal tissue with an Ussing chamber set-up. Mucoadhesion experiments were carried out by an ex vivo bioadhesion method with excised rat intestinal tissue. The average size of the PCP microparticles was increased after thiol modification. Thiolated microparticles significantly improved the paracellular permeability of FD4 across Caco 2 cell monolayers, with no sign of toxicity. However, the efficacy of thiolated system remained low when permeation experiments were carried out across excised intestinal membrane. This was attributed to the high adhesion of the thiolated particles on the gut mucosa. Nevertheless, it can be concluded that surface thiolation is an interesting strategy to improve paracellular permeability of hydrophilic macromolecules. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A feasibility study of a 3-day basal-bolus insulin delivery device in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Julia K; Lilly, Leslie C; Aberer, Felix; Korsatko, Stefan; Strock, Ellie; Mazze, Roger S; Damsbo, Peter; Pieber, Thomas R

    2014-05-01

    This study tested the feasibility of transition from multiple daily injections (MDI) to a 3-day, basal-bolus insulin delivery device (PaQ) for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Twenty MDI-treated individuals with T2D with HbA(1c) ≤9% (75 mmol/mol) were enrolled in a single-center, single-arm pilot study, lasting three 2-week periods: baseline (MDI), transition to PaQ, and PaQ therapy. Feasibility of use, glycemic control, safety, and patient satisfaction were assessed. Nineteen participants transitioned to PaQ treatment and demonstrated competency in assembling, placing, and using the device. Self-monitored blood glucose and blinded continuous glucose-monitoring data showed glycemic control similar to MDI. Study participants reported high satisfaction and device acceptance. PaQ treatment is both feasible and acceptable in individuals with T2D. Transition from MDI is easy and safe. PaQ treatment might lead to better therapy adherence and improvements in glycemic control and clinical outcomes.

  16. Diminished hepatic insulin removal in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, I.; Salvador, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Arraiza, M.C.; Goena, M.; Barberia, J.J.; Moncada, E.

    1986-01-01

    Peripheral insulin and C-peptide levels during oral glucose load were measured in 20 obese and 23 normal weight nondiabetic subjects. The fasting C-peptide to insulin molar ratios (Cp/I), as well as the relation between incremental areas of the two polypeptides (ACp-AI)/ACp, were used as relative measures of the hepatic insulin extraction (HIE). The insulin and C-peptide basal levels as well as incremental areas under plasma curves were higher in the obese subjects (P<0.001). HIE was lower in obeses than in controls assessed in the fasting state (P<0.05), as well as after glucose load (P<0.001). Nevertheless, obeses and controls with similar insulin fasting levels showed identical hepatic insulin extraction in fasting or after glucose load. HIE was independent of obesity degree, but was related to insulin basal levels (r=-0.60, P<0.01). This study suggests the hypothesis that the decreased hepatic insulin extraction in obeses is a result of the chronically increased insulin delivery to the liver and is not a consequence of obesity, although a contributory role cannot be ruled out

  17. Diminished hepatic insulin removal in obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, I; Salvador, J; Rodriguez, R; Arraiza, M C; Goena, M; Barberia, J J; Moncada, E

    1986-01-01

    Peripheral insulin and C-peptide levels during oral glucose load were measured in 20 obese and 23 normal weight nondiabetic subjects. The fasting C-peptide to insulin molar ratios (Cp/I), as well as the relation between incremental areas of the two polypeptides (ACp-AI)/ACp, were used as relative measures of the hepatic insulin extraction (HIE). The insulin and C-peptide basal levels as well as incremental areas under plasma curves were higher in the obese subjects (P<0.001). HIE was lower in obeses than in controls assessed in the fasting state (P<0.05), as well as after glucose load (P<0.001). Nevertheless, obeses and controls with similar insulin fasting levels showed identical hepatic insulin extraction in fasting or after glucose load. HIE was independent of obesity degree, but was related to insulin basal levels (r=-0.60, P<0.01). This study suggests the hypothesis that the decreased hepatic insulin extraction in obeses is a result of the chronically increased insulin delivery to the liver and is not a consequence of obesity, although a contributory role cannot be ruled out.

  18. Cytotoxicity and Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity of Bacterial Cellulose-Poly (acrylamide-sodium acrylate Hydrogel: A Carrier for Oral Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Pandey 1,2 * , Hira Choudhury 1, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd Amin 2

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preliminary safety evaluation of polymer intended to use as drug delivery carrier is essential. Methods: In this study polyacrylamide grafted bacterial cellulose (BC/AM hydrogel was prepared by microwave irradiation initiated free radical polymerization. The synthesized hydrogel was subjected to in vitro cytotoxicity and acute gastrointestinal toxicity studies to evaluate its biological safety as potential oral drug delivery carrier. Results: The results indicate that hydrogel was non cytotoxic and did not show any histopathological changes in GI tract after a high dose of oral administration. Conclusion: The results revealed that hydrogel composed of bacterial cellulose and polyacrylamide is safe as oral drug delivery carrier.

  19. Assessment of endothelial function during oral contraception in women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K R; Skouby, S O; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen

    1994-01-01

    The effects of contraceptive steroids on the expression of endothelial homeostasis were examined by direct and indirect measures in women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in a prospective nonrandomized controlled study. Study subjects were 13 women with uncomplicated IDDM treated...... with a monophasic combination of 30 micrograms ethinyl estradiol and 75 micrograms gestodene for 12 consecutive cycles and 13 women of comparable diabetic status as control. During the study period, none of the participants developed increased renal albumin excretion, which was used as a direct measure......-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (type 1 [PAI-1]), whereas the activities of t-PA and PAI-1 were unchanged. Plasma levels of plasminogen and histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) increased and decreased, respectively, whereas an increase in von Willebrand factor was observed in the treatment group. No significant...

  20. The use of dextrose/insulin infusions during labour and delivery in women with gestational diabetes mellitus: Is there any point?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrant, Maritza T; Williamson, Kathryn; Battin, Malcolm; Hague, William M; Rowan, Janet A

    2017-06-01

    We compared, in 733 women with gestational diabetes mellitus treated with metformin and/or insulin, rates of neonatal hypoglycaemia in those who had received a dextrose/insulin infusion during labour and prior to delivery (n = 132) with those who did not (n = 601). Women who had infusions were more likely to have been treated with insulin (87.1% vs 70.4%, P < 0.01) and have higher mean capillary glucose values (measured four times daily) in the two weeks prior to delivery (P < 0.01). They had lower mean (SD) glucose values in the 12 h prior to delivery (5.1 (1.1) mmol/L vs 5.4 (0.9) mmol/L, P < 0.01). There was no difference between the groups in rates of neonatal hypoglycaemia (glucose <2.6 mmol/L on two or more occasions), 15.9% versus 17.8%, P = 0.78, or of severe neonatal hypoglycaemia (one or more glucose <1.6 mmol/L), 8.3% versus 5.2%, P = 0.15. In the absence of randomised data comparing use of infusions with no infusions, these data are reassuring for clinicians who do not routinely use infusions. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  1. PEG-lipid-PLGA hybrid nanoparticles loaded with berberine-phospholipid complex to facilitate the oral delivery efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Ao, Mingtao; Zheng, Xiao; Li, Nini; Xia, Junjie; Li, Yang; Li, Donghui; Hou, Zhenqing; Qi, Zhongquan; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2017-11-01

    The natural product berberine (BBR), present in various plants, arouses great interests because of its numerous pharmacological effects. However, the further development and application of BBR had been hampered by its poor oral bioavailability. In this work, we report on polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (PEG-lipid-PLGA NPs) loaded with BBR phospholipid complex using a solvent evaporation method for enhancing the oral BBR efficiency. The advantage of this new drug delivery system is that the BBR-soybean phosphatidylcholine complex (BBR-SPC) could be used to enhance the liposolubility of BBR and improve the affinity with the biodegradable polymer to increase the drug-loading capacity and controlled/sustained release. The entrapment efficiency of the PEG-lipid-PLGA NPs/BBR-SPC was observed to approach approximately 89% which is more than 2.4 times compared with that of the PEG-lipid-PLGA NPs/BBR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on using polymer material for effective encapsulation of BBR to improve its oral bioavailability. The prepared BBR delivery systems demonstrated a uniform spherical shape, a well-dispersed core-shell structure and a small particle size (149.6 ± 5.1 nm). The crystallographic and thermal analysis has indicated that the BBR dispersed in the PEG-lipid-PLGA NPs matrix is in an amorphous form. More importantly, the enhancement in the oral relative bioavailability of the PEG-lipid-PLGA NPs/BBR-SPC was ∼343% compared with that of BBR. These positive results demonstrated that PEG-lipid-PLGA NPs/BBR-SPC may have the potential for facilitating the oral drug delivery of BBR.

  2. Insulin nanocomplexes formed by self-assembly from amine-modified poly(vinyl alcohol)-graft-poly(L-Lactide) for non-invasive mucosal delivery: Preparation, characterization and in vivo investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this work biodegradable DEAPA-PVAL-g-PLLA nanocomplexes were investigated as a colloidal peptide carrier system for non-invasive transmucosal insulin delivery. Chapter 1 describes the basic fundamentals of insulin therapy, current status, problems and future trends. The pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and the different treatment options are discussed to give an understanding of the necessity for alternative non-invasive ...

  3. Association of insulin treatment versus oral hypoglycaemic agents with diabetic retinopathy and its severity in type 2 diabetes patients in Cameroon, sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingi, Ahmadou M; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N; Essouma, Mickael; Bigna, Jean Joel R; Nansseu, Jobert Richie N; Ellong, Augustin; Mvogo, Côme Ebana

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic metabolic disease associated with multiple macro and microvascular complications, diabetic retinopathy (DR) being the commonest one. Recent literature has reported an increased risk of DR with insulin use. We carried out a cross-sectional study at the Ophthalmology Department of the Douala General Hospital (DGH) during a 2-year period to explore the association between insulin treatment and both DR and its severity as compared with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) in Cameroonian T2DM patients aged ≥35 years, and who were all screened for DR through eye examination including exhaustive retinal evaluation. In total, medical files of 134 T2DM patients were analyzed. The frequency of DR was 54.1% among patients on OHA and 73.9% among those on insulin treatment, giving an overall frequency of 57.5%. There were significantly more OHA treated patients than insulin treated patients (82.8% vs . 17.2%, Phistory of hypertension, alcohol misuse, and current tobacco smoking. DR was almost significantly more frequent in T2DM patients under insulin regimen than in patients under OHA [73.9% vs . 54.1%; odds ratio (OR) 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.9-6.6; P=0.06]. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was significantly more observed in insulin treated patients than in OHA treated patients (34.8% vs . 15.3%; OR 2.95; 95% CI, 1.1-8; P=0.035). Irrespective of staging, the frequency of diabetic macular edema (DME) was significantly higher in the insulin group than in the OHA group (43.5% vs . 19.8%; OR 3.1; 95% CI, 1.2-8; P=0.019). Compared with OHA, insulin therapy may be associated with DR, DR severity and DME in these T2DM sub-Saharan African patients.

  4. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems ameliorate the oral delivery of silymarin in rats with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Han Chen,1,2 Cheng-Chih Chang,1 Tsung-Hsien Shih,2 Ibrahim A Aljuffali,3 Ta-Sen Yeh,4,5 Jia-You Fang6–8 1Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, 2Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 3Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5School of Medicine, College of Medicine, 6Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, 7Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, 8Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan Abstract: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB is a popular surgery to reduce the body weight of obese patients. Although food intake is restricted by RYGB, drug absorption is also decreased. The purpose of this study was to develop novel self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS for enhancing the oral delivery of silymarin, which has poor water solubility. The SNEDDS were characterized by size, zeta potential, droplet number, and morphology. A technique of RYGB was performed in Sprague-Dawley rats. SNEDDS were administered at a silymarin dose of 600 mg/kg in normal and RYGB rats for comparison with silymarin aqueous suspension and polyethylene glycol (PEG 400 solution. Plasma silibinin, the main active ingredient in silymarin, was chosen for estimating the pharmacokinetic parameters. SNEDDS diluted in simulated gastric fluid exhibited a droplet size of 190 nm with a spherical shape. The nanocarriers promoted silibinin availability via oral ingestion in RYGB rats by 2.5-fold and 1.5-fold compared to the suspension and PEG 400 solution, respectively. A significant double-peak concentration of silibinin was detected for RYGB rats receiving SNEDDS. Fluorescence

  5. Evaluation of current trends and recent development in insulin therapy for management of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Muhammad Sarfraz; Shah, Kifayat Ullah; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Rehman, Asim Ur; Rashid, Haroon Ur; Mahmood, Sajid; Khan, Shahzeb; Farrukh, Muhammad Junaid

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem in developing countries. There are various insulin therapies to manage diabetes mellitus. This systematic review evaluates various insulin therapies for management of diabetes mellitus worldwide. This review also focuses on recent developments being explored for better management of diabetes mellitus. We reviewed a number of published articles from 2002 to 2016 to find out the appropriate management of diabetes mellitus. The paramount parameters of the selected studies include the insulin type & its dose, type of diabetes, duration and comparison of different insulin protocols. In addition, various newly developed approaches for insulin delivery with potential output have also been evaluated. A great variability was observed in managing diabetes mellitus through insulin therapy and the important controlling factors found for this therapy include; dose titration, duration of insulin use, type of insulin used and combination therapy of different insulin. A range of research articles on current trends and recent advances in insulin has been summarized, which led us to the conclusion that multiple daily insulin injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pump) is the best method to manage diabetes mellitus. In future perspectives, development of the oral and inhalant insulin would be a tremendous breakthrough in Insulin therapy. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Development and in vivo evaluation of an oral delivery system for low molecular weight heparin based on thiolated polycarbophil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Constantia E; Guggi, Davide; Langoth, Nina; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2003-06-01

    It was the purpose of this study to develop a new oral drug delivery system for low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) providing an improved bioavailability and a prolonged therapeutic effect. The permeation enhancing polycarbophil-cysteine conjugate (PCP-Cys) used in this study displayed 111.4 +/- 6.4 microM thiol groups per gram polymer. Permeation studies on freshly excised intestinal mucosa were performed in Ussing chambers demonstrating a 2-fold improved uptake of heparin as a result of the addition of 0.5% (w/v) PCP-Cys and the permeation mediator glutathione (GSH). Tablets containing PCP-Cys, GSH, and 279 IU of LMWH showed a sustained drug release over 4 h. To guarantee the swelling of the polymeric carrier matrix in the small intestine tablets were enteric coated. They were orally given to rats. For tablets being based on the thiomer/GSH system an absolute bioavailability of 19.9 +/- 9.3% (means +/- SD; n = 5) vs. intravenous injection could be achieved. whereas tablets comprising unmodified PCP did not lead to a significant (p < 0.01) heparin concentration in plasma. The permeation enhancing effect and subsequently a therapeutic heparin level was maintained for 24 h after a single dose. Because of the strong and prolonged lasting permeation enhancing effect of the thiomer/GSH system, the oral bioavailability of LMWH could be significantly improved. This new delivery system represents therefore a promising tool for the oral administration of heparin.

  7. Oral delivery of ACE2/Ang-(1-7) bioencapsulated in plant cells protects against experimental uveitis and autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shil, Pollob K; Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Zhu, Ping; Verma, Amrisha; Daniell, Henry; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-12-01

    Hyperactivity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) resulting in elevated Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to all stages of inflammatory responses including ocular inflammation. The discovery of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has established a protective axis of RAS involving ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas that counteracts the proinflammatory and hypertrophic effects of the deleterious ACE/AngII/AT1R axis. Here we investigated the hypothesis that enhancing the systemic and local activity of the protective axis of the RAS by oral delivery of ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) bioencapsulated in plant cells would confer protection against ocular inflammation. Both ACE2 and Ang-(1-7), fused with the non-toxic cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) were expressed in plant chloroplasts. Increased levels of ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) were observed in circulation and retina after oral administration of CTB-ACE2 and Ang-(1-7) expressing plant cells. Oral feeding of mice with bioencapsulated ACE2/Ang-(1-7) significantly reduced endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in mice. Treatment with bioencapsulated ACE2/Ang-(1-7) also dramatically decreased cellular infiltration, retinal vasculitis, damage and folding in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Thus, enhancing the protective axis of RAS by oral delivery of ACE2/Ang-(1-7) bioencapsulated in plant cells provide an innovative, highly efficient and cost-effective therapeutic strategy for ocular inflammatory diseases.

  8. A facile nanoaggregation strategy for oral delivery of hydrophobic drugs by utilizing acid-base neutralization reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huabing; Wan Jiangling; Wang Yirui; Mou Dongsheng; Liu Hongbin; Xu Huibi; Yang Xiangliang

    2008-01-01

    Nanonization strategies have been used to enhance the oral availability of numerous drugs that are poorly soluble in water. Exploring a facile nanonization strategy with highly practical potential is an attractive focus. Here, we report a novel facile nanoaggregation strategy for constructing drug nanoparticles of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility by utilizing acid-base neutralization in aqueous solution, thus facilitating the exploration of nanonization in oral delivery for general applicability. We demonstrate that hydrophobic itraconazole dissolved in acid solution formed a growing core and aggregated into nanoparticles in the presence of stabilizers. The nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 279.3 nm and polydispersity index of 0.116, showed a higher dissolution rate when compared with the marketed formulation; the average dissolution was about 91.3%. The in vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the nanoparticles had a rapid absorption and enhanced oral availability. The diet state also showed insignificant impact on the absorption of itraconazole from nanoparticles. This nanoaggregation strategy is a promising nanonization method with a facile process and avoidance of toxic organic solvents for oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs with pH-dependent solubility and reveals a highly practical potential in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries

  9. Day-and-night glycaemic control with closed-loop insulin delivery versus conventional insulin pump therapy in free-living adults with well controlled type 1 diabetes: an open-label, randomised, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bally, Lia; Thabit, Hood; Kojzar, Harald; Mader, Julia K; Qerimi-Hyseni, Jehona; Hartnell, Sara; Tauschmann, Martin; Allen, Janet M; Wilinska, Malgorzata E; Pieber, Thomas R; Evans, Mark L; Hovorka, Roman

    2017-04-01

    Tight control of blood glucose concentration in people with type 1 diabetes predisposes to hypoglycaemia. We aimed to investigate whether day-and-night hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery can improve glucose control while alleviating the risk of hypoglycaemia in adults with HbA 1c below 7·5% (58 mmol/mol). In this open-label, randomised, crossover study, we recruited adults (aged ≥18 years) with type 1 diabetes and HbA 1c below 7·5% from Addenbrooke's Hospital (Cambridge, UK) and Medical University of Graz (Graz, Austria). After a 2-4 week run-in period, participants were randomly assigned (1:1), using web-based randomly permuted blocks of four, to receive insulin via the day-and-night hybrid closed-loop system or usual pump therapy for 4 weeks, followed by a 2-4 week washout period and then the other intervention for 4 weeks. Treatment interventions were unsupervised and done under free-living conditions. During the closed-loop period, a model-predictive control algorithm directed insulin delivery, and prandial insulin delivery was calculated with a standard bolus wizard. The primary outcome was the proportion of time when sensor glucose concentration was in target range (3·9-10·0 mmol/L) over the 4 week study period. Analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02727231, and is completed. Between March 21 and June 24, 2016, we recruited 31 participants, of whom 29 were randomised. One participant withdrew during the first closed-loop period because of dissatisfaction with study devices and glucose control. The proportion of time when sensor glucose concentration was in target range was 10·5 percentage points higher (95% CI 7·6-13·4; pday-and-night hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery under unsupervised, free-living conditions for 4 weeks in adults with type 1 diabetes and HbA 1c below 7·5% is safe and well tolerated, improves glucose control, and reduces hypoglycaemia burden. Larger and longer studies

  10. Chloroplast-derived vaccine antigens and biopharmaceuticals: protocols for expression, purification, or oral delivery and functional evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N Dolendro; Ding, Yi; Daniell, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Many vaccine antigens and biopharmaceutical proteins have been expressed at high levels via the chloroplast genome and their functionality has been evaluated using in vitro assays in cell cultures (i.e., macrophage lysis assay, inhibition of vesicular stomatitis virus-induced cytopathicity in baby hamster kidney cells, or inhibition of human HIV infection in TZM-BL cells) as well as protection after challenge with bacterial or viral pathogens or antitumor assays or delay the onset of insulitis in suitable animal models. Production of therapeutic proteins in chloroplasts eliminates the expensive fermentation technology. Moreover, oral delivery of chloroplast-derived therapeutic proteins eliminates expensive purification steps, cold storage, cold transportation, and delivery via sterile needles, thereby further decreasing their cost. In this chapter, we describe detailed protocols for chloroplast transformation including the construction of chloroplast transformation vectors, delivery of DNA into plant cells using particle bombardment, selection and regeneration of transformants by tissue culture, confirmation of transgene integration into the chloroplast genome and homoplasmy, evaluation of foreign gene expression, purification of foreign protein, or oral delivery via bioencapsulation, functional evaluation using in vitro and in vivo assays, and evaluation of immunity after challenge with pathogens in suitable animal models.

  11. Antibiotic treatment at delivery shapes the initial oral microbiome in neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez-Arango, Luisa F.; Barrett, Helen L.; McIntyre, H. David.; Callaway, Leonie K.; Morrison, Mark; Dekker Nitert, Marloes

    2017-01-01

    Oral microorganisms are important determinants of health and disease. The source of the initial neonatal microbiome and the factors dictating initial human oral microbiota development are unknown. This study aimed to investigate this in placental, oral and gut microbiome profiles from 36 overweight or obese mother-baby dyads as determined by 16S rRNA sequencing. Expression of five antibiotic resistance genes of the ?-lactamase class was analysed in the infant oral microbiota samples by QPCR. ...

  12. A combination of complexation and self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system for enhancing oral bioavailability and anticancer efficacy of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Mahendra; Jaiswal, Swati; Sharma, Abhisheak; Srivastava, Pradeep Kumar; Arya, Abhishek; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Lal, Jawahar

    2017-05-01

    Curcumin, the golden spice from Indian saffron, has shown chemoprotective action against many types of cancer including breast cancer. However, poor oral bioavailability is the major hurdle in its clinical application. In the recent years, self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) has emerged as a promising tool to improve the oral absorption and enhancing the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. In this context, complexation with lipid carriers like phospholipid has also shown the tremendous potential to improve the solubility and therapeutic efficacy of certain drugs with poor oral bioavailability. In the present investigation, a systematic combination of both the approaches is utilized to prepare the phospholipid complex of curcumin and facilitate its incorporation into SNEDDS. The combined use of both the approaches has been explored for the first time to enhance the oral bioavailability and in turn increase the anticancer activity of curcumin. As evident from the pharmacokinetic studies and in situ single pass intestinal perfusion studies in Sprague-Dawley rats, the optimized SNEDDS of curcumin-phospholipid complex has shown enhanced oral absorption and bioavailability of curcumin. The cytotoxicity study in metastatic breast carcinoma cell line has shown the enhancement of cytotoxic action by 38.7%. The primary tumor growth reduction by 58.9% as compared with the control group in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice further supported the theory of enhancement of anticancer activity of curcumin in SNEDDS. The developed formulation can be a potential and safe carrier for the oral delivery of curcumin.

  13. Improved Oral Bioavailability Using a Solid Self-Microemulsifying Drug Delivery System Containing a Multicomponent Mixture Extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Bi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The active ingredients of salvia (dried root of Salvia miltiorrhiza include both lipophilic (e.g., tanshinone IIA, tanshinone I, cryptotanshinone and dihydrotanshinone I and hydrophilic (e.g., danshensu and salvianolic acid B constituents. The low oral bioavailability of these constituents may limit their efficacy. A solid self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (S-SMEDDS was developed to load the various active constituents of salvia into a single drug delivery system and improve their oral bioavailability. A prototype SMEDDS was designed using solubility studies and phase diagram construction, and characterized by self-emulsification performance, stability, morphology, droplet size, polydispersity index and zeta potential. Furthermore, the S-SMEDDS was prepared by dispersing liquid SMEDDS containing liposoluble extract into a solution containing aqueous extract and hydrophilic polymer, and then freeze-drying. In vitro release of tanshinone IIA, salvianolic acid B, cryptotanshinone and danshensu from the S-SMEDDS was examined, showing approximately 60%–80% of each active component was released from the S-SMEDDS in vitro within 20 min. In vivo bioavailability of these four constituents indicated that the S-SMEDDS showed superior in vivo oral absorption to a drug suspension after oral administration in rats. It can be concluded that the novel S-SMEDDS developed in this study increased the dissolution rate and improved the oral bioavailability of both lipophilic and hydrophilic constituents of salvia. Thus, the S-SMEDDS can be regarded as a promising new method by which to deliver salvia extract, and potentially other multicomponent drugs, by the oral route.

  14. Evaluation of fasting state-/oral glucose tolerance test-derived measures of insulin release for the detection of genetically impaired β-cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke A Herzberg-Schäfer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, fasting state- and different oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT-derived measures are used to estimate insulin release with reasonable effort in large human cohorts required, e.g., for genetic studies. Here, we evaluated twelve common (or recently introduced fasting state-/OGTT-derived indices for their suitability to detect genetically determined β-cell dysfunction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cohort of 1364 White European individuals at increased risk for type 2 diabetes was characterized by OGTT with glucose, insulin, and C-peptide measurements and genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs known to affect glucose- and incretin-stimulated insulin secretion. One fasting state- and eleven OGTT-derived indices were calculated and statistically evaluated. After adjustment for confounding variables, all tested SNPs were significantly associated with at least two insulin secretion measures (p≤0.05. The indices were ranked according to their associations' statistical power, and the ranks an index obtained for its associations with all the tested SNPs (or a subset were summed up resulting in a final ranking. This approach revealed area under the curve (AUC(Insulin(0-30/AUC(Glucose(0-30 as the best-ranked index to detect SNP-dependent differences in insulin release. Moreover, AUC(Insulin(0-30/AUC(Glucose(0-30, corrected insulin response (CIR, AUC(C-Peptide(0-30/AUC(Glucose(0-30, AUC(C-Peptide(0-120/AUC(Glucose(0-120, two different formulas for the incremental insulin response from 0-30 min, i.e., the insulinogenic indices (IGI(2 and IGI(1, and insulin 30 min were significantly higher-ranked than homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-B; p<0.05. AUC(C-Peptide(0-120/AUC(Glucose(0-120 was best-ranked for the detection of SNPs involved in incretin-stimulated insulin secretion. In all analyses, HOMA-β displayed the highest rank sums and, thus, scored last. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: With AUC(Insulin(0

  15. Thiolated chitosan nanoparticles as an oral delivery system for Amikacin: in vitro and ex vivo evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atyabi, F; Talaie, F; Dinarvand, R

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was the synthesis of two thiol conjugated Chitosan polymers, and evaluation of the potential of Thiomer nanoparticle formulation as a carrier for oral delivery system. Mediated by EDAC (Ethylene-3-(3-di-methylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide), either N-acetyl Cysteine (NAC) or N-acetyl D-penicillamine (NAP) were covalently attached to Chitosan. The success of the synthesis was demonstrated by comparing FTIR spectra. Iodometric titration demonstrated that depending on the pH value of the synthesis medium, the Thiomers display 250 +/- 30 microMol and 300 +/- 20 microMol thiol groups per gram of polymer respectively. The interaction between mucin and Thiomers, compared to mucin and Chitosan was studied for assessment of mucoadhesion properties of synthesized polymers. This interaction was determined by the measurement of the amount of mucin adsorbed on Chitosan and the conjugated polymers. Rotating cylinder method demonstrated an average of 20 times improvement in mucoadhesion of Thiomers compared to the unmodified polymer. Chitosan and Thiomer nanoparticles were formulated by two methods; TPP and Sodium Sulfate gelation. SEM micrographs and data achieved by a Malvern nano/zetasizer show nanoparticles formed by TPP gelation have a mean size of 150 +/- 15 nm compared to 300 +/- 25 nm sized nanoparticles obtained by Sodium sulfate gelation. TPP gelation yields smaller, more spherical shaped nanoparticles with a smaller range of size distribution. Amikacin loaded nanoparticles with an average size of 280 nm were prepared by TPP gelation in which disulfide bond formation was achieved by a time dependent oxidation process. In vitro studies were carried out; a recovery rate of 33% and a drug entrapment of 25% were achieved. The amount of release was determined during 18 hr in a carefully prepared media. The permeation time across a biological membrane was observed to be about 150 minutes. Microbiological tests were carried out on two microorganisms

  16. Orally Targeted Delivery of Tripeptide KPV via Hyaluronic Acid-Functionalized Nanoparticles Efficiently Alleviates Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Xu, Zhigang; Viennois, Emilie; Zhang, Yuchen; Zhang, Zhan; Zhang, Mingzhen; Han, Moon Kwon; Kang, Yuejun; Merlin, Didier

    2017-07-05

    Overcoming adverse effects and selectively delivering drug to target cells are two major challenges in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC). Lysine-proline-valine (KPV), a naturally occurring tripeptide, has been shown to attenuate the inflammatory responses of colonic cells. Here, we loaded KPV into hyaluronic acid (HA)-functionalized polymeric nanoparticles (NPs). The resultant HA-KPV-NPs had a desirable particle size (∼272.3 nm) and a slightly negative zeta potential (∼-5.3 mV). These NPs successfully mediated the targeted delivery of KPV to key UC therapy-related cells (colonic epithelial cells and macrophages). In addition, these KPV-loaded NPs appear to be nontoxic and biocompatible with intestinal cells. Intriguingly, we found that HA-KPV-NPs exert combined effects against UC by both accelerating mucosal healing and alleviating inflammation. Oral administration of HA-KPV-NPs encapsulated in a hydrogel (chitosan/alginate) exhibited a much stronger capacity to prevent mucosa damage and downregulate TNF-α, thus they showed a much better therapeutic efficacy against UC in a mouse model, compared with a KPV-NP/hydrogel system. These results collectively demonstrate that our HA-KPV-NP/hydrogel system has the capacity to release HA-KPV-NPs in the colonic lumen and that these NPs subsequently penetrate into colitis tissues and enable KPV to be internalized into target cells, thereby alleviating UC. Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Insulin aspart in diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2008-01-01

    in insulin requirements during pregnancy necessitate short-acting insulins for postprandial control of hyperglycemia. The fast-acting insulin analogue insulin aspart has been tested in a large, randomized trial of pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes and offers benefits in control of postprandial...... hyperglycemia with a tendency towards fewer episodes of severe hypoglycemia compared with human insulin. Treatment with insulin aspart was associated with a tendency toward fewer fetal losses and preterm deliveries than treatment with human insulin. Insulin aspart could not be detected in the fetal circulation...... and no increase in insulin antibodies was found. Thus, the use of insulin aspart in pregnancy is regarded safe....

  18. Heterogeneity of high-density lipoprotein particles and insulin output during oral glucose tolerance test in men with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanejko, J; Kwaśniak, M; Wybrańska, I; Hartwich, J; Guevara, I; Zdzienicka, A; Kruszelnicka-Kwiatkowska, O; Piwowarska, W; Miszczuk-Jamska, B; Dembińska-Kieć, A

    1996-03-01

    We compared the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) composition and particle heterogeneity in 60 nonobese (normal body mass index, BMI) men suffering from coronary artery disease (CAD) with normolipemia and normoinsulinemia with lower and higher insulin output during the oral glucose tolerance test (silent hyperinsulinemia). The apolipoprotein apoAI, apoAII, and apoE levels were higher in the high insulin response (HI) group than in low insulin response (LI) group. The ratio of apoAI versus total protein and the ratio of apoAI versus total cholesterol were increased in HI compared with LI. The lipid components in HDL were higher in LI than in HI, while for HDL2 they were higher in HI. The fractioning of HDL by gradient gel electrophoresis revealed a different pattern of HDL particles in both groups. The larger particles, HDL2b and HDL2a (mean particle diameters 10.6 and 9.2 nm, respectively), occur more frequently in HI patients (up to 60%) than in LI patients, whereas the smaller particles, HDL3a and HDL3b (mean particle diameters 8.6 and 7.8 nm, respectively), predominate in LI patients. Our results demonstrate that even in the normoglycemic, normocholesterolemic CAD patients, a high insulin output observed during the oral glucose tolerance test may be connected with a different HDL particle pattern, which suggests changes in the reverse cholesterol transport.

  19. Self-double-emulsifying drug delivery system (SDEDDS): a new way for oral delivery of drugs with high solubility and low permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Lishuang; Zhu, Jiabi; Hu, Zhenyi; Zhang, Jie

    2011-05-16

    Water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions are potential for enhancing oral bioavailability of drugs with high solubility and low permeability, but their industrial application is limited due to the instability. Herein, we developed a novel formulation, self-double-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SDEDDS) by formulating mixtures of hydrophilic surfactants and water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions, which were easier to be stable through formulations optimization. SDEDDS can spontaneously emulsify to water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double emulsions in the mixed aqueous gastrointestinal environment, with drugs encapsulated in the internal water phase of the double emulsions. We employed SDEDDS to improve the oral absorption of pidotimod, a peptide-like drug with high solubility and low permeability. The optimized pidotimod-SDEDDS were found to be stable up to 6 months under 25°C. Plasma concentration-time profiles from pharmacokinetic studies in rats dosed with SDEDDS showed 2.56-fold (p<0.05) increased absorption of pidotimod, compared to the pidotimod solution. Histopathologic studies confirmed that SDEDDS exerted absorption promoting effect without serious local damages. These studies demonstrate that SDEDDS may be a promising strategy for peroral delivery of peptide and peptidomimetic drugs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Targeted delivery of antigen to intestinal dendritic cells induces oral tolerance and prevents autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Wu, Jie; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Wenjing; Xu, Bohui; Xu, Xiaojun; Zong, Li

    2018-03-15

    The intestinal immune system is an ideal target to induce immune tolerance physiologically. However, the efficiency of oral protein antigen delivery is limited by degradation of the antigen in the gastrointestinal tract and poor uptake by antigen-presenting cells. Gut dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that are prone to inducing antigen-specific immune tolerance. In this study, we delivered the antigen heat shock protein 65-6×P277 (H6P) directly to the gut DCs of NOD mice through oral vaccination with H6P-loaded targeting nanoparticles (NPs), and investigated the ability of this antigen to induce immune tolerance to prevent autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. A targeting NP delivery system was developed to encapsulate H6P, and the ability of this system to protect and facilitate H6P delivery to gut DCs was assessed. NOD mice were immunised with H6P-loaded targeting NPs orally once a week for 7 weeks and the onset of diabetes was assessed by monitoring blood glucose levels. H6P-loaded targeting NPs protected the encapsulated H6P from degradation in the gastrointestinal tract environment and significantly increased the uptake of H6P by DCs in the gut Peyer's patches (4.1 times higher uptake compared with the control H6P solution group). Oral vaccination with H6P-loaded targeting NPs induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance and prevented diabetes in 100% of NOD mice. Immune deviation (T helper [Th]1 to Th2) and CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + regulatory T cells were found to participate in the induction of immune tolerance. In this study, we successfully induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance and prevented the onset of diabetes in NOD mice. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at delivering antigen to gut DCs using targeting NPs to induce T cell tolerance.

  1. Pluronic-Functionalized Silica-Lipid Hybrid Microparticles: Improving the Oral Delivery of Poorly Water-Soluble Weak Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shasha; Richter, Katharina; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Boyd, Ben J; Porter, Christopher J H; Tan, Angel; Prestidge, Clive A

    2015-12-07

    A Pluronic-functionalized silica-lipid hybrid (Plu-SLH) microparticle system for the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble, weak base drugs is reported for the first time. A highly effective Plu-SLH microparticle system was composed of Labrasol as the lipid phase, Pluronic F127 as the polymeric precipitation inhibitor (PPI), and silica nanoparticles as the solid carrier. For the model drug cinnarizine (CIN), the Plu-SLH delivery system was shown to offer significant biopharmaceutical advantages in comparison with unformulated drug and drug in the silica-lipid hybrid (SLH) system. In vitro two-phase dissolution studies illustrated significantly reduced pH provoked CIN precipitation and an 8- to 14-fold improvement in the extent of dissolution in intestinal conditions. In addition, under simulated intestinal digesting conditions, the Plu-SLH provided approximately three times more drug solubilization than the SLH. Oral administration in rats resulted in superior bioavailability for Plu-SLH microparticles, i.e., 1.6- and 2.1-fold greater than the SLH and the unformulated CIN, respectively. A physical mixture of Pluronic and SLH (Plu&SLH), having the same composition as Plu-SLH, was also evaluated, but showed no significant increase in CIN absorption when compared to unmodified CIN or SLH. This work represents the first study where different methods of incorporating PPI to formulate solid-state lipid-based formulations were compared for the impact on the biopharmaceutical performance. The data suggest that the novel physicochemical properties and structure of the fabricated Plu-SLH microparticle delivery system play an important role in facilitating the synergistic advantage of Labrasol and Pluronic F127 in preventing drug precipitation, and the Plu-SLH provides efficient oral delivery of poorly water-soluble weak bases.

  2. Oral delivery of bioencapsulated coagulation factor IX prevents inhibitor formation and fatal anaphylaxis in hemophilia B mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dheeraj; Moghimi, Babak; LoDuca, Paul A; Singh, Harminder D; Hoffman, Brad E; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2010-04-13

    To address complications of pathogenic antibody or life-threatening anaphylactic reactions in protein replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia or other inherited protein deficiencies, we have developed a prophylactic protocol using a murine hemophilia B model. Oral delivery of coagulation factor IX fused with cholera toxin beta-subunit (with or without a furin cleavage site; CTB-FFIX or CTB-FIX), expressed in chloroplasts (up to 3.8% soluble protein or 0.4 mg/g leaf tissue), bioencapsulated in plant cells, effectively blocked formation of inhibitory antibodies (undetectable or up to 100-fold less than controls). Moreover, this treatment eliminated fatal anaphylactic reactions that occurred after four to six exposures to intravenous F.IX. Whereas only 20-25% of control animals survived after six to eight F.IX doses, 90-93% of F.IX-fed mice survived 12 injections without signs of allergy or anaphylaxis. Immunostaining confirmed delivery of F.IX to Peyer's patches in the ileum. Within 2-5 h, feeding of CTB-FFIX additionally resulted in systemic delivery of F.IX antigen. This high-responder strain of hemophilia B mice represents a new animal model to study anaphylactic reactions. The protocol was effective over a range of oral antigen doses (equivalent to 5-80 microg recombinant F.IX/kg), and controlled inhibitor formation and anaphylaxis long-term, up to 7 months (approximately 40% life span of this mouse strain). Oral antigen administration caused a deviant immune response that suppressed formation of IgE and inhibitory antibodies. This cost-effective and efficient approach of antigen delivery to the gut should be applicable to several genetic diseases that are prone to pathogenic antibody responses during treatment.

  3. Bioavailability Enhancement of Paclitaxel via a Novel Oral Drug Delivery System: Paclitaxel-Loaded Glycyrrhizic Acid Micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Heng Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Paclitaxel (PTX, taxol, a classical antitumor drug against a wide range of tumors, shows poor oral bioavailability. In order to improve the oral bioavailability of PTX, glycyrrhizic acid (GA was used as the carrier in this study. This was the first report on the preparation, characterization and the pharmacokinetic study in rats of PTX-loaded GA micelles The PTX-loaded micelles, prepared with ultrasonic dispersion method, displayed small particle sizes and spherical shapes. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC thermograms indicated that PTX was entrapped in the GA micelles and existed as an amorphous state. The encapsulation efficiency was about 90%, and the drug loading rate could reach up to 7.90%. PTX-loaded GA micelles displayed a delayed drug release compared to Taxol in the in vitro release experiment. In pharmacokinetic study via oral administration, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0→24 h of PTX-loaded GA micelles was about six times higher than that of Taxol (p < 0.05. The significant oral absorption enhancement of PTX from PTX-loaded GA micelles could be largely due to the increased absorption in jejunum and colon intestine. All these results suggested that GA would be a promising carrier for the oral delivery of PTX.

  4. Biocompatible nanoemulsions based on hemp oil and less surfactants for oral delivery of baicalein with enhanced bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Juntao; Xiang, Cuiyu; Wang, Peiqing; Yin, Yuyun; Hou, Yantao

    2017-01-01

    Baicalein (BCL) possesses high pharmacological activities but low solubility and stability in the intestinal tract. This study aimed to probe the potential of nanoemulsions (NEs) consisting of hemp oil and less surfactants in ameliorating the oral bioavailability of BCL. BCL-loaded NEs (BCL-NEs) were prepared by high-pressure homogenization technique to reduce the amount of surfactants. BCL-NEs were characterized by particle size, entrapment efficiency (EE), in vitro drug release, and morphology. Bioavailability was studied in Sprague-Dawley rats following oral administration of BCL suspensions, BCL conventional emulsions, and BCL-NEs. The obtained NEs were ~90 nm in particle size with an EE of 99.31%. BCL-NEs significantly enhanced the oral bioavailability of BCL, up to 524.7% and 242.1% relative to the suspensions and conventional emulsions, respectively. BCL-NEs exhibited excellent intestinal permeability and transcellular transport ability. The cytotoxicity of BCL-NEs was documented to be low and acceptable for oral purpose. Our findings suggest that such novel NEs and preparative process provide a promising alternative to current formulation technologies and suitable for oral delivery of drugs with bioavailability issues.

  5. Clinical and Economic Outcomes Associated With the Timing of Initiation of Basal Insulin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Previously Treated With Oral Antidiabetes Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Philip; Zhou, Steve; Durden, Emily; Farr, Amanda M; Gill, Jasvinder; Wei, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) not achieving glycemic targets using oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs), studies suggest that timely insulin initiation has clinical benefits. Insulin initiation at the early versus late stage of disease progression has not been explored in detail. This retrospective database analysis investigated clinical and economic outcomes associated with the timing of insulin initiation in patients with T2DM treated with ≥1 OAD in a real-world US setting. This study linked data from the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Commercial database, Medicare Supplemental database, and Quintiles Electronic Medical Records database. A total of 1830 patients with T2DM were included. Patients were grouped according to their OAD use before basal insulin initiation (1, 2, or ≥3 OADs) as a proxy for the timing of insulin initiation. Clinical and economic outcomes were evaluated over 1 year of follow-up. During follow-up the 1 OAD group, compared with the 2 and ≥3 OADs groups, had a greater reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (-1.7% vs -1.0% vs -0.9%, respectively; P 1), greater achievement of glycemic target (38.2% vs 26.7% vs 19.6%, respectively; P 1), and a lower incidence of hypoglycemia (2.7% vs 6.6% vs 5.0%, respectively; P = 0.0002), with no difference in total health care costs ($21,167 vs $21,060 vs $20,133, respectively). This study shows that early insulin initiation (represented by the 1 OAD group) may be clinically beneficial to patients with T2DM not controlled with OADs, without adding to costs. This supports the call for timely initiation of individualized insulin therapy in this population. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of critical formulation parameters in design and differentiation of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDSs) for oral delivery of aciclovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Jovana; Djekic, Ljiljana; Dobričić, Vladimir; Primorac, Marija

    2016-01-30

    The study investigated the influence of formulation parameters for design of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDSs) comprising oil (medium chain triglycerides) (10%), surfactant (Labrasol(®), polysorbate 20, or Kolliphor(®) RH40), cosurfactant (Plurol(®) Oleique CC 497) (q.s. ad 100%), and cosolvent (glycerol or macrogol 400) (20% or 30%), and evaluate their potential as carriers for oral delivery of a poorly permeable antivirotic aciclovir (acyclovir). The drug loading capacity of the prepared formulations ranged from 0.18-31.66 mg/ml. Among a total of 60 formulations, three formulations meet the limits for average droplet size (Z-ave) and polydispersity index (PdI) that have been set for SMEDDSs (Z-ave≤100nm, PdI<0.250) upon spontaneous dispersion in 0.1M HCl and phosphate buffer pH 7.2. SMEDDSs with the highest aciclovir loading capacity (24.06 mg/ml and 21.12 mg/ml) provided the in vitro drug release rates of 0.325 mg cm(-2)min(-1) and 0.323 mg cm(-2)min(-1), respectively, and significantly enhanced drug permeability in the parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA), in comparison with the pure drug substance. The results revealed that development of SMEDDSs with enhanced drug loading capacity and oral delivery potential, required optimization of hydrophilic ingredients, in terms of size of hydrophilic moiety of the surfactant, surfactant-to-cosurfactant mass ratio (Km), and log P of the cosolvent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Chitosan/o-carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles for efficient and safe oral anticancer drug delivery: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao; Wang, Zhiguo; Jiang, Changqing; Kong, Ming; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Yang; Cheng, Xiaojie; Chen, Xiguang

    2013-11-30

    The present study investigated the ability of a polyelectrolyte complex (CS/CMCS-NPs), composed of chitosan (CS) and o-carboxymeymethy chitosan (CMCS) as a pH responsive carrier for oral delivery of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX). The obtained CS/CMCS-NPs were characterized for various parameters including morphology, particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and stability under the simulated GI tract conditions. The pH responsive stability of the DOX-loaded CS/CMCS nanoparticles (DOX:CS/CMCS-NPs) determined the drug release rate, which was lower in acidic pH than the neutral. Ex vivo intestinal adhesion and permeation indicated DOX:CS/CMCS-NGs were able to enhance absorption of DOX throughout the entire small intestine, especially in jejunum and ileum. Oral administration of DOX:CS/CMCS-NPs was effective to deliver DOX into blood, giving an absolute bioavailability of 42%. The tissue distribution and toxicity of DOX:CS/CMCS-NPs in rats showed low level of DOX in heart and kidney, and obviously decreased cardiac and renal toxicities. These results indicated CS/CMCS-NPs were highly efficient and safe as an oral delivery system for DOX. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multilayer sodium alginate beads with porous core containing chitosan based nanoparticles for oral delivery of anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Jiang, Changqing; Lang, Xuqian; Kong, Ming; Cheng, Xiaojie; Liu, Ya; Feng, Chao; Chen, Xiguang

    2016-04-01

    To develop efficient and safe anticancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) delivery system for oral chemotherapy, chitosan based nanoparticles (CS/CMCS-NPs) composed of chitosan (CS) and o-carboxymeymethy chitosan (CMCS) were immobilized in multilayer sodium alginate beads (NPs-M-Beads). Two kinds of NPs-M-Beads, with or without porous core, were respectively prepared by internal or external ionic gelation method. In the small intestine, the intact CS/CMCS-NPs were able to escape from porous-beads and sustained release the loading DOX. In vivo results showed that the DOX could be efficiently absorbed by small intestine of SD rat and the higher concentration of the DOX in major organs of rats were found after oral administration of Porous-Beads, which were about 2-4 folds higher than that of non-porous-beads. These results suggested that the NPs-M-Beads with porous core to be exciting and promising for oral delivery of DOX. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-Assembled Lipid Nanoparticles for Oral Delivery of Heparin-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Theranostic Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzi, Eleonora; Bongio, Chiara; Sacchetti, Francesca; Maretti, Eleonora; Montanari, Monica; Iannuccelli, Valentina; Vismara, Elena; Leo, Eliana

    2017-06-09

    Recently, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have attracted increasing attention owing to their potential as an oral delivery system, promoting intestinal absorption in the lymphatic circulation which plays a role in disseminating metastatic cancer cells and infectious agents throughout the body. SLN features can be exploited for the oral delivery of theranostics. Therefore, the aim of this work was to design and characterise self-assembled lipid nanoparticles (SALNs) to encapsulate and stabilise iron oxide nanoparticles non-covalently coated with heparin (Fe@hepa) as a model of a theranostic tool. SALNs were characterised for physico-chemical properties (particle size, surface charge, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro stability, and heparin leakage), as well as in vitro cytotoxicity by methyl thiazole tetrazolium (MTT) assay and cell internalisation in CaCo-2, a cell line model used as an indirect indication of intestinal lymphatic absorption. SALNs of about 180 nm, which are stable in suspension and have a high encapsulation efficiency (>90%) were obtained. SALNs were able to stabilise the heparin coating of Fe@hepa, which are typically unstable in physiological environments. Moreover, SALNs-Fe@hepa showed no cytotoxicity, although their ability to be internalised into CaCo-2 cells was highlighted by confocal microscopy analysis. Therefore, the results indicated that SALNs can be considered as a promising tool to orally deliver theranostic Fe@hepa into the lymphatic circulation, although further in vivo studies are needed to comprehend further potential applications.

  10. Probiotic Ferulic Acid Esterase Active Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221 APA Microcapsules for Oral Delivery: Preparation and in Vitro Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Tomaro-Duchesneau

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics possess potential therapeutic and preventative effects for various diseases and metabolic disorders. One important limitation for the oral delivery of probiotics is the harsh conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT which challenge bacterial viability and activity. One proposed method to surpass this obstacle is the use of microencapsulation to improve the delivery of bacterial cells to the lower GIT. The aim of this study is to use alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA microcapsules to encapsulate Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221 and characterize its enzymatic activity and viability through a simulated GIT. This specific strain, in previous research, was characterized for its inherent ferulic acid esterase (FAE activity which could prove beneficial in the development of a therapeutic for the treatment and prevention of cancers and metabolic disorders. Our findings demonstrate that the APA microcapsule does not slow the mass transfer of substrate into and that of the FA product out of the microcapsule, while also not impairing bacterial cell viability. The use of simulated gastrointestinal conditions led to a significant 2.5 log difference in viability between the free (1.10 × 104 ± 1.00 × 103 cfu/mL and the microencapsulated (5.50 × 106 ± 1.00 × 105 cfu/mL L. fermentum NCIMB 5221 following exposure. The work presented here suggests that APA microencapsulation can be used as an effective oral delivery method for L. fermentum NCIMB 5221, a FAE-active probiotic strain.

  11. Probiotic Ferulic Acid Esterase Active Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221 APA Microcapsules for Oral Delivery: Preparation and in Vitro Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Coussa-Charley, Michael; Kahouli, Imen; Jones, Mitchell L.; Labbé, Alain; Prakash, Satya

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics possess potential therapeutic and preventative effects for various diseases and metabolic disorders. One important limitation for the oral delivery of probiotics is the harsh conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) which challenge bacterial viability and activity. One proposed method to surpass this obstacle is the use of microencapsulation to improve the delivery of bacterial cells to the lower GIT. The aim of this study is to use alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA) microcapsules to encapsulate Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221 and characterize its enzymatic activity and viability through a simulated GIT. This specific strain, in previous research, was characterized for its inherent ferulic acid esterase (FAE) activity which could prove beneficial in the development of a therapeutic for the treatment and prevention of cancers and metabolic disorders. Our findings demonstrate that the APA microcapsule does not slow the mass transfer of substrate into and that of the FA product out of the microcapsule, while also not impairing bacterial cell viability. The use of simulated gastrointestinal conditions led to a significant 2.5 log difference in viability between the free (1.10 × 104 ± 1.00 × 103 cfu/mL) and the microencapsulated (5.50 × 106 ± 1.00 × 105 cfu/mL) L. fermentum NCIMB 5221 following exposure. The work presented here suggests that APA microencapsulation can be used as an effective oral delivery method for L. fermentum NCIMB 5221, a FAE-active probiotic strain. PMID:24288090

  12. Probiotic Ferulic Acid Esterase Active Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221 APA Microcapsules for Oral Delivery: Preparation and in Vitro Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Coussa-Charley, Michael; Kahouli, Imen; Jones, Mitchell L; Labbé, Alain; Prakash, Satya

    2012-02-16

    Probiotics possess potential therapeutic and preventative effects for various diseases and metabolic disorders. One important limitation for the oral delivery of probiotics is the harsh conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) which challenge bacterial viability and activity. One proposed method to surpass this obstacle is the use of microencapsulation to improve the delivery of bacterial cells to the lower GIT. The aim of this study is to use alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA) microcapsules to encapsulate Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221 and characterize its enzymatic activity and viability through a simulated GIT. This specific strain, in previous research, was characterized for its inherent ferulic acid esterase (FAE) activity which could prove beneficial in the development of a therapeutic for the treatment and prevention of cancers and metabolic disorders. Our findings demonstrate that the APA microcapsule does not slow the mass transfer of substrate into and that of the FA product out of the microcapsule, while also not impairing bacterial cell viability. The use of simulated gastrointestinal conditions led to a significant 2.5 log difference in viability between the free (1.10 × 104 ± 1.00 × 103 cfu/mL) and the microencapsulated (5.50 × 106 ± 1.00 × 105 cfu/mL) L. fermentum NCIMB 5221 following exposure. The work presented here suggests that APA microencapsulation can be used as an effective oral delivery method for L. fermentum NCIMB 5221, a FAE-active probiotic strain.

  13. How can insulin initiation delivery in a dual-sector health system be optimised? A qualitative study on healthcare professionals' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping Yein; Lee, Yew Kong; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2012-04-30

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in developing countries. However, glycaemia control remains suboptimal and insulin use is low. One important barrier is the lack of an efficient and effective insulin initiation delivery approach. This study aimed to document the strategies used and proposed by healthcare professionals to improve insulin initiation in the Malaysian dual-sector (public-private) health system. In depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in Klang Valley and Seremban, Malaysia in 2010-11. Healthcare professionals consisting of general practitioners (n = 11), medical officers (n = 8), diabetes educators (n = 3), government policy makers (n = 4), family medicine specialists (n = 10) and endocrinologists (n = 2) were interviewed. We used a topic guide to facilitate the interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach. Three main themes emerged from the interviews. Firstly, there was a lack of collaboration between the private and public sectors in diabetes care. The general practitioners in the private sector proposed an integrated system for them to refer patients to the public health services for insulin initiation programmes. There could be shared care between the two sectors and this would reduce the disproportionately heavy workload at the public sector. Secondly, besides the support from the government health authority, the healthcare professionals wanted greater involvement of non-government organisations, media and pharmaceutical industry in facilitating insulin initiation in both the public and private sectors. The support included: training of healthcare professionals; developing and disseminating patient education materials; service provision by diabetes education teams; organising programmes for patients' peer group sessions; increasing awareness and demystifying insulin via public campaigns; and subsidising glucose

  14. How can insulin initiation delivery in a dual-sector health system be optimised? A qualitative study on healthcare professionals’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ping Yein

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing at an alarming rate in developing countries. However, glycaemia control remains suboptimal and insulin use is low. One important barrier is the lack of an efficient and effective insulin initiation delivery approach. This study aimed to document the strategies used and proposed by healthcare professionals to improve insulin initiation in the Malaysian dual-sector (public–private health system. Methods In depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in Klang Valley and Seremban, Malaysia in 2010–11. Healthcare professionals consisting of general practitioners (n = 11, medical officers (n = 8, diabetes educators (n = 3, government policy makers (n = 4, family medicine specialists (n = 10 and endocrinologists (n = 2 were interviewed. We used a topic guide to facilitate the interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach. Results Three main themes emerged from the interviews. Firstly, there was a lack of collaboration between the private and public sectors in diabetes care. The general practitioners in the private sector proposed an integrated system for them to refer patients to the public health services for insulin initiation programmes. There could be shared care between the two sectors and this would reduce the disproportionately heavy workload at the public sector. Secondly, besides the support from the government health authority, the healthcare professionals wanted greater involvement of non-government organisations, media and pharmaceutical industry in facilitating insulin initiation in both the public and private sectors. The support included: training of healthcare professionals; developing and disseminating patient education materials; service provision by diabetes education teams; organising programmes for patients’ peer group sessions; increasing awareness and demystifying

  15. The effect of dentifrice quantity and toothbrushing behaviour on oral delivery and retention of fluoride in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creeth, Jonathan; Zero, Domenick; Mau, Melissa; Bosma, Mary Lynn; Butler, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    While toothpaste F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen have well-characterised impacts on fluoride's effectiveness, other aspects of brushing regimen have much less well-established effects, in particular, dentifrice quantity and brushing duration. An in vivo study (n = 42) of oral fluoride delivery (i.e. oral disposition post-brushing), and retention (i.e. concentration of F(-) in saliva post-brushing, a known efficacy predictor), was performed to compare effects observed with those of dentifrice F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen. Subjects brushed with a NaF-silica dentifrice (Aquafresh Advanced, 1,150 ppm F(-) ) or a control dentifrice (250 ppm F(-) , same base), for 45, 60, 120 or 180 seconds with 0.5 or 1.5 g dentifrice, and rinsed with 15 ml water once or three times in a cross-over design. The F(-) concentration was measured in post-brushing expectorate, rinse and toothbrush washing samples, and in saliva between 5-120 minutes after brushing. Using 1.5 g versus 0.5 g dentifrice increased F(-) in all samples: oral retention of F(-) was almost doubled by this increase. Increasing duration of brushing had more complex effects. The amount of F(-) in the expectorate increased but decreased in both rinse and toothbrush washing samples. Oral F(-) retention increased, but only in the period 30-120 minutes after brushing. Over the ranges investigated, the order of importance on oral F(-) retention was: dentifrice F(-) concentration > quantity > rinsing regimen > brushing duration. Hence, increasing dentifrice quantity and, to a lesser extent, the duration of brushing, can elevate oral fluoride post-brushing. Evidence is accumulating that the importance of these variables to fluoride efficacy may have been underestimated. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  16. Low Molecular Weight Chitosan–Insulin Polyelectrolyte Complex: Characterization and Stability Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakieh I. Al-Kurdi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work reported herein was to investigate the effect of various low molecular weight chitosans (LMWCs on the stability of insulin using USP HPLC methods. Insulin was found to be stable in a polyelectrolyte complex (PEC consisting of insulin and LMWC in the presence of a Tris-buffer at pH 6.5. In the presence of LMWC, the stability of insulin increased with decreasing molecular weight of LMWC; 13 kDa LMWC was the most efficient molecular weight for enhancing the physical and chemical stability of insulin. Solubilization of insulin-LMWC polyelectrolyte complex (I-LMWC PEC in a reverse micelle (RM system, administered to diabetic rats, results in an oral delivery system for insulin with acceptable bioactivity.

  17. Local myocardial insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) delivery with biotinylated peptide nanofibers improves cell therapy for myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Michael E.; Hsieh, Patrick C. H.; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Song, Qing; Zhang, Shuguang; Kamm, Roger D.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Anversa, Piero; Lee, Richard T.

    2006-05-01

    Strategies for cardiac repair include injection of cells, but these approaches have been hampered by poor cell engraftment, survival, and differentiation. To address these shortcomings for the purpose of improving cardiac function after injury, we designed self-assembling peptide nanofibers for prolonged delivery of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a cardiomyocyte growth and differentiation factor, to the myocardium, using a "biotin sandwich" approach. Biotinylated IGF-1 was complexed with tetravalent streptavidin and then bound to biotinylated self-assembling peptides. This biotin sandwich strategy allowed binding of IGF-1 but did not prevent self-assembly of the peptides into nanofibers within the myocardium. IGF-1 that was bound to peptide nanofibers activated Akt, decreased activation of caspase-3, and increased expression of cardiac troponin I in cardiomyocytes. After injection into rat myocardium, biotinylated nanofibers provided sustained IGF-1 delivery for 28 days, and targeted delivery of IGF-1 in vivo increased activation of Akt in the myocardium. When combined with transplanted cardiomyocytes, IGF-1 delivery by biotinylated nanofibers decreased caspase-3 cleavage by 28% and increased the myocyte cross-sectional area by 25% compared with cells embedded within nanofibers alone or with untethered IGF-1. Finally, cell therapy with IGF-1 delivery by biotinylated nanofibers improved systolic function after experimental myocardial infarction, demonstrating how engineering the local cellular microenvironment can improve cell therapy. engineering | maturation | scaffold

  18. Cost-effectiveness of exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine as add-on therapy to oral antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuyan; Wang, Xiaoyong; Qiao, Qing; Gao, Weiguo; Wang, Jian; Dong, Hengjin

    2017-12-01

    To estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine once daily as add-on therapy to oral antidiabetic agents (OADs) for Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The Cardiff Diabetes Model was used to simulate disease progression and estimate the long-term effects of exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine once daily. Patient profiles and treatment effects required for the model were obtained from literature reviews (English and Chinese databases) and from a meta-analysis of 8 randomized controlled trials comparing exenatide twice daily with insulin glargine once daily add-on to OADs for T2DM in China. Medical expenditure data were collected from 639 patients with T2DM (aged ≥18 years) with and without complications incurred between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2015 from claims databases in Shandong, China. Costs (2014 Chinese Yuan [¥]) and benefits were estimated, from the payers' perspective, over 40 years at a discount rate of 3%. A series of sensitivity analyses were performed. Patients on exenatide twice daily + OAD had a lower predicted incidence of most cardiovascular and hypoglycaemic events and lower total costs compared with those on insulin glargine once daily + OAD. A greater number of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; 1.94) at a cost saving of ¥117 706 gained was associated with exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine once daily. (i.e. cost saving of ¥60 764/QALY) per patient. In Chinese patients with T2DM inadequately controlled by OADs, exenatide twice daily is a cost-effective add-on therapy alternative to insulin glargine once daily, and may address the problem of an excess of medical needs resulting from weight gain and hypoglycaemia in T2DM treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Yeast Microcapsule-Mediated Targeted Delivery of Diverse Nanoparticles for Imaging and Therapy via the Oral Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xing; Zhang, Xiangjun; Han, Songling; Dou, Yin; Liu, Mengyu; Zhang, Lin; Guo, Jiawei; Shi, Qing; Gong, Genghao; Wang, Ruibing; Hu, Jiang; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianxiang

    2017-02-08

    Targeting of nanoparticles to distant diseased sites after oral delivery remains highly challenging due to the existence of many biological barriers in the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report targeted oral delivery of diverse nanoparticles in multiple disease models, via a "Trojan horse" strategy based on a bioinspired yeast capsule (YC). Diverse charged nanoprobes including quantum dots (QDs), iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs), and assembled organic fluorescent nanoparticles can be effectively loaded into YC through electrostatic force-driven spontaneous deposition, resulting in different diagnostic YC assemblies. Also, different positive nanotherapies containing an anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin (IND) or an antitumor drug paclitaxel (PTX) are efficiently packaged into YC. YCs containing either nanoprobes or nanotherapies may be rapidly endocytosed by macrophages and maintained in cells for a relatively long period of time. Post oral administration, nanoparticles packaged in YC are first transcytosed by M cells and sequentially endocytosed by macrophages, then transported to neighboring lymphoid tissues, and finally delivered to remote diseased sites of inflammation or tumor in mice or rats, all through the natural route of macrophage activation, recruitment, and deployment. For the examined acute inflammation model, the targeting efficiency of YC-delivered QDs or IONPs is even higher than that of control nanoprobes administered at the same dose via intravenous injection. Assembled IND or PTX nanotherapies orally delivered via YCs exhibit remarkably potentiated efficacies as compared to nanotherapies alone in animal models of inflammation and tumor, which is consistent with the targeting effect and enhanced accumulation of drug molecules at diseased sites. Consequently, through the intricate transportation route, nanoprobes or nanotherapies enveloped in YC can be preferentially delivered to desired targets, affording remarkably improved efficacies for the

  20. Improved oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble indirubin by a supersaturatable self-microemulsifying drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Ji-Hui; Wang, Lan; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Indirubin, isolated from the leaves of the Chinese herb Isatis tinctoria L, is a protein kinase inhibitor and promising antitumor agent. However, the poor water solubility of indirubin has limited its application. In this study, a supersaturatable self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (S-SMEDDS) was developed to improve the oral bioavailability of indirubin. A prototype S-SMEDDS was designed using solubility studies and phase diagram construction. Precipitation inhibitors were selected from hydrophilic polymers according to their crystallization-inhibiting capacity through in vitro precipitation tests. In vitro release of indirubin from S-SMEDDS was examined to investigate its likely release behavior in vivo. The in vivo bioavailability of indirubin from S-SMEDDS and from SMEDDS was compared in rats. The prototype formulation of S-SMEDDS comprised Maisine™ 35-1:Cremophor(®) EL:Transcutol(®) P (15:40:45, w/w/w). Polyvinylpyrrolidone K17, a hydrophilic polymer, was used as a precipitation inhibitor based on its better crystallization-inhibiting capacity compared with polyethylene glycol 4000 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose. In vitro release analysis showed more rapid drug release from S-SMEDDS than from SMEDDS. In vivo bioavailability analysis in rats indicated that improved oral absorption was achieved and that the relative bioavailability of S-SMEDDS was 129.5% compared with SMEDDS. The novel S-SMEDDS developed in this study increased the dissolution rate and improved the oral bioavailability of indirubin in rats. The results suggest that S-SMEDDS is a superior means of oral delivery of indirubin.

  1. The Various Forms of Insulin Secretion Response to the Intravenous and Oral Administration of Glucose in Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Les Differentes Modalites de Reponse Insulino-Secretrice Lors de Charges Veineuse et Orale en Glucose dans le Diabete Sucre Non Insulino-Dependant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirouze, J.; Orsetti, A.; Lapinski, H. [Clinique des Maladies Metaboliques et Endocriniennes, Hopital St-Eloi, Montpellier (France)

    1970-02-15

    On the basis of 68 observations on advanced diabetes mellitus (20 cases), latent diabetes with obesity (12 cases), chemical diabetes with subjective symptoms (26 cases) and 10 observations of obesity without diabetes, the authors have analysed the various forms of insulin secretion response to the intravenous and oral administration of glucose. The response appeared to be totally withdrawn in advanced diabetes mellitus although the patients were still capable of responding to stimulation with glucagon. In the two other forms of diabetes described, the response to stimulation by intravenous administration was less marked than in normal subjects. With oral administration, on the other hand, the response was greater, although the insulin secreted in this case appeared ineffective in cases of obesity but effective in conditions without obesity due to the hypoglycaemic effect. (author) [French] A l'aide de 68 observations de diabete sucre evolue (20 cas), latent avec obesite (12 cas), chimique avec malaises (26 cas) et de 10 observations d'obesite sans diabete, les auteurs analysent les differentes modalites de riposte insulino- secretrice lors des charges en glucose, veineuse et orale. La riposte s'avere totalement effondree dans le diabete evolue, mais susceptible de repondre encore a la stimulation par le glucagon. Dans les deux autres formes de diabete decrites, la stimulation par charge veineuse est reduite par rapport au sujet normal alors qu'elle est majoree apres charge orale mais l'insuline ainsi secretee parait inefficace dans l'obesite et efficace puisque hypoglycemiante lors de malaises sans obesite. (author)

  2. Insulin initiation and intensification in patients with T2DM for the primary care physician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jeff UngerCatalina Research Institute, Chino, CA, USAAbstract: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is characterized by both insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion. All patients with the disease require treatment to achieve and maintain the target glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C level of 6.5%–7%. Pharmacological management of T2DM typically begins with the introduction of oral medications, and the majority of patients require exogenous insulin therapy at some point in time. Primary care physicians play an essential role in the management of T2DM since they often initiate insulin therapy and intensify regimens over time as needed. Although insulin therapy is prescribed on an individualized basis, treatment usually begins with basal insulin added to a background therapy of oral agents. Prandial insulin injections may be added if glycemic targets are not achieved. Treatments may be intensified over time using patient-friendly titration algorithms. The goal of insulin intensification within the primary care setting is to minimize patients' exposure to chronic hyperglycemia and weight gain, and reduce patients' risk of hypoglycemia, while achieving individualized fasting, postprandial, and A1C targets. Simplified treatment protocols and insulin delivery devices allow physicians to become efficient prescribers of insulin intensification within the primary care arena.Keywords: diabetes, basal, bolus, regimens, insulin analogs, structured glucose testing

  3. Expression and Purification of C-Peptide Containing Insulin Using Pichia pastoris Expression System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed N. Baeshen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase in the incidence of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM among people from developed and developing countries has created a large global market for insulin. Moreover, exploration of new methods for insulin delivery including oral or inhalation route which require very high doses would further increase the demand of cost-effective recombinant insulin. Various bacterial and yeast strains have been optimized to overproduce important biopharmaceuticals. One of the approaches we have taken is the production of recombinant human insulin along with C-peptide in yeast Pichia pastoris. We procured a cDNA clone of insulin from Origene Inc., USA. Insulin cDNA was PCR amplified and cloned into yeast vector pPICZ-α. Cloned insulin cDNA was confirmed by restriction analysis and DNA sequencing. pPICZ-α-insulin clone was transformed into Pichia pastoris SuperMan5 strain. Several Zeocin resistant clones were obtained and integration of insulin cDNA in Pichia genome was confirmed by PCR using insulin specific primers. Expression of insulin in Pichia clones was confirmed by ELISA, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis. In vivo efficacy studies in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice confirmed the activity of recombinant insulin. In conclusion, a biologically active human proinsulin along with C-peptide was expressed at high level using Pichia pastoris expression system.

  4. ORAL COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A REVIEW ON CURRENT AND NOVEL PERSPECTIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Asija Rajesh; Chaudhari Bharat; Asija Sangeeta

    2012-01-01

    Small intestine is mostly the site for drug absorption but in some cases the drug needs to be targeted to colon due to some factors like local colonic disease, degradation related conditions, delayed release of drugs, systemic delivery of protein and peptide drugs etc. Colon targeted drug delivery is important and relatively new concept for the absorption of drugs because it offers almost neutral pH and long residence time, thereby increasing the drug absorption. Colon has proved to be a site...

  5. Biocompatible nanoemulsions based on hemp oil and less surfactants for oral delivery of baicalein with enhanced bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin J

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Juntao Yin,1,* Cuiyu Xiang,1,* Peiqing Wang,1 Yuyun Yin,2 Yantao Hou3 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Huaihe Hospital Affiliated to Henan University, Kaifeng, 2Department of Physiochemical Analysis, Henan Provincial Institute for Food and Drug Control, Zhengzhou, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Henan Vocational College of Applied Technology, Kaifeng, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Baicalein (BCL possesses high pharmacological activities but low solubility and stability in the intestinal tract. This study aimed to probe the potential of nanoemulsions (NEs consisting of hemp oil and less surfactants in ameliorating the oral bioavailability of BCL. BCL-loaded NEs (BCL-NEs were prepared by high-pressure homogenization technique to reduce the amount of surfactants. BCL-NEs were characterized by particle size, entrapment efficiency (EE, in vitro drug release, and morphology. Bioavailability was studied in Sprague-Dawley rats following oral administration of BCL suspensions, BCL conventional emulsions, and BCL-NEs. The obtained NEs were ~90 nm in particle size with an EE of 99.31%. BCL-NEs significantly enhanced the oral bioavailability of BCL, up to 524.7% and 242.1% relative to the suspensions and conventional emulsions, respectively. BCL-NEs exhibited excellent intestinal permeability and transcellular transport ability. The cytotoxicity of BCL-NEs was documented to be low and acceptable for oral purpose. Our findings suggest that such novel NEs and preparative process provide a promising alternative to current formulation technologies and suitable for oral delivery of drugs with bioavailability issues. Keywords: baicalein, nanoemulsions, biocompatibility, high-pressure homogenization, hemp oil, bioavailability

  6. Comparison of different zeolite framework types as carriers for the oral delivery of the poorly soluble drug indomethacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavasili, Christina; Amanatiadou, Elsa P; Kontogiannidou, Eleni; Eleftheriadis, Georgios K; Bouropoulos, Nikolaos; Pavlidou, Eleni; Kontopoulou, Ioanna; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S; Fatouros, Dimitrios G

    2017-08-07

    Microporous zeolites of distinct framework types, textural properties and crystal morphologies namely BEA, ZSM and NaX, have been employed as carriers to assess their effect on modulating the dissolution behavior of a BCS II model drug (indomethacin). Preparation of the loaded carriers via the incipient wetness method induced significant drug amorphization for the BEA and NaX samples, as well as high drug payloads. The stability of the amorphous drug content was retained after stressing test evaluation of the porous carriers. The dissolution profile of loaded indomethacin was evaluated in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) and simulated intestinal fluids FaSSIF (fasted) and FeSSIF (fed state) conditions and was found to be dependent on the aluminosilicate ratio of the zeolites and the degree of crystalline drug content. The feasibility of the zeolitic particles as oral drug delivery systems was appraised with cytocompatibility and cellular toxicity studies in Caco-2 cultures in a time- and dose-dependent manner by means of the MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. Intracellular accumulation of the zeolite particles was observed with no apparent cytotoxic effects at the lower concentrations tested, rendering such microporous zeolites pertinent candidates in oral drug delivery applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Self-Nanoemulsifying Lyophilized Tablets for Flash Oral Transmucosal Delivery of Vitamin K: Development and Clinical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Say, Khalid M; Ahmed, Tarek A; Ahmed, Osama A A; Hosny, Khaled M; Abd-Allah, Fathy I

    2017-09-01

    Owing to limited solubility, vitamin K undergoes low bioavailability with large inter-individual variability after oral administration. This article aimed to prepare self-nanoemulsifying lyophilized tablets (SNELTs) for the flash oral transmucosal delivery of vitamin K. Twenty-one formulae of vitamin K self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) were prepared using different concentrations of vitamin K, Labrasol, and Transcutol according to mixture design. The SNEDDS was loaded on porous carriers and formulated as lyophilized tablets. The release profile and the pharmacokinetic parameters of vitamin K SNELTs were evaluated in comparison with commercial tablets and ampoules on human volunteers. Results revealed that the optimized SNEDDS showed the smallest and most stable nanoemulsion globules. SNELTs were prepared successfully and showed substantial superiority drug release compared with the commercial tablets. Interestingly, SNELTs enhanced both rate and extent of vitamin K absorption as well as relative bioavailability (169.67%) in healthy subjects compared with the commercial tablets. SNELTs revealed promising no significant difference in the area under the curve compared with the commercial intramuscular injection. SNELTs enhanced dissolution and bioavailability that expected to have the strong impact on the efficiency of vitamin K in the prophylaxis and treatment of bleeding disorders in patients with hepatic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for oral delivery of polypeptide-k: Formulation, optimization, in-vitro and in-vivo antidiabetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Varun; Kaur, Puneet; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Kumar, Bimlesh; Bawa, Palak; Gulati, Monica; Yadav, Ankit Kumar

    2017-11-15

    Development of self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) of polypeptide-k (PPK) is reported with the aim to achieve its oral delivery. Box-Behnken design (BBD) was adopted to develop and optimize the composition of SNEDDS. Oleoyl polyoxyl-6 glycerides (A), Tween 80 (B), and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (C) were used as oil, surfactant and co-surfactant, respectively as independent variables. The effect of variation in their composition was observed on the mean droplet size (y1), polydispersity index (PDI) (y2), % drug loading (y3) and zeta potential (y4). As per the optimal design, seventeen SNEDDS prototypes were prepared. The optimized composition of SNEDDS formulation was 25% v/v Oleoyl polyoxyl-6 glycerides, 37% v/v Tween 80, 38% v/v diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, and 3% w/v PPK. The optimized formulation revealed values of y1, y2, y3, and y4 as 31.89nm, 0.16, 73.15%, and -15.65mV, respectively. Further the optimized liquid SNEDDS were solidified through spray drying using various hydrophilic and hydrophobic carriers. Among the various carriers, Aerosil 200 was found to provide desirable flow, compression, disintegration and dissolution properties. Both, liquid and solid-SNEDDS have shown release of >90% within 10min. The formulation was found stable with change in pH, dilution, temperature variation and freeze thaw cycles in terms of droplet size, zeta potential, drug precipitation and phase separation. Crystalline PPK was observed in amorphous state in solid SNEDDS when characterized through DSC and PXRD studies. The biochemical, hematological and histopathological results of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats shown promising antidiabetic potential of PPK loaded in SNEDDS at its both the doses (i.e. 400mg/kg and 800mg/kg) as compared to its naïve form at both the doses. The study revealed successful formulation of SNEDDS for oral delivery of PPK. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multidisciplinary Optimization of Oral Chemotherapy Delivery at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkerin, Daniel L; Bergsbaken, Jason J; Fischer, Jessica A; Mulkerin, Mary J; Bohler, Aaron M; Mably, Mary S

    2016-10-01

    Use of oral chemotherapy is expanding and offers advantages while posing unique safety challenges. ASCO and the Oncology Nursing Society jointly published safety standards for administering chemotherapy that offer a framework for improving oral chemotherapy practice at the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center. With the goal of improving safety, quality, and uniformity within our oral chemotherapy practice, we conducted a gap analysis comparing our practice against ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society guidelines. Areas for improvement were addressed by multidisciplinary workgroups that focused on education, workflows, and information technology. Recommendations and process changes included defining chemotherapy, standardizing patient and caregiver education, mandating the use of comprehensive electronic order sets, and standardizing documentation for dose modification. Revised processes allow pharmacists to review all orders for oral chemotherapy, and they support monitoring adherence and toxicity by using a library of scripted materials. Between August 2015 and January 2016, revised processes were implemented across the University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center clinics. The following are key performance indicators: 92.5% of oral chemotherapy orders (n = 1,216) were initiated within comprehensive electronic order sets (N = 1,315), 89.2% compliance with informed consent was achieved, 14.7% of orders (n = 193) required an average of 4.4 minutes review time by the pharmacist, and 100% compliance with first-cycle monitoring of adherence and toxicity was achieved. We closed significant gaps between institutional practice and published standards for our oral chemotherapy practice and experienced steady improvement and sustainable performance in key metrics. We created an electronic definition of oral chemotherapies that allowed us to leverage our electronic health records. We believe our tools are broadly applicable.

  10. Improved Insulin Pharmacokinetics Using a Novel Microneedle Device for Intradermal Delivery in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Raz, Itamar; Cahn, Avivit

    2016-09-01

    Currently available short-acting insulin analogs have slower absorption compared with endogenous insulin occasionally resulting in immediate postprandial hyperglycemia. Intradermal (ID) injection facilitates faster drug absorption and may result in improved insulin pharmacokinetics. Seventeen patients with type 2 diabetes were included in this single-center, pilot, open-label crossover study. Patients received 0.2 U/kg Insulin aspart ID injections using a MicronJet (MJ) needle and subcutaneous (SC) injections, using a conventional needle in a crossover design. Thirteen patients were studied under fasting conditions and four before a standard meal test. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profile, as well as the safety and tolerability of injections, was compared. Fourteen patients completed the study per-protocol. ID versus SC injection demonstrated significantly shorter Tmax (median 35 vs. 87.5 min [P < 0.001]), while the Cmax did not significantly differ (median 80 vs. 55 μU/mL [P = 0.085]). Median insulin area under the curve (AUC; 360 min) did not differ between the groups (9914 vs. 10,936 μU/mL/min [p = 0.077]), yet 0-60 min insulin AUC was higher with ID versus SC injection (mean ± SD 3821 ± 1429 vs. 2534 ± 737 μU/mL/min [p = 0.01]) and 4-6 h AUC was lower with ID versus SC injection (mean ± SD 2054 ± 858 vs. 2929 ± 1412 μU/mL/min [p = 0.02]). The relative bioavailability of the ID versus the SC insulin (AUCID/AUCSC) was similar (median 0.91 [95% confidence interval 0.73-1.27]). ID insulin injection delivered through an MJ needle demonstrated superior PK profile compared with conventional SC administration, including shorter Tmax and higher early and lower late exposure in patients with type 2 diabetes. This may help achieve better insulin coverage of meals and lower postprandial glucose excursions.

  11. Mechanism of enhanced oral absorption of morin by phospholipid complex based self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinjie; Li, Jianbo; Ju, Yuan; Fu, Yao; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong

    2015-02-02

    Phospholipid complex (PLC) based self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (PLC-SNEDDS) has been developed for efficient delivery of drugs with poor solubility and low permeability. In the present study, a BCS class IV drug and a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate, morin, was selected as the model drug to elucidate the oral absorption mechanism of PLC-SNEDDS. PLC-SNEDDS was superior to PLC in protecting morin from degradation by intestinal enzymes in vitro. In situ perfusion study showed increased intestinal permeability by PLC was duodenum-specific. In contrast, PLC-SNEDDS increased morin permeability in all intestinal segments and induced a change in the main absorption site of morin from colon to ileum. Moreover, ileum conducted the lymphatic transport of PLC-SNEDDS, which was proven by microscopic intestinal visualization of Nile red labeled PLC-SNEDDS and lymph fluids in vivo. Low cytotoxicity and increased Caco-2 cell uptake suggested a safe and efficient delivery of PLC-SNEDDS. The increased membrane fluidity and disrupted actin filaments were closely associated with the increased cell uptake of PLC-SNEDDS. PLC-SNEDDS could be internalized into enterocytes as an intact form in a cholesterol-dependent manner via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. The enhanced oral absorption of morin was attributed to the P-gp inhibition by Cremophor RH and the intact internalization of M-PLC-SNEDDS into Caco-2 cells bypassing P-gp recognition. Our findings thus provide new insights into the development of novel nanoemulsions for poorly absorbed drugs.

  12. Enhanced oral bioavailability and sustained delivery of glimepiride via niosomal encapsulation: in-vitro characterization and in-vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, Amira Mohamed; AbouSamra, Mona Mahmoud; ElShebiney, Shaimaa Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potency of niosomes, for glimepiride (GLM) encapsulation, aiming at enhancing its oral bioavailability and hypoglycemic efficacy. Niosomes containing nonionic surfactants (NIS) were prepared by thin film hydration technique and characterized. In-vitro release study was performed using a dialysis technique. In-vivo pharmacodynamic studies, as well as pharmacokinetic evaluation were performed on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. GLM niosomes exhibited high-entrapment efficiency percentages (E.E. %) up to 98.70% and a particle size diameter ranging from 186.8 ± 18.69 to 797.7 ± 12.45 nm, with negatively charged zeta potential (ZP). Different GLM niosomal formulation showed retarded in vitro release, compared to free drug. In-vivo studies revealed the superiority of GLM niosomes in lowering blood glucose level (BGL) and in maintaining a therapeutic level of GLM for a longer period of time, as compared to free drug and market product. There was no significant difference between mean plasma AUC 0-48 hr of GLM-loaded niosomes and that of market product. GLM-loaded niosomes exhibited seven-fold enhancement in relative bioavailability in comparison with free drug. These findings reinforce the potential use of niosomes for enhancing the oral bioavailability and prolonged delivery of GLM via oral administration.

  13. Amine functionalized cubic mesoporous silica nanoparticles as an oral delivery system for curcumin bioavailability enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi Hartono, Sandy; Hadisoewignyo, Lannie; Yang, Yanan; Meka, Anand Kumar; Antaresti; Yu, Chengzhong

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, a simple method was used to develop composite curcumin-amine functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN). The nanoparticles were used to improve the bioavailability of curcumin in mice through oral administration. We investigated the effect of particle size on the release profile, solubility and oral bioavailability of curcumin in mice, including amine functionalized mesoporous silica micron-sized-particles (MSM) and MSN (100-200 nm). Curcumin loaded within amine functionalized MSN (MSN-A-Cur) had a better release profile and a higher solubility compared to amine MSM (MSM-A-Cur). The bioavailability of MSN-A-Cur and MSM-A-Cur was considerably higher than that of ‘free curcumin’. These results indicate promising features of amine functionalized MSN as a carrier to deliver low solubility drugs with improved bioavailability via the oral route.

  14. Effective plague vaccination via oral delivery of plant cells expressing F1-V antigens in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, Philip A; Singleton, Michael; Adamovicz, Jeffrey J; Ding, Yi; Davoodi-Semiromi, Abdolreza; Daniell, Henry

    2008-08-01

    The chloroplast bioreactor is an alternative to fermentation-based systems for production of vaccine antigens and biopharmaceuticals. We report here expression of the plague F1-V fusion antigen in chloroplasts. Site-specific transgene integration and homoplasmy were confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. Mature leaves showed the highest level of transgene expression on the third day of continuous illumination, with a maximum level of 14.8% of the total soluble protein. Swiss Webster mice were primed with adjuvant-containing subcutaneous (s.c.) doses of F1-V and then boosted with either adjuvanted s.c. doses (s.c. F1-V mice) or unadjuvanted oral doses (oral F1-V mice). Oral F1-V mice had higher prechallenge serum immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) titers than s.c. F1-V mice. The corresponding serum levels of antigen-specific IgG2a and IgA were 2 and 3 orders of magnitude lower, respectively. After vaccination, mice were exposed to an inhaled dose of 1.02 x 10(6) CFU of aerosolized Yersinia pestis CO92 (50% lethal dose, 6.8 x 10(4) CFU). All control animals died within 3 days. F1-V given s.c. (with adjuvant) protected 33% of the immunized mice, while 88% of the oral F1-V mice survived aerosolized Y. pestis challenge. A comparison of splenic Y. pestis CFU counts showed that there was a 7- to 10-log reduction in the mean bacterial burden in survivors. Taken together, these data indicate that oral booster doses effectively elicit protective immune responses in vivo. In addition, this is the first report of a plant-derived oral vaccine that protected animals from live Y. pestis challenge, bringing the likelihood of lower-cost vaccines closer to reality.

  15. Drug Transport Mechanism of Oral Antidiabetic Nanomedicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Evren; Yurdasiper, Aysu

    2014-01-01

    Context: Over the last few decades, extensive efforts have been made worldwide to develop nanomedicine delivery systems, especially via oral route for antidiabetic drugs. Absorption of insulin is hindered by epithelial cells of gastrointestinal tract, acidic gastric pH and digestive enzymes. Evidence Acquisition: Recent reports have identified and explained the beneficial role of several structural molecules like mucoadhesive polymers (polyacrylic acid, sodium alginate, chitosan) and other copolymers for the efficient transport and release of insulin to its receptors. Results: Insulin nanomedicines based on alginate-dextran sulfate core with a chitosan-polyethylene glycol-albumin shell reduced glycaemia in a dose dependent manner. Orally available exendin-4 formulations exerted their effects in a time dependent manner. Insulin nanoparticles formed by using alginate and dextran sulfate nucleating around calcium and binding to poloxamer, stabilized by chitosan, and subsequently coated with albumin showed a threefold increase of the hypoglycemic effect in comparison to free insulin in animal models. Solid lipid nanoparticles showed an enhancement of the bioavailability of repaglinide (RG) within optimized solid lipid nanoparticle formulations when compared with RG alone. Conclusions: Nanoparticles represent multiparticulate delivery systems designed to obtain prolonged or controlled drug delivery and to improve bioavailability as well as stability. Nanoparticles can also offer advantages like limiting fluctuations within therapeutic range, reducing side effects, protecting drugs from degradation, decreasing dosing frequency, and improving patient compliance and convenience PMID:24696697

  16. Drug transport mechanism of oral antidiabetic nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Evren; Yurdasiper, Aysu

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, extensive efforts have been made worldwide to develop nanomedicine delivery systems, especially via oral route for antidiabetic drugs. Absorption of insulin is hindered by epithelial cells of gastrointestinal tract, acidic gastric pH and digestive enzymes. Recent reports have identified and explained the beneficial role of several structural molecules like mucoadhesive polymers (polyacrylic acid, sodium alginate, chitosan) and other copolymers for the efficient transport and release of insulin to its receptors. Insulin nanomedicines based on alginate-dextran sulfate core with a chitosan-polyethylene glycol-albumin shell reduced glycaemia in a dose dependent manner. Orally available exendin-4 formulations exerted their effects in a time dependent manner. Insulin nanoparticles formed by using alginate and dextran sulfate nucleating around calcium and binding to poloxamer, stabilized by chitosan, and subsequently coated with albumin showed a threefold increase of the hypoglycemic effect in comparison to free insulin in animal models. Solid lipid nanoparticles showed an enhancement of the bioavailability of repaglinide (RG) within optimized solid lipid nanoparticle formulations when compared with RG alone. Nanoparticles represent multiparticulate delivery systems designed to obtain prolonged or controlled drug delivery and to improve bioavailability as well as stability. Nanoparticles can also offer advantages like limiting fluctuations within therapeutic range, reducing side effects, protecting drugs from degradation, decreasing dosing frequency, and improving patient compliance and convenience.

  17. A Study on the Glucose and Immunoreactive Insulin Response during Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Kang Won; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mu Ho

    1973-01-01

    The blood glucose and plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels were measured during aral glucose tolerance test in 7 healthy subjects and 6 patients with chronic liver diseases. The glucose tolerance was impaired in 5 of the 6 patients and normal in I. Plasma IRI responses were markedly increased and delayed in all patients, suggesting endogenous insulin resistance. Patients with more glucose intolerance showed less increase in plasma IRI than the group with less intolerance. lt is suggested that some insulin antagonists may decrease the peripheral insulin sensitivity and stimulate compensatory hyperactivity of pancreatic islets. If the compensatory hyperactivity is inadequate due to gemetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus or exhaustion of β-cells of pancreatic islets, the glucose intolerance and overt diabetes mellitus may ensue.

  18. A Study on the Glucose and Immunoreactive Insulin Response during Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Kang Won; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mu Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1973-03-15

    The blood glucose and plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels were measured during aral glucose tolerance test in 7 healthy subjects and 6 patients with chronic liver diseases. The glucose tolerance was impaired in 5 of the 6 patients and normal in I. Plasma IRI responses were markedly increased and delayed in all patients, suggesting endogenous insulin resistance. Patients with more glucose intolerance showed less increase in plasma IRI than the group with less intolerance. lt is suggested that some insulin antagonists may decrease the peripheral insulin sensitivity and stimulate compensatory hyperactivity of pancreatic islets. If the compensatory hyperactivity is inadequate due to gemetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus or exhaustion of beta-cells of pancreatic islets, the glucose intolerance and overt diabetes mellitus may ensue.

  19. Lactic acid bacteria as antigen delivery vehicles for oral immunization purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, P.H.; Leer, R.J.; Shaw, M.; Heijne Den Bak-Glashouwer, M.J.; Tielen, F.D.; Smit, E.; Martinez, B.; Jore, J.; Conway, P.L.

    1998-01-01

    In vaccination programmes in which large numbers of subjects are involved, the oral route of administration is more convenient as compared to the more frequently used parenteral route. This is particularly relevant when vaccines are to be applied in less industrialized countries. Lactic acid

  20. Development and evaluation of polymer nanoparticles for oral delivery of estradiol to rat brain in a model of Alzheimer's pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, G; Carswell, H; Brett, R; Currie, S; Kumar, M N V Ravi

    2011-03-10

    The purpose of this study was to develop tween 80 (T-80) coated polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) nanoparticles that can deliver estradiol to the brain upon oral administration. Estradiol containing nanoparticles were made by a single emulsion technique and T-80 coating was achieved by incubating the re-constituted nanoparticles at different concentrations of T-80. The process of T-80 coating on the nanoparticles was optimized and the pharmacokinetics of estradiol nanoparticles was studied as a function of T-80 coating. The nanoparticles were then evaluated in an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that mimics the postmenopausal conditions. The nanoparticles bound T-80 were found to proportionally increase from 9.72 ± 1.07 mg to 63.84 ± 3.59 mg with an increase in the initial concentration T-80 from 1% to 5% and were stable in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). Orally administered T-80 coated nanoparticles resulted in significantly higher brain estradiol levels after 24h (1.969 ± 0.197 ng/g tissue) as compared to uncoated ones (1.105 ± 0.136 ng/g tissue) at a dose of 0.2mg/rat, suggesting a significant role of surface coating. Moreover, these brain estradiol levels were almost similar to those obtained after administration of the same dose of drug suspension via 100% bioavailable intramuscular route (2.123 ± 0.370 ng/g tissue), indicating the increased fraction of bioavailable drug reaching the brain when administered orally. Also, the nanoparticle treated group was successful in preventing the expression of amyloid beta-42 (Aβ42) immunoreactivity in the hippocampus region of brain. Together, the results indicate the potential of nanoparticles for oral delivery of estradiol to brain. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Immune response induced by oral delivery of Bacillus subtilis spores expressing enolase of Clonorchis sinensis in grass carps (Ctenopharyngodon idellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongye; Chen, Tingjin; Sun, Hengchang; Tang, Zeli; Yu, Jinyun; Lin, Zhipeng; Ren, Pengli; Zhou, Xinyi; Huang, Yan; Li, Xuerong; Yu, Xinbing

    2017-01-01

    Clonorchiasis, caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked freshwater fish containing infective metacercariae of Clonorchis sinensisis (C.sinensis), remains a common public health problem. New effective prevention strategies are still urgent to control this food-borne infectious disease. The previous studies suggested Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) spores was an ideal vaccines delivery system, and the C.sinensis enolase (CsENO) was a potential vaccine candidate against clonorchiasis. In the current study, we detected CsENO-specific IgM levels by ELISA in sera, intestinal mucus and skin mucus in grass carps (Ctenopharyngodon idella) through oral administration with B. subtilis spores surface expressing CsENO. In addition, immune-related genes expression was also measured by qRT-PCR. Grass carps orally treated with B. subtilis spores or normal forages were used as controls. The results of ELISA manifested that specific IgM levels of grass carps in CsENO group in sera, intestine mucus and skin mucus almost significantly increased from week 4 post the first oral administration when compared to the two control groups. The levels of specific IgM reached its peak in intestine mucus firstly, then in sera, and last in skin mucus. qRT-PCR results showed that 5 immune-related genes expression had different degree of rising trend in CsENO group when compared to the two control groups. Our study demonstrated that orally administrated with B. subtilis spores expressing CsENO induced innate and adaptive immunity, systemic and local mucosal immunity, and humoral and cellular immunity. Our work may pave the way to clarify the exact mechanisms of protective efficacy elicited by B. subtilis spores expressing CsENO and provide new ideas for vaccine development against C. sinensis infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chitosan-modified porous silicon microparticles for enhanced permeability of insulin across intestinal cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Neha; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Araújo, Francisca; Zhang, Hongbo; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Kauppila, Jussi; Sarmento, Bruno; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-08-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) based particulate systems are emerging as an important drug delivery system due to its advantageous properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability and ability to tailor the particles' physicochemical properties. Here, annealed thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (AnnTHCPSi) and undecylenic acid modified AnnTHCPSi (AnnUnTHCPSi) microparticles were developed as a PSi-based platform for oral delivery of insulin. Chitosan (CS) was used to modify the AnnUnTHCPSi microparticles to enhance the intestinal permeation of insulin. Surface modification with CS led to significant increase in the interaction of PSi microparticles with Caco-2/HT-29 cell co-culture monolayers. Compared to pure insulin, the CS-conjugated microparticles significantly improved the permeation of insulin across the Caco-2/HT-29 cell monolayers, with ca. 20-fold increase in the amount of insulin permeated and ca. 7-fold increase in the apparent permeability (P(app)) value. Moreover, among all the investigated particles, the CS-conjugated microparticles also showed the highest amount of insulin associated with the mucus layer and the intestinal Caco-2 cells and mucus secreting HT-29 cells. Our results demonstrate that CS-conjugated AnnUnTHCPSi microparticles can efficiently enhance the insulin absorption across intestinal cells, and thus, they are promising microsystems for the oral delivery of proteins and peptides across the intestinal cell membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems: design trends and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Seth; Brown, Jack E; Dave, Vivek S

    2015-08-01

    Colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) are desirable for the treatment of a range of local diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pancreatitis, and colonic cancer. In addition, the colon can be a potential site for the systemic absorption of several drugs to treat non-colonic conditions. Drugs such as proteins and peptides that are known to degrade in the extreme gastric pH, if delivered to the colon intact, can be systemically absorbed by colonic mucosa. In order to achieve effective therapeutic outcomes, it is imperative that the designed delivery system specifically targets the drugs into the colon. Several formulation approaches have been explored in the development colon-targeted drug delivery systems. These approaches involve the use of formulation components that interact with one or more aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, such as the difference in the pH along the GI tract, the presence of colonic microflora, and enzymes, to achieve colon targeting. This article highlights the factors influencing colon-specific drug delivery and colonic bioavailability, and the limitations associated with CDDS. Further, the review provides a systematic discussion of various conventional, as well as relatively newer formulation approaches/technologies currently being utilized for the development of CDDS.

  4. Preparation and characterization of insulin-surfactant complexes for loading into lipid-based drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ping; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Fano, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    of surfactants, but also a nonnative secondary structure in the solid state. Finally, circular dichroism analysis of rehydrated complexes showed that the processing did not irreversibly alter the secondary structure of insulin. In short, the present study demonstrates changes in the secondary structure...

  5. A potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of the protein-tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B improves insulin and leptin signaling in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Navasona; Konidaris, Konstantis F; Gasser, Gilles; Tonks, Nicholas K

    2018-02-02

    The protein-tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is a negative regulator of insulin and leptin signaling and a highly validated therapeutic target for diabetes and obesity. Conventional approaches to drug development have produced potent and specific PTP1B inhibitors, but these inhibitors lack oral bioavailability, which limits their potential for drug development. Here, we report that DPM-1001, an analog of the specific PTP1B inhibitor trodusquemine (MSI-1436), is a potent, specific, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of PTP1B. DPM-1001 also chelates copper, which enhanced its potency as a PTP1B inhibitor. DPM-1001 displayed anti-diabetic properties that were associated with enhanced signaling through insulin and leptin receptors in animal models of diet-induced obesity. Therefore, DPM-1001 represents a proof of concept for a new approach to therapeutic intervention in diabetes and obesity. Although the PTPs have been considered undruggable, the findings of this study suggest that allosteric PTP inhibitors may help reinvigorate drug development efforts that focus on this important family of signal-transducing enzymes. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. FAST DISSOLVING THIN STRIPS: AN EMERGING WAY FOR ORAL DRUG DELIVERY

    OpenAIRE

    Anjali Joshi* and Ganesh Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Various pharmaceutical dosage form are present in the market but all of the dosage forms possess some drawback most common is patient incompliance which is seen in all age groups. So from last few years focus is done on developing such dosage form which enhances safety, efficacy and patient compliance. In this manner, in late 1970 fast-dissolving drug delivery system came in existence which includes Fast dissolving tablets and fast dissolving thin strips means those dosage form which dissolve...

  7. Insulin and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan, Fatemeh; Toth, Cory

    2013-03-01

    Mainly known for its role in peripheral glucose homeostasis, insulin has also significant impact within the brain, functioning as a key neuromodulator in behavioral, cellular, biochemical and molecular studies. The brain is now regarded as an insulin-sensitive organ with widespread, yet selective, expression of the insulin receptor in the olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebellum, amygdala and cerebral cortex. Insulin receptor signaling in the brain is important for neuronal development, glucoregulation, feeding behavior, body weight, and cognitive processes such as with attention, executive functioning, learning and memory. Emerging evidence has demonstrated insulin receptor signaling to be impaired in several neurological disorders. Moreover, insulin receptor signaling is recognized as important for dendritic outgrowth, neuronal survival, circuit development, synaptic plasticity and postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor trafficking. We review the multiple roles of insulin in the brain, as well as its endogenous trafficking to the brain or its exogenous intervention. Although insulin can be directly targeted to the brain via intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intraparenchymal delivery, these invasive techniques are with significant risk, necessitating repeated surgical intervention and providing potential for systemic hypoglycemia. Another method, intranasal delivery, is a non-invasive, safe, and alternative approach which rapidly targets delivery of molecules to the brain while minimizing systemic exposure. Over the last decades, the delivery of intranasal insulin in animal models and human patients has evolved and expanded, permitting new hope for associated neurodegenerative and neurovascular disorders.

  8. Lipid-based oral delivery systems for skin deposition of a potential chemopreventive DIM derivative: characterization and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boakye, Cedar H A; Patel, Ketan; Patel, Apurva R; Faria, Henrique A M; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Safe, Stephen; Singh, Mandip

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the oral route as a viable potential for the skin deposition of a novel diindolylmethane derivative (DIM-D) for chemoprevention activity. Various lipid-based oral delivery systems were optimized and compared for enhancing DIM-D's oral bioavailability and skin deposition. Preformulation studies were performed to evaluate the log P and solubility of DIM-D. Microsomal metabolism, P-glycoprotein efflux, and caco-2 monolayer permeability of DIM-D were determined. Comparative evaluation of the oral absorption and skin deposition of DIM-D-loaded various lipid-based formulations was performed in rats. DIM-D showed pH-dependent solubility and a high log P value. It was not a strong substrate of microsomal degradation and P-glycoprotein. SMEDDs comprised of medium chain triglycerides, monoglycerides, and kolliphor-HS15 (36.70 ± 0.42 nm). SNEDDs comprised of long chain triglycerides, cremophor RH40, labrasol, and TPGS (84.00 ± 14.14 nm). Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) consisted of compritol, miglyol, and surfactants (116.50 ± 2.12 nm). The blank formulations all showed >70 % cell viability in caco-2 cells. Differential Scanning Calorimetry confirmed the amorphization of DIM-D within the lipid matrices while Atomic Force Microscopy showed particle size distribution similar to the dynamic light scattering data. DIM-D also showed reduced permeation across caco-2 monolayer that was enhanced (p < 0.05) by SNEDDs in comparison to SMEDDs and NLC. Fabsolute for DIM-D SNEDDs, SMEDDs, and NLC was 0.14, 0.04, and 0.007, respectively. SNEDDs caused 53.90, 11.32, and 15.08-fold more skin deposition of DIM-D than the free drug, SMEDDs, and NLC, respectively, at 2 h following oral administration and shows a viable potential for use in skin cancer chemoprevention. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Evaluation of oral and subcutaneous delivery of an experimental canarypox recombinant canine distemper vaccine in the Siberian polecate (Mustela eversmanni)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimsatt, Jeffrey; Biggins, Dean E.; Innes, Kim; Taylor, Bobbi; Garell, Della

    2003-01-01

    the treatment groups. Survival rates were higher in animals with increasing serum neutralization titers (P = 0.027). This study demonstrates the efficacy of oral delivery of a recombinant CDV vaccine in the Siberian polecat. Further studies are needed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of vectored recombinant vaccines in highly susceptible species and especially in those species in which vaccination with modified live CDV has led to disease.

  10. Lipid nanoparticles of zaleplon for improved oral delivery by Box-Behnken design: optimization, in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhipala, Narendar; Janga, Karthik Yadav

    2017-07-01

    Zaleplon (ZL) is a hypnotic drug prescribed for the management of insomnia and convulsions. The oral bioavailability of ZL was low (∼30%) owing to poor water solubility and hepatic first-pass metabolism. The cornerstone of this investigation is to develop and optimize solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of ZL with the aid of Box-Behnken design (BBD) to improve the oral bioavailability. A design space with three formulation variables at three levels were evaluated in BBD. Amount of lipid (A 1 ), amount of surfactant (A 2 ) and concentration of co-surfactant (%) (A 3 ) were selected as independent variables, whereas, particle size (B 1 ), entrapment efficiency (B 2 ) and zeta potential (ZP, B 3 ) as responses. ZL-SLNs were prepared by hot homogenization with ultrasonication method and evaluated for responses to obtain optimized formulation. Morphology of nanoparticles was observed under SEM. DSC and XRD studies were examined to understand the native crystalline behavior of drug in SLN formulations. Further, in vivo studies were performed in Wistar rats. The optimized formulation with 132.89 mg of lipid, 106.7 mg of surfactant and 0.2% w/v of co-surfactant ensued in the nanoparticles with 219.9 ± 3.7 nm of size, -25.66 ± 2.83 mV surface charge and 86.83 ± 2.65% of entrapment efficiency. SEM studies confirmed the spherical shape of SLN formulations. The DSC and XRD studies revealed the transformation of crystalline drug to amorphous form in SLN formulation. In conclusion, in vivo studies in male Wistar rats demonstrated an improvement in the oral bioavailability of ZL from SLN over control ZL suspension. The enhancement in the oral bioavailability of ZL from SLNs, developed with the aid of BBD, explicated the potential of lipid-based nanoparticles as a potential carrier in improving the oral delivery of this poorly soluble drug.

  11. N-mercapto acetyl-N'-octyl-O, N″-glycol chitosan as an efficiency oral delivery system of paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Meirong; Fu, Ying; Liu, Yanhong; Chen, Qinyu; Mu, Yan; Zhou, Jianping; Li, Lingchao; Xu, Wei; Yin, Tingjie

    2018-02-01

    Herein, thioglycolic acid modified N-octyl-O, N'-glycol chitosan (N-mercapto acetyl-N'-octyl-O, N″-glycol chitosan, abbreviated as SH-OGC) was synthesized to improve the oral bioavailability of paclitaxel (PTX). PTX was readily solubilized into the hydrophobic inner core of SH-OGC. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the bioavailability of PTX was greatly enhanced when delivered by SH-OGC compared to Taxol ® or non-sulfhydrylated OGC micelles. Caco-2 cell experiments confirmed PTX or rhodamine-123-loaded SH-OGC demonstrated effective cellular accumulation via caveola-mediated endocytosis along with the inhibition of P-gp efflux. Furthermore, Caco-2 transport studies demonstrated that the mechanistic basis of SH-OGC efficacy was attributed to P-gp inhibition, enhanced permeability of tight junctions and clathrin-mediated transcytosis across the endothelium. In addition, SH-OGC exhibited increased intestinal retention through thiol-mediated mucoadhesion compared with OGC according to results of mucoadhesion evaluation on freshly excised rat intestine. In summary, SH-OGC micelles may present as a promising delivery vehicle for enhancing the oral bioavailability of P-gp substrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In vivo evaluation of an oral delivery system for P-gp substrates based on thiolated chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föger, Florian; Schmitz, Thierry; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2006-08-01

    Recently, thiolated polymers, so called thiomers, have been reported to modulate drug absorption by inhibition of intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The aim of the present study was to provide a proof-of-principle for a delivery system based on thiolated chitosan in vivo in rats, using rhodamine-123 (Rho-123) as representative P-gp substrate. In vitro, the permeation enhancing effect of unmodified chitosan, chitosan-4 thiobutylamidine (Ch-TBA) and the combination of Ch-TBA with reduced glutathione (GSH) was evaluated by using freshly excised rat intestinal mucosa mounted in Ussing-type chambers. In comparison to buffer only, Rho-123 transport in presence of 0.5% (w/v) chitosan, 0.5% (w/v) Ch-TBA and the combination of 0.5% (w/v) Ch-TBA/0.5% (w/v) GSH, was 1.8-fold, 2.6-fold, 3.8-fold improved, respectively. Furthermore, enteric-coated tablets based on unmodified chitosan or Ch-TBA/GSH, were investigated in vivo. In rats, the Ch-TBA/GSH tablets increased the area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC0-12) of Rho-123 by 217% in comparison to buffer control and by 58% in comparison to unmodified chitosan. This in vivo study showed that a delivery system based on thiolated chitosan significantly increased the oral bioavailability of P-gp substrate Rho-123.

  13. Polarity-sensitive nanocarrier for oral delivery of Sb(V and treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanza JS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Juliane S Lanza,1 Flaviana R Fernandes,1 José D Corrêa-Júnior,2 José MC Vilela,3 Rogério Magalhães-Paniago,4 Lucas AM Ferreira,5 Margareth S Andrade,3 Cynthia Demicheli,6 Maria N Melo,7 Frédéric Frézard1 1Department of Physiology and Biophysics, 2Department of Morphology, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas (ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG, 3Innovation and Technology Center SENAI FIEMG – Campus CETEC, 4Department of Physics, Instituto de Ciências Exatas (ICEX, 5Department of Pharmaceutical Products, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG, 6Department of Chemistry, Instituto de Ciências Exatas (ICEX, 7Department of Parasitology, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas (ICB, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Brazil Abstract: There is a great need for orally active drugs for the treatment of the neglected tropical disease leishmaniasis. Amphiphilic Sb(V complexes, such as 1:3 Sb–N-octanoyl-N-methylglucamide complex (SbL8, are promising drug candidates. It has been previously reported that SbL8 forms kinetically stabilized nanoassemblies in water and that this simple dispersion exhibits antileishmanial activity when given by oral route to a murine model of visceral leishmaniasis. The main objective of the present work was to interfere in the structural organization of these nanoassemblies so as to investigate their influence on the oral bioavailability of Sb, and ultimately, optimize an oral formulation of SbL8 for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis. The structural organization of SbL8 nanoassemblies was manipulated through addition of propylene glycol (PG to the aqueous dispersion of SbL8. The presence of 50% (v/v PG resulted in the loss of hydrophobic microenvironment, as evidenced by fluorescence probing. However, nanostructures were still present, as demonstrated by dynamic light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. A

  14. A Novel Self-Microemulsifying System for the Simultaneous Delivery and Enhanced Oral Absorption of Curcumin and Resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisamut, Patcharawalai; Wiwattanawongsa, Kamonthip; Wiwattanapatapee, Ruedeekorn

    2017-03-01

    The use of curcumin and resveratrol in combination has now become increasingly of interest because of their synergistic effects as therapeutic agents for various diseases, especially cancer. To overcome the poor oral bioavailability of both compounds and improve patient compliance, a novel self-microemulsifying formulation containing curcumin together with resveratrol was developed. Capryol 90, Cremophor EL, and Labrasol were selected as the oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant in the formulation, respectively, based on the solubility study of both compounds. More than 70 % and 80 % of curcumin and resveratrol, respectively, were released in 20 min. The formulation formed a fine oil in water microemulsion with droplet sizes in aqueous media of 15-20 nm. In addition, the formulation containing curcumin and resveratrol showed greater antioxidant activity than that of the formulations with individual compounds, while the cytotoxic activity against HT-29 of the co-formulation (IC 50  = 18.25 µM; curcumin and resveratrol in the ratio 1 : 1) was less than the formulation with only curcumin (IC 50  = 30.1 µM) and only resveratrol (IC 50  = 25.4 µM). After oral administration to rabbits, the self-microemulsifying formulation containing curcumin together with resveratrol increased the total plasma concentrations of curcumin and resveratrol by 10-fold and 6-fold, respectively, compared to the unformulated combination. This study clearly demonstrated the potential use of the self-microemulsifying formulation for co-delivery, and enhanced oral absorption of poorly water-soluble natural compounds. In addition, the combination was found to produce synergistic antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity against HT-29 cells. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Functionalized PLA-PEG nanoparticles targeting intestinal transporter PepT1 for oral delivery of acyclovir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdon, Betty; Chemin, Caroline; Moreau, Amélie; Arnauld, Thomas; Baumy, Philippe; Cisternino, Salvatore; Péan, Jean-Manuel; Declèves, Xavier

    2017-08-30

    Targeting intestinal di- and tri-peptide transporter PepT1 with prodrugs is a successful strategy to improve oral drug bioavailability, as demonstrated with valacyclovir, a prodrug of acyclovir. The aim of this new drug delivery strategy is to over-concentrate a poorly absorbed drug on the intestinal membrane surface by targeting PepT1 with functionalized polymer nanoparticles. In the present study, poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-ligand (PLA-PEG-ligand) nanoparticles were obtained by nanoprecipitation. A factorial experimental design allowed us to identify size-influent parameters and to obtain optimized ≈30nm nanoparticles. Valine, Glycylsarcosine, Valine-Glycine, and Tyrosine-Valine were chemically linked to PLA-PEG. In Caco-2 cell monolayer model, competition between functionalized nanoparticles and [ 3 H]Glycylsarcosine, a strong substrate of PepT1, reduced [ 3 H]Glycylsarcosine transport from 22 to 46%. Acyclovir was encapsulated with a drug load of ≈10% in valine-functionalized nanoparticles, resulting in a 2.7-fold increase in permeability as compared to the free drug. An in vivo pharmacokinetic study in mice compared oral absorption of acyclovir after administration of 25mg/kg of valacyclovir, free or encapsulated acyclovir in functionalized nanoparticles. Acyclovir encapsulation did not statistically modify AUC or C max , but increased t 1/2 and MRT 1.3-fold as compared to free acyclovir. This new strategy is promising for poorly absorbed drugs by oral administration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Core–shell hybrid nanocapsules for oral delivery of camptothecin: formulation development, in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ünal, Hale, E-mail: unalhale@gmail.com [Hacettepe University, Division of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Institute of Pure and Applied Science (Turkey); D’Angelo, Ivana [Second University of Napoli, Di.S.T.A.Bi.F. (Italy); Pagano, Ester; Borrelli, Francesca; Izzo, Angelo; Ungaro, Francesca; Quaglia, Fabiana [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Pharmacy (Italy); Bilensoy, Erem [Hacettepe University, Division of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Institute of Pure and Applied Science (Turkey)

    2015-01-15

    The objective of this study was to design and in vitro–in vivo evaluate oral nanocapsules prepared from amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CDs) or poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) for the effective oral delivery of an anticancer agent, camptothecin (CPT). CPT-loaded anionic and Chitosan (CS)-coated cationic nanocapsules were prepared and characterized in vitro. Morphological analysis was performed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). CPT release profile was evaluated using dialysis method under sink conditions. To determine the protective effect and drug stability provided by nanocapsules, all the formulations were incubated in simulated gastrointestinal media. Measurement of mucoadhesive tendency of CPT-loaded nanocapsules was realized by turbidimetric method. Penetration of nanocapsules was performed through an artificial mucus model. The permeability of CPT in solution form and bound to nanocapsule formulations were demonstrated across Caco-2 cell line. Finally, the intestinal uptake of nanocapsules was evaluated in vivo, in a mouse model. Both anionic and cationic formulations were in the range of 180–220 nm with a narrow size distribution and desired zeta potential values. CPT-loaded nanocapsules were found to be stable in simulated gastrointestinal media. Turbidimetric measurements confirmed the interaction between nanoparticles and mucin. Penetration of CPT through an artificial mucus gel layer was higher with CS-coated nanocapsules in accordance with the results obtained from permeability studies across Caco-2 cell line. In vivo animal studies confirmed that the intestinal uptake of nanocapsules was significantly higher with cationic nanocapsules. CPT-loaded positively charged CD nanocapsules might be an attractive and promising treatment for oral chemotherapy.

  17. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A; Byrne, Barry J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Core–shell hybrid nanocapsules for oral delivery of camptothecin: formulation development, in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ünal, Hale; D’Angelo, Ivana; Pagano, Ester; Borrelli, Francesca; Izzo, Angelo; Ungaro, Francesca; Quaglia, Fabiana; Bilensoy, Erem

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and in vitro–in vivo evaluate oral nanocapsules prepared from amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CDs) or poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) for the effective oral delivery of an anticancer agent, camptothecin (CPT). CPT-loaded anionic and Chitosan (CS)-coated cationic nanocapsules were prepared and characterized in vitro. Morphological analysis was performed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). CPT release profile was evaluated using dialysis method under sink conditions. To determine the protective effect and drug stability provided by nanocapsules, all the formulations were incubated in simulated gastrointestinal media. Measurement of mucoadhesive tendency of CPT-loaded nanocapsules was realized by turbidimetric method. Penetration of nanocapsules was performed through an artificial mucus model. The permeability of CPT in solution form and bound to nanocapsule formulations were demonstrated across Caco-2 cell line. Finally, the intestinal uptake of nanocapsules was evaluated in vivo, in a mouse model. Both anionic and cationic formulations were in the range of 180–220 nm with a narrow size distribution and desired zeta potential values. CPT-loaded nanocapsules were found to be stable in simulated gastrointestinal media. Turbidimetric measurements confirmed the interaction between nanoparticles and mucin. Penetration of CPT through an artificial mucus gel layer was higher with CS-coated nanocapsules in accordance with the results obtained from permeability studies across Caco-2 cell line. In vivo animal studies confirmed that the intestinal uptake of nanocapsules was significantly higher with cationic nanocapsules. CPT-loaded positively charged CD nanocapsules might be an attractive and promising treatment for oral chemotherapy

  19. Liposomes coated with thiolated chitosan enhance oral peptide delivery to rats☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradauer, K.; Barthelmes, J.; Vonach, C.; Almer, G.; Mangge, H.; Teubl, B.; Roblegg, E.; Dünnhaupt, S.; Fröhlich, E.; Bernkop-Schnürch, A.; Prassl, R.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the in vivo evaluation of thiomer-coated liposomes for an oral application of peptides. For this purpose, salmon calcitonin was chosen as a model drug and encapsulated within liposomes. Subsequently, the drug loaded liposomes were coated with either chitosan–thioglycolic acid (CS–TGA) or an S-protected version of the same polymer (CS–TGA–MNA), leading to an increase in the particle size of about 500 nm and an increase in the zeta potential from approximately − 40 mV to a maximum value of about + 44 mV, depending on the polymer. Coated liposomes were demonstrated to effectively penetrate the intestinal mucus layer where they came in close contact with the underlying epithelium. To investigate the permeation enhancing properties of the coated liposomes ex vivo, we monitored the transport of fluoresceinisothiocyanate-labeled salmon calcitonin (FITC-sCT) through rat small intestine. Liposomes coated with CS–TGA–MNA showed the highest effect, leading to a 3.8-fold increase in the uptake of FITC-sCT versus the buffer control. In vivo evaluation of the different formulations was carried out by the oral application of 40 μg of sCT per rat, either encapsulated within uncoated liposomes, CS–TGA-coated liposomes or CS–TGA–MNA-coated liposomes, or given as a solution serving as negative control. The blood calcium level was monitored over a time period of 24 h. The highest reduction in the blood calcium level, to a minimum of 65% of the initial value after 6 h, was achieved for CS–TGA–MNA-coated liposomes. Comparing the areas above curves (AAC) of the blood calcium levels, CS–TGA–MNA-coated liposomes led to an 8.2-fold increase compared to the free sCT solution if applied orally in the same concentration. According to these results, liposomes coated with S-protected thiomers have demonstrated to be highly valuable carriers for enhancing the oral bioavailability of salmon calcitonin. PMID:24140721

  20. Liposomes coated with thiolated chitosan enhance oral peptide delivery to rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradauer, K; Barthelmes, J; Vonach, C; Almer, G; Mangge, H; Teubl, B; Roblegg, E; Dünnhaupt, S; Fröhlich, E; Bernkop-Schnürch, A; Prassl, R

    2013-12-28

    The aim of the present study was the in vivo evaluation of thiomer-coated liposomes for an oral application of peptides. For this purpose, salmon calcitonin was chosen as a model drug and encapsulated within liposomes. Subsequently, the drug loaded liposomes were coated with either chitosan-thioglycolic acid (CS-TGA) or an S-protected version of the same polymer (CS-TGA-MNA), leading to an increase in the particle size of about 500 nm and an increase in the zeta potential from approximately -40 mV to a maximum value of about +44 mV, depending on the polymer. Coated liposomes were demonstrated to effectively penetrate the intestinal mucus layer where they came in close contact with the underlying epithelium. To investigate the permeation enhancing properties of the coated liposomes ex vivo, we monitored the transport of fluoresceinisothiocyanate-labeled salmon calcitonin (FITC-sCT) through rat small intestine. Liposomes coated with CS-TGA-MNA showed the highest effect, leading to a 3.8-fold increase in the uptake of FITC-sCT versus the buffer control. In vivo evaluation of the different formulations was carried out by the oral application of 40 μg of sCT per rat, either encapsulated within uncoated liposomes, CS-TGA-coated liposomes or CS-TGA-MNA-coated liposomes, or given as a solution serving as negative control. The blood calcium level was monitored over a time period of 24h. The highest reduction in the blood calcium level, to a minimum of 65% of the initial value after 6h, was achieved for CS-TGA-MNA-coated liposomes. Comparing the areas above curves (AAC) of the blood calcium levels, CS-TGA-MNA-coated liposomes led to an 8.2-fold increase compared to the free sCT solution if applied orally in the same concentration. According to these results, liposomes coated with S-protected thiomers have demonstrated to be highly valuable carriers for enhancing the oral bioavailability of salmon calcitonin. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Gelatin coated hybrid lipid nanoparticles for oral delivery of amphotericin B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Sanyog; Valvi, Pankaj U; Swarnakar, Nitin K

    2012-01-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) loaded polymer lipid hybrid nanoparticles (AmB-PLNs) comprised of lecithin (anionic lipid) and gelatin (Type A, cationic below its isoelectric point 7.0-9.0) were prepared by a two-step desolvation method to improve the oral bioavailability of AmB. The optimized AmB-PLNs were......) and fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis confirmed the orientation of the lecithin (located in the core) and gelatin (exterior coat) within the system. The developed formulation exhibited a sustained drug release profile with a release pattern best fitted to Higuchi kinetics. Experiments on Caco...

  2. Orally disintegrating and oral standard olanzapine tablets similarly elevate the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index and plasma triglyceride levels in 12 healthy men: a randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidarsdottir, Solrun; Vlug, Pauline; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Frölich, Marijke; Pijl, Hanno

    2010-09-01

    Treatment with olanzapine is associated with obesity, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. Reports have indicated that orally disintegrating tablets (ODT) cause less weight gain than oral standard tablets (OST). The aim of this study was to compare the effect of short-term treatment with these 2 distinct olanzapine formulations on glucose and lipid metabolism in healthy men. Twelve healthy men (mean ± SEM age: 25.1 ± 5.5 years) received olanzapine ODT (10 mg od, 8 days), olanzapine OST (10 mg od, 8 days), or no intervention in a randomized crossover design. At breakfast and dinner, glucose, insulin, free fatty acids (FFA), and triglyceride concentrations were measured at 10-minute intervals from 30 minutes prior to 2 hours after ingestion of standard meals. Leptin and adiponectin concentrations were measured at 20- and 30-minute intervals, respectively, between 0000h-1200h. Physical activity was assessed with an accelerometer. Fuel oxidation was measured in fasting condition by indirect calorimetry. The study was conducted from April 2006 through September 2006. Treatment with olanzapine ODT and OST equally elevated the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P = .005). At breakfast, both formulations equally increased fasting and postprandial triglyceride concentrations (P = .013 and P = .005, respectively) while decreasing fasting and postprandial FFA concentrations (P = .004 and P = .009, respectively). Body weight, body composition, physical activity, or fuel oxidation did not differ between treatment modalities. Eight days of treatment with both olanzapine formulations similarly increased HOMA-IR and triglyceride concentrations and decreased FFA concentrations in response to standard meals without affecting anthropometrics or physical activity. These data suggest that olanzapine hampers insulin action via mechanistic routes other than body adiposity or physical inactivity. controlled-trials.com. Identifier: ISRCTN17632637. © Copyright

  3. Modeling of a Piezoelectric MEMS Micropump Dedicated to Insulin Delivery and Experimental Validation Using Integrated Pressure Sensors: Application to Partial Occlusion Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fournier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model based on equivalent electrical networks has been built to simulate the dynamic behavior of a positive-displacement MEMS micropump dedicated to insulin delivery. This device comprises a reservoir in direct communication with the inlet check valve, a pumping membrane actuated by a piezo actuator, two integrated piezoresistive pressure sensors, an anti-free-flow check valve at the outlet, and finally a fluidic pathway up to the patient cannula. The pressure profiles delivered by the sensors are continuously analyzed during the therapy in order to detect failures like occlusion. The numerical modeling is a reliable way to better understand the behavior of the micropump in case of failure. The experimental pressure profiles measured during the actuation phase have been used to validate the numerical modeling. The effect of partial occlusion on the pressure profiles has been also simulated. Based on this analysis, a new management of partial occlusion for MEMS micropump is finally proposed.

  4. In vivo evaluation of an oral drug delivery system for peptides based on S-protected thiolated chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dünnhaupt, Sarah; Barthelmes, Jan; Iqbal, Javed; Perera, Glen; Thurner, Clemens C; Friedl, Heike; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2012-06-28

    The aim of the present study was the development and evaluation in vitro as well as in vivo of an oral delivery system based on a novel type of thiolated chitosan, so-called S-protected thiolated chitosan, for the peptide drug antide. The sulfhydryl ligand thioglycolic acid (TGA) was covalently attached to chitosan (CS) in the first step of modification. In the second step, these thiol groups of thiolated chitosan were protected by disulfide bond formation with the thiolated aromatic residue 6-mercaptonicotinamide (6-MNA). Absorptive transport studies of antide were evaluated ex vivo using rat intestinal mucosa. Matrix tablets of each polymer sample were prepared and their effect on the absorption of antide evaluated in vivo in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, tablets were examined in terms of their disintegration, swelling and drug release behavior. The resulting S-protected thiomer (TGA-MNA) exhibited 840μmol of covalently linked 6-MNA per gram thiomer. Based on the implementation of this hydrophobic ligand on the thiolated backbone, the disintegration behavior was reduced greatly and a controlled release of the peptide could be achieved. Furthermore, permeation studies with TGA-MNA on rat intestine revealed a 4.5-fold enhanced absorptive transport of the peptide in comparison to antide in solution. Additional in vivo studies confirmed the potential of this novel conjugate. Oral administration of antide in solution led to only very small detectable quantities in plasma with an absolute and relative bioavailability (BA) of 0.003 and 0.03%, only. In contrast, with antide incorporated in TGA-MNA matrix tablets an absolute and relative BA of 1.4 and 10.9% could be reached, resulting in a 421-fold increased area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC) compared to the antide solution. According to these results, S-protected thiolated chitosan as oral drug delivery system might be a valuable tool for improving the bioavailability of peptides. Copyright

  5. Development and characterization of orally-disintegrating films for propolis delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Gonçalves Borges

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the effect of different concentrations of hydrolyzed collagen (HC on the properties of an orally disintegrating film containing propolis ethanol extract (PEE as an active component. The films were evaluated in terms of total phenols, mechanical properties, solubility, contact angle, disintegration time, and microstructure. The films were prepared by casting with 2 g of protein mass (gelatin and HC, 30 g of sorbitol/100 g of protein mass, and 100 g of PEE/100 g of protein mass. HC was incorporated at concentrations of 0, 10, 20, and 30 g/100 g of protein mass. It was found that increased concentrations of HC reduced tensile strength and increased elongation; however, all films showed plastic behavior. An increase in solubility at 25 ºC, a reduction in the contact angle, and disintegration time were also observed. Thus, higher concentrations of collagen led to more hydrophilic and more soluble polymeric matrices that showed shorter dissolution time, favoring the use of these materials as carriers for active compounds to be delivered in the oral cavity.

  6. Oral Delivery of Probiotics in Poultry Using pH-Sensitive Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Li, Hui-Shan; Han, Geon Goo; Singh, Bijay; Kang, Sang-Kee; Bok, Jin-Duck; Kim, Dae-Duk; Hong, Zhong-Shan; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2017-04-28

    As alternatives to antibiotics in livestocks, probiotics have been used, although most of them in the form of liquid or semisolid formulations, which show low cell viability after oral administration. Therefore, suitable dry dosage forms should be developed for livestocks to protect probiotics against the low pH in the stomach such that the products have higher probiotics survivability. Here, in order to develop a dry dosage forms of probiotics for poultry, we used hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate 55 (HPMCP 55) as a tablet-forming matrix to develop probiotics in a tablet form for poultry. Here, we made three different kinds of probiotics-loaded tablet under different compression forces and investigated their characteristics based on their survivability, morphology, disintegration time, and kinetics in simulated gastrointestinal fluid. The results indicated that the probiotics formulated in the tablets displayed higher survival rates in acidic gastric conditions than probiotics in solution. Rapid release of the probiotics from the tablets occurred in simulated intestinal fluid because of fast swelling of the tablets in neutral pH. As a matrix of tablet, HPMCP 55 provided good viability of probiotics after 6 months under refrigeration. Moreover, after oral administration of probiotics-loaded tablets to chicken, more viable probiotics were observed, than with solution type, through several digestive areas of chicken by the tablets.

  7. Smart nanocomposite hydrogels based on azo crosslinked graphene oxide for oral colon-specific drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lin; Shi, Yuyang; Jiang, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Han, Huili; Feng, Qianhua; Ren, Junxiao; Yuan, Yujie; Wang, Yongchao; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2016-08-01

    A safe and efficient nanocomposite hydrogel for colon cancer drug delivery was synthesized using pH-sensitive and biocompatible graphene oxide (GO) containing azoaromatic crosslinks as well as poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) (GO-N=N-GO/PVA composite hydrogels). Curcumin (CUR), an anti-cancer drug, was encapsulated successfully into the hydrogel through a freezing and thawing process. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were performed to confirm the formation and morphological properties of the nanocomposite hydrogel. The hydrogels exhibited good swelling properties in a pH-sensitive manner. Drug release studies under conditions mimicking stomach to colon transit have shown that the drug was protected from being released completely into the physiological environment of the stomach and small intestine. In vivo imaging analysis, pharmacokinetics and a distribution of the gastrointestinal tract experiment were systematically studied and evaluated as colon-specific drug delivery systems. All the results demonstrated that GO-N=N-GO/PVA composite hydrogels could protect CUR well while passing through the stomach and small intestine to the proximal colon, and enhance the colon-targeting ability and residence time in the colon site. Therefore, CUR loaded GO-N=N-GO/PVA composite hydrogels might potentially provide a theoretical basis for the treatment of colon cancer with high efficiency and low toxicity.

  8. Delay of insulin initiation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with oral hypoglycemic agents (analysis of patient- and physician-related factors): A prospective observational DIPP-FACTOR study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sin Gon; Kim, Nam Hoon; Ku, Bon Jeong; Shon, Ho Sang; Kim, Doo Man; Park, Tae Sun; Kim, Yong-Seong; Kim, In Joo; Choi, Dong Seop

    2017-05-01

    To assess the time to initiation of insulin therapy, and concurrently investigate both patient- and physician-related factors associated with delaying insulin therapy in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled by oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). This prospective, observational disease registry study was carried out across 69 centers in Korea. Type 2 diabetes patients who had received two or more OHAs within the past 5 years, had a glycated hemoglobin ≥8% in the past 6 months and had not received insulin were included. Data recorded on data collection forms during a 12-month period were analyzed. Of 2168 patients enrolled, 1959 were evaluated and classified as the insulin-initiated or insulin-delayed group. Insulin was prescribed for just 20% of the patients during a 1-year follow-up period, and less than half (44.5%) of the patients who were taking two OHAs started insulin after 6 years. Patient-related factors for delay in insulin initiation included older age, shorter duration of diabetes and lower glycated hemoglobin. Physician-related factors included age (~50 to 1000) of patients consulted per month. Patient refusal (33.6%) and physicians' concerns of patient non-compliance (26.5%) were the major physician-reported reasons for delaying insulin therapy. Inconvenience of insulin therapy (51.6%) and fear of injection (48.2%) were the major reasons for patient refusal. Insulin initiation is delayed in patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled by two or more OHAs in Korea. Patient- and physician-related factors associated with this delay need to be addressed for better diabetes management. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidoo, C.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, 125 I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and 125 I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture

  10. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo, C

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, /sup 125/I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and /sup 125/I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture.

  11. Oral Delivery of Curcumin Polymeric Nanoparticles Ameliorates CCl4-Induced Subacute Hepatotoxicity in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Marslin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is the major bioactive compound of Curcuma longa, an important medicinal plant used in traditional herbal formulations since ancient times. In the present study, we report that curcumin nanoparticles (ηCur protects Wistar rats against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced subacute hepatotoxicity. Nanoparticles of sizes less than 220 nm with spherical shape were prepared using PLGA and PVA respectively as polymer and stabilizer. Test animals were injected via intraperitoneal route with 1 mL/kg CCl4 (8% in olive oil twice a week over a period of 8 weeks to induce hepatotoxicity. On the days following the CCl4 injection, test animals were orally administered with either curcumin or its equivalent dose of ηCur. Behavioural observation, biochemical analysis of serum and histopathological examination of liver of the experimental animals indicated that ηCur offer significantly higher hepatoprotection compared to curcumin.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of pH-sensitive drinkable nanoparticles for oral delivery of ibuprofen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Azzurra; Capasso Palmiero, Umberto; Barbieri, Sara D. A.; Lupi, Monica; Moscatelli, Davide

    2018-06-01

    Ibuprofen (IBU) is a widespread drug used to treat both acute and chronic disorders. It is generally taken orally but the free drug can induce the irritation of the gastric mucosa due to its acid nature. In literature, different approaches have been adopted to prevent the release in the stomach, such as physical entrapment with film-coated tablets and drug-conjugates. Nevertheless, these solutions have many disadvantages, including the fast release of the drug and the difficulty to swallow the tablet, especially for children who may vomit or refuse the tablet. For this reason, in this work, novel formulations are proposed that do not require the encapsulation of the drug into a solid form and, in turn, their assumption as a pill. IBU has been linked to different types of methacrylates via ester bond in order to produce pH-responsive macromolecular monomers. The novelty is related to the use of these drug-conjugates macromonomer for the production of nanoparticles (NPs) via emulsion polymerization (EP), using water as solvent. The final emulsion is able to load up to 30 mg ml‑1 of IBU, so less than 10 ml is required to be assumed to reach the minimum therapeutic dose of the drug (200 mg). Finally, the release of IBU from these novel drinkable formulations has been investigated in the gastric and intestinal simulated fluids to show the preferential release of IBU from the NPs in basic conditions. A comparison with an existing oral suspension has been performed to highlight the slower release in acid environment of these new formulations. Afterwards, the IBU loaded NPs were tested in vitro showing lower toxicity compared to the free drug.

  13. Genipin Cross-Linked Polymeric Alginate-Chitosan Microcapsules for Oral Delivery: In-Vitro Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported the preparation of the genipin cross-linked alginate-chitosan (GCAC microcapsules composed of an alginate core with a genipin cross-linked chitosan membrane. This paper is the further investigation on their structural and physical characteristics. Results showed that the GCAC microcapsules had a smooth and dense surface and a networked interior. Cross-linking by genipin substantially reduced swelling and physical disintegration of microcapsules induced by nongelling ions and calcium sequestrants. Strong resistance to mechanical shear forces and enzymatic degradation was observed. Furthermore, the GCAC membranes were permeable to bovine serum albumin and maintained a molecular weight cutoff at 70 KD, analogous to the widely studied alginate-chitosan, and alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate microcapsules. The release features and the tolerance of the GCAC microcapsules in the stimulated gastrointestinal environment were also investigated. This GCAC microcapsule formulation offers significant potential as a delivery vehicle for many biomedical applications.

  14. Development of a lozenge for oral transmucosal delivery of trans-resveratrol in humans: proof of concept.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otis L Blanchard

    Full Text Available Resveratrol provides multiple physiologic benefits which promote healthspan in various model species and clinical trials support continued exploration of resveratrol treatment in humans. However, there remains concern regarding low bioavailability and wide inter-individual differences in absorption and metabolism in humans, which suggests a great need to develop novel methods for resveratrol delivery. We hypothesized that oral transmucosal delivery, using a lozenge composed of a resveratrol-excipient matrix, would allow resveratrol to be absorbed rapidly into the bloodstream. We pursued proof of concept through two experiments. In the first experiment, the solubility of trans-resveratrol (tRES in water and 2.0 M solutions of dextrose, fructose, ribose, sucrose, and xylitol was determined using HPLC. Independent t-tests with a Bonferroni correction were used to compare the solubility of tRES in each of the solutions to that in water. tRES was significantly more soluble in the ribose solution (p = 0.0013 than in the other four solutions. Given the enhanced solubility of tRES in a ribose solution, a resveratrol-ribose matrix was developed into a lozenge suitable for human consumption. Lozenges were prepared, each containing 146±5.5 mg tRES per 2000 mg of lozenge mass. Two healthy human participants consumed one of the prepared lozenges following an overnight fast. Venipuncture was performed immediately before and 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes following lozenge administration. Maximal plasma concentrations (Cmax for tRES alone (i.e., resveratrol metabolites not included were 325 and 332 ng⋅mL(-1 for the two participants at 15 minute post-administration for both individuals. These results suggest a resveratrol-ribose matrix lozenge can achieve greater Cmax and enter the bloodstream faster than previously reported dosage forms for gastrointestinal absorption. While this study is limited by small sample size and only one method of resveratrol

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Water-Soluble Chitosan Microparticles Loaded with Insulin Using the Polyelectrolyte Complexation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.; Tao, Y.; Zhang, H.; Su, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric delivery systems based on microparticles have emerged as a promising approach for peroral insulin delivery. The amount of insulin was quantified by the improved Bradford method. It was shown that water-soluble chitosan/insulin/tripolyphosphate (TPP) mass ratio played an important role in microparticles formation. Stable, uniform, and spherical water-soluble chitosan microparticles (WSC-MPs) with high insulin association efficiency were formed at or close to optimized WSC/insulin/TPP mass ratio. WSC-MPs had higher association efficiency in the ph 4.0 and ph 9.7 of TPP solution. The results showed that association efficiency and loading capacity of insulin-loaded WSC-MPs prepared in 0.01 mol/L HCl of insulin were 48.28 ± 0.90% and 9.52 ± 1.34%. The average size of insulin-loaded WSC-MPs was 292 nm. The presented WSC microparticulate system has promising properties towards the development of an oral delivery system for insulin