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Sample records for oral heme iron

  1. Monitoring oral iron therapy with protoporphyrin/heme ratios in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, N; Prasannaraj, P; Rusia, U; Sundaram, K R; Nath, L M; Sood, S K

    1999-06-01

    Assessment of the efficacy of iron therapy has usually been done in populations/patients by monitoring changes in hemoglobin concentration, serum iron, percent transferrin saturation, and serum ferritin. In this study the protoporphyrin heme (P/H) ratio (a measure of free erythrocyte protoporphyrin) was measured before and after iron therapy in three groups of pregnant women, who received 60 mg (group A), 120 mg (group B), and 240 mg (group C) of elemental iron with folic acid (0.5 mg) per day for a period of 12 weeks, to evaluate its efficacy to monitor iron therapy. The three groups were comparable regarding the initial mean Hb concentration and serum ferritin levels. The initial mean P/H ratios were markedly elevated in all three groups and were different in the three groups, being highest in group A (113.2+/-92.6), intermediate in group B (87.5+/-62.5), and lowest in group C (69.8+/-43.3). The initial P/H ratio was significantly higher in group A than in group C (p<0.05). This probably affected the efficacy of iron therapy in the three groups. The P/H ratio decreased significantly in each of the three groups after iron therapy (A and B: p<0.001; C p<0.01). Mean Hb concentration and serum ferritin increased in all three groups post therapy; however, the magnitude of change in P/H ratio in all three groups was much greater. This indicated that the predominant contributory factor for anemia was iron deficiency in this group of pregnant women. Serum iron and percent transferrin saturation are difficult to interpret in our population, as iron is freely available over the counter and is prescribed as soon as anemia is detected in patients; therefore, the reduction in P/H ratio may be used to monitor response to iron therapy in population groups.

  2. Non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not interact with heme iron absorption in humans.

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    Gaitán, Diego; Olivares, Manuel; Lönnerdal, Bo; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    The absorption of heme iron has been described as distinctly different from that of non-heme iron. Moreover, whether heme and non-heme iron compete for absorption has not been well established. Our objective was to investigate the potential competition between heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate for absorption, when both iron forms are ingested on an empty stomach. Twenty-six healthy nonpregnant women were selected to participate in two iron absorption studies using iron radioactive tracers. We obtained the dose-response curve for absorption of 0.5, 10, 20, and 50 mg heme iron doses, as concentrated red blood cells. Then, we evaluated the absorption of the same doses, but additionally we added non-heme iron, as ferrous sulfate, at constant heme/non-heme iron molar ratio (1:1). Finally, we compare the two curves by a two-way ANOVA. Iron sources were administered on an empty stomach. One factor analysis showed that heme iron absorption was diminished just by increasing total heme iron (P ferrous sulfate did not have any effect on heme iron absorption (P = NS). We reported evidence that heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not compete for absorption. The mechanism behind the absorption of these iron sources is not clear.

  3. Rationale and design of the oral HEMe iron polypeptide Against Treatment with Oral Controlled Release Iron Tablets trial for the correction of anaemia in peritoneal dialysis patients (HEMATOCRIT trial

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    Isbel Nicole M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main hypothesis of this study is that oral heme iron polypeptide (HIP; Proferrin® ES administration will more effectively augment iron stores in erythropoietic stimulatory agent (ESA-treated peritoneal dialysis (PD patients than conventional oral iron supplementation (Ferrogradumet®. Methods Inclusion criteria are peritoneal dialysis patients treated with darbepoietin alpha (DPO; Aranesp®, Amgen for ≥ 1 month. Patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive either slow-release ferrous sulphate (1 tablet twice daily; control or HIP (1 tablet twice daily for a period of 6 months. The study will follow an open-label design but outcome assessors will be blinded to study treatment. During the 6-month study period, haemoglobin levels will be measured monthly and iron studies (including transferring saturation [TSAT] measurements will be performed bi-monthly. The primary outcome measure will be the difference in TSAT levels between the 2 groups at the end of the 6 month study period, adjusted for baseline values using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA. Secondary outcome measures will include serum ferritin concentration, haemoglobin level, DPO dosage, Key's index (DPO dosage divided by haemoglobin concentration, and occurrence of adverse events (especially gastrointestinal adverse events. Discussion This investigator-initiated multicentre study has been designed to provide evidence to help nephrologists and their peritoneal dialysis patients determine whether HIP administration more effectively augments iron stores in ESP-treated PD patients than conventional oral iron supplementation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number ACTRN12609000432213.

  4. Transcriptional profile of Haemophilus influenzae: effects of iron and heme.

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    Whitby, Paul W; Vanwagoner, Timothy M; Seale, Thomas W; Morton, Daniel J; Stull, Terrence L

    2006-08-01

    Haemophilus influenzae requires either heme or a porphyrin and iron source for growth. Microarray studies of H. influenzae strain Rd KW20 identified 162 iron/heme-regulated genes, representing approximately 10% of the genome, with > or =1.5-fold changes in transcription in response to iron/heme availability in vitro. Eighty genes were preferentially expressed under iron/heme restriction; 82 genes were preferentially expressed under iron/heme-replete conditions.

  5. Duodenal Absorption and Tissue Utilization of Dietary Heme and Nonheme Iron Differ in Rats123

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    Cao, Chang; Thomas, Carrie E.; Insogna, Karl L.; O'Brien, Kimberly O.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dietary heme contributes to iron intake, yet regulation of heme absorption and tissue utilization of absorbed heme remains undefined. Objectives: In a rat model of iron overload, we used stable iron isotopes to examine heme- and nonheme-iron absorption in relation to liver hepcidin and to compare relative utilization of absorbed heme and nonheme iron by erythroid (RBC) and iron storage tissues (liver and spleen). Methods: Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to groups for injections of either saline or iron dextran (16 or 48 mg Fe over 2 wk). After iron loading, rats were administered oral stable iron in the forms of 57Fe-ferrous sulfate and 58Fe-labeled hemoglobin. Expression of liver hepcidin and duodenal iron transporters and tissue stable iron enrichment was determined 10 d postdosing. Results: High iron loading increased hepatic hepcidin by 3-fold and reduced duodenal expression of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) by 76%. Nonheme-iron absorption was 2.5 times higher than heme-iron absorption (P = 0.0008). Absorption of both forms of iron was inversely correlated with hepatic hepcidin expression (heme-iron absorption: r = −0.77, P = 0.003; nonheme-iron absorption: r = −0.80, P = 0.002), but hepcidin had a stronger impact on nonheme-iron absorption (P = 0.04). Significantly more 57Fe was recovered in RBCs (P = 0.02), and more 58Fe was recovered in the spleen (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Elevated hepcidin significantly decreased heme- and nonheme-iron absorption but had a greater impact on nonheme-iron absorption. Differential tissue utilization of heme vs. nonheme iron was evident between erythroid and iron storage tissues, suggesting that some heme may be exported into the circulation in a form different from that of nonheme iron. PMID:25332470

  6. Mechanisms of heme iron absorption: Current questions and controversies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Iron is a critical micronutrient, and iron derived from heme contributes a large proportion of the total iron absorbed in a typical Western diet. Heine iron is absorbed by different mechanisms than non-heine iron, but despite considerable study over many years these mechanisms remain poorly understood. This review provides an overview of the importance of heme iron in the diet and discusses the two prevailing hypotheses of heine absorption; namely receptor mediated endocytosis of heme, and direct transport into the intestinal enterocyte by recently discovered heine transporters. A specific emphasis is placed on the questions surrounding the site of heme catabolism and the identity of the enzyme that performs this task. Additionally, we present the hypothesis that a nonheme iron transport protein may be required for heine iron absorption and discuss the experiences of our laboratory in examining this hypothesis.

  7. Heme and non-heme iron transporters in non-polarized and polarized cells

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    Yasui Yumiko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heme and non-heme iron from diet, and recycled iron from hemoglobin are important products of the synthesis of iron-containing molecules. In excess, iron is potentially toxic because it can produce reactive oxygen species through the Fenton reaction. Humans can absorb, transport, store, and recycle iron without an excretory system to remove excess iron. Two candidate heme transporters and two iron transporters have been reported thus far. Heme incorporated into cells is degraded by heme oxygenases (HOs, and the iron product is reutilized by the body. To specify the processes of heme uptake and degradation, and the reutilization of iron, we determined the subcellular localizations of these transporters and HOs. Results In this study, we analyzed the subcellular localizations of 2 isoenzymes of HOs, 4 isoforms of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1, and 2 candidate heme transporters--heme carrier protein 1 (HCP1 and heme responsive gene-1 (HRG-1--in non-polarized and polarized cells. In non-polarized cells, HCP1, HRG-1, and DMT1A-I are located in the plasma membrane. In polarized cells, they show distinct localizations: HCP1 and DMT1A-I are located in the apical membrane, whereas HRG-1 is located in the basolateral membrane and lysosome. 16Leu at DMT1A-I N-terminal cytosolic domain was found to be crucial for plasma membrane localization. HOs are located in smooth endoplasmic reticulum and colocalize with NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. Conclusions HCP1 and DMT1A-I are localized to the apical membrane, and HRG-1 to the basolateral membrane and lysosome. These findings suggest that HCP1 and DMT1A-I have functions in the uptake of dietary heme and non-heme iron. HRG-1 can transport endocytosed heme from the lysosome into the cytosol. These localization studies support a model in which cytosolic heme can be degraded by HOs, and the resulting iron is exported into tissue fluids via the iron transporter ferroportin 1, which is

  8. Caenorhabditis elegans ATAD-3 modulates mitochondrial iron and heme homeostasis.

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    van den Ecker, Daniela; Hoffmann, Michael; Müting, Gesine; Maglioni, Silvia; Herebian, Diran; Mayatepek, Ertan; Ventura, Natascia; Distelmaier, Felix

    2015-11-13

    ATAD3 (ATPase family AAA domain-containing protein 3) is a mitochondrial protein, which is essential for cell viability and organismal development. ATAD3 has been implicated in several important cellular processes such as apoptosis regulation, respiratory chain function and steroid hormone biosynthesis. Moreover, altered expression of ATAD3 has been associated with several types of cancer. However, the exact mechanisms underlying ATAD3 effects on cellular metabolism remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Caenorhabditis elegans ATAD-3 is involved in mitochondrial iron and heme homeostasis. Knockdown of atad-3 caused mitochondrial iron- and heme accumulation. This was paralleled by changes in the expression levels of several iron- and heme-regulatory genes as well as an increased heme uptake. In conclusion, our data indicate a regulatory role of C. elegans ATAD-3 in mitochondrial iron and heme metabolism.

  9. Non-heme induction of heme oxygenase-1 does not alter cellular iron metabolism.

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    Sheftel, Alex D; Kim, Sangwon F; Ponka, Prem

    2007-04-06

    The catabolism of heme is carried out by members of the heme oxygenase (HO) family. The products of heme catabolism by HO-1 are ferrous iron, biliverdin (subsequently converted to bilirubin), and carbon monoxide. In addition to its function in the recycling of hemoglobin iron, this microsomal enzyme has been shown to protect cells in various stress models. Implicit in the reports of HO-1 cytoprotection to date are its effects on the cellular handling of heme/iron. However, the limited amount of uncommitted heme in non-erythroid cells brings to question the source of substrate for this enzyme in non-hemolytic circumstances. In the present study, HO-1 was induced by either sodium arsenite (reactive oxygen species producer) or hemin or overexpressed in the murine macrophage-like cell line, RAW 264.7. Both of the inducers elicited an increase in active HO-1; however, only hemin exposure caused an increase in the synthesis rate of the iron storage protein, ferritin. This effect of hemin was the direct result of the liberation of iron from heme by HO. Cells stably overexpressing HO-1, although protected from oxidative stress, did not display elevated basal ferritin synthesis. However, these cells did exhibit an increase in ferritin synthesis, compared with untransfected controls, in response to hemin treatment, suggesting that heme levels, and not HO-1, limit cellular heme catabolism. Our results suggest that the protection of cells from oxidative insult afforded by HO-1 is not due to the catabolism of significant amounts of cellular heme as thought previously.

  10. Effects of heme iron enriched peptide on iron deficiency anemia in rats.

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    Tang, Ning; Chen, Le-qun; Zhuang, Hong

    2014-02-01

    The present study aims to investigate whether a daily intake of heme iron enriched peptide obtained from bovine hemoglobin is effective in alleviating iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups: a control group, an anemic group not treated, and anemic groups treated with FeSO4 or with the heme iron enriched peptide at low, moderate or high doses. The rats in the anemic groups were fed on a low-iron diet to establish the iron deficiency anemia model. After the model had been established, different doses of heme iron enriched peptide were given to the rats once a day via intragastric administration. After the iron supplement administration, it was observed that heme iron enriched peptide had effective restorative action returning the hemoglobin, red blood cells, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and serum iron in IDA animals to normal values or better. In addition, compared with FeSO4, higher Fe bioavailability and fewer side effects were observed. The rats in the moderate dose group had the highest apparent Fe absorption. Moreover, in vivo antioxidant activity was also observed, enhancing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and reduced malondialdehyde levels in IDA rats. Furthermore, the heme iron enriched peptide also exhibited strong in vitro antioxidant activities. In conclusion, heme iron enriched peptide significantly alleviated iron deficiency anemia, and exhibited strong in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities. This suggests that heme iron enriched peptide might be exploited as a safe, efficient new iron supplement.

  11. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

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    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling.

  12. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

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    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  13. Age-related accumulation of non-heme ferric and ferrous iron in mouse ovarian stroma visualized by sensitive non-heme iron histochemistry.

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    Asano, Yoshiya

    2012-03-01

    Sensitive non-heme iron histochemistry--namely, the perfusion-Perls method and perfusion-Turnbull method--was applied to study the distribution and age-related accumulation of non-heme ferric iron and ferrous iron in mouse ovary. Light and electron microscopic studies revealed that non-heme ferric iron is distributed predominantly in stromal tissue, especially in macrophages. By contrast, the distribution of non-heme ferrous iron was restricted to a few ovoid macrophages. Aged ovaries exhibited remarkable non-heme iron accumulation in all stromal cells. In particular, non-heme ferrous iron level was increased in stromal tissue, suggestive of increased levels of redox-active iron, which can promote oxidative stress. Moreover, intense localization of both non-heme ferric and ferrous iron was observed in aggregated large stromal cells that were then characterized as ceroid-laden enlarged macrophages with frothy cytoplasm. Intraperitoneal iron overload in adult mice resulted in non-heme iron deposition in the entire stroma and generation of enlarged macrophages, suggesting that excessive iron accumulation induced macrophage morphological changes. The data indicated that non-heme iron accumulation in ovarian stromal tissue may be related to aging of the ovary due to increasing oxidative stress.

  14. Bioactive dietary polyphenols decrease heme iron absorption by decreasing basolateral iron release in human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

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    Ma, Qianyi; Kim, Eun-Young; Han, Okhee

    2010-06-01

    Because dietary polyphenolic compounds have a wide range of effects in vivo and vitro, including chelation of metals such as iron, it is prudent to test whether the regular consumption of dietary bioactive polyphenols impair the utilization of dietary iron. Because our previous study showed the inhibitory effect of (-) -epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and grape seed extract (GSE) on nonheme iron absorption, we investigated whether EGCG and GSE also affect iron absorption from heme. The fully differentiated intestinal Caco-2 cells grown on microporous membrane inserts were incubated with heme (55)Fe in uptake buffer containing EGCG or GSE in the apical compartment for 7 h. Both EGCG and GSE decreased (P heme-derived iron. However, apical heme iron uptake was increased (P heme (55)Fe, the transfer of iron across the intestinal basolateral membrane was extremely low, indicating that basolateral export was impaired by GSE. In contrast, EGCG moderately decreased the cellular assimilation of heme (55)Fe, but the basolateral iron transfer was extremely low, suggesting that the basolateral efflux of heme iron was also inhibited by EGCG. Expression of heme oxygenase, ferroportin, and hephaestin protein was not changed by EGCG and GSE. The apical uptake of heme iron was temperature dependent and saturable in fully differentiated Caco-2 cells. Our data show that bioactive dietary polyphenols inhibit heme iron absorption mainly by reducing basolateral iron exit rather than decreasing apical heme iron uptake in intestinal cells.

  15. In vitro bioavailability of iron from the heme analogue sodium iron chlorophyllin.

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    Miret, Silvia; Tascioglu, Serpil; van der Burg, Monique; Frenken, Leon; Klaffke, Werner

    2010-01-27

    The use of heme analogues from vegetable origin could provide an alternative iron source of potentially high bioavailability. Sodium iron chlorophyllin is a water-soluble semisynthetic chlorophyll derivative where the magnesium in the porphyrin ring has been substituted by iron. We have used an in vitro model that combines gastric and intestinal digestion followed by intestinal iron uptake in Caco-2 cells to determine the bioavailability of iron from sodium iron chlorophyllin. Our results demonstrate that sodium iron chlorophyllin is stable under simulated gastrointestinal conditions and is able to deliver bioavailable iron to Caco-2 cells. Similar to the heme, the bioavailability of iron from sodium iron chlorophyllin is dependent on the food matrix, and it was inhibited by calcium. Potentially, sodium iron chlorophyllin could be used as an iron fortificant from vegetable origin with high bioavailability.

  16. EPR of Mononuclear Non-Heme Iron Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Gaffney, Betty J.

    2009-01-01

    Flexible geometry of three- to six-protein side-chain ligands to non-heme iron in proteins is the basis for widely diverse reactivites ranging from iron transport to redox chemistry. The gap between fixed states determined by x-ray analysis can be filled by spectroscopic study of trapped intermediates. EPR is a versatile and relatively quick approach to defining intermediate states in terms of the geometry and electronic structures of iron. A number of examples in which the iron chemistry of ...

  17. Heme synthase (ferrochelatase) catalyzes the removal of iron from heme and demetalation of metalloporphyrins.

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    Taketani, Shigeru; Ishigaki, Mutsumi; Mizutani, Atsushi; Uebayashi, Masashi; Numata, Masahiro; Ohgari, Yoshiko; Kitajima, Sakihito

    2007-12-25

    The red pigments in meat products, including cooked cured ham, arise from the reaction of myoglobin with nitric oxide generated from exogenous nitrite. Since carcinogenic nitrosoamines may be generated by the treatment of meats with nitrite, the production of nitrite-free meat products is an attractive alternative. Raw dry-cured (Parma) hams are produced by the treatment of meats with salts other than nitrite. Analysis of pigments in raw dry-cured hams reveals that the main pigment is zinc protoporphyrin, suggesting that the conversion of heme to zinc protoporphyrin occurs via an iron-removal reaction from myoglobin heme during the processing of raw hams. Purification of the iron-removal enzyme showed that it was identical to ferrochelatase. Recombinant ferrochelatase in combination with NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase catalyzed NADH-dependent iron-removal reaction from hemin and hemoproteins. Metal ions such as zinc and cobalt were also removed from the corresponding metalloporphyrins. The addition of zinc ions led to the formation of zinc protoporphyrin. In cultured cells, the conversion of zinc mesoporphyrin to mesoheme was observed to be dependent on ferrochelatase and could be markedly induced during erythroid differentiation. This is the first demonstration of a new enzyme reaction, the reverse reaction of ferrochelatase, which may contribute to a new route of the recycling of protoporphyrin and heme in cells.

  18. Oral iron chelators.

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    Kwiatkowski, Janet L

    2010-02-01

    Effective chelation therapy can prevent or reverse organ toxicity related to iron overload, yet cardiac complications and premature death continue to occur, largely related to difficulties with compliance in patients who receive parenteral therapy. The use of oral chelators may be able to overcome these difficulties and improve patient outcomes. A chelator's efficacy at cardiac and liver iron removal and side-effect profile should be considered when tailoring individual chelation regimens. Broader options for chelation therapy, including possible combination therapy, should improve clinical efficacy and enhance patient care.

  19. Effect of dietary protein on heme iron uptake by Caco-2 cells.

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    Villarroel, Pía; Flores, Sebastián; Pizarro, Fernando; de Romaña, Daniel López; Arredondo, Miguel

    2011-12-01

    To study heme iron bioavailability and the role of dietary protein (animal and vegetable) on iron uptake using an in vitro model (Caco-2 cell line). Caco-2 cells were seeded in bicameral chambers with different animal (beef, chicken or fish) or vegetable (peas, lentils, and soybeans) proteins or with pure animal (collagen and casein) or vegetable (gliadin, zein, and glutein) protein extracts. The effect of each protein over heme iron absorption was assessed. Intact heme uptake was higher than either heme plus albumin or digested heme plus albumin, but lower than digested heme. White meal exerted the highest inhibitory effect on hemin uptake. Heme iron uptake decreased in the presence of all legume extracts, but was not significantly different among them (one-way ANOVA, NS). Pure animal (collagen and casein) and vegetable (zein and glutelin) proteins increased heme iron uptake, except for gliadin. Animal and vegetable protein in general decreased heme iron uptake. However, purified animal and vegetable protein induce an increase in heme iron uptake.

  20. Covalent heme attachment to the protein in human heme oxygenase-1 with selenocysteine replacing the His25 proximal iron ligand.

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    Jiang, Yongying; Trnka, Michael J; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Ouellet, Hugues; Wang, Yongqiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2009-03-01

    To characterize heme oxygenase with a selenocysteine (SeCys) as the proximal iron ligand, we have expressed truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) His25Cys, in which Cys-25 is the only cysteine, in the Escherichia coli cysteine auxotroph strain BL21(DE3)cys. Selenocysteine incorporation into the protein was demonstrated by both intact protein mass measurement and mass spectrometric identification of the selenocysteine-containing tryptic peptide. One selenocysteine was incorporated into approximately 95% of the expressed protein. Formation of an adduct with Ellman's reagent (DTNB) indicated that the selenocysteine in the expressed protein was in the reduced state. The heme-His25SeCys hHO-1 complex could be prepared by either (a) supplementing the overexpression medium with heme, or (b) reconstituting the purified apoprotein with heme. Under reducing conditions in the presence of imidazole, a covalent bond is formed by addition of the selenocysteine residue to one of the heme vinyl groups. No covalent bond is formed when the heme is replaced by mesoheme, in which the vinyls are replaced by ethyl groups. These results, together with our earlier demonstration that external selenolate ligands can transfer an electron to the iron [Y. Jiang, P.R. Ortiz de Montellano, Inorg. Chem. 47 (2008) 3480-3482 ], indicate that a selenyl radical is formed in the hHO-1 His25SeCys mutant that adds to a heme vinyl group.

  1. Wearing red for signaling: the heme-bach axis in heme metabolism, oxidative stress response and iron immunology.

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    Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Watanabe-Matsui, Miki

    2014-04-01

    The connection between gene regulation and metabolism is an old issue that warrants revisiting in order to understand both normal as well as pathogenic processes in higher eukaryotes. Metabolites affect the gene expression by either binding to transcription factors or serving as donors for post-translational modification, such as that involving acetylation and methylation. The focus of this review is heme, a prosthetic group of proteins that includes hemoglobin and cytochromes. Heme has been shown to bind to several transcription factors, including Bach1 and Bach2, in higher eukaryotes. Heme inhibits the transcriptional repressor activity of Bach1, resulting in the derepression of its target genes, such as globin in erythroid cells and heme oxygenase-1 in diverse cell types. Since Bach2 is important for class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes as well as regulatory and effector T cell differentiation and the macrophage function, the heme-Bach2 axis may regulate the immune response as a signaling cascade. We discuss future issues regarding the topic of the iron/heme-gene regulation network based on current understanding of the heme-Bach axis, including the concept of "iron immunology" as the synthesis of the iron metabolism and the immune response.

  2. Porphyrin-Cored Polymer Nanoparticles: Macromolecular Models for Heme Iron Coordination.

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    Rodriguez, Kyle J; Hanlon, Ashley M; Lyon, Christopher K; Cole, Justin P; Tuten, Bryan T; Tooley, Christian A; Berda, Erik B; Pazicni, Samuel

    2016-10-03

    Porphyrin-cored polymer nanoparticles (PCPNs) were synthesized and characterized to investigate their utility as heme protein models. Created using collapsible heme-centered star polymers containing photodimerizable anthracene units, these systems afford model heme cofactors buried within hydrophobic, macromolecular environments. Spectroscopic interrogations demonstrate that PCPNs display redox and ligand-binding reactivity similar to that of native systems and thus are potential candidates for modeling biological heme iron coordination.

  3. The effect of proteins from animal source foods on heme iron bioavailability in humans.

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    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Valenzuela, Carolina; Brito, Alex; Weinborn, Valerie; Flores, Sebastián; Arredondo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Forty-five women (35-45 year) were randomly assigned to three iron (Fe) absorption sub-studies, which measured the effects of dietary animal proteins on the absorption of heme Fe. Study 1 was focused on heme, red blood cell concentrate (RBCC), hemoglobin (Hb), RBCC+beef meat; study 2 on heme, heme+fish, chicken, and beef; and study 3 on heme and heme+purified animal protein (casein, collagen, albumin). Study 1: the bioavailability of heme Fe from Hb was similar to heme only (∼13.0%). RBCC (25.0%) and RBCC+beef (21.3%) were found to be increased 2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, when compared with heme alone (pheme alone (10.3%) was reduced (pheme Fe absorption.

  4. Serum iron increases with acute induction of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 in mice.

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    Mostert, Volker; Nakayama, Akihiro; Austin, Lori M; Levander, Ximena A; Ferris, Christopher D; Hill, Kristina E; Burk, Raymond F

    2007-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is induced by oxidative stress and protects against oxidant injury. We examined the effect of rapid induction of hepatic HO-1 on serum iron level. Serum iron was approximately doubled within 6 h when HO-1 was induced by phenobarbital treatment of selenium-deficient mice. Blocking heme synthesis with diethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate (DDC) prevented the induction of HO-1 and the rise in serum iron. DDC did not block HO-1 induction by hemin. Inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin prevented a rise in serum iron that occurred following phorone treatment. These results indicate that heme synthesis or an exogenous source of heme is needed to allow induction of HO-1. Further, they link HO-1 induction with a rise in serum iron, suggesting that the iron resulting from catabolism of heme by HO-1 is released by the liver.

  5. Long-term dietary heme iron and red meat intake in relation to endometrial cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genkinger, J.M.; Friberg, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Wolk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Heme and total iron, present in meat, have been hypothesized to promote carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined the associations between intakes of heme and total iron, types of meat, and endometrial cancer risk. Objective: We evaluated the associations between intakes of h

  6. Long-term dietary heme iron and red meat intake in relation to endometrial cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genkinger, J.M.; Friberg, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Wolk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Heme and total iron, present in meat, have been hypothesized to promote carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined the associations between intakes of heme and total iron, types of meat, and endometrial cancer risk. Objective: We evaluated the associations between intakes of h

  7. TLR Stimulation Dynamically Regulates Heme and Iron Export Gene Expression in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Philip

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria have evolved multiple mechanisms to capture iron or iron-containing heme from host tissues or blood. In response, organisms have developed defense mechanisms to keep iron from pathogens. Very little of the body’s iron store is available as free heme; rather nearly all body iron is complexed with heme or other proteins. The feline leukemia virus, subgroup C (FeLV-C receptor, FLVCR, exports heme from cells. It was unknown whether FLVCR regulates heme-iron availability after infection, but given that other heme regulatory proteins are upregulated in macrophages in response to bacterial infection, we hypothesized that macrophages dynamically regulate FLVCR. We stimulated murine primary macrophages or macrophage cell lines with LPS and found that Flvcr is rapidly downregulated in a TLR4/MD2-dependent manner; TLR1/2 and TLR3 stimulation also decreased Flvcr expression. We identified several candidate TLR-activated transcription factors that can bind to the Flvcr promoter. Macrophages must balance the need to sequester iron from systemic circulating or intracellular pathogens with the macrophage requirement for heme and iron to produce reactive oxygen species. Our findings underscore the complexity of this regulation and point to a new role for FLVCR and heme export in macrophages responses to infection and inflammation.

  8. Dysfunction of the heme recycling system in heme oxygenase 1-deficient mice: effects on macrophage viability and tissue iron distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Eckhaus, Michael A; Ghosh, Manik C; Ollivierre-Wilson, Hayden; Rouault, Tracey A

    2010-12-23

    To better understand the tissue iron overload and anemia previously reported in a human patient and mice that lack heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), we studied iron distribution and pathology in HO-1(Hmox1)(-/-) mice. We found that resident splenic and liver macrophages were mostly absent in HO-1(-/-) mice. Erythrophagocytosis caused the death of HO-1(-/-) macrophages in in vitro experiments, supporting the hypothesis that HO-1(-/-) macrophages died of exposure to heme released on erythrophagocytosis. Rupture of HO-1(-/-) macrophages in vivo and release of nonmetabolized heme probably caused tissue inflammation. In the spleen, initial splenic enlargement progressed to red pulp fibrosis, atrophy, and functional hyposplenism in older mice, recapitulating the asplenia of an HO-1-deficient patient. We postulate that the failure of tissue macrophages to remove senescent erythrocytes led to intravascular hemolysis and increased expression of the heme and hemoglobin scavenger proteins, hemopexin and haptoglobin. Lack of macrophages expressing the haptoglobin receptor, CD163, diminished the ability of haptoglobin to neutralize circulating hemoglobin, and iron overload occurred in kidney proximal tubules, which were able to catabolize heme with HO-2. Thus, in HO-1(-/-) mammals, the reduced function and viability of erythrophagocytosing macrophages are the main causes of tissue damage and iron redistribution.

  9. Analysis of Heme Iron Coordination in DGCR8: The Heme-Binding Component of the Microprocessor Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girvan, Hazel M; Bradley, Justin M; Cheesman, Myles R; Kincaid, James R; Liu, Yilin; Czarnecki, Kazimierz; Fisher, Karl; Leys, David; Rigby, Stephen E J; Munro, Andrew W

    2016-09-13

    DGCR8 is the RNA-binding partner of the nuclease Drosha. Their complex (the "Microprocessor") is essential for processing of long, primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) in the nucleus. Binding of heme to DGCR8 is essential for pri-miRNA processing. On the basis of the split Soret ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum of ferric DGCR8, bis-thiolate sulfur (cysteinate, Cys(-)) heme iron coordination of DGCR8 heme iron was proposed. We have characterized DGCR8 heme ligation using the Δ276 DGCR8 variant and combined electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), electron nuclear double resonance, resonance Raman, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. These studies indicate DGCR8 bis-Cys heme iron ligation, with conversion from bis-thiolate (Cys(-)/Cys(-)) axial coordination in ferric DGCR8 to bis-thiol (CysH/CysH) coordination in ferrous DGCR8. Pri-miRNA binding does not perturb ferric DGCR8's optical spectrum, consistent with the axial ligand environment being separated from the substrate-binding site. UV-vis absorption spectra of the Fe(II) and Fe(II)-CO forms indicate discrete species exhibiting peaks with absorption coefficients substantially larger than those for ferric DGCR8 and that previously reported for a ferrous form of DGCR8. Electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy data exclude histidine or water as axial ligands for ferric DGCR8 and favor bis-thiolate coordination in this form. UV-vis MCD and near-infrared MCD provide data consistent with this conclusion. UV-vis MCD data for ferrous DGCR8 reveal features consistent with bis-thiol heme iron coordination, and resonance Raman data for the ferrous-CO form are consistent with a thiol ligand trans to the CO. These studies support retention of DGCR8 cysteine coordination upon reduction, a conclusion distinct from those of previous studies of a different ferrous DGCR8 isoform.

  10. Cellular iron depletion weakens induction of heme oxygenase-1 by cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chengzhi; Loo, George

    2011-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is an inducible cytoprotective gene, although its induction by environmental factors is not completely understood. This study aimed to ascertain if specific nutritive factors or related compounds influence heme oxygenase-1 expression. In HCT-116 cells, cadmium increased heme oxygenase-1 enzymatic activity. This effect of cadmium was weaker in cells made iron-deficient with the iron chelator, desferrioxamine, which was associated with repression of heme oxygenase-1 protein and mRNA expression. The repression by desferrioxamine of cadmium-induced heme oxygenase-1 upregulation was reversed upon iron replenishment of the cells. Additionally, it was found that thiol antioxidants inhibited the heme oxygenase-1 upregulation caused by cadmium and also by ethacrynic acid, which each decreased intracellular glutathione as did buthionine sulfoxamine. Interestingly, cadmium and ethacrynic acid increased nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and subsequent heme oxygenase-1 expression, but buthionine sulfoxamine did not. Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin, and a superoxide scavenger (Tiron) inhibited cadmium-induced upregulation of heme oxygenase-1. Diphenyleneiodonium was the most potent and inhibited NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase as well, whereas apocynin and Tiron did not. It is concluded that adequate amounts of iron, which at the atomic level can serve as the pivotal element of heme in NADPH oxidase, must be present in cells to permit what appears to be thiol redox-sensitive, NADPH oxidase-dependent upregulation of heme oxygenase-1. Thus, these findings are significant because they suggest that cells without adequate iron would be unable to fully express the stress gene, heme oxygenase-1, when confronted with the toxic metal, cadmium.

  11. Oxidative stability of a heme iron-fortified bakery product: Effectiveness of ascorbyl palmitate and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Mercedes; Bou, Ricard; Tres, Alba; Polo, Javier; Codony, Rafael; Guardiola, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Fortification of food products with iron is a common strategy to prevent or overcome iron deficiency. However, any form of iron is a pro-oxidant and its addition will cause off-flavours and reduce a product's shelf life. A highly bioavailable heme iron ingredient was selected to fortify a chocolate cream used to fill sandwich-type cookies. Two different strategies were assessed for avoiding the heme iron catalytic effect on lipid oxidation: ascorbyl palmitate addition and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate. Oxidation development and sensory acceptability were monitored in the cookies over one-year of storage at room temperature in the dark. The addition of ascorbyl palmitate provided protection against oxidation and loss of tocopherols and tocotrienols during the preparation of cookies. In general, ascorbyl palmitate, either alone or in combination with the co-spray-dried heme iron, prevented primary oxidation and hexanal formation during storage. The combination of both strategies resulted in cookies that were acceptable from a sensory point of view after 1year of storage.

  12. Yersinia pestis TonB: Role in Iron, Heme, and Hemoprotein Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Robert D.; Shah, Jessica; Bearden, Scott W.; Thompson, Jan M.; Fetherston, Jacqueline D.

    2003-01-01

    In Yersinia pestis, the siderophore-dependent yersiniabactin (Ybt) iron transport system and heme transport system (Hmu) have putative TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors. Here we demonstrate that hemin uptake and iron utilization from Ybt are TonB dependent. However, the Yfe iron and manganese transport system does not require TonB. PMID:12819108

  13. A central role for heme iron in colon carcinogenesis associated with red meat intake.

    OpenAIRE

    Bastide, Nadia; Chenni, Fatima; Audebert, Marc; Santarelli, Raphaelle; Tache, Sylviane; Naud, Nathalie; Baradat, Maryse; Jouanin, Isabelle; Surya, Reggie; Hobbs, Ditte; Kuhnle, Gunter; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Gueraud, Francoise; Corpet, Denis; Pierre, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology shows that red and processed meat intake is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Heme iron, heterocyclic amines, and endogenous N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are proposed to explain this effect, but their relative contribution is unknown. Our study aimed at determining, at nutritional doses, which is the main factor involved and proposing a mechanism of cancer promotion by red meat. The relative part of heme iron (1% in diet), heterocyclic amines (PhIP + MeIQx, 50 ...

  14. The Role of the Cytoplasmic Heme-binding Protein (PhuS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Intracellular Heme Trafficking and Iron Homeostasis*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The cytoplasmic heme-binding protein PhuS, encoded within the Fur-regulated Pseudomonas heme utilization (phu) operon, has previously been shown to traffic heme to the iron-regulated heme oxygenase (HO). We further investigate the role of PhuS in heme trafficking to HO on disruption of the phuS and hemO genes in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore-deficient and wild-type background. Previous studies have shown that deletion of hemO prevents the cells from utilizin...

  15. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinborn, Valerie; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Arredondo, Miguel; Flores, Sebastián; Valenzuela, Carolina

    2015-10-30

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe) absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study). Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin) and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil) on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control), study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05). In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption.

  16. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Weinborn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study. Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control, study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05. In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p < 0.05. These results suggest that with the exception of soy proteins, which decreased absorption, proteins derived from cereals and legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption.

  17. Irradiation of bovine meat: effect of heme-iron concentration.; Irradiacao de carne bovina: efeito na concentracao de ferro heme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistura, Liliana Perazzini Furtado

    2002-07-01

    The irradiation is often used, nowadays, for meat conservation and it is important to know how much this process interferes with the nutritional quality of the meat. In this study round cut meat, ground and steaks (from a local supermarket) was irradiated with doses of O; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 7,5 and 10 kGy (JS-7500 Nordium Inc -Canada) and the interference of irradiation and the process of food preparation on heme-iron (H Fe) content was determined. Half of the sample was kept raw and the other half was grilled in a pre-warmed oven at 250 deg C for 9 min and a controlled humidity of 70%. The chemical composition, the total iron (T Fe) (EM) and the heme iron concentration were determined (Hornsey,1956) and the sensorial quality evaluated. The average T Fe concentration of raw and ground , ground and grilled, raw steaks and grilled steak meat, on dry and degreased basis was 113 mug/g, 121 mug/g , 91 mug/g and 77 mug/g; and the H Fe concentration 105 mug/g (93% of T Fe) , 88 mug/g (73% of T Fe), 90 mug/g (99% of T Fe) and 52 mug/g (68% of T Fe) respectively. Data were evaluated by ANOVA with fixed effects and multiple comparisons. The irradiation neither altered the chemical composition nor the proportion of heme iron of meat. The preparation conditions (temperature, cooking time, environment humidity, meat presentation) of the sample interfered more with the heme iron content than the irradiation. With the sensorial analysis we verified that meats irradiated with doses of 3 kGy were better evaluated in softness and succulency attributes than the others. Meat submitted to irradiation doses up to 3 kGy were accepted by the specialists' panel. (author)

  18. Melatonin attenuates hypochlorous acid-mediated heme destruction, free iron release, and protein aggregation in hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Dhiman; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Diamond, Michael P; Saed, Ghassan M; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2012-09-01

    In inflammatory diseases, where hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is elevated, iron homeostasis is disturbed, resulting in accumulation of free iron. Free iron is toxic by virtue of its ability to generate free radicals through the Fenton reaction. HOCl is generated by myeloperoxidase, (MPO) using chloride and hydrogen peroxide as substrates. Recent studies demonstrate that HOCl binds to the heme moiety of hemoglobin (Hb), which generates a transient ferric species whose formation and decay kinetics indicate it participates in protein aggregation, heme destruction, and free iron release. Here, we show that melatonin prevents HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction and protein aggregation, using a combination of UV-vis spectrophotometry, ferrozine colorimetric assay, and in-gel heme staining. We also show that melatonin treatment prevents HOCl-mediated loss of red blood cell (RBC) viability, indicating biologic relevance of this finding. The mechanism by which melatonin prevents HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction is by direct scavenging of HOCl and/or through the destabilization of the higher Hb oxidative states intermediates, ferryl porphyrin radical cation Hb-Fe(IV)=O(+π•) and Hb-Fe(IV)=O, which are formed through the reaction of HOCl with Hb. Our work establishes a direct mechanistic link between melatonin and its protective effect in chronic inflammatory diseases. Collectively, in addition to acting as an antioxidant and as a MPO inhibitor, melatonin can also exert its protective effect by inhibiting HOCl-mediated heme destruction of hemoproteins and subsequent free iron release.

  19. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat; Alteracoes provocadas pela irradiacao e armazenamento nos teores de ferro heme em carne de frango

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de; Arthur, Valter Arthur [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao]. E-mail: sgcbraza@esalq.usp.br

    2007-04-15

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 deg C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  20. Exploring genome-wide - dietary heme iron intake interactions and the risk of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Robert Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims/hypothesis: Genome-wide association studies have identified over 50 new genetic loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D. Several studies conclude that higher dietary heme iron intake increases the risk of T2D. Therefore we assessed whether the relation between genetic loci and type 2 diabetes is modified by dietary heme iron intake. Methods: We used Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human 6.0 array data (681,770 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and dietary information collected in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n=725 cases; n=1,273 controls and the Nurses’ Health Study (n=1,081 cases; n=1,692 controls. We assessed whether genome-wide SNPs or iron metabolism SNPs interacted with dietary heme iron intake in relation to T2D, testing for associations in each cohort separately and then meta-analyzing to pool the results. Finally, we created 1,000 synthetic pathways matched to an iron metabolism pathway on number of genes, and number of SNPs in each gene. We compared the iron metabolic pathway SNPs with these synthetic SNP assemblies in their relation to T2D to assess if the pathway as a whole interacts with dietary heme iron intake.Results: Using a genomic approach, we found no significant gene-environment interactions with dietary heme iron intake in relation to T2D (top SNP in pooled analysis: intergenic rs10980508; p=1.03E-06 > Bonferroni corrected p=7.33E-08. Furthermore, no SNP in the iron metabolic pathway significantly interacted with dietary heme iron intake (top SNP in pooled analysis: rs1805313; p=1.14E-03 > Bonferroni corrected p=2.10E-04. Finally, neither the main genetic effects (pooled empirical p by SNP=0.41, nor gene – dietary heme-iron interactions (pooled empirical p value for the interactions=0.72 were significant for the iron metabolic pathway as a whole. Conclusions: We found no significant interactions between dietary heme iron intake and common SNPs in relation to T2D.

  1. Trypanosoma brucei brucei: effects of ferrous iron and heme on ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Milane S; Thomaz, Rachel; Oliveira, José Henrique M; Oliveira, Pedro L; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2009-02-01

    Trypanosoma brucei brucei is the causative agent of animal African trypanosomiasis, also called nagana. Procyclic vector form resides in the midgut of the tsetse fly, which feeds exclusively on blood. Hemoglobin digestion occurs in the midgut resulting in an intense release of free heme. In the present study we show that the magnesium-dependent ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) activity of procyclic T. brucei brucei is inhibited by ferrous iron and heme. The inhibition of E-NTPDase activity by ferrous iron, but not by heme, was prevented by pre-incubation of cells with catalase. However, antioxidants that permeate cells, such as PEG-catalase and N-acetyl-cysteine prevented the inhibition of E-NTPDase by heme. Ferrous iron was able to induce an increase in lipid peroxidation, while heme did not. Therefore, both ferrous iron and heme can inhibit E-NTPDase activity of T. brucei brucei by means of formation of reactive oxygen species, but apparently acting through distinct mechanisms.

  2. Molecular insights into frataxin-mediated iron supply for heme biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Mielcarek

    Full Text Available Iron is required as an element to sustain life in all eukaryotes and most bacteria. Although several bacterial iron acquisition strategies have been well explored, little is known about the intracellular trafficking pathways of iron and its entry into the systems for co-factor biogenesis. In this study, we investigated the iron-dependent process of heme maturation in Bacillus subtilis and present, for the first time, structural evidence for the physical interaction of a frataxin homologue (Fra, which is suggested to act as a regulatory component as well as an iron chaperone in different cellular pathways, and a ferrochelatase (HemH, which catalyses the final step of heme b biogenesis. Specific interaction between Fra and HemH was observed upon co-purification from crude cell lysates and, further, by using the recombinant proteins for analytical size-exclusion chromatography. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments identified the landscape of the Fra/HemH interaction interface and revealed Fra as a specific ferrous iron donor for the ferrochelatase HemH. The functional utilisation of the in vitro-generated heme b co-factor upon Fra-mediated iron transfer was confirmed by using the B. subtilis nitric oxide synthase bsNos as a metabolic target enzyme. Complementary mutational analyses confirmed that Fra acts as an essential component for maturation and subsequent targeting of the heme b co-factor, hence representing a key player in the iron-dependent physiology of B. subtilis.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1410 - Iron (non-heme) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron (non-heme) test system. 862.1410 Section 862.1410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... with widespread deposit in the tissues of two iron-containing pigments, hemosiderin and hemofuscin,...

  4. Molecular basis of inherited microcytic anemia due to defects in iron acquisition or heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; De Falco, Luigia; Beaumont, Carole

    2009-03-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most commonly encountered anemia in general medical practice. Nutritional iron deficiency and beta thalassemia trait are the primary causes in pediatrics, whereas bleeding disorders and anemia of chronic disease are common in adulthood. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from a defect in globin genes, in heme synthesis, in iron availability or in iron acquisition by the erythroid precursors. These microcytic anemia can be sideroblastic or not, a trait which reflects the implications of different gene abnormalities. Iron is a trace element that may act as a redox component and therefore is integral to vital biological processes that require the transfer of electrons as in oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, DNA biosynthesis and xenobiotic metabolism. However, it can also be pro-oxidant and to avoid its toxicity, iron metabolism is strictly controlled and failure of these control systems could induce iron overload or iron deficient anemia. During the past few years, several new discoveries mostly arising from human patients or mouse models have highlighted the implication of iron metabolism components in hereditary microcytic anemia, from intestinal absorption to its final inclusion into heme. In this paper we will review the new information available on the iron acquisition pathway by developing erythrocytes and its regulation, and we will consider only inherited microcytosis due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects. This information could be useful in the diagnosis and classification of these microcytic anemias.

  5. Dietary heme iron and the risk of colorectal cancer with specific mutations in KRAS and APC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilsing, Anne M J; Fransen, Fiona; de Kok, Theo M; Goldbohm, Alexandra R; Schouten, Leo J; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; van Engeland, Manon; van den Brandt, Piet A; de Goeij, Anton F P M; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2013-12-01

    Red meat intake has been linked to increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, experimental studies suggest a role for dietary heme iron. Because heme iron was shown to promote specific mutations, it would be insightful to link heme iron data to CRC with mutations in key genes in an observational, population-based study. We investigated the association between dietary heme iron intake and risk of CRC with mutations in APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) and KRAS (Kirsten ras) and P53 overexpression in the Netherlands Cohort Study. After 7.3 years of follow-up, excluding the first 2.3 years due to incomplete coverage of the pathology registry and to avoid preclinical disease, adjusted hazard ratios (including adjustment for total meat) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, using 4026 subcohort members (aged 55-69 years at baseline), 435 colon and 140 rectal cancer patients. When comparing the highest with the lowest tertile of intake, heme iron intake was associated with an increased risk of CRC harboring activating mutations in KRAS (hazard ratio = 1.71, 95% confidence interval: 1.15-2.57; P for trend = 0.03) and CRC without truncating mutations in APC (hazard ratio = 1.79, 95% confidence interval: 1.23-2.60; P for trend = 0.003). We observed a positive association between heme iron intake and the risk of CRC with activating G>A mutations in KRAS (P for trend = 0.01) and overall G>A mutations in APC (P for trend = 0.005). No associations were found with CRC harboring G>T mutations in KRAS/APC. Heme iron intake was positively associated with the risk of P53 overexpressed tumors but not with tumors without P53 overexpression (Pheterogeneity = 0.12). Heme iron intake was associated with an increased risk of colorectal tumors harboring G>A transitions in KRAS and APC and overexpression of P53. These novel findings suggest that alkylating rather than oxidative DNA-damaging mechanisms are involved in heme

  6. Surface protein IsdC and Sortase B are required for heme-iron scavenging of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresso, Anthony W; Chapa, Travis J; Schneewind, Olaf

    2006-12-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the spore-forming agent of anthrax, requires iron for growth and is capable of scavenging heme-iron during infection. We show here that the B. anthracis iron-regulated surface determinants (isd) locus encompasses isdC, specifying a heme-iron binding surface protein. Anchoring of IsdC to the cell wall envelopes of vegetative bacilli requires srtB, which encodes sortase B. Purified sortase B cleaves IsdC between the threonine and the glycine of its NPKTG motif sorting signal. B. anthracis variants lacking either isdC or srtB display defects in heme-iron scavenging, suggesting that IsdC binding to heme-iron in the cell wall envelope contributes to bacterial uptake of heme.

  7. Nitrosamines and Heme Iron and Risk of Prostate Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakszyn, Paula G.; Allen, Naomi E.; Lujan-Barroso, Leila; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Key, Timothy J.; Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Tjonneland, Anne; Fons-Johnsen, Nina; Overvad, Kim; Teucher, Birgit; Li, Kuanrong; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Oikonomou, Eleni; Sarantopoulou, Maria; Saieva, Calogero; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Huerta, Jose M.; Ardanaz, Eva; Arguelles, Marcial V.; Molina-Montes, Esther; Larranaga, Nerea; Wirfaelt, Elisabet; Wallstrom, Peter; Johansson, Mattias; Stattin, Paer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Jenab, Mazda; Fedirko, Veronika; Riboli, Elio

    2012-01-01

    Background: The evidence about nitrosamines and heme iron intake and cancer risk is limited, despite the biologic plausibility of the hypothesis that these factors might increase cancer risk. We investigated the association between dietary nitrosamines and heme iron and the risk of prostate cancer a

  8. Small Molecule Antivirulents Targeting the Iron-Regulated Heme Oxygenase (HemO) of P. aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria require iron for survival and virulence and employ several mechanisms including utilization of the host heme containing proteins. The final step in releasing iron is the oxidative cleavage of heme by HemO. A recent computer aided drug design (CADD) study identified several inhibitors of the bacterial HemOs. Herein we report the near complete HN, N, CO Cα and Cβ chemical shift assignment of the P. aeruginosa HemO in the absence and presence of inhibitors (E)-3-(4-(Phenylamino)phenylca...

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westre, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s{yields}3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westre, Tami E. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s→3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  11. Iron chelators can protect against oxidative stress through ferryl heme reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Brandon J; Hider, Robert C; Wilson, Michael T

    2008-02-01

    Iron chelators such as desferrioxamine have been shown to ameliorate oxidative damage in vivo. The mechanism of this therapeutic action under non-iron-overload conditions is, however, complex, as desferrioxamine has properties that can impact on oxidative damage independent of its capacity to act as an iron chelator. Desferrioxamine can act as a reducing agent to remove cytotoxic ferryl myoglobin and hemoglobin and has recently been shown to prevent the formation of a highly cytotoxic heme-to-protein cross-linked derivative of myoglobin. In this study we have examined the effects of a wide range of iron chelators, including the clinically used hydroxypyridinone CP20 (deferriprone), on the stability of ferryl myoglobin and on the formation of heme-to-protein cross-linking. We show that all hydroxypyridinones, as well as many other iron chelators, are efficient reducing agents of ferryl myoglobin. These compounds are also effective at preventing the formation of cytotoxic derivatives of myoglobin such as heme-to-protein cross-linking. These results show that the use of iron chelators in vivo may ameliorate oxidative damage under conditions of non-iron overload by at least two mechanisms. The antioxidant effects of chelators in vivo cannot, therefore, be attributed solely to iron chelation.

  12. Intakes of dietary iron and heme-iron and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Cross, Amanda J; Park, Yikyung; Schatzkin, Arthur; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Rohan, Thomas E; Sinha, Rashmi

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intakes of dietary iron and, in particular, heme iron may increase breast cancer risk because of the prooxidant properties of iron. However, few studies have examined the association of iron and heme-iron intakes with breast cancer risk. Objective: We assessed the association of intakes of dietary iron and heme iron with risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Design: We used data from the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study to assess intakes of total dietary iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron in relation to breast cancer risk in 116,674 postmenopausal women who completed a detailed questionnaire regarding meat preparation methods and degrees of doneness. During 6.5 y of follow-up, 3396 cases of invasive breast cancer were identified. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. Results: After adjustment for covariates, HRs for the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of intakes of total iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron were all close to unity, and there were no increasing trends with increasing intakes. The multivariable-adjusted HR for the highest compared with the lowest quintile of heme-iron intake was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.14; P for trend = 0.97). In addition, no associations were seen when iron variables were stratified by possible effect modifiers or hormone receptor status. Conclusion: The results of this large cohort study do not support an association between iron or heme-iron intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer. PMID:20962158

  13. Intakes of dietary iron and heme-iron and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Cross, Amanda J; Park, Yikyung; Schatzkin, Arthur; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Rohan, Thomas E; Sinha, Rashmi

    2010-12-01

    Intakes of dietary iron and, in particular, heme iron may increase breast cancer risk because of the prooxidant properties of iron. However, few studies have examined the association of iron and heme-iron intakes with breast cancer risk. We assessed the association of intakes of dietary iron and heme iron with risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. We used data from the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study to assess intakes of total dietary iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron in relation to breast cancer risk in 116,674 postmenopausal women who completed a detailed questionnaire regarding meat preparation methods and degrees of doneness. During 6.5 y of follow-up, 3396 cases of invasive breast cancer were identified. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. After adjustment for covariates, HRs for the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of intakes of total iron, iron from meat, iron from red meat, and heme iron were all close to unity, and there were no increasing trends with increasing intakes. The multivariable-adjusted HR for the highest compared with the lowest quintile of heme-iron intake was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.14; P for trend = 0.97). In addition, no associations were seen when iron variables were stratified by possible effect modifiers or hormone receptor status. The results of this large cohort study do not support an association between iron or heme-iron intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer.

  14. Identification of iron and heme utilization genes in Aeromonas and their role in the colonization of the leech digestive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Michele; LeVarge, Barbara L; Graf, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    It is known that many pathogens produce high-affinity iron uptake systems like siderophores and/or proteins for utilizing iron bound to heme-containing molecules, which facilitate iron-acquisition inside a host. In mutualistic digestive-tract associations, iron uptake systems have not been as well studied. We investigated the importance of two iron utilization systems within the beneficial digestive-tract association Aeromonas veronii and the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana. Siderophores were detected in A. veronii using chrome azurol S. Using a mini Tn5, a transposon insertion in viuB generated a mutant unable to utilize iron using siderophores. The A. veronii genome was then searched for genes potentially involved in iron utilization bound to heme-containing molecules. A putative outer membrane heme receptor (hgpB) was identified with a transcriptional activator, termed hgpR, downstream. The hgpB gene was interrupted with an antibiotic resistance cassette in both the parent strain and the viuB mutant, yielding an hgpB mutant and a mutant with both iron uptake systems inactivated. In vitro assays indicated that hgpB is involved in utilizing iron bound to heme and that both iron utilization systems are important for A. veronii to grow in blood. In vivo colonization assays revealed that the ability to acquire iron from heme-containing molecules is critical for A. veronii to colonize the leech gut. Since iron and specifically heme utilization is important in this mutualistic relationship and has a potential role in virulence factor of other organisms, genomes from different Aeromonas strains (both clinical and environmental) were queried with iron utilization genes of A. veronii. This analysis revealed that in contrast to the siderophore utilization genes heme utilization genes are widely distributed among aeromonads. The importance of heme utilization in the colonization of the leech further confirms that symbiotic and pathogenic relationships possess similar

  15. TonB-dependent heme iron acquisition in the tsetse fly symbiont Sodalis glossinidius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrusa, Gili; Farmer, William; Weiss, Brian L; Applebaum, Taylor; Roma, Jose Santinni; Szeto, Lauren; Aksoy, Serap; Runyen-Janecky, Laura J

    2015-04-01

    Sodalis glossinidius is an intra- and extracellular symbiont of the tsetse fly (Glossina sp.), which feeds exclusively on vertebrate blood. S. glossinidius resides in a wide variety of tsetse tissues and may encounter environments that differ dramatically in iron content. The Sodalis chromosome encodes a putative TonB-dependent outer membrane heme transporter (HemR) and a putative periplasmic/inner membrane ABC heme permease system (HemTUV). Because these gene products mediate iron acquisition processes by other enteric bacteria, we characterized their regulation and physiological role in the Sodalis/tsetse system. Our results show that the hemR and tonB genes are expressed by S. glossinidius in the tsetse fly. Furthermore, transcription of hemR in Sodalis is repressed in a high-iron environment by the iron-responsive transcriptional regulator Fur. Expression of the S. glossinidius hemR and hemTUV genes in an Escherichia coli strain unable to use heme as an iron source stimulated growth in the presence of heme or hemoglobin as the sole iron source. This stimulation was dependent on the presence of either the E. coli or Sodalis tonB gene. Sodalis tonB and hemR mutant strains were defective in their ability to colonize the gut of tsetse flies that lacked endogenous symbionts, while wild-type S. glossinidius proliferated in this same environment. Finally, we show that the Sodalis HemR protein is localized to the bacterial membrane and appears to bind hemin. Collectively, this study provides strong evidence that TonB-dependent, HemR-mediated iron acquisition is important for the maintenance of symbiont homeostasis in the tsetse fly, and it provides evidence for the expression of bacterial high-affinity iron acquisition genes in insect symbionts. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Crystal structure of the heme-IsdC complex, the central conduit of the Isd iron/heme uptake system in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Katherine H; Schneider, Sabine; Cockayne, Alan; Paoli, Max

    2007-04-06

    Pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus require iron to survive and have evolved specialized proteins to steal heme from their host. IsdC is the central conduit of the Isd (iron-regulated surface determinant) multicomponent heme uptake machinery; staphylococcal cell-surface proteins such as IsdA, IsdB, and IsdH are thought to funnel their molecular cargo to IsdC, which then mediates the transfer of the iron-containing nutrient to the membrane translocation system IsdDEF. The structure of the heme-IsdC complex reveals a novel heme site within an immunoglobulin-like domain and sheds light on its binding mechanism. The folding topology is reminiscent of the architecture of cytochrome f, cellobiose dehydrogenase, and ethylbenzene dehydrogenase; in these three proteins, the heme is bound in an equivalent position, but interestingly, IsdC features a distinct binding pocket with the ligand located next to the hydrophobic core of the beta-sandwich. The iron is coordinated with a tyrosine surrounded by several non-polar side chains that cluster into a tightly packed proximal side. On the other hand, the distal side is relatively exposed with a short helical peptide segment that acts as a lip clasping onto almost half of the porphyrin plane. This structural feature is argued to play a role in the mechanism of binding and release by switching to an open conformation and thus loosening the interactions holding the heme. The structure of the heme-IsdC complex provides a template for the understanding of other proteins, such as IsdA, IsdB, and IsdH, that contain the same heme-binding module as IsdC, known as the NEAT (near transporter) domain.

  17. Identification of Iron and Heme Utilization Genes in Aeromonas and their Role in the Colonization of the Leech Digestive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eMaltz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It is known that many pathogens produce high-affinity iron uptake systems like siderophores and/or genes for utilizing iron bound to heme-containing molecules, which facilitate iron-acquisition inside a host. In mutualistic digestive-tract associations, iron uptake systems have not been as well studied. We investigated the importance of two iron utilization systems within the beneficial digestive-tract association Aeromonas veronii and the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana. Siderophores were detected in A. veronii using chrome azurol S. Using a mTn5, a transposon insertion in viuB generated a mutant unable to acquire iron using siderophores. The A. veronii genome was then searched for genes potentially involved in iron utilization bound to heme-containing molecules. A putative outer membrane heme receptor (hgpB was identified with a transcriptional activator, termed hgpR, downstream. The hgpB gene was interrupted in both the parent strain and the viuB mutant with an antibiotic resistance cassette, yielding a hgpB mutant and a mutant with both iron uptake systems inactivated. In vitro assays indicated that hgpB is involved in utilizing iron bound to heme and that both iron utilization systems are important for A. veronii to grow in blood. In vivo colonization assays revealed that the ability to acquire iron from heme-containing molecules is critical for A.veronii to colonize the leech gut. Since iron and specifically heme utilization is important in this mutualistic relationship and has a role as a possible virulence factor in other organisms, genomes from different Aeromonas strains (both clinical and environmental were queried with iron utilization genes of A. veronii. This analysis revealed the heme utilization genes are widely distributed among aeromonads. In addition, aeromonads posses a suite of genes involved in iron acquisition. These data further confirm symbiotic and pathogenic relationships possess similar mechanisms for interacting with

  18. A central role for heme iron in colon carcinogenesis associated with red meat intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastide, Nadia M; Chenni, Fatima; Audebert, Marc; Santarelli, Raphaelle L; Taché, Sylviane; Naud, Nathalie; Baradat, Maryse; Jouanin, Isabelle; Surya, Reggie; Hobbs, Ditte A; Kuhnle, Gunter G; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Gueraud, Françoise; Corpet, Denis E; Pierre, Fabrice H F

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiology shows that red and processed meat intake is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Heme iron, heterocyclic amines, and endogenous N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are proposed to explain this effect, but their relative contribution is unknown. Our study aimed at determining, at nutritional doses, which is the main factor involved and proposing a mechanism of cancer promotion by red meat. The relative part of heme iron (1% in diet), heterocyclic amines (PhIP + MeIQx, 50 + 25 μg/kg in diet), and NOC (induced by NaNO₂+ NaNO₂; 0.17 + 0.23 g/L of drinking water) was determined by a factorial design and preneoplastic endpoints in chemically induced rats and validated on tumors in Min mice. The molecular mechanisms (genotoxicity, cytotoxicity) were analyzed in vitro in normal and Apc-deficient cell lines and confirmed on colon mucosa. Heme iron increased the number of preneoplastic lesions, but dietary heterocyclic amines and NOC had no effect on carcinogenesis in rats. Dietary hemoglobin increased tumor load in Min mice (control diet: 67 ± 39 mm²; 2.5% hemoglobin diet: 114 ± 47 mm², P = 0.004). In vitro, fecal water from rats given hemoglobin was rich in aldehydes and was cytotoxic to normal cells, but not to premalignant cells. The aldehydes 4-hydroxynonenal and 4-hydroxyhexenal were more toxic to normal versus mutated cells and were only genotoxic to normal cells. Genotoxicity was also observed in colon mucosa of mice given hemoglobin. These results highlight the role of heme iron in the promotion of colon cancer by red meat and suggest that heme iron could initiate carcinogenesis through lipid peroxidation. .

  19. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus FepA and FepB proteins drive heme iron utilization in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlin, Evelyne; Débarbouillé, Michel; Augustyniak, Katarzyna; Gilles, Anne-Marie; Wandersman, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    EfeUOB-like tripartite systems are widespread in bacteria and in many cases they are encoded by genes organized into iron-regulated operons. They consist of: EfeU, a protein similar to the yeast iron permease Ftrp1; EfeO, an extracytoplasmic protein of unknown function and EfeB, also an extracytoplasmic protein with heme peroxidase activity, belonging to the DyP family. Many bacterial EfeUOB systems have been implicated in iron uptake, but a prefential iron source remains undetermined. Nevertheless, in the case of Escherichia coli, the EfeUOB system has been shown to recognize heme and to allow extracytoplasmic heme iron extraction via a deferrochelation reaction. Given the high level of sequence conservations between EfeUOB orthologs, we hypothesized that heme might be the physiological iron substrate for the other orthologous systems. To test this hypothesis, we undertook characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus FepABC system. Results presented here indicate: i) that the S. aureus FepB protein binds both heme and PPIX with high affinity, like EfeB, the E. coli ortholog; ii) that it has low peroxidase activity, comparable to that of EfeB; iii) that both FepA and FepB drive heme iron utilization, and both are required for this activity and iv) that the E. coli FepA ortholog (EfeO) cannot replace FepA in FepB-driven iron release from heme indicating protein specificity in these activities. Our results show that the function in heme iron extraction is conserved in the two orthologous systems.

  1. Use of Heme Compounds as Iron Sources by Pathogenic Neisseriae Requires the Product of the hemO Gene

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Heme compounds are an important source of iron for neisseriae. We have identified a neisserial gene, hemO, that is essential for heme, hemoglobin (Hb), and haptoglobin-Hb utilization. The hemO gene is located 178 bp upstream of the hmbR Hb receptor gene in Neisseria meningitidis isolates. The product of the hemO gene is homologous to enzymes that degrade heme; 21% of its amino acid residues are identical, and 44% are similar, to those of the human heme oxygenase-1. DNA sequences homologous to...

  2. Heme Iron Content in Lamb Meat Is Differentially Altered upon Boiling, Grilling, or Frying as Assessed by Four Distinct Analytical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azin Pourkhalili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lamb meat is regarded as an important source of highly bioavailable iron (heme iron in the Iranians diet. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of traditional cooking methods on the iron changes in lamb meat. Four published experimental methods for the determination of heme iron were assessed analytically and statistically. Samples were selected from lambs' loin. Standard methods (AOAC were used for proximate analysis. For measuring heme iron, the results of four experimental methods were compared regarding their compliance to Ferrozine method which was used for the determination of nonheme iron. Among three cooking methods, the lowest total iron and heme iron were found in boiling method. The heme iron proportions to the total iron in raw, boiled lamb meat and grilled, were counted as 65.70%, 67.75%, and 76.01%, receptively. Measuring the heme iron, the comparison of the methods in use showed that the method in which heme extraction solution was composed of 90% acetone, 18% water, and 2% hydrochloric acid was more appropriate and more correlated with the heme iron content calculated by the difference between total iron and nonheme iron.

  3. Heme iron uptake by Caco-2 cells is a saturable, temperature sensitive and modulated by extracellular pH and potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Miguel; Kloosterman, Janneke; Núñez, Sergio; Segovia, Fabián; Candia, Valeria; Flores, Sebastián; Le Blanc, Solange; Olivares, Manuel; Pizarro, Fernando

    2008-11-01

    It is known that heme iron and inorganic iron are absorbed differently. Heme iron is found in the diet mainly in the form of hemoglobin and myoglobin. The mechanism of iron absorption remains uncertain. This study focused on the heme iron uptake by Caco-2 cells from a hemoglobin digest and its response to different iron concentrations. We studied the intracellular Fe concentration and the effect of time, K+ depletion, and cytosol acidification on apical uptake and transepithelial transport in cells incubated with different heme Fe concentrations. Cells incubated with hemoglobin-digest showed a lower intracellular Fe concentration than cells grown with inorganic Fe. However, uptake and transepithelial transport of Fe was higher in cells incubated with heme Fe. Heme Fe uptake had a low Vmax and Km as compared to inorganic Fe uptake and did not compete with non-heme Fe uptake. Heme Fe uptake was inhibited in cells exposed to K+ depletion or cytosol acidification. Heme oxygenase 1 expression increased and DMT1 expression decreased with higher heme Fe concentrations in the media. The uptake of heme iron is a saturable and temperature-dependent process and, therefore, could occur through a mechanism involving both a receptor and the endocytic pathway.

  4. Catalytic effect of free iron ions and heme-iron on chromophore oxidation of a polyene antibiotic amphotericin B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czernel, Grzegorz; Typek, Rafał; Klimek, Katarzyna; Czuryło, Aleksandra; Dawidowicz, Andrzej L.; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2016-05-01

    Owing to the presence of a chromophore in the amphotericin B (AmB) structure, the molecule can undergo the oxidation process. In this research, AmB chromophore oxidation was catalysed by iron ions (iron(III) chloride (FeCl3), pH 2.5) and by heme-iron (methemoglobin (HbFe(III)), and hemin (heme-Fe(III)) at pH 7.0). Additionally, we compared oxidation processes induced by the aforementioned oxidizing agents with autoxidation by dioxygen (O2) naturally occurring in a sample. The effects of the interaction of the oxidizing agents with AmB were analysed using molecular spectroscopies (electronic absorption (UV-Vis), fluorescence) and LC-MS. The use of a 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) chelator facilitated unambiguous determination of the oxidative effect of free iron(III) ions (FeIII) in an acidic solution on the AmB molecules. Also, the changes in the spectra of fluorescence emission centred at ∼470 nm indicate iron-catalysed processes of AmB chromophore oxidation. Unexpectedly, we found a similar spectroscopic effect for AmB induced by methemoglobin and hemin at pH 7.0. Methemoglobin and hemin at a concentration of 8 × 10-7 M (physiological) significantly increases the rate of the processes of AmB chromophore oxidation relative to the process of autoxidation.

  5. The iron/heme regulated genes of Haemophilus influenzae: comparative transcriptional profiling as a tool to define the species core modulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus influenzae requires heme for aerobic growth and possesses multiple mechanisms to obtain this essential nutrient. Although an understanding of the heme acquisition mechanisms of H. influenzae is emerging, significant gaps in our knowledge remain. Unresolved issues include the identities of all genes exhibiting altered transcription in response to iron and heme availability, the fraction of such genes functioning in iron/heme acquisition, and the heterogeneity of this gene set among clinical isolates. Previously we utilized H. influenzae strain Rd KW20 to demonstrate the utility of transcriptional profiling in defining the genes exhibiting altered transcription in response to environmental iron and heme levels. The current study expands upon those observations by determining the iron/heme modulons of two clinical isolates, the type b isolate 10810 and the nontypeable isolate R2866. These data are used to begin to define the core iron/heme modulon of the species. Results Microarray studies were performed to compare gene expression on transition from iron/heme-restricted to iron/heme-replete conditions for each isolate. Of 1820 ORFs on the array corresponding to R2866 genes, 363 were significantly differentially expressed: 233 were maximally transcribed under iron/heme-replete conditions and 130 under iron/heme-restricted conditions. Of the 1883 ORFs representing genes of strain 10810, 353 were significantly differentially transcribed: 150 were preferentially transcribed under iron/heme-replete conditions and 203 under iron/heme-restricted conditions. Comparison of the data sets indicated that 163 genes exhibited similar regulation in both isolates and that 74 of these exhibited similar patterns of regulation in Rd KW20. These comprise the putative core iron/heme modulon. Conclusion This study provides evidence for a conserved core of H. influenzae genes the transcription of which is altered by the availability of

  6. Meat and heme iron intake and esophageal adenocarcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakszyn, Paula; Luján-Barroso, Leila; Agudo, Antonio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Molina, Esther; Sánchez, Ma José; Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Siersema, Peter D; Matiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Saieva, Calogero; Pala, Valeria; Vineis, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Bastide, Nadie; Travis, Ruth C; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Riboli, Elio; Murphy, Neil; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Valanou, Elissavet; Oikonomidou, Edespina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Johansen, Dorthe; Lindkvist, Björn; Johansson, Mattias; Duarte-Salles, Talita; Freisling, Heinz; Barricarte, Aurelio; Huerta, Jose Ma; Amiano, Pilar; Tjonneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Kuehn, Tilman; Grote, Verena; Boeing, Heiner; Peeters, Petra H M; González, Carlos A

    2013-12-01

    Although recent studies suggest that high intakes of meat and heme iron are risk factors for several types of cancer, studies in relation to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) are scarce. Previous results in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) based on a relatively small number of cases suggested a positive association between processed meat and EAC. In this study, we investigate the association between intake of different types of meats and heme iron intake and EAC risk in a larger number of cases from EPIC. The study included 481,419 individuals and 137 incident cases of EAC that occurred during an average of 11 years of follow-up. Dietary intake of meat (unprocessed/processed red and white meat) was assessed by validated center-specific questionnaires. Heme iron was calculated as a type-specific percentage of the total iron content in meat. After adjusting for relevant confounders, we observed a statistically significant positive association of EAC risk with heme iron and processed meat intake, with HR: 1.67, 95% CI: 1.05-2.68 and HR: 2.27, 95% CI:1.33-3.89, respectively, for comparison of the highest vs. lowest tertile of intake. Our results suggest a potential association between higher intakes of processed meat and heme iron and risk of EAC.

  7. Heme Iron Concentrate and Iron Sulfate Added to Chocolate Biscuits: Effects on Hematological Indices of Mexican Schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Gutiérrez, Adrián Guillermo; González-Rosendo, Guillermina; Pozo, Javier Polo; Villanueva-Sánchez, Javier

    2016-08-01

    Food fortification is one of the most effective strategies for increasing iron intake in the population. A simple blind trial was conducted to compare the effect of 2 forms of iron fortification and assess the changes in hemoglobin and iron status indices among preschool children from rural communities. Hemoglobin was evaluated in 47 children aged 3-6 years old. For 72 days (10-week period), children ate Nito biscuits. Thirteen pupils with elevated hemoglobin levels were assigned to the biscuit control group, and pupils with hemoglobin equal to 13.5 mg/dL or less were randomly allocated to consume fortified biscuits with a heme iron concentrate (n = 15) or iron sulfate (n = 19). Changes in hemoglobin, plasma ferritin, and other hematological indices were evaluated with analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measurements. Except mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations (+1.27 ± 2.25 g/dL), hematological indices increased significantly across the study: Mean corpuscular volume (+2.2 ± 1.0 f/dL), red blood cells (+0.30 ± 0.37 M/μL), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (+1.8 ± 1.74 pg), hemoglobin (+1.68 ± 0.91 g/dL), hematocrit (+3.43% ± 3.03%), and plasma ferritin (+18.38 ± 22.1 μg/L) were all p chocolate biscuits in the hemoglobin levels was higher than the control group (+1.1 ± 0.2 g/dL) but no difference was found between consumers of fortified biscuits with heme iron concentrate or iron sulfate (+1.9 ± 0.2 g/dL and +2.0 ± 0.2 g/dL, respectively). Heme iron concentrate and iron sulfate were equally effective in increasing Hb levels and hematological indices. Processed foods were shown to be an effective, valuable, and admissible intervention to prevent anemia in preschool children.

  8. Heme iron from meat and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis and a review of the mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastide, Nadia M; Pierre, Fabrice H F; Corpet, Denis E

    2011-02-01

    Red meat and processed meat intake is associated with a risk of colorectal cancer, a major cause of death in affluent countries. Epidemiological and experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that heme iron present in meat promotes colorectal cancer. This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies of colon cancer reporting heme intake included 566,607 individuals and 4,734 cases of colon cancer. The relative risk of colon cancer was 1.18 (95% CI: 1.06-1.32) for subjects in the highest category of heme iron intake compared with those in the lowest category. Epidemiological data thus show a suggestive association between dietary heme and risk of colon cancer. The analysis of experimental studies in rats with chemically-induced colon cancer showed that dietary hemoglobin and red meat consistently promote aberrant crypt foci, a putative precancer lesion. The mechanism is not known, but heme iron has a catalytic effect on (i) the endogenous formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds and (ii) the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic aldehydes by lipoperoxidation. A review of evidence supporting these hypotheses suggests that both pathways are involved in heme iron toxicity.

  9. Iminoguanidines as Allosteric Inhibitors of the Iron-Regulated Heme Oxygenase (HemO) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic targets are required to combat multidrug resistant infections, such as the iron-regulated heme oxygenase (HemO) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, due to links between iron and virulence and dependence on heme as an iron source during infection. Herein we report the synthesis and activity of a series of iminoguanidine-based inhibitors of HemO. Compound 23 showed a binding affinity of 5.7 µM and an MIC50 of 52.3 µg/mL against P. aeruginosa PAO1. An in cellulo activity assay was develop...

  10. Dioxygen activation by a non-heme iron(II) complex: formation of an iron(IV)-oxo complex via C-H activation by a putative iron(III)-superoxo species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Min; Hong, Seungwoo; Morimoto, Yuma; Shin, Woonsup; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2010-08-11

    Iron(III)-superoxo intermediates are believed to play key roles in oxygenation reactions by non-heme iron enzymes. We now report that a non-heme iron(II) complex activates O(2) and generates its corresponding iron(IV)-oxo complex in the presence of substrates with weak C-H bonds (e.g., olefins and alkylaromatic compounds). We propose that a putative iron(III)-superoxo intermediate initiates the O(2)-activation chemistry by abstracting a H atom from the substrate, with subsequent generation of a high-valent iron(IV)-oxo intermediate from the resulting iron(III)-hydroperoxo species.

  11. Heme iron from meat and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis and a review of the mechanisms involved

    OpenAIRE

    Bastide, Nadia; Pierre, Fabrice; Corpet, Denis E

    2011-01-01

    accepted 2 dec 2010; International audience; Red meat and processed meat intake is associated with a risk of colorectal cancer, a major cause of death in affluent countries. Epidemiological and experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that heme iron present in meat promotes colorectal cancer. This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies of colon cancer reporting heme intake included 566,607 individuals and 4,734 cases of colon cancer. The summary relative risk of colon cancer was 1.1...

  12. Melatonin prevents myeloperoxidase heme destruction and the generation of free iron mediated by self-generated hypochlorous acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Shaeib

    Full Text Available Myeloperoxidase (MPO generated hypochlorous acid (HOCl formed during catalysis is able to destroy the MPO heme moiety through a feedback mechanism, resulting in the accumulation of free iron. Here we show that the presence of melatonin (MLT can prevent HOCl-mediated MPO heme destruction using a combination of UV-visible photometry, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-specific electrode, and ferrozine assay techniques. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis showed that MPO heme protection was at the expense of MLT oxidation. The full protection of the MPO heme requires the presence of a 1:2 MLT to H2O2 ratio. Melatonin prevents HOCl-mediated MPO heme destruction through multiple pathways. These include competition with chloride, the natural co-substrate; switching the MPO activity from a two electron oxidation to a one electron pathway causing the buildup of the inactive Compound II, and its subsequent decay to MPO-Fe(III instead of generating HOCl; binding to MPO above the heme iron, thereby preventing the access of H2O2 to the catalytic site of the enzyme; and direct scavenging of HOCl. Collectively, in addition to acting as an antioxidant and MPO inhibitor, MLT can exert its protective effect by preventing the release of free iron mediated by self-generated HOCl. Our work may establish a direct mechanistic link by which MLT exerts its antioxidant protective effect in chronic inflammatory diseases with MPO elevation.

  13. Light-induced cytotoxicity after aminolevulinic acid treatment is mediated by heme and not by iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breusing, Nicolle; Grimm, Stefanie; Mvondo, Dagmar; Flaccus, Andrea; Biesalski, Hans Konrad; Grune, Tilman

    2010-04-02

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising antitumor treatment strategy. However, effectiveness of PDT is limited due to an initiation of rescue responses in tumor cells, including the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, the main sources of free radical production in PDT-induced oxidative stress are not clear. Here, human melanoma cells were loaded with the photosensitizer 5-aminolevulinic acid and exposed to non-thermal light of 420-800 nm at different doses. It was shown that inhibition of HO-1 activity by zinc protoporphyrin IX increased PDT-induced cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the cytotoxic effects were not diminished by the simultaneous application of the iron chelator desferrioxamine. Importantly, PDT together with non-toxic doses of hemin increased the number of dead cells. From these results can be concluded that heme but not iron act as the main source of free radicals in PDT treatment. This is supported by the fact that during PDT ferritin is readily up-regulated, able to bind excess iron formed by the HO-1 action. The combined treatment of photosensitizers with HO-1 inhibitors might increase the effectiveness of PDT in tumor treatment.

  14. Cryptococcus neoformans requires the ESCRT protein Vps23 for iron acquisition from heme, for capsule formation, and for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Cadieux, Brigitte; Chan, Vivienne; Liu, Victor; Kronstad, James

    2013-01-01

    Iron availability is a key regulator of virulence factor elaboration in Cryptococcus neoformans, the causative agent of fungal meningoencephalitis in HIV/AIDS patients. In addition, iron is an essential nutrient for pathogen proliferation in mammalian hosts but little is known about the mechanisms of iron sensing and uptake in fungal pathogens that attack humans. In this study, we mutagenized C. neoformans by Agrobacterium-mediated T-DNA insertion and screened for mutants with reduced growth on heme as the sole iron source. Among 34 mutants, we identified a subset with insertions in the gene for the ESCRT-I (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) protein Vps23 that resulted in a growth defect on heme, presumably due to a defect in uptake via endocytosis or misregulation of iron acquisition from heme. Remarkably, vps23 mutants were also defective in the elaboration of the cell-associated capsular polysaccharide that is a major virulence factor, while overexpression of Vps23 resulted in cells with a slightly enlarged capsule. These phenotypes were mirrored by a virulence defect in the vps23 mutant in a mouse model of cryptococcosis and by hypervirulence of the overexpression strain. Overall, these results reveal an important role for trafficking via ESCRT functions in both heme uptake and capsule formation, and they further reinforce the connection between iron and virulence factor deployment in C. neoformans.

  15. Structural and Functional Models of Non-Heme Iron Enzymes : A Study of the 2-His-1-Carboxylate Facial Triad Structural Motif

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnincx, P.C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The structural and functional modeling of a specific group of non-heme iron enzymes by the synthesis of small synthetic analogues is the topic of this thesis. The group of non-heme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad has recently been established as a common platform for the

  16. Structural and Functional Models of Non-Heme Iron Enzymes : A Study of the 2-His-1-Carboxylate Facial Triad Structural Motif

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnincx, P.C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The structural and functional modeling of a specific group of non-heme iron enzymes by the synthesis of small synthetic analogues is the topic of this thesis. The group of non-heme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad has recently been established as a common platform for the activ

  17. Alterações provocadas pela irradiação e armazenamento nos teores de ferro heme em carne de frango Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Régia Marques de Souza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudos sobre o efeito da irradiação e do armazenamento em carnes de frango foram realizados para se conhecer melhor sua influência nos teores de ferro heme, não-heme, cor e pigmentos totais. Foram estudados coxa e filé de peito de frango. Estes foram irradiados a 0, 1 e 2 kGy e armazenados por 14 dias a 4 °C em câmara refrigerada. A determinação do conteúdo de heme e não-heme de carnes foi realizada através do método colorimétrico, empregando-se o reagente Ferrozine. Os valores de ferro heme foram influenciados tanto pela irradiação quanto pelo armazenamento, diminuindo seus teores com o passar do tempo. O ferro não-heme também foi influenciado tanto pelas doses empregadas quanto pelo tempo de estocagem, porém aumentou seus valores com o passar do tempo, devido à conversão do heme em não-heme. A cor não se mostrou influenciada pelas doses estudadas, somente pela estocagem, e os pigmentos totais foram afetados tanto pela irradiação quanto pelo tempo, diminuindo seus valores com o aumento do tempo de armazenamento. A irradiação se mostrou um bom método para conservação do ferro, visto que aumentou os teores de acordo com o aumento das doses.Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 °C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses

  18. Effects of illumination and packaging on non-heme iron and color attributes of sliced ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Li, C B; Xu, X L; Zhou, G H

    2012-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of illumination and packaging on color of cooked cured sliced ham during refrigeration, and the possibility of decomposition of nitrosylheme under light and oxygen exposure. Three illumination levels and three packaging films with different oxygen transmission rates (OTRs) were used in two separate experiments during 35 days storage, and pH value, a* value, nitrosylheme, residual nitrite and non-heme iron were evaluated. Packaging OTRs had significant effects (P0.05) nitrosylheme concentration during storage. For both groups, storage time had a significant effect (Pheme iron in the packaging group were observed. Therefore, illumination level and packaging OTR had limited effects on overall pigment stability, but more discoloration and loss of redness occurred on the surface of products.

  19. Dietary intake of iron, heme-iron and magnesium and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Montes, Esther; Wark, Petra A; Sánchez, María-José; Norat, Teresa; Jakszyn, Paula; Luján-Barroso, Leila; Michaud, Dominique S; Crowe, Francesca; Allen, Naomi; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Adarakis, George; Katarachia, Helen; Skeie, Guri; Henningsen, Maria; Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild; Berrino, Franco; Tumino, Rosario; Palli, Domenico; Mattiello, Amalia; Vineis, Paolo; Amiano, Pilar; Barricarte, Aurelio; Huerta, José-María; Duell, Eric J; Quirós, José-Ramón; Ye, Weimin; Sund, Malin; Lindkvist, Björn; Johansen, Dorthe; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Roswall, Nina; Li, Kuanrong; Grote, Verena A; Steffen, Annika; Boeing, Heiner; Racine, Antoine; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Carbonnel, Franck; Peeters, Petra H M; Siersema, Peter D; Fedirko, Veronika; Jenab, Mazda; Riboli, Elio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas

    2012-10-01

    Several studies support a protective effect of dietary magnesium against type 2 diabetes, but a harmful effect for iron. As diabetes has been linked to pancreatic cancer, intake of these nutrients may be also associated with this cancer. We examined the association between dietary intake of magnesium, total iron and heme-iron and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In total, 142,203 men and 334,999 women, recruited between 1992 and 2000, were included. After an average follow-up of 11.3 years, 396 men and 469 women developed exocrine pancreatic cancer. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained using Cox regression stratified by age and center, and adjusted for energy intake, smoking status, height, weight, and self-reported diabetes status. Neither intake of magnesium, total iron nor heme-iron was associated with pancreatic cancer risk. In stratified analyses, a borderline inverse association was observed among overweight men (body mass index, ≥ 25 kg/m(2) ) with magnesium (HR(per 100 mg/day increase) = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.63-1.01) although this was less apparent using calibrated intake. In female smokers, a higher intake of heme-iron was associated with a higher pancreatic cancer risk (HR (per 1 mg/day increase) = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.10-1.74). After calibration, this risk increased significantly to 2.5-fold (95% CI = 1.22-5.28). Overall, dietary magnesium, total iron and heme-iron were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk during the follow-up period. Our observation that heme-iron was associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk in female smokers warrants replication in additional study populations.

  20. Macrophage preconditioning with synthetic malaria pigment reduces cytokine production via heme iron-dependent oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taramelli, D; Recalcati, S; Basilico, N; Olliaro, P; Cairo, G

    2000-12-01

    Hemozoin (malaria pigment), a polymer of hematin (ferri-protoporphyrin IX) derived from hemoglobin ingested by intraerythrocytic plasmodia, modulates cytokine production by phagocytes. Mouse peritoneal macrophages (PM) fed with synthetic beta-hematin (BH), structurally identical to native hemozoin, no longer produce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and nitric oxide (NO) in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Impairment of NO synthesis is due to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production. BH-mediated inhibition of PM functions cannot be ascribed to iron release from BH because neither prevention by iron chelators nor down-regulation of iron-regulatory protein activity was detected. Inhibition appears to be related to pigment-induced oxidative stress because (a) thiol compounds partially restored PM functions, (b) heme oxygenase (HO-1) and catalase mRNA levels were up-regulated, and (c) free radicals production increased in BH-treated cells. The antioxidant defenses of the cells determine the response to BH: microglia cells, which show a lower extent of induction of HO-1 and catalase mRNAs and lower accumulation of oxygen radicals, are less sensitive to the inhibitory effect of BH on cytokine production. Results indicate that BH is resistant to degradation by HO-1 and that heme-iron mediated oxidative stress may contribute to malaria-induced immunosuppression. This study may help correlate the different clinical manifestations of malaria, ranging from uncomplicated to severe disease, with dysregulation of phagocyte functions and promote better therapeutic strategies to counteract the effects of hemozoin accumulation.

  1. Clinical Consequences of New Insights in the Pathophysiology of Disorders of Iron and Heme Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittenham, Gary M.; Weiss, Günter; Brissot, Pierre; Lainé, Fabrice; Guillygomarc'h, Anne; Guyader, Dominique; Moirand, Romain; Deugnier, Yves

    2000-01-01

    This review examines the clinical consequences for the practicing hematologist of remarkable new insights into the pathophysiology of disorders of iron and heme metabolism. The familiar proteins of iron transport and storage-transferrin, transferrin receptor, and ferritin-have recently been joined by a host of newly identified proteins that play critical roles in the molecular management of iron homeostasis. These include the iron-regulatory proteins (IRP-1 and -2), HFE (the product of the HFE gene that is mutated in most patients with hereditary hemochromatosis), the divalent metal transporter (DMT1), transferrin receptor 2, ceruloplasmin, hephaestin, the "Stimulator of Fe Transport" (SFT), frataxin, ferroportin 1 and others. The growing appreciation of the roles of these newly identified proteins has fundamental implications for the clinical understanding and laboratory evaluation of iron metabolism and its alterations with iron deficiency, iron overload, infection, and inflammation. In Section I, Dr. Brittenham summarizes current concepts of body and cellular iron supply and storage and reviews new means of evaluating the full range of body iron stores including genetic testing for mutations in the HFE gene, measurement of serum ferritin iron, transferrin receptor, reticulocyte hemoglobin content and measurement of tissue iron by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic susceptometry using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) instrumentation. In Section II, Dr. Weiss discusses the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying alterations in iron metabolism due to chronic inflammatory disorders. The anemia of chronic disorders remains the most common form of anemia found in hospitalized patients. The network of interactions that link iron metabolism with cellular immune effector functions involving pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, acute phase proteins and oxidative stress is described, with an emphasis on

  2. Pressure effects reveal that changes in the redox states of the heme iron complexes in the sensor domains of two heme-based oxygen sensor proteins, EcDOS and YddV, have profound effects on their flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzenbacher, Pavel; Marchal, Stéphane; Palacký, Jan; Anzenbacherová, Eva; Domaschke, Thomas; Lange, Reinhard; Shimizu, Toru; Kitanishi, Kenichi; Stranava, Martin; Stiborová, Marie; Martinkova, Marketa

    2014-12-01

    The catalytic activity of a heme-based oxygen sensor phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli (EcDOS) towards cyclic diGMP is regulated by the redox state of the heme iron complex in the enzyme's sensing domain and the association of external ligands with the iron center. Specifically, the Fe(II) complex is more active towards cyclic diGMP than the Fe(III) complex, and its activity is further enhanced by O2 or CO binding. In order to determine how the redox state and coordination of the heme iron atom regulate the catalytic activity of EcDOS, we investigated the flexibility of its isolated N-terminal heme-binding domain (EcDOS-heme) by monitoring its spectral properties at various hydrostatic pressures. The most active form of the heme-containing domain, i.e. the Fe(II)-CO complex, was found to be the least flexible. Conversely, the oxidized Fe(III) forms of EcDOS-heme and its mutants had relatively high flexibilities, which appeared to be linked to the low catalytic activity of the corresponding intact enzymes. These findings corroborate the suggestion, made on the basis of crystallographic data, that there is an inverse relationship between the flexibility of the heme-containing domain of EcDOS and its catalytic activity. The Fe(II)-CO form of the heme domain of a second heme-based oxygen sensor, diguanylate cyclase (YddV), was also found to be quite rigid. Interestingly, the incorporation of a water molecule into the heme complex of YddV caused by mutation of the Leu65 residue reduced the flexibility of this heme domain. Conversely, mutation of the Tyr43 residue increased its flexibility.

  3. Heme versus non-heme iron-nitroxyl {FeN(H)O}⁸ complexes: electronic structure and biologically relevant reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelman, Amy L; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2014-04-15

    Researchers have completed extensive studies on heme and non-heme iron-nitrosyl complexes, which are labeled {FeNO}(7) in the Enemark-Feltham notation, but they have had very limited success in producing corresponding, one-electron reduced, {FeNO}(8) complexes where a nitroxyl anion (NO(-)) is formally bound to an iron(II) center. These complexes, and their protonated iron(II)-NHO analogues, are proposed key intermediates in nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitric oxide (NO) reducing enzymes in bacteria and fungi. In addition, HNO is known to have a variety of physiological effects, most notably in the cardiovascular system. HNO may also serve as a signaling molecule in mammals. For these functions, iron-containing proteins may mediate the production of HNO and serve as receptors for HNO in vivo. In this Account, we highlight recent key advances in the preparation, spectroscopic characterization, and reactivity of ferrous heme and non-heme nitroxyl (NO(-)/HNO) complexes that have greatly enhanced our understanding of the potential biological roles of these species. Low-spin (ls) heme {FeNO}(7) complexes (S = 1/2) can be reversibly reduced to the corresponding {FeNO}(8) species, which are stable, diamagnetic compounds. Because the reduction is ligand (NO) centered in these cases, it occurs at extremely negative redox potentials that are at the edge of the biologically feasible range. Interestingly, the electronic structures of ls-{FeNO}(7) and ls-{FeNO}(8) species are strongly correlated with very similar frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and thermodynamically strong Fe-NO bonds. In contrast, high-spin (hs) non-heme {FeNO}(7) complexes (S = 3/2) can be reduced at relatively mild redox potentials. Here, the reduction is metal-centered and leads to a paramagnetic (S = 1) {FeNO}(8) complex. The increased electron density at the iron center in these species significantly decreases the covalency of the Fe-NO bond, making the reduced complexes highly reactive. In the absence of

  4. Enhancement of non-heme iron absorption by anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) muscle protein hydrolysate involves a nanoparticle-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haohao; Zhu, Suqin; Zeng, Mingyong; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Huang, Hai; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-08-27

    The mechanisms by which meat enhances human absorption of non-heme iron remain unknown. Recently, anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) muscle protein hydrolysate (AMPH) was found to mediate the formation of nanosized ferric hydrolysis products in vitro. The current paper evaluates the effects of AMPH on the bioavailability and the intestinal speciation of non-heme iron in rats, followed by an investigation of cellular uptake pathways of in vitro-formed AMPH-stabilized nanosized ferric hydrolysis products (ANPs) by polarized human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. The hemoglobin regeneration efficiencies in anemic rats followed the order ferric citrate (9.79 ± 2.02%) iron in the groups of FC+AMPH, FeSO4, and ANPs were significantly lower than the corresponding hemoglobin regeneration efficiencies (P iron in intestinal iron absorption from FC+AMPH, FeSO4, and ANPs. Calcein-fluorescence measurements of the labile iron pool of polarized Caco-2 cells revealed the involvement of both divalent transporter 1 and endocytosis in apical uptake of ANPs, with endocytosis dominating at acidic extracellular pH. Overall, AMPH enhancement of non-heme iron absorption involves a nanoparticle-mediated mechanism.

  5. Crystal Structure of the Non-heme Iron Dixoygenase PtlH in Pentalenolactone Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You,Z.; Omura, S.; Ikeda, H.; Cane, D.; Jogl, G.

    2007-01-01

    The non-heme iron dioxygenase PtlH from the soil organism Streptomyces avermitilis is a member of the iron(II)/{alpha}-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily and catalyzes an essential reaction in the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpenoid antibiotic pentalenolactone. To investigate the structural basis for substrate recognition and catalysis, we have determined the x-ray crystal structure of PtlH in several complexes with the cofactors iron, a-ketoglutarate, and the non-reactive enantiomer of the substrate, ent-1-deoxypentalenic acid, in four different crystal forms to up to 1.31 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure of PtlH forms a double-stranded barrel helix fold, and the cofactor-binding site for iron and a-ketoglutarate is similar to other double-stranded barrel helix fold enzymes. Additional secondary structure elements that contribute to the substrate-binding site in PtlH are not conserved in other double-stranded barrel helix fold enzymes. Binding of the substrate enantiomer induces a reorganization of the monoclinic crystal lattice leading to a disorder-order transition of a C-terminal {alpha}-helix. The newly formed helix blocks the major access to the active site and effectively traps the bound substrate. Kinetic analysis of wild type and site-directed mutant proteins confirms a critical function of two arginine residues in substrate binding, while simulated docking of the enzymatic reaction product reveals the likely orientation of bound substrate.

  6. Peroxo-Type Intermediates in Class I Ribonucleotide Reductase and Related Binuclear Non-Heme Iron Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Bell, Caleb B.; Clay, MIchael D.;

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a systematic study of chemically possible peroxo-type intermediates occurring in the non-heme di-iron enzyme class la ribonucleotide reductase, using spectroscopically calibrated computational chemistry. Density functional computations of equilibrium structures, Fe-O and O...... in carboxylate conformations occurring during the O-2 reaction of this class of non-heme iron enzymes. Our procedure identifies and characterizes various possible candidates for peroxo intermediates experimentally observed along the ribonucleotide reductase dioxygen activation reaction. The study explores how...... water or a proton can bind to the di-iron site of ribonucleotide reductase and facilitate changes that affect the electronic structure of the iron sites and activate the site for further reaction. Two potential reaction pathways are presented: one where water adds to Fe1 of the cis-mu-1,2 peroxo...

  7. Daily oral iron supplementation during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Dowswell, Therese; Viteri, Fernando E

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron and folic acid supplementation has been the preferred intervention to improve iron stores and prevent anaemia among pregnant women, and it may also improve other maternal and birth outcomes. Objectives To assess the effects of daily oral iron supplements for pregnant women, either alone or in conjunction with folic acid, or with other vitamins and minerals as a public health intervention. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (2 July 2012). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (2 July 2012) and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effects of oral preventive supplementation with daily iron, iron + folic acid or iron + other vitamins and minerals during pregnancy. Data collection and analysis We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. Main results We included 60 trials. Forty-three trials, involving more than 27,402 women, contributed data and compared the effects of daily oral supplements containing iron versus no iron or placebo. Overall, women taking iron supplements were less likely to have low birthweight newborns (below 2500 g) compared with controls (8.4% versus 10.2%, average risk ratio (RR) 0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68 to 0.97, 11 trials, 8480 women) and mean birthweight was 30.81 g greater for those infants whose mothers received iron during pregnancy (average mean difference (MD) 30.81; 95% CI 5.94 to 55.68, 14 trials, 9385 women). Preventive iron supplementation reduced the risk of maternal anaemia at term by 70% (RR 0.30; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.46, 14 trials, 2199 women) and iron deficiency at term by 57% (RR 0.43; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.66, seven trials, 1256 women

  8. A functional mimic of natural peroxidases : synthesis and catalytic activity of a non-heme iron/peptide hydroperoxide complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choma, Christin T.; Schudde, Ebe P.; Kellogg, Richard M.; Robillard, George T.; Feringa, Ben L.

    1998-01-01

    Site-selective attachment of unprotected peptides to a non-heme iron complex is achieved by displacing two halides on the catalyst by peptide caesium thiolates. This coupling approach should be compatible with any peptide sequence provided there is only a single reduced cysteine. The oxidation activ

  9. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of microcytic anemias due to genetic disorders of iron metabolism or heme synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, A.E.; Raymakers, R.A.P.; Vlasveld, L.T.; Barneveld, T. van; Terink, R.; Dors, N.; Brons, P.P.T.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Swinkels, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    During recent years, our understanding of the pathogenesis of inherited microcytic anemias has gained from the identification of several genes and proteins involved in systemic and cellular iron metabolism and heme syntheses. Numerous case reports illustrate that the implementation of these novel mo

  10. New insights into Alzheimer's disease amyloid inhibition: nanosized metallo-supramolecular complexes suppress aβ-induced biosynthesis of heme and iron uptake in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Zhao, Chuanqi; Duan, Taicheng; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-06-01

    Nanosized metallo-supramolecular compounds, [Ni2 L3 ](4+) and [Fe2 L3 ](4+) , can not only strongly inhibit Aβ aggregation but also reduce the peroxidase activity of Aβ-heme. Further studies demonstrate that through blocking the heme-binding site, these two compounds can suppress Aβ-induced biosynthesis of heme and iron uptake in PC12 cells. This work provides new insights into molecular mechanisms of Aβ inhibitors on Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity.

  11. Calcium does not inhibit the absorption of 5 milligrams of nonheme or heme iron at doses less than 800 milligrams in nonpregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán, Diego; Flores, Sebastián; Saavedra, Pía; Miranda, Constanza; Olivares, Manuel; Arredondo, Miguel; López de Romaña, Daniel; Lönnerdal, Bo; Pizarro, Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Calcium is the only known component in the diet that may affect absorption of both nonheme and heme iron. However, the evidence for a calcium effect on iron absorption mainly comes from studies that did not isolate the effect of calcium from that of other dietary components, because it was detected in single-meal studies. Our objective was to establish potential effects of calcium on absorption of nonheme and heme iron and the dose response for this effect in the absence of a meal. Fifty-four healthy, nonpregnant women were selected to participate in 4 iron absorption studies using iron radioactive tracers. We evaluated the effects of calcium doses between 200 and 1500 mg on absorption of 5 mg nonheme iron (as ferrous sulfate). We also evaluated the effects of calcium doses between 200 and 800 mg on absorption of 5 mg heme iron [as concentrated RBC (CRBC)]. Calcium was administered as calcium chloride in all studies and minerals were ingested on an empty stomach. Calcium doses ≥1000 mg diminished nonheme iron absorption by an average of 49.6%. A calcium dose of 800 mg diminished absorption of 5 mg heme iron by 37.7%. In conclusion, we demonstrated an isolated effect of calcium (as chloride) on absorption of 5 mg of iron provided as nonheme (as sulfate) and heme (as CRBC) iron. This effect was observed at doses higher than previously reported from single-meal studies, starting at ~800 mg of calcium.

  12. Acute Copper and Ascorbic Acid Supplementation Inhibits Non-heme Iron Absorption in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Manuel; Figueroa, Constanza; Pizarro, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the effect of copper (Cu) plus the reducing agent ascorbic acid (AA) on the absorption of non-heme iron (Fe). Experimental study with block design in which each subject was his own control. After signing an informed consent, 14 adult women using an effective method of contraception and negative pregnancy test received 0.5 mg Fe, as ferrous sulfate, alone or with Cu, as copper sulfate, plus ascorbic acid (AA/Cu 2/1 molar ratio) at 4/1; 6/1 and 8/1 Cu/Fe molar ratios as an aqueous solution on days 1, 2, 14, and 15 of the study. Fe absorption was assessed by erythrocyte incorporation of iron radioisotopes (55)Fe and (59)Fe. Geometric mean (range ± SD) absorption of Fe at 4/1 and 6/1 Cu/Fe molar ratios (and AA/Cu 2/1 molar ratio) and Fe alone was 57.4 % (35.7-92.1 %), 64.2 % (45.8-89.9 %), and 38.8 % (20.4-73.8 %), respectively (ANOVA for repeated measures p absorption; however, Fe absorption at Cu/Fe 8/1 molar ratio was 47.3 % (27.7-80.8) (p = NS compared with Fe alone). It was expected that Fe absorption would have been equal or greater than at 4/1 and 6/1 molar ratios. Copper in the presence of ascorbic acid inhibits non-heme Fe absorption at Cu/Fe 8/1 molar ratio.

  13. Intermittent oral iron supplementation during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Gomez Malave, Heber; Flores-Urrutia, Monica C; Dowswell, Therese

    2015-10-19

    iron regimen (with or without other vitamins and minerals) compared with a daily regimen there was no clear evidence of differences between groups for any infant primary outcomes: low birthweight (average risk ratio (RR) 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.55 to 1.22; participants = 1898; studies = eight; low quality evidence), infant birthweight (mean difference (MD) 5.13 g; 95% CI -29.46 to 39.72; participants = 1939; studies = nine; low quality evidence), premature birth (average RR 1.03; 95% CI 0.76 to 1.39; participants = 1177; studies = five; low quality evidence), or neonatal death (average RR 0.49; 95% CI 0.04 to 5.42; participants = 795; studies = one; very low quality). None of the studies reported congenital anomalies.For maternal outcomes, there was no clear evidence of differences between groups for anaemia at term (average RR 1.22; 95% CI 0.84 to 1.80; participants = 676; studies = four; I² = 10%; very low quality). Women receiving intermittent supplementation had fewer side effects (average RR 0.56; 95% CI 0.37 to 0.84; participants = 1777; studies = 11; I² = 87%; very low quality) and were at lower risk of having high haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations (greater than 130 g/L) during the second or third trimester of pregnancy (average RR 0.53; 95% CI 0.38 to 0.74; participants = 2616; studies = 15; I² = 52%; (this was not a primary outcome)) compared with women receiving daily supplements. There were no significant differences in iron-deficiency anaemia at term between women receiving intermittent or daily iron + folic acid supplementation (average RR 0.71; 95% CI 0.08 to 6.63; participants = 156; studies = one). There were no maternal deaths (six studies) or women with severe anaemia in pregnancy (six studies). None of the studies reported on iron deficiency at term or infections during pregnancy.Most of the studies included in the review (14/21 contributing data) compared intermittent oral iron + folic acid supplementation compared with daily oral iron

  14. 4-Nitrocatechol as a colorimetric probe for non-heme iron dioxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, C A

    1975-03-10

    4-Nitrocatechol is examined as an active site probe for non-heme iron dioxygenases and found to be of value, particularly with those containing iron in the Fe(II) oxidation state. 4-Nitrocatechol is astrong competitive inhibitor of substrate oxygenation by protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase, forming a reversible complex with this enzyme, and by pyrocatechase. The number of binding sites per enzyme molecule titrated spectrophotometrically with 4-nitrocatechol agrees with results from previous studies with either the principal substrate or other analogues, as expected of an effective probe. Despite these facts and the observation that both enzymes cleave the same substrates at the same carbon-carbon bond, the optical and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of their 4-nitrocatechol complexes are remarkably different. The 4-nitocatechol-protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase optical spectra resemble that of the 4-nitrocatecholate ion shifted 20 to 30 nm to longer wavelength. Concomitant with this change the EPR signal centered at g equal 4.28 shows increased rhombicity (g values at 4.74, 4.28, and 3.74). In contrast, the spectrum of the 4-nitrocatechol-pyrocatechase complex has a maximum at the same wavelength as that of a 1:1 solution of free Fe(II) and 4-nitrocatechol in the absence of enzyme after titration of the catecholic protons with base and the g equal 4.28 EPR signal is not resolved at liquid N-2 temperature. These changes are interpreted as resulting in part from a pronounced change in the ligand fields about the irons at the active sites which in the case of protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase leads to enzyme inactivation. The results also are the first indication that substrate analogues change their ionization form upon complexation with Fe (III) dioxygenases. The interaction of the probe with metapyrocatechase, an Fe(III) containing dioxygenase, and with several additional oxygenases and hydroperoxidases is also briefly examined. The probe is not specific

  15. Interaction between Non-Heme Iron of Lipoxygenases and Cumene Hydroperoxide: Basis for Enzyme Activation, Inactivation, and Inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeshir; Brault, Pierre-Alexandre; Shah, Priya; Kim, Yong-Wah; Dunham, William R.; Funk, Jr., Max O. (Toledo)

    2010-11-16

    Lipoxygenase catalysis depends in a critical fashion on the redox properties of a unique mononuclear non-heme iron cofactor. The isolated enzyme contains predominantly, if not exclusively, iron(II), but the catalytically active form of the enzyme has iron(III). The activating oxidation of the iron takes place in a reaction with the hydroperoxide product of the catalyzed reaction. In a second peroxide-dependent process, lipoxygenases are also inactivated. To examine the redox activation/inactivation dichotomy in lipoxygenase chemistry, the interaction between lipoxygenase-1 (and -3) and cumene hydroperoxide was investigated. Cumene hydroperoxide was a reversible inhibitor of the reaction catalyzed by lipoxygenase-1 under standard assay conditions at high substrate concentrations. Reconciliation of the data with the currently held kinetic mechanism requires simultaneous binding of substrate and peroxide. The enzyme also was both oxidized and largely inactivated in a reaction with the peroxide in the absence of substrate. The consequences of this reaction for the enzyme included the hydroxylation at C{beta} of two amino acid side chains in the vicinity of the cofactor, Trp and Leu. The modifications were identified by mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. The peroxide-induced oxidation of iron was also accompanied by a subtle rearrangement in the coordination sphere of the non-heme iron atom. Since the enzyme retains catalytic activity, albeit diminished, after treatment with cumene hydroperoxide, the structure of the iron site may reflect the catalytically relevant form of the cofactor.

  16. Interaction between non-heme iron of lipoxygenases and cumene hydroperoxide: basis for enzyme activation, inactivation, and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeshir; Brault, Pierre-Alexandre; Shah, Priya; Kim, Yong-Wah; Dunham, William R; Funk, Max O

    2004-02-25

    Lipoxygenase catalysis depends in a critical fashion on the redox properties of a unique mononuclear non-heme iron cofactor. The isolated enzyme contains predominantly, if not exclusively, iron(II), but the catalytically active form of the enzyme has iron(III). The activating oxidation of the iron takes place in a reaction with the hydroperoxide product of the catalyzed reaction. In a second peroxide-dependent process, lipoxygenases are also inactivated. To examine the redox activation/inactivation dichotomy in lipoxygenase chemistry, the interaction between lipoxygenase-1 (and -3) and cumene hydroperoxide was investigated. Cumene hydroperoxide was a reversible inhibitor of the reaction catalyzed by lipoxygenase-1 under standard assay conditions at high substrate concentrations. Reconciliation of the data with the currently held kinetic mechanism requires simultaneous binding of substrate and peroxide. The enzyme also was both oxidized and largely inactivated in a reaction with the peroxide in the absence of substrate. The consequences of this reaction for the enzyme included the hydroxylation at C beta of two amino acid side chains in the vicinity of the cofactor, Trp and Leu. The modifications were identified by mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. The peroxide-induced oxidation of iron was also accompanied by a subtle rearrangement in the coordination sphere of the non-heme iron atom. Since the enzyme retains catalytic activity, albeit diminished, after treatment with cumene hydroperoxide, the structure of the iron site may reflect the catalytically relevant form of the cofactor.

  17. Go it alone: four-electron oxidations by mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Spencer C; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2017-04-01

    This review discusses the current mechanistic understanding of a group of mononuclear non-heme iron-dependent enzymes that catalyze four-electron oxidation of their organic substrates without the use of any cofactors or cosubstrates. One set of enzymes acts on α-ketoacid-containing substrates, coupling decarboxylation to oxygen activation. This group includes 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, 4-hydroxymandelate synthase, and CloR involved in clorobiocin biosynthesis. A second set of enzymes acts on substrates containing a thiol group that coordinates to the iron. This group is comprised of isopenicillin N synthase, thiol dioxygenases, and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of ergothioneine and ovothiol. The final group of enzymes includes HEPD and MPnS that both carry out the oxidative cleavage of the carbon-carbon bond of 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate but generate different products. Commonalities amongst many of these enzymes are discussed and include the initial substrate oxidation by a ferric-superoxo-intermediate and a second oxidation by a ferryl species.

  18. Comparative study of oral iron and intravenous iron sucrose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva Garg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of iron sucrose with oral iron in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia of pregnancy. Methods: An interventional comparative study was conducted at Jhalawar Medical College, Jhalawar involving 80 pregnant women with iron deficiency anemia from March 2016 to August 2016. Inclusion criteria were gestational age between 24-32 weeks with established iron deficiency anemia, with hemoglobin between 7-10g/dl. Target Hemoglobin was 11 g/dl. In intravenous iron sucrose group iron sucrose dose was calculated from following formula: total iron dose required (mg = 2.4 x body weight in Kg x (target Hb – Patient’s Hb g/dl + 500. In oral iron, group patient received ferrous-sulphate 335 mg daily BD. Hb level were reviewed at 2, 4, 6 weeks. Results: Change in Hemoglobin level from baseline significantly higher in IV iron group than oral iron group. In IV iron, group mean value of baseline Hb was 8.07±0.610 g/dl and in oral iron group was 8.48±0.741 g/dl. At the end of 6-week mean hemoglobin in IV iron sucrose was 10.66±0.743 g/dl and in oral iron group was 10.08±0.860 g/dl. Conclusions: Intravenous iron sucrose elevates more Hb than oral iron, with less adverse effects.

  19. Iron Metabolism Regulates p53 Signaling through Direct Heme-p53 Interaction and Modulation of p53 Localization, Stability, and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Shen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron excess is closely associated with tumorigenesis in multiple types of human cancers, with underlying mechanisms yet unclear. Recently, iron deprivation has emerged as a major strategy for chemotherapy, but it exerts tumor suppression only on select human malignancies. Here, we report that the tumor suppressor protein p53 is downregulated during iron excess. Strikingly, the iron polyporphyrin heme binds to p53 protein, interferes with p53-DNA interactions, and triggers both nuclear export and cytosolic degradation of p53. Moreover, in a tumorigenicity assay, iron deprivation suppressed wild-type p53-dependent tumor growth, suggesting that upregulation of wild-type p53 signaling underlies the selective efficacy of iron deprivation. Our findings thus identify a direct link between iron/heme homeostasis and the regulation of p53 signaling, which not only provides mechanistic insights into iron-excess-associated tumorigenesis but may also help predict and improve outcomes in iron-deprivation-based chemotherapy.

  20. Non-heme iron complexes for stereoselective oxidation : Tuning of the selectivity in dihydroxylation using different solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopstra, Marten; Roelfes, Gerard; Hage, R; Kellogg, Richard M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2004-01-01

    A new class of functional models for non-heme iron-based dioxygenases, including [(N3Py-Me)Fe(CH3CN)(2)](ClO4)(2) and [(N3Py-Bn)Fe(CH3CN)(2)](ClO4)(2) {N3Py-Me = [di(2-pyridyl)methyl]methyl(2-pyridyl)methylamine; N3Py-Bn = [di(2-pyridyl)methyl]benzyl(2-pyridyl)methylamine}, is presented here. NMR, U

  1. Daily oral iron supplementation during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Garcia-Casal, Maria N; Dowswell, Therese

    2015-07-22

    Iron and folic acid supplementation has been the preferred intervention to improve iron stores and prevent anaemia among pregnant women, and it is thought to improve other maternal and birth outcomes. To assess the effects of daily oral iron supplements for pregnant women, either alone or in conjunction with folic acid, or with other vitamins and minerals as a public health intervention in antenatal care. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (10 January 2015). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (26 February 2015) and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies (26 February 2015) . Randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effects of oral preventive supplementation with daily iron, iron + folic acid or iron + other vitamins and minerals during pregnancy. We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of the evidence for primary outcomes.We anticipated high heterogeneity among trials and we pooled trial results using a random-effects model and were cautious in our interpretation of the pooled results: the random-effects model gives the average treatment effect. We included 61 trials. Forty-four trials, involving 43,274 women, contributed data and compared the effects of daily oral supplements containing iron versus no iron or placebo.Preventive iron supplementation reduced maternal anaemia at term by 70% (risk ratio (RR) 0.30; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19 to 0.46, 14 trials, 2199 women, low quality evidence), iron-deficiency anaemia at term (RR 0.33; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.69, six trials, 1088 women), and iron deficiency at term by 57% (RR 0.43; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.66, seven trials, 1256 women, low quality evidence). There were no clear

  2. Invited award contribution for ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry. Geometric and electronic structure contributions to function in bioinorganic chemistry: active sites in non-heme iron enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, E I

    2001-07-16

    Spectroscopy has played a major role in the definition of structure/function correlations in bioinorganic chemistry. The importance of spectroscopy combined with electronic structure calculations is clearly demonstrated by the non-heme iron enzymes. Many members of this large class of enzymes activate dioxygen using a ferrous active site that has generally been difficult to study with most spectroscopic methods. A new spectroscopic methodology has been developed utilizing variable temperature, variable field magnetic circular dichroism, which enables one to obtain detailed insight into the geometric and electronic structure of the non-heme ferrous active site and probe its reaction mechanism on a molecular level. This spectroscopic methodology is presented and applied to a number of key mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes leading to a general mechanistic strategy for O2 activation. These studies are then extended to consider the new features present in the binuclear non-heme iron enzymes and applied to understand (1) the mechanism of the two electron/coupled proton transfer to dioxygen binding to a single iron center in hemerythrin and (2) structure/function correlations over the oxygen-activating enzymes stearoyl-ACP Delta9-desaturase, ribonucleotide reductase, and methane monooxygenase. Electronic structure/reactivity correlations for O2 activation by non-heme relative to heme iron enzymes will also be developed.

  3. Iron Metabolism Regulates p53 Signaling through Direct Heme-p53 Interaction and Modulation of p53 Localization, Stability, and Function

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron excess is closely associated with tumorigenesis in multiple types of human cancers, with underlying mechanisms yet unclear. Recently, iron deprivation has emerged as a major strategy for chemotherapy, but it exerts tumor suppression only on select human malignancies. Here, we report that the tumor suppressor protein p53 is downregulated during iron excess. Strikingly, the iron polyporphyrin heme binds to p53 protein, interferes with p53-DNA interactions, and triggers both nuclear...

  4. Responsiveness to parenteral iron therapy in children with oral iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Mehmet; Atay, Enver; Oztekin, Osman; Karadeniz, Cem; Karakus, Yasin Tugrul; Yilmaz, Bilal; Erdogan, Firat

    2014-02-01

    Intravenous (IV) ferric iron (Fe)-carbohydrate complexes are used for treating Fe deficiency in children with iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA). An optimal treatment has yet to be determined. There are relatively little publications on the responsiveness to IV iron therapy in children with IRIDA. This study analyzed responses to IV iron sucrose therapy given to 11 children, ranging in age from 2 to 13 years (mean 4.8 years), with iron-deficiency anemia who were unresponsive to oral iron therapy. The hemoglobin and ferritin values (mean) of the 11 children with IRIDA were 7.7 g/dL and 4.8 ng/mL at diagnosis. Both hemoglobin and ferritin levels increased to 9.5 g/dL, and 24 ng/mL, respectively, at 6 weeks after the first therapy. Although the level of hemoglobin was steady at 6 months after the first, and 6 weeks after the second therapy, the ferritin levels continued to increase up to 30 ng/mL and 47 ng/mL at 6 months after the first and 6 weeks after the second therapy, respectively. We recommend that IRIDA should be considered in patients presenting with iron-deficiency anemia of unknown cause that is unresponsive to oral iron therapy. Our results suggest that IV iron therapy should be administered only once in cases of IRIDA. Continued administration of IV iron would be of no benefit to increase hemoglobin levels. On the contrary, ferritin levels may continue to increase resulting in untoward effects of hyperferritinemia.

  5. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles effects iron absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron trans...

  6. Identification of two genes potentially associated in iron-heme homeostasis in human carotid plaque using microarray analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hanène Ayari; Giampiero Bricca

    2013-06-01

    Classic characteristics are poor predictors of the risk of thromboembolism. Thus, better markers for the carotid atheroma plaque formation and symptom causing are needed. Our objective was to study by microarray analysis gene expression of genes involved in homeostasis of iron and heme in carotid atheroma plaque from the same patient. mRNA gene expression was measured by an Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST arrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA) using RNA prepared from 68 specimens of endarteriectomy from 34 patients. Two genes involved in iron-heme homeostasis, CD163 and heme oxygenase (HO-1), were analysed in 34 plaques. CD163 (2.18, =1.45E−08) and HO-1 (fold-change 2.67, =2.07E−09) mRNAs were induced. We suggest that atheroma plaques show a more pronounced induction of CD163 and HO-1. Although further evidence is needed, our results support previous data. To our knowledge, this is the first report comparing gene expression between intact arterial tissue and carotid plaque using microarray analysis.

  7. Inclusion of guava enhances non-heme iron bioavailability but not fractional zinc absorption from a rice-based meal in adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessing the bioavailability of non-heme iron and zinc is essential for recommending diets that meet the increased growth-related demand for these nutrients. We studied the bioavailability of iron and zinc from a rice-based meal in 16 adolescent boys and girls, 13–15 y of age, from 2 government-run...

  8. Mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad: recent developments in enzymology and modeling studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Iron-containing enzymes are one of Nature’s main means of effecting key biological transformations. The mononuclear non-heme iron oxygenases and oxidases have received the most attention recently, primarily because of the recent availability of crystal structures of many different enzymes and the st

  9. Recent developments centered on orally active iron chelators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Hider

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty years there has been a growing interest in the orally active iron chelators, deferiprone and deferasirox, both have been extensively studied. The ability of these compounds to mobilize iron from the heart and endocrine tissue has presented the clinician with some advantages over desferrioxamine, the first therapeutic iron chelator. Other orally active iron chelators are currently under development. The critical features necessary for the design of therapeutically useful orally active iron chelators are presented in this review, together with recent studies devoted to the design of such chelators. This newly emerging range of iron chelators will enable clinicians to apply iron chelation methodology to other disease states and to begin to design personalized chelation regimes.

  10. In vivo genotoxic effects of dietary heme iron on rat colon mucosa and ex vivo effects on colon cells monitored by an optimized alkaline comet assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Océane, C Martin

    2015-04-01

    In conclusion, our results offer a suitable protocol to evaluate genotoxicity on in vivo cryopreserved colon mucosa and on in vitro murine colonic cells, with a middle throughput capacity. This protocol confirms the increase of genotoxicity in rat colon mucosa after an heme-iron diet. Moreover, this protocol enables the demonstration that aldehydes from heme-induced lipoperoxidation are responsible for this increase of genotoxicity.

  11. Deferasirox, an oral chelator in the treatment of iron overload

    OpenAIRE

    I. Portioli

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Deferasirox is a once-daily oral iron chelator developed for treating iron overload complicating long-term transfusion therapy in patients with diseases such as beta-thalassemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Iron overload can damage the liver, pancreas and the heart. Deferoxamine, the only other drug approved for iron chelation, can prevent these effects but requires parenteral administration. Deferasirox has been approved after a one-year, open-label trial in patients ≥ 2 years o...

  12. Cafestol to Tricalysiolide B and Oxidized Analogues: Biosynthetic and Derivatization Studies Using Non-heme Iron Catalyst Fe(PDP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Marinus A; Liu, Peng; Zou, Lufeng; Houk, K N; White, M Christina

    2012-12-01

    The tricalysiolides are a recently isolated class of diterpene natural products featuring the carbon backbone of the well-known coffee extract, cafestol. Herein we validate the use of our non-heme iron complex, Fe(PDP), as an oxidative tailoring enzyme mimic to test the proposal that this class of natural products derives from cafestol via cytochrome P-450-mediated furan oxidation. Thereafter, as predicted by computational analysis, C-H oxidation derivatization studies provided a novel 2° alcohol product as a single diastereomer.

  13. Comparative Genomics of the Genus Porphyromonas Identifies Adaptations for Heme Synthesis within the Prevalent Canine Oral Species Porphyromonas cangingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Darling, Aaron E; Eisen, Jonathan A; Wallis, Corrin; Davis, Ian J; Harris, Stephen J

    2015-11-13

    Porphyromonads play an important role in human periodontal disease and recently have been shown to be highly prevalent in canine mouths. Porphyromonas cangingivalis is the most prevalent canine oral bacterial species in both plaque from healthy gingiva and plaque from dogs with early periodontitis. The ability of P. cangingivalis to flourish in the different environmental conditions characterized by these two states suggests a degree of metabolic flexibility. To characterize the genes responsible for this, the genomes of 32 isolates (including 18 newly sequenced and assembled) from 18 Porphyromonad species from dogs, humans, and other mammals were compared. Phylogenetic trees inferred using core genes largely matched previous findings; however, comparative genomic analysis identified several genes and pathways relating to heme synthesis that were present in P. cangingivalis but not in other Porphyromonads. Porphyromonas cangingivalis has a complete protoporphyrin IX synthesis pathway potentially allowing it to synthesize its own heme unlike pathogenic Porphyromonads such as Porphyromonas gingivalis that acquire heme predominantly from blood. Other pathway differences such as the ability to synthesize siroheme and vitamin B12 point to enhanced metabolic flexibility for P. cangingivalis, which may underlie its prevalence in the canine oral cavity.

  14. Formation of heme-iron complexes with nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) after ultraviolet radiation as a protective mechanism in rat skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiou, Stelios; Fotiou, Despina; Deliconstantinos, George

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet C (UVC)-irradiated microvessels isolated from rat skin release free nitrogen radicals, i.e. nitric oxide (NO), peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and nitrosocompounds formed from L-arginine. During UVC radiation of microvessels, heme (Fe3+) is released from hemoglobin and reacts with NO to form nitrosyl-heme (Fe2+-NO). The hydroxyl radical (OH*) produced is attached to heme-iron (Fe3+) to form hematin. ONOO- then binds to Fe(OH) and the complex Fe[(OH)ONOO-]2- is formed. Thus, in cases of increased oxidative stress, the free heme can act as an endogenous scavenger of OH* and ONOO-. Furthermore, Fe-NO and Fe[(OH)ONOO-]2- can act as NO donor and as antioxidant in redox cyclic iron-centered heme reactions, respectively. The scavenging-antioxidant properties of heme complexes, which allow it to protect the cells from the cytotoxic effects of the oxygen and/or nitrogen free radicals, were verified by estimating the changes in membrane fluidity of microvessels after UVC radiation. The present study indicates that UVC radiation of the skin acts as a potent stimulator for the formation of Fe-NO and Fe[(OH)ONOO-]2- in microvasculature with cytoprotective effects.

  15. The Crystal Structure of the Extracellular 11-heme Cytochrome UndA Reveals a Conserved 10-heme Motif and Defined Binding Site for Soluble Iron Chelates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Marcus; Hall, Andrea; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-07-03

    Members of the genus Shewanella translocate deca- or undeca-heme cytochromes to the external cell surface thus enabling respiration using extracellular minerals and polynuclear Fe(III) chelates. The high resolution structure of the first undeca-heme outer membrane cytochrome, UndA, reveals a crossed heme chain with four potential electron ingress/egress sites arranged within four domains. Sequence and structural alignment of UndA and the deca-heme MtrF reveals the extra heme of UndA is inserted between MtrF hemes 6 and 7. The remaining UndA hemes can be superposed over the heme chain of the decaheme MtrF, suggesting that a ten heme core is conserved between outer membrane cytochromes. The UndA structure is the first outer membrane cytochrome to be crystallographically resolved in complex with substrates, an Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetate dimer or an Fe(III)-citrate trimer. The structural resolution of these UndA-Fe(III)-chelate complexes provides a rationale for previous kinetic measurements on UndA and other outer membrane cytochromes.

  16. Chloroquine interference with hemoglobin endocytic trafficking suppresses adaptive heme and iron homeostasis in macrophages: the paradox of an antimalarial agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, Christian A; Laczko, Endre; Schoedon, Gabriele; Schaer, Dominik J; Vallelian, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The CD163 scavenger receptor pathway for Hb:Hp complexes is an essential mechanism of protection against the toxicity of extracellular hemoglobin (Hb), which can accumulate in the vasculature and within tissues during hemolysis. Chloroquine is a lysosomotropic agent, which has been extensively used as an antimalarial drug in the past, before parasite resistance started to limit its efficacy in most parts of the world. More recent use of chloroquine is related to its immunomodulatory activity in patients with autoimmune diseases, which may also involve hemolytic disease components. In this study we examined the effects of chloroquine on the human Hb clearance pathway. For this purpose we developed a new mass-spectrometry-based method to specifically quantify intracellular Hb peptides within the endosomal-lysosomal compartment by single reaction monitoring (SRM). We found that chloroquine exposure impairs trafficking of Hb:Hp complexes through the endosomal-lysosomal compartment after internalization by CD163. Relative quantification of intracellular Hb peptides by SRM confirmed that chloroquine blocked cellular Hb:Hp catabolism. This effect suppressed the cellular heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) response and shifted macrophage iron homeostasis towards inappropriately high expression of the transferrin receptor with concurrent inhibition of ferroportin expression. A functional deficiency of Hb detoxification and heme-iron recycling may therefore be an adverse consequence of chloroquine treatment during hemolysis.

  17. Chloroquine Interference with Hemoglobin Endocytic Trafficking Suppresses Adaptive Heme and Iron Homeostasis in Macrophages: The Paradox of an Antimalarial Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A. Schaer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The CD163 scavenger receptor pathway for Hb:Hp complexes is an essential mechanism of protection against the toxicity of extracellular hemoglobin (Hb, which can accumulate in the vasculature and within tissues during hemolysis. Chloroquine is a lysosomotropic agent, which has been extensively used as an antimalarial drug in the past, before parasite resistance started to limit its efficacy in most parts of the world. More recent use of chloroquine is related to its immunomodulatory activity in patients with autoimmune diseases, which may also involve hemolytic disease components. In this study we examined the effects of chloroquine on the human Hb clearance pathway. For this purpose we developed a new mass-spectrometry-based method to specifically quantify intracellular Hb peptides within the endosomal-lysosomal compartment by single reaction monitoring (SRM. We found that chloroquine exposure impairs trafficking of Hb:Hp complexes through the endosomal-lysosomal compartment after internalization by CD163. Relative quantification of intracellular Hb peptides by SRM confirmed that chloroquine blocked cellular Hb:Hp catabolism. This effect suppressed the cellular heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1 response and shifted macrophage iron homeostasis towards inappropriately high expression of the transferrin receptor with concurrent inhibition of ferroportin expression. A functional deficiency of Hb detoxification and heme-iron recycling may therefore be an adverse consequence of chloroquine treatment during hemolysis.

  18. Iron depletion in HCT116 cells diminishes the upregulatory effect of phenethyl isothiocyanate on heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolloskis, Michael P; Carvalho, Fabiana P; Loo, George

    2016-04-15

    Some of the health-promoting properties of cruciferous vegetables are thought to be partly attributed to isothiocyanates. These phytochemicals can upregulate the expression of certain cytoprotective stress genes, but it is unknown if a particular nutrient is involved. Herein, the objective was to ascertain if adequate iron is needed for enabling HCT116 cells to optimally express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when induced by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). PEITC increased HO-1 expression and also nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which is a transcription factor known to activate the HO-1 gene. However, in HCT116 cells that were made iron-deficient by depleting intracellular iron with deferoxamine (DFO), PEITC was less able to increase HO-1 expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. These suppressive effects of DFO were overcome by replenishing the iron-deficient cells with the missing iron. To elucidate these findings, it was found that PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation can be inhibited with thiol antioxidants (glutathione and N-acetylcysteine). Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) and a superoxide scavenger (Tiron) each inhibited PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation. In doing so, diphenyleneiodonium was the most potent and also inhibited nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2. Collectively, the results imply that the HO-1 upregulation by PEITC involves an iron-dependent, oxidant signaling pathway. Therefore, it is concluded that ample iron is required to enable PEITC to fully upregulate HO-1 expression in HCT116 cells. As such, it is conceivable that iron-deficient individuals may not reap the full health benefits of eating PEITC-containing cruciferous vegetables that via HO-1 may help protect against multiple chronic diseases.

  19. Impact of oral iron challenges on circulating non-transferrin-bound iron in healthy Guatemalan males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schümann, Klaus; Kroll, Sylvia; Romero-Abal, Maria-Eugenia; Georgiou, Niki A; Marx, Jo J M; Weiss, Günter; Solomons, Noel W

    2012-01-01

    Oral iron as a supplement has been associated with adverse health consequences, especially in the context of young children with active malaria. A potential aggravating role of non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) has been proposed. NTBI responses in both a fasting and post-oral iron dosing situation were related to serum iron concentration and ferritin status. Fasting and 1, 2, and 3 h postdose serum samples were obtained in conjunction with oral ferrous sulfate supplementation in aqueous solution of 0, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 mg Fe in a cohort of 8 healthy Guatemalan men over a 9-week metabolic protocol. Hemoglobin, serum ferritin, percent transferrin saturation, serum iron and NTBI were all measured. Circulating levels of serum iron and NTBI increased in a graded fashion in response to oral iron, with the relative increment for NTBI slightly greater than that of iron. Detectable NTBI was occasionally measured in fasting specimens, more frequently in subjects with high ferritin status. Post-iron NTBI responses, by contrast, were higher in normal-ferritin subjects in absolute terms, and rose with increasing postabsorptive serum iron responses. The appearance and response of circulating NTBI were consistent with recognized principles of iron regulation. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Nutritional iron deficiency: the role of oral iron supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowicz, J I; Nurchi, V M; Fanni, D; Gerosa, C; Peana, M; Zoroddu, M A

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency represents a relevant health problem mainly in developing countries. Children and pregnant women represent the main target of this disease, and the low amount of bio-available iron mostly depends on plant-based diets. Iron deficiency may have serious consequences, with severe impairment of the immune function leading to infectious diseases. The brain development in embryos and fetuses during gestation can be greatly affected by iron deficiency of the mother with heavy outcomes on the cognition status of children. A better understanding of molecular pathways involved in iron absorption and metabolism are the basis for new strategies for developing a therapy for iron deficiency. Different therapeutic strategies are summarized, and iron fortification appears the best tool.

  1. Axial ligand effects on vibrational dynamics of iron in heme carbonyl studied by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Takehiro; Liu, Jin-Gang; Saito, Makina; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Seto, Makoto; Naruta, Yoshinori

    2012-11-29

    Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and density functional theory calculation (DFT) have been applied to illuminate the effect of axial ligation on the vibrational dynamics of iron in heme carbonyl. The analyses of the NRVS data of five- (5c) and six-coordinate (6c) heme-CO complexes indicate that the prominent feature of (57)Fe partial vibrational density of state ((57)FePVDOS) at the 250-300 cm(-1) region is significantly affected by the association of the axial ligand. The DFT calculations predict that the prominent (57)FePVDOS is composed of iron in-plane motions which are coupled with porphyrin pyrrole in-plane (ν(49), ν(50), and ν(53)), an out-of-plane (γ(8)) (two of four pyrrole rings include the in-plane modes, while the rest of pyrrole rings vibrate along the out-of-plane coordinate), and out-of-phase carbonyl C and O atom displacement perpendicular to the Fe-C-O axis. Thus, in the case of the 5c CO-heme the prominent (57)FePVDOS shows sharp and intense feature because of the degeneracy of the e symmetry mode within the framework of C(4v) symmetry molecule, whereas the association of the axial imidazole ligand in the 6c complex with the lowered symmetry results in split of the degenerate vibrational energy as indicated by broader and lower intensity features of the corresponding NRVS peak compared to the 5c structure. The vibrational energy of the iron in-plane motion in the 6c complex is higher than that in 5c, implying that the iron in the 6c complex includes stronger in-plane interaction with the porphyrin compared to 5c. The iron in-plane mode above 500 cm(-1), which is predominantly coupled with the out-of-phase carbonyl C and O atom motion perpendicular to Fe-C-O, called as Fe-C-O bending mode (δ(Fe-C-O)), also suggests that the 6c structure involves a larger force constant for the e symmetry mode than 5c. The DFT calculations along with the NRVS data suggest that the stiffened iron in-plane motion in the 6c complex can be ascribed

  2. Secondary Hemochromatosis due to Chronic Oral Iron Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isang, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Iron may accumulate in excess due to a mutation in the HFE gene that upregulates absorption or when it is ingested or infused at levels that exceed the body's ability to clear it. Excess iron deposition in parenchymal tissue causes injury and ultimately organ dysfunction. Diabetes mellitus and hepatic cirrhosis due to pancreas and liver damage are just two examples of diseases that result from iron overload. Despite the rapid growth of information regarding iron metabolism and iron overload states, the most effective treatment is still serial phlebotomies. We present a patient who developed iron overload due to chronic ingestion of oral ferrous sulfate. This case illustrates the importance of querying geriatric patients regarding their use of nonprescription iron products without a medical indication. PMID:28133557

  3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of soybean lipoxygenase-1 : Influence of lipid hydroperoxide activation and lyophilization on the structure of the non-heme iron active site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Heijdt, L.M. van der; Feiters, M.C.; Navaratnam, S.; Nolting, H.-F.; Hermes, C.; Veldink, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the Fe K-edge of the non-heme iron site in Fe(II) as well as Fe(III) soybean lipoxygenase-1, in frozen solution or lyophilized, are presented; the latter spectra were obtained by incubation of the Fe(II) enzyme with its product hydroperoxide. An edge shift of about 23 eV

  4. The effect of irradiation and thermal process on beef heme iron concentration and color properties Efeito da irradiação e processo térmico na concentração do ferro heme e nas propriedades de cor da carne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Perazzini Furtado Mistura

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of irradiation and thermal process on the heme iron (heme-Fe concentration and color properties of Brazilian cattle beef. Beef samples (patties and steaks were irradiated at 0-10 kGy and cooked in a combination oven at 250 ºC for 9 minutes with 70% humidity. Total iron and heme iron (heme-Fe concentrations were determined. The data were compared by multiple comparisons and fixed- effects ANOVA. Irradiation at doses higher than 5 kGy significantly altered the heme-Fe concentration. However, the sample preparation conditions interfered more in the heme-Fe content than did the irradiation. Depending on the animal species, meat heme iron levels between 35 and 52% of the total iron are used for dietetic calculations. In this study the percentage of heme-iron was, on average, 70% of the total iron showing that humidity is an important factor for its preservation. The samples were analyzed instrumentally for CIE L*, a*, and b* values.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a influência da irradiação e de processos térmicos na concentração do ferro heme (Fe heme e nas propriedades de cor da carne do gado brasileiro. As amostras da carne (hambúrgueres e bifes foram irradiadas com 0-10 kGy e foram cozidas em um forno combinado a 250 ºC por 9 minutes com umidade de 70%. As concentrações de ferro total e de ferro heme foram determinadas. Os dados foram comparados por comparações múltiplas e por efeitos fixos, ANOVA. Irradiação em doses mais altas do que 5 kGy alteraram significativamente a concentração de Fe heme. Entretanto, as condições de preparo da amostra, interferiram muito mais na quantidade de Fe heme do que a irradiação. Dependendo da espécie animal, os níveis do ferro heme da carne estão entre 35 e 52% do ferro total e são usados para cálculos dietéticos. Em nosso estudo, a porcentagem de ferro heme foi em média, 70% do ferro total, mostrando que a umidade é um fator

  5. Ferrous versus Ferric Oral Iron Formulations for the Treatment of Iron Deficiency: A Clinical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palacios Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anaemia represents a major public health problem, particularly in infants, young children, pregnant women, and females with heavy menses. Oral iron supplementation is a cheap, safe, and effective means of increasing haemoglobin levels and restoring iron stores to prevent and correct iron deficiency. Many preparations are available, varying widely in dosage, formulation (quick or prolonged release, and chemical state (ferrous or ferric form. The debate over the advantages of ferrous versus ferric formulations is ongoing. In this literature review, the tolerability and efficacy of ferrous versus ferric iron formulations are evaluated. We focused on studies comparing ferrous sulphate preparations with ferric iron polymaltose complex preparations, the two predominant forms of iron used. Current data show that slow-release ferrous sulphate preparations remain the established and standard treatment of iron deficiency, irrespective of the indication, given their good bioavailability, efficacy, and acceptable tolerability demonstrated in several large clinical studies.

  6. Ferrous versus ferric oral iron formulations for the treatment of iron deficiency: a clinical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Palacios

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia represents a major public health problem, particularly in infants, young children, pregnant women, and females with heavy menses. Oral iron supplementation is a cheap, safe, and effective means of increasing haemoglobin levels and restoring iron stores to prevent and correct iron deficiency. Many preparations are available, varying widely in dosage, formulation (quick or prolonged release), and chemical state (ferrous or ferric form). The debate over the advantages of ferrous versus ferric formulations is ongoing. In this literature review, the tolerability and efficacy of ferrous versus ferric iron formulations are evaluated. We focused on studies comparing ferrous sulphate preparations with ferric iron polymaltose complex preparations, the two predominant forms of iron used. Current data show that slow-release ferrous sulphate preparations remain the established and standard treatment of iron deficiency, irrespective of the indication, given their good bioavailability, efficacy, and acceptable tolerability demonstrated in several large clinical studies.

  7. Impact of Oral Iron Challenges on Circulating Non-Transferrin-Bound Iron in Healthy Guatemalan Males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuemann, Klaus; Kroll, Sylvia; Romero-Abal, Maria-Eugenia; Georgiou, Niki A.; Marx, Jo J. M.; Weiss, Guenter; Solomons, Noel W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:Oral iron as a supplement has been associated with adverse health consequences, especially in the context of young children with active malaria. A potential aggravating role of non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) has been proposed. Material and Methods: NTBI responses in both a fasting an

  8. Impact of Oral Iron Challenges on Circulating Non-Transferrin-Bound Iron in Healthy Guatemalan Males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuemann, Klaus; Kroll, Sylvia; Romero-Abal, Maria-Eugenia; Georgiou, Niki A.; Marx, Jo J. M.; Weiss, Guenter; Solomons, Noel W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:Oral iron as a supplement has been associated with adverse health consequences, especially in the context of young children with active malaria. A potential aggravating role of non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) has been proposed. Material and Methods: NTBI responses in both a fasting an

  9. The P. aeruginosa Heme Binding Protein PhuS is a Heme Oxygenase Titratable Regulator of Heme Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa heme utilization (Phu) system encodes several proteins involved in the acquisition of heme as an iron source. Once internalized heme is degraded by the iron-regulated heme oxygenase, HemO to biliverdin (BV) IXδ and β. In vitro studies have shown holo-PhuS transfers heme to the iron-regulated HemO. This protein-protein interaction is specific for HemO as PhuS does not interact with the α-regioselective heme oxygenase, BphO. Bacterial genetics and isotopic labeling...

  10. Measurement of heme concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, P R; Gorman, N; Jacobs, J M

    2001-05-01

    Heme (iron protoporphyrin IX) is a prosthetic group for a number of hemoproteins in different tissues (e.g., hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochrome P-450s, mitochondrial cytochromes, catalases, and peroxidases). Mutations in the biosynthetic pathway can affect the synthesis and/or degradation of heme. Several assays are provided in this unit for quantifying heme: a spectrophotometric assay based on the characteristic absorption spectrum of oxidized and reduced form of the hemochrome formed by replacing the nitrogen ligands with pyridine; a fluorescence assay based on removal of the iron by a heated, strong oxalic acid solution to produce fluorescent protoporphyrin; a reversed-phase HPLC assay to measure heme and intermediates in the synthetic pathway; and a radiometric assay to measure newly synthesized heme in tissue culture cells.

  11. Setting an upper limit on the myoglobin iron(IV)hydroxide pK(a): insight into axial ligand tuning in heme protein catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosca, Timothy H; Behan, Rachel K; Krest, Courtney M; Onderko, Elizabeth L; Langston, Matthew C; Green, Michael T

    2014-06-25

    To provide insight into the iron(IV)hydroxide pK(a) of histidine ligated heme proteins, we have probed the active site of myoglobin compound II over the pH range of 3.9-9.5, using EXAFS, Mössbauer, and resonance Raman spectroscopies. We find no indication of ferryl protonation over this pH range, allowing us to set an upper limit of 2.7 on the iron(IV)hydroxide pK(a) in myoglobin. Together with the recent determination of an iron(IV)hydroxide pK(a) ∼ 12 in the thiolate-ligated heme enzyme cytochrome P450, this result provides insight into Nature's ability to tune catalytic function through its choice of axial ligand.

  12. Iron therapy for the treatment of iron deficiency in chronic heart failure: intravenous or oral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Theresa; Macdougall, Iain C

    2015-03-01

    This article considers the use and modality of iron therapy to treat iron deficiency in patients with heart failure, an aspect of care which has received relatively little attention compared with the wider topic of anaemia management. Iron deficiency affects up to 50% of heart failure patients, and is associated with poor quality of life, impaired exercise tolerance, and mortality independent of haematopoietic effects in this patient population. The European Society of Cardiology Guidelines for heart failure 2012 recommend a diagnostic work-up for iron deficiency in patients with suspected heart failure. Iron absorption from oral iron preparations is generally poor, with slow and often inefficient iron repletion; moreover, up to 60% of patients experience gastrointestinal side effects. These problems may be exacerbated in heart failure due to decreased gastrointestinal absorption and poor compliance due to pill burden. Evidence for clinical benefits using oral iron is lacking. I.v. iron sucrose has consistently been shown to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function, symptom severity, and quality of life. Similar findings were observed recently for i.v. ferric carboxymaltose in patients with systolic heart failure and impaired LVEF in the double-blind, placebo-controlled FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF trials. I.v. iron therapy may be better tolerated than oral iron, although confirmation in longer clinical trials is awaited. Routine diagnosis and management of iron deficiency in patients with symptomatic heart failure regardless of anaemia status is advisable, and, based on current evidence, prompt intervention using i.v. iron therapy should now be considered.

  13. Kinetic Analysis of a Globin-Coupled Histidine Kinase, AfGcHK: Effects of the Heme Iron Complex, Response Regulator, and Metal Cations on Autophosphorylation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtikova, Veronika; Stranava, Martin; Vos, Marten H; Liebl, Ursula; Hranicek, Jakub; Kitanishi, Kenichi; Shimizu, Toru; Martinkova, Marketa

    2015-08-18

    The globin-coupled histidine kinase, AfGcHK, is a part of the two-component signal transduction system from the soil bacterium Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5. Activation of its sensor domain significantly increases its autophosphorylation activity, which targets the His183 residue of its functional domain. The phosphate group of phosphorylated AfGcHK is then transferred to the cognate response regulator. We investigated the effects of selected variables on the autophosphorylation reaction's kinetics. The kcat values of the heme Fe(III)-OH(-), Fe(III)-cyanide, Fe(III)-imidazole, and Fe(II)-O2 bound active AfGcHK forms were 1.1-1.2 min(-1), and their Km(ATP) values were 18.9-35.4 μM. However, the active form bearing a CO-bound Fe(II) heme had a kcat of 1.0 min(-1) but a very high Km(ATP) value of 357 μM, suggesting that its active site structure differs strongly from the other active forms. The Fe(II) heme-bound inactive form had kcat and Km(ATP) values of 0.4 min(-1) and 78 μM, respectively, suggesting that its low activity reflects a low affinity for ATP relative to that of the Fe(III) form. The heme-free form exhibited low activity, with kcat and Km(ATP) values of 0.3 min(-1) and 33.6 μM, respectively, suggesting that the heme iron complex is essential for high catalytic activity. Overall, our results indicate that the coordination and oxidation state of the sensor domain heme iron profoundly affect the enzyme's catalytic activity because they modulate its ATP binding affinity and thus change its kcat/Km(ATP) value. The effects of the response regulator and different divalent metal cations on the autophosphorylation reaction are also discussed.

  14. Deferasirox, an oral chelator in the treatment of iron overload

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    I. Portioli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Deferasirox is a once-daily oral iron chelator developed for treating iron overload complicating long-term transfusion therapy in patients with diseases such as beta-thalassemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Iron overload can damage the liver, pancreas and the heart. Deferoxamine, the only other drug approved for iron chelation, can prevent these effects but requires parenteral administration. Deferasirox has been approved after a one-year, open-label trial in patients ≥ 2 years old with beta-thalassemia and transfusional emosiderosis randomized to once-daily oral 5, 10, 20, 30 mg/kg/day in comparison of subcutaneous deferoxamine 20-60 mg/mg/kg/day x 5/week. CONCLUSIONS Deferasirox 20-30 mg/kg/day produced reductions in liver iron concentration (LIC similar to those with deferoxamine. Adverse effect of deferasirox (increases of serum creatinine and aminotransferases, including the gastrointestinal ones, are similar but more frequent than those occurring with deferoxamine. Information is lacking on the effects of deferasirox on cardiac iron and cardiac dysfunction which is the most serious complication of transfusional iron overload.

  15. Mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad: recent developments in enzymology and modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; van Koten, Gerard; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M

    2008-12-01

    Iron-containing enzymes are one of Nature's main means of effecting key biological transformations. The mononuclear non-heme iron oxygenases and oxidases have received the most attention recently, primarily because of the recent availability of crystal structures of many different enzymes and the stunningly diverse oxidative transformations that these enzymes catalyze. The wealth of available structural data has furthermore established the so-called 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad as a new common structural motif for the activation of dioxygen. This superfamily of mononuclear iron(ii) enzymes catalyzes a wide range of oxidative transformations, ranging from the cis-dihydroxylation of arenes to the biosynthesis of antibiotics such as isopenicillin and fosfomycin. The remarkable scope of oxidative transformations seems to be even broader than that associated with oxidative heme enzymes. Not only are many of these oxidative transformations of key biological importance, many of these selective oxidations are also unprecedented in synthetic organic chemistry. In this critical review, we wish to provide a concise background on the chemistry of the mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes characterized by the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad and to discuss the many recent developments in the field. New examples of enzymes with unique reactivities belonging to the superfamily have been reported. Furthermore, key insights into the intricate mechanistic details and reactive intermediates have been obtained from both enzyme and modeling studies. Sections of this review are devoted to each of these subjects, i.e. the enzymes, biomimetic models, and reactive intermediates (225 references).

  16. A novel non-heme iron-containing dioxygenase. Chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase from Phenylobacterium immobilis DSM 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, R; Schmitt, S; Lingens, F

    1982-07-01

    Previously we purified an enzyme from Phenylobacterium immobilis DSM 1986, which cleaves the catechol derivative of the herbicide Chloridazon [5-amino-4-chloro-2-phenyl-3 (2H)-pyridazinone] in the meta position. The enzyme, which could be crystallized, proved in Ouchterlony double-diffusion tests to consist of a single protein species. No cross-reaction was observed with other meta-cleaving enzymes. Its light absorption spectrum showed a maximum at 279 nm (epsilon = 310 mM -1 cm -1), shoulders at 289 nm and 275 nm and a very weak band at around 430 nm (epsilon = 1.14 mM -1 cm -1). The amino acid analysis showed a slight excess of acidic amino acids, in agreement with the pl of 4.5. Surprisingly the enzyme per se is completely inactive, although it contains one non-dialysable iron atom per submit. It has to be activated by preincubation with ferrous ions or ascorbate. The enzyme activated this way is autoxidizable and returns to its non-activated state in the presence of oxygen. During the reaction with the substrate, this inactivation seems to be enhanced about 100 times. Since this kind of activation and inactivation is not observed in other meta-cleaving enzymes, this enzyme seems to represent a new type of a non-heme iron dioxygenase. We tentatively propose the name Chloridazon-catechol dioxygenase for this enzyme.

  17. Intermittent oral iron supplementation during pregnancy (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Dowswell, Therese; Viteri, Fernando E

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaemia is a frequent condition during pregnancy, particularly among women from developing countries who have insufficient iron intake to meet increased iron needs of both the mother and the fetus. Traditionally, gestational anaemia has been prevented with the provision of daily iron supplements throughout pregnancy, but adherence to this regimen due to side effects, interrupted supply of the supplements, and concerns about safety among women with an adequate iron intake, have limited the use of this intervention. Intermittent (i.e. one, two or three times a week on non-consecutive days) supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals has recently been proposed as an alternative to daily supplementation. Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of intermittent supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals to pregnant women on neonatal and pregnancy outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (23 March 2012). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for ongoing studies and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies (23 March 2012). Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. Main results This review includes 21 trials from 13 different countries, but only 18 trials (with 4072 women) reported on our outcomes of interest and contributed data to the review. All of these studies compared daily versus intermittent iron supplementation. Three studies provided iron alone, 12 iron+folic acid and three more iron plus multiple vitamins and minerals. Their methodological quality was mixed

  18. Effects of High Dietary HEME Iron and Radiation on Cardiovascular Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westby, Christian M.; Brown, A. K.; Platts, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    The radiation related health risks to astronauts is of particular concern to NASA. Data support that exposure to radiation is associated with a number of disorders including a heightened risk for cardiovascular diseases. Independent of radiation, altered nutrient status (e.g. high dietary iron) also increases ones risk for cardiovascular disease. However, it is unknown whether exposure to radiation in combination with high dietary iron further increases ones cardiovascular risk. The intent of our proposal is to generate compulsory data examining the combined effect of radiation exposure and iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury to address HRP risks: 1) Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition; 2) Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems; and 3) Risk of Degenerative Tissue or other Health Effects from Space Radiation. Towards our goal we propose two distinct pilot studies using the following specific aims: Vascular Aim 1: To determine the short-term consequences of the independent and combined effects of exposure to gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on measures of endothelial function and cell viability and integrity. We hypothesize that animals that have high body iron stores and are exposed to gamma radiation will show a greater reduction in endothelial dependent nitric oxid production and larger pathological changes in endothelial integrity than animals that have only 1 of those treatments (either high iron stores or exposure to gamma radiation). Vascular Aim 2: Identify and compare the effects of gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on the genetic and epigenetic regulation of proteins associated with endothelial cell function. We hypothesize that modifications of epigenetic control and posttranslational expression of proteins associated with endothelial cell function will be differentially altered in rats with high body iron stores and exposed to gamma radiation compared to rats with only 1 type of treatment. Cardiac Aim 1: To determine the

  19. Oral iron therapy and chronic idiopathic urticaria: sideropenic urticaria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarneri, Fabrizio; Guarneri, Claudio; Cannavò, Serafinella Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is frequent, remains often idiopathic despite diagnostic efforts, and sometimes poorly responds to oral antihistamines and/or corticosteroids. We noticed that hyposideremia is often found in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria poorly responsive to usual treatments (prCIU), and oral iron therapy is frequently associated to improvement or resolution of urticaria. Between 2003 and 2012, we observed 122 patients with prCIU, of which 81 had moderate hyposideremia at our first visit. They continued the antihistamines already practiced and received oral iron therapy for 30 or 45 days. Two months after our first visit, all had normal serum iron levels; 64 reported complete remission of urticaria and 17 reported improvement superior to 80%. No adverse reactions to treatment were observed. Follow-up visits confirmed stability of results over 6 months. Our preliminary data show that hyposideremia is the only abnormality in many patients with prCIU, and restoration of normal iron serum levels is associated to remission or remarkable clinical improvement of urticaria. In consideration of low cost and potential benefits for some patients, determination of serum levels of iron could be introduced in the diagnostic workup of chronic urticaria, maybe as a second-level exam in patients without other relevant clinical or laboratory abnormalities.

  20. Geometric and electronic structure contributions to function in non-heme iron enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Edward I; Light, Kenneth M; Liu, Lei V; Srnec, Martin; Wong, Shaun D

    2013-11-19

    Mononuclear non-heme Fe (NHFe) enzymes play key roles in DNA repair, the biosynthesis of antibiotics, the response to hypoxia, cancer therapy, and many other biological processes. These enzymes catalyze a diverse range of oxidation reactions, including hydroxylation, halogenation, ring closure, desaturation, and electrophilic aromatic substitution (EAS). Most of these enzymes use an Fe(II) site to activate dioxygen, but traditional spectroscopic methods have not allowed researchers to insightfully probe these ferrous active sites. We have developed a methodology that provides detailed geometric and electronic structure insights into these NHFe(II) active sites. Using these data, we have defined a general mechanistic strategy that many of these enzymes use: they control O2 activation (and limit autoxidation and self-hydroxylation) by allowing Fe(II) coordination unsaturation only in the presence of cosubstrates. Depending on the type of enzyme, O2 activation either involves a 2e(-) reduced Fe(III)-OOH intermediate or a 4e(-) reduced Fe(IV)═O intermediate. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) has provided the geometric structure of these intermediates, and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) has defined the frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), the electronic structure that controls reactivity. This Account emphasizes that experimental spectroscopy is critical in evaluating the results of electronic structure calculations. Therefore these data are a key mechanistic bridge between structure and reactivity. For the Fe(III)-OOH intermediates, the anticancer drug activated bleomycin (BLM) acts as the non-heme Fe analog of compound 0 in heme (e.g., P450) chemistry. However BLM shows different reactivity: the low-spin (LS) Fe(III)-OOH can directly abstract a H atom from DNA. The LS and high-spin (HS) Fe(III)-OOHs have fundamentally different transition states. The LS transition state goes through a hydroxyl radical, but the HS transition state is activated for

  1. Multinuclear non-heme iron complexes for double-strand DNA cleavage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megens, Rik P.; van den Berg, Tieme A.; de Bruijn, A. Dowine; Feringa, Ben L.; Roelfes, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of the antitumor drug BLM is believed to be related to the ability of the corresponding iron complex (Fe-BLM) to engage in oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage. The iron complex of the ligand N4Py (Fe-N4Py; N4Py - N,N-bis(2-pyridyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine has proven to be a

  2. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy: Intravenous versus Oral Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghana N Mehta, Jitesh M Shah

    2014-01-01

    Methodology: One hundred fifty pregnant women with gestational age less than 34 weeks with iron deficiency anemia were selected. The women in group A received IV iron sucrose. The drug was administered by IV infusion. The women in the group B received ferrous sulphate as oral iron in the dose of two tablets three times a day. Repeat laboratory estimations were done after six weeks. Results were analyzed by t test and Z- test of preparation using SPSS 15 and Microsoft excel. Results: Mean gestational age in group A and group B were 26.13 ± 5.15 weeks and 26.27 ± 4.71 weeks, respectively. Mean Hb level was 6.71 ± 0.65 g/dl in group A which was raised to 10.64 ± 0.71 g/dl. Mean Hb level was 6.72 ± 0.67 g/dl in group B which was raised to 10.17 ± 0.54. The target Hb level of 10 g/dl was achieved in 88% cases in group A and in 76% cases in group B (P =0.055. Conclusion: Intravenous iron sucrose therapy is safe and as effective as oral iron in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy.

  3. Human Pharmacokinetics of High Dose Oral Curcumin and Its Effect on Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in Healthy Male Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uros Klickovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 has been proposed to exert pharmacological benefits by its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. HO-1 expression may be affected by the GT length polymorphism in the promoter region of the HO-1 gene. We investigated the inducibility of HO-1 by orally administered curcumin in healthy male subjects and its correlation with the GT length polymorphism. Methods. In an open label uncontrolled phase-1 pilot study, ten male subjects received 12 g of oral curcumin. To investigate the effects of the GT length polymorphism on the inducibility of HO-1, five subjects with homozygous short and five with homozygous long GT genotypes were studied. Plasma concentrations of curcumin, bilirubin, HO-1 mRNA, and protein expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were analyzed over 48 hours. Results. At a detection limit of 1 µg/mL curcumin could not be detected in plasma of any subject. Compared to baseline, HO-1 mRNA and protein levels were not induced in PBMCs at any time point up to 48 hours. There was no correlation between any of the parameters and GT length polymorphism. Conclusions. Oral curcumin administration has low bioavailability and does not induce HO-1 on mRNA or protein level in PBMCs.

  4. HtaA is an iron-regulated hemin binding protein involved in the utilization of heme iron in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Courtni E; Schmitt, Michael P

    2009-04-01

    Many human pathogens, including Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the causative agent of diphtheria, use host compounds such as heme and hemoglobin as essential iron sources. In this study, we examined the Corynebacterium hmu hemin transport region, a genetic cluster that contains the hmuTUV genes encoding a previously described ABC-type hemin transporter and three additional genes, which we have designated htaA, htaB, and htaC. The hmu gene cluster is composed of three distinct transcriptional units. The htaA gene appears to be part of an iron- and DtxR-regulated operon that includes hmuTUV, while htaB and htaC are transcribed from unique DtxR-regulated promoters. Nonpolar deletion of either htaA or the hmuTUV genes resulted in a reduced ability to use hemin as an iron source, while deletion of htaB had no effect on hemin iron utilization in C. diphtheriae. A comparison of the predicted amino acid sequences of HtaA and HtaB showed that they share some sequence similarity, and both proteins contain leader sequences and putative C-terminal transmembrane regions. Protein localization studies with C. diphtheriae showed that HtaA is associated predominantly with the cell envelope when the organism is grown in minimal medium but is secreted during growth in nutrient-rich broth. HtaB and HmuT were detected primarily in the cytoplasmic membrane fraction regardless of the growth medium. Hemin binding studies demonstrated that HtaA and HtaB are able to bind hemin, suggesting that these proteins may function as cell surface hemin receptors in C. diphtheriae.

  5. IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY INTRAVENOUS IRON SUCROSE AN ALTERNATIVE TO ORAL FERROUS SULPHATE THERAPY

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    Shireen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy is a commonest medical problem throughout the developing world with the burden of disease impacting in both mother and newborn. 46 Anaemia affects nearly half of all the pregnant women in the world, these figures are 52%1 in the developing and 23%26 in the developed world. The high prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia among women during pregnancy in developing countries is of concern and a cause of considerable morbidity and mortality. 27 The aim of the study is to know whether intravenous iron sucrose can be an better alternative in terms of safety, efficacy and compliance over oral ferrous sulphate in the treatment of anaemia in pregnancy. METHOD: This prospective study is conducted in Obstetrics & Gynaecology Department of Cheluvamba hospital, Mysore Medical College and Research Institute, Mysore. All these women are randomly assigned (100 women each to receive either calculated dose of intravenous iron sucrose (Group B or oral ferrous suphate 200mg BD per day (Group A. Hemoglobin, hematocrit and mean corpuscular estimation is done before treatment and after 4wks of correction in both groups to note the improvement in values and monitored for adverse reactions. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS: The percentage rise in hemoglobin is statistically significant when baseline hemoglobin levels are compared with that at fourth week of treatment. Statistically significant rise in hemoglobin, hematocrit and mean corpuscular levels are found at fourth week in IV group when compared to oral group. None of the patients had any serious side effects. There were no treatment failures and none of them required blood transfusions. CONCLUSION: This study concluded that intravenous iron sucrose is safe, highly efficacious with better compliance for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy. Iron sucrose therapy is more effective in achieving the optimum results, an increase in hemoglobin

  6. Oral iron supplements for children in malaria-endemic areas

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    Neuberger, Ami; Okebe, Joseph; Yahav, Dafna; Paul, Mical

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron-deficiency anaemia is common during childhood. Iron administration has been claimed to increase the risk of malaria. Objectives To evaluate the effects and safety of iron supplementation, with or without folic acid, in children living in areas with hyperendemic or holoendemic malaria transmission. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (up to August 2015) and LILACS (up to February 2015). We also checked the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) up to February 2015. We contacted the primary investigators of all included trials, ongoing trials, and those awaiting assessment to ask for unpublished data and further trials. We scanned references of included trials, pertinent reviews, and previous meta-analyses for additional references. Selection criteria We included individually randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs conducted in hyperendemic and holoendemic malaria regions or that reported on any malaria-related outcomes that included children younger than 18 years of age. We included trials that compared orally administered iron, iron with folic acid, and iron with antimalarial treatment versus placebo or no treatment. We included trials of iron supplementation or fortification interventions if they provided at least 80% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for prevention of anaemia by age. Antihelminthics could be administered to either group, and micronutrients had to be administered equally to both groups. Data collection and analysis The primary outcomes were clinical malaria, severe malaria, and death from any cause. We assessed the risk of bias in included trials with domain-based evaluation and assessed the quality of the evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment

  7. A randomised controlled trial to compare intravenous iron sucrose and oral iron in treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

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    Gupta, Avantika; Manaktala, Usha; Rathore, Asmita Muthal

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose with oral iron therapy in pregnant patients with anemia. The primary outcome of the study was increase in haemoglobin on day 7, 14 & 28 and rise of serum ferritin over 28 days. The study population consisted of 100 patients with singleton pregnancy between 24 and 34 weeks, hemoglobin levels between 7.0-9.0 gm/dL and serum ferritin levels less than 15 ng/mL. The participants in the oral group were given daily 180 mg elemental iron in three divided oral doses for 4 weeks. Total calculated dose of iron sucrose with a target hemoglobin of 11 gm %, was given in 200 mg dose on alternate days. Mean haemoglobin rise was 0.58 gm/dL in the IV group as compared to 0.23 gm/dL in the oral group on day 14 and 1.9 gm/dL in the IV group & 1.3 gm/dL in the oral group on day 28, (p <0.05). In the IV group, 76% of the subjects achieved haemoglobin levels of ≥11 gm% at the time of delivery, as compared to only 54% of the subjects in the oral group who achieved these levels. Serum ferritin value was significantly higher in the IV group, 37.45 ± 5.73 ng/mL as compared to 13.96 ± 1.88 ng/mL in the oral group at 4th week (p <0.001). There was no major side effect in the IV group. 36% subjects in the oral group developed gastrointestinal side effects & 10% of the subjects were non compliant. The rate of hemoglobin rise is faster with intravenous iron sucrose therapy as compared to oral iron therapy which can be beneficial in pregnant women presenting with anemia at a later period of gestation. Intravenous iron sucrose is very well tolerated during pregnancy.

  8. The detection of iron protoporphyrin (heme b) in phytoplankton and marine particulate material by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry – comparison with diode array detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, Martha, E-mail: m.gledhill@geomar.de

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • Mass spectrometry was applied to the analysis of heme b in biological material. • Optimal conditions involved selective reactant monitoring of the heme b product ion. • The isotopic signature for this iron tetrapyrrole further improved selectivity. • Mass spectrometry and spectrophotometry were compared for heme b analysis. • Combining techniques made a powerful tool for analysis of heme in marine microbes. - Abstract: A mass spectrometric (MS) method for the identification of iron protoporphyrin (IX) (FePTP, heme b) in marine particulate material and phytoplankton is described. Electrospray ionisation of FePTP produced the molecular Fe(III)PTP{sup +} ion (m/z = 616) or the pseudomolecular [Fe(II)PTP + H]{sup +} ion (m/z = 617), depending on the oxidation state of the central iron ion. Collision induced dissociation (CID) in the ion trap mass spectrometer resulted in a single detected product ion (m/z = 557) indicative of loss of ethanoic acid from a carboxylic acid side chain. Widening the isolation width to 616 ± 3 resulted in production of a mass spectrum demonstrating the distinctive isotopic ratio of the iron containing fragment, further increasing the specificity of the analysis. Selective reactant monitoring (SRM) of the fragment ion (m/z = 557) was applied to the detection of FePTP after chromatography of ammoniacal OGP extracts of marine samples. The detection limit for FePTP analysed by SRM after chromatography was 1.2 ± 0.5 fmol. For phytoplankton samples, reasonably good agreement was achieved between results obtained with SRM and those obtained by monitoring absorbance at λ = 400 nm using a diode array detector (DAD). Use of SRM for analysis of particulate material obtained from the high latitude North Atlantic allowed for the analysis of FePTP in the presence of a co-eluting compound that interfered with detection by DAD. Simultaneous collection of mass spectra from m/z = 300 to 1500 resulted in identification of the

  9. Roles of iron acquisition systems in virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli: salmochelin and aerobactin contribute more to virulence than heme in a chicken infection model

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    Gao Qingqing

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC are the two main subsets of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC. Both types have multiple iron acquisition systems, including heme and siderophores. Although iron transport systems involved in the pathogenesis of APEC or UPEC have been documented individually in corresponding animal models, the contribution of these systems during simultaneous APEC and UPEC infection is not well described. To determine the contribution of each individual iron acquisition system to the virulence of APEC and UPEC, isogenic mutants affecting iron uptake in APEC E058 and UPEC U17 were constructed and compared in a chicken challenge model. Results Salmochelin-defective mutants E058ΔiroD and U17ΔiroD showed significantly decreased pathogenicity compared to the wild-type strains. Aerobactin defective mutants E058ΔiucD and U17ΔiucD demonstrated reduced colonization in several internal organs, whereas the heme defective mutants E058ΔchuT and U17ΔchuT colonized internal organs to the same extent as their wild-type strains. The triple mutant ΔchuTΔiroDΔiucD in both E058 and U17 showed decreased pathogenicity compared to each of the single mutants. The histopathological lesions in visceral organs of birds challenged with the wild-type strains were more severe than those from birds challenged with ΔiroD, ΔiucD or the triple mutants. Conversely, chickens inoculated with the ΔchuT mutants had lesions comparable to those in chickens inoculated with the wild-type strains. However, no significant differences were observed between the mutants and the wild-type strains in resistance to serum, cellular invasion and intracellular survival in HD-11, and growth in iron-rich or iron-restricted medium. Conclusions Results indicated that APEC and UPEC utilize similar iron acquisition mechanisms in chickens. Both salmochelin and aerobactin systems appeared to be important in APEC

  10. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. Methods: A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Results: Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Conclusion: Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment. PMID:27375698

  11. α-Hemoglobin-stabilizing Protein (AHSP) Perturbs the Proximal Heme Pocket of Oxy-α-hemoglobin and Weakens the Iron-Oxygen Bond*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F.; Rich, Anne M.; D'Avigdor, William M. H.; Collins, Daniel A. T.; Lowry, Jason A.; Mollan, Todd L.; Khandros, Eugene; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Mackay, Joel P.; Lay, Peter A.; Gell, David A.

    2013-01-01

    α-Hemoglobin (αHb)-stabilizing protein (AHSP) is a molecular chaperone that assists hemoglobin assembly. AHSP induces changes in αHb heme coordination, but how these changes are facilitated by interactions at the αHb·AHSP interface is not well understood. To address this question we have used NMR, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and ligand binding measurements to probe αHb conformational changes induced by AHSP binding. NMR chemical shift analyses of free CO-αHb and CO-αHb·AHSP indicated that the seven helical elements of the native αHb structure are retained and that the heme Fe(II) remains coordinated to the proximal His-87 side chain. However, chemical shift differences revealed alterations of the F, G, and H helices and the heme pocket of CO-αHb bound to AHSP. Comparisons of iron-ligand geometry using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed that AHSP binding induces a small 0.03 Å lengthening of the Fe-O2 bond, explaining previous reports that AHSP decreases αHb O2 affinity roughly 4-fold and promotes autooxidation due primarily to a 3–4-fold increase in the rate of O2 dissociation. Pro-30 mutations diminished NMR chemical shift changes in the proximal heme pocket, restored normal O2 dissociation rate and equilibrium constants, and reduced O2-αHb autooxidation rates. Thus, the contacts mediated by Pro-30 in wild-type AHSP promote αHb autooxidation by introducing strain into the proximal heme pocket. As a chaperone, AHSP facilitates rapid assembly of αHb into Hb when βHb is abundant but diverts αHb to a redox resistant holding state when βHb is limiting. PMID:23696640

  12. α-Hemoglobin-stabilizing protein (AHSP) perturbs the proximal heme pocket of oxy-α-hemoglobin and weakens the iron-oxygen bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F; Rich, Anne M; D'Avigdor, William M H; Collins, Daniel A T; Lowry, Jason A; Mollan, Todd L; Khandros, Eugene; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J; Mackay, Joel P; Lay, Peter A; Gell, David A

    2013-07-01

    α-Hemoglobin (αHb)-stabilizing protein (AHSP) is a molecular chaperone that assists hemoglobin assembly. AHSP induces changes in αHb heme coordination, but how these changes are facilitated by interactions at the αHb·AHSP interface is not well understood. To address this question we have used NMR, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and ligand binding measurements to probe αHb conformational changes induced by AHSP binding. NMR chemical shift analyses of free CO-αHb and CO-αHb·AHSP indicated that the seven helical elements of the native αHb structure are retained and that the heme Fe(II) remains coordinated to the proximal His-87 side chain. However, chemical shift differences revealed alterations of the F, G, and H helices and the heme pocket of CO-αHb bound to AHSP. Comparisons of iron-ligand geometry using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy showed that AHSP binding induces a small 0.03 Å lengthening of the Fe-O2 bond, explaining previous reports that AHSP decreases αHb O2 affinity roughly 4-fold and promotes autooxidation due primarily to a 3-4-fold increase in the rate of O2 dissociation. Pro-30 mutations diminished NMR chemical shift changes in the proximal heme pocket, restored normal O2 dissociation rate and equilibrium constants, and reduced O2-αHb autooxidation rates. Thus, the contacts mediated by Pro-30 in wild-type AHSP promote αHb autooxidation by introducing strain into the proximal heme pocket. As a chaperone, AHSP facilitates rapid assembly of αHb into Hb when βHb is abundant but diverts αHb to a redox resistant holding state when βHb is limiting.

  13. Emerging causes of iron deficiency anemia refractory to oral iron supplementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sean; Warsch; John; Byrnes

    2013-01-01

    While oral iron supplementation is commonly used throughout many clinical setting,treatment with intravenous(IV) iron has historically been reserved for specific settings,such as chronic kidney disease,gynecologic issues,and anemia associated with cancer and its treatments.However,the use of IV iron has begun to gain popularity in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia(IDA) associated with two conditions that are being seen more frequently than in years past:patients who are status post gastric bypass procedure and those with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD).The Roux-en-Y procedure involves connecting a gastric pouch to the jejunum,creating a blind loop consisting of distal stomach,duodenum,and proximal jejunum that connects to the Roux limb to form a common tract.IDA occurs in 6%-50% of patients who have undergone a gastric bypass,the etiology being multifactorial.The proximal gastric pouch,the primary site of gastric acid secretion,is bypassed,resulting in a decreased ability to metabolize molecular iron.Once metabolized,most iron is absorbed in the duodenum,which is entirely bypassed.After undergoing bypass procedures,most patients significantly limit their intake of red meat,another factor contributing to post-bypass IDA.Chronic anemia occurs in approximately 1/3 of patients who suffer from IBD,and almost half of all IBD patients are iron deficient.IBD leads to IDA through multiple mechanisms,including chronic intestinal blood loss,decreased absorption capabilities of the duodenum secondary to inflammation,and an inability of many IBD patients to tolerate the side effects of oral ferrous sulfate.In this study,we reviewed the charts of all patients who received IV iron at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center/University of Miami Hospital Clinic from January 2007 to May 2012.The most common indications for IV iron were for issues related to cancer and its treatment(21.9%),IBD(20.1%),and gastric bypass(15.0%).Of the 262 patients who received IV iron,230 received

  14. Oral Iron Prophylaxis in Pregnancy: Not Too Little and Not Too Much!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Milman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An adequate supply of iron is essential for normal development of the fetus and newborn child. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia (IDA during pregnancy increase the risk of preterm birth and low birth weight. Iron is important for development of the fetal brain and cognitive abilities of the newborn. Children born to iron-deficient mothers will start their lives suffering from iron deficiency or even IDA. Oral iron prophylaxis to pregnant women improves iron status and prevents development of IDA. The Danish National Board of Health has since 1992 recommended prophylactic oral iron supplements to all pregnant women and the currently advocated dose is 40–50 mg ferrous iron taken between meals from 10 weeks gestation to delivery. However, 30–40 mg ferrous iron is probably an adequate dose in most affluent societies. In developed countries, individual iron prophylaxis guided by iron status (serum ferritin has physiological advantages compared to general iron prophylaxis. In contrast, in most developing countries, general iron prophylaxis is indicated, and higher doses of oral iron, for example, 60 mg ferrous iron or even more should be recommended, according to the present iron status situation in the specific populations of women of fertile age and pregnant women.

  15. Systematic Perturbations of Binuclear Non-heme Iron Sites: Structure and Dioxygen Reactivity of de Novo Due Ferri Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rae Ana; Betzu, Justine; Butch, Susan E; Reig, Amanda J; DeGrado, William F; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-08-04

    DFsc (single-chain due ferri) proteins allow for modeling binuclear non-heme iron enzymes with a similar fold. Three 4A → 4G variants of DFsc were studied to investigate the effects of (1) increasing the size of the substrate/solvent access channel (G4DFsc), (2) including an additional His residue in the first coordination sphere along with three additional helix-stabilizing mutations [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)], and (3) the three helix-stabilizing mutations alone [G4DFsc(Mut3)] on the biferrous structures and their O2 reactivities. Near-infrared circular dichroism and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy show that the 4A → 4G mutations increase coordination of the diiron site from 4-coordinate/5-coordinate to 5-coordinate/5-coordinate, likely reflecting increased solvent accessibility. While the three helix-stabilizing mutations [G4DFsc(Mut3)] do not affect the coordination number, addition of the third active site His residue [3His-G4DFsc(Mut3)] results in a 5-coordinate/6-coordinate site. Although all 4A→ 4G variants have significantly slower pseudo-first-order rates when reacting with excess O2 than DFsc (∼2 s(-1)), G4DFsc and 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3) have rates (∼0.02 and ∼0.04 s(-1)) faster than that of G4DFsc(Mut3) (∼0.002 s(-1)). These trends in the rate of O2 reactivity correlate with exchange coupling between the Fe(II) sites and suggest that the two-electron reduction of O2 occurs through end-on binding at one Fe(II) rather than through a peroxy-bridged intermediate. UV-vis absorption and MCD spectroscopies indicate that an Fe(III)Fe(III)-OH species first forms in all three variants but converts into an Fe(III)-μ-OH-Fe(III) species only in the 2-His forms, a process inhibited by the additional active site His ligand that coordinatively saturates one of the iron centers in 3His-G4DFsc(Mut3).

  16. The Structure of the Complex between Yeast Frataxin and Ferrochelatase: CHARACTERIZATION AND PRE-STEADY STATE REACTION OF FERROUS IRON DELIVERY AND HEME SYNTHESIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Christopher; Gillam, Mallory E; Ahlgren, Eva-Christina; Hunter, Gregory A; Gakh, Oleksandr; Isaya, Grazia; Ferreira, Gloria C; Al-Karadaghi, Salam

    2016-05-27

    Frataxin is a mitochondrial iron-binding protein involved in iron storage, detoxification, and delivery for iron sulfur-cluster assembly and heme biosynthesis. The ability of frataxin from different organisms to populate multiple oligomeric states in the presence of metal ions, e.g. Fe(2+) and Co(2+), led to the suggestion that different oligomers contribute to the functions of frataxin. Here we report on the complex between yeast frataxin and ferrochelatase, the terminal enzyme of heme biosynthesis. Protein-protein docking and cross-linking in combination with mass spectroscopic analysis and single-particle reconstruction from negatively stained electron microscopic images were used to verify the Yfh1-ferrochelatase interactions. The model of the complex indicates that at the 2:1 Fe(2+)-to-protein ratio, when Yfh1 populates a trimeric state, there are two interaction interfaces between frataxin and the ferrochelatase dimer. Each interaction site involves one ferrochelatase monomer and one frataxin trimer, with conserved polar and charged amino acids of the two proteins positioned at hydrogen-bonding distances from each other. One of the subunits of the Yfh1 trimer interacts extensively with one subunit of the ferrochelatase dimer, contributing to the stability of the complex, whereas another trimer subunit is positioned for Fe(2+) delivery. Single-turnover stopped-flow kinetics experiments demonstrate that increased rates of heme production result from monomers, dimers, and trimers, indicating that these forms are most efficient in delivering Fe(2+) to ferrochelatase and sustaining porphyrin metalation. Furthermore, they support the proposal that frataxin-mediated delivery of this potentially toxic substrate overcomes formation of reactive oxygen species.

  17. Red and processed meat, nitrite, and heme iron intakes and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Sinha, Rashmi; Gierach, Gretchen L; Ward, Mary H

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have shown inconsistent associations between red and processed meat intake and breast cancer risk. N-nitroso compounds and heme iron have been hypothesized as contributing factors. We followed 193,742 postmenopausal women in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and identified 9,305 incident breast cancers (1995-2006). Dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire at baseline. We adjusted daily intakes of meat, nitrite and heme iron for energy intake using the nutrient density method. We estimated multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by quintiles of dietary exposures for all breast cancer, by stage (in-situ, localized, regional/distant) and by estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR) status using Cox proportional hazards regression. Total red meat intake was positively associated with risk of regional/distant cancer (p-trend = 0.02). The risk was 25% higher in the highest vs. lowest intake quintile (95% CI = 1.03-1.52). Higher processed red meat intake (Q5 vs. Q1) was associated with 27% higher risk of localized breast cancer (95% CI = 1.01-1.27, p-trend = 0.03) and a 19% higher risk of regional/distant cancer (95% CI = 0.98-1.44, p-trend = 0.10). In addition, higher nitrite intake from processed red meat was positively associated with localized cancer (HR for Q5 vs. Q1 = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.09-1.39, p-trend processed meat may increase risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Added nitrite and heme iron may partly contribute to these observed associations.

  18. Overexpression of the yeast frataxin homolog (Yfh1): contrasting effects on iron-sulfur cluster assembly, heme synthesis and resistance to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Alexandra; Bayot, Aurélien; Dancis, Andrew; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Auchère, Françoise; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2009-04-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is generally associated with defects in [Fe-S] cluster assembly/stability and heme synthesis and strong susceptibility to oxidative stress. We used the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model of Friedreich's ataxia to study the physiological consequences of modulating the expression of the frataxin gene (YFH1). We show that the number of frataxin molecules per wild-type cell varies from less than 200 to 1500 according to the iron concentration in the medium. Cells overexpressing YFH1 on a plasmid (2muYFH1; about 3500 molecules Yfh1/cell) took up more iron than wild-type cells and displayed defective [Fe-S] cluster assembly/stability in vivo. By contrast, endogenous mitochondrial iron was more available to ferrochelatase in 2muYFH1 cells than in wild-type cells, resulting in higher levels of heme synthesis in vitro. Frataxin overproduction resulted in a shift from frataxin trimers to frataxin oligomers of higher molecular mass in the mitochondrial matrix. Much fewer carbonylated proteins were present in 2muYFH1 cells, and these cells were more resistant to oxidizing agents than wild-type cells, which probably resulted from the lower production of hydrogen peroxide by the mitochondria of 2muYFH1 cells compared to wild-type cells. To our knowledge, this work is the first description where major frataxin-related phenotypes ([Fe-S] cluster assembly and heme synthesis) can be split in vivo, suggesting that frataxin has independent roles in both processes, and that the optimal conditions for these independent roles are different.

  19. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids and heme iron induce oxidative stress biomarkers and a cancer promoting environment in the colon of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéraud, Françoise; Taché, Sylviane; Steghens, Jean-Paul; Milkovic, Lidija; Borovic-Sunjic, Suzana; Zarkovic, Neven; Gaultier, Eric; Naud, Nathalie; Héliès-Toussaint, Cécile; Pierre, Fabrice; Priymenko, Nathalie

    2015-06-01

    The end products of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) peroxidation, such as malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), and isoprostanes (8-iso-PGF2α), are widely used as systemic lipid oxidation/oxidative stress biomarkers. However, some of these compounds have also a dietary origin. Thus, replacing dietary saturated fat by PUFAs would improve health but could also increase the formation of such compounds, especially in the case of a pro-oxidant/antioxidant imbalanced diet. Hence, the possible impact of dietary fatty acids and pro-oxidant compounds was studied in rats given diets allowing comparison of the effects of heme iron vs. ferric citrate and of ω-6- vs. ω-3-rich oil on the level of lipid peroxidation/oxidative stress biomarkers. Rats given a heme iron-rich diet without PUFA were used as controls. The results obtained have shown that MDA and the major urinary metabolite of HNE (the mercapturic acid of dihydroxynonane, DHN-MA) were highly dependent on the dietary factors tested, while 8-iso-PGF2α was modestly but significantly affected. Intestinal inflammation and tissue fatty acid composition were checked in parallel and could only explain the differences we observed to a limited extent. Thus, the differences in biomarkers were attributed to the formation of lipid oxidation compounds in food or during digestion, their intestinal absorption, and their excretion into urine. Moreover, fecal extracts from the rats fed the heme iron or fish oil diets were highly toxic for immortalized mouse colon cells. Such toxicity can eventually lead to promotion of colorectal carcinogenesis, supporting the epidemiological findings between red meat intake and colorectal cancer risk. Therefore, the analysis of these biomarkers of lipid peroxidation/oxidative stress in urine should be used with caution when dietary factors are not well controlled, while control of their possible dietary intake is needed also because of their pro-inflammatory, toxic, and even

  20. Natural selection on HFE in Asian populations contributes to enhanced non-heme iron absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Kaixiong; Cao, Chang; Lin, Xu; O'Brien, Kimberly O; Gu, Zhenglong

    2015-06-10

    HFE, a major regulator of iron (Fe) homeostasis, has been suggested to be under positive selection in both European and Asian populations. While the genetic variant under selection in Europeans (a non-synonymous mutation, C282Y) has been relatively well-studied, the adaptive variant in Asians and its functional consequences are still unknown. Identifying the adaptive HFE variants in Asians will not only elucidate the evolutionary history and the genetic basis of population difference in Fe status, but also assist the future practice of genome-informed dietary recommendation. Using data from the International HapMap Project, we confirmed the signatures of positive selection on HFE in Asian populations and identified a candidate adaptive haplotype that is common in Asians (52.35-54.71%) but rare in Europeans (5.98%) and Africans (4.35%). The T allele at tag SNP rs9366637 (C/T) captured 95.8% of this Asian-common haplotype. A significantly reduced HFE expression was observed in individuals carrying T/T at rs9366637 compared to C/C and C/T, indicating a possible role of gene regulation in adaptation. We recruited 57 women of Asian descent and measured Fe absorption using stable isotopes in those homozygous at rs9366637. We observed a 22% higher absorption in women homozygous for the Asian-common haplotype (T/T) compared to the control genotype (C/C). Additionally, compared with a group of age-matched Caucasian women, Asian women exhibited significantly elevated Fe absorption. Our results indicate parallel adaptation of HFE gene in Europeans and Asians with different genetic variants. Moreover, natural selection on HFE may have contributed to elevated Fe absorption in Asians. This study regarding population differences in Fe homeostasis has significant medical impact as high Fe level has been linked to an increased disease risk of metabolic syndromes.

  1. Trends in substrate hydroxylation reactions by heme and nonheme iron(IV)-oxo oxidants give correlations between intrinsic properties of the oxidant with barrier height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Sam P

    2010-01-27

    Iron(IV)-oxo species have been characterized in several nonheme enzymes and biomimetic systems and are efficient oxidants of aliphatic hydroxylation reactions. However, there appears to be a large variation in substrate hydroxylation ability by different iron(IV)-oxo oxidants due to the effect of the ligands bound to the metal. In this work, we have studied these indirect effects of ligands perpendicular (cis or equatorial) and opposite (trans or axial) to the iron(IV)-oxo group in heme and nonheme oxidants on the oxygenation capability of the oxidant. To this end, we have done a series of density functional theory calculations on the hydrogen atom abstraction of propene by a range of different iron(IV)-oxo oxidants that include heme and nonheme iron(IV)-oxo oxidants. We show that the hydrogen atom abstraction barrier of substrate hydroxylation correlates linearly with the strength of the Fe(III)O-H bond that is formed, i.e., BDE(OH), and that this value ranges by at least 20 kcal mol(-1) dependent on the cis- and trans-ligands attached to the metal. Thus, our studies show that ligands bound to the metal are noninnocent and influence the catalytic properties of the metal-oxo group dramatically due to involvement into the high-lying occupied and virtual orbitals. A general valence bond curve crossing model is set up that explains how the rate constant of hydrogen atom abstraction is proportional to the difference in energy of the C-H bond of the substrate that is broken and the O-H bond of the Fe(III)O-H complex that is formed, i.e., proportional to BDE(CH) - BDE(OH) or the reaction enthalpy. In addition, we show a correlation between the polarizability change and barrier height for the hydrogen atom abstraction reaction.

  2. Hypochlorous acid-induced heme degradation from lactoperoxidase as a novel mechanism of free iron release and tissue injury in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Carlos Eduardo A; Maitra, Dhiman; Saed, Ghassan M; Diamond, Michael P; Moura, Arlindo A; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2011-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is the major consumer of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the airways through its ability to oxidize thiocyanate (SCN(-)) to produce hypothiocyanous acid, an antimicrobial agent. In nasal inflammatory diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, both LPO and myeloperoxidase (MPO), another mammalian peroxidase secreted by neutrophils, are known to co-localize. The aim of this study was to assess the interaction of LPO and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), the final product of MPO. Our rapid kinetic measurements revealed that HOCl binds rapidly and reversibly to LPO-Fe(III) to form the LPO-Fe(III)-OCl complex, which in turn decayed irreversibly to LPO Compound II through the formation of Compound I. The decay rate constant of Compound II decreased with increasing HOCl concentration with an inflection point at 100 µM HOCl, after which the decay rate increased. This point of inflection is the critical concentration of HOCl beyond which HOCl switches its role, from mediating destabilization of LPO Compound II to LPO heme destruction. Lactoperoxidase heme destruction was associated with protein aggregation, free iron release, and formation of a number of fluorescent heme degradation products. Similar results were obtained when LPO-Fe(II)-O(2), Compound III, was exposed to HOCl. Heme destruction can be partially or completely prevented in the presence of SCN(-). On the basis of the present results we concluded that a complex bi-directional relationship exists between LPO activity and HOCl levels at sites of inflammation; LPO serve as a catalytic sink for HOCl, while HOCl serves to modulate LPO catalytic activity, bioavailability, and function.

  3. Hypochlorous acid-induced heme degradation from lactoperoxidase as a novel mechanism of free iron release and tissue injury in inflammatory diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo A Souza

    Full Text Available Lactoperoxidase (LPO is the major consumer of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 in the airways through its ability to oxidize thiocyanate (SCN(- to produce hypothiocyanous acid, an antimicrobial agent. In nasal inflammatory diseases, such as cystic fibrosis, both LPO and myeloperoxidase (MPO, another mammalian peroxidase secreted by neutrophils, are known to co-localize. The aim of this study was to assess the interaction of LPO and hypochlorous acid (HOCl, the final product of MPO. Our rapid kinetic measurements revealed that HOCl binds rapidly and reversibly to LPO-Fe(III to form the LPO-Fe(III-OCl complex, which in turn decayed irreversibly to LPO Compound II through the formation of Compound I. The decay rate constant of Compound II decreased with increasing HOCl concentration with an inflection point at 100 µM HOCl, after which the decay rate increased. This point of inflection is the critical concentration of HOCl beyond which HOCl switches its role, from mediating destabilization of LPO Compound II to LPO heme destruction. Lactoperoxidase heme destruction was associated with protein aggregation, free iron release, and formation of a number of fluorescent heme degradation products. Similar results were obtained when LPO-Fe(II-O(2, Compound III, was exposed to HOCl. Heme destruction can be partially or completely prevented in the presence of SCN(-. On the basis of the present results we concluded that a complex bi-directional relationship exists between LPO activity and HOCl levels at sites of inflammation; LPO serve as a catalytic sink for HOCl, while HOCl serves to modulate LPO catalytic activity, bioavailability, and function.

  4. A Randomized, Open-Label, Non-Inferiority Study of Intravenous Iron Isomaltoside 1,000 (Monofer) Compared With Oral Iron for Treatment of Anemia in IBD (PROCEED)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinisch, Walter; Staun, Michael; Tandon, Rakesh K

    2013-01-01

    In the largest head-to-head comparison between an oral and an intravenous (IV) iron compound in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) so far, we strived to determine whether IV iron isomaltoside 1,000 is non-inferior to oral iron sulfate in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA)....

  5. Nitric oxide and iron modulate heme oxygenase activity as a long distance signaling response to salt stress in sunflower seedling cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neha; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-02-29

    Nitric oxide is a significant component of iron signaling in plants. Heme is one of the iron sensors in plants. Free heme is highly toxic and can cause cell damage as it catalyzes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Its catabolism is carried out by heme oxygenase (HOs; EC 1.14.99.3) which uses heme both as a prosthetic group and as a substrate. Two significant events, which accompany adaptation to salt stress in sunflower seedlings, are accumulation of ROS and enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) in roots and cotyledons. Present investigations on the immunolocalization of heme oxygenase distribution in sunflower seedling cotyledons by confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging provide new information on the differential spatial distribution of the inducible form of HO (HO-1) as a long distance in response to NaCl stress. The enzyme is abundantly distributed in the specialized cells around the secretory canals (SCs) in seedling cotyledons. Abundance of tyrosine nitrated proteins has also been observed in the specialized cells around the secretory canals in cotyledons derived from salt stressed seedlings. The spatial distribution of tyrosine nitrated proteins and HO-1 expression further correlates with the abundance of mitochondria in these cells. Present findings, thus, highlight a link among distribution of HO-1 expression, abundance of tyrosine nitrated proteins and mitochondria in specialized cells around the secretory canal as a long distance mechanism of salt stress tolerance in sunflower seedlings. Enhanced spatial distribution of HO-1 in response to NaCl stress in seedling cotyledons is in congruence with the observed increase in specific activity of HO-1 in NaCl stressed conditions. The enzyme activity is further enhanced by hemin (HO-1 inducer) both in the absence or presence of NaCl stress and inhibited by zinc protoporphyrin. Western blot analysis of cotyledon homogenates using anti-HO-1 polyclonal antibody shows one major band (29

  6. Iron casein succinylate-chitosan coacervate for the liquid oral delivery of iron with bioavailability and stability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Cho, Jung-Hye; Song, Yun-Kyoung; Kim, Chong-Kook

    2016-01-01

    Iron casein succinylate (ICS) liquid oral preparation as iron supplement has uncomfortable taste after a long period of storage because of its stability, and poor bioavailability of iron compared to any other iron preparations. To improve the chemical stability of ICS and enhance the bioavailability of iron, chitosan-ICS nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by complex coacervation method and stabilized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400. NPs were spherical (mean diameter of 830-1070 nm) with positive charge (+30-60 mV) depending on the composition of NPs. Addition of PEG400 (2 w/v %) increased the zeta potential (26-50 %) and physical stability of chitosan-ICS NPs suspension. Also, NPs decreased iron release compared to ICS after 7-weeks of storage at 4 °C. NPs markedly increased the permeability of iron in Caco-2 cell up to 32-38-fold compared to ICS, while physical mixture of chitosan and ICS increased the iron permeability only 2.5-fold. In summary, NPs improved the physicochemical stability and enhanced the transport of iron compared to other iron preparations in Caco-2 cell model. Thus, chitosan-ICS coacervate might be a promising candidate as a liquid oral iron delivery system for iron deficiency patients with stability and bioavailability enhancement.

  7. Heme on innate immunity and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabianno Ferreira Dutra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heme is an essential molecule expressed ubiquitously all through our tissues. Heme plays major functions in cellular physiology and metabolism as the prostetic group of diverse proteins. Once released from cells and from hemeproteins free heme causes oxidative damage and inflammation, thus acting as a prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern. In this context, free heme is a critical component of the pathological process of sterile and infectious hemolytic conditions including malaria, hemolytic anemias, ischemia-reperfusion and hemorrhage. The plasma scavanger proteins hemopexin and albumin reduce heme toxicity and are responsible for transporting free heme to intracellular compartments where it is catabolized by heme-oxygenase enzymes. Upon hemolysis or severe cellular damage the serum capacity to scavange heme may saturate and increase free heme to sufficient amounts to cause tissue damage in various organs. The mechanism by which heme causes reactive oxygen generation, activation of cells of the innate immune system and cell death are not fully understood. Although heme can directly promote lipid peroxidation by its iron atom, heme can also induce ROS generation and production of inflammatory mediators through the activation of selective signaling pathways. Heme activates innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils through activation of innate immune receptors. The importance of these events has been demonstrated in infectious and non-infectious diseases models. In this review we will discuss the mechanisms behind heme-induced citotoxicity and inflammation and the consequences of these events on different tissues and diseases.

  8. Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose in Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia Who Respond Poorly to Oral Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Shamoun, Mark; McCavit, Timothy L; Adix, Leah; Buchanan, George R

    2017-01-01

    To assess the benefits and risks of intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) in children with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In a retrospective cohort study of patients seen at our center, we identified all FCM infusions in children with IDA over a 12-month period through a query of pharmacy records. Clinical data, including hematologic response and adverse effects, were extracted from the electronic medical record. A total of 116 IV FCM infusions were administered to 72 patients with IDA refractory to oral iron treatment (median age, 13.7 years; range, 9 months to 18 years). Median preinfusion and postinfusion hemoglobin values were 9.1 g/dL and 12.3 g/dL, respectively (at 4-12 weeks after the initial infusion; n = 53). Sixty-five patients (84%) experienced no adverse effects. Minor transient complications were encountered during or immediately after 7 infusions. FCM administered as a short IV infusion without a test dose proved to be safe and highly effective in a small yet diverse population of infants, children, and adolescents with IDA refractory to oral iron therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilibeth Lanceta

    Full Text Available Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by "loose" (probably intralysosomal iron because cytotoxic effects of heme are lessened by pre-incubation of HO-1 deficient cells with desferrioxamine (which localizes preferentially in the lysosomal compartment. Desferrioxamine also decreases lysosomal rupture promoted by intracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide. Supporting the importance of endogenous oxidant production, both chemical and siRNA inhibition of catalase activity predisposes HO-1 deficient cells to heme-mediated killing. Importantly, it appears that HO-1 deficiency somehow blocks the induction of ferritin; control cells exposed to heme show ~10-fold increases in ferritin heavy chain expression whereas in heme-exposed HO-1 deficient cells ferritin expression is unchanged. Finally, overexpression of ferritin H chain in HO-1 deficient cells completely prevents heme-induced cytotoxicity. Although two other products of HO-1 activity--CO and bilirubin--have been invoked to explain HO-1-mediated cytoprotection, we conclude that, at least in this experimental system, HO-1 activity triggers the induction of ferritin and the latter is actually responsible for the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 activity.

  10. EVALUATION OF INTRAVENOUS IRON VERSUS ORAL IRON IN MANAGEMENT OF IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY WITH SPECIFIC REFERENCE TO BODY IRON STORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Anemia is the most common Nutritional deficiency di sorder in the World. Iron-deficient anemia (IDA is responsible for 95% o f anemia during pregnancy. Parenteral iron is a useful treatment, although iro n dextran use decreased due to anaphylaxis. Iron sucrose is a newer agent that has overcome the shortcomings of iron dextran. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy an d tolerance of intravenous iron sucrose (IVIS therapy with oral iron (OI therapy in pregnant women with IDA with specific emphasis on body iron stores. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective, randomized clinical trial included 100 pregnant women between < 32 weeks with established IDA who were treated with IVIS or OI (ferrous ascorbate. All patients we re monitored for laboratory response and adverse effects. Independent sample- t test was used for statistical analysis. P < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: Although hemoglobin increased in both the groups, in crease in the reticulocyte count and percentage increase in hemoglobin was significantly higher in the IVIS group than in the OI group. Serum ferritin was s ignificantly higher in the IVIS group than in the OI group ( P = 0.000. The IVIS group had no major side-effects. Compliance was good with OI, although majority had gastrointestinal side-eff ects. CONCLUSION: IVIS is safe and effective in the treatment of IDA during pregnancy. Iron store s increased better with IVIS compared with OI

  11. Mechanisms of heme utilization by Francisella tularensis.

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    Helena Lindgren

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent facultative intracellular pathogen causing the severe disease tularemia in mammals. As for other bacteria, iron is essential for its growth but very few mechanisms for iron acquisition have been identified. Here, we analyzed if and how F. tularensis can utilize heme, a major source of iron in vivo. This is by no means obvious since the bacterium lacks components of traditional heme-uptake systems. We show that SCHU S4, the prototypic strain of subspecies tularensis, grew in vitro with heme as the sole iron source. By screening a SCHU S4 transposon insertion library, 16 genes were identified as important to efficiently utilize heme, two of which were required to avoid heme toxicity. None of the identified genes appeared to encode components of a potential heme-uptake apparatus. Analysis of SCHU S4 deletion mutants revealed that each of the components FeoB, the siderophore system, and FupA, contributed to the heme-dependent growth. In the case of the former two systems, iron acquisition was impaired, whereas the absence of FupA did not affect iron uptake but led to abnormally high binding of iron to macromolecules. Overall, the present study demonstrates that heme supports growth of F. tularensis and that the requirements for the utilization are highly complex and to some extent novel.

  12. Synthesis of a Non-Heme Template for Attaching Four Peptides : An Approach to Artificial Iron(II)-Containing Peroxidases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, Marco van den; Berg, Tieme A. van den; Kellogg, Richard M.; Choma, Christin T.; Feringa, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    We are developing all-synthetic model cofactor-protein complexes in order to define the parameters controlling non-natural cofactor activity. The long-term objective is to establish the theoretical and practical basis for designing novel enzymes. A non-heme pentadentate ligand (N4Py) is being

  13. The DFT-DVM theoretical study of the differences of quadrupole splitting and the iron electronic structure for the rough heme models for {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits in deoxyhemoglobin and for deoxymyoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuryeva, E. I. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@mail.utnet.ru [Ural State Technical University-UPI, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation)

    2008-01-15

    Quantum chemical calculations of the iron electron structure and {sup 57}Fe quadrupole splitting were made by density functional theory and X{alpha} discrete variation method for the rough heme models for {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits in deoxyhemoglobin and for deoxymyoglobin accounting stereochemical differences of the active sites in native proteins. The calculations revealed differences of quadrupole splitting temperature dependences for three models indicating sensitivity of quadrupole splitting and Fe(II) electronic structure to small variations of iron stereochemistry.

  14. Pre-Altitude Serum Ferritin Levels and Daily Oral Iron Supplement Dose Mediate Iron Parameter and Hemoglobin Mass Responses to Altitude Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Govus, Andrew D.; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Chris R Abbiss; Peter Peeling; Gore, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of daily oral iron supplementation on changes in hemoglobin mass (Hbmass) and iron parameters after 2–4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure. Methods Hematological data collected from 178 athletes (98 males, 80 females) exposed to moderate altitude (1,350–3,000 m) were analysed using linear regression to determine how altitude exposure combined with oral iron supplementation influenced Hbmass, total iron incorporation (TII) and blood iron parameters [ferrit...

  15. Synthesis of 5-hydroxyectoine from ectoine: crystal structure of the non-heme iron(II and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase EctD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Reuter

    Full Text Available As a response to high osmolality, many microorganisms synthesize various types of compatible solutes. These organic osmolytes aid in offsetting the detrimental effects of low water activity on cell physiology. One of these compatible solutes is ectoine. A sub-group of the ectoine producer's enzymatically convert this tetrahydropyrimidine into a hydroxylated derivative, 5-hydroxyectoine. This compound also functions as an effective osmostress protectant and compatible solute but it possesses properties that differ in several aspects from those of ectoine. The enzyme responsible for ectoine hydroxylation (EctD is a member of the non-heme iron(II-containing and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (EC 1.14.11. These enzymes couple the decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate with the formation of a high-energy ferryl-oxo intermediate to catalyze the oxidation of the bound organic substrate. We report here the crystal structure of the ectoine hydroxylase EctD from the moderate halophile Virgibacillus salexigens in complex with Fe(3+ at a resolution of 1.85 A. Like other non-heme iron(II and 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases, the core of the EctD structure consists of a double-stranded beta-helix forming the main portion of the active-site of the enzyme. The positioning of the iron ligand in the active-site of EctD is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved 2-His-1-carboxylate iron-binding motif. The side chains of the three residues forming this iron-binding site protrude into a deep cavity in the EctD structure that also harbours the 2-oxoglutarate co-substrate-binding site. Database searches revealed a widespread occurrence of EctD-type proteins in members of the Bacteria but only in a single representative of the Archaea, the marine crenarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The EctD crystal structure reported here can serve as a template to guide further biochemical and structural studies of this biotechnologically interesting enzyme family.

  16. Synthesis of 5-hydroxyectoine from ectoine: crystal structure of the non-heme iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase EctD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Klaus; Pittelkow, Marco; Bursy, Jan; Heine, Andreas; Craan, Tobias; Bremer, Erhard

    2010-05-14

    As a response to high osmolality, many microorganisms synthesize various types of compatible solutes. These organic osmolytes aid in offsetting the detrimental effects of low water activity on cell physiology. One of these compatible solutes is ectoine. A sub-group of the ectoine producer's enzymatically convert this tetrahydropyrimidine into a hydroxylated derivative, 5-hydroxyectoine. This compound also functions as an effective osmostress protectant and compatible solute but it possesses properties that differ in several aspects from those of ectoine. The enzyme responsible for ectoine hydroxylation (EctD) is a member of the non-heme iron(II)-containing and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (EC 1.14.11). These enzymes couple the decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate with the formation of a high-energy ferryl-oxo intermediate to catalyze the oxidation of the bound organic substrate. We report here the crystal structure of the ectoine hydroxylase EctD from the moderate halophile Virgibacillus salexigens in complex with Fe(3+) at a resolution of 1.85 A. Like other non-heme iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases, the core of the EctD structure consists of a double-stranded beta-helix forming the main portion of the active-site of the enzyme. The positioning of the iron ligand in the active-site of EctD is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved 2-His-1-carboxylate iron-binding motif. The side chains of the three residues forming this iron-binding site protrude into a deep cavity in the EctD structure that also harbours the 2-oxoglutarate co-substrate-binding site. Database searches revealed a widespread occurrence of EctD-type proteins in members of the Bacteria but only in a single representative of the Archaea, the marine crenarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The EctD crystal structure reported here can serve as a template to guide further biochemical and structural studies of this biotechnologically interesting enzyme family.

  17. Glucocorticoid treatment skews human monocyte differentiation into a hemoglobin-clearance phenotype with enhanced heme-iron recycling and antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallelian, Florence; Schaer, Christian A; Kaempfer, Theresa; Gehrig, Peter; Duerst, Elena; Schoedon, Gabriele; Schaer, Dominik J

    2010-12-09

    Glucocorticoids are used extensively to treat autoimmune hemolytic anemias. Some beneficial effects of glucocorticoid pulse therapy have also been reported in sickle cell disease and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Based on established concepts of hemoglobin (Hb) toxicity and physiologic Hb scavenger systems, we evaluated whether glucocorticoids could support an adaptive response to extracellular Hb independently of their immunosuppressive activities. Using global proteome and transcriptome analysis with mass-spectrometry (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) and gene-array experiments, we found that glucocorticoid treatment in vitro and in patients on glucocorticoid-pulse therapy polarized monocytes into a M2/alternatively activated phenotype with high Hb-scavenger receptor (CD163) expression and enhanced Hb-clearance and detoxification capability. Monocytes concurrently exposed to the interactive activity of glucocorticoids and extracellular Hb were characterized by high expression of a group of antioxidant enzymes known to be regulated by the conserved oxidative response transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor. Further, suppressed transferrin receptor, together with high ferroportin expression, pointed to a shift in iron homeostasis directed toward an increased cellular export of heme-derived iron. Therefore, stimulating Hb-endocytosis by CD163 and enhancing antioxidative homeostasis and iron recycling may be an essential activity of glucocorticoids that helps alleviate the adverse effects of extracellular Hb.

  18. Inhibition of replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by hemin is highly dependent on heme oxygenase-1, but independent of iron in MARC-145 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangliang; Xiao, Shuqi; Gao, Jintao; Liu, Meirui; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Li, Ming; Zhao, Guangyin; Mo, Delin; Liu, Xiaohong; Chen, Yaosheng

    2014-05-01

    Current vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have failed to provide sustainable disease control, and development of new antiviral strategies is of great importance. The present study investigated the mechanism of the antiviral effect of hemin during PRRSV infection in MARC-145 cells. Hemin, a commercial preparation of heme, is used as an iron donor or heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) inducer, and has been shown to provide antiviral activity in many studies. In the current study, the anti-PRRSV activity of hemin was identified through suppressing PRRSV propagation. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of hemin antiviral activity was estimated to be 32μM, and the 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of hemin was found to be higher than 125μM. Further study showed that the antiviral activity of hemin is independent of iron. In addition, after treatment with Protoporphyrin IX zinc (II) (ZnPP) or Sn (IV) Protoporphyrin IX dichloride (SnPP), inhibitors of HO-1, the inhibition of viral replication by hemin was partially reversed. Additionally, it was confirmed that hemin and N-acetyl cysteine were able to significantly reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in MARC-145 cells infected with virus. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), however, did not produce a reduction in viral load or promote expression of HO-1. Taken together, these data indicate that the effect of hemin on the inhibition of PRRSV propagation via HO-1 induction, as well as the antiviral mechanism of HO-1, is not dependent on decreased levels of ROS. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that hemin had antiviral activity against PRRSV and may serve as a useful antiviral agent inhibiting PRRSV replication.

  19. A review and meta-analysis of prospective studies of red and processed meat, meat cooking methods, heme iron, heterocyclic amines and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylsma, Lauren C; Alexander, Dominik D

    2015-12-21

    Prostate cancer remains a significant public health concern among men in the U.S. and worldwide. Epidemiologic studies have generally produced inconclusive results for dietary risk factors for prostate cancer, including consumption of red and processed meats. We aimed to update a previous meta-analysis of prospective cohorts of red and processed meats and prostate cancer with the inclusion of new and updated cohort studies, as well as evaluate meat cooking methods, heme iron, and heterocyclic amine (HCA) intake exposure data. A comprehensive literature search was performed and 26 publications from 19 different cohort studies were included. Random effects models were used to calculate summary relative risk estimates (SRREs) for high vs. low exposure categories. Additionally, meta-regression analyses and stratified intake analyses were conducted to evaluate dose-response relationships. The SRREs for total prostate cancer and total red meat consumption, fresh red meat consumption, and processed meat consumption were 1.02 (95% CI: 0.92-1.12), 1.06 (95% CI: 0.97-1.16), and 1.05 (95% CI: 1.01-1.10), respectively. Analyses were also conducted for the outcomes of non-advanced, advanced, and fatal prostate cancer when sufficient data were available, but these analyses did not produce significant results. No significant SRREs were observed for any of the meat cooking methods, HCA, or heme iron analyses. Dose-response analyses did not reveal significant patterns of associations between red or processed meat and prostate cancer. In conclusion, the results from our analyses do not support an association between red meat or processed consumption and prostate cancer, although we observed a weak positive summary estimate for processed meats.

  20. The effects of nitrogen-heme-iron coordination on substrate affinities for cytochrome P450 2E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeffrey P; Joswig-Jones, Carolyn A; Hebner, Michelle; Chu, Yuzhuo; Koop, Dennis R

    2011-08-15

    A descriptor based computational model was developed for cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) based on inhibition constants determined for inhibition of chlorzoxazone, or 4-nitrophenol, metabolism. An empirical descriptor for type II binding was developed and tested for a series of CYP2E1 inhibitors. Inhibition constants where measured for 51 different compounds. A fast 2-dimensional predictive model was developed based on 40 compounds, and tested on 8 compounds of diverse structure. The trained model (n=40) had an r(2) value of 0.76 and an RMSE of 0.48. The correlation between the predicted and actual pK(i) values of the test set of compounds not included in the model gives an r(2) value of 0.78. The features that described binding include heme coordination (type II binding), molecular volume, octanol/water partition coefficient, solvent accessible surface area, and the sum of the atomic polarizabilities. The heme coordination parameter assigns an integer between 0 and 6 depending on structure, and is a new descriptor, based on simple quantum chemical calculations with correction for steric effects. The type II binding parameter was found to be important in obtaining a good correlation between predicted and experimental inhibition constants increasing the r(2) value from 0.38 to 0.77.

  1. Effects of dietary heme iron and exercise training on abdominal fat accumulation and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumura, Masanori; Takagi, Shoko; Oya, Hana; Tamura, Shohei; Saneyasu, Takaoki; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-02

    Animal by-products can be recycled and used as sources of essential nutrients. Water-soluble heme iron (WSHI), a functional food additive for supplementing iron, is produced by processing animal blood. In this study, we investigated the effects of dietary supplementation of 3% WSHI and exercise training for 4 weeks on the accumulation of abdominal fat and lipid metabolism in mice fed high-fat diet. Exercise-trained mice had significantly less perirenal adipose tissue, whereas WSHI-fed mice tended to have less epididymal adipose tissue. In addition, total weight of abdominal adipose tissues was significantly decreased in the Exercise + WSHI group. Dietary WSHI significantly increased the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of lipoprotein lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase. WSHI-fed mice also tended to show increased mRNA levels of adipose triglyceride lipase in their epididymal adipose tissue. Dietary WSHI also significantly decreased the mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation-related enzymes in the liver, but did not influence levels in the Gastrocnemius muscle. Exercise training did not influence the mRNA levels of lipid metabolism-related enzymes in the epididymal adipose tissue, liver or the Gastrocnemius muscle. These findings suggest that the accumulation of abdominal fat can be efficiently decreased by the combination of dietary WSHI and exercise training in mice fed high-fat diet.

  2. Glutaredoxin 5 deficiency causes sideroblastic anemia by specifically impairing heme biosynthesis and depleting cytosolic iron in human erythroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hong; Jeong, Suh Young; Ghosh, Manik C.; Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Silvestri, Laura; Ortillo, Danilo; Uchida, Naoya; Tisdale, John; Camaschella, Clara; Rouault, Tracey A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) deficiency has previously been identified as a cause of anemia in a zebrafish model and of sideroblastic anemia in a human patient. Here we report that GLRX5 is essential for iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis and the maintenance of normal mitochondrial and cytosolic iron homeostasis in human cells. GLRX5, a mitochondrial protein that is highly expressed in erythroid cells, can homodimerize and assemble [2Fe-2S] in vitro. In GLRX5-deficient cells, [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis was impaired, the iron-responsive element–binding (IRE-binding) activity of iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) was activated, and increased IRP2 levels, indicative of relative cytosolic iron depletion, were observed together with mitochondrial iron overload. Rescue of patient fibroblasts with the WT GLRX5 gene by transfection or viral transduction reversed a slow growth phenotype, reversed the mitochondrial iron overload, and increased aconitase activity. Decreased aminolevulinate δ, synthase 2 (ALAS2) levels attributable to IRP-mediated translational repression were observed in erythroid cells in which GLRX5 expression had been downregulated using siRNA along with marked reduction in ferrochelatase levels and increased ferroportin expression. Erythroblasts express both IRP-repressible ALAS2 and non-IRP–repressible ferroportin 1b. The unique combination of IRP targets likely accounts for the tissue-specific phenotype of human GLRX5 deficiency. PMID:20364084

  3. 4-Hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal metabolism differs in Apc(+/+) cells and in Apc(Min/+) cells: it may explain colon cancer promotion by heme iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradat, Maryse; Jouanin, Isabelle; Dalleau, Sabine; Taché, Sylviane; Gieules, Mathilde; Debrauwer, Laurent; Canlet, Cécile; Huc, Laurence; Dupuy, Jacques; Pierre, Fabrice H F; Guéraud, Françoise

    2011-11-21

    Animal and epidemiological studies suggest that dietary heme iron would promote colorectal cancer. Oxidative properties of heme could lead to the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic secondary lipid oxidation products, such as 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal (HNE). This compound is more cytotoxic to mouse wild-type colon cells than to isogenic cells with a mutation on the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. The latter thus have a selective advantage, possibly leading to cancer promotion. This mutation is an early and frequent event in human colorectal cancer. To explain this difference, the HNE biotransformation capacities of the two cell types have been studied using radiolabeled and stable isotope-labeled HNE. Apc-mutated cells showed better biotransformation capacities than nonmutated cells did. Thiol compound conjugation capacities were higher for mutated cells, with an important advantage for the extracellular conjugation to cysteine. Both cells types were able to reduce HNE to 4-hydroxynonanal, a biotransformation pathway that has not been reported for other intestinal cells. Mutated cells showed higher capacities to oxidize 4-hydroxynonanal into 4-hydroxynonanoic acid. The mRNA expression of different enzymes involved in HNE metabolism such as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1, 2 and 3A1, glutathione transferase A4-4, or cystine transporter xCT was upregulated in mutated cells compared with wild-type cells. In conclusion, this study suggests that Apc-mutated cells are more efficient than wild-type cells in metabolizing HNE into thiol conjugates and 4-hydroxynonanoic acid due to the higher expression of key biotransformation enzymes. These differential biotransformation capacities would explain the differences of susceptibility between normal and Apc-mutated cells regarding secondary lipid oxidation products.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of an iron complex bearing a cyclic tetra-N-heterocyclic carbene ligand: An artifical heme analogue?

    KAUST Repository

    Anneser, Markus R.

    2015-04-20

    An iron(II) complex with a cyclic tetradentate ligand containing four N-heterocyclic carbenes was synthesized and characterized by means of NMR and IR spectroscopies, as well as by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. The iron center exhibits an octahedral coordination geometry with two acetonitrile ligands in axial positions, showing structural analogies with porphyrine-ligated iron complexes. The acetonitrile ligands can readily be substituted by other ligands, for instance, dimethyl sulfoxide, carbon monoxide, and nitric oxide. Cyclic voltammetry was used to examine the electronic properties of the synthesized compounds. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  5. Extracellular heme uptake and the challenges of bacterial cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron D; Wilks, Angela

    2012-01-01

    In bacteria, the fine balance of maintaining adequate iron levels while preventing the deleterious effects of excess iron has led to the evolution of sophisticated cellular mechanisms to obtain, store, and regulate iron. Iron uptake provides a significant challenge given its limited bioavailability and need to be transported across the bacterial cell wall and membranes. Pathogenic bacteria have circumvented the iron-availability issue by utilizing the hosts' heme-containing proteins as a source of iron. Once internalized, iron is liberated from the porphyrin enzymatically for cellular processes within the bacterial cell. Heme, a lipophilic and toxic molecule, poses a significant challenge in terms of transport given its chemical reactivity. As such, pathogenic bacteria have evolved sophisticated membrane transporters to coordinate, sequester, and transport heme. Recent advances in the biochemical and structural characterization of the membrane-bound heme transport proteins are discussed in the context of ligand coordination, protein-protein interaction, and heme transfer.

  6. Heme-containing dioxygenases involved in tryptophan oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Elizabeth S; Efimov, Igor; Basran, Jaswir; Handa, Sandeep; Mowat, Christopher G; Raven, Emma Lloyd

    2012-04-01

    Heme iron is often used in biology for activation of oxygen. The mechanisms of oxygen activation by heme-containing monooxygenases (the cytochrome P450s) are well known, and involve formation of a Compound I species, but information on the heme-containing dioxygenase enzymes involved in tryptophan oxidation lags far behind. In this review, we gather together information emerging recently from structural, mechanistic, spectroscopic, and computational approaches on the heme dioxygenase enzymes involved in tryptophan oxidation. We explore the subtleties that differentiate various heme enzymes from each other, and use this to piece together a developing picture for oxygen activation in this particular class of heme-containing dioxygenases.

  7. Oral exfoliative cytology as a screening tool for iron overload in β-thalassemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Ajit Singh; Keshri, Neha; Shetty, Devi Charan; Juneja, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Increased iron overload is frequent problem in thalassemia patients, and this is monitored by serum ferritin levels or chemical assessment of the iron levels in liver tissue. However, repeated monitoring of serum ferritin levels to assess the iron overload is an invasive procedure associated with practical problems. To use Perl's Prussian blue reaction to evaluate the iron overload in beta-thalassemia patients by staining the oral cytosmears. The study comprised 35 patients diagnosed with beta-thalassemia. Cytosmears were prepared from exfoliated oral epithelial cells, fixed in 70% ethanol and stained with Perl's Prussian blue stain for detection of blue colored granules in the cytoplasm. 29/35 (82.9%) cases showed a positive reaction for Perl's Prussian blue reaction while 6/35 (17%) cases did not show the presence of blue colored granules in the oral cytosmears. The presence of iron detected by Perl's Prussian blue reaction correlated with serum ferritin level (P < 0.05). Perl's Prussian blue reaction can be used to evaluate the iron overload in beta-thalassemia patients by staining the oral cytosmears. It is a simple and noninvasive method for assessment of iron overload in such patients.

  8. Alterações provocadas pela irradiação e armazenamento nos teores de ferro heme em carne de frango Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Régia Marques Souza; Valter Arthur; Solange Guidolin Canniatti-Brazaca

    2007-01-01

    Estudos sobre o efeito da irradiação e do armazenamento em carnes de frango foram realizados para se conhecer melhor sua influência nos teores de ferro heme, não-heme, cor e pigmentos totais. Foram estudados coxa e filé de peito de frango. Estes foram irradiados a 0, 1 e 2 kGy e armazenados por 14 dias a 4 °C em câmara refrigerada. A determinação do conteúdo de heme e não-heme de carnes foi realizada através do método colorimétrico, empregando-se o reagente Ferrozine. Os valores de ferro ...

  9. 血红素铁改善缺铁性贫血效果观察%Effect of the heme iron supplement on improving nutritional anemia in women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈炜林; 胡余明; 李梓民

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解血红素铁对缺铁性贫血的影响.方法 将符合贫血诊断的女性108人随机分为血红素铁组和对照组,并分别给予血红素铁和安慰剂,连续服用45 d,服用开始前和服用结束时对受试者进行膳食营养调查、体格检查和血液生化指标的检测并进行统计学分析.结果 血红素铁组血红蛋白的含量由试验前的(106.43±10.48) g/L上升到(117.34±10.25)g/L,平均升高了10.91 g/L(服用前后配对t检验,P<0.05,服用后与对照组t检验,P<0.05);红细胞游离原卟啉的含量由(942.15±96.34)μg/L下降为(820.53±109.95)μg/L(服用前后配对t检验,P<0.05,服用后与对照组t检验,P<0.05);试验组血清铁蛋白的含量由试验前的(25.19±6.71) ng/ml上升到(25.40±6.69) ng/ml,(服用前后配对t检验,P>0.05).结论 血红素铁对缺铁性贫血具有一定的改善作用.并对受试者健康无不良影响.%Objective To investigate the improvement of nutritional anemia in women treated by heme iron supplement. Methods A total of 108 female subjects with nutritional anemia ( Hb 0.05). Conclusion The heme iron supplement is effective in the treatment of nutritional anemia in women with no serious side effect.

  10. Heme oxygenase: evolution, structure, and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Angela

    2002-08-01

    Heme oxygenase has evolved to carry out the oxidative cleavage of heme, a reaction essential in physiological processes as diverse as iron reutilization and cellular signaling in mammals, synthesis of essential light-harvesting pigments in cyanobacteria and higher plants, and the acquisition of iron by bacterial pathogens. In all of these processes, heme oxygenase has evolved a similar structural and mechanistic scaffold to function within seemingly diverse physiological pathways. The heme oxygenase reaction is catalytically distinct from that of other hemoproteins such as the cytochromes P450, peroxidases, and catalases, but shares a hemoprotein scaffold that has evolved to generate a distinct activated oxygen species. In the following review we discuss the evolution of the structural and functional properties of heme oxygenase in light of the recent crystal structures of the mammalian and bacterial enzymes.

  11. Influence of Ligand Architecture in Tuning Reaction Bifurcation Pathways for Chlorite Oxidation by Non-Heme Iron Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barman, Prasenjit; Faponle, Abayomi S; Vardhaman, Anil Kumar; Angelone, Davide; Löhr, Anna-Maria; Browne, Wesley R; Comba, Peter; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-01-01

    Reaction bifurcation processes are often encountered in the oxidation of substrates by enzymes and generally lead to a mixture of products. One particular bifurcation process that is common in biology relates to electron transfer versus oxygen atom transfer by high-valent iron(IV)-oxo complexes, whi

  12. Influence of Ligand Architecture in Tuning Reaction Bifurcation Pathways for Chlorite Oxidation by Non-Heme Iron Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barman, Prasenjit; Faponle, Abayomi S; Vardhaman, Anil Kumar; Angelone, Davide; Löhr, Anna-Maria; Browne, Wesley R; Comba, Peter; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-01-01

    Reaction bifurcation processes are often encountered in the oxidation of substrates by enzymes and generally lead to a mixture of products. One particular bifurcation process that is common in biology relates to electron transfer versus oxygen atom transfer by high-valent iron(IV)-oxo complexes,

  13. Catalytic Oxidation with a Non-Heme Iron Complex That Generates a Low-Spin FeIIIOOH Intermediate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfes, Gerard; Lubben, Marcel; Hage, Ronald; Que, Jr.; Feringa, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    The antitumor drug bleomycin (BLM) is proposed to act via a low-spin iron(III) hydroperoxide intermediate called “activated bleomycin”. To gain more insight into the mechanistic aspects of catalytic oxidation by these intermediates we have studied the reactivity of [(N4Py)Fe(CH3CN)](ClO4)2 (1) (N4Py

  14. Oral administration of lactoferrin increases hemoglobin and total serum iron in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesano, Rosalba; Torcia, Francesco; Berlutti, Francesca; Pacifici, Enrica; Ebano, Valeria; Moscarini, Massimo; Valenti, Piera

    2006-06-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) during pregnancy continues to be of world-wide concern. IDA is a risk factor for preterm delivery and subsequent low birth weight, and possibly for poor neonatal health. Iron supplementation in pregnancy is a widely recommended practice, yet intervention programs have met with many controversies. In our study, 300 women at different trimesters of pregnancy were enrolled in a trial of oral administration of ferrous sulfate (520 mg once a day) or 30% iron-saturated bovine lactoferrin (bLf) (100 mg twice a day). Pregnant women refusing treatment represented the control group. In this group hemoglobin and total serum iron values measured after 30 d without treatment decreased significantly, especially in women at 18-31 weeks of pregnancy. In contrast, after 30 d of oral administration of bLf, hemoglobin and total serum iron values increased and to a greater extent than those observed in women treated orally for 30 d with ferrous sulfate, independently of the trimester of pregnancy. Unlike ferrous sulfate, bLf did not result in any side effects. These findings lead us to hypothesize that lactoferrin could influence iron homeostasis directly or through other proteins involved in iron transport out of the intestinal cells into the blood.

  15. The detection of iron protoporphyrin (heme b) in phytoplankton and marine particulate material by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry - comparison with diode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Martha

    2014-09-02

    A mass spectrometric (MS) method for the identification of iron protoporphyrin (IX) (FePTP, heme b) in marine particulate material and phytoplankton is described. Electrospray ionisation of FePTP produced the molecular Fe(III)PTP(+) ion (m/z=616) or the pseudomolecular [Fe(II)PTP + H](+) ion (m/z=617), depending on the oxidation state of the central iron ion. Collision induced dissociation (CID) in the ion trap mass spectrometer resulted in a single detected product ion (m/z=557) indicative of loss of ethanoic acid from a carboxylic acid side chain. Widening the isolation width to 616±3 resulted in production of a mass spectrum demonstrating the distinctive isotopic ratio of the iron containing fragment, further increasing the specificity of the analysis. Selective reactant monitoring (SRM) of the fragment ion (m/z=557) was applied to the detection of FePTP after chromatography of ammoniacal OGP extracts of marine samples. The detection limit for FePTP analysed by SRM after chromatography was 1.2±0.5fmol. For phytoplankton samples, reasonably good agreement was achieved between results obtained with SRM and those obtained by monitoring absorbance at λ=400nm using a diode array detector (DAD). Use of SRM for analysis of particulate material obtained from the high latitude North Atlantic allowed for the analysis of FePTP in the presence of a co-eluting compound that interfered with detection by DAD. Simultaneous collection of mass spectra from m/z=300 to 1500 resulted in identification of the pseudomolecular ion for the interfering compound. The CID fragmentation pattern and UV-visible mass spectra indicated that the interfering compound was a previously unidentified chlorin type compound. Comparison of FePTP determined by SRM and DAD on samples where this compound could not be detected showed that results collected using the two methods correlated. The use of both MS and DAD results in a powerful tool for quantifying this important biogenic component of the

  16. Effects of proton acceptors on formation of a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex via proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Yusuke; Morimoto, Yuma; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-03-18

    Rates of formation of a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex, [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+) (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine), via electron-transfer oxidation of [Fe(III)(OH)(N4Py)](2+) in acetonitrile (MeCN) containing H2O (0.56 M) were accelerated as much as 390-fold by addition of proton acceptors such as CF3COO(-), TsO(-) (p-MeC6H4SO3(-)), NsO(-) (o-NO2C6H4SO3(-)), DNsO(-) (2,4-(NO2)2C6H3SO3(-)), and TfO(-) (CF3SO3(-)). The acceleration effect of proton acceptors increases with increasing basicity of the proton acceptors. The one-electron oxidation potential of [Fe(III)(OH)(N4Py)](2+) was shifted from 1.24 to 0.96 V vs SCE in the presence of TsO(-) (10 mM). The electron-transfer oxidation of Fe(III)-OH complex was coupled with the deprotonation process by proton acceptors in which deuterium kinetic isotope effects were observed when H2O was replaced by D2O.

  17. Effects of heme iron on growth performance and blood biochemical parameters of weaned piglets%血红素铁对断奶仔猪生长性能和血液指标的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高冬余; 王留香; 于伟; 江国永; 潘勇; 成国祥

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and twenty 28-day-old weaned piglets were selected and randomly divided into 4 groups, i.e. control, treatment 1, treatment 2 and treatment 3, which were respectively supplied (K27.5, 55.0 and 85.0 mg/kg heme iron on the basal diet. The effects of heme iron on growth performance and blood biochemical parameters (hemoglobin and IgG) of weaned piglets were researched. The feeding experiment was conducted for 13 days. The results as follows: heme iron could improve weaned piglet's average daily gain and feed conversion rate, Statistical analysis showed 55.0 mg/kg heme iron in diet increased feed conversion rate by 10.27% compared with control group (P<0.05). Heme iron had a certain growth promoting effect on weaned piglets, and the hemoglobin concentration in the whole blood and the IgG concentration in the plasma were improved.%选取120头28日龄断奶仔猪,随机分成4个处理组,即1个对照组和3个试验组,每组3个重复,每个重复10头.对照组饲喂基础日粮,试验1、2、3组分别饲喂基础日粮中血红素铁净添加量为27.5、55.0、85.0 mg/kg的3种试验日粮,研究日粮中添加血红素铁对断奶仔猪的生长性能、血液指标(血红蛋白浓度、免疫球蛋白浓度)的影响.试验正试期13d.结果表明,血红素铁各添加量组均能够提高仔猪的生长性能,日粮中血红素铁添加量为55 mg/kg时,仔猪平均日增重、饲料转化率较对照组分别提高12.02%和10.27%(P<0.05).血红素铁对断奶仔猪有良好的促生长作用,也在一定程度上提高了仔猪血液中血红蛋白和IgG浓度.

  18. Oral or parenteral iron supplementation to reduce deferral, iron deficiency and/or anaemia in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham A; Fisher, Sheila A; Doree, Carolyn; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Roberts, David J

    2014-07-03

    Iron deficiency is a significant cause of deferral in people wishing to donate blood. If iron removed from the body through blood donation is not replaced, then donors may become iron deficient. All donors are screened at each visit for low haemoglobin (Hb) levels. However, some deferred blood donors do not return to donate. Deferred first-time donors are even less likely to return. Interventions that reduce the risk of provoking iron deficiency and anaemia in blood donors will therefore increase the number of blood donations. Currently, iron supplementation for blood donors is not a standard of care in many blood services. A systematic review is required to answer specific questions regarding the efficacy and safety of iron supplementation in blood donors. To assess the efficacy and safety of iron supplementation to reduce deferral, iron deficiency and/or anaemia in blood donors. We ran the search on 18 November 2013. We searched Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, PubMed, MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCO Host) and six other databases. We also searched clinical trials registers and screened guidelines reference lists. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing iron supplementation versus placebo or control, oral versus parenteral iron supplementation, iron supplementation versus iron-rich food supplements, and different doses, treatment durations and preparations of iron supplementation in healthy blood donors. Autologous blood donors were excluded. We combined data using random-effects meta-analyses. We evaluated heterogeneity using the I(2) statistic; we explored considerable heterogeneity (I(2) > 75%) in subgroup analyses. We carried out sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of trial quality on the results. Thirty RCTs (4704 participants) met the eligibility criteria, including 19 comparisons of iron supplementation and placebo or control; one comparison of oral and parenteral iron supplementation; four comparisons of

  19. Isocyanides Inhibit Human Heme Oxygenases at the Verdoheme Stage†

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, John P.; Kandel, Sylvie; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the oxidative cleavage of heme to generate biliverdin, CO, and free iron. In humans, heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is overexpressed in tumor tissues, where it helps to protect cancer cells from anticancer agents, while HOs in fungal pathogens, such as Candida albicans, function as the primary means of iron acquisition. Thus, HO can be considered a potential therapeutic target for certain diseases. In this study, we have examined the equilibrium binding of three isocya...

  20. Pre-Altitude Serum Ferritin Levels and Daily Oral Iron Supplement Dose Mediate Iron Parameter and Hemoglobin Mass Responses to Altitude Exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Govus

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of daily oral iron supplementation on changes in hemoglobin mass (Hbmass and iron parameters after 2-4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure.Hematological data collected from 178 athletes (98 males, 80 females exposed to moderate altitude (1,350-3,000 m were analysed using linear regression to determine how altitude exposure combined with oral iron supplementation influenced Hbmass, total iron incorporation (TII and blood iron parameters [ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT].Altitude exposure (mean ± s: 21 ± 3 days increased Hbmass by 1.1% [-0.4, 2.6], 3.3% [1.7, 4.8], and 4.0% [2.0, 6.1] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who ingested nil, 105 mg and 210 mg respectively, of oral iron supplement daily. Serum ferritin levels decreased by -33.2% [-46.9, -15.9] and 13.8% [-32.2, 9.7] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who supplemented with nil and 105 mg of oral iron supplement daily, but increased by 36.8% [1.3, 84.8] in athletes supplemented with 210 mg of oral iron daily. Finally, athletes who ingested either 105 mg or 210 mg of oral iron supplement daily had a greater TII compared with non-supplemented athletes (0 versus 105 mg: effect size (d = -1.88 [-2.56, -1.17]; 0 versus 210 mg: effect size (d = -2.87 [-3.88, -1.66].Oral iron supplementation during 2-4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure may enhance Hbmass production and assist the maintenance of iron balance in some athletes with low pre-altitude iron stores.

  1. FERRIC CITRATE: AN IRON-BASED ORAL PHOSPHATE BINDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Christopher Bond

    2012-06-01

    Based on actual physician behavior in response to ferritin and TSAT increases and ferric citrate clinical trial results, and assuming equivalent pricing to other PBs, there would be cost savings with ferric citrate use through reduced ESA and iron use.

  2. The distal pocket histidine residue in horse heart myoglobin directs the O-binding mode of nitrite to the heme iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jun; Heinecke, Julie; Tan, Hui; Ford, Peter C; Richter-Addo, George B

    2009-12-23

    It is now well-established that mammalian heme proteins are reactive with various nitrogen oxide species and that these reactions may play significant roles in mammalian physiology. For example, the ferrous heme protein myoglobin (Mb) has been shown to reduce nitrite (NO(2)(-)) to nitric oxide (NO) under hypoxic conditions. We demonstrate here that the distal pocket histidine residue (His64) of horse heart metMb(III) (i.e., ferric Mb(III)) has marked effects on the mode of nitrite ion coordination to the iron center. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the mutant proteins metMb(III) H64V (2.0 A resolution) and its nitrite ion adduct metMb(III) H64V-nitrite (1.95 A resolution), and metMb(III) H64V/V67R (1.9 A resolution) and its nitrite ion adduct metMb(III) H64V/V67R-nitrite (2.0 A resolution). These are compared to the known structures of wild-type (wt) hh metMb(III) and its nitrite ion adduct hh metMb(III)-nitrite, which binds NO(2)(-) via an O-atom in a trans-FeONO configuration. Unlike wt metMb(III), no axial H(2)O is evident in either of the metMb(III) mutant structures. In the ferric H64V-nitrite structure, replacement of the distal His residue with Val alters the binding mode of nitrite from the nitrito (O-binding) form in the wild-type protein to a weakly bound nitro (N-binding) form. Reintroducing a H-bonding residue in the H64V/V67R double mutant restores the O-binding mode of nitrite. We have also examined the effects of these mutations on reactivities of the metMb(III)s with cysteine as a reducing agent and of the (ferrous) Mb(II)s with nitrite ion under anaerobic conditions. The Mb(II)s were generated by reduction of the Mb(III) precursors in a second-order reaction with cysteine, the rate constants for this step following the order H64V/V67R > H64V > wt. The rate constants for the oxidation of the Mb(II)s by nitrite (giving NO as the other product) follow the order wt > H64V/V67R > H64V and suggest a significant role of the distal pocket H

  3. The Role of Serum Copper and Iron in Oral Submucous Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Master Luquman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF is a chronic insidious disease of multifactorial etiology. The habit of chewing arecanut is thought to be one of the most important etiologic factors. Copper and iron are elements in the human body that form part of important enzymes. We estimated the serum copper and iron in patients with OSMF as well as normal controls and discuss the role of these elements in the etiology of OSMF.

  4. Property of compound protective agents on ferrous iron of heme-iron enriched polypeptide%亚铁血红素肽复合型保护剂的性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄红; 陈乐群; 张婷; 朱媛媛; 唐宁; 袁媛

    2012-01-01

    Heme-iron enriched polypeptide product was produced from bovine blood enzymolysis.Various kinds of protective agents were added to the enzymolysis substrates and the products to examine they protective effect on the products.Results show that the compound protective agents are superior to a single protective agent.Ferrous iron in enzymolysis substrates and in products are increased by 24.5% and 37.7% respectively after the addition of compound protective agents with mass ratio of antioxidant/reductant = 2∶1.%酶解牛血制取亚铁血红素肽,并于酶解底物及产物中分别添加不同种类亚铁保护剂,考察其对产物亚铁血红素肽的保护效果。结果表明,复合型保护剂的性能明显优于单一型。与空白组相比,酶解底物添加2∶1(抗氧化剂/还原剂质量比)的复合型保护剂可使亚铁含量提高24.5%;酶解产物中添加复合型保护剂后(2∶1),亚铁含量可提高37.7%。

  5. Iron Homeostasis and Nutritional Iron Deficiency123

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Nonheme food ferritin (FTN) iron minerals, nonheme iron complexes, and heme iron contribute to the balance between food iron absorption and body iron homeostasis. Iron absorption depends on membrane transporter proteins DMT1, PCP/HCP1, ferroportin (FPN), TRF2, and matriptase 2. Mutations in DMT1 and matriptase-2 cause iron deficiency; mutations in FPN, HFE, and TRF2 cause iron excess. Intracellular iron homeostasis depends on coordinated regulation of iron trafficking and storage proteins enc...

  6. End-on and side-on peroxo derivatives of non-heme iron complexes with pentadentate ligands : Models for putative intermediates in biological iron/dioxygen chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfes, G; Vrajmasu, [No Value; Ho, RYN; Rohde, JU; Zondervan, C; la Crois, RM; Schudde, EP; Lutz, M; Spek, AL; Hage, R; Feringa, BL; Munck, E; Que, L; Vrajmasu, Vladislav; Ho, Raymond Y.N.; Rohde, Jan-Uwe; Crois, Rene M. la; Spek, Anthony L.; Que, Jr.; Feringa, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Mononuclear iron(III) species with end-on and side-on peroxide have been proposed or identified in the catalytic cycles of the antitumor drug bleomycin and a variety of enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 and Rieske dioxygenases, Only recently have biomimetic analogues of such reactive species been, ge

  7. Spectroscopic characterization of a higher plant heme oxygenase isoform-1 from Glycine max (soybean)--coordination structure of the heme complex and catabolism of heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohya, Tomohiko; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Tadashi; Migita, Catharina T

    2006-12-01

    Heme oxygenase converts heme into biliverdin, CO, and free iron. In plants, as well as in cyanobacteria, heme oxygenase plays a particular role in the biosynthesis of photoreceptive pigments, such as phytochromobilins and phycobilins, supplying biliverdin IX(alpha) as a direct synthetic resource. In this study, a higher plant heme oxygenase, GmHO-1, of Glycine max (soybean), was prepared to evaluate the molecular features of its heme complex, the enzymatic activity, and the mechanism of heme conversion. The similarity in the amino acid sequence between GmHO-1 and heme oxygenases from other biological species is low, and GmHO-1 binds heme with 1 : 1 stoichiometry at His30; this position does not correspond to the proximal histidine of other heme oxygenases in their sequence alignments. The heme bound to GmHO-1, in the ferric high-spin state, exhibits an acid-base transition and is converted to biliverdin IX(alpha) in the presence of NADPH/ferredoxin reductase/ferredoxin, or ascorbate. During the heme conversion, an intermediate with an absorption maximum different from that of typical verdoheme-heme oxygenase or CO-verdoheme-heme oxygenase complexes was observed and was extracted as a bis-imidazole complex; it was identified as verdoheme. A myoglobin mutant, H64L, with high CO affinity trapped CO produced during the heme degradation. Thus, the mechanism of heme degradation by GmHO-1 appears to be similar to that of known heme oxygenases, despite the low sequence homology. The heme conversion by GmHO-1 is as fast as that by SynHO-1 in the presence of NADPH/ferredoxin reductase/ferredoxin, thereby suggesting that the latter is the physiologic electron-donating system.

  8. Field Evaluation of the Effectiveness of an Oral Toltrazuril and Iron Combination (Baycox® Iron) in Maintaining Weaning Weight by Preventing Coccidiosis and Anaemia in Neonatal Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streyl, Kristina; Carlstron, Janaina; Dantos, Eliana; Mendoza, Roberto; Islas, Juan Agustin Torres; Bhushan, Chandra

    2015-08-01

    Effectiveness of an oral combination of toltrazuril and iron dextran (Baycox(®) Iron) to maintain weaning weight by preventing coccidiosis caused by Isospora suis and iron-deficiency anaemia in neonatal piglets was investigated on three commercial pig farms with a history of coccidiosis: two in Mexico and one in Brazil. On day (SD) 2 of life, piglets were randomised within litter by bodyweight to treatment or control group. On SD 3 piglets allocated to the control group (CG) each received 1 mL Baycox(®), containing 50 mg/mL toltrazuril orally and commercially available iron (200 mg/piglet) by intramuscular injection. Piglets allocated to the treatment group (TG) each received 1 mL toltrazuril and iron combination orally (Baycox(®) Iron) containing 50 mg/mL toltrazuril and 228 mg iron as iron dextran. All piglets had access to creep feed. 6493 piglets completed the study. Bodyweight at weaning on SD 21 of piglets treated with the oral toltrazuril and iron combination was confirmed to be non-inferior to the control treatment with coccidiosis. Haemoglobin levels on SD 21 were lower in the oral toltrazuril and iron combination treated piglets compared to control levels but above minimum haemoglobin levels to maintain health. There was no difference in mortality between the two groups. This large scale field evaluation clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of oral toltrazuril and iron (Baycox(®) Iron) in maintaining body weight at weaning compared to conventional treatment. The combination was effective in preventing coccidiosis and anaemia and thus provides a valuable alternative that reduces stressful events in neonatal piglets. There were no product related adverse events.

  9. Oral zinc supplementation decreases the serum iron concentration in healthy schoolchildren: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, Naira Josele Neves; Rocha, Érika Dantas; de Araújo Silva, Alfredo; Costa, João Batista Sousa; França, Mardone Cavalcante; das Graças Almeida, Maria; Brandão-Neto, José

    2014-09-04

    The recognized antagonistic actions between zinc and iron prompted us to study this subject in children. A convenience sample was used. Thirty healthy children between 8 and 9 years of age were studied with the aim of establishing the effect of a 3-mo oral zinc supplementation on iron status. Fifteen individuals were given a placebo (control group), and 15 were given 10 mg Zn/day (experimental group). Blood samples were collected at 0, 60, 120, 180 and 210 min after a 12-h overnight fast, before and after placebo or zinc supplementation. This supplementation was associated with significant improvements in energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber, calcium, iron, and zinc intake in accordance with the recommendations for age and sex. The basal serum zinc concentration significantly increased after oral zinc supplementation (p iron concentrations and area under the iron curves significantly decreased in the experimental group (p iron was likely due to the effects of chronic zinc administration, and the decrease in serum iron was not sufficient to cause anemia.

  10. Oral Zinc Supplementation Decreases the Serum Iron Concentration in Healthy Schoolchildren: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira Josele Neves de Brito

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The recognized antagonistic actions between zinc and iron prompted us to study this subject in children. A convenience sample was used. Thirty healthy children between 8 and 9 years of age were studied with the aim of establishing the effect of a 3-mo oral zinc supplementation on iron status. Fifteen individuals were given a placebo (control group, and 15 were given 10 mg Zn/day (experimental group. Blood samples were collected at 0, 60, 120, 180 and 210 min after a 12-h overnight fast, before and after placebo or zinc supplementation. This supplementation was associated with significant improvements in energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber, calcium, iron, and zinc intake in accordance with the recommendations for age and sex. The basal serum zinc concentration significantly increased after oral zinc supplementation (p < 0.001. However, basal serum iron concentrations and area under the iron curves significantly decreased in the experimental group (p < 0.0001 and remained at the same level throughout the 210-min study. The values obtained for hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, ferritin, transferrin, transferrin saturation, ceruloplasmin and total protein were within normal reference ranges. In conclusion, the decrease in serum iron was likely due to the effects of chronic zinc administration, and the decrease in serum iron was not sufficient to cause anemia.

  11. Iron therapy for the treatment of iron deficiency in chronic heart failure: intravenous or oral?

    OpenAIRE

    McDonagh, Theresa; Macdougall, Iain C.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the use and modality of iron therapy to treat iron deficiency in patients with heart failure, an aspect of care which has received relatively little attention compared with the wider topic of anaemia management. Iron deficiency affects up to 50% of heart failure patients, and is associated with poor quality of life, impaired exercise tolerance, and mortality independent of haematopoietic effects in this patient population. The European Society of Cardiology Guidelines f...

  12. In-Cell Enzymology To Probe His-Heme Ligation in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigala, Paul A; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Goldberg, Daniel E

    2016-08-30

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a ubiquitous enzyme with key roles in inflammation, cell signaling, heme disposal, and iron acquisition. HO catalyzes the oxidative conversion of heme to biliverdin (BV) using a conserved histidine to coordinate the iron atom of bound heme. This His-heme interaction has been regarded as being essential for enzyme activity, because His-to-Ala mutants fail to convert heme to biliverdin in vitro. We probed a panel of proximal His mutants of cyanobacterial, human, and plant HO enzymes using a live-cell activity assay based on heterologous co-expression in Escherichia coli of each HO mutant and a fluorescent biliverdin biosensor. In contrast to in vitro studies with purified proteins, we observed that multiple HO mutants retained significant activity within the intracellular environment of bacteria. X-ray crystallographic structures of human HO1 H25R with bound heme and additional functional studies suggest that HO mutant activity inside these cells does not involve heme ligation by a proximal amino acid. Our study reveals unexpected plasticity in the active site binding interactions with heme that can support HO activity within cells, suggests important contributions by the surrounding active site environment to HO catalysis, and can guide efforts to understand the evolution and divergence of HO function.

  13. Heme Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus IsdE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.L.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen and a leading cause of hospital acquired infections. Because the free iron concentration in the human body is too low to support growth, S. aureus must acquire iron from host sources. Heme iron is the most prevalent iron reservoir in the human body and a predominant source of iron for S. aureus. The iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system removes heme from host heme proteins and transfers it to IsdE, the cognate substrate-binding lipoprotein of an ATP-binding cassette transporter, for import and subsequent degradation. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the soluble portion of the IsdE lipoprotein in complex with heme. The structure reveals a bi-lobed topology formed by an N- and C-terminal domain bridged by a single {alpha}-helix. The structure places IsdE as a member of the helical backbone metal receptor superfamily. A six-coordinate heme molecule is bound in the groove established at the domain interface, and the heme iron is coordinated in a novel fashion for heme transporters by Met{sup 78} and His{sup 229}. Both heme propionate groups are secured by H-bonds to IsdE main chain and side chain groups. Of these residues, His{sup 299} is essential for IsdE-mediated heme uptake by S. aureus when growth on heme as a sole iron source is measured. Multiple sequence alignments of homologues from several other Gram-positive bacteria, including the human pathogens pyogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes, suggest that these other systems function equivalently to S. aureus IsdE with respect to heme binding and transport.

  14. 3D Motions of Iron in Six-Coordinate {FeNO}(7) Hemes by Nuclear Resonance Vibration Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qian; Pavlik, Jeffrey W; Silvernail, Nathan J; Alp, E Ercan; Hu, Michael Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Sage, J Timothy; Scheidt, W Robert

    2016-04-25

    The vibrational spectrum of a six-coordinate nitrosyl iron porphyrinate, monoclinic [Fe(TpFPP)(1-MeIm)(NO)] (TpFPP=tetra-para-fluorophenylporphyrin; 1-MeIm=1-methylimidazole), has been studied by oriented single-crystal nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). The crystal was oriented to give spectra perpendicular to the porphyrin plane and two in-plane spectra perpendicular or parallel to the projection of the FeNO plane. These enable assignment of the FeNO bending and stretching modes. The measurements reveal that the two in-plane spectra have substantial differences that result from the strongly bonded axial NO ligand. The direction of the in-plane iron motion is found to be largely parallel and perpendicular to the projection of the bent FeNO on the porphyrin plane. The out-of-plane Fe-N-O stretching and bending modes are strongly mixed with each other, as well as with porphyrin ligand modes. The stretch is mixed with v50 as was also observed for dioxygen complexes. The frequency of the assigned stretching mode of eight Fe-X-O (X=N, C, and O) complexes is correlated with the Fe-XO bond lengths. The nature of highest frequency band at ≈560 cm(-1) has also been examined in two additional new derivatives. Previously assigned as the Fe-NO stretch (by resonance Raman), it is better described as the bend, as the motion of the central nitrogen atom of the FeNO group is very large. There is significant mixing of this mode. The results emphasize the importance of mode mixing; the extent of mixing must be related to the peripheral phenyl substituents.

  15. Novel Three-Component Rieske Non-Heme Iron Oxygenase System Catalyzing the N-Dealkylation of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides in Sphingomonads DC-6 and DC-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Wang, Cheng-Hong; Deng, Shi-Kai; Wu, Ya-Dong; Li, Yi; Yao, Li; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomonads DC-6 and DC-2 degrade the chloroacetanilide herbicides alachlor, acetochlor, and butachlor via N-dealkylation. In this study, we report a three-component Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase (RHO) system catalyzing the N-dealkylation of these herbicides. The oxygenase component gene cndA is located in a transposable element that is highly conserved in the two strains. CndA shares 24 to 42% amino acid sequence identities with the oxygenase components of some RHOs that catalyze N- or O-demethylation. Two putative [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin genes and one glutathione reductase (GR)-type reductase gene were retrieved from the genome of each strain. These genes were not located in the immediate vicinity of cndA. The four ferredoxins share 64 to 72% amino acid sequence identities to the ferredoxin component of dicamba O-demethylase (DMO), and the two reductases share 62 to 65% amino acid sequence identities to the reductase component of DMO. cndA, the four ferredoxin genes, and the two reductases genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified using Ni-affinity chromatography. The individual components or the components in pairs displayed no activity; the enzyme mixture showed N-dealkylase activities toward alachlor, acetochlor, and butachlor only when CndA-His6 was combined with one of the four ferredoxins and one of the two reductases, suggesting that the enzyme consists of three components, a homo-oligomer oxygenase, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a GR-type reductase, and CndA has a low specificity for the electron transport component (ETC). The N-dealkylase utilizes NADH, but not NADPH, as the electron donor. PMID:24928877

  16. Akt/Nrf2 activated upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 involves in the role of Rg1 against ferrous iron-induced neurotoxicity in SK-N-SH cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xixun; Xu, Huamin; Jiang, Hong; Xie, Junxia

    2013-07-01

    Iron accumulation is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Our previous studies have observed that Rg1, a major pharmacologically active ingredient from Ginseng, could protect dopaminergic neurons by reducing nigral iron levels through regulating the expression of iron transporters in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced PD mice. The aim of this study is to investigate other mechanism involved in the cytoprotection of Rg1 against iron-induced neurotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. Significant rescue of Rg1 on cell viability against 100 μM ferrous iron-induced neurotoxicity was observed. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn SOD) were observed in Rg1 pretreated group. Moreover, Rg1 pretreatment induces Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of HO-1 expression, and activated PI3K/Akt pathway was also observed in Rg1 pretreated group. This could antagonize iron-induced increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species and decrease in mitochondrial transmembrane potential. These results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of Rg1 against iron toxicity are attributed to the anti-oxidative properties by activating Akt/Nrf2 pathway and increasing Nrf2-induced expression of HO-1 and Cu/Zn SOD.

  17. Heme sensing in Bacillus thuringiensis: a supplementary HssRS-regulated heme resistance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rachel M; Carter, Micaela M; Chu, Michelle L; Latario, Casey J; Stadler, Sarah K; Stauff, Devin L

    2016-05-01

    Several Gram-positive pathogens scavenge host-derived heme to satisfy their nutritional iron requirement. However, heme is a toxic molecule capable of damaging the bacterial cell. Gram-positive pathogens within the phylum Firmicutes overcome heme toxicity by sensing heme through HssRS, a two-component system that regulates the heme detoxification transporter HrtAB. Here we show that heme sensing by HssRS and heme detoxification by HrtAB occur in the insect pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis We find that in B. thuringiensis, HssRS directly regulates an operon, hrmXY, encoding hypothetical membrane proteins that are not found in other Firmicutes with characterized HssRS and HrtAB systems. This novel HssRS-regulated operon or its orthologs BMB171_c3178 and BMB171_c3330 are required for maximal heme resistance. Furthermore, the activity of HrmXY is not dependent on expression of HrtAB. These results suggest that B. thuringiensis senses heme through HssRS and induces expression of separate membrane-localized systems capable of overcoming different aspects of heme toxicity.

  18. Utility of heme analogues to intentionally modify heme-globin interactions in myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neya, Saburo; Nagai, Masako; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Hoshino, Tyuji; Yoneda, Tomoki; Kawaguchi, Akira T

    2016-05-01

    Myoglobin reconstitution with various synthetic heme analogues was reviewed to follow the consequences of modified heme-globin interactions. Utility of dimethyl sulfoxide as the solvent for water-insoluble hemes was emphasized. Proton NMR spectroscopy revealed that loose heme-globin contacts in the heme pocket eventually caused the dynamic heme rotation around the iron-histidine bond. The full rotational rate was estimated to be about 1400 s(-1) at room temperature for 1,4,5,8-tetramethylhemin. The X-ray analysis of the myoglobin containing iron porphine, the smallest heme without any side chains, showed that the original globin fold was well conserved despite the serious disruption of native heme-globin contacts. Comparison between the two myoglobins with static and rotatory prosthetic groups indicated that the oxygen and carbon monoxide binding profiles were almost unaffected by the heme motion. On the other hand, altered tetrapyrrole array of porphyrin dramatically changed the dissociation constant of oxygen from 0.0005 mm Hg of porphycene-myoglobin to ∞ in oxypyriporphyrin-myoglobin. Heme-globin interactions in myoglobin were also monitored with circular dichroism spectroscopy. The observation on several reconstituted protein revealed an unrecognized role of the propionate groups in protoheme. Shortening of heme 6,7-propionates to carboxylates resulted in almost complete disappearance of the positive circular dichroism band in the Soret region. The theoretical analysis suggested that the disappeared circular dichroism band reflected the cancellation effects between different conformers of the carboxyl groups directly attached to heme periphery. The above techniques were proposed to be applicable to other hemoproteins to create new biocatalysts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  19. IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN PREGNANCY INTRAVENOUS IRON SUCROSE AN ALTERNATIVE TO ORAL FERROUS SULPHATE THERAPY

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shireen; Radhamani

    2014-01-01

    ...%1 in the developing and 23%26 in the developed world. The high prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia among women during pregnancy in developing countries is of concern and a cause of considerable morbidity and mortality...

  20. Heme oxygenase-1: a metabolic nike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegiel, Barbara; Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Bulmer, Andrew C; Otterbein, Leo E

    2014-04-10

    Heme degradation, which was described more than 30 years ago, is still very actively explored with many novel discoveries on its role in various disease models every year. The heme oxygenases (HO) are metabolic enzymes that utilize NADPH and oxygen to break apart the heme moiety liberating biliverdin (BV), carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Heme that is derived from hemoproteins can be toxic to the cells and if not removed immediately, it causes cell apoptosis and local inflammation. Elimination of heme from the milieu enables generation of three products that influences numerous metabolic changes in the cell. CO has profound effects on mitochondria and cellular respiration and other hemoproteins to which it can bind and affect their function, while BV and bilirubin (BR), the substrate and product of BV, reductase, respectively, are potent antioxidants. Sequestration of iron into ferritin and its recycling in the tissues is a part of the homeodynamic processes that control oxidation-reduction in cellular metabolism. Further, heme is an important component of a number of metabolic enzymes, and, therefore, HO-1 plays an important role in the modulation of cellular bioenergetics. In this review, we describe the cross-talk between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its products with other metabolic pathways. HO-1, which we have labeled Nike, the goddess who personified victory, dictates triumph over pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes, ischemia, and cancer.

  1. Characterization of a Heme-Regulated Non-Coding RNA Encoded by the prrF Locus of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G.; Vasil, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, requires iron for virulence and can obtain this nutrient via the acquisition of heme, an abundant source of iron in the human body. A surplus of either iron or heme can lead to oxidative stress; thus, the Fur (ferric uptake regulator) protein blocks expression of genes required for iron and heme uptake in iron-replete environments. Fur also represses expression of two nearly identical genes encoding the 116- and 114-nucleotide (nt) long PrrF1...

  2. A novel approach to oral iron delivery using ferrous sulphate loaded solid lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariwala, M Gulrez; Elsaid, Naba; Jackson, Timothy L; Corral López, Francisco; Farnaud, Sebastien; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Renshaw, Derek

    2013-11-18

    Iron (Fe) loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN's) were formulated using stearic acid and iron absorption was evaluated in vitro using the cell line Caco-2 with intracellular ferritin formation as a marker of iron absorption. Iron loading was optimised at 1% Fe (w/w) lipid since an inverse relation was observed between initial iron concentration and SLN iron incorporation efficiency. Chitosan (Chi) was included to prepare chitosan coated SLN's. Particle size analysis revealed a sub-micron size range (300.3±31.75 nm to 495.1±80.42 nm), with chitosan containing particles having the largest dimensions. As expected, chitosan (0.1%, 0.2% and 0.4% w/v) conferred a net positive charge on the particle surface in a concentration dependent manner. For iron absorption experiments equal doses of Fe (20 μM) from selected formulations (SLN-FeA and SLN-Fe-ChiB) were added to Caco-2 cells and intracellular ferritin protein concentrations determined. Caco-2 iron absorption from SLN-FeA (583.98±40.83 ng/mg cell protein) and chitosan containing SLN-Fe-ChiB (642.77±29.37 ng/mg cell protein) were 13.42% and 24.9% greater than that from ferrous sulphate (FeSO4) reference (514.66±20.43 ng/mg cell protein) (p≤0.05). We demonstrate for the first time preparation, characterisation and superior iron absorption in vitro from SLN's, suggesting the potential of these formulations as a novel system for oral iron delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The oral iron chelator ICL670A (deferasirox) does not protect myocytes against doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasinoff, Brian B; Patel, Daywin; Wu, Xing

    2003-12-01

    The oral iron chelating agent ICL670A (deferasirox) and the clinically approved cardioprotective agent dexrazoxane (ICRF-187) were compared for their ability to protect neonatal rat cardiac myocytes from doxorubicin-induced damage. Doxorubicin is thought to induce oxidative stress on the heart muscle through iron-mediated oxygen radical damage. While dexrazoxane was able to protect myocytes from doxorubicin-induced lactate dehydrogenase release, ICL670A, in contrast, depending upon the concentration, synergistically increased or did not affect the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin. This occurred in spite of the fact that ICL670A quickly and efficiently removed iron(III) from its complex with doxorubicin, and rapidly entered myocytes and displaced iron from a fluorescence-quenched trapped intracellular iron-calcein complex. Continuous exposure of ICL670A to either myocytes or Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells resulted in cytotoxicity while treatment of CHO cells with the ferric complex of ICL670A did not. These results suggest that ICL670A was cytotoxic either by removing or withholding iron from critical iron-containing proteins. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to show that neither ICL670A nor its ferric complex were able to generate free radicals in either oxidizing or reducing systems suggesting that its cytotoxicity is not due to radical generation.

  4. Comparison of intravenous ferrous sucrose and oral ferrous sulphate in treatment of postpartum iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khouly, Nabih I

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of intravenous ferrous sucrose, compared to oral ferrous sulphate in women with postpartum iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In a single center, randomized, controlled study, 352 patients with hemoglobin 9 gm/dl or less and serum ferritin of ferrous sucrose (up to three calculated replacement doses) or oral ferrous sulphate (150 mg twice daily for six weeks). Primary measures were to assess the rise in hemoglobin (Hb) and serum ferritin. By day 5, the Hb level in women treated with intravenous ferrous sucrose had rised from 8.48 ± 0.47 to 9.4 ± 0.56 gm/dl. Women treated with intravenous ferrous sucrose had significantly higher Hb levels on day 5, day 14 and day 40 (p ferrous sulphate. Throughout the study, ferritin level rose rapidly in those treated with intravenous iron and remained significantly higher than in those treated with oral iron (p ferrous sucrose increases Hb level more rapidly than ferrous sulphate in women with postpartum IDA. It also replenishes iron stores more rapidly with better tolerability.

  5. Terapia quelante oral com deferiprona em pacientes com sobrecarga de ferro Oral iron chelator therapy with deferiprone in patients with overloaded iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fabron Jr

    2003-01-01

    . For these patients, the orally active iron chelator deferiprone is an attractive alternative to control the overloaded iron. It has been estimated that more than six thousands patients have already been treated with deferiprone, with some of them taking the chelator for 10 years or more. The deferiprone-induced iron excretion is directly related to the dose of deferiprone and the patient's iron load. In most of transfusion-dependent patients, a dose of 75 mg/kg/day is sufficient to offset the transfusional iron-load. Recently, it has been demonstrated that desferrioxamine and deferiprone exhibit different chelating capabilities for the removal of iron from the various body iron pools and that the use of both chelators promote an additive or synergistic iron excretion with rapid reduction in the body iron load. It now is possible to consider tailor-made chelation regimens based on individual patient needs.

  6. Homologues of Neisserial Heme Oxygenase in Gram-Negative Bacteria: Degradation of Heme by the Product of the pigA Gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of heme to release iron is a mechanism by which some bacterial pathogens can utilize heme as an iron source. The pigA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is shown to encode a heme oxygenase protein, which was identified in the genome sequence by its significant homology (37%) with HemO of Neisseria meningitidis. When the gene encoding the neisserial heme oxygenase, hemO, was replaced with pigA, we demonstrated that pigA could functionally replace hemO and allow for heme util...

  7. Porphyrin and heme metabolism and the porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonkovsky, Herbert L; Guo, Jun-Tao; Hou, Weihong; Li, Ting; Narang, Tarun; Thapar, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Porphyrins and metalloporphyrins are the key pigments of life on earth as we know it, because they include chlorophyll (a magnesium-containing metalloporphyrin) and heme (iron protoporphyrin). In eukaryotes, porphyrins and heme are synthesized by a multistep pathway that involves eight enzymes. The first and rate-controlling step is the formation of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) from glycine plus succinyl CoA, catalyzed by ALA synthase. Intermediate steps occur in the cytoplasm, with formation of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen and the tetrapyrroles hydroxymethylbilane and a series of porphyrinogens, which are serially decarboxylated. Heme is utilized chiefly for the formation of hemoglobin in erythrocytes, myoglobin in muscle cells, cytochromes P-450 and mitochondrial cytochromes, and other hemoproteins in hepatocytes. The rate-controlling step of heme breakdown is catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HMOX), of which there are two isoforms, called HMOX1 and HMOX2. HMOX breaks down heme to form biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and iron. The porphyrias are a group of disorders, mainly inherited, in which there are defects in normal porphyrin and heme synthesis. The cardinal clinical features are cutaneous (due to the skin-damaging effects of excess deposited porphyrins) or neurovisceral attacks of pain, sometimes with weakness, delirium, seizures, and the like (probably due mainly to neurotoxic effects of ALA). The treatment of choice for the acute hepatic porphyrias is intravenous heme therapy, which repletes a critical regulatory heme pool in hepatocytes and leads to downregulation of hepatic ALA synthase, which is a biochemical hallmark of all forms of acute porphyria in relapse.

  8. Nitrite attenuated hypochlorous acid-mediated heme degradation in hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Li, Jiayu; Ren, Xiaoming; Tian, Rong; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2015-08-05

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is elevated in many inflammatory diseases and causes the accumulation of free iron. Through the Fenton reaction, free iron has the ability to generate free radicals and subsequently is toxic. Recent studies have demonstrated that HOCl participates in heme destruction of hemoglobin (Hb) and free iron release. In this study, it was showed that nitrite (NO2(-)) could prevent HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction and free iron release. Also, NO2(-) prevented HOCl-mediated loss of Hb peroxidase activity. After the NO2(-)/HOCl treatment, Tyr 42 in α-chain was found to be nitrated in Hb, attenuating the electron transferring abilities of phenolic compounds. The protective effects of NO2(-) on HOCl-induced heme destruction were attributed to its reduction of ferryl Hb and/or direct scavenging of HOCl. Therefore, NO2(-) could show protective effects in some inflammatory diseases by preventing HOCl-mediated heme destruction of hemoproteins and free iron release.

  9. Assessment of serum copper, iron and immune complexes in potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu TIWARI

    Full Text Available Abstract Potentially malignant disorders (PMDs of oral cavity and oral cancer remain a cause of serious concern despite intensive research and development. Diet and immunity have been identified to play a crucial role as modifying factors in these diseases. Our study intended to explore this relationship by estimating and comparing the serum levels of copper, iron and circulating immune complexes (CICs in patients diagnosed with PMDs and oral cancer and normal healthy individuals. In this study, 40 histopathologically diagnosed cases of PMDs and oral cancer were included along with 30 healthy controls and 5 ml of venous blood was drawn using venipuncture. Serum estimation of copper, iron and CIC then followed using the colorimetric and spectrophotometric methods. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using one way ANOVA and Pearson’s Product-Moment Correlation Test. The mean serum copper level was measured as 138.98 ± 10.13µg/100ml in the PMD group and 141.99 ± 21.44 µg/100ml in the oral cancer as compared to 105.5 + 18.81µ/100ml in the controls. The mean serum CIC levels was highest in the oral cancer (9.65 ± 0.16OD470 followed by the PMD group (0.18 + 0.21 OD470 and least in the control group (0.048 ± 0.02OD470. Whereas, the serum levels of iron showed a significant decrease in the PMD group (110.9 ± 10.54 µg/100ml and the oral cancer group (114.29 ± 25.83 µg/100ml as compared with the control group (136.85 ± 14.48 µg/100ml. There was no positive correlation obtained between the three groups with respect to the chosen parameters indicating that the variables were independent of each other. It can be thus be ascertained that trace elements like copper and iron as well as humoral responses (CICs have a close relationship with PMDs and oral cancers.

  10. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taifeng Zhuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women.

  11. Oral Submucous Fibrosis Secondary to Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Case Report, Etiopathogenesis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, P T; Khaitan, T; Sarkar, S B; Sinha, R

    2016-02-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) is a premalignant condition that has received considerable attention in the recent past because of its chronic debilitating and resistant nature. Over the past decades, dental researchers have reported overwhelming evidence about various etiological factors of OSMF. It has been the subject of controversy ever since Schwartz first described the condition in 1952. Areca nut is considered the primary etiology along with other local irritants like capsaicin, pungent and spicy food, nutritional deficiency, defective iron metabolism, collagen metabolic disorder and genetic predisposition. Association of iron deficiency anemia and OSMF is very sparse in literature. Here, we present a case report of a 58 year old male patient where the patient presented with OSMF where iron deficiency anemia was found to be the main etiological factor.

  12. Effects of oral iron chelator deferasirox on human malignant lymphoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Gwon; Kim, Jung-Lim; Park, Joohee; Lee, Soonwook; Park, Seh Jong; Kim, Jun Suk

    2012-01-01

    Background Iron is essential for cell proliferation and viability. It has been reported that iron depletion by a chelator inhibits proliferation of some cancer cells. Deferasirox is a new oral iron chelator, and a few reports have described its effects on lymphoma cells. The goal of this study was to determine the anticancer effects of deferasirox in malignant lymphoma cell lines. Methods Three human malignant lymphoma cell lines (NCI H28:N78, Ramos, and Jiyoye) were treated with deferasirox at final concentrations of 20, 50, or 100 µM. Cell proliferation was evaluated by an MTT assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the relative activity of various apoptotic pathways. The role of caspase in deferasirox-induced apoptosis was investigated using a luminescent assay. Results The MTT assay showed that deferasirox had dose-dependent cytotoxic effects on all 3 cell lines. Cell cycle analysis showed that the sub-G1 portion increased in all 3 cell lines as the concentration of deferasirox increased. Early apoptosis was also confirmed in the treated cells by Annexin V and PI staining. Western blotting showed an increase in the cleavage of PARP, caspase 3/7, and caspase 9 in deferasirox-treated groups. Conclusion We demonstrated that deferasirox, a new oral iron-chelating agent, induced early apoptosis in human malignant lymphoma cells, and this apoptotic effect is dependent on the caspase-3/caspase-9 pathway. PMID:23071474

  13. Lessons from bloodless worms: heme homeostasis in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jason; Hamza, Iqbal

    2015-06-01

    Heme is an essential cofactor for proteins involved in diverse biological processes such as oxygen transport, electron transport, and microRNA processing. Free heme is hydrophobic and cytotoxic, implying that specific trafficking pathways must exist for the delivery of heme to target hemoproteins which reside in various subcellular locales. Although heme biosynthesis and catabolism have been well characterized, the pathways for trafficking heme within and between cells remain poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans serves as a unique animal model for uncovering these pathways because, unlike vertebrates, the worm lacks enzymes to synthesize heme and therefore is crucially dependent on dietary heme for sustenance. Using C. elegans as a genetic animal model, several novel heme trafficking molecules have been identified. Importantly, these proteins have corresponding homologs in vertebrates underscoring the power of using C. elegans, a bloodless worm, in elucidating pathways in heme homeostasis and hematology in humans. Since iron deficiency and anemia are often exacerbated by parasites such as helminths and protozoa which also rely on host heme for survival, C. elegans will be an ideal model to identify anti-parasitic drugs that target heme transport pathways unique to the parasite.

  14. Chelation Therapy with Oral Solution of Deferiprone in Transfusional Iron-Overloaded Children with Hemoglobinopathies

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    Alexandros Makis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron overload in hemoglobinopathies is secondary to blood transfusions, chronic hemolysis, and increased iron absorption and leads to tissue injury requiring the early use of chelating agents. The available agents are parenteral deferoxamine and oral deferiprone and deferasirox. There are limited data on the safety and efficacy of deferiprone at a very young age. The aim of our study was the presentation of data regarding the use of oral solution of deferiprone in 9 children (mean age 6.5, range 2–10 with transfusion dependent hemoglobinopathies (6 beta thalassemia major, 1 thalassemia intermedia, and 2 sickle cell beta thalassemia. The mean duration of treatment was 21.5 months (range 15–31. All children received the oral solution without any problems of compliance. Adverse reactions were temporary abdominal discomfort and diarrhea (1 child, mild neutropenia (1 child that resolved with no need of discontinuation of treatment, and transient arthralgia (1 child that resolved spontaneously. The mean ferritin levels were significantly reduced at the end of 12 months (initial 2440 versus final 1420 μg/L, . This small study shows that oral solution of deferiprone was well tolerated by young children and its use was not associated with major safety concerns. Furthermore, it was effective in decreasing serum ferritin.

  15. Overexpression of the yeast frataxin homolog (Yfh1): contrasting effects on iron-sulfur cluster assembly, heme synthesis and resistance to oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seguin, Alexandra; Bayot, Aurélien; Dancis, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is generally associated with defects in [Fe-S] cluster assembly/stability and heme synthesis and strong susceptibility to oxidative stress. We used the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model of Friedreich's ataxia to study the physiological consequences of modulating...

  16. HEME OXYGENASE: ENZYME WITH FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhawat G. S.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years role of Heme oxygenase (HO has been considered in nearly all living system including plants, animals and other organisms. The common role of heme oxygenase is the degradation of heme, although there is a diversity of additional role of HO in organisms including iron acquisition, cellular signaling, defense against stress and biosynthesis during metabolism. Likewise, the function of HO is to provide cofactors for the photosynthetic apparatus in cyanobacteria. Heme concentration is variable in different plant species and found maximum in leguminous plant root nodules. Moreover HO has diverse isoforms in plant and animal systems. The review addressed important function of HO and focused on its functional diversity.

  17. Crystal structure of dimeric heme oxygenase-2 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in complex with heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugishima, Masakazu; Hagiwara, Yoshinori; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Tadashi; Migita, Catharina T; Fukuyama, Keiichi

    2005-03-22

    Phycobiliproteins, light-harvesting proteins in cyanobacteria, red algae, and cryptophytes, contain phycobilin pigments. Phycobilins are synthesized from biliverdin, which is produced by the oxidative cleavage of the heme porphyrin ring catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO). Two paralogs of ho (ho1 and ho2) have been identified in the genome of the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The recombinant proteins of both paralogs (Syn HO-1 and Syn HO-2) possess in vitro heme degradation activity. We have determined the crystal structures of Syn HO-2 in complex with heme (heme-Syn HO-2) and its reduced and NO bound forms. The heme-Syn HO-2 crystal was a nonmerohedral twin, and detwinned diffraction data were used to refine the structure. Although heme-Syn HO-2 shares common folding with other HOs, the C-terminal segment is ordered and turns back to the heme-binding side. Gel-filtration chromatography analysis and molecular packing in the crystal indicate that heme-Syn HO-2 forms a homodimer, in which the C-terminal ordered segments interact with each other. Because Syn HO-2 is a monomer in the apo state, the dimeric interaction may aid in the selection of the reducing partner but likely does not interfere with heme binding. The heme iron is coordinated by a water molecule in the ferric form, but the distal water is absent in the ferrous form. In all of the Syn HO-2 structures, several water molecules form a hydrogen-bond network at the distal hemepocket, which is involved in HO activity. Upon NO binding, the side-chain conformation of Tyr 156 changes. Tyr 156 is located at the hydrophobic cluster, which interrupts the possible H(+) pathway from the molecular surface to the hemepocket. Thus, Tyr 156 may function as a H(+) shuttle by changing conformation.

  18. A Young Adult with Unintentional Acute Parenteral Iron intoxication Treated with Oral Chelation: The Use of Liver Ferriscan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Sanctis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute iron poisoning in humans has not been adequately studied. Toxicity depends on the severity of iron overload. Manifestation of acute iron poisoning, defined as a serum iron concentration >300 µg/dL (55 µmol/L within 12 hours of ingestion, by oral route include numerous symptoms which appear in progressive stages.  Systemic toxicity is expected with an ingestion of 60 mg/kg.  A 27 year old female nurse presented to hematology department with iron toxicity 1 week after self-injecting herself with 20 ampoules of IV iron (4000 mg elemental iron, 60 mg/kg. Her vital signs were stable but she had mild hepatic tenderness.

  19. Heme-Scavenging Role of alpha1-Microglobulin in Chronic Ulcers.

    OpenAIRE

    Allhorn, Maria; Lundqvist, Katarina; Schmidtchen, Artur; Åkerström, Bo

    2003-01-01

    Chronic venous ulcers are characterized by chronic inflammation. Heme and iron, originating from blood cell hemolysis as well as extravascular necrosis, have been implicated as important pathogenic factors due to their promotion of oxidative stress. It was recently reported that the plasma and tissue protein alpha1-microglobulin is involved in heme metabolism. The protein binds heme, and a carboxy-terminally processed form, truncated alpha1-microglobulin, also degrades heme. Here, we show the...

  20. A heme-binding domain controls regulation of ATP-dependent potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Mark J; Kapetanaki, Sofia M; Chernova, Tatyana; Jamieson, Andrew G; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Moody, Peter C E; Mitcheson, John S; Davies, Noel W; Schmid, Ralf; Raven, Emma L; Storey, Nina M

    2016-04-01

    Heme iron has many and varied roles in biology. Most commonly it binds as a prosthetic group to proteins, and it has been widely supposed and amply demonstrated that subtle variations in the protein structure around the heme, including the heme ligands, are used to control the reactivity of the metal ion. However, the role of heme in biology now appears to also include a regulatory responsibility in the cell; this includes regulation of ion channel function. In this work, we show that cardiac KATP channels are regulated by heme. We identify a cytoplasmic heme-binding CXXHX16H motif on the sulphonylurea receptor subunit of the channel, and mutagenesis together with quantitative and spectroscopic analyses of heme-binding and single channel experiments identified Cys628 and His648 as important for heme binding. We discuss the wider implications of these findings and we use the information to present hypotheses for mechanisms of heme-dependent regulation across other ion channels.

  1. Comparison of oral and subcutaneous iron chelation therapies in the prevention of major endocrinopathies in beta-thalassemia major patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chung-Hsing; Wu, Kang-Hsi; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Peng, Ching-Tien; Tsai, Chang-Hai

    2006-01-01

    While hypertransfusion and subcutaneous iron chelation therapy have increased longevity of patients with beta-thalassemia (thal) major, endocrinopathies have become more common and impair the quality of their lives. Additionally, subcutaneous iron chelation therapy is an uncomfortable experience and can prevent patients from regular compliance with iron chelation therapy. We compared the efficacy of oral deferiprone (L1) to subcutaneous desferrioxamine (DFO) chelation therapy for the prevention of major endocrinopathies (growth hormone insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and gonadal dysfunction) among patients with beta-thal major to see if we could offer these patients an easier and more painless way to reduce their body iron load and related endocrine complications.

  2. Multi-heme proteins: nature's electronic multi-purpose tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Kathryn D; Ellis, Katie E; Firer-Sherwood, Mackenzie A; Elliott, Sean J

    2013-01-01

    While iron is often a limiting nutrient to Biology, when the element is found in the form of heme cofactors (iron protoporphyrin IX), living systems have excelled at modifying and tailoring the chemistry of the metal. In the context of proteins and enzymes, heme cofactors are increasingly found in stoichiometries greater than one, where a single protein macromolecule contains more than one heme unit. When paired or coupled together, these protein associated heme groups perform a wide variety of tasks, such as redox communication, long range electron transfer and storage of reducing/oxidizing equivalents. Here, we review recent advances in the field of multi-heme proteins, focusing on emergent properties of these complex redox proteins, and strategies found in Nature where such proteins appear to be modular and essential components of larger biochemical pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and Biomimetics Systems.

  3. Heme exporter FLVCR1a regulates heme synthesis and degradation and controls activity of cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinchi, Francesca; Ingoglia, Giada; Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-05-01

    The liver has one of the highest rates of heme synthesis of any organ. More than 50% of the heme synthesized in the liver is used for synthesis of P450 enzymes, which metabolize exogenous and endogenous compounds that include natural products, hormones, drugs, and carcinogens. Feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular receptor 1a (FLVCR1a) is plasma membrane heme exporter that is ubiquitously expressed and controls intracellular heme content in hematopoietic lineages. We investigated the role of Flvcr1a in liver function in mice. We created mice with conditional disruption of Mfsd7b, which encodes Flvcr1a, in hepatocytes (Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice). Mice were analyzed under basal conditions, after phenylhydrazine-induced hemolysis, and after induction of cytochromes P450 synthesis. Livers were collected and analyzed by histologic, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblot analyses. Hepatic P450 enzymatic activities were measured. Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice accumulated heme and iron in liver despite up-regulation of heme oxygenase 1, ferroportin, and ferritins. Hepatic heme export activity of Flvcr1a was closely associated with heme biosynthesis, which is required to sustain cytochrome induction. Upon cytochromes P450 stimulation, Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice had reduced cytochrome activity, associated with accumulation of heme in hepatocytes. The expansion of the cytosolic heme pool in these mice was likely responsible for the early inhibition of heme synthesis and increased degradation of heme, which reduced expression and activity of cytochromes P450. In livers of mice, Flvcr1a maintains a free heme pool that regulates heme synthesis and degradation as well as cytochromes P450 expression and activity. These findings have important implications for drug metabolism. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. HmuS and HmuQ of Ensifer/Sinorhizobium meliloti degrade heme in vitro and participate in heme metabolism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarelle, Vanesa; Rosconi, Federico; Lázaro-Martínez, Juan Manuel; Buldain, Graciela; Noya, Francisco; O'Brian, Mark R; Fabiano, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Ensifer meliloti is a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of the alfalfa legume able to use heme as an iron source. The transport mechanism involved in heme acquisition in E. meliloti has been identified and characterized, but the fate of heme once inside the cell is not known. In silico analysis of E. meliloti 1021 genome revealed no canonical heme oxygenases although two genes encoding putative heme degrading enzymes, smc01518 and hmuS, were identified. SMc01518 is similar to HmuQ of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, which is weakly homologous to the Staphylococcus aureus IsdG heme-degrading monooxygenase, whereas HmuS is homolog to Pseudomonas aeruginosa PhuS, a protein reported as a heme chaperone and as a heme degrading enzyme. Recombinant HmuQ and HmuS were able to bind hemin with a 1:1 stoichiometry and displayed a Kd value of 5 and 4 µM, respectively. HmuS degrades heme in vitro to the biliverdin isomers IX-β and IX-δ in an equimolar ratio. The HmuQ recombinant protein degrades heme to biliverdin IX-δ only. Additionally, in this work we demonstrate that humS and hmuQ gene expression is regulated by iron and heme in a RirA dependent manner and that both proteins are involved in heme metabolism in E. meliloti in vivo.

  5. Comparison of efficacy, tolerability, and cost of newer with conventional oral iron preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iron deficiency anaemia in women of reproductive age group is a major health problem in India. Objective: The present study was designed to compare the efficacy, tolerability, and cost, of three oral iron preparations among the anaemic pregnant women (n=6o of gestation (12-24 weeks. Methodology: The patients were divided into 3 groups (n=20 and treated with ferrous fumarate(100mg, ferrous bisglycinate (100mg,and carbonyl iron(100mg respectively. Follow-up was done for 3 months. Haemoglobin gm%, mean corpuscular volume and reticulocyte count were assessed at 0,1,2,3 months and serum ferritin at 0 and 3 months. Adverse effects were monitored and cost analysis was done at end of three months. Results: Significant increase in Hb was seen in all three groups (p<0.001 but, no significant difference was found between three treatments in relation to increase in Hb. Increase in ferritin with ferrous fumarate was significantly more than other treatments (p<0.05. Nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain was significantly more with ferrous fumarate but patient compliance was not affected due to them. Ferrous fumarate was the cheapest amongst all three treatments. Conclusion: It can be concluded that, ferrous fumarate still can be considered best cost effective medication with tolerable side effects for treatment as well as prevention of iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy.

  6. Efficacy and safety of oral iron(III) polymaltose complex versus ferrous sulfate in pregnant women with iron-deficiency anemia: a multicenter, randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ricardo; Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Romero, Juan Diego; Monterrosa, Beatriz; Frer, Cristina; Macagno, Eugenia; Breymann, Christian

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of iron(III) polymaltose complex (Maltofer(®)) versus ferrous sulfate in iron-deficient pregnant women using recommended doses. An exploratory, open-label, randomized, controlled, multicenter study was undertaken in 80 pregnant women with iron-deficiency anemia (hemoglobin ≤ 10.5 g/dL, serum ferritin ≤ 15 ng/mL and mean corpuscular volume ferrous sulfate (each 100 mg iron twice daily) for 90 days. The primary endpoint, change in hemoglobin from baseline to days 60 and 90, did not differ significantly between treatment groups. The mean (SD) change to day 90 was 2.16 (0.67) g/dL in the iron(III) polymaltose complex group and 1.93 (0.97) g/dL in the ferrous sulfate group (n.s). Mean serum ferritin at day 90 was 179 (38) ng/mL and 157 (34) ng/mL with iron(III) polymaltose complex and ferrous sulfate, respectively (p = 0.014). Adverse events were significantly less frequent in the iron(III) polymaltose group, occurring in 12/41 (29.3%) patients, than in the ferrous sulfate group (22/39 [56.4%]) (p = 0.015). Oral iron(III) polymaltose complex offers at least equivalent efficacy and a superior safety profile compared to ferrous sulfate for the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia during pregnancy.

  7. Oral chelators in transfusion-dependent thalassemia major patients may prevent or reverse iron overload complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmaki, Kallistheni; Tzoumari, Ioanna; Pappa, Christina

    2011-06-15

    Combined chelation treatment may be a better approach for transfusion-dependent thalassemia major patients with iron overload complications because of increased efficacy. Combination therapy with desferrioxamine and deferiprone has already been reported to improve survival dramatically by reversing cardiac dysfunction and other endocrine complications. Some patients have intolerance or inconvenience to parenteral desferrioxamine. The hypothesis of this study was that combining two oral chelators, deferiprone and deferasirox, might lead to similar results. Following approval by the hospital ethical committee and a written informed consent from each patient, 16 patients who fulfilled the criteria participated in a study protocol for a period of up to 2 years. Efficacy measures analysis demonstrated a statistically significant decrease of total body iron load as estimated by serum ferritin, LIC and MRI T2* indices. Regarding the safety assessment, the incidence of adverse events was minor compared to the associated toxicity of monotherapy of each drug. No new onset of iron overload-related complications was demonstrated. A reversal of cardiac dysfunction was observed in 2/4 patients, while the mean LVEF increased significantly. Regarding endocrine assessment, in 2/8 patients with impaired glucose tolerance, we noted a significant decrease in the mean 2h glucose in OGTT. Additionally an improvement in gonadal function was observed and one male and one female gave birth to two healthy children without hormonal stimulation. Combined oral chelation in thalassemia offers the promise of easier administration, better compliance and may lead to an improvement of patient quality of life by preventing or even reversing iron overload complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of iron-oxide nanoparticles and magnetic fields on oral biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alas, Gema; Pagano, Ronald E.; Nguyen, Jane Q.; Bandara, H. M. H. Nihal; Ivanov, Sergei A.; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Huber, Dale L.; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osiński, Marek

    2017-02-01

    Human mouth is a host of a large gamut of bacteria species, with over 700 of different bacteria strains identified. Most of these bacterial species are harmless, some are beneficial (such as probiotics assisting in food digestion), but some are responsible for various diseases, primarily tooth decay and gum diseases such as gingivitis and periodontitis. For example, Streptococus mutans produces enamel-eroding acids, while Porphyromonas gingivalis is strongly linked to periodontitis. In this paper, we report on the effects of exposure of oral biofilms to iron oxide nanoparticles and static magnetic fields as possible bactericidal agent.

  9. A Phase III, randomized, open-label trial of ferumoxytol compared with iron sucrose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with a history of unsatisfactory oral iron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, David; Strauss, William; Bernard, Kristine; Li, Zhu; Urboniene, Audrone; Allen, Lee F

    2014-06-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common form of anemia worldwide. Although oral iron is used as first-line treatment, many patients are unresponsive to or cannot take oral iron. This Phase III, open-label, non-inferiority study compared the efficacy and safety of ferumoxytol, a rapid, injectable intravenous (IV) iron product with low immunological reactivity and minimal detectable free iron, with IV iron sucrose in adults with IDA of any cause. Patients (N = 605) were randomized 2:1 to receive ferumoxytol (n = 406, two doses of 510 mg 5 ± 3 days apart) or iron sucrose (n = 199, five doses of 200 mg on five nonconsecutive days over 14 days) and followed for 5 weeks. Ferumoxytol demonstrated noninferiority to iron sucrose at the primary endpoint, the proportion of patients achieving a hemoglobin increase of ≥2 g dL(-1) at any time from Baseline to Week 5 (ferumoxytol, 84.0% [n = 406] vs. iron sucrose, 81.4% [n = 199]), with a noninferiority margin of 15%. Ferumoxytol was superior to iron sucrose (2.7 g dL(-1) vs. 2.4 g dL(-1) ) in the mean change in hemoglobin from Baseline to Week 5 (the alternative preplanned primary endpoint) with P = 0.0124. Transferrin saturation, quality-of-life measures, and safety outcomes were similar between the two treatment groups. Overall, ferumoxytol demonstrated comparable safety and efficacy to iron sucrose, suggesting that ferumoxytol may be a useful treatment option for patients with IDA in whom oral iron was unsatisfactory or could not be used.

  10. Heme degrading protein HemS is involved in oxidative stress response of Bartonella henselae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaFeng Liu

    Full Text Available Bartonellae are hemotropic bacteria, agents of emerging zoonoses. These bacteria are heme auxotroph Alphaproteobacteria which must import heme for supporting their growth, as they cannot synthesize it. Therefore, Bartonella genome encodes for a complete heme uptake system allowing the transportation of this compound across the outer membrane, the periplasm and the inner membranes. Heme has been proposed to be used as an iron source for Bartonella since these bacteria do not synthesize a complete system required for iron Fe³⁺ uptake. Similarly to other bacteria which use heme as an iron source, Bartonellae must transport this compound into the cytoplasm and degrade it to allow the release of iron from the tetrapyrrole ring. For Bartonella, the gene cluster devoted to the synthesis of the complete heme uptake system also contains a gene encoding for a polypeptide that shares homologies with heme trafficking or degrading enzymes. Using complementation of an E. coli mutant strain impaired in heme degradation, we demonstrated that HemS from Bartonella henselae expressed in E. coli allows the release of iron from heme. Purified HemS from B. henselae binds heme and can degrade it in the presence of a suitable electron donor, ascorbate or NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. Knocking down the expression of HemS in B. henselae reduces its ability to face H₂O₂ induced oxidative stress.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of Ferrous Sulphate (Tardyferon®) after Single Oral Dose Administration in Women with Iron Deficiency Anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, A; Barthe, L; Clavel, T; Sanchez, C; Oulmi-Castel, M; Paillard, B; Edmond, J M; Brunner, V

    2016-01-01

    Iron-containing preparations available on the market vary in dosage, salt, and chemical state of iron contained in the preparation, as well as in the iron delivery process (immediate or prolonged-release). The present study aimed at characterizing the serum pharmacokinetics of iron in non pregnant women with iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) following a single oral administration of a prolonged-release ferrous sulphate tablet. This multicenter, single dose, open-label study was conducted in 30 women aged between 18 and 45 years with IDA. A single 160 mg oral dose of ferrous sulphate was given as 2 tablets of 80 mg of Tardyferon(®) under fasting conditions. Blood samples were collected before dosing and until 24 h post-dosing. Serum iron concentrations were determined using a routine colorimetric analytical method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined from the serum concentration profiles using a non compartmental approach. Serum profiles showed elevated levels of iron up to 12 h after drug intake. The median time to maximum serum concentrations (Tmax) occurred 4 h post-dosing. Between 2 and 8 h post-dosing, mean serum iron concentrations fluctuated by only 20%. Additionally, C8h and C12h represented on average 78.6% and 47.5% of the Cmax, respectively. This study demonstrates that a single oral dose of 160 mg Tardyferon(®) administered under fasting condition to 30 women with IDA leads to an optimal long-lasting release of iron in the gastrointestinal tract in the targeted population. This allows the attainment and maintenance of elevated serum iron levels for up to 12 h after administration. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Structure of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 heme oxygenase ChuS in complex with heme and enzymatic inactivation by mutation of the heme coordinating residue His-193

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suits,M.; Jaffer, N.; Jia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Heme oxygenases catalyze the oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. For pathogenic microorganisms, heme uptake and degradation are critical mechanisms for iron acquisition that enable multiplication and survival within hosts they invade. Here we report the first crystal structure of the pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 heme oxygenase ChuS in complex with heme at 1.45 {angstrom} resolution. When compared with other heme oxygenases, ChuS has a unique fold, including structural repeats and a {beta}-sheet core. Not surprisingly, the mode of heme coordination by ChuS is also distinct, whereby heme is largely stabilized by residues from the C-terminal domain, assisted by a distant arginine from the N-terminal domain. Upon heme binding, there is no large conformational change beyond the fine tuning of a key histidine (His-193) residue. Most intriguingly, in contrast to other heme oxygenases, the propionic side chains of heme are orientated toward the protein core, exposing the {alpha}-meso carbon position where O{sub 2} is added during heme degradation. This unique orientation may facilitate presentation to an electron donor, explaining the significantly reduced concentration of ascorbic acid needed for the reaction. Based on the ChuS-heme structure, we converted the histidine residue responsible for axial coordination of the heme group to an asparagine residue (H193N), as well as converting a second histidine to an alanine residue (H73A) for comparison purposes. We employed spectral analysis and CO measurement by gas chromatography to analyze catalysis by ChuS, H193N, and H73A, demonstrating that His-193 is the key residue for the heme-degrading activity of ChuS.

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 system and gastrointestinal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie; CM; Lin; Hsiangfu; Kung

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) system catabolizes heme into three products:carbon monoxide,biliverdin/bilirubin and free iron.It is involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes.A great deal of data has demonstrated the roles of HO-1 in the formation,growth and metastasis of tumors.The interest in this system by investigators involved in gastrointestinal tumors is fairly recent,and few papers on HO-1 have touched upon this subject.This review focuses on the current understanding of the physiologic...

  14. Characterization of the non-heme iron center of human 5-lipoxygenase by electron paramagnetic resonance, fluorescence, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy: redox cycling between ferrous and ferric states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasteen, N D; Grady, J K; Skorey, K I; Neden, K J; Riendeau, D; Percival, M D

    1993-09-21

    Purified human 5-lipoxygenase, a non-heme iron containing enzyme, has been characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance, (EPR), ultraviolet (UV)-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. As isolated, the enzyme is largely in the ferrous state and shows a weak X-band EPR signal extending from 0 to 700 G at 15 K, tentatively ascribed to integer spin Fe(II). Titration of the protein with 13-HPOD (13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid) generates a strong multicomponent EPR signal in the g' approximately 6 region, a yellow color associated with an increased absorption between 310 and 450 nm (epsilon 330nm = 2400 M-1 cm-1), and a 17% decrease in the intrinsic protein fluorescence. The multiple component nature of the g' approximately 6 signal indicates that the metal center in its oxidized state exists in more than one but related forms. The g' approximately 6 EPR signal and the yellow color reach a maximum when approximately 1 mol of 13-HPOD is added/mol of iron; the resultant EPR spectrum accounts quantitatively for all of the iron in the protein with a signal at g' = 4.3 representing less than 3% of the total iron in the majority of samples. Addition of a hydroxyurea reducing agent abolished the g' approximately 6 signal and yellow color of the protein and also reversed the decrease in fluorescence caused by the oxidant 13-HPOD. The results indicate that the g' approximately 6 EPR signal, the yellow color, and the decreased fluorescence are associated with the formation of the Fe(III) form of the enzyme.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  16. Inhibitory effect of calcium on non-heme iron absorption may be related to translocation of DMT-1 at the apical membrane of enterocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ben A V; Sharp, Paul A; Elliott, Ruan; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2010-07-28

    Many studies show that calcium reduces iron absorption from single meals, but the underlying mechanism is not known. We tested the hypothesis that calcium alters the expression and/or functionality of iron transport proteins. Differentiated Caco-2 cells were treated with ferric ammonium citrate and calcium chloride, and ferritin, DMT-1, and ferroportin were quantified in whole-cell lysate and cell-membrane fractions. Calcium attenuated the iron-induced increase in cell ferritin levels in a dose-dependent manner; a significant decrease was seen at calcium concentrations of 1.25 and 2.5 mM but was only evident after a 16-24 h incubation period. Calcium and iron treatments decreased DMT-1 protein in Caco-2 cell membranes, although total DMT-1 in whole cell lysates was unchanged by either iron or calcium. No change was seen in ferroportin expression. Our data suggest that calcium reduces iron bioavailability by decreasing DMT-1 expression at the apical cell membrane, thereby downregulating iron transport into the cell.

  17. Kidney injury and heme oxygenase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-xing MAI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available     Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is one of the main pathways to degrade heme in mammals, and the main degradation products are free iron (Fe2+, carbon monoxide (CO, and bilirubin. Heme plays an important role in promoting cell survival, circulation of intracellular substrates, and immune regulation. Previous studies suggest that HO-1 pathway is an important internal factor in determining the susceptibility and severity of acute kidney injury (AKI. The induction of HO-1 expression can attenuate the severity of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI, and the inhibition of HO-1 expression will aggravate IRI. The present article summarizes the latest advances in research abroad and at home on protective mechanism by which HO-1 prevents AKI to further deepen our understanding of the role of HO-1 in the treatment of AKI.   

  18. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  19. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of iron stored in the body become low, iron deficiency anemia sets in. Red blood cells become smaller and ... from the lungs throughout the body. Symptoms of iron deficiency anemia include tiredness and lack of energy, GI upset, ...

  20. Post-translational transformation of methionine to aspartate is catalyzed by heme iron and driven by peroxide: a novel subunit-specific mechanism in hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Michael Brad; Hicks, Wayne A; Kassa, Tigist; Singleton, Eileen; Soman, Jayashree; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J; Mollan, Todd L; Wilson, Michael T; Alayash, Abdu I

    2014-08-08

    A pathogenic V67M mutation occurs at the E11 helical position within the heme pockets of variant human fetal and adult hemoglobins (Hb). Subsequent post-translational modification of Met to Asp was reported in γ subunits of human fetal Hb Toms River (γ67(E11)Val → Met) and β subunits of adult Hb (HbA) Bristol-Alesha (β67(E11)Val → Met) that were associated with hemolytic anemia. Using kinetic, proteomic, and crystal structural analysis, we were able to show that the Met → Asp transformation involves heme cycling through its oxoferryl state in the recombinant versions of both proteins. The conversion to Met and Asp enhanced the spontaneous autoxidation of the mutants relative to wild-type HbA and human fetal Hb, and the levels of Asp were elevated with increasing levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Using H2(18)O2, we verified incorporation of (18)O into the Asp carboxyl side chain confirming the role of H2O2 in the oxidation of the Met side chain. Under similar experimental conditions, there was no conversion to Asp at the αMet(E11) position in the corresponding HbA Evans (α62(E11)Val → Met). The crystal structures of the three recombinant Met(E11) mutants revealed similar thioether side chain orientations. However, as in the solution experiments, autoxidation of the Hb mutant crystals leads to electron density maps indicative of Asp(E11) formation in β subunits but not in α subunits. This novel post-translational modification highlights the nonequivalence of human Hb α, β, and γ subunits with respect to redox reactivity and may have direct implications to α/β hemoglobinopathies and design of oxidatively stable Hb-based oxygen therapeutics.

  1. Effect of Mesalamine and Prednisolone on TNBS Experimental Colitis, following Various Doses of Orally Administered Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K. Triantafillidis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Experimental data suggest that oral iron (I. supplementation can worsen colitis in animals. Aim. To investigate the influence of various concentrations of orally administered I. in normal gut mucosa and mucosa of animals with TNBS colitis, as well as the influence of Mesalamine (M. and Prednisolone (P. on the severity of TNBS colitis following orally administered I. Methods and Materials. 156 Wistar rats were allocated into 10 groups. Colitis was induced by TNBS. On the 8th day, all animals were euthanatized. Activity of colitis and extent of tissue damage were assessed histologically. The levels of tissue tumor necrosis factor-α (t-TNF-α and tissue malondialdehyde (t-MDA were estimated in all animal groups. Results. Moderate and high I. supplementation induced inflammation in the healthy colon and increased the activity of the experimentally induced TNBS colitis. Administration of M. on TNBS colitis following moderate iron supplementation (0.3 g/Kg diet resulted in a significant improvement in the overall histological score as well as in two individual histological parameters. M. administration, however, did not significantly reduce the t-TNF-α levels (17.67±4.92 versus 14.58±5.71, P=0.102, although it significantly reduced the t-MDA levels (5.79±1.55 versus 3.67±1.39, P=0.000. Administration of M. on TNBS colitis following high iron supplementation (3.0 g/Kg diet did not improve the overall histological score and the individual histological parameters, neither reduced the levels of t-TNF-α (16.57 ± 5.61 versus 14.65±3.88, P=0.296. However, M. significantly reduced the t-MDA levels (5.99±1.37 versus 4.04±1.41, P=0.000. Administration of P. on TNBS colitis after moderate iron supplementation resulted in a significant improvement in the overall histological score as well as in three individual histological parameters. P. also resulted in a significant reduction in the t-TNF-α levels (17.67±4.92 versus 12.64±3

  2. Effect of corrosion products (neodymium iron boron) on oral fibroblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R D; McDonald, F

    1995-01-01

    The biological effects of the corrosion products of neodymium iron boron (Nd2Fe14B) magnets are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the types of corrosion product and to evaluate the effect of the corrosion products (CP) of Nd2Fe14B magnets on the proliferation of human oral mucosal fibroblasts. Uncoated Nd2Fe14B magnets were stored in saline at 37 degrees C for 6 months and the corrosion products collected. 100 microL of a cell suspension (human oral mucosal fibroblasts [14 x 10(4) cells/mL]) was aliquoted into 72 wells of a 96-well plate, the remaining plates receiving culture medium only. After 12 h incubation at 37 degrees C, each well then received 100 microL of either (A) culture medium, (B) 100% CP, (C) 50% CP, or (D) 0% CP. The plates were reincubated at 37 degrees C for a further 48, 96, or 144 h. Fibroblast proliferation was assessed using the methylene blue uptake/elution technique. The compounds in the corrosion product were examined using quantitative X-ray analysis. Statistical analysis (ANOVA, Bonferroni's test 0.05, SAS v 6.04), showed that at each time point, the cell numbers in groups B, C, and D were significantly lower than group A. Within groups B, C, and D no significant differences were found, despite the suggestion of a dose response effect. Fibroblast proliferation in the presence of corrosion products was significantly lower than with culture medium. Fibroblast proliferation did occur in the presence of 0, 50, and 100% CP. The actual corrosion products appeared to be salts of iron but 3.2% (+/- 0.6) of neodymium chloride (NdCl3) was found.

  3. Deferasirox, an oral iron chelator, prevents hepatocarcinogenesis and adverse effects of sorafenib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Takami, Taro; Uchida, Koichi; Fujisawa, Koichi; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Saeki, Issei; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Although sorafenib is expected to have a chemopreventive effect on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence, there are limitations to its use because of adverse effects, including effects on liver function. We have reported that the iron chelator, deferoxamine can prevent liver fibrosis and preneoplastic lesions. We investigated the influence of administering a new oral iron chelator, deferasirox (DFX), on the effects of sorafenib. We used the choline-deficient l-amino acid-defined (CDAA) diet-induced rat liver fibrosis and HCC model. We divided rats into four groups: CDAA diet only (control group), CDAA diet with sorafenib (sorafenib group), CDAA diet with DFX (DFX group), and CDAA diet with DFX and sorafenib (DFX + sorafenib group). Liver fibrosis and development of preneoplastic lesions were assessed. In addition, we assessed adverse effects such as changes in body and liver weight, skin damage (eruption, dryness, and hair loss), which is defined as hand-foot skin syndrome, in the sorafenib and DFX + sorafenib groups. The combination of DFX + sorafenib markedly prevented liver fibrosis and preneoplastic lesions better than the other treatments. Furthermore, the combination therapy significantly decreased adverse effects compared with the sorafenib group. In conclusion, the combination therapy with DFX and sorafenib may be a useful adjuvant therapy to prevent recurrence after curative treatment of HCC. PMID:27257345

  4. Deferasirox, an oral iron chelator, prevents hepatocarcinogenesis and adverse effects of sorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Takami, Taro; Uchida, Koichi; Fujisawa, Koichi; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Saeki, Issei; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-05-01

    Although sorafenib is expected to have a chemopreventive effect on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence, there are limitations to its use because of adverse effects, including effects on liver function. We have reported that the iron chelator, deferoxamine can prevent liver fibrosis and preneoplastic lesions. We investigated the influence of administering a new oral iron chelator, deferasirox (DFX), on the effects of sorafenib. We used the choline-deficient l-amino acid-defined (CDAA) diet-induced rat liver fibrosis and HCC model. We divided rats into four groups: CDAA diet only (control group), CDAA diet with sorafenib (sorafenib group), CDAA diet with DFX (DFX group), and CDAA diet with DFX and sorafenib (DFX + sorafenib group). Liver fibrosis and development of preneoplastic lesions were assessed. In addition, we assessed adverse effects such as changes in body and liver weight, skin damage (eruption, dryness, and hair loss), which is defined as hand-foot skin syndrome, in the sorafenib and DFX + sorafenib groups. The combination of DFX + sorafenib markedly prevented liver fibrosis and preneoplastic lesions better than the other treatments. Furthermore, the combination therapy significantly decreased adverse effects compared with the sorafenib group. In conclusion, the combination therapy with DFX and sorafenib may be a useful adjuvant therapy to prevent recurrence after curative treatment of HCC.

  5. Processing of heme and heme-containing proteins by bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojiljkovic, Igor; Perkins-Balding, Donna

    2002-04-01

    An extensive amount of new knowledge on bacterial systems involved in heme processing has been accumulated in the last 10 years. We discuss common themes in heme transport across bacterial outer and inner membranes, emphasizing proteins and mechanisms involved. The processing of heme in the bacterial cytoplasm is extensively covered, and a new hypothesis about the fate of heme in the bacterial cell is presented. Auxiliary genes involved in heme utilization, i.e., TonB, proteases, proteins involved in heme storage and pigmentation, as well as genes involved in regulation of heme assimilation are reviewed.

  6. Switching Patients with Non-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease from Oral Iron to Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose: Effects on Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Requirements, Costs, Hemoglobin and Iron Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Di Gennaro, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD) often receive an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) and oral iron treatment. This study evaluated whether a switch from oral iron to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose can reduce ESA requirements and improve iron status and hemoglobin in patients with ND-CKD. Methods This prospective, single arm and single-center study included adult patients with ND-CKD (creatinine clearance ≤40 mL/min), hemoglobin 11–12 g/dL and iron deficiency (ferritin iron and ESA during 6 months prior to inclusion. Study patients received an intravenous ferric carboxymaltose dose of 1,000 mg iron, followed by a 6-months ESA/ ferric carboxymaltose maintenance regimen (target: hemoglobin 12 g/dL, transferrin saturation >20%). Outcome measures were ESA dose requirements during the observation period after initial ferric carboxymaltose treatment (primary endpoint); number of hospitalizations and transfusions, renal function before and after ferric carboxymaltose administration, number of adverse reactions (secondary endpoints). Hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, ferritin and transferrin saturation were measured monthly from baseline until end of study. Creatinine clearance, proteinuria, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase bimonthly from baseline until end of study. Results Thirty patients were enrolled (age 70.1±11.4 years; mean±SD). Mean ESA consumption was significantly reduced by 83.2±10.9% (from 41,839±3,668 IU/patient to 6,879±4,271 IU/patient; pferric carboxymaltose-related adverse events were reported and no patient withdrew or required transfusions during the study. Conclusion Among patients with ND-CKD and stable normal or borderline hemoglobin, switching from oral iron to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose was associated with significant improvements in hematological and iron parameters and a significant reduction in ESA dose

  7. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  8. The Heme Connection: Linking Erythrocytes and Macrophage Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Zahidul; Devalaraja, Samir; Haldar, Malay

    2017-01-01

    Erythroid function and development is intimately linked to macrophages. The primary function of erythrocytes is oxygen delivery, which is mediated by iron-containing hemoglobin. The major source of this iron is a recycling pathway where macrophages scavenge old and damaged erythrocytes to release iron contained within the heme moiety. Macrophages also promote erythropoiesis by providing a supportive niche in the bone marrow as an integral component of “erythorblastic islands.” Importantly, inflammation leads to alterations in iron handling by macrophages with significant impact on iron homeostasis and erythropoiesis. The importance of macrophages in erythropoiesis and iron homeostasis is well established and has been extensively reviewed. However, this developmental relationship is not one way, and erythrocytes can also regulate macrophage development and function. Erythrocyte-derived heme can induce the development of iron-recycling macrophages from monocytes, engage pattern recognition receptors to activate macrophages, and act as ligand for specific nuclear receptors to modulate macrophage function. Here, we discuss the role of heme as a signaling molecule impacting macrophage homeostasis. We will review these actions of heme within the framework of our current understanding of the role of micro-environmental factors in macrophage development and function. PMID:28167947

  9. Hemolysis-induced lethality involves inflammasome activation by heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Fabianno F; Alves, Letícia S; Rodrigues, Danielle; Fernandez, Patricia L; de Oliveira, Rosane B; Golenbock, Douglas T; Zamboni, Dario S; Bozza, Marcelo T

    2014-09-30

    The increase of extracellular heme is a hallmark of hemolysis or extensive cell damage. Heme has prooxidant, cytotoxic, and inflammatory effects, playing a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria, sepsis, and sickle cell disease. However, the mechanisms by which heme is sensed by innate immune cells contributing to these diseases are not fully characterized. We found that heme, but not porphyrins without iron, activated LPS-primed macrophages promoting the processing of IL-1β dependent on nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3). The activation of NLRP3 by heme required spleen tyrosine kinase, NADPH oxidase-2, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and K(+) efflux, whereas it was independent of heme internalization, lysosomal damage, ATP release, the purinergic receptor P2X7, and cell death. Importantly, our results indicated the participation of macrophages, NLRP3 inflammasome components, and IL-1R in the lethality caused by sterile hemolysis. Thus, understanding the molecular pathways affected by heme in innate immune cells might prove useful to identify new therapeutic targets for diseases that have heme release.

  10. 鹅血红素对患缺铁性贫血症幼龄大鼠生长发育、铁代谢和器官组织元素分布的影响%Effects of Goose Heme on Growth Development, Iron Metabolism and Organic Tissues Element Distribution of Iron Deficiency Anemia Young Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解超; 王宝维; 葛文华; 张名爱; 徐晓波; 岳斌

    2015-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to study the effects of different dosages of goose heme on growth de-velopment, iron metabolism and organic tissues element ( iron, copper, manganese, zinc and selenium) distri-bution of iron deficiency anemia ( IDA) rats aged from 3 to 7 weeks, and to find the appropriate supplemental level of goose heme and its feeding effect. The same late pregnancy period maternal were selected and fed by low-iron diet, from 15 days after pregnancy to the end of lactation, to establish the IDA model. After that, a total of 180 three-week-old young rats were randomly assigned into 5 groups with 6 replicates per group and 6 rats per replicate. Adding distilled water 10 mL/kg BW ( iron deficiency group) , 1% FeSO4 10 mL/kg BW ( FeSO4 group) and goose heme 0.11 ( low-dose group) , 0.22 ( mid-dose group) , 0.33 g/kg BW ( high-dose group) , fed low iron feed. Normal group had been fed a basal control diet during modling and intervention pe-riod. The experiment lasted for 4 weeks. The results showed as follows:1) the average body gain, final weight and organ indexes ( except heart index) in high-dose group had no significant different with normal group ( P>0.05) . Compared with the iron deficiency group, the hemoglobin, red blood cell, hematokrit, mean corpuscu-lar volume, serum iron and transferrin saturation in blood of young rats in high-dose group were significantly increased ( P0.05)。与缺铁组相比较,高剂量组幼龄大鼠血液中血红蛋白含量、红细胞数、红细胞压积、平均红细胞体积、血清铁、转铁蛋白饱和度显著或极显著升高(P<0.05或P<0.01),红细胞分布宽度和总铁结合力显著或极显著降低( P<0.05或P<0.01),大鼠心脏铁、铜、锌含量显著升高( P<0.05),肝脏铜、锰含量显著或极显著降低( P<0.05或P<0.01)。2) FeSO4溶液作为补铁剂长期服用对幼龄大鼠缺铁模型的干预效果不明显。由此可见,鹅血红素摄入量为0.33 g/kg BW时能有效干

  11. Bacillus anthracis HssRS signaling to HrtAB regulates heme resistance during infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauff, Devin L.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis proliferates to high levels within vertebrate tissues during the pathogenesis of anthrax. This growth is facilitated by the acquisition of nutrient iron from host heme. However, heme acquisition can lead to the accumulation of toxic amounts of heme within B. anthracis. Here, we show that B. anthracis resists heme toxicity by sensing heme through the HssRS two-component system, which regulates expression of the heme-detoxifying transporter HrtAB. In addition, we demonstrate that B. anthracis exhibits elevated HssRS function compared to its evolutionary relative S. aureus. Elevated heme sensing is likely required by B. anthracis due to the significant heme sensitivity exhibited by members of the genus Bacilli. We also demonstrate that B. anthracis depends on conserved residues within the previously uncharacterized sensing domain of the histidine kinase HssS for HssS function. Finally, we show that the heme- and HssRS-regulated hrtAB promoter is activated in a murine model of anthrax. These results demonstrate the evolutionary conservation of heme sensing among multiple Gram-positive bacteria and begin to provide a mechanistic explanation for the heme resistance of B. anthracis. Further, these data suggest that heme stress is experienced by bacterial pathogens during infection. PMID:19400785

  12. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    The interest in the role of ferrous iron in diabetes pathophysiology has been revived by recent evidence of iron as an important determinant of pancreatic islet inflammation and as a biomarker of diabetes risk and mortality. The iron metabolism in the β-cell is complex. Excess free iron is toxic......, but at the same time, iron is required for normal β-cell function and thereby glucose homeostasis. In the pathogenesis of diabetes, iron generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) by participating in the Fenton chemistry, which can induce oxidative damage and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to present...... and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...

  13. Immunogenicity of iron-regulated outer membrane proteins of Pasteurella multocida A:3 in cattle: molecular characterization of the immunodominant heme acquisition system receptor (HasR) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M E; Dabo, S M; Confer, A W

    2005-02-25

    The iron-regulated outer membrane proteins (IROMPs) of Pasteurella multocida A:3 strain 232 (Pm232), a bovine isolate, were investigated as potential immunogens in cattle. We addressed the ability of P. multocida IROMP-enriched fractions to induce antibody responses in cattle by different vaccination strategies and the protective efficacy of these antibodies using a P. multocida-induced pneumonia challenge model. Vaccination of cattle with outer membrane-enriched fractions derived from Pm232 grown on either iron-depleted (IROMPs) or iron-sufficient (OMPs) conditions induced significant antibody responses; however, the correlation with lung lesion scores was not significant (P = 0.01 and P multocida (strain Pm70) and was confirmed by DNA sequence analysis of the cloned Pm232 hasR gene. Further analyses indicated that Pm232 HasR is a surface-exposed OMP and conserved among most P. multocida isolates investigated. In addition, cattle vaccinated with live Pm232 or IROMPs had significantly higher antibody responses to the 96 kDa protein band and the correlation with lung lesion scores approached significance (P = 0.056). These results indicate that antibody responses in cattle are induced by P. multocida IROMPs, and that the 96 kDa HasR protein is an immunodominant IROMP.

  14. Novel hemin binding domains in the Corynebacterium diphtheriae HtaA protein interact with hemoglobin and are critical for heme iron utilization by HtaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Courtni E; Schmitt, Michael P

    2011-10-01

    The human pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae utilizes hemin and hemoglobin as iron sources for growth in iron-depleted environments. The use of hemin iron in C. diphtheriae involves the dtxR- and iron-regulated hmu hemin uptake locus, which encodes an ABC hemin transporter, and the surface-anchored hemin binding proteins HtaA and HtaB. Sequence analysis of HtaA and HtaB identified a conserved region (CR) of approximately 150 amino acids that is duplicated in HtaA and present in a single copy in HtaB. The two conserved regions in HtaA, designated CR1 and CR2, were used to construct glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins (GST-CR1 and GST-CR2) to assess hemin binding by UV-visual spectroscopy. These studies showed that both domains were able to bind hemin, suggesting that the conserved sequences are responsible for the hemin binding property previously ascribed to HtaA. HtaA and the CR2 domain were also shown to be able to bind hemoglobin (Hb) by the use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in which Hb was immobilized on a microtiter plate. The CR1 domain exhibited a weak interaction with Hb in the ELISA system, while HtaB showed no significant binding to Hb. Competitive binding studies demonstrated that soluble hemin and Hb were able to inhibit the binding of HtaA and the CR domains to immobilized Hb. Moreover, HtaA was unable to bind to Hb from which the hemin had been chemically removed. Alignment of the amino acid sequences of CR domains from various Corynebacterium species revealed several conserved residues, including two highly conserved tyrosine (Y) residues and one histidine (H) residue. Site-directed mutagenesis studies showed that Y361 and H412 were critical for the binding to hemin and Hb by the CR2 domain. Biological assays showed that Y361 was essential for the hemin iron utilization function of HtaA. Hemin transfer experiments demonstrated that HtaA was able to acquire hemin from Hb and that hemin bound to HtaA could be

  15. Induced fit on heme binding to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytoplasmic protein (PhuS) drives interaction with heme oxygenase (HemO)

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Iron, an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability, requires specialized cellular mechanisms for uptake. Although iron uptake into the cytoplasm in the form of heme has been well characterized in many bacteria, the subsequent trafficking is poorly understood. The cytoplasmic heme-binding proteins belong to a structurally related family thought to have evolved as “induced fit” ligand-binding macromolecules. One member, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytoplasmic protein (PhuS), has previously bee...

  16. Absolute Reticulocyte Count and Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content as Predictors of Early Response to Exclusive Oral Iron in Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Emilia; Giraudo, Maria Teresa; Ricceri, Fulvio; Aurucci, Maria Luigia; Mazzone, Raffaela; Ramenghi, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    We report data regarding kinetic of response to oral iron in 34 iron deficiency anemia children. Twenty-four/34 patients (70.5%) reached reference value of hemoglobin (Hb) concentration for age and sex at day + 30 from the beginning of treatment (complete early responders (CERs)), and 4/34 (12%) reached an Hb concentration at least 50% higher than the original (partial early responders (PERs)). CHr at T1 (within 7 days from the beginning of treatment) was significantly different in the different groups (22.95 in CERs versus 18.41 in other patients; p = 0.001; 22.42 in early responders versus 18.07 in NERs; p = 0.001). Relative increase of CHr from T0 to T1 resulted significantly higher in CERs than in other patients (0.21 versus 0.11, p = 0.042) and in early responders than in NERs (0.22 versus 0.004, p = 0.006). Multivariate logistic models revealed a higher probability of being a complete early responder due to relative increase of ARC from T0 to T1 [OR (95% CI) = 44.95 (1.54–1311.98)] and to CHr at T1 [OR (95% CI) =3.18 (1.24–8.17)]. Our preliminary data confirm CHr as early and accurate predictor of hematological response to oral iron. PMID:27092272

  17. Absolute Reticulocyte Count and Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content as Predictors of Early Response to Exclusive Oral Iron in Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Parodi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report data regarding kinetic of response to oral iron in 34 iron deficiency anemia children. Twenty-four/34 patients (70.5% reached reference value of hemoglobin (Hb concentration for age and sex at day + 30 from the beginning of treatment (complete early responders (CERs, and 4/34 (12% reached an Hb concentration at least 50% higher than the original (partial early responders (PERs. CHr at T1 (within 7 days from the beginning of treatment was significantly different in the different groups (22.95 in CERs versus 18.41 in other patients; p=0.001; 22.42 in early responders versus 18.07 in NERs; p=0.001. Relative increase of CHr from T0 to T1 resulted significantly higher in CERs than in other patients (0.21 versus 0.11, p=0.042 and in early responders than in NERs (0.22 versus 0.004, p=0.006. Multivariate logistic models revealed a higher probability of being a complete early responder due to relative increase of ARC from T0 to T1 [OR (95% CI = 44.95 (1.54–1311.98] and to CHr at T1 [OR (95% CI =3.18 (1.24–8.17]. Our preliminary data confirm CHr as early and accurate predictor of hematological response to oral iron.

  18. Genetic/metabolic effect of iron metabolism and rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in iron metabolism have allowed a novel classification of iron disorders and to identify previously unknown diseases. These disorders include genetic iron overload (hemochromatosis and inherited iron-related anemias, in some cases accompanied by iron overload. Rare inherited anemias may affect the hepcidin pathway, iron absorption, transport, utilization and recycling. Among the genetic iron-related anemias the most common form is likely the iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA, due to mutations of the hepcidin inhibitor TMPRSS6 encoding the serine protease matriptase-2. IRIDA is characterized by hepcidin up-regulation, decrease iron absorption and macrophage recycling and by microcytic- hypochromic anemia, unresponsive to oral iron. High serum hepcidin levels may suggest the diagnosis, which requires demonstrating the causal TMPRSS6 mutations by gene sequencing. Other rare microcytic hypochromic anemias associated with defects of iron transport-uptake are the rare hypotransferrinemia, and DMT1 and STEAP3 mutations. The degree of anemia is variable and accompanied by secondary iron overload even in the absence of blood transfusions. This is due to the iron-deficient or expanded erythropoiesis that inhibits hepcidin transcription, increases iron absorption, through the erythroid regulator, as in untransfused beta-thalassemia. Sideroblastic anemias are due to decreased mitochondrial iron utilization for heme or sulfur cluster synthesis. Their diagnosis requires demonstrating ringed sideroblasts by Perl’s staining of the bone marrow smears. The commonest X-linked form is due to deltaamino- levulinic-synthase-2-acid (ALAS2 mutations. The recessive, more severe form, affects SLC25A38, which encodes a potential mitochondrial importer of glycine, an amino acid essential for ALA synthesis and thus results in heme deficiency. Two disorders affect iron/sulfur cluster biogenesis: deficiency of the ATP-binding cassette B7 (ABCB7 causes X

  19. Increase on the initial soluble heme levels in acidic conditions is an important mechanism for spontaneous heme crystallization in vitro.

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    Renata Stiebler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hemozoin (Hz is a heme crystal that represents a vital pathway for heme disposal in several blood-feeding organisms. Recent evidence demonstrated that β-hematin (βH (the synthetic counterpart of Hz formation occurs under physiological conditions near synthetic or biological hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces. This seems to require a heme dimer acting as a precursor of Hz crystals that would be formed spontaneously in the absence of the competing water molecules bound to the heme iron. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of medium polarity on spontaneous βH formation in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed the effect of water content on spontaneous βH formation by using the aprotic solvent dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO and a series of polyethyleneglycols (PEGs. We observed that both DMSO and PEGs (3.350, 6.000, 8.000, and 22.000 increased the levels of soluble heme under acidic conditions. These compounds were able to stimulate the production of βH crystals in the absence of any biological sample. Interestingly, the effects of DMSO and PEGs on βH formation were positively correlated with their capacity to promote previous heme solubilization in acidic conditions. Curiously, a short chain polyethyleneglycol (PEG 300 caused a significant reduction in both soluble heme levels and βH formation. Finally, both heme solubilization and βH formation strongly correlated with reduced medium water activity provided by increased DMSO concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: The data presented here support the notion that reduction of the water activity is an important mechanism to support spontaneous heme crystallization, which depends on the previous increase of soluble heme levels.

  20. Decreased Heme Oxygenase Activity in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

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    Berkay Cataloglu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized with progressive im-pairment of cognitive functions. Heme oxygenase is an enzyme that degrades the heme molecule resulting in equimolar amounts of the carbon monoxide, ferrous iron, and bili-verdin. Up to now, heme oxygenase activity and its metabolic effects in Alzheimer's dis-ease have been investigated in so many studies; most of them were performed in post-mortem brain tissues of Alzheimer's disease patients or in animal models. Therefore, we aimed to investigate heme oxygenase activity in leukocytes of Alzheimer's disease pa-tients as a peripheral sample. Mean heme oxygenase activity was significantly lower in patients with Alzheimer's disease (0.53 +/- 0.32 nmol/h/mg protein compared to control sucjects (1.19 +/- 0.84 nmol/h/mg protein (p= 0.001. We think that reduction in leukocyte heme oxygenase activity may limit disease progression through preserving peripheral mitochondrial function by reducing the formation of free iron and carbon monoxide. [Dis Mol Med 2013; 1(2.000: 31-34

  1. A new iron free treatment with oral fish cartilage polysaccharide for iron deficiency chronic anemia in inflammatory bowel diseases: A pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea Belluzzi; Giulia Roda; Francesca Tonon; Antonio Soleti; Alessandra Caponi; Anna Tuci; Aldo Roda; Enrico Roda

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of a new oral preparation, highly concentrated in fish cartilage, in a group of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) patients with chronic iron deficient anemia.METHODS: In an open label pilot study, we supplemented a group of 25 patients (11 with Crohn's disease and 14 with ulcerative colitis) in stable clinical conditions and chronic anemia with a food supplement which does not contain iron but contains a standardized fraction of fish cartilage glycosaminoglycans and a mixture of antioxidants (Captafer Medestea, Turin, Italy). Patients received 500 mg, twice a day during meals, for at least 4 mo. Patients were suggested to maintain their alimentary habit. At time 0 and after 2 and 4 mo, emocrome, sideremia and ferritin were examined. Paired data were analyzed with Student's t test.RESULTS: Three patients relapsed during the study (2 in the 3rt mo, 1 in the 4th mo), two patients were lost to follow up and two patients dropped out (1 for orticaria, 1 for gastric burning). Of the remaining 18 patients, levels of serum iron started to rapidly increase within the 2nd mo of treatment, P < 0.05), whereas serum ferritin and hemoglobin needed a longer period to significantly improve their serum levels (mo 4) P < 0.05. The product was safe, easy to administer and well tolerated by patients.CONCLUSION: These data suggest a potential new treatment for IBD patients with iron deficiency chronic anemia and warrant further larger controlled studies.

  2. Degradation of heme in gram-negative bacteria: the product of the hemO gene of Neisseriae is a heme oxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W; Wilks, A; Stojiljkovic, I

    2000-12-01

    A full-length heme oxygenase gene from the gram-negative pathogen Neisseria meningitidis was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Expression of the enzyme yielded soluble catalytically active protein and caused accumulation of biliverdin within the E. coli cells. The purified HemO forms a 1:1 complex with heme and has a heme protein spectrum similar to that previously reported for the purified heme oxygenase (HmuO) from the gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae and for eukaryotic heme oxygenases. The overall sequence identity between HemO and these heme oxygenases is, however, low. In the presence of ascorbate or the human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase system, the heme-HemO complex is converted to ferric-biliverdin IXalpha and carbon monoxide as the final products. Homologs of the hemO gene were identified and characterized in six commensal Neisseria isolates, Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria flava, Neisseria polysacchareae, Neisseria kochii, and Neisseria cinerea. All HemO orthologs shared between 95 and 98% identity in amino acid sequences with functionally important residues being completely conserved. This is the first heme oxygenase identified in a gram-negative pathogen. The identification of HemO as a heme oxygenase provides further evidence that oxidative cleavage of the heme is the mechanism by which some bacteria acquire iron for further use.

  3. Structural basis of heme binding in the Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töro, Imre; Petrutz, Cristiana; Pacello, Francesca; D'Orazio, Melania; Battistoni, Andrea; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2009-02-20

    The Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi is characterized by the unique ability to bind heme at its dimer interface. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structures of this protein in the heme-loaded (holo) and heme-free (apo) forms. Heme is asymmetrically bound between the two enzyme subunits, where heme iron is coordinated by two histidine residues, His64 and His 124, provided by the two subunits. Moreover, the binding of heme to the protein is ensured by stabilizing contacts between the prosthetic group and a limited number of other residues, most of which are not present in other bacterial enzyme variants. We show that the introduction of only three mutations at the dimer interface of the enzyme from Haemophilus parainfluenzae, a closely related bacterial species, is sufficient to induce heme-binding ability by this enzyme variant. Heme binding does not alter protein activity. Moreover, the binding of the prosthetic group does not induce any significant structural perturbation at the subunit level and requires only limited local structural rearrangements that widen the cleft at the dimer interface and cause a limited shift in the relative orientation between the subunits. The presence of a preformed heme-binding pocket and the significant solvent exposure of the cofactor to the solvent are compatible with the suggested protective role of the enzyme against heme toxicity or with its involvement in heme trafficking in the periplasmic space.

  4. Haemoproteus and Schistosoma synthesize heme polymers similar to Plasmodium hemozoin and beta-hematin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M M; Shi, L; Sullivan, D J

    2001-03-01

    Many parasites digest hemoglobin as an amino acid source, but only a few produce heme polymer pigment instead of catabolizing heme via heme oxygenase. This work compares purified heme polymers produced by Haemoproteus columbae and Schistosoma mansoni to that of Plasmodium falciparum hemozoin and synthetic beta-hematin. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy identifies the signature peaks of the common iron-carboxylate bond characteristic in all four heme polymers. However, all pigments could be distinguished by quite different three-dimensional structure visualized by Field Emission Inlens Scanning Electron Microscopy. Both P. falciparum and H. columbae heme polymers had a symmetrical shape unlike the amorphous S. mansoni heme polymer and beta-hematin. All four heme pigments serve as templates for heme polymer extension, which was inhibitable by chloroquine and other quinoline antimalarials. The polymers showed different levels of resistance to hydrogen peroxide degradation. This work identifies another genus, Haemoproteus, capable of intracellular heme polymer formation. The different three-dimensional structures of each pigment implicate genus specific formation of heme polymer, variation of inhibition of polymer extension by the quinolines and degradation by hydrogen peroxide.

  5. Intravenous iron sucrose v/s oral ferrous fumarate for treatment of anemia in pregnancy. A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavi, Shruti B; Jaju, Purushottam B

    2017-05-08

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy, safety and tolerability of intravenous iron sucrose with that of oral ferrous fumarate in iron deficiency anemia during 14 to 34 weeks of pregnancy. A randomized controlled trial was performed involving 112 patients attending the antenatal clinic at Shri B.M.Patil Medical college Hospital, Bijapur from October 2011 to August 2012,with hemoglobin levels between 70-110 g/L and serum ferritin of ferrous fumarate per day. The primary outcome measures for the trial, haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels were measured after 4 weeks. Statistical significance was assessed using Student's t-test. The change in haemoglobin in women receiving intravenous iron was higher than with oral ferrous fumarate 22 ± 11.5 g/L vs 12 ± 9 g/L (p ferrous fumarate in increasing maternal iron stores. The trial registration number is CTRI/2016/12/007552 registered in Clinical Trial Registry India on 8/12/2016. It is a retrospectively registered trial.

  6. Dioxygen reactivity of meso-hydroxylated hemes: intermediates in heme degradation process catalyzed by heme oxygenase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sankar Prasad Rath

    2006-11-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the only enzyme in mammals known to catalyse the physiological degradation of unwanted heme into biliverdin, Fe ion and CO. The process involves introduction of the hydroxyl group at one of its meso-positions as the first fundamental step of the heme cleavage process. It was also found that meso-amino heme undergoes similar ring-cleavage process while reacting with dioxygen in presence of pyridine as an axial ligand. The present paper briefly reviews the reactions of model meso-hydroxylated heme and its analogues with dioxygen, and their relevance in the heme degradation process.

  7. Efficacy and safety of deferasirox, an oral iron chelator, in heavily iron-overloaded patients with β-thalassaemia: the ESCALATOR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Ali; El-Beshlawy, Amal; Elalfy, Mohsen S; Al Zir, Kusai; Daar, Shahina; Habr, Dany; Kriemler-Krahn, Ulrike; Hmissi, Abdel; Al Jefri, Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Many patients with transfusional iron overload are at risk for progressive organ dysfunction and early death and poor compliance with older chelation therapies is believed to be a major contributing factor. Phase II/III studies have shown that oral deferasirox 20–30 mg/kg/d reduces iron burden, depending on transfusional iron intake. Methods: The prospective, open-label, 1-yr ESCALATOR study in the Middle East was designed to evaluate once-daily deferasirox in patients ≥2 yr with β-thalassaemia major and iron overload who were previously chelated with deferoxamine and/or deferiprone. Most patients began treatment with deferasirox 20 mg/kg/d; doses were adjusted in response to markers of over- or under-chelation. The primary endpoint was treatment success, defined as a reduction in liver iron concentration (LIC) of ≥3 mg Fe/g dry weight (dw) if baseline LIC was ≥10 mg Fe/g dw, or final LIC of 1–7 mg Fe/g dw for patients with baseline LIC of 2 to <10 mg Fe/g dw. Results: Overall, 233/237 enrolled patients completed 1 yr’s treatment. Mean baseline LIC was 18.0 ± 9.1 mg Fe/g dw, while median serum ferritin was 3356 ng/mL. After 1 yr’s deferasirox treatment, the intent-to-treat population experienced a significant treatment success rate of 57.0% (P = 0.016) and a mean reduction in LIC of 3.4 mg Fe/g dw. Changes in serum ferritin appeared to parallel dose increases at around 24 wk. Most patients (78.1%) underwent dose increases above 20 mg/kg/d, primarily to 30 mg/kg/d. Drug-related adverse events were mostly mild to moderate and resolved without discontinuing treatment. Conclusions: The results of the ESCALATOR study in primarily heavily iron-overloaded patients confirm previous observations in patients with β-thalassaemia, highlighting the importance of timely deferasirox dose adjustments based on serum ferritin levels and transfusional iron intake to ensure patients achieve their therapeutic goal of maintenance or reduction in iron burden

  8. Mutational analysis of hemoglobin binding and heme utilization by a bacterial hemoglobin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, W G; Choudhary, N R; Council, S E; Collins, E J; Leduc, I

    2013-07-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most living organisms. To acquire iron from their environment, Gram-negative bacteria use TonB-dependent transporters that bind host proteins at the bacterial surface and transport iron or heme to the periplasm via the Ton machinery. TonB-dependent transporters are barrel-shaped outer membrane proteins with 22 transmembrane domains, 11 surface-exposed loops, and a plug domain that occludes the pore. To identify key residues of TonB-dependent transporters involved in hemoglobin binding and heme transport and thereby locate putative protective epitopes, the hemoglobin receptor of Haemophilus ducreyi HgbA was used as a model of iron/heme acquisition from hemoglobin. Although all extracellular loops of HgbA are required by H. ducreyi to use hemoglobin as a source of iron/heme, we previously demonstrated that hemoglobin binding by HgbA only involves loops 5 and 7. Using deletion, substitution, and site-directed mutagenesis, we were able to differentiate hemoglobin binding and heme acquisition by HgbA. Deletion or substitution of the GYEAYNRQWWA region of loop 5 and alanine replacement of selected histidines affected hemoglobin binding by HgbA. Conversely, mutation of the phenylalanine in the loop 7 FRAP domain or substitution of the NRQWWA motif of loop 5 significantly abrogated utilization of heme from hemoglobin. Our findings show that hemoglobin binding and heme utilization by a bacterial hemoglobin receptor involve specific motifs of HgbA.

  9. Isocyanides Inhibit Human Heme Oxygenases at the Verdoheme Stage†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John P.; Kandel, Sylvie; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the oxidative cleavage of heme to generate biliverdin, CO, and free iron. In humans, heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is overexpressed in tumor tissues, where it helps to protect cancer cells from anticancer agents, while HOs in fungal pathogens, such as Candida albicans, function as the primary means of iron acquisition. Thus, HO can be considered a potential therapeutic target for certain diseases. In this study, we have examined the equilibrium binding of three isocyanides; isopropyl, n-butyl, and benzyl, to the two major human HO isoforms (hHO-1 and hHO-2), Candida albicans HO (CaHmx1), and human cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 using electronic absorption spectroscopy. Isocyanides coordinate to both ferric and ferrous HO-bound heme, with tighter binding by the more hydrophobic isocyanides, and 200-300-fold tighter binding to the ferrous form. Benzyl isocyanide was the strongest ligand to ferrous heme in all the enzymes. Because the dissociation constants (KD) of the ligands for ferrous heme-hHO-1 were below the limit of accuracy for equilibrium titrations, stopped-flow kinetic experiments were used to measure the binding parameters of the isocyanides to ferrous hHO-1. Steady-state activity assays showed that benzyl isocyanide was the most potent uncompetitive inhibitor with respect to heme with a KI = 0.15 μM for hHO-1. Importantly, single turnover assays revealed that the reaction was completely stopped by coordination of the isocyanide to the verdoheme intermediate rather than to the ferric heme complex. Much tighter binding of the inhibitor to the verdoheme intermediate differentiates it from inhibition of, for example, CYP3A4 and offers a possible route to more selective inhibitor design. PMID:19694439

  10. Isocyanides inhibit human heme oxygenases at the verdoheme stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John P; Kandel, Sylvie; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2009-09-22

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the oxidative cleavage of heme to generate biliverdin, CO, and free iron. In humans, heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is overexpressed in tumor tissues, where it helps to protect cancer cells from anticancer agents, while HOs in fungal pathogens, such as Candida albicans, function as the primary means of iron acquisition. Thus, HO can be considered a potential therapeutic target for certain diseases. In this study, we have examined the equilibrium binding of three isocyanides, isopropyl, n-butyl, and benzyl, to the two major human HO isoforms (hHO-1 and hHO-2), Candida albicans HO (CaHmx1), and human cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 using electronic absorption spectroscopy. Isocyanides coordinate to both ferric and ferrous HO-bound heme, with tighter binding by the more hydrophobic isocyanides and 200-300-fold tighter binding to the ferrous form. Benzyl isocyanide was the strongest ligand to ferrous heme in all the enzymes. Because the dissociation constants (KD) of the ligands for ferrous heme-hHO-1 were below the limit of accuracy for equilibrium titrations, stopped-flow kinetic experiments were used to measure the binding parameters of the isocyanides to ferrous hHO-1. Steady-state activity assays showed that benzyl isocyanide was the most potent uncompetitive inhibitor with respect to heme with a KI = 0.15 microM for hHO-1. Importantly, single turnover assays revealed that the reaction was completely stopped by coordination of the isocyanide to the verdoheme intermediate rather than to the ferric heme complex. Much tighter binding of the inhibitor to the verdoheme intermediate differentiates it from inhibition of, for example, CYP3A4 and offers a possible route to more selective inhibitor design.

  11. Immunological evaluation of β-thalassemia major patients receiving oral iron chelator deferasirox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Aamer; Shakoor, Zahid; Alsaleh, Khalid; Algahtani, Farjah; Iqbal, Zafar; Al-Momen, Abdulkareem

    2014-07-01

    To determine the immune abnormalities and occurrence of infections in transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia major patients receiving oral iron chelator deferasirox (DFX). An observational study. Hematology Clinics, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from July to December 2010. Seventeen patients with β-thalassemia major (12 females, median age 26 years) receiving deferasirox (DFX) for a median duration of 27 months were observed for any infections and had their immune status determined. Immune parameters studied included serum immunoglobulins and IgG subclasses, serum complement (C3 and C4) and anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) level, total B and T-lymphocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ counts, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and natural killer (NK) cells. Immunological parameters of the patients were compared with age, gender, serum ferritin level and splenectomy status. Lymphocyte subsets were also compared with age and gender matched normal controls. A considerable reduction in serum ferritin was achieved by DFX from a median level of 2528 to 1875 μmol/l. Serum IgG levels were increased in 7 patients. Low C4 levels were found in 9 patients. Total B and T-lymphocytes were increased in 14 patients each, while CD4+, CD8+ and NK cells were increased in 13, 12 and 11 patients respectively. Absolute counts for all lymphocyte subsets were significantly higher compared to the normal controls (p ² 0.05 for all parameters). Raised levels of IgG were associated with older age, female gender, splenectomized status and higher serum ferritin levels but this did not reach statistical significance except for the higher ferritin levels (p=0.044). Increased tendency to infections was not observed. Patients with β-thalassemia major receiving DFX exhibited significant immune abnormalities. Changes observed have been described previously, but could be related to DFX. The immune abnormalities were not associated with increased tendency to infections.

  12. Oxygen-independent alkane formation by non-heme iron-dependent cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase: investigation of kinetics and requirement for an external electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eser, Bekir E; Das, Debasis; Han, Jaehong; Jones, Patrik R; Marsh, E Neil G

    2011-12-13

    Cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (cAD) is, structurally, a member of the di-iron carboxylate family of oxygenases. We previously reported that cAD from Prochlorococcus marinus catalyzes the unusual hydrolysis of aldehydes to produce alkanes and formate in a reaction that requires an external reducing system but does not require oxygen [Das et al. (2011) Angew. Chem. 50, 7148-7152]. Here we demonstrate that cADs from divergent cyanobacterial classes, including the enzyme from N. puntiformes that was reported to be oxygen dependent, catalyze aldehyde decarbonylation at a much faster rate under anaerobic conditions and that the oxygen in formate derives from water. The very low activity (<1 turnover/h) of cAD appears to result from inhibition by the ferredoxin reducing system used in the assay and the low solubility of the substrate. Replacing ferredoxin with the electron mediator phenazine methosulfate allowed the enzyme to function with various chemical reductants, with NADH giving the highest activity. NADH is not consumed during turnover, in accord with the proposed catalytic role for the reducing system in the reaction. With octadecanal, a burst phase of product formation, k(prod) = 3.4 ± 0.5 min(-1), is observed, indicating that chemistry is not rate-determining under the conditions of the assay. With the more soluble substrate, heptanal, k(cat) = 0.17 ± 0.01 min(-1) and no burst phase is observed, suggesting that a chemical step is limiting in the reaction of this substrate.

  13. Heme oxygenase 1 transgenic mice as a model to study neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maines, Mahin D

    2002-01-01

    Bile pigments and CO are formed in the course of heme degradation by the isozymes and are biologically active moieties. In the course of heme degradation the chelated iron is also released. Heme and iron are prooxidants, whereas bile pigments are antioxidants. In addition, CO functions as a signal molecule and HO-2 may serve as an intracellular "sink" for NO. In the balance, the published data suggest that the HO system functions in cellular defense mechanisms. The methods described in this chapter can be used to assess the tissue/cell toxicity of chemicals in general, and as pertains to the defense activity of HO-1, specifically.

  14. The dppBCDF gene cluster of Haemophilus influenzae: Role in heme utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morton Daniel J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilus influenzae requires a porphyrin source for aerobic growth and possesses multiple mechanisms to obtain this essential nutrient. This porphyrin requirement may be satisfied by either heme alone, or protoporphyrin IX in the presence of an iron source. One protein involved in heme acquisition by H. influenzae is the periplasmic heme binding protein HbpA. HbpA exhibits significant homology to the dipeptide and heme binding protein DppA of Escherichia coli. DppA is a component of the DppABCDF peptide-heme permease of E. coli. H. influenzae homologs of dppBCDF are located in the genome at a point distant from hbpA. The object of this study was to investigate the potential role of the H. influenzae dppBCDF locus in heme utilization. Findings An insertional mutation in dppC was constructed and the impact of the mutation on the utilization of both free heme and various proteinaceous heme sources as well as utilization of protoporphyrin IX was determined in growth curve studies. The dppC insertion mutant strain was significantly impacted in utilization of all tested heme sources and protoporphyin IX. Complementation of the dppC mutation with an intact dppCBDF gene cluster in trans corrected the growth defects seen in the dppC mutant strain. Conclusion The dppCBDF gene cluster constitutes part of the periplasmic heme-acquisition systems of H. influenzae.

  15. HRG1 is essential for heme transport from the phagolysosome of macrophages during erythrophagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carine; Yuan, Xiaojing; Schmidt, Paul J; Bresciani, Erica; Samuel, Tamika K; Campagna, Dean; Hall, Caitlin; Bishop, Kevin; Calicchio, Monica L; Lapierre, Ariane; Ward, Diane M; Liu, Paul; Fleming, Mark D; Hamza, Iqbal

    2013-02-05

    Adult humans have about 25 trillion red blood cells (RBCs), and each second we recycle about 5 million RBCs by erythrophagocytosis (EP) in macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Despite the central role for EP in mammalian iron metabolism, the molecules and pathways responsible for heme trafficking during EP remain unknown. Here, we show that the mammalian homolog of HRG1, a transmembrane heme permease in C. elegans, is essential for macrophage iron homeostasis and transports heme from the phagolysosome to the cytoplasm during EP. HRG1 is strongly expressed in macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system and specifically localizes to the phagolysosomal membranes during EP. Depletion of Hrg1 in mouse macrophages causes attenuation of heme transport from the phagolysosomal compartment. Importantly, missense polymorphisms in human HRG1 are defective in heme transport. Our results reveal HRG1 as the long-sought heme transporter for heme-iron recycling in macrophages and suggest that genetic variations in HRG1 could be modifiers of human iron metabolism.

  16. Alteration of the Regiospecificity of Human Heme Oxygenase-1 by Unseating of the Heme but not Disruption of the Distal Hydrogen Bonding Network†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Evans, John P.; Ogura, Hiroshi; La Mar, Gerd N.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Heme oxygenase regiospecifically oxidizes heme at the α-meso position to give biliverdin IXα, CO, and iron. The heme orientation within the active site, which is thought to determine the oxidation regiospecificity, is shown here for the human enzyme (hHO1) to be largely determined by interactions between the heme carboxylic acid groups and residues Arg183 and Lys18 but not Tyr134. Mutation of either Arg183 or Lys18 individually does not significantly alter the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent reaction regiochemistry, but partially shifts the oxidation to the β/δ-meso positions in the reaction supported by ascorbic acid. Mutation of Glu29 to a lysine, which places a positive charge where it can interact with a heme carboxyl if the heme rotates by ~90°, causes a slight loss of regiospecificity, but combined with the R183E and K18E mutations results primarily in β/δ-meso oxidation of the heme under all conditions. NMR analysis of heme binding to the triple K18E/E29K/R183E mutant confirms rotation of the heme in the active site. Kinetic studies demonstrate that mutations of Arg183 greatly impair the rate of the P450 reductase-dependent reaction, in accord with the earlier finding that Arg183 is involved in binding of the reductase to hHO1, but have little effect on the ascorbate reaction. Mutations of Asp140 and Tyr58 that disrupt the active site hydrogen bonding network, impair catalytic rates but do not influence the oxidation regiochemistry. The results indicate both that the oxidation regiochemistry is largely controlled by ionic interactions of the heme propionic acid groups with the protein and that shifts in regiospecificity involve rotation of the heme about an axis perpendicular to the heme plane. PMID:16388581

  17. Facile heme vinyl posttranslational modification in a hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preimesberger, Matthew R; Wenke, Belinda B; Gilevicius, Lukas; Pond, Matthew P; Lecomte, Juliette T J

    2013-05-21

    Iron-protoporphyrin IX, or b heme, is utilized as such by a large number of proteins and enzymes. In some cases, notably the c-type cytochromes, this group undergoes a posttranslational covalent attachment to the polypeptide chain, which adjusts the physicochemical properties of the holoprotein. The hemoglobin from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (GlbN), contrary to the archetypical hemoglobin, modifies its b heme covalently. The posttranslational modification links His117, a residue that does not coordinate the iron, to the porphyrin 2-vinyl substituent and forms a hybrid b/c heme. The reaction is an electrophilic addition that occurs spontaneously in the ferrous state of the protein. This apparently facile type of heme modification has been observed in only two cyanobacterial GlbNs. To explore the determinants of the reaction, we examined the behavior of Synechocystis GlbN variants containing a histidine at position 79, which is buried against the porphyrin 4-vinyl substituent. We found that L79H/H117A GlbN bound the heme weakly but nevertheless formed a cross-link between His79 Nε2 and the heme 4-Cα. In addition to this linkage, the single variant L79H GlbN also formed the native His117-2-Cα bond yielding an unprecedented bis-alkylated protein adduct. The ability to engineer the doubly modified protein indicates that the histidine-heme modification in GlbN is robust and could be engineered in different local environments. The rarity of the histidine linkage in natural proteins, despite the ease of reaction, is proposed to stem from multiple sources of negative selection.

  18. Oral administration of iron-saturated bovine lactoferrin–loaded ceramic nanocapsules for breast cancer therapy and influence on iron and calcium metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahidhara G

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ganesh Mahidhara, Rupinder K Kanwar, Kislay Roy, Jagat R Kanwar Nanomedicine-Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research, School of Medicine, Molecular and Medical Research Strategic Research Centre, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, VIC, Australia Abstract: We determined the anticancer efficacy and internalization mechanism of our polymeric–ceramic nanoparticle system (calcium phosphate nanocores, enclosed in biodegradable polymers chitosan and alginate nanocapsules/nanocarriers [ACSC NCs] loaded with iron-saturated bovine lactoferrin (Fe-bLf in a breast cancer xenograft model. ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs with an overall size of 322±27.2 nm were synthesized. In vitro internalization and anticancer efficacy were evaluated in the MDA-MB-231 cells using multicellular tumor spheroids, CyQUANT and MTT assays. These NCs were orally delivered in a breast cancer xenograft mice model, and their internalization, cytotoxicity, biodistribution, and anticancer efficacy were evaluated. Chitosan-coated calcium phosphate Fe-bLf NCs effectively (59%, P≤0.005 internalized in a 1-hour period using clathrin-mediated endocytosis (P≤0.05 and energy-mediated pathways (P≤0.05 for internalization; 3.3 mg/mL of ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs completely disintegrated (~130-fold reduction, P≤0.0005 the tumor spheroids in 72 hours and 96 hours. The IC50 values determined for ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs were 1.69 mg/mL at 10 hours and 1.62 mg/mL after 20 hours. We found that Fe-bLf-NCs effectively (P≤0.05 decreased the tumor size (4.8-fold compared to the void NCs diet and prevented tumor recurrence when compared to intraperitoneal injection of Taxol and Doxorubicin. Receptor gene expression and micro-RNA analysis confirmed upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and transferrin receptor (liver, intestine, and brain. Several micro-RNAs responsible for iron metabolism upregulated with NCs were identified. Taken together, orally delivered Fe-bLf NCs

  19. Influence of Cd{sup 2+} on the spin state of non-heme iron and on protein local motions in reactions centers from purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirilium rubrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinska, M [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, 31-342 Krakow, Radzikowskiego 152 (Poland); Orzechowska, A [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, 30-059 Krakow, Reymonta 4 (Poland); Fiedor, J; Slezak, T; Zajac, M; Matlak, K; Korecki, J; Halas, A; Burda, K [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, 30-059 Krakow, Reymonta 19 (Poland); Chumakov, A I [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Strzalka, K; Fiedor, L, E-mail: burda@novell.ftj.agh.edu.p [Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, 30-387 Krakow, Gronostajowa 7 (Poland)

    2010-03-01

    Non-heme Fe is a conservative component of the Q-type photosynthetic reaction centers but its function remains unknown. Applying Moessbauer spectroscopy we show that in Rhodospirillum rubrum the non-heme Fe exists mostly in a ferrous low spin state. The binding of Cd{sup 2+} ions in the vicinity of the quinone-Fe complex changes the high spin state of the non-heme Fe into a low spin one characterized by hyperfine parameters similar to those obtained for the non-heme Fe low spin state in untreated reaction centers, as confirmed by Moessbauer measurements. The nuclear inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation experiments show that the contribution of vibrations at low energies, between 3-15 meV, activated at 240 K are damped in the bacterial reaction centers treated with CdCl{sub 2}. No influence of Cd{sup 2+} ions is observed on the soft vibrational states at 60 K. These results suggest that binding of cadmium cations within the reaction centers may enhance decoupling of the non-heme Fe from the surrounding protein matrix at temperatures higher than 200 K, what can explain the slowing down of electron transfer between the Q{sub A} and Q{sub B} quinones by Cd{sup 2+}.

  20. Estimation of iron overloads using oral exfoliative cytology in beta-thalassemia major patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekha, Swati; Nayar, Amit Kumar; Bakshi, Preeti; Sharma, Aman; Parhar, Swati; Soni, Sugandhi

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload is a medical condition that occurs when too much of the mineral iron builds up inside the body and produces a toxic reaction. Thalassemia is a genetic disorder of hemoglobin synthesis, which requires regular blood transfusion therapy, and the lack of specific excretory pathways for iron in humans leads to iron overload in the body tissues. It is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. The estimation of iron levels in exfoliated buccal mucosal cells may provide a simple, noninvasive, and a safe procedure for estimating the iron overload by using the Perls' Prussian blue stain. Smears were obtained from buccal mucosa of 40 randomly selected beta-thalassemia major patients and 40 healthy subjects as controls. Smears were stained with Perls' Prussian blue method. Blood samples were taken for estimation of serum ferritin levels. Images of smears were analyzed using the software image J software version 1.47v and correlated with serum ferritin. Perls' positivity was observed in 87.5% of thalassemic patients with a positive correlation to serum ferritin levels. The use of exfoliative buccal mucosal cells for the evaluation of iron overloads in the body provides us with a diagnostic medium that is noninvasive, easy to collect, store, and transport, cost effective, and above all reliable.

  1. Estimation of iron overloads using oral exfoliative cytology in beta-thalassemia major patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Leekha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iron overload is a medical condition that occurs when too much of the mineral iron builds up inside the body and produces a toxic reaction. Thalassemia is a genetic disorder of hemoglobin synthesis, which requires regular blood transfusion therapy, and the lack of specific excretory pathways for iron in humans leads to iron overload in the body tissues. It is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. The estimation of iron levels in exfoliated buccal mucosal cells may provide a simple, noninvasive, and a safe procedure for estimating the iron overload by using the Perls′ Prussian blue stain. Methods: Smears were obtained from buccal mucosa of 40 randomly selected beta-thalassemia major patients and 40 healthy subjects as controls. Smears were stained with Perls′ Prussian blue method. Blood samples were taken for estimation of serum ferritin levels. Images of smears were analyzed using the software image J software version 1.47v and correlated with serum ferritin. Results: Perls′ positivity was observed in 87.5% of thalassemic patients with a positive correlation to serum ferritin levels. Conclusion: The use of exfoliative buccal mucosal cells for the evaluation of iron overloads in the body provides us with a diagnostic medium that is noninvasive, easy to collect, store, and transport, cost effective, and above all reliable.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 system and gastrointestinal inflammation: a short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao; Fan, Wen-Guo; Li, Dong-Pei; Kung, Hsiangfu; Lin, Marie Cm

    2011-10-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) system catalyzes heme to biologically active products: carbon monoxide, biliverdin/bilirubin and free iron. It is involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis and many physiological and pathophysiological processes. A growing body of evidence indicates that HO-1 activation may play an important protective role in acute and chronic inflammation of gastrointestinal tract. This review focuses on the current understanding of the physiological significance of HO-1 induction and its possible roles in the gastrointestinal inflammation studied to date. The ability to upregulate HO-1 by pharmacological means or using gene therapy may offer therapeutic strategies for gastrointestinal inflammation in the future.

  3. Al-hijamah and oral honey for treating thalassemia, conditions of iron overload, and hyperferremia: toward improving the therapeutic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Salah Mohamed; Baghdadi, Hussam; Abou-Taleb, Ashraf; Mahmoud, Hany Salah; Maria, Reham A; Ahmed, Nagwa S; Helmy Nabo, Manal Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    -step procedure that includes skin suction using cups, scarification (shartat mihjam in Arabic), and second skin suction (triple S technique). Al-hijamah is a more comprehensive technique and does better than traditional WCT, as Al-hijamah includes two pressure-dependent filtration steps versus one step in traditional WCT. Whenever blood plasma is to be cleared of an excess pathological substance, Al-hijamah is indicated. We will discuss here some reported hematological and therapeutic benefits of Al-hijamah, its medical bases, methodologies, precautions, side effects, contraindications, quantitative evaluation, malpractice, combination with oral honey treatment, and to what extent it may be helpful when treating thalassemia and other conditions of iron overload and hyperferremia.

  4. Heme mediates cytotoxicity from artemisinin and serves as a general anti-proliferation target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiming Zhang

    Full Text Available Heme (Fe2+ protoporphyrin IX is an essential molecule that has been implicated the potent antimalarial action of artemisinin and its derivatives, although the source and nature of the heme remain controversial. Artemisinins also exhibit selective cytotoxicity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that intracellular heme is the physiologically relevant mediator of the cytotoxic effects of artemisinins. Increasing intracellular heme synthesis through the addition of aminolevulinic acid, protoporphyrin IX, or transferrin-bound iron increased the cytotoxicity of dihydroartemisinin, while decreasing heme synthesis through the addition of succinyl acetone decreased its cytotoxic activity. A simple and robust high throughput assay was developed to screen chemical compounds that were capable of interacting with heme. A natural products library was screened which identified the compound coralyne, in addition to artemisinin, as a heme interacting compound with heme synthesis dependent cytotoxic activity. These results indicate that cellular heme may serve a general target for the development of both anti-parasitic and anti-cancer therapeutics.

  5. Benfang Lei’s research on heme acquisition in Gram-positive pathogens and bacterial pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Benfang Lei’s laboratory conducts research on pathogenesis of human pathogen Group A Streptococcus (GAS)and horse pathogen Streptococcus equi(S.equi). His current research focuses on heme acquisition in Gram-positive pathogens and molecular mechanism of GAS and S.equi pathogenesis.Heme is an important source of essential iron for bacterial pathogens.Benfang Lei and colleagues identified the first cell surface heme-binding protein in Gram-positive pathogens and the heme acquisition system in GAS,demonstrated direct heme transfer from one protein to another,demonstrated an experimental pathway of heme acquisition by the Staphylococcus aureus Isd system,elucidated the activated heme transfer mechanism,and obtained evidence for a chemical mechanism of direct axial ligand displacement during the Shp-to-HtsA heme transfer reaction.These findings have considerably contributed to the progress that has been made over recent years in understanding the heme acquisition process in Grampositive pathogens.Pathogenesis of GAS is mediated by an abundance of extracellular proteins,and pathogenic role and functional mechanism are not known for many of these virulence factors.Lei laboratory identified a secreted protein of GAS as a CovRS-regulated virulence factor that is a protective antigen and is critical for GAS spreading in the skin and systemic dissemination.These studies may lead to development of novel strategies to prevent and treat GAS infections.

  6. Circulating Immune Complexes and trace elements (Copper, Iron and Selenium as markers in oral precancer and cancer : a randomised, controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karjodkar Freny R

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To evaluate the levels of circulating immune complexes, trace elements (copper, iron and selenium in serum of patients with oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF, oral leukoplakia (L, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, analyze the alteration and identify the best predictors amongst these parameters for disease occurrence and progression. Methods Circulating immune complexes (CIC were estimated using 37.5% Polyethylene Glycol 6000(PEG serum precipitation. Serum estimation of copper (Cu, Iron (Fe and selenium (Se was done using the Oxalyl Dihydrazide method, Colorimetric Dipyridyl method and the Differential Pulse Cathodic Stripping Voltametry respectively. Results The data analysis revealed increased circulating immune complex levels in the precancer and cancer patients. Serum copper levels showed gradual increase from precancer to cancer patients. However, serum iron levels were decreased significantly in the cancer group. Selenium levels showed marked decrease in the cancer group. Among CIC, serum, copper, iron and selenium the best predictors for the occurrence of lesions were age, serum iron, CIC, serum selenium in the decreasing order. Conclusion The present study shows that these immunological and biological markers may be associated with the pathogenesis of oral premalignant and malignant lesions and their progressions. Concerted efforts would, therefore, help in early detection, management, and monitoring the efficacy of treatment.

  7. Association Studies of HFE C282Y and H63D Variants with Oral Cancer Risk and Iron Homeostasis Among Whites and Blacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan R. Jones

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis (HFE gene are associated with excessive iron absorption from the diet, and pro-oxidant effects of iron accumulation are thought to be a risk factor for several types of cancer. Methods: The C282Y (rs1800562 and H63D (rs1799945 polymorphisms were genotyped in 301 oral cancer cases and 437 controls and analyzed in relation to oral cancer risk, and serum iron biomarker levels from a subset of 130 subjects. Results: Individuals with the C282Y allele had lower total iron binding capacity (TIBC (321.2 ± 37.2 µg/dL vs. 397.7 ± 89.0 µg/dL, p = 0.007 and higher percent transferrin saturation (22.0 ± 8.7 vs. 35.6 ± 22.9, p = 0.023 than wild type individuals. Iron and ferritin levels approached significantly higher levels for the C282Y allele (p = 0.0632 and p = 0.0588, respectively. Conclusions: Iron biomarker levels were elevated by the C282Y allele, but neither (rs1800562 nor (rs1799945 was associated with oral cancer risk in blacks and whites.

  8. Enhancement of nitrite on heme-induced oxidative reactions: A potential toxicological implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Jingjie; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is one of the major end products of NO metabolism. Although the biological significance of heme/NO(2)(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration is a subject of great interest, the important roles of NO(2)(-) on heme-dependent redox reaction have been greatly underestimated. In this study, we investigated the influence of NO(2)(-) on heme -dependent oxidative reactions. It was found that NO(2)(-) had the capacity to act as a reducing agent to remove high oxidation states of heme iron. In the reduction of ferryl heme to ferric heme, NO(2)(-) was oxidized to a nitrating agent NO(2), and subsequently, tyrosine residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA) were nitrated. However, the presence of NO(2)(-) surprisingly exerted pro-oxidant effect on heme-H(2)O(2)-induced formation of BSA carbonyls at lower concentrations and enhanced the loss of HepG2 cell viability dose-dependently, which was probably due to the ability of this inorganic compound to efficiently enhance the peroxidase activity and oxidative degradation of heme. These data provide novel evidence that the dietary intake and experimental use of NO(2)(-) in vivo and in vitro would possess the pro-oxidant activity through interfering in heme-dependent oxidative reactions. Besides the classic role in protein tyrosine nitration, the deleterious effects on heme redox reactions may provide new insights into the toxicological implications of NO(2)(-) with cellular heme proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Al-hijamah and oral honey for treating thalassemia, conditions of iron overload, and hyperferremia: toward improving the therapeutic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Sayed SM

    2014-10-01

    liver and the kidneys. Interestingly, WCT was reported to decrease serum ferritin (circulating iron stores significantly by about 22.25% in healthy subjects (in one session and to decrease serum iron significantly to the level of causing iron deficiency (in multiple sessions. WCT was reported to clear blood significantly of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, uric acid, inflammatory mediators, and immunoglobulin antibodies (rheumatoid factor. Moreover, WCT was reported to enhance the natural immunity, potentiate pharmacological treatments, and to treat many different disease conditions. There are two distinct methods of WCT: traditional WCT and Al-hijamah (WCT of prophetic medicine. Both start and end with skin sterilization. In traditional WCT, there are two steps, skin scarification followed by suction using plastic cups (double S technique; Al-hijamah is a three-step procedure that includes skin suction using cups, scarification (shartat mihjam in Arabic, and second skin suction (triple S technique. Al-hijamah is a more comprehensive technique and does better than traditional WCT, as Al-hijamah includes two pressure-dependent filtration steps versus one step in traditional WCT. Whenever blood plasma is to be cleared of an excess pathological substance, Al-hijamah is indicated. We will discuss here some reported hematological and therapeutic benefits of Al-hijamah, its medical bases, methodologies, precautions, side effects, contraindications, quantitative evaluation, malpractice, combination with oral honey treatment, and to what extent it may be helpful when treating thalassemia and other conditions of iron overload and hyperferremia.Keywords: Al-hijamah, prophetic medicine, cupping therapy, phlebotomy, iron chelation therapy, oral honey

  10. Relaxation Dynamics in Heme Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Reinhard Wilhelm

    A protein molecule possesses many conformational substates that are likely arranged in a hierarchy consisting of a number of tiers. A hierarchical organization of conformational substates is expected to give rise to a multitude of nonequilibrium relaxation phenomena. If the temperature is lowered, transitions between substates of higher tiers are frozen out, and relaxation processes characteristic of lower tiers will dominate the observational time scale. This thesis addresses the following questions: (i) What is the energy landscape of a protein? How does the landscape depend on the environment such as pH and viscosity, and how can it be connected to specific structural parts? (ii) What relaxation phenomena can be observed in a protein? Which are protein specific, and which occur in other proteins? How does the environment influence relaxations? (iii) What functional form best describes relaxation functions? (iv) Can we connect the motions to specific structural parts of the protein molecule, and are these motions important for the function of the protein?. To this purpose, relaxation processes after a pressure change are studied in carbonmonoxy (CO) heme proteins (myoglobin-CO, substrate-bound and substrate-free cytochrome P450cam-CO, chloroperoxidase-CO, horseradish peroxidase -CO) between 150 K and 250 K using FTIR spectroscopy to monitor the CO bound to the heme iron. Two types of p -relaxation experiments are performed: p-release (200 to ~eq40 MPa) and p-jump (~eq40 to 200 MPa) experiments. Most of the relaxations fall into one of three groups and are characterized by (i) nonexponential time dependence and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIM1( nu), FIM1(Gamma)); (ii) exponential time dependence and non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIM0(A_{i}to A_{j})); exponential time dependence and Arrhenius temperature dependence (FIMX( nu)). The influence of pH is studied in myoglobin-CO and shown to have a strong influence on the substate population of the

  11. Heme in intestinal epithelial cell turnover, differentiation,detoxification, inflammation, carcinogenesis, absorption and motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phillip S Oates; Adrian R West

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined by a simple epithelium that undergoes constant renewal involving cell division,differentiation and cell death. In addition, the epithelial lining separates the hostile processes of digestion and absorption that occur in the intestinal lumen from the aseptic environment of the internal milieu by defensive mechanisms that protect the epithelium from being breached. Central to these defensive processes is the synthesis of heme and its catabolism by heme oxygenase (HO). Dietary heme is also an important source of iron for the body which is taken up intact by the enterocyte.This review describes the recent literature on the diverse properties of heme/HO in the intestine tract.The roles of heme/HO in the regulation of the cell cycle/apoptosis, detoxification of xenobiotics, oxidative stress,inflammation, development of colon cancer, hemeiron absorption and intestinal motility are specifically examined.

  12. Heme biosynthesis and its regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Punt; C.A. van den Hondel; A.F. Ram; S. de Weert; A.C. Franken; Christien Lokman

    2011-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis in fungal host strains has acquired considerable interest in relation to the production of secreted heme-containing peroxidases. Class II peroxidase enzymes have been suggested as eco-friendly replacements of polluting chemical processes in industry. These peroxidases are naturally

  13. The Legend of Sally Hemings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Herman

    2012-01-01

    The part played by Sally Hemings in the life of Thomas Jefferson has been regarded as provocatively dubious since political enemy James Callender claimed in 1802 that Jefferson was the father of several of Hemings's children. Historian Merrill Peterson, observing that paternity is hard to prove, wrote in 1960 that no concrete evidence was ever…

  14. Whole Body Retention and Distribution of Orally-Adminsitered Radiolabeled Zerovalent Iron nanoparticles in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerovalent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) are used for in situ remediation of contaminated ground water, raising the possibility that nZVI particles or their altered residues could contaminate the ground water. Therefore, it is important to study their effects on humans and other orga...

  15. Study on the Effect of Temperature and Time on the Direct Interaction Between Heme-Iron of Myoglobin and Metal Ions%温度和时间对肌红蛋白血红素铁与金属离子相互作用的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐乾; 曹洪玉; 王静云; 郑学仿

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究在生理条件下,温度和时间对肌红蛋白血红素铁与各种金属离子直接相互作用的影响.方法:利用紫外-可见光谱法研究肌红蛋白活性中心的铁和外加金属离子(CuSO4、ZnS4,,MgS4,,Col1Z和MnSO4)的直接相互作用;改变作用温度(4、21、37和52℃)和作用时间(2、4、6、8和10d),研究肌红蛋白活性中心铁卟啉与不同金属离子的直接相互作用.结果与结论:紫外光谱数据表明,金属离子与肌红蛋白活性中心的Fe(Ⅱ)发生直接相互作用,且随着作用温度的升高和作用时间的延长,这种相互作用逐渐增强.作用10d后,金属离子与肌红蛋白活性中心的铁的作用强度依次为Mn(Ⅱ)>Zn(Ⅱ)>Co(Ⅱ);温度升至52℃时,作用强度依次为Cu(Ⅱ)>Mg(Ⅱ)>Zn(Ⅱ).%Objective: To research the effect of temperature and time on the direct interaction between heme-iron of myoglobin and metal ions on physical condition.Methods: At different interaction temperature(4, 21, 37 and 52℃) and in different interaction time(2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 days), the direct interaction between heme-iron of myoglobin and additional metal ions(CuSO4, ZnSO4, MgSO4, CoCl2 and MnSO4) has been studied by UV-VIS spectrometry.Results & Conclusion: Through the data of spectra, we found that heme-iron of myoglobin has directly interacted with additional Cu( Ⅱ ), Mg( Ⅱ ), Mn( Ⅱ ), Zn( Ⅱ ) and Co( Ⅱ ), which can drag iron out from heme prosthetic group of myoglobin, the latter became myoglobin derivative lack of iron.In addition, the intensity of interaction was increased gradually with increase of interaction time and interaction temperature.The results showed that the interaction intension between three kind metal ions and myoglobin was Mn( Ⅱ ), Zn(Ⅱ), Co(Ⅱ) in turn.When the temperature was at 52℃, the interaction intension was Cu( Ⅱ )>Mg( Ⅱ )>Zn( Ⅱ ) after interaction 10 days.

  16. Control of bacterial iron homeostasis by manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sumant; Hohle, Thomas H.; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Perception and response to nutritional iron availability by bacteria are essential to control cellular iron homeostasis. The Irr protein from Bradyrhizobium japonicum senses iron through the status of heme biosynthesis to globally regulate iron-dependent gene expression. Heme binds directly to Irr to trigger its degradation. Here, we show that severe manganese limitation created by growth of a Mn2+ transport mutant in manganese-limited media resulted in a cellular iron deficiency. In wild-type cells, Irr levels were attenuated under manganese limitation, resulting in reduced promoter occupancy of target genes and altered iron-dependent gene expression. Irr levels were high regardless of manganese availability in a heme-deficient mutant, indicating that manganese normally affects heme-dependent degradation of Irr. Manganese altered the secondary structure of Irr in vitro and inhibited binding of heme to the protein. We propose that manganese limitation destabilizes Irr under low-iron conditions by lowering the threshold of heme that can trigger Irr degradation. The findings implicate a mechanism for the control of iron homeostasis by manganese in a bacterium. PMID:20498065

  17. The heme-heme oxygenase system: a molecular switch in wound healing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Beurden, H.E. van; Hoff, J.W. Von den; Adema, G.J.; Figdor, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    When cells are injured they release their contents, resulting in a local accumulation of free heme proteins and heme. Here, we investigated the involvement of heme and its degrading enzyme heme oxygenase (HO) in the inflammatory process during wound healing. We observed that heme directly accumulate

  18. IsdB-dependent hemoglobin binding is required for acquisition of heme by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchany, Gleb; Sheldon, Jessica R; Dickson, Claire F; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Read, Timothy D; Gell, David A; Heinrichs, David E; Skaar, Eric P

    2014-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality. As with most bacteria, S. aureus requires iron to cause disease, and it can acquire iron from host hemoglobin. The current model for staphylococcal hemoglobin-iron acquisition proposes that S. aureus binds hemoglobin through the surface-exposed hemoglobin receptor IsdB. IsdB removes heme from bound hemoglobin and transfers this cofactor to other proteins of the Isd system, which import and degrade heme to release iron in the cytoplasm. Here we demonstrate that the individual components of the Isd system are required for growth on low nanomolar concentrations of hemoglobin as a sole source of iron. An in-depth study of hemoglobin binding by IsdB revealed key residues that are required for hemoglobin binding. Further, we show that these residues are necessary for heme extraction from hemoglobin and growth on hemoglobin as a sole iron source. These processes are found to contribute to the pathogenicity of S. aureus in a murine model of infection. Together these results build on the model for Isd-mediated hemoglobin binding and heme-iron acquisition during the pathogenesis of S. aureus infection.

  19. Dynamic Motion and Rearranged Molecular Shape of Heme in Myoglobin: Structural and Functional Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saburo Neya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobin, a simple oxygen binding protein, was reconstituted with various types of synthetic hemes to manipulate the heme-globin interactions. From the paramagnetic NMR analysis, small heme was found to rotate rapidly about the iron-histidine bond upon. This is a novel and typical example for the fluctuation of protein. The dynamic NMR analysis indicated that the 360° rotational rate of a small heme was 1,400 s−1 at room temperature. The X-ray analyses revealed that the tertiary structure of globin containing the smallest heme was closely similar to that of native protein despite extensive destruction of the specific heme-globin interactions. The functional analyses of O2 binding showed that the loose heme-globin contacts do not significantly affect the oxygen binding. On the other hand, the rearrangement of tetrapyrrole array and the non-planar deformation in porphyrin ring significantly affect the functional properties of myoglobin. These results, taken together, indicate that the essential factors to regulate the myoglobin function are hidden under the molecular shape of prosthetic group rather than in the nonbonded heme-globin contacts.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency: the first autopsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Oda, Yoshio; Yachie, Akihiro; Koizumi, Shoichi; Nakanishi, Isao

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the first autopsy case of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 deficiency. A 6-year-old boy who presented with growth retardation; anemia; leukocytosis; thrombocytosis; coagulation abnormality; elevated levels of haptoglobin, ferritin, and heme in serum; a low serum bilirubin concentration; and hyperlipidemia was diagnosed as HO-1 deficient by gene analysis several months before death. Autopsy showed amyloid deposits in the liver and adrenal glands and mesangioproliferative glomerular changes in kidneys, in addition to an irregular distribution of foamy macrophages with iron pigments. Fatty streaks and fibrous plaques were noted in the aorta. Compared with HO-1--targeted mice, the present case seems to more severely involve endothelial cells and the reticuloendothelial system, resulting in intravascular hemolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and amyloidosis with a short survival. This contrasts to the predominant iron metabolic disorders of HO-1--targeted mice with a long survival.

  1. The Alternative Route to Heme in the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanosarcina barkeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Kühner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In living organisms heme is formed from the common precursor uroporphyrinogen III by either one of two substantially different pathways. In contrast to eukaryotes and most bacteria which employ the so-called “classical” heme biosynthesis pathway, the archaea use an alternative route. In this pathway, heme is formed from uroporphyrinogen III via the intermediates precorrin-2, sirohydrochlorin, siroheme, 12,18-didecarboxysiroheme, and iron-coproporphyrin III. In this study the heme biosynthesis proteins AhbAB, AhbC, and AhbD from Methanosarcina barkeri were functionally characterized. Using an in vivo enzyme activity assay it was shown that AhbA and AhbB (Mbar_A1459 and Mbar_A1460 together catalyze the conversion of siroheme into 12,18-didecarboxysiroheme. The two proteins form a heterodimeric complex which might be subject to feedback regulation by the pathway end-product heme. Further, AhbC (Mbar_A1793 was shown to catalyze the formation of iron-coproporphyrin III in vivo. Finally, recombinant AhbD (Mbar_A1458 was produced in E. coli and purified indicating that this protein most likely contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters. Using an in vitro enzyme activity assay it was demonstrated that AhbD catalyzes the conversion of iron-coproporphyrin III into heme.

  2. Salivary estimation of copper, iron, zinc and manganese in oral submucous fibrosis patients: A case-control study

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    Akshata Raghavendra Okade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trace elements (TEs are required for physiological functioning and alterations are noted in potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer. These TEs are used in early diagnosis, treatment and also as an indicator of disease progress and prognosis. Aims: To estimate the TEs such as copper (Cu, zinc (Zn, iron (Fe, manganese (Mn and Cu/Zn ratio in the saliva of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF patients and controls. Settings and Design: The hospital-based study was conducted to estimate salivary TEs using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS in 60 individuals. Methods and Material: 5 ml saliva was collected from OSF cases (n=30 and controls (n=30 and was centrifuged and prepared by using the Wet Ashing method. The TEs were estimated in parts per million (ppm by using AAS. Statistical Analysis Used: The data obtained was statistically analyzed using non parametric tests such as Mann Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests. Results: Significant difference in the mean salivary Zn, Mn and Fe levels in OSF when compared to that of controls. Mean salivary Cu levels were increased and Cu/ Zn ratio was decreased in OSF when compared to the controls. Conclusions: To conclude TEs play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of OSF. Betel quid and areca nut chewing habits are frequently associated with OSF and alters the salivary TE levels. Concerted efforts would, therefore, help in early detection, management and monitoring the efficacy of treatment.

  3. Active-Site Models of Bacterial Nitric Oxide Reductase Featuring Tris-Histidyl and Glutamic Acid Mimics: Influence of Carboxylate Ligand on FeB Binding and Heme Fe/FeB Redox Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collman, James P.; Yan, Yi-Long; Lei, Jianping; Dinolfo, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    Active-site models of bacterial nitric oxide reductase (NOR) featuring a heme iron and a trisimidazole and a glutaric acid-bound non-heme iron (FeB) have been synthesized. These models closely replicate the proposed active site of native NORs. Examination of these models shows that the glutamic acid mimic is required for both FeB retention in the distal binding site and proper modulation of the redox potentials of both the heme and non-heme irons. PMID:16961346

  4. PPE Surface Proteins Are Required for Heme Utilization by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Avishek; Speer, Alexander; Lin, Kan; Ehrt, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron is essential for replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but iron is efficiently sequestered in the human host during infection. Heme constitutes the largest iron reservoir in the human body and is utilized by many bacterial pathogens as an iron source. While heme acquisition is well studied in other bacterial pathogens, little is known in M. tuberculosis. To identify proteins involved in heme utilization by M. tuberculosis, a transposon mutant library was screened for resistance to the toxic heme analog gallium(III)-porphyrin (Ga-PIX). Inactivation of the ppe36, ppe62, and rv0265c genes resulted in resistance to Ga-PIX. Growth experiments using isogenic M. tuberculosis deletion mutants showed that PPE36 is essential for heme utilization by M. tuberculosis, while the functions of PPE62 and Rv0265c are partially redundant. None of the genes restored growth of the heterologous M. tuberculosis mutants, indicating that the proteins encoded by the genes have separate functions. PPE36, PPE62, and Rv0265c bind heme as shown by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and are associated with membranes. Both PPE36 and PPE62 proteins are cell surface accessible, while the Rv0265c protein is probably located in the periplasm. PPE36 and PPE62 are, to our knowledge, the first proline-proline-glutamate (PPE) proteins of M. tuberculosis that bind small molecules and are involved in nutrient acquisition. The absence of a virulence defect of the ppe36 deletion mutant indicates that the different iron acquisition pathways of M. tuberculosis may substitute for each other during growth and persistence in mice. The emerging model of heme utilization by M. tuberculosis as derived from this study is substantially different from those of other bacteria. PMID:28119467

  5. Bone marrow: its contribution to heme catabolism.

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    Mähönen, Y; Anttinen, M; Vuopio, P; Tenhunen, R

    1976-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) and biliverdin reductase (BR), the two NADPH-dependent enzymes involved in the degradation of hemoglobin and its derivatives, were measured in bone marrow aspirates from 5 hematologically normal persons, 4 patients with chronic leucemia (CL), 11 patients with acute leucemia (AL), 8 patients with refractory sideroblastic anemia (RA), 7 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IA), 5 patients with hemolytic anemia (HA), and 7 patients with secondary anemia (SA) to determine the enzymatic capacity of the bone marrow in different hematologic disorders for heme catabolism. HO activity in the bone marrow of normal persons was 0.42 +/- 0.28 (SD) nmoles bilirubin/10 mg protein/min; in CL, 2.15 +/- 1.34; in AL, 0.39 +/- 0.25; in RA, 0.58 +/- 0.37; in IA, 0.41 +/- 0.28; in HA, 2.56 +/- 1.40; and in SA, 1.72 +/- 1.06. BR activity, respectively, was in normal persons 8.7 +/- 2.4 (SD) nmoles bilirubin/10 mg protein/min; in CL, 13.6 +/- 9.1; in AL, 3.8 +/- 3.1 in RA, 5.1 +/- 2.7; in IA, 5.5 +/- 3.7; in HA, 17.0 +/- 7.2; and in SA, 10.5 +/- 4.2. On the basis of these findings it seems evident that both oxygenase and biliverdin reductase activities of the bone marrow are capable of adaptive regulation. The physiologic role of bone marrow in heme catabolism seems to be of significant importance.

  6. Heme oxygenase-1, oxidation, inflammation and atherosclerosis

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    Jesus A Araujo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process of the vascular wall characterized by the infiltration of lipids and inflammatory cells. Oxidative modifications of infiltrating low density lipoproteins and induction of oxidative stress play a major role in lipid retention in the vascular wall, uptake by macrophages and generation of foam cells, a hallmark of this disorder. The vasculature has a plethora of protective resources against oxidation and inflammation, many of them regulated by the Nrf2 transcription factor. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a Nrf2-regulated gene that plays a critical role in the prevention of vascular inflammation. It is the inducible isoform of heme oxygenase, responsible for the oxidative cleavage of heme groups leading to the generation of biliverdin, carbon monoxide and release of ferrous iron. HO-1 has important antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiapoptotic, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects in vascular cells, most of which play a significant role in the protection against atherogenesis. HO-1 may also be an important feature in macrophage differentiation and polarization to certain subtypes. The biological effects of HO-1 are largely attributable to its enzymatic activity, which can be conceived as a system with three arms of action, corresponding to its three enzymatic byproducts. HO-1 mediated vascular protection may be due to a combination of systemic and vascular local effects. It is usually expressed at low levels but can be highly upregulated in the presence of several proatherogenic stimuli. The HO-1 system is amenable for use in the development of new therapies, some of them currently under experimental and clinical trials. Interestingly, in contrast to the HO-1 antiatherogenic actions, the expression of its transcriptional regulator Nrf2 leads to proatherogenic effects instead. This article reviews the evidence that supports the antiatherogenic role of HO-1, potential pathways and mechanisms mediating

  7. Targeting heme oxygenase-1 in vascular disease.

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    Durante, William

    2010-12-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) metabolizes heme to generate carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and iron. Biliverdin is subsequently metabolized to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. HO-1 has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of vascular disease. Pharmacological induction or gene transfer of HO-1 ameliorates vascular dysfunction in animal models of atherosclerosis, post-angioplasty restenosis, vein graft stenosis, thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and hypertension, while inhibition of HO-1 activity or gene deletion exacerbates these disorders. The vasoprotection afforded by HO-1 is largely attributable to its end products: CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These end products exert potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and anti-thrombotic actions. In addition, CO and bile pigments act to preserve vascular homeostasis at sites of arterial injury by influencing the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or leukocytes. Several strategies are currently being developed to target HO-1 in vascular disease. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 by heme derivatives, dietary antioxidants, or currently available drugs, is a promising near-term approach, while HO-1 gene delivery is a long-term therapeutic goal. Direct administration of CO via inhalation or through the use of CO-releasing molecules and/or CO-sensitizing agents provides an attractive alternative approach in targeting HO-1. Furthermore, delivery of bile pigments, either alone or in combination with CO, presents another avenue for protecting against vascular disease. Since HO-1 and its products are potentially toxic, a major challenge will be to devise clinically effective therapeutic modalities that target HO-1 without causing any adverse effects.

  8. Human heme oxygenase oxidation of 5- and 15-phenylhemes.

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    Wang, Jinling; Niemevz, Fernando; Lad, Latesh; Huang, Liusheng; Alvarez, Diego E; Buldain, Graciela; Poulos, Thomas L; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2004-10-08

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. Previous work indicated that electrophilic addition of the terminal oxygen of the ferric hydroperoxo complex to the alpha-meso-carbon gives 5-hydroxyheme. Earlier efforts to block this reaction with a 5-methyl substituent failed, as the reaction still gave biliverdin IXalpha. Surprisingly, a 15-methyl substituent caused exclusive cleavage at the gamma-meso-rather than at the normal, unsubstituted alpha-meso-carbon. No CO was formed in these reactions, but the fragment cleaved from the porphyrin eluded identification. We report here that hHO-1 cleaves 5-phenylheme to biliverdin IXalpha and oxidizes 15-phenylheme at the alpha-meso position to give 10-phenylbiliverdin IXalpha. The fragment extruded in the oxidation of 5-phenylheme is benzoic acid, one oxygen of which comes from O2 and the other from water. The 2.29- and 2.11-A crystal structures of the hHO-1 complexes with 1- and 15-phenylheme, respectively, show clear electron density for both the 5- and 15-phenyl rings in both molecules of the asymmetric unit. The overall structure of 15-phenylheme-hHO-1 is similar to that of heme-hHO-1 except for small changes in distal residues 141-150 and in the proximal Lys18 and Lys22. In the 5-phenylheme-hHO-1 structure, the phenyl-substituted heme occupies the same position as heme in the heme-HO-1 complex but the 5-phenyl substituent disrupts the rigid hydrophobic wall of residues Met34, Phe214, and residues 26-42 near the alpha-meso carbon. The results provide independent support for an electrophilic oxidation mechanism and support a role for stereochemical control of the reaction regiospecificity.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus uses a novel multidomain receptor to break apart human hemoglobin and steal its heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirig, Thomas; Malmirchegini, G Reza; Zhang, Jiang; Robson, Scott A; Sjodt, Megan; Liu, Mengyao; Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Dickson, Claire F; Gell, David A; Lei, Benfang; Loo, Joseph A; Clubb, Robert T

    2013-01-11

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of life-threatening infections in the United States. It requires iron to grow, which must be actively procured from its host to successfully mount an infection. Heme-iron within hemoglobin (Hb) is the most abundant source of iron in the human body and is captured by S. aureus using two closely related receptors, IsdH and IsdB. Here we demonstrate that each receptor captures heme using two conserved near iron transporter (NEAT) domains that function synergistically. NMR studies of the 39-kDa conserved unit from IsdH (IsdH(N2N3), Ala(326)-Asp(660)) reveals that it adopts an elongated dumbbell-shaped structure in which its NEAT domains are properly positioned by a helical linker domain, whose three-dimensional structure is determined here in detail. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and heme transfer measurements indicate that IsdH(N2N3) extracts heme from Hb via an ordered process in which the receptor promotes heme release by inducing steric strain that dissociates the Hb tetramer. Other clinically significant Gram-positive pathogens capture Hb using receptors that contain multiple NEAT domains, suggesting that they use a conserved mechanism.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus Uses a Novel Multidomain Receptor to Break Apart Human Hemoglobin and Steal Its Heme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirig, Thomas; Malmirchegini, G. Reza; Zhang, Jiang; Robson, Scott A.; Sjodt, Megan; Liu, Mengyao; Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Dickson, Claire F.; Gell, David A.; Lei, Benfang; Loo, Joseph A.; Clubb, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of life-threatening infections in the United States. It requires iron to grow, which must be actively procured from its host to successfully mount an infection. Heme-iron within hemoglobin (Hb) is the most abundant source of iron in the human body and is captured by S. aureus using two closely related receptors, IsdH and IsdB. Here we demonstrate that each receptor captures heme using two conserved near iron transporter (NEAT) domains that function synergistically. NMR studies of the 39-kDa conserved unit from IsdH (IsdHN2N3, Ala326–Asp660) reveals that it adopts an elongated dumbbell-shaped structure in which its NEAT domains are properly positioned by a helical linker domain, whose three-dimensional structure is determined here in detail. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and heme transfer measurements indicate that IsdHN2N3 extracts heme from Hb via an ordered process in which the receptor promotes heme release by inducing steric strain that dissociates the Hb tetramer. Other clinically significant Gram-positive pathogens capture Hb using receptors that contain multiple NEAT domains, suggesting that they use a conserved mechanism. PMID:23132864

  11. Addition of oral iron to plasma transfusion in human congenital hypotransferrinemia: A 10-year observational follow-up with the effects on hematological parameters and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Deniz

    2017-09-12

    Congenital hypotransferrinemia (OMIM 209300) is an extremely rare disorder of inherited iron metabolism. Since its description in 1961, only 16 cases have been reported. The defective gene and molecular defect causing this disorder and clinicolaboratory findings seen in the homozygous and heterozygous states have been documented in both humans and mice. However, due to the lack of follow-up studies of the described cases, the long-term prognosis remains unknown. We present a 10-year observational follow-up of a patient previously diagnosed on a molecular basis who was treated with a unique therapy of plasma transfusion fortified with oral iron, with satisfactory clinicolaboratory responses. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Malabsorption of iron in children with iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, S J; Stuart, M J; Swender, P T; Oski, F A

    1976-05-01

    Inability to absorb oral iron is believed to be an extremely rare cause of therapeutic failure in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Six patients who had failed to respond to oral iron therapy were studied by a simple oral absorption test and contrasted with 25 patients with untreated iron deficiency anemia and 10 normal subjects. All six of the patients who were therapeutic failures demonstrated impaired iron absorption in the absence of other clinical evidence of gastrointestinal disease. In the 25 newly diagnosed patients with iron deficiency. 24 demonstrated elevated iron absorptions while 10 ironreplete normal subjects had minimal elevations in their serum iron values following the administration of the test dose of 1 mg of elemental iron per kilogram. When the therapeutic failures were treated with parenteral iron, all had a therapeutic response. In addition, after treatment the impaired absorption of iron improved transiently. All children who absorbed iron readily responded to oral iron therapy.

  13. Structural Characterization of Heme Environmental Mutants of CgHmuT that Shuttles Heme Molecules to Heme Transporters

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    Norifumi Muraki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacteria contain a heme uptake system encoded in hmuTUV genes, in which HmuT protein acts as a heme binding protein to transport heme to the cognate transporter HmuUV. The crystal structure of HmuT from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgHmuT reveals that heme is accommodated in the central cleft with His141 and Tyr240 as the axial ligands and that Tyr240 forms a hydrogen bond with Arg242. In this work, the crystal structures of H141A, Y240A, and R242A mutants were determined to understand the role of these residues for the heme binding of CgHmuT. Overall and heme environmental structures of these mutants were similar to those of the wild type, suggesting that there is little conformational change in the heme-binding cleft during heme transport reaction with binding and the dissociation of heme. A loss of one axial ligand or the hydrogen bonding interaction with Tyr240 resulted in an increase in the redox potential of the heme for CgHmuT to be reduced by dithionite, though the wild type was not reduced under physiological conditions. These results suggest that the heme environmental structure stabilizes the ferric heme binding in CgHmuT, which will be responsible for efficient heme uptake under aerobic conditions where Corynebacteria grow.

  14. Identification of residues in the heme domain of soluble guanylyl cyclase that are important for basal and stimulated catalytic activity.

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    Padmamalini Baskaran

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide signals through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, a heme-containing heterodimer. NO binds to the heme domain located in the N-terminal part of the β subunit of sGC resulting in increased production of cGMP in the catalytic domain located at the C-terminal part of sGC. Little is known about the mechanism by which the NO signaling is propagated from the receptor domain (heme domain to the effector domain (catalytic domain, in particular events subsequent to the breakage of the bond between the heme iron and Histidine 105 (H105 of the β subunit. Our modeling of the heme-binding domain as well as previous homologous heme domain structures in different states point to two regions that could be critical for propagation of the NO activation signal. Structure-based mutational analysis of these regions revealed that residues T110 and R116 in the αF helix-β1 strand, and residues I41 and R40 in the αB-αC loop mediate propagation of activation between the heme domain and the catalytic domain. Biochemical analysis of these heme mutants allows refinement of the map of the residues that are critical for heme stability and propagation of the NO/YC-1 activation signal in sGC.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide in pulmonary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2003-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an inducible stress protein, confers cytoprotection against oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. In addition to its physiological role in heme degradation, HO-1 may influence a number of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and apoptosis. By virtue of anti-inflammatory effects, HO-1 limits tissue damage in response to proinflammatory stimuli and prevents allograft rejection after transplantation. The transcriptional upregulation of HO-1 responds to many agents, such as hypoxia, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. HO-1 and its constitutively expressed isozyme, heme oxygenase-2, catalyze the rate-limiting step in the conversion of heme to its metabolites, bilirubin IXalpha, ferrous iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). The mechanisms by which HO-1 provides protection most likely involve its enzymatic reaction products. Remarkably, administration of CO at low concentrations can substitute for HO-1 with respect to anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects, suggesting a role for CO as a key mediator of HO-1 function. Chronic, low-level, exogenous exposure to CO from cigarette smoking contributes to the importance of CO in pulmonary medicine. The implications of the HO-1/CO system in pulmonary diseases will be discussed in this review, with an emphasis on inflammatory states.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide in pulmonary medicine

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    Choi Augustine MK

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, an inducible stress protein, confers cytoprotection against oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. In addition to its physiological role in heme degradation, HO-1 may influence a number of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and apoptosis. By virtue of anti-inflammatory effects, HO-1 limits tissue damage in response to proinflammatory stimuli and prevents allograft rejection after transplantation. The transcriptional upregulation of HO-1 responds to many agents, such as hypoxia, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. HO-1 and its constitutively expressed isozyme, heme oxygenase-2, catalyze the rate-limiting step in the conversion of heme to its metabolites, bilirubin IXα, ferrous iron, and carbon monoxide (CO. The mechanisms by which HO-1 provides protection most likely involve its enzymatic reaction products. Remarkably, administration of CO at low concentrations can substitute for HO-1 with respect to anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects, suggesting a role for CO as a key mediator of HO-1 function. Chronic, low-level, exogenous exposure to CO from cigarette smoking contributes to the importance of CO in pulmonary medicine. The implications of the HO-1/CO system in pulmonary diseases will be discussed in this review, with an emphasis on inflammatory states.

  17. Heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide: from metabolism to molecular therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2009-09-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a ubiquitous inducible stress-response protein, serves a major metabolic function in heme turnover. HO activity cleaves heme to form biliverdin-IXalpha, carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Genetic experiments have revealed a central role for HO-1 in tissue homeostasis, protection against oxidative stress, and in the pathogenesis of disease. Four decades of research have witnessed not only progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation and function of this illustrious enzyme, but also have opened remarkable translational applications for HO-1 and its reaction products. CO, once regarded as a metabolic waste, can act as an endogenous mediator of cellular signaling and vascular function. Exogenous application of CO by inhalation or pharmacologic delivery can confer cytoprotection in preclinical models of lung/vascular injury and disease, based on anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-proliferative properties. The bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin, end products of heme degradation, have also shown potential as therapeutics in vascular disease based on anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities. Further translational and clinical trials research will unveil whether the HO-1 system or any of its reaction products can be successfully applied as molecular medicine in human disease.

  18. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-06-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification.

  19. Binding Modes of Aromatic Ligands to Mammalian Heme Peroxidases with Associated Functional Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit K.; Singh, Nagendra; Sinha, Mau; Bhushan, Asha; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2009-01-01

    The binding and structural studies of bovine lactoperoxidase with three aromatic ligands, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), salicylhydoxamic acid (SHA), and benzylhydroxamic acid (BHA) show that all the three compounds bind to lactoperoxidase at the substrate binding site on the distal heme side. The binding of ASA occurs without perturbing the position of conserved heme water molecule W-1, whereas both SHA and BHA displace it by the hydroxyl group of their hydroxamic acid moieties. The acetyl group carbonyl oxygen atom of ASA forms a hydrogen bond with W-1, which in turn makes three other hydrogen-bonds, one each with heme iron, His-109 Nϵ2, and Gln-105 Nϵ2. In contrast, in the complexes of SHA and BHA, the OH group of hydroxamic acid moiety in both complexes interacts with heme iron directly with Fe-OH distances of 3.0 and 3.2Å respectively. The OH is also hydrogen bonded to His-109 Nϵ2 and Gln-105Nϵ2. The plane of benzene ring of ASA is inclined at 70.7° from the plane of heme moiety, whereas the aromatic planes of SHA and BHA are nearly parallel to the heme plane with inclinations of 15.7 and 6.2°, respectively. The mode of ASA binding provides the information about the mechanism of action of aromatic substrates, whereas the binding characteristics of SHA and BHA indicate the mode of inhibitor binding. PMID:19465478

  20. Antimalarial iron chelator, FBS0701, shows asexual and gametocyte Plasmodium falciparum activity and single oral dose cure in a murine malaria model.

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    Patricia Ferrer

    Full Text Available Iron chelators for the treatment of malaria have proven therapeutic activity in vitro and in vivo in both humans and mice, but their clinical use is limited by the unsuitable absorption and pharmacokinetic properties of the few available iron chelators. FBS0701, (S3"-(HO-desazadesferrithiocin-polyether [DADFT-PE], is an oral iron chelator currently in Phase 2 human studies for the treatment of transfusional iron overload. The drug has very favorable absorption and pharmacokinetic properties allowing for once-daily use to deplete circulating free iron with human plasma concentrations in the high µM range. Here we show that FBS0701 has inhibition concentration 50% (IC(50 of 6 µM for Plasmodium falciparum in contrast to the IC(50 for deferiprone and deferoxamine at 15 and 30 µM respectively. In combination, FBS0701 interfered with artemisinin parasite inhibition and was additive with chloroquine or quinine parasite inhibition. FBS0701 killed early stage P. falciparum gametocytes. In the P. berghei Thompson suppression test, a single dose of 100 mg/kg reduced day three parasitemia and prolonged survival, but did not cure mice. Treatment with a single oral dose of 100 mg/kg one day after infection with 10 million lethal P. yoelii 17XL cured all the mice. Pretreatment of mice with a single oral dose of FBS0701 seven days or one day before resulted in the cure of some mice. Plasma exposures and other pharmacokinetics parameters in mice of the 100 mg/kg dose are similar to a 3 mg/kg dose in humans. In conclusion, FBS0701 demonstrates a single oral dose cure of the lethal P. yoelii model. Significantly, this effect persists after the chelator has cleared from plasma. FBS0701 was demonstrated to remove labile iron from erythrocytes as well as enter erythrocytes to chelate iron. FBS0701 may find clinically utility as monotherapy, a malarial prophylactic or, more likely, in combination with other antimalarials.

  1. Therapeutic Approaches to Limit Hemolysis-Driven Endothelial Dysfunction: Scavenging Free Heme to Preserve Vasculature Homeostasis

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    Francesca Vinchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemolysis results in the release of hemoglobin and heme into the bloodstream and is associated with the development of several pathologic conditions of different etiology, including hemoglobinopathies, hemolytic anemias, bacterial infections, malaria, and trauma. In addition, hemolysis is associated with surgical procedures, hemodialysis, blood transfusion, and other conditions in which mechanical forces can lead to red blood cell rupture. Free plasma hemoglobin and heme are toxic for the vascular endothelium since heme iron promotes oxidative stress that causes endothelial activation responsible for vasoocclusive events and thrombus formation. Moreover, free hemoglobin scavenges nitric oxide, reducing its bioavailability, and heme favours ROS production, thus causing oxidative nitric oxide consumption. This results in the dysregulation of the endothelium vasodilator:vasoconstrictor balance, leading to severe vasoconstriction and hypertension. Thus, endothelial dysfunction and impairment of cardiovascular function represent a common feature of pathologic conditions associated with hemolysis. In this review, we discuss how hemoglobin/heme released following hemolysis may affect vascular function and summarise the therapeutic approaches available to limit hemolysis-driven endothelial dysfunction. Particular emphasis is put on recent data showing the beneficial effects obtained through the use of the plasma heme scavenger hemopexin in counteracting heme-mediated endothelial damage in mouse models of hemolytic diseases.

  2. Elucidating second coordination sphere effects in heme proteins using low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Nicolai

    2012-05-01

    This paper reviews recent findings on how the second coordination sphere of heme proteins fine-tunes the properties of the heme active site via hydrogen bonding. This insight is obtained from low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy. In the case of high-spin ferric hemes, MCD spectroscopy allows for the identification of a multitude of charge-transfer (CT) transitions. Using optically-detected magnetic saturation curves, out-of-plane polarized CT transitions between the heme and its axial ligand(s) can be identified. In the case of ferric Cytochrome P450cam, the corresponding S(σ)→Fe(III) CT transition can be used as a probe for the {Fe(III)-axial ligand} interaction, indicating that the hydrogen bonding network of the proximal Cys only plays a limited role for fine-tuning the Fe(III)-S(Cys) interaction. In the case of high-spin ferrous hemes with axial His/imidazole coordination, our MCD-spectroscopic investigations have uncovered a direct correlation between the strength of the hydrogen bond to the proximal imidazole ligand and the ground state of the complexes. With neutral imidazole coordination, the doubly occupied d-orbital of high-spin iron(II) is of d(π) character, located orthogonal to the heme plane. As the strength of the hydrogen bond increases, this orbital rotates into the heme plane, changing the ground state of the complex.

  3. Characterization of a heme-regulated non-coding RNA encoded by the prrF locus of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Amanda G Oglesby-Sherrouse

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, requires iron for virulence and can obtain this nutrient via the acquisition of heme, an abundant source of iron in the human body. A surplus of either iron or heme can lead to oxidative stress; thus, the Fur (ferric uptake regulator protein blocks expression of genes required for iron and heme uptake in iron-replete environments. Fur also represses expression of two nearly identical genes encoding the 116- and 114-nucleotide (nt long PrrF1 and PrrF2 RNAs, respectively. While other Pseudomonads encode for the two PrrF RNAs at separate genomic loci, PrrF1 and PrrF2 are encoded in tandem in all sequenced strains of P. aeruginosa. In this report we characterize a third longer transcript encoded by the prrF locus, PrrH, which is repressed by heme as well as iron. We mapped the PrrH RNA in PA01 using 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and northern analysis, demonstrating the PrrH RNA is 325 nt in length. Accordingly, transcription of PrrH initiates at the 5' end of prrF1, proceeds through the prrF1 terminator and prrF1-prrF2 intergenic sequence (95 nt, and terminates at the 3' end of the prrF2 gene. We also present evidence that repression of PrrH by heme causes increased expression of previously identified PrrF-regulated genes, as well as newly identified iron- and heme-activated genes. Thus, the PrrH RNA appears to impart a novel heme regulatory mechanism to P. aeruginosa.

  4. Accuracy of erythrogram and serum ferritin for the maternal anemia diagnosis (AMA): a phase 3 diagnostic study on prediction of the therapeutic responsiveness to oral iron in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresani, Cristiane Campello; Braga, Maria Cynthia; Felisberto, Daniel Falcão; Tavares-de-Melo, Carlos Eduardo Lopes; Salvi, Debora Bresani; Batista-Filho, Malaquias

    2013-01-16

    Pregnancy anemia remains as a public health problem, since the official reports in the 70's. To guide the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy, the haemoglobin concentration is the most used test in spite of its low accuracy, and serum ferritin is the most reliable test, although its cutoff point remains an issue. The aim of this protocol is to verify the accuracy of erythrocyte indices and serum ferritin (studied tests) for the diagnosis of functional iron-deficiency in pregnancy using the iron-therapy responsiveness as the gold-standard. This is an ongoing phase III accuracy study initiated in August 2011 and to be concluded in April 2013. The subjects are anemic pregnant women (haemoglobin concentration iron during 90 days and will be analyzed as a delayed-type cross-sectional study. Women at the second trimester of pregnancy are being evaluated with clinical and laboratorial examinations at the enrollment and monthly. The 'responsiveness to therapeutic test with oral iron' (gold-standard) was defined to an increase of at least 0.55 Z-score in haemoglobin after 4 weeks of treatment and a total dose of 1200 mg of iron. At the study conclusion, sensitivities, specificities, predictive values, likelihood ratios and areas under the ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) curves of serum ferritin and erythrocyte indices (red blood cell count, haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, red blood cell distribution width, reticulocyte count) will be tested. The compliance and adverse effects are considered confounding variables, since they are the main obstacles for the iron-therapy responsiveness. This study protocol shows a new approach on iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy from a functional point of view that could bring some insights about the diagnostic misclassifications arising from the dynamic physiologic changes during the gestational cycle. WHO

  5. An alternative reaction for heme degradation catalyzed by the Escherichia coli O157:H7 ChuS protein: Release of hematinic acid, tripyrrole and Fe(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, Yannick H; Ndiaye, Cheikh Tidiane; Gagné, Stéphane M; Sebilo, Anne; Suits, Michael D L; Jubinville, Éric; Jia, Zongchao; Ivancich, Anabella; Couture, Manon

    2016-01-01

    As part of the machinery to acquire, internalize and utilize heme as a source of iron from the host, some bacteria possess a canonical heme oxygenase, where heme plays the dual role of substrate and cofactor, the later catalyzing the cleavage of the heme moiety using O2 and electrons, and resulting in biliverdin, carbon monoxide and ferrous non-heme iron. We have previously reported that the Escherichia coli O157:H7 ChuS protein, which is not homologous to heme oxygenases, can bind and degrade heme in a reaction that releases carbon monoxide. Here, we have pursued a detailed characterization of such heme degradation reaction using stopped-flow UV-visible absorption spectrometry, the characterization of the intermediate species formed in such reaction by EPR spectroscopy and the identification of reaction products by NMR spectroscopy and Mass spectrometry. We show that hydrogen peroxide (in molar equivalent) is the key player in the degradation reaction, at variance to canonical heme oxygenases. While the initial intermediates of the reaction of ChuS with hydrogen peroxide (a ferrous keto π neutral radical and ferric verdoheme, both identified by EPR spectroscopy) are in common with heme oxygenases, a further and unprecedented reaction step, involving the cleavage of the porphyrin ring at adjacent meso-carbons, results in the release of hematinic acid (a monopyrrole moiety identified by NMR spectroscopy), a tripyrrole product (identified by Mass spectrometry) and non-heme iron in the ferric oxidation state (identified by EPR spectroscopy). Overall, the unprecedented reaction of E. coli O157:H7 ChuS provides evidence for a novel heme degradation activity in a Gram-negative bacterium.

  6. A Heme-responsive Regulator Controls Synthesis of Staphyloferrin B in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Holly A; Marolda, Cristina L; Pinter, Tyler B; Stillman, Martin J; Heinrichs, David E

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus possesses a multitude of mechanisms by which it can obtain iron during growth under iron starvation conditions. It expresses an effective heme acquisition system (the iron-regulated surface determinant system), it produces two carboxylate-type siderophores staphyloferrin A and staphyloferrin B (SB), and it expresses transporters for many other siderophores that it does not synthesize. The ferric uptake regulator protein regulates expression of genes encoding all of these systems. Mechanisms of fine-tuning expression of iron-regulated genes, beyond simple iron regulation via ferric uptake regulator, have not been uncovered in this organism. Here, we identify the ninth gene of the sbn operon, sbnI, as encoding a ParB/Spo0J-like protein that is required for expression of genes in the sbn operon from sbnD onward. Expression of sbnD-I is drastically decreased in an sbnI mutant, and the mutant does not synthesize detectable SB during early phases of growth. Thus, SB-mediated iron acquisition is impaired in an sbnI mutant strain. We show that the protein forms dimers and tetramers in solution and binds to DNA within the sbnC coding region. Moreover, we show that SbnI binds heme and that heme-bound SbnI does not bind DNA. Finally, we show that providing exogenous heme to S. aureus growing in an iron-free medium results in delayed synthesis of SB. This is the first study in S. aureus that identifies a DNA-binding regulatory protein that senses heme to control gene expression for siderophore synthesis.

  7. Fur-regulated iron uptake system of Edwardsiella ictaluri and its influence on pathogenesis and immunogenicity in the catfish host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Javier; Golden, Greg; Wanda, Soo-Young; Curtiss, Roy

    2012-08-01

    The ability of bacterial pathogens to take up iron from the host during infection is necessary for their multiplication within the host. However, host high-affinity iron binding proteins limit levels of free iron in fluids and tissues. To overcome this deficiency of iron during infection, bacterial pathogens have developed iron uptake systems that are upregulated in the absence of iron, typically tightly controlled by the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein. The iron uptake system of Edwardsiella ictaluri, a host-restricted pathogen of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and the main pathogen of this fish in aquaculture, is unknown. Here we describe the E. ictaluri Fur protein, the iron uptake machinery controlled by Fur, and the effects of fur gene deletion on virulence and immunogenicity in the fish host. Analysis of the E. ictaluri Fur protein shows that it lacks the N-terminal region found in the majority of pathogen-encoded Fur proteins. However, it is fully functional in regulated genes encoding iron uptake proteins. E. ictaluri grown under iron-limited conditions upregulates an outer membrane protein (HemR) that shows heme-hemoglobin transport activity and is tightly regulated by Fur. In vivo studies showed that an E. ictaluri Δfur mutant is attenuated and immune protective in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), triggering systemic immunity. We conclude that an E. ictaluri Δfur mutant could be an effective component of an immersion-oral vaccine for the catfish industry.

  8. Estudo teórico da interação existente entre a artemisinina e o heme Theoretical study of the interaction between artemisinin and heme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mírian da Silva Costa

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to study theoretically stereoelectronic aspects of the interaction between heme and artemisinin in the transitional heme-artemisinin complex. Through semi-empirical calculations using the PM3 method, the potential energy barrier of artemisinin rotation relative to heme in the heme-artemisinin complex was studied in vacuum and in the partially solvated state. The minimum heat of formation obtained for the complex with and without water molecules is -702.39 and -100.86 kcal mol-1, respectively, which corresponds to the dihedral angle C-Fe-O1-O2 of 43.93º and 51.90º around the iron-oxygen O1 bond, respectively. The water molecules bind to heme via 13 hydrogen bonds and O-H•••O and 6 C-H•••O interactions, which accounts for -67.23 kcal mol-1. It is observed that the inclusion of water molecules does not affect significantly the stability of the heme-artemisinin complex.

  9. Detection of heme oxygenase activity in a library of four-helix bundle proteins: towards the de novo synthesis of functional heme proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monien, Bernhard H; Drepper, Friedel; Sommerhalter, Monika; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Haehnel, Wolfgang

    2007-08-17

    Design and chemical synthesis of de novo heme proteins with enzymatic activity on cellulose membranes is described. 352 antiparallel four-helix bundle proteins with a single histidine for heme ligation were assembled from three different sets of short amphipathic helices on membrane-bound peptide templates. The templates were coupled by linkers to cellulose membranes of microplate format, which could be cleaved for control of intermediate and final products. The incorporation of heme and the heme oxygenase activity of the 352 proteins were monitored by measuring UV-visible spectra directly on the cellulose. The kinetics of the heme oxygenase reaction was studied by monitoring the decrease of the Soret band and the transient absorbance of verdoheme being an intermediate product in the formation of biliverdin. Four of the proteins covering a broad range of the enzymatic rate constants were selected and synthesized in solution for further characterization. Detailed studies by redox potentiometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy yielded information about the aggregation state of the proteins, the spin state and the putative coordination environment of the iron. The amount of five-coordinated high-spin iron and a positive reduction potential were found to promote the oxygenase activity of the proteins.

  10. Measurement of heme efflux and heme content in isolated developing chloroplasts. [Cucumis sativus, cv. Sumter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. (Clemson Univ., SC (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Hemes destined for cytosolic hemoproteins must originate in one of the cellular compartments which have the capacity for heme synthesis, namely the chloroplast or the mitochondria. Since developing chloroplasts from greening cucumber (Cucumis sativus, cv. Sumter) cotyledons are known to contain complete heme and chlorophyll biosynthetic pathways, they were tested for their capacity export hemes. Picomole quantities of heme were measured by reconstitution of the heme with apo-peroxidase and subsequent determination of peroxidase activity. The assay method was sensitive (as little as 0.7 picomole of heme could be detected in a volume of 100 microliters) and was linear with heme concentration. When intact plastids were incubated with apo-peroxidase, a steady-state rate of efflux between 0.12 and 0.45 picomole heme/minute/milligram plastid protein was measured. The efflux rate was not due to plastid breakage and could be enhanced by incubating with the heme precursor, {delta}-aminolevulinic acid. Cold acetone extraction removed 47 {plus minus} 17 picomoles heme/milligram plastid protein from the total b-type heme pool in the chloroplasts (166 {plus minus} 9 picomoles heme/milligram protein, by acid-acetone extraction). The reconstitution technique provided a similar estimate of readily exchangeable heme in the plastid, 37 {plus minus} 8 picomoles heme/milligram protein (or 6 micromolar in the plastids). These values may be indicative of a free heme pool which exists in the chloroplast.

  11. Estimates of the effect on hepatic iron of oral deferiprone compared with subcutaneous desferrioxamine for treatment of iron overload in thalassemia major: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caro J

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta thalassemia major requires regular blood transfusions and iron chelation to alleviate the harmful accumulation of iron. Evidence on the efficacy and safety of the available agents, desferrioxamine and deferiprone, is derived from small, non-comparative, heterogeneous observational studies. This evidence was reviewed to quantitatively compare the ability of these chelators to reduce hepatic iron. Methods The literature was searched using Medline and all reports addressing the effect of either chelator on hepatic iron were considered. Data were abstracted independently by two investigators. Analyses were performed using reported individual patient data. Hepatic iron concentrations at study end and changes over time were compared using ANCOVA, controlling for initial iron load. Differences in the proportions of patients improving were tested using χ2. Results Eight of 11 reports identified provided patient-level data relating to 30 desferrioxamine- and 68 deferiprone-treated patients. Desferrioxamine was more likely than optimal dose deferiprone to decrease hepatic iron over the average follow-up of 45 months (odds ratio, 19.0, 95% CI, 2.4 to 151.4. The degree of improvement was also larger with desferrioxamine. Conclusions This analysis suggests that desferrioxamine is more effective than deferiprone in lowering hepatic iron. This comparative analysis – despite its limitations – should prove beneficial to physicians faced with the challenge of selecting the optimal treatment for their patients.

  12. The FIND-CKD study-a randomized controlled trial of intravenous iron versus oral iron in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients : background and rationale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macdougall, Iain C.; Bock, Andreas; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Van Wyck, David; Roubert, Bernard; Cushway, Timothy; Roger, Simon D.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Rigorous data are sparse concerning the optimal route of administration and dosing strategy for iron therapy with or without concomitant erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) therapy for the management of iron deficiency anaemia in patients with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney dis

  13. The Staphylococcus aureus Protein IsdH Inhibits Host Hemoglobin Scavenging to Promote Heme Acquisition by the Pathogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saederup, Kirstine Lindhardt; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Kristian; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov;

    2016-01-01

    Hemolysis is a complication in septic infections with Staphylococcus aureus, which utilizes the released Hb as an iron source. S. aureus can acquire heme in vitro from hemoglobin (Hb) by a heme-sequestering mechanism that involves proteins from the S. aureus iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd....... By binding and uptake studies, we now show that the IsdH protein, which serves as an Hb receptor in the Isd system, directly interferes with the CD163-mediated clearance by binding the Hb-Hp complex and inhibiting CD163 recognition. Analysis of truncated IsdH variants including one or more of three near iron...

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Seon-Jin; Chung, Su Wol

    2015-09-15

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1-/- fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death.

  15. Heme Degradation by Heme Oxygenase Protects Mitochondria but Induces ER Stress via Formed Bilirubin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Müllebner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase (HO, in conjunction with biliverdin reductase, degrades heme to carbon monoxide, ferrous iron and bilirubin (BR; the latter is a potent antioxidant. The induced isoform HO-1 has evoked intense research interest, especially because it manifests anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects relieving acute cell stress. The mechanisms by which HO mediates the described effects are not completely clear. However, the degradation of heme, a strong pro-oxidant, and the generation of BR are considered to play key roles. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of BR on vital functions of hepatocytes focusing on mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. The affinity of BR to proteins is a known challenge for its exact quantification. We consider two major consequences of this affinity, namely possible analytical errors in the determination of HO activity, and biological effects of BR due to direct interaction with protein function. In order to overcome analytical bias we applied a polynomial correction accounting for the loss of BR due to its adsorption to proteins. To identify potential intracellular targets of BR we used an in vitro approach involving hepatocytes and isolated mitochondria. After verification that the hepatocytes possess HO activity at a similar level as liver tissue by using our improved post-extraction spectroscopic assay, we elucidated the effects of increased HO activity and the formed BR on mitochondrial function and the ER stress response. Our data show that BR may compromise cellular metabolism and proliferation via induction of ER stress. ER and mitochondria respond differently to elevated levels of BR and HO-activity. Mitochondria are susceptible to hemin, but active HO protects them against hemin-induced toxicity. BR at slightly elevated levels induces a stress response at the ER, resulting in a decreased proliferative and metabolic activity of hepatocytes. However, the proteins that are targeted

  16. Unique structure and stability of HmuY, a novel heme-binding protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Wójtowicz

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection, survival, and proliferation of pathogenic bacteria in humans depend on their capacity to impair host responses and acquire nutrients in a hostile environment. Among such nutrients is heme, a co-factor for oxygen storage, electron transport, photosynthesis, and redox biochemistry, which is indispensable for life. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the major human bacterial pathogen responsible for severe periodontitis. It recruits heme through HmuY, which sequesters heme from host carriers and delivers it to its cognate outer-membrane transporter, the TonB-dependent receptor HmuR. Here we report that heme binding does not significantly affect the secondary structure of HmuY. The crystal structure of heme-bound HmuY reveals a new all-beta fold mimicking a right hand. The thumb and fingers pinch heme iron through two apical histidine residues, giving rise to highly symmetric octahedral iron co-ordination. The tetrameric quaternary arrangement of the protein found in the crystal structure is consistent with experiments in solution. It shows that thumbs and fingertips, and, by extension, the bound heme groups, are shielded from competing heme-binding proteins from the host. This may also facilitate heme transport to HmuR for internalization. HmuY, both in its apo- and in its heme-bound forms, is resistant to proteolytic digestion by trypsin and the major secreted proteases of P. gingivalis, gingipains K and R. It is also stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. In conclusion, these studies reveal novel molecular properties of HmuY that are consistent with its role as a putative virulence factor during bacterial infection.

  17. EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF DEFERASIROX WHEN COMPARED TO D EFERIPRONE AS ORAL IRON CHELATING AGENT : A RANDOMIZED CONTROL TRIAL

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    Sanjeeva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Thalassemia is one of the most common inherited hemoglobinopathy seen in southern India. With regular blood transfusion, these children live longer but associated morbidity due to iron overload impairs the quality of life. We studied the efficacy and safety of new oral iron chelator, deferasirox, compared with deferiprone which was used for long time. MATERIAL AND METHODS : We cond ucted a prospective randomised control study, between January 2011 to June 2012 at thalassemia day care centre of Indira Gandhi I nstitute of C hild H ealth, Bengaluru. The children who were diagnosed as Thalassemia and receiving regular blood transfusion wit h serum ferritin levels more than 1000ng/ml and not receiving any chelation therapy were included in the study. These children were randomly divided into two groups as group 1 and group 2 by computer generated randomization. The children included in g roup 1 received Deferasirox and group 2 received Deferiprone as chelation therapy. The dosage of deferasirox was 20mg/kg/day once daily and that of deferiprone 75 mg/kg/day in three divided daily doses. The primary study outcome was to measure and compare the d ecrease in serum ferritin levels between the two study groups. The secondary outcome measures were to compare the side effect profiles among the two groups. RESULTS : We included 41 thalessemic children and 19 of them were included in group 1 (Deferasirox and 22 children in Group 2 (Deferiprone. At the end of study period of 18 months three children in group II discontinued therapy due to side effects, hence the remaining 19 were available for final analysis in group 2 whereas no drop outs in the group 1. During the study period, the serum ferritin decreased from 3261±2613ng/dl to 1586±766 ng/dl in group 1 as compared in group 2 from 4109±3153 ng/dl to 1743±1138 ng/dl (fig 2. This was also not statistically significant. In group 2, 68% of the children expe rienced adverse effect as compared

  18. The iron chelator, deferasirox, as a novel strategy for cancer treatment: oral activity against human lung tumor xenografts and molecular mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Goldie Y L; Obeidy, Peyman; Ford, Samuel J; Tselepis, Chris; Sharp, Danae M; Jansson, Patric J; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Lovejoy, David B; Richardson, Des R

    2013-01-01

    Deferasirox is an orally effective iron (Fe) chelator currently used for the treatment of iron-overload disease and has been implemented as an alternative to the gold standard chelator, desferrioxamine (DFO). Earlier studies demonstrated that DFO exhibits anticancer activity due to its ability to deplete cancer cells of iron. In this investigation, we examined the in vitro and in vivo activity of deferasirox against cells from human solid tumors. To date, there have been no studies to investigate the effect of deferasirox on these types of tumors in vivo. Deferasirox demonstrated similar activity at inhibiting proliferation of DMS-53 lung carcinoma and SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma cell lines compared with DFO. Furthermore, deferasirox was generally similar or slightly more effective than DFO at mobilizing cellular (59)Fe and inhibiting iron uptake from human transferrin depending on the cell type. However, deferasirox potently inhibited DMS-53 xenograft growth in nude mice when given by oral gavage, with no marked alterations in normal tissue histology. To understand the antitumor activity of deferasirox, we investigated its effect on the expression of molecules that play key roles in metastasis, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. We demonstrated that deferasirox increased expression of the metastasis suppressor protein N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 and upregulated the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(CIP1/WAF1) while decreasing cyclin D1 levels. Moreover, this agent increased the expression of apoptosis markers, including cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1. Collectively, we demonstrate that deferasirox is an orally effective antitumor agent against solid tumors.

  19. No changes in heme synthesis in human Friedreich´s ataxia erythroid progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, Hannes; Singh, Himanshu Narayan; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Goldenberg, Hans; Moganty, Rajeswari R; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara; Sturm, Brigitte

    2017-07-20

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by reduced expression of the protein frataxin. Frataxin is thought to play a role in iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and heme synthesis. In this study, we used erythroid progenitor stem cells obtained from FRDA patients and healthy donors to investigate the putative role, if any, of frataxin deficiency in heme synthesis. We used electrochemiluminescence and qRT-PCR for frataxin protein and mRNA quantification. We used atomic absorption spectrophotometry for iron levels and a photometric assay for hemoglobin levels. Protoporphyrin IX and Ferrochelatase were analyzed using auto-fluorescence. An "IronChip" microarray analysis followed by a protein-protein interaction analysis was performed. FRDA patient cells showed no significant changes in iron levels, hemoglobin synthesis, protoporphyrin IX levels, and ferrochelatase activity. Microarray analysis presented 11 genes that were significantly changed in all patients compared to controls. The genes are especially involved in oxidative stress, iron homeostasis and angiogenesis. The mystery about the involvement of frataxin on iron metabolism raises the question why frataxin deficiency in primary FRDA cells did not lead to changes in biochemical parameters of heme synthesis. It seems that alternative pathways can circumvent the impact of frataxin deficiency on heme synthesis. We show for the first time in primary FRDA patient cells that reduced frataxin levels are still sufficient for heme synthesis and possibly other mechanisms can overcome reduced frataxin levels in this process. Our data strongly support the fact that so far no anemia in FRDA patients was reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative study of genotoxicity and tissue distribution of nano and micron sized iron oxide in rats after acute oral treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Shailendra Pratap; Rahman, M.F.; Murty, U.S.N.; Mahboob, M.; Grover, Paramjit, E-mail: paramgrover@gmail.com

    2013-01-01

    Though nanomaterials (NMs) are being utilized worldwide, increasing use of NMs have raised concerns over their safety to human health and environment. Iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) NMs have important applications. The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxicity of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30 nm and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-bulk in female Wistar rats. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30 nm was characterized by using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry and surface area analysis. The rats were treated orally with the single doses of 500, 1000, 2000 mg/kg bw of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30 nm and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} –bulk. The genotoxicity was evaluated at 6, 24, 48 and 72 h by the comet assay in leucocytes, 48 and 72 h by micronucleus test (MNT) in peripheral blood cells, 18 and 24 h by chromosomal aberration (CA) assay and 24 and 48 h by MNT in bone marrow cells. The biodistribution of iron (Fe) was carried out at 6, 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment in liver, spleen, kidney, heart, brain, bone marrow, urine and feces by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The % tail DNA, frequencies of micronuclei and CAs were statistically insignificant (p > 0.05) at all doses. These results suggest that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30 nm and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-bulk was not genotoxic at the doses tested. Bioavailability of Fe was size and dose dependent in all the tissues from the groups exposed to Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30 nm. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NMs were able to enter in the organs and the rats are biocompatible with much higher concentration of Fe. However, the accumulated Fe did not cause significant genotoxicity. This study provides additional knowledge about the toxicology of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NMs. -- Highlights: ► Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30 nm and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-bulk were orally administered to rats with single doses. ► The nano and bulk Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed insignificant results with MNT, comet and CA assays. ► The bulk was excreted via feces whereas the NMs

  1. The Oral Iron Chelator, Deferasirox, Reverses the Age-Dependent Alterations in Iron and Amyloid-β Homeostasis in Rat Brain: Implications in the Therapy of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Sahoo, Arghyadip; Anand, Shruti; Bir, Aritri; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2016-01-01

    The altered metabolism of iron impacts the brain function in multiple deleterious ways during normal aging as well as in Alzheimer's disease. We have shown in this study that chelatable iron accumulates in the aged rat brain along with overexpression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and ferritin, accompanied by significant alterations in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide homeostasis in the aging brain, such as an increased production of the amyloid-β protein precursor, a decreased level of neprilysin, and increased accumulation of Aβ42. When aged rats are given daily the iron chelator, deferasirox, over a period of more than 4 months starting from the 18th month, the age-related accumulation of iron and overexpression of TfR1 and ferritin in the brain are significantly prevented. More interestingly, the chelator treatment also considerably reverses the altered Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging brain implying a significant role of iron in the latter phenomenon. Further, other results indicate that iron accumulation results in oxidative stress and the activation of NF-κB in the aged rat brain, which are also reversed by the deferasirox treatment. The analysis of the results together suggests that iron accumulation and oxidative stress interact at multiple levels that include transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to bring about changes in the expression levels of TfR1 and ferritin and also alterations in Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging rat brain. The efficacy of deferasirox in preventing age-related changes in iron and Aβ peptide metabolism in the aging brain, as shown here, has obvious therapeutic implications for Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Isoporphyrin Intermediate in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John P.; Niemevz, Fernando; Buldain, Graciela; de Montellano, Paul Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2- and NADPH-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The first step involves regiospecific insertion of an oxygen atom at the α-meso carbon by a ferric hydroperoxide and is predicted to proceed via an isoporphyrin π-cation intermediate. Here we report spectroscopic detection of a transient intermediate during oxidation by hHO-1 of α-meso-phenylheme-IX, α-meso-(p-methylphenyl)-mesoheme-III, and α-meso-(p-trifluoromethylphenyl)-mesoheme-III. In agreement with previous experiments (Wang, J., Niemevz, F., Lad, L., Huang, L., Alvarez, D. E., Buldain, G., Poulos, T. L., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 42593–42604), only the α-biliverdin isomer is produced with concomitant formation of the corresponding benzoic acid. The transient intermediate observed in the NADPH-P450 reductase-catalyzed reaction accumulated when the reaction was supported by H2O2 and exhibited the absorption maxima at 435 and 930 nm characteristic of an isoporphyrin. Product analysis by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the product generated with H2O2 identified it as an isoporphyrin that, on quenching, decayed to benzoylbiliverdin. In the presence of H218O2, one labeled oxygen atom was incorporated into these products. The hHO-1-isoporphyrin complexes were found to have half-lives of 1.7 and 2.4 h for the p-trifluoromethyl- and p-methyl-substituted phenylhemes, respectively. The addition of NADPH-P450 reductase to the H2O2-generated hHO-1-isoporphyrin complex produced α-biliverdin, confirming its role as a reaction intermediate. Identification of an isoporphyrin intermediate in the catalytic sequence of hHO-1, the first such intermediate observed in hemoprotein catalysis, completes our understanding of the critical first step of heme oxidation. PMID:18487208

  3. Red meat and colon cancer : The cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects of dietary heme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sesink, ALA; Termont, DSML; Kleibeuker, JH; Van der Meer, R

    1999-01-01

    The intake of a Western diet with a high amount of red meat is associated with a high risk for colon cancer. We hypothesize that heme, the iron carrier of red meat, is involved in diet-induced colonic epithelial damage, resulting in increased epithelial proliferation. Rats were fed purified control

  4. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III) complexes of linear and tripodal tridentate ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases: Effect of -alkyl substitution on regioselectivity and reaction rate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mallayan Palaniandavar; Kusalendiran Visvaganesan

    2011-03-01

    Catechol dioxygenases are responsible for the last step in the biodegradation of aromatic molecules in the environment. The iron(II) active site in the extradiol-cleaving enzymes cleaves the C-C bond adjacent to the hydroxyl group, while the iron(III) active site in the intradiol-cleaving enzymes cleaves the C-C bond in between two hydroxyl groups. A series of mononuclear iron(III) complexes of the type [Fe(L)Cl3], where L is the linear -alkyl substituted bis(pyrid-2-ylmethyl)amine, -alkyl substituted -(pyrid-2-ylmethyl)ethylenediamine, linear tridentate 3N ligands containing imidazolyl moieties and tripodal ligands containing pyrazolyl moieties have been isolated and studied as structural and functional models for catechol dioxygenase enzymes. All the complexes catalyse the cleavage of catechols using molecular oxygen to afford both intra- and extradiol cleavage products. The rate of oxygenation depends on the solvent and the Lewis acidity of iron(III) center as modified by the sterically demanding -alkyl groups. Also, our studies reveal that stereo-electronic factors like the Lewis acidity of the iron(III) center and the steric demand of ligands, as regulated by the -alkyl substituents, determine the regioselectivity and the rate of dioxygenation. In sharp contrast to all these complexes, the pyrazole-containing tripodal ligand complexes yield mainly the oxidized product benzoquinone.

  5. Oily fish increases iron bioavailability of a phytate rich meal in young iron deficient women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Pérez-Granados, Ana M; Sarriá, Beatriz; Carbajal, Angeles; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Roe, Mark A; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Vaquero, M Pilar

    2008-02-01

    Iron deficiency is a major health problem worldwide, and is associated with diets of low iron bioavailability. Non-heme iron absorption is modulated by dietary constituents, one of which is the so-called "meat factor", present in meat, fish (oily and lean) and poultry, which is an important enhancer of iron absorption in humans. Food processing also affects iron bioavailability. To evaluate the effect of consuming sous vide cooked salmon fish on non-heme iron bioavailability from a bean meal, rich in phytate, in iron-deficient women. Randomized crossover trial in 21 young women with low iron stores (ferritin Sous vide cooked salmon fish increases iron absorption from a high phytate bean meal in humans.

  6. Transmutation of a heme protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, P D; Ferrer, J C; Mylrajan, M; Loehr, T M; Feng, R; Konishi, Y; Funk, W D; MacGillivray, R T; Mauk, A G

    1993-07-15

    Residue Asn57 of bovine liver cytochrome b5 has been replaced with a cysteine residue, and the resulting variant has been isolated from recombinant Escherichia coli as a mixture of four major species: A, BI, BII, and C. A combination of electronic spectroscopy, 1H NMR spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy, electrospray mass spectrometry, and direct electrochemistry has been used to characterize these four major cytochrome derivatives. The red form A (E(m) = -19 mV) is found to possess a heme group bound covalently through a thioether linkage involving Cys57 and the alpha carbon of the heme 4-vinyl group. Form BI has a covalently bound heme group coupled through a thioether linkage involving the beta carbon of the heme 4-vinyl group. Form BII is similar to BI except that the sulfur involved in the thioether linkage is oxidized to a sulfoxide. The green form C (E(m) = 175 mV) possesses a noncovalently bound prosthetic group with spectroscopic properties characteristic of a chlorin. A mechanism is proposed for the generation of these derivatives, and the implications of these observations for the biosynthesis of cytochrome c and naturally occurring chlorin prosthetic groups are discussed.

  7. Transdermal iron replenishment therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modepalli, Naresh; Shivakumar, H N; Kanni, K L Paranjothy; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the major nutritional deficiency disorders. Iron deficiency anemia occurs due to decreased absorption of iron from diet, chronic blood loss and other associated diseases. The importance of iron and deleterious effects of iron deficiency anemia are discussed briefly in this review followed by the transdermal approaches to deliver iron. Transdermal delivery of iron would be able to overcome the side effects associated with conventional oral and parenteral iron therapy and improves the patient compliance. During preliminary investigations, ferric pyrophosphate and iron dextran were selected as iron sources for transdermal delivery. Different biophysical techniques were explored to assess their efficiency in delivering iron across the skin, and in vivo studies were carried out using anemic rat model. Transdermal iron delivery is a promising approach that could make a huge positive impact on patients suffering with iron deficiency.

  8. Iron supplementation and the female soldier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anthony E

    2006-04-01

    Twenty-two percent of women in the United States are iron deficient. Iron deficiency adversely affects immune function as well as physical and cognitive performance. Although the risk of developing iron deficiency is high for female soldiers, this risk can be minimized with proper nutritional guidance. Recommended dietary modifications include (1) heme iron consumption, (2) ingestion of vitamin C and protein with meals, and (3) discontinued tea and coffee consumption with meals.

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 deletion affects stress erythropoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-An Cao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Homeostatic erythropoiesis leads to the formation of mature red blood cells under non-stress conditions, and the production of new erythrocytes occurs as the need arises. In response to environmental stimuli, such as bone marrow transplantation, myelosuppression, or anemia, erythroid progenitors proliferate rapidly in a process referred to as stress erythropoiesis. We have previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 deficiency leads to disrupted stress hematopoiesis. Here, we describe the specific effects of HO-1 deficiency on stress erythropoiesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a transplant model to induce stress conditions. In irradiated recipients that received hmox(+/- or hmox(+/+ bone marrow cells, we evaluated (i the erythrocyte parameters in the peripheral blood; (ii the staining intensity of CD71-, Ter119-, and CD49d-specific surface markers during erythroblast differentiation; (iii the patterns of histological iron staining; and (iv the number of Mac-1(+-cells expressing TNF-α. In the spleens of mice that received hmox(+/- cells, we show (i decreases in the proerythroblast, basophilic, and polychromatophilic erythroblast populations; (ii increases in the insoluble iron levels and decreases in the soluble iron levels; (iii increased numbers of Mac-1(+-cells expressing TNF-α; and (iv decreased levels of CD49d expression in the basophilic and polychromatophilic erythroblast populations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As reflected by effects on secreted and cell surface proteins, HO-1 deletion likely affects stress erythropoiesis through the retention of erythroblasts in the erythroblastic islands of the spleen. Thus, HO-1 may serve as a therapeutic target for controlling erythropoiesis, and the dysregulation of HO-1 may be a predisposing condition for hematologic diseases.

  10. The Iron Chelator, Dp44mT, Effectively Inhibits Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Growth in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehn-Chuan Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is a common malignancy with a growing worldwide incidence and prevalence. The N-myc downstream regulated gene (NDRG family of NDRG1, 2, 3, and mammary serine protease inhibitor (Maspin gene are well-known modulators in the neoplasia process. Current research has considered iron chelators as new anti-cancer agents; however, the anticancer activities of iron chelators and their target genes in OSCC have not been well investigated. We showed that iron chelators (Dp44mT, desferrioxamine (DFO, and deferasirox all significantly inhibit SAS cell growth. Flow cytometry further indicated that Dp44mT inhibition of SAS cells growth was partly due to induction of G1 cell cycle arrest. Iron chelators enhanced expressions of NDRG1 and NDRG3 while repressing cyclin D1 expression in OSCC cells. The in vivo antitumor effect on OSCC and safety of Dp44mT were further confirmed through a xenograft animal model. The Dp44mT treatment also increased Maspin protein levels in SAS and OECM-1 cells. NDRG3 knockdown enhanced the growth of OECM-1 cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicated that NDRG3 is a tumor suppressor gene in OSCC cells, and Dp44mT could be a promising therapeutic agent for OSCC treatment.

  11. Investigations of ultrafast ligand rebinding to heme and heme proteins using temperature and strong magnetic field perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    This thesis is written to summarize investigations of the mechanisms that underlie the kinetics of diatomic ligand rebinding to the iron atom of the heme group, which is chelated inside heme proteins. The family of heme proteins is a major object of studies for several branches of scientific research activity. Understanding the ligand binding mechanisms and pathways is one of the major goals for biophysics. My interests mainly focus on the physics of this ligand binding process. Therefore, to investigate the problem, isolated from the influence of the protein matrix, Fe-protophorphyrin IX is chosen as the prototype system in my studies. Myoglobin, the most extensively and intensively studied protein, is another ideal system that allows coupling the protein polypeptide matrix into the investigation. A technique to synchro-lock two laser pulse trains electronically is applied to our pump-probe spectroscopic studies. Based on this technique, a two color, fs/ps pump-probe system is developed which extends the temporal window for our investigation to 13ns and fills a gap existing in previous pump-probe investigations. In order to apply this newly-developed pump-probe laser system to implement systematic studies on the kinetics of diatomic ligand (NO, CO, O2) rebinding to heme and heme proteins, several experimental setups are utilized. In Chapter 1, the essential background knowledge, which helps to understand the iron-ligand interaction, is briefly described. In Chapter 2, in addition to a description of the preparation protocols of protein samples and details of the method for data analysis, three home-made setups are described, which include: a picosecond laser regenerative amplifier, a pump-probe application along the bore (2-inch in diameter) of a superconducting magnet and a temperature-controllable cryostat for spinning sample cell. Chapter 3 presents high magnetic field studies of several heme-ligand or protein-ligand systems. Pump-probe spectroscopy is used to

  12. Regiospecificity determinants of human heme oxygenase: differential NADPH- and ascorbate-dependent heme cleavage by the R183E mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Lad, Latesh; Poulos, Thomas L; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2005-01-28

    The ability of the human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) R183E mutant to oxidize heme in reactions supported by either NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase or ascorbic acid has been compared. The NADPH-dependent reaction, like that of wild-type hHO-1, yields exclusively biliverdin IXalpha. In contrast, the R183E mutant with ascorbic acid as the reductant produces biliverdin IXalpha (79 +/- 4%), IXdelta (19 +/- 3%), and a trace of IXbeta. In the presence of superoxide dismutase and catalase, the yield of biliverdin IXdelta is decreased to 8 +/- 1% with a corresponding increase in biliverdin IXalpha. Spectroscopic analysis of the NADPH-dependent reaction shows that the R183E ferric biliverdin complex accumulates, because reduction of the iron, which is required for sequential iron and biliverdin release, is impaired. Reversal of the charge at position 183 makes reduction of the iron more difficult. The crystal structure of the R183E mutant, determined in the ferric and ferrous-NO bound forms, shows that the heme primarily adopts the same orientation as in wild-type hHO-1. The structure of the Fe(II).NO complex suggests that an altered active site hydrogen bonding network supports catalysis in the R183E mutant. Furthermore, Arg-183 contributes to the regiospecificity of the wild-type enzyme, but its contribution is not critical. The results indicate that the ascorbate-dependent reaction is subject to a lower degree of regiochemical control than the NADPH-dependent reaction. Ascorbate may be able to reduce the R183E ferric and ferrous dioxygen complexes in active site conformations that cannot be reduced by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase.

  13. Safety of oral iron supplements for iron deficiency anemia in children: a network meta-analysis%不同口服铁剂治疗儿童缺铁性贫血安全性的网络Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    旷满华; 熊文婧; 谢新鑫; 刘也; 刘洋; 让蔚清

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare and evaluate the safety of eight kinds of oral iron supplements that treat children with iron deficiency anemia(IDA) by using Network Meta-analysis.Methods We searched and collected domestic and foreign literatures on oral iron supplement for iron deficiency anemia children in CNKI,PubMed,Cochrane Library and Science Direct Database from the inception to July 2015.Statistical analysis was performed by Microsoft Excel 2013 software,we used the NetMetaXL macros in it to load the WinBUGS 1.4.3 software to conduct the calculate by random effects Bayesian models.The odds ratios (ORs) and mean ranking and the probability among eight kinds of oral irons were estimated.Results We identified 31 eligible studies which involved 3 417 children with IDA.In network analyses,there was higher risk that ferrous sulfate(OR =0.00,95% CI:0.00-0.03),sodium iron chlorophyll (OR =0.03,95% CI:0.00-0.39),ferrous succinate (OR =0.02,95 % CI:0.00-0.23),ferrous gluconate (OR =0.01,95 % CI:0.00-0.07),multidimensional iron compounds (OR =0.01 95 % CI:0.00-0.11),iron polymaltose complex (OR =0.02,95 % CI:0.00-0.19) and ferrous fumarate (OR =0.01,95% CI:0.00-0.12) prevented side-effects when compared to iron dextran.Although iron dextran was ranked the regiment with the least favorable adverse event profile among eight kinds of oral irons (SUCRA =0.999 4),ferrous sulfate was the highest risk (SUCRA =0.034 1).Conclusions Our results suggest that consumers and clinicians might be more cautious when using ferrous sulfate to treat children with IDA,because of its highest risk among other oral iron supplements.%目的 应用网络Meta分析评价8种口服铁剂治疗儿童缺铁性贫血安全性.方法 检索收集2015年7月之前国内外发表有关口服铁剂与儿童缺铁性贫血文献.采用Microsoft Excel 2013软件加载NetMetaXL宏命令调用WinBUGS 1.4.3软件选择随机效应模型进行统计分析,系统评价8种口服铁剂之

  14. Protective role of heme oxygenase-1 against inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, William

    2011-06-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the metabolism of free heme into equimolar amounts of ferrous iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin. Biliverdin is subsequently converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. HO-1 has recently been identified as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of vascular inflammatory disease, including atherosclerosis. HO-1 represses inflammation by removing the pro-inflammatory molecule heme and by generating CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These HO-1 reaction products are capable of blocking innate and adaptive immune responses by modifying the activation, differentiation, maturation, and/or polarization of numerous immune cells, including endothelial cells, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, mast cells, and platelets. These cellular actions by CO and bile pigments result in diminished leukocyte recruitment and infiltration, and pro-inflammatory mediator production within atherosclerotic lesions. This review highlights the mechanisms by which HO-1 suppresses vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, and explores possible therapeutic modalities by which HO-1 and its reaction products can be employed to ameliorate vascular inflammatory disease.

  15. Nitric oxide heme interactions in nitrophorin from Cimex lectularius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christmann, R.; Auerbach, H., E-mail: auerbach@physik.uni-kl.de [University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Physics (Germany); Berry, R. E.; Walker, F. A. [The University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Schünemann, V. [University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Physics (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    The nitrophorin from the bedbug Cimex lectularius (cNP) is a nitric oxide (NO) carrying protein. Like the nitrophorins (rNPs) from the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus, cNP forms a stable heme Fe(III)-NO complex, where the NO can be stored reversibly for a long period of time. In both cases, the NPs are found in the salivary glands of blood-sucking bugs. The insects use the nitrophorins to transport the NO to the victim’s tissues, resulting in vasodilation and reduced blood coagulation. However, the structure of cNP is significantly different to those of the rNPs from Rhodnius prolixus. Furthermore, the cNP can bind a second NO molecule to the proximal heme cysteine when present at higher concentrations. High field Mössbauer spectroscopy on {sup 57}Fe enriched cNP complexed with NO shows reduction of the heme iron and formation of a ferrous nitric oxide (Fe(II)-NO) complex. Density functional theory calculations reproduce the experimental Mössbauer parameters and confirm this observation.

  16. Nitric oxide heme interactions in nitrophorin from Cimex lectularius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, R.; Auerbach, H.; Berry, R. E.; Walker, F. A.; Schünemann, V.

    2016-12-01

    The nitrophorin from the bedbug Cimex lectularius (cNP) is a nitric oxide (NO) carrying protein. Like the nitrophorins (rNPs) from the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus, cNP forms a stable heme Fe(III)-NO complex, where the NO can be stored reversibly for a long period of time. In both cases, the NPs are found in the salivary glands of blood-sucking bugs. The insects use the nitrophorins to transport the NO to the victim's tissues, resulting in vasodilation and reduced blood coagulation. However, the structure of cNP is significantly different to those of the rNPs from Rhodnius prolixus. Furthermore, the cNP can bind a second NO molecule to the proximal heme cysteine when present at higher concentrations. High field Mössbauer spectroscopy on 57Fe enriched cNP complexed with NO shows reduction of the heme iron and formation of a ferrous nitric oxide (Fe(II)-NO) complex. Density functional theory calculations reproduce the experimental Mössbauer parameters and confirm this observation.

  17. Interaction of nitric oxide with human heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Lu, Shen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2003-01-24

    NO and CO may complement each other as signaling molecules in some physiological situations. We have examined the binding of NO to human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an enzyme that oxidizes heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron, to determine whether inhibition of hHO-1 by NO can contribute to the signaling interplay of NO and CO. An Fe(3+)-NO hHO-1-heme complex is formed with NO or the NO donors NOC9 or 2-(N,N-diethylamino)-diazenolate-2-oxide.sodium salt. Resonance Raman spectroscopy shows that ferric hHO-1-heme forms a 6-coordinated, low spin complex with NO. The nu(N-O) vibration of this complex detected by Fourier transform IR is only 4 cm(-1) lower than that of the corresponding metmyoglobin (met-Mb) complex but is broader, suggesting a greater degree of ligand conformational freedom. The Fe(3+)-NO complex of hHO-1 is much more stable than that of met-Mb. Stopped-flow studies indicate that k(on) for formation of the hHO-1-heme Fe(3+)-NO complex is approximately 50-times faster, and k(off) 10 times slower, than for met-Mb, resulting in K(d) = 1.4 microm for NO. NO thus binds 500-fold more tightly to ferric hHO-1-heme than to met-Mb. The hHO-1 mutations E29A, G139A, D140A, S142A, G143A, G143F, and K179A/R183A do not significantly diminish the tight binding of NO, indicating that NO binding is not highly sensitive to mutations of residues that normally stabilize the distal water ligand. As expected from the K(d) value, the enzyme is reversibly inhibited upon exposure to pathologically, and possibly physiologically, relevant concentrations of NO. Inhibition of hHO-1 by NO may contribute to the pleiotropic responses to NO and CO.

  18. Oral pigmentation: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, C; Ramakrishnan, K; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations.

  19. Mechanistic insights on the ortho-hydroxylation of aromatic compounds by non-heme iron complex: a computational case study on the comparative oxidative ability of ferric-hydroperoxo and high-valent Fe(IV)═O and Fe(V)═O intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Azaj; Kaushik, Abhishek; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2013-03-20

    ortho-Hydroxylation of aromatic compounds by non-heme Fe complexes has been extensively studied in recent years by several research groups. The nature of the proposed oxidant varies from Fe(III)-OOH to high-valent Fe(IV)═O and Fe(V)═O species, and no definitive consensus has emerged. In this comprehensive study, we have investigated the ortho-hydroxylation of aromatic compounds by an iron complex using hybrid density functional theory incorporating dispersion effects. Three different oxidants, Fe(III)-OOH, Fe(IV)═O, and Fe(V)═O, and two different pathways, H-abstraction and electrophilic attack, have been considered to test the oxidative ability of different oxidants and to underpin the exact mechanism of this regiospecific reaction. By mapping the potential energy surface of each oxidant, our calculations categorize Fe(III)-OOH as a sluggish oxidant, as both proximal and distal oxygen atoms of this species have prohibitively high barriers to carry out the aromatic hydroxylation. This is in agreement to the experimental observation where Fe(III)-OOH is found not to directly attack the aromatic ring. A novel mechanism for the explicit generation of non-heme Fe(IV)═O and Fe(V)═O from isomeric forms of Fe(III)-OOH has been proposed where the O···O bond is found to cleave via homolytic (Fe(IV)═O) or heterolytic (Fe(V)═O) fashion exclusively. Apart from having favorable formation energies, the Fe(V)═O species also has a lower barrier height compared to the corresponding Fe(IV)═O species for the aromatic ortho-hydroxylation reaction. The transient Fe(V)═O prefers electrophilic attack on the benzene ring rather than the usual aromatic C-H activation step. A large thermodynamic drive for the formation of a radical intermediate is encountered in the mechanistic scene, and this intermediate substantially diminishes the energy barrier required for C-H activation by the Fe(V)═O species. Further spin density distribution and the frontier orbitals of

  20. A Heme Oxygenase-1 Transducer Model of Degenerative and Developmental Brain Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman M. Schipper

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a 32 kDa protein which catalyzes the breakdown of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. The Hmox1 promoter contains numerous consensus sequences that render the gene exquisitely sensitive to induction by diverse pro-oxidant and inflammatory stimuli. In “stressed” astroglia, HO-1 hyperactivity promotes mitochondrial iron sequestration and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergetic failure documented in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and certain neurodevelopmental conditions. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact neuroplasticity and cell survival by modulating brain sterol metabolism and the proteasomal degradation of neurotoxic proteins. The glial HO-1 response may represent a pivotal transducer of noxious environmental and endogenous stressors into patterns of neural damage and repair characteristic of many human degenerative and developmental CNS disorders.

  1. Cloning and Characterization of an Outer Membrane Protein of Vibrio vulnificus Required for Heme Utilization: Regulation of Expression and Determination of the Gene Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Litwin, Christine M.; Byrne, Burke L.

    1998-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a halophilic, marine pathogen that has been associated with septicemia and serious wound infections in patients with iron overload and preexisting liver disease. For V. vulnificus, the ability to acquire iron from the host has been shown to correlate with virulence. V. vulnificus is able to use host iron sources such as hemoglobin and heme. We previously constructed a fur mutant of V. vulnificus which constitutively expresses at least two iron-regulated outer membrane pro...

  2. [Iron metabolism, overview and recent insights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, S; Feki, M; Kaabachi, N

    2006-01-01

    The paper is an up to date overview of knowledge on iron metabolism that integrate recent findings in this field. Significant advances were made in understanding the implication of protein factors (transporters, enzymes and regulation factors) in iron metabolism, as well as related genetic abnormalities. The research highlighted the complexity of mechanisms in charge of maintaining equilibrium of Fe in the body. The iron is vital to the life of cells, but its presence in excess is rather toxic. Iron is mostly required for hemoglobin synthesis. It is recycled between reticulo-endothelial macrophages and bone marrow that is the main user of iron. Intestinal absorption is a key step in determining iron capital in the body. Its rate is tightly controlled by several factors that act under influence of signals of unknown nature, which indicate iron needs and storage. The IRP/IRE (iron regulatory protein/iron responsive element) system controls cellular uptake, stores and exportation of iron, and heme synthesis. Mitochondrion is a dynamo of iron metabolism, being vital for heme synthesis and iron sulphur cluster genesis. The recent discovery of several mitochondrial proteins involved in iron metabolism resulted in better understanding mitochondrial iron movement, storage and exchange. Nevertheless, much remains to be known on the role of some actors such as HFE protein, hepcidin, hemojuvelin and transferrin receptor 2, and to determine the nature and mechanisms of signals regulating iron level in the body.

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1 and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Protect Against Heme-induced Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Dankers, A.C.A.; Summeren, F. van; Scharstuhl, A.; Heuvel, J.J. van den; Koenderink, J.B.; Pennings, S.W.C.; Russel, F.G.M.; Masereeuw, R.

    2013-01-01

    Heme is the functional group of diverse hemoproteins and crucial for many cellular processes. However, heme is increasingly recognized as a culprit for a wide variety of pathologies, including sepsis, malaria, and kidney failure. Excess of free heme can be detrimental to tissues by mediating oxidati

  4. Understanding heme proteins with hyperfine spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2017-07-01

    Heme proteins are versatile proteins that are involved in a large number of biological processes. Many spectroscopic methods are used to gain insight into the different mechanistic processes governing heme-protein functions. Since many (intermediate) states of heme proteins are paramagnetic, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods, such as hyperfine spectroscopy, offer unique tools for these investigations. This perspective gives an overview of the use of state-of-the-art hyperfine spectroscopy in heme research, focusing on the advantages, limits and challenges of the different techniques.

  5. Altered heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 caused by mutations in human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland); Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E. [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutations in POR identified from patients lead to reduced HO-1 activities. {yields} POR mutation Y181D affecting FMN binding results in total loss of HO-1 activity. {yields} POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F, lost 50-70% activity. {yields} Mutations in FAD binding domain, R457H, Y459H and V492E lost all HO-1 activity. {yields} POR polymorphisms P228L, R316W, G413S, A503V and G504R have normal activity. -- Abstract: Human heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) carries out heme catabolism supported by electrons supplied from the NADPH through NADPH P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Previously we have shown that mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of mutations in POR on HO-1 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified HO-1 to measure heme degradation in a coupled assay using biliverdin reductase. Here we show that mutations in POR found in patients may reduce HO-1 activity, potentially influencing heme catabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had total loss of HO-1 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 50-70% activity. The POR variants P228L, R316W and G413S, A503V and G504R identified as polymorphs had close to WT activity. Loss of HO-1 activity may result in increased oxidative neurotoxicity, anemia, growth retardation and iron deposition. Further examination of patients affected with POR deficiency will be required to assess the metabolic effects of reduced HO-1 activity in affected individuals.

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Stuart T; Midwinter, Robyn G; Coupland, Lucy A; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Chong, Beng H; Parish, Christopher R; Stocker, Roland

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119(+)-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119(+)-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes.

  7. The oral iron chelator deferasirox inhibits NF-κB mediated gene expression without impacting on proximal activation: implications for myelodysplasia and aplastic anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ashish; Mifsud, Nicole A; Bird, Robert; Forsyth, Cecily; Szer, Jeff; Tam, Constantine; Kellner, Sybil; Grigg, Andrew; Motum, Penelope; Bentley, Mark; Opat, Stephen; Grigoriadis, George

    2015-02-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of disorders characterized by ineffective haematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia and cytopenias. Failure of red cell production often results in transfusion dependency with subsequent iron loading requiring iron chelation in lower risk patients. Consistent with previous reports, we have observed haematopoietic improvement in a cohort of patients treated with the oral iron chelator deferasirox (DFX). It has been postulated that MDS patients have a pro-inflammatory bone marrow environment with increased numbers of activated T cells producing elevated levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF), which is detrimental to normal haematopoiesis. We demonstrate that DFX inhibits nuclear factor (NF)-κB dependent transcription without affecting its proximal activation, resulting in reduced TNF production from T cells stimulated in vitro. These results suggest that the haematopoietic improvement observed in DFX-treated patients may reflect an anti-inflammatory effect, mediated through inhibition of the transcription factor NF-κB and support the therapeutic targeting of this pathway, which is aberrantly activated in a large proportion of haematological malignancies.

  8. Characterization of the Products of the Heme Detoxification Pathway in Malarial Late Trophozoites by X-ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohle,D.; Dinnebier, R.; Madsen, S.; Stephens, P.

    2007-01-01

    Heme is a potent multifunction regulator whose biochemical levels and distribution are precisely controlled on both intra- and extracellular levels. Efficient regulation of heme is particularly critical for intra-erythrocytic parasites such as plasmodia which process large quantities of heme in the post-invasion digestion of the erythrocyte's hemoglobin. Plasmodia, which lack heme oxygenases, detoxify heme by sequestering it into an insoluble heme aggregate termed malarial pigment or hemozoin. The quinoline-based family of antimalarials interfere with this process by an as yet unknown mechanism that has recently come under intense scrutiny as part of the effort to combat the spread of chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium. A variety of spectroscopic and bioanalytical techniques indicate that hemozoin is similar to the synthetic aggregated heme phase {beta}-hematin, which is thought to form strands of hemes linked by propionate oxygen-iron bonds as well as interstrand propionate hydrogen bonds. Characterization of the carboxylate stretching bands for the propionic acid side chains by IR and Raman spectroscopy provides the best evidence for the presence of iron-oxygen bonds to the propionate side chains. Unfortunately, crystallographic characterization of these heme aggregates has been hampered by the phase heterogeneity of many synthetic preparations as well as by the small size of the synthetic and natural crystallites isolated from either trophozoites and infected hosts. High resolution powder diffraction has been used extensively for the solution of many structural problems, and it can solve problems posed by diffraction from microcrystalline phases. In this communication we describe the characterization of {beta}-hematin derived from both synthetic and natural sources and provide new unambiguous evidence that the heme aggregate present in late stage trophozoites is {beta}-hematin. In a process inhibited by the quinoline antimalarial drugs, Plasmodia

  9. Fe-heme structure in Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase from Haemophilus ducreyi by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Paola; Zitolo, Andrea; Pacello, Francesca; Mancini, Giordano; Proux, Olivier; Hazemann, Jean Louis; Desideri, Alessandro; Battistoni, Andrea

    2010-06-01

    We have carried out an X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) study of ferric, ferrous, CO- and NO-bound Haemophilus ducreyi Cu,ZnSOD (HdSOD) in solution to investigate the structural modifications induced by the binding of small gaseous ligands to heme in this enzyme. The combined analysis of EXAFS and XANES data has allowed us to characterize the local structure around the Fe-heme with 0.02A accuracy, revealing a heterogeneity in the distances between iron and the two histidine ligands which was not evident in the X-ray crystal structure. In addition, we have shown that the metal oxidation state does not influence the Fe-heme coordination environment, whereas the presence of the CO and NO ligands induces local structural rearrangements in the enzyme which are very similar to those already observed in other hexa-coordinated heme proteins, such as neuroglobin.

  10. The Effect of Distal Interactions on O2-Binding to Heme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Dasmeh, Pouria

    2013-01-01

    , the impact of specific types of distal interactions on oxyheme electronic structure can be systematized. Hydrogen bonding increases back donation, O-O bond activation, and oxygen binding affinity. The heme side-chains reduce isomer shifts by -0.06 mm/s due to electron-withdrawal from iron, and distal...... hydrogen bonds can further reduce isomer shifts up to 0.07 mm/s. The O-O stretch vibration, the O-O distance, and the isomer shift possess substantial heuristic value in interpreting electronic structure, whereas other properties are less effective, based on computed correlation coefficients. Shorter Fe......-O bonding combined with electron withdrawal by hydrogen bonds is shown to robustly explain the structural, spectroscopic, and thermodynamic properties of the hemes. The identified correlations may be useful e.g. for designing O2-activating catalysts or for diagnosing heme protein variants....

  11. The non-canonical functions of the heme oxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanella, Luca; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Tibullo, Daniele; Forte, Stefano; Zappalà, Agata; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2016-10-18

    Heme oxygenase (HO) isoforms catalyze the conversion of heme to carbon monoxide (CO) and biliverdin with a concurrent release of iron, which can drive the synthesis of ferritin for iron sequestration. Most of the studies so far were directed at evaluating the protective effect of these enzymes because of their ability to generate antioxidant and antiapoptotic molecules such as CO and bilirubin. Recent evidences are suggesting that HO may possess other important physiological functions, which are not related to its enzymatic activity and for which we would like to introduce for the first time the term "non canonical functions". Recent evidence suggest that both HO isoforms may form protein-protein interactions (i.e. cytochrome P450, adiponectin, CD91) thus serving as chaperone-like protein. In addition, truncated HO-1 isoform was localized in the nuclear compartment under certain experimental conditions (i.e. excitotoxicity, hypoxia) regulating the activity of important nuclear transcription factors (i.e. Nrf2) and DNA repair. In the present review, we discuss three potential signaling mechanisms that we refer to as the non-canonical functions of the HO isoforms: protein-protein interaction, intracellular compartmentalization, and extracellular secretion. The aim of the present review is to describe each of this mechanism and all the aspects warranting additional studies in order to unravel all the functions of the HO system.

  12. The effects of oral iron supplementation on cognition in older children and adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Falkingham, Martin

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In observational studies anaemia and iron deficiency are associated with cognitive deficits, suggesting that iron supplementation may improve cognitive function. However, due to the potential for confounding by socio-economic status in observational studies, this needs to be verified in data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). AIM: To assess whether iron supplementation improved cognitive domains: concentration, intelligence, memory, psychomotor skills and scholastic achievement. METHODOLOGY: Searches included MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Cochrane CENTRAL and bibliographies (to November 2008). Inclusion, data extraction and validity assessment were duplicated, and the meta-analysis used the standardised mean difference (SMD). Subgrouping, sensitivity analysis, assessment of publication bias and heterogeneity were employed. RESULTS: Fourteen RCTs of children aged 6+, adolescents and women were included; no RCTs in men or older people were found. Iron supplementation improved attention and concentration irrespective of baseline iron status (SMD 0.59, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.90) without heterogeneity. In anaemic groups supplementation improved intelligence quotient (IQ) by 2.5 points (95% CI 1.24 to 3.76), but had no effect on non-anaemic participants, or on memory, psychomotor skills or scholastic achievement. However, the funnel plot suggested modest publication bias. The limited number of included studies were generally small, short and methodologically weak. CONCLUSIONS: There was some evidence that iron supplementation improved attention, concentration and IQ, but this requires confirmation with well-powered, blinded, independently funded RCTs of at least one year\\'s duration in different age groups including children, adolescents, adults and older people, and across all levels of baseline iron status.

  13. The effects of oral iron supplementation on cognition in older children and adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairweather-Tait Susan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In observational studies anaemia and iron deficiency are associated with cognitive deficits, suggesting that iron supplementation may improve cognitive function. However, due to the potential for confounding by socio-economic status in observational studies, this needs to be verified in data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs. Aim To assess whether iron supplementation improved cognitive domains: concentration, intelligence, memory, psychomotor skills and scholastic achievement. Methodology Searches included MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Cochrane CENTRAL and bibliographies (to November 2008. Inclusion, data extraction and validity assessment were duplicated, and the meta-analysis used the standardised mean difference (SMD. Subgrouping, sensitivity analysis, assessment of publication bias and heterogeneity were employed. Results Fourteen RCTs of children aged 6+, adolescents and women were included; no RCTs in men or older people were found. Iron supplementation improved attention and concentration irrespective of baseline iron status (SMD 0.59, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.90 without heterogeneity. In anaemic groups supplementation improved intelligence quotient (IQ by 2.5 points (95% CI 1.24 to 3.76, but had no effect on non-anaemic participants, or on memory, psychomotor skills or scholastic achievement. However, the funnel plot suggested modest publication bias. The limited number of included studies were generally small, short and methodologically weak. Conclusions There was some evidence that iron supplementation improved attention, concentration and IQ, but this requires confirmation with well-powered, blinded, independently funded RCTs of at least one year's duration in different age groups including children, adolescents, adults and older people, and across all levels of baseline iron status.

  14. The effect of water on the Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) reduction potential of heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edholm, O; Nordlander, P; Chen, W; Ohlsson, P I; Smith, M L; Paul, J

    2000-02-24

    Hemeproteins can act as catalysts, oxygen carriers or electron conductors. The ferric/ferrous reduction potential E(m7) of iron in the center of the prosthetic group ranges from negative values for peroxidases to an extreme positive value for cytochrome a(3) with Hb and Mb in the middle [1]. Proteins exercise their influence on E(m7) in several ways: via substituents at the periphery of the chelate structure, via the proximal ligand, and via interaction with the surrounding medium, amino acid side chains, or polar solvents. Work on recombined proteins and 2,4-substituted free hemes documented that the first two effects are additive [2]. For the third effect, models of the dielectric media on a molecular level have been successfully applied [3-5]. E(m7) has also been empirically correlated to the degree of heme exposure to water [6-8]. The apoprotein/porphyrin and water/porphyrin interfaces are complementary since water molecules fill any empty space in the crevice and surround any pertinent part of heme outside the protein boundary. The present work links to this idea by a combination of statistical mechanics simulations and quantum mechanical calculations comparing heme in water with heme in an apolar environment. Our results show that polarization of the porphyrin pi-electron cloud by the field from water dipoles influences E(m7). The dominant effect of this and other determinates of iron electron availability is perturbations of delocalized electron density in the porphyrin chelate, reproduced by a model where the prosthetic group is treated as a disc of uniform electron density. The present work is also of interest since the interfacial energy constitutes the main barrier for heme-protein separation [9-11]. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  15. The hexadentate hydroxypyridinonate TREN-(Me-3,2-HOPO) is a more orally active iron chelator than its bidentate analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokel, R A; Fredenburg, A M; Durbin, P W; Xu, J; Rayens, M K; Raymond, K N

    2000-04-01

    Bidentate hydroxypyridinone chelators effectively complex and facilitate excretion of trivalent iron. To test the hypothesis that hexadentate chelators are more effective than bidentate chelators at low concentrations, urinary and biliary Fe excretions were determined in Fe-loaded rats before and after administration of a bidentate chelator, Pr-(Me-3,2-HOPO), or its hexadentate analogue, TREN-(Me-3,2-HOPO). The bidentate chelator slightly increased biliary Fe excretion in Fe-loaded rats after IV (90 micromol/kg) and PO (90 or 270 micromol/kg) administration, but chelation efficiency did not exceed 1%. The hexadentate chelator markedly increased biliary Fe excretion, achieving overall chelation efficiencies of 14% after IV administration of 30 micromol/kg and 8 or 3% after PO (30 or 90 micromol/kg) administration. The hexadentate chelator was significantly more effective than the bidentate chelator after IV injection and oral dosing. In chelator-treated Fe-loaded or saline-injected rats, >90% of the excreted Fe was in the bile. Oral TREN-(Me-3,2-HOPO), given to non-Fe-loaded rats, did not appreciably change Fe output, indicating that there was little Fe depletion in the absence of Fe overload. These results support the hypothesis that greater Fe chelation efficiency can be achieved with hexadentate than with bidentate chelators at lower, and presumably safer, concentrations. The results also demonstrate that TREN-(Me-3, 2-HOPO) is a promising, orally effective, Fe chelator.

  16. Nitric oxide generation from heme/copper assembly mediated nitrite reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hematian, Shabnam; Siegler, Maxime A; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a cellular signaling molecule and vasodilator regulates a range of physiological and pathological processes. Nitrite (NO2 (-)) is recycled in vivo to generate nitric oxide, particularly in physiologic hypoxia and ischemia. The cytochrome c oxidase binuclear heme a 3/CuB active site is one entity known to be responsible for conversion of cellular nitrite to nitric oxide. We recently reported that a partially reduced heme/copper assembly reduces nitrite ion, producing nitric oxide; the heme serves as the reductant and the cupric ion provides a Lewis acid interaction with nitrite, facilitating nitrite (N-O) bond cleavage (Hematian et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134:18912-18915, 2012). To further investigate this nitrite reductase chemistry, copper(II)-nitrito complexes with tridentate and tetradentate ligands were used in this study, where either O,O'-bidentate or O-unidentate modes of nitrite binding to the cupric center are present. To study the role of the reducing ability of the ferrous heme center, two different tetraarylporphyrinate-iron(II) complexes, one with electron-donating para-methoxy peripheral substituents and the other with electron-withdrawing 2,6-difluorophenyl substituents, were used. The results show that differing modes of nitrite coordination to the copper(II) ion lead to differing kinetic behavior. Here, also, the ferrous heme is in all cases the source of the reducing equivalent required to convert nitrite to nitric oxide, but the reduction ability of the heme center does not play a key role in the observed overall reaction rate. On the basis of our observations, reaction mechanisms are proposed and discussed in terms of heme/copper heterobinuclear structures.

  17. Heme oxygenase, inflammation, and fibrosis: the good, the bad, and the ugly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditte M. S. Lundvig

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Upon injury, prolonged inflammation and oxidative stress may cause pathological wound healing and fibrosis, leading to formation of excessive scar tissue. Fibrogenesis can occur in most organs and tissues and may ultimately lead to organ dysfunction and failure. The underlying mechanisms of pathological wound healing still remains unclear, but are considered to have a multifactoral pathogenesis, and so far, no efficient anti-fibrotic therapies exists.Extra- and intracellular levels of free heme may be increased in a variety of pathological conditions due to heme-release from hemoproteins. Free heme possesses pro-inflammatory and oxidative effects, and may act as a danger signal, which counteracted by protein scavenging via various heme-binding proteins and by heme degradation. Heme is degraded by heme oxygenase (HO that exists as two isoforms: inducible HO-1 and constitutively expressed HO-2. This generates the effector molecules biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and free iron. HO deficiency in mouse and man leads to exaggerated inflammation upon insults, and still accumulating epidemiological and preclinical studies support the widely recognized notion of the cytoprotective, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory effects of the activity of the HO system and the generated effector molecules. In this review, we address the potential applications of targeted HO-1 induction or administration of its effector molecules as therapeutic targets in fibrotic and inflammatory conditions to counteract inflammatory and oxidative insults. This is shown in various clinically relevant conditions, such as hypertrophic scarring, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic pancreatitis, and chronic graft rejection in transplantation.

  18. Tracheobronchial cytologic changes and abnormal serum heme pigments in hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman-Mor, Z; Chalon, J; Turndorf, H; Orkin, L R

    1977-11-01

    Significantly elevated numbers of iron laden histiocytes have been shown to appear in the tracheobronchial secretions of subjects in hemorrhagic shock and in patients undergoing open heart-surgery during cardiopulmonary bypass (3,4). Abnormal heme pigments have also been demonstrated in the serum of dogs bled to hemorrhagic shock (6) and have been felt to be toxic. Because the ingestion of abnormal heme pigments by histiocytes may be part of a defense mechanism, we have attempted to correlate the percentage of iron laden histiocytes found in the tracheobronchial secretions of patients in hemorrhagic shock (Prussian blue method) with the presence of degradation of products of hemoglobin found in their serum by scanning spectrophotometry. There were, generally speaking, few iron laden histiocytes when hemoglobin degradation was advanced, and always numerous iron laden histiocytes when abnormal heme pigments were absent or spectrophotometric findings revealed minor degrees of degradation. Our findings probably reflect the process in the reticuloendothelial systems which eliminates toxic products accumulating in the circulation in low-flow states.

  19. Dioxygen Binding to Protonated Heme in the Gas Phase, an Intermediate Between Ferric and Ferrous Heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafizadeh, Niloufar; Soorkia, Satchin; Grégoire, Gilles; Broquier, Michel; Crestoni, Maria-Elisa; Soep, Benoît

    2017-09-27

    With a view to characterizing the influence of the electronic structure of the Fe atom on the nature of its bond with dioxygen (O2 ) in heme compounds, a study of the UV/Vis action spectra and binding energies of heme-O2 molecules has been undertaken in the gas phase. The binding reaction of protonated ferrous heme [Fe(II) -hemeH](+) with O2 has been studied in the gas phase by determining the equilibrium of complexed [Fe(II) -hemeH(O2 )](+) with uncomplexed protonated heme in an ion trap at controlled temperatures. The binding energy of O2 to the Fe atom of protonated ferrous heme was obtained from a van't Hoff plot. Surprisingly, this energy (1540±170 cm(-1) , 18.4±2 kJ mol(-1) ) is intermediate between those of ferric heme and ferrous heme. This result is interpreted in terms of a delocalization of the positive charge over the porphyrin cycle, such that the Fe atom bears a fractional positive charge. The resulting electron distribution on the Fe atom differs notably from that of a purely low-spin ferrous heme [Fe(II) -heme(O2 )] complex, as deduced from its absorption spectrum. It also differs from that of ferric heme [Fe(III) -heme(O2 )](+) , as evidenced by the absorption spectra. Protonated heme creates a specific bond that cannot accommodate strong σ donation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Obtaining the magnetic susceptibility of the heme complex from DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, L. M. O.; Resende, S. M.; Leite Alves, H. W.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic field interactions with particles, as observed in magnetophoresis, are becoming important tool to understand the nature of the iron role in heme molecular complex, besides other useful applications. Accurate estimations of some macroscopic magnetic properties from quantum mechanical calculations, such as the magnetic susceptibility, can also check the reliability of the heme microscopic models. In this work we report, by using the Stoner criterion, a simple way to obtain the magnetic susceptibility of the heme complex from Density Functional Theory calculations. Some of our calculated structural properties and electronic structure show good agreement with both the available experimental and theoretical data, and the results show that its groundstate is a triplet 3A state. From the obtained results, we have evaluated the exchange interaction energy, J = 0.98 eV, the associated magnetic energy gain, Δ EM =-0.68 eV, and the magnetic susceptibility, χ0=1.73 ×10-6 cm3/mol for the heme alone (with uncompleted Fe ligands). If we consider the heme complex with the two histidine residues (completing the Fe ligands), we have then obtained χ0=5.27 ×10-12 cm3/g, which is in good agreement with experimental magnetophoresis data.

  1. Heme degradation and human disease: diversity is the soul of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, Shigeki; Kitamuro, Tomomi; Takahashi, Kazuhiro

    2002-08-01

    We all depend on molecular oxygen and heme for our life, as evident from the pigments in blood and daily wastes. About 80% of serum bilirubin is derived from hemoglobin of senescent erythrocytes, which have finished their mission of 120 days and have been phagocytized by macrophages in the reticuloendothelial system. Here we present an overview of the heme degradation processes and relevant disorders by focusing on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a key enzyme in heme catabolism. HO-1 cleaves the porphyrin macrocycle of heme at the expense of molecular oxygen to release a linear tetrapyrrole biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and ferrous iron; biliverdin is rapidly reduced to bilirubin. Bilirubin is transported to the liver (hepatocytes), conjugated with glucuronic acid by bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and excreted into bile. Genetic diversity, a strategy in the host defense, is seen in the human ho-1 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase genes. Moreover, striking interspecies variations are noted in the regulation of HO-1 expression by hypoxia, heat shock, or interferon-gamma, each of which mainly represses HO-1 expression in human cells. Implications of such a variety are discussed in relevance to the pathogenesis of severe malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum, the most ancient foe of humans.

  2. Clinically important features of porphyrin and heme metabolism and the porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besur, Siddesh; Hou, Wehong; Schmeltzer, Paul; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2014-11-03

    Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias) and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), porphobilinogen and porphyrins) are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute porphyrias and chronic hepatic porphyrias. The acute porphyrias include acute intermittent, hereditary copro-, variegate and ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Chronic hepatic porphyrias include porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria. The erythropoietic porphyrias include congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gűnther's disease) and erythropoietic protoporphyria. In this review, we summarize the key features of normal heme synthesis and its differing regulation in liver versus bone marrow. In both organs, principal regulation is exerted at the level of the first and rate-controlling enzyme, but by different molecules (heme in the liver and iron in the bone marrow). We also describe salient clinical, laboratory and genetic features of the eight types of porphyria.

  3. Obtaining the magnetic susceptibility of the heme complex from DFT calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. O. Pereira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic field interactions with particles, as observed in magnetophoresis, are becoming important tool to understand the nature of the iron role in heme molecular complex, besides other useful applications. Accurate estimations of some macroscopic magnetic properties from quantum mechanical calculations, such as the magnetic susceptibility, can also check the reliability of the heme microscopic models. In this work we report, by using the Stoner criterion, a simple way to obtain the magnetic susceptibility of the heme complex from Density Functional Theory calculations. Some of our calculated structural properties and electronic structure show good agreement with both the available experimental and theoretical data, and the results show that its groundstate is a triplet 3A state. From the obtained results, we have evaluated the exchange interaction energy, J = 0.98 eV, the associated magnetic energy gain, ΔEM=−0.68 eV, and the magnetic susceptibility, χ0=1.73×10−6 cm3/mol for the heme alone (with uncompleted Fe ligands. If we consider the heme complex with the two histidine residues (completing the Fe ligands, we have then obtained χ0=5.27×10−12 cm3/g, which is in good agreement with experimental magnetophoresis data.

  4. Clinically Important Features of Porphyrin and Heme Metabolism and the Porphyrias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besur, Siddesh; Hou, Weihong; Schmeltzer, Paul; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2014-01-01

    Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias) and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), porphobilinogen and porphyrins) are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute porphyrias and chronic hepatic porphyrias. The acute porphyrias include acute intermittent, hereditary copro-, variegate and ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Chronic hepatic porphyrias include porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria. The erythropoietic porphyrias include congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gűnther’s disease) and erythropoietic protoporphyria. In this review, we summarize the key features of normal heme synthesis and its differing regulation in liver versus bone marrow. In both organs, principal regulation is exerted at the level of the first and rate-controlling enzyme, but by different molecules (heme in the liver and iron in the bone marrow). We also describe salient clinical, laboratory and genetic features of the eight types of porphyria. PMID:25372274

  5. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 inhibits the monocyte transmigration induced by mildly oxidized LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, K; Navab, M; Leitinger, N; Fogelman, A M; Lusis, A J

    1997-09-01

    Heme catabolic processes produce the antioxidants biliverdin and bilirubin, as well as the potent prooxidant free iron. Since these products have opposing effects on oxidative stress, it is not clear whether heme catabolism promotes or inhibits inflammatory processes, including atherosclerotic lesion formation. Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of heme catabolism. We used cocultures of human aortic endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells to examine the possible role of HO in early atherosclerosis. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the inducible isoform of HO, was highly induced by mildly oxidized LDL, and augmented induction was observed with hemin pretreatment. This augmented HO-1 induction resulted in the reduction of monocyte chemotaxis in response to LDL oxidation. Conversely, inhibition of HO by a specific inhibitor, Sn-protoporphyrin IX, enhanced chemotaxis. Furthermore, pretreatment with biliverdin or bilirubin, the products of HO, reduced chemotaxis. Oxidized phospholipids in the mildly oxidized LDL appear to be responsible for HO-1 induction, since oxidized but not native arachidonic acid-containing phospholipids also induced HO-1. These results suggest that HO-1 induced by mildly oxidized LDL may protect against the induction of inflammatory responses in artery wall cells through the production of the antioxidants biliverdin and bilirubin.

  6. Clinically Important Features of Porphyrin and Heme Metabolism and the Porphyrias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddesh Besur

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA, porphobilinogen and porphyrins are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute porphyrias and chronic hepatic porphyrias. The acute porphyrias include acute intermittent, hereditary copro-, variegate and ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Chronic hepatic porphyrias include porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria. The erythropoietic porphyrias include congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gűnther’s disease and erythropoietic protoporphyria. In this review, we summarize the key features of normal heme synthesis and its differing regulation in liver versus bone marrow. In both organs, principal regulation is exerted at the level of the first and rate-controlling enzyme, but by different molecules (heme in the liver and iron in the bone marrow. We also describe salient clinical, laboratory and genetic features of the eight types of porphyria.

  7. Poisoning in animals due to oral application of iron. With description of a case in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnbjerg, J

    1981-02-01

    Peroral application of iron salts in various types of anemia was previously considered atoxic. The increased use of iron has, however, led to an increasing number of poisoning in children, taking iron tablets for candy. There have only been reported a few number of spontaneous intoxications in animals, but experimentally it has been possible to produce fatal intoxications in various kinds of animal species. The clinical findings are quite similar in the various animals, starting with vomiting, bloody diarrhoea and metabolic acidosis. If the intoxication is severe, shock and coma may develop, and death occurs quite soon. The histological findings are also similar in the various animals, varying from erosions of the tops of the villi to necrosis of the mucosal membrane of the jejunum. Degenerative changes in the liver as well as in the kidney are seen in several cases. The mentioned case was a horse given about 475 g ferro fumarate over a period of 5 days. The horse developed the classic clinical picture and death occurred on day 7. The diagnosis was confirmed by very high levels of iron in the liver, kidney and serum. The blood values of the enzymes ASAT and gamma GT were extremely high as a sign of a severe damage of the liver.

  8. Differential effects of heme oxygenase isoforms on heme mediation of endothelial intracellular adhesion molecule 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, F A; da Silva, J L; Farley, T; de Witte, T; Kappas, A; Abraham, N G

    1999-10-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), by catabolizing heme to bile pigments, down-regulates cellular hemoprotein, hemoglobin, and heme; the latter generates pro-oxidant products, including free radicals. Two HO isozymes, the products of distinct genes, have been described; HO-1 is the inducible isoform, whereas HO-2 is suggested to be constitutively expressed. We studied the inducing effect of several metal compounds (CoCl(2), stannic mesoporphyrin, and heme) on HO activity. Additionally, we studied HO-1 expression in experimental models of adhesion molecule expression produced by heme in endothelial cells, and the relationship of HO-1 expression to the induced adhesion molecules. Flow cytometry analysis showed that heme induces intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression in a concentration (10-100 microM)- and time (1-24 h)-dependent fashion in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Pretreatment with stannic mesoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO activity, caused a 2-fold increase in heme-induced ICAM-1 expression. In contrast, HO induction by CoCl(2) decreased heme-induced ICAM-1 expression by 33%. To examine the contribution of HO-1 and HO-2 to endothelial HO activity, specific antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) of each isoform were tested for their specificity to inhibit HO activity in cells exposed to heme. Endothelial cells exposed to heme elicited increased HO activity, which was prevented (70%) by HO-1 antisense ODNs. HO-2 antisense ODN inhibited heme-induced HO activity by 21%. Addition of HO-1 antisense ODNs prevented heme degradation and resulted in elevation of microsomal heme. Western blot analysis showed that HO-1 antisense ODNs selectively inhibited HO-1 protein and failed to inhibit HO-2 protein. Incubation of endothelial cells with HO-1 antisense enhanced heme-dependent increase of ICAM-1. In contrast, addition of HO-2 antisense to endothelial cells failed to increase adhesion molecules. The role of glutathione, an important antioxidant, was examined on heme

  9. Effects of urea and acetic acid on the heme axial ligation structure of ferric myoglobin at very acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droghetti, Enrica; Sumithran, Suganya; Sono, Masanori; Antalík, Marián; Fedurco, Milan; Dawson, John H; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2009-09-01

    The heme iron coordination of ferric myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of 9.0M urea and 8.0M acetic acid at acidic pH values has been probed by electronic absorption, magnetic circular dichroism and resonance Raman spectroscopic techniques. Unlike Mb at pH 2.0, where heme is not released from the protein despite the acid denaturation and the loss of the axial ligand, upon increasing the concentration of either urea or acetic acid, a spin state change is observed, and a novel, non-native six-coordinated high-spin species prevails, where heme is released from the protein.

  10. Treatment of mild non-chemotherapy-induced iron deficiency anemia in cancer patients: comparison between oral ferrous bisglycinate chelate and ferrous sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Paola; Nicolini, Andrea; Manca, Maria Laura; Rossi, Giuseppe; Anselmi, Loretta; Conte, Massimo; Carpi, Angelo; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2012-09-01

    In cancer patients mild-moderate non-chemotherapy-induced iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is usually treated with oral iron salts, mostly ferrous sulfate. In this study, we compare efficacy and toxicity of oral ferrous bisglycinate chelate and ferrous sulfate in cancer patients with mild IDA. Twenty-four patients operated on for solid tumors (10 breast, 12 colorectal, 2 gastric), aged 61±10 years (range 45-75), with non-chemotherapy-induced hemoglobin (Hb) values between 10 and 12 g/dL and ferritin lower than 30 ng/mL were randomized to receive oral ferrous bisglycinate chelate, 28 mg per day for 20 days, and then 14 mg per day for 40 days (12 patients) (A group) or oral ferrous sulphate, 105 mg per day for 60 days (12 patients) (B group). Values of hemoglobin and ferritin obtained at diagnosis, 1 and 2 months from the beginning of treatment were compared. Adverse events (AEs) related to the two treatments were recorded. In the 12 patients treated with ferrous bisglycinate chelate, basal hemoglobin and ferritin values (mean±SD) were 11.6±0.8 g/dL and 16.1±8.0 ng/mL. After 2 months of treatment, they were 13.0±1.4 g/dL and 33.8±22.0 ng/mL, respectively (P=0.0003 and P=0.020). In the group treated with ferrous sulphate, hemoglobin and ferritin mean values were 11.3±0.6 g/dL and 19.0±6.4 ng/mL basally, and 12.7±0.70 g/dL and 40.8±28.1 ng/mL (Pferrous bisglycinate chelate and four (33%) with ferrous sulphate, toxicity was grade 1. In conclusion, these data suggest that ferrous bisglycinate chelate has similar efficacy and likely lower GI toxicity than ferrous sulphate given at the conventional dose of 105 mg per day for the same time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Horse heart ferricytochrome c: conformation and heme configuration of high ionic strength acidic forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Y P; Saturno, A F

    1991-10-01

    The absorption, circular dichroism, and resonance Raman spectra of horse heart ferricytochrome c in the presence of 0.2 M KCl, 0.1 M NaClO4, and 0.2 M KNO3, in the pH region 7 to 0.5, have been investigated to determine the nature and the course of the processes involved. As in the absence of salts (Myer, Y., and Saturno, A. F. (1990) J. Protein Chem, 9, 379-387), the change from neutral to low acidic pH's in the presence of salts is a three-step process: state IIIs----state IIIS,a----state IIS----state IS, with pKa's of 3.5 +/- 0.2, 2.2 +/- 0.2, and 1.1 +/- 0.2, and with two, one, and one number of protons, respectively. The addition of salts at neutral pH's has little or no effect on the protein conformation and the heme-iron configuration (i.e., they remain the same, low-spin hexacoordinated heme iron with a Met-80-Fe-His-18 axial coordination), but such addition does cause a slight tightening of the heme crevice and the enlargement of the porphyrin core. State IIIS,a is a folded state with about the same degree of folding and with a similar spin state and coordination configuration of iron, but the heme crevice is loosened and the porphyrin core is smaller. Both states IIS and IS are also essentially folded forms, but with a smaller degree of protein secondary structure. State IIS has a high-spin hexacoordinated heme iron with a water molecular and a protonated and/or hydrogen-bonded imidazole of his-18 as the two axial ligates; and state IS has a high-spin pentacoordinated heme iron, which is about 0.49 A out of the porphyrin plane, with a protonated and/or hydrogen-bonded imidazole nitrogen as the only axial ligate. The addition of anions causes the stabilization of the protein secondary structures and the state IIIa----state II transition. The mode of effectiveness of anions appears to be nonspecific (i.e., because of electrostatic shielding and/or disruption of salt bridges).

  12. The PAS Domain-Containing Protein HeuR Regulates Heme Uptake in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremiah G; Gaddy, Jennifer A; DiRita, Victor J

    2016-11-15

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterially derived gastroenteritis. A previous mutant screen demonstrated that the heme uptake system (Chu) is required for full colonization of the chicken gastrointestinal tract. Subsequent work identified a PAS domain-containing regulator, termed HeuR, as being required for chicken colonization. Here we confirm that both the heme uptake system and HeuR are required for full chicken gastrointestinal tract colonization, with the heuR mutant being particularly affected during competition with wild-type C. jejuni Transcriptomic analysis identified the chu genes-and those encoding other iron uptake systems-as regulatory targets of HeuR. Purified HeuR bound the chuZA promoter region in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Consistent with a role for HeuR in chu expression, heuR mutants were unable to efficiently use heme as a source of iron under iron-limiting conditions, and mutants exhibited decreased levels of cell-associated iron by mass spectrometry. Finally, we demonstrate that an heuR mutant of C. jejuni is resistant to hydrogen peroxide and that this resistance correlates to elevated levels of catalase activity. These results indicate that HeuR directly and positively regulates iron acquisition from heme and negatively impacts catalase activity by an as yet unidentified mechanism in C. jejuni IMPORTANCE: Annually, Campylobacter jejuni causes millions of gastrointestinal infections in the United States, due primarily to its ability to reside within the gastrointestinal tracts of poultry, where it can be released during processing and contaminate meat. In the developing world, humans are often infected by consuming contaminated water or by direct contact with livestock. Following consumption of contaminated food or water, humans develop disease that is characterized by mild to severe diarrhea. There is a need to understand both colonization of chickens, to make food safer, and colonization of humans, to better

  13. Dietary heme alters microbiota and mucosa of mouse colon without functional changes in host-microbe cross-talk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssenagger, N.; Derrien, M.; Doorn, van G.M.; Rijnierse, A.; Bogert, van den B.; Muller, M.R.; Dekker, J.; Kleerebezem, M.; Meer, van der R.

    2012-01-01

    Colon cancer is a major cause of cancer deaths in Western countries and is associated with diets high in red meat. Heme, the iron-porphyrin pigment of red meat, induces cytotoxicity of gut contents which injures surface cells leading to compensatory hyperproliferation of crypt cells. This hyperproli

  14. Dietary heme alters microbiota and mucosa of mouse colon without functional changes in host-microbe cross-talk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssenagger, N.; Derrien, M.; Doorn, van G.M.; Rijnierse, A.; Bogert, van den B.; Muller, M.R.; Dekker, J.; Kleerebezem, M.; Meer, van der R.

    2012-01-01

    Colon cancer is a major cause of cancer deaths in Western countries and is associated with diets high in red meat. Heme, the iron-porphyrin pigment of red meat, induces cytotoxicity of gut contents which injures surface cells leading to compensatory hyperproliferation of crypt cells. This hyperproli

  15. 1,2,3-Triazole-heme interactions in cytochrome P450: functionally competent triazole-water-heme complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Kip P; Vennam, Preethi; Woods, Caleb M; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Bowman, Michael K; Atkins, William M

    2012-08-14

    In comparison to imidazole (IMZ) and 1,2,4-triazole (1,2,4-TRZ), the isosteric 1,2,3-triazole (1,2,3-TRZ) is unrepresented among cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibitors. This is surprising because 1,2,3-TRZs are easily obtained via "click" chemistry. To understand this underrepresentation of 1,2,3-TRZs among CYP inhibitors, thermodynamic and density functional theory computational studies were performed with unsubstituted IMZ, 1,2,4-TRZ, and 1,2,3-TRZ. The results indicate that the lower affinity of 1,2,3-TRZ for the heme iron includes a large unfavorable entropy term likely originating in solvent-1,2,3-TRZ interactions; the difference is not solely due to differences in the enthalpy of heme-ligand interactions. In addition, the 1,2,3-TRZ fragment was incorporated into a well-established CYP3A4 substrate and mechanism-based inactivator, 17-α-ethynylestradiol (17EE), via click chemistry. This derivative, 17-click, yielded optical spectra consistent with low-spin ferric heme iron (type II) in contrast to 17EE, which yields a high-spin complex (type I). Furthermore, the rate of CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of 17-click was comparable to that of 17EE, with a different regioselectivity. Surprisingly, continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and HYSCORE EPR spectroscopy indicate that 17-click does not displace water from the sixth axial ligand position of CYP3A4 as expected for a type II ligand. We propose a binding model in which 17-click pendant 1,2,3-TRZ hydrogen bonds with the sixth axial water ligand. The results demonstrate the potential for 1,2,3-TRZ to form metabolically labile water-bridged low-spin heme complexes, consistent with recent evidence that nitrogenous type II ligands of CYPs can be efficiently metabolized. The specific case of [CYP3A4·17-click] highlights the risk of interpreting CYP-ligand complex structure on the basis of optical spectra.

  16. Fatal anaphylactic reaction to iron sucrose in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy can have serious deleterious effects for both mother and fetus. Parenteral iron therapy in iron-deficiency anemia is recommended in patients where oral iron therapy is ineffective due to malabsorption states and non-compliance. Compared to oral iron therapy, intravenous iron results in much more rapid resolution of iron-deficiency anemia with minimal adverse reactions. Iron sucrose has a favorable safety profile and is an alternative to other forms of parenteral iron therapy in correction of iron stores depletion. Immune mechanisms and iron agent releasing bioactive, partially unbound iron into the circulation, resulting in oxidative stress appears to cause severe adverse reactions. Although iron sucrose has a favorable safety profile in comparison to other parenteral iron preparations, this report highlights a fatal anaphylactic shock to iron sucrose in a pregnant woman with severe iron deficiency non-compliant to oral iron therapy.

  17. Identification of the receptor scavenging hemopexin-heme complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Jacobsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    and is suggested to facilitate cellular heme metabolism. Using a ligand-affinity approach, we purified the human hemopexin-heme receptor and identified it as the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)/CD91, a receptor expressed in several cell types including macrophages, hepatocytes, neurons......-heme complex established the ability of LRP/CD91 to mediate hemopexin-heme internalization resulting in cellular heme uptake and lysosomal hemopexin degradation. Uptake of hemopexin-heme complex induced LRP/CD91-dependent heme-oxygenase 1 mRNA transcription in cultured monocytes. In conclusion, hemopexin...

  18. Free heme and sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunova, Veselina V.

    This work investigates further the mechanism of one of the most interesting of the protein self-assembly systems---the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and the role of free heme in it. Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin is the primary event in the pathology of a chronic hemolytic condition called sickle cell anemia with complex pathogenesis, unexplained variability and symptomatic treatment. Auto-oxidation develops in hemoglobin solutions exposed to room temperature and causes release of ferriheme. The composition of such solutions is investigated by mass spectrometry. Heme dimers whose amount corresponds to the initial amounts of heme released from the protein are followed. Differences in the dimer peak height are established for hemoglobin variants A, S and C and depending on the exposure duration. The effects of free heme on polymerization kinetics are studied. Growth rates and two characteristic parameters of nucleation are measured for stored Hb S. After dialysis of polymerizing solutions, no spherulites are detected at moderately high supersaturation and prolonged exposure times. The addition of 0.16-0.26 mM amounts of heme to dialyzed solutions leads to restoration of polymerization. The measured kinetic parameters have higher values compared to the ones before dialysis. The amount of heme in non-dialyzed aged solution is characterized using spectrophotometry. Three methods are used: difference in absorbance of dialyzed and non-dialyzed solutions, characteristic absorbance of heme-albumin complex and absorbance of non-dialyzed solutions with added potassium cyanide. The various approaches suggest the presence of 0.12 to 0.18 mM of free ferriheme in such solutions. Open questions are whether the same amounts of free heme are present in vivo and whether the same mechanism operates intracellulary. If the answer to those questions is positive, then removal of free heme from erythrocytes can influence their readiness to sickle.

  19. Heme environment in HmuY, the heme-binding protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtowicz, Halina [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland); Wojaczynski, Jacek [Department of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Olczak, Mariusz [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland); Kroliczewski, Jaroslaw [Laboratory of Biophysics, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, 50-148 Wroclaw (Poland); Latos-Grazynski, Lechoslaw [Department of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Olczak, Teresa, E-mail: Teresa.Olczak@biotech.uni.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2009-05-29

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium implicated in the development and progression of chronic periodontitis, acquires heme for growth by a novel mechanism composed of HmuY and HmuR proteins. The aim of this study was to characterize the nature of heme binding to HmuY. The protein was expressed, purified and detailed investigations using UV-vis absorption, CD, MCD, and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy were carried out. Ferric heme bound to HmuY may be reduced by sodium dithionite and re-oxidized by potassium ferricyanide. Heme complexed to HmuY, with a midpoint potential of 136 mV, is in a low-spin Fe(III) hexa-coordinate environment. Analysis of heme binding to several single and double HmuY mutants with the methionine, histidine, cysteine, or tyrosine residues replaced by an alanine residue identified histidines 134 and 166 as potential heme ligands.

  20. The NEAT Domain-Containing Proteins of Clostridium perfringens Bind Heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jocelyn M; Cheung, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Steer, David L; Bulach, Dieter M; Hiscox, Thomas J; Chakravorty, Anjana; Smith, A Ian; Gell, David A; Rood, Julian I; Awad, Milena M

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to scavenge iron from its host is important for its growth and survival during an infection. Our studies on C. perfringens gas gangrene strain JIR325, a derivative of strain 13, showed that it is capable of utilizing both human hemoglobin and ferric chloride, but not human holo-transferrin, as an iron source for in vitro growth. Analysis of the C. perfringens strain 13 genome sequence identified a putative heme acquisition system encoded by an iron-regulated surface gene region that we have named the Cht (Clostridium perfringens heme transport) locus. This locus comprises eight genes that are co-transcribed and includes genes that encode NEAT domain-containing proteins (ChtD and ChtE) and a putative sortase (Srt). The ChtD, ChtE and Srt proteins were shown to be expressed in JIR325 cells grown under iron-limited conditions and were localized to the cell envelope. Moreover, the NEAT proteins, ChtD and ChtE, were found to bind heme. Both chtDE and srt mutants were constructed, but these mutants were not defective in hemoglobin or ferric chloride utilization. They were, however, attenuated for virulence when tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, although the virulence phenotype could not be restored via complementation and, as is common with such systems, secondary mutations were identified in these strains. In summary, this study provides evidence for the functional redundancies that occur in the heme transport pathways of this life threatening pathogen.

  1. Managing iron supply during the infection cycle of a flea borne pathogen, Bartonella henselae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis eBiville

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bartonella are hemotropic bacteria responsible for emerging zoonoses. Most Bartonella species appear to share a natural cycle that involves an arthropod transmission, followed by exploitation of a mammalian host in which they cause long-lasting intra-erythrocytic bacteremia. Persistence in erythrocytes is considered an adaptation to transmission by bloodsucking arthropod vectors and a strategy to obtain heme required for Bartonella growth. Bartonella genomes do not encode for siderophore biosynthesis or a complete iron Fe3+ transport system. Only genes, sharing strong homology with all compounds of a Fe2+ transport system, are present in Bartonella genomes. Also, Bartonella genomes encode for a complete heme transport system. Bartonella must face various environments in their hosts and vectors. In mammals, free heme and iron are rare and oxygen concentration is low. In arthropod vectors, toxic heme level is found in the gut where oxygen concentration is high. Bartonella genomes encode for three to five heme binding proteins. In Bartonella henselae heme binding proteins were shown to be involved in heme uptake process, oxidative stress response and survival inside endothelial cells and in the flea. In this report, we discuss the use of the heme uptake and storage system of B. henselae during its infection cycle. Also, we establish a comparison with the use of the iron and heme uptake systems by Yersinia pestis during its infection cycle.

  2. 口服铁剂改善妊娠缺铁性贫血效果及铁储备状态的研究%Study on the improving effect of oral iron on pregnant women with iron - deficiency anemia and iron storage status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘奕; 吴千苗; 谢爱兰

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the improving effect of oral iron on pregnant women with iron -deficiency anemia (IDA) and I-ron storage status. Methods: 144 pregnant women with IDA (anemia group, treated with oral administration of polysaccharide - iron complex capsules, 150 mg per time, twice a day), 100 normal pregnant women (prevention group, treated with oral administration of polysaccharide -iron complex capsules, 150 mg per time, once a day) and 50 normal pregnant women (control group, treated with dietary supplementa-tion) were selected. The levels of hemoglobin, red blood cell count, serum ferritin and serum iron were measured. Results; The levels of hemoglobin and red blood cells decreased at early to middle period (P <0. 05), then increased at middle to late period in anemia group and prevention group (P <0.05) . In control group, the levels of hemoglobin and red blood cells showed a gradual - decreasing trend at different gestational weeks (P < 0. 05) . The level of serum ferritin decreased gradually in the whole gestational age in the three groups (P < 0. 01) . The decrease of serum iron at early to middle period was obvious in the three groups (P < 0. 01) . Conclusion; Simple dietary supplementation cant satisfy the iron requirement during pregnancy. Iron storage during pregnancy is in a continuous consumption state, more attention should be paid to iron supplementation during the first and second trimester of pregnancy.%目的:探讨口服铁剂改善孕期贫血及铁储备状态的作用.方法:选择144例妊娠贫血孕妇(贫血组,口服多糖铁复合物胶囊150 mg/次,2次/天)、100例正常孕妇(预防组,口服多糖铁复合物胶囊150 mg/次,1次/天)和50例正常孕妇(对照组,膳食补铁),测定血红蛋白(Hb)、红细胞计数( RBC)、血清铁蛋白(SF)、血清铁(SI).结果:贫血组和预防组Hb和RBC呈现早-中期下降(P<0.05)、中-晚期上升(P<0.05)的变化,对照组各孕周Hb、RBC呈逐渐下降趋势(P<0.05).

  3. Selenolate complexes of CYP101 and the heme-bound hHO-1/H25A proximal cavity mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongying; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2008-05-05

    Thiolate and selenolate complexes of CYP101 (P450cam) and the H25A proximal cavity mutant of heme-bound human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) have been examined by UV-vis spectroscopy. Both thiolate and selenolate ligands bound to the heme distal side in CYP101 and gave rise to characteristic hyperporphyrin spectra. Thiolate ligands also bound to the proximal side of the heme in the cavity created by the H25A mutation in hHO-1, giving a Soret absorption similar to that of the H25C hHO-1 mutant. Selenolate ligands also bound to this cavity mutant under anaerobic conditions but reduced the heme iron to the ferrous state, as shown by the formation of a ferrous CO complex. Under aerobic conditions, the selenolate ligand but not the thiolate ligand was rapidly oxidized. These results indicate that selenocysteine-coordinated heme proteins will not be stable species in the absence of a redox potential stabilizing effect.

  4. The Staphylococcus aureus Protein IsdH Inhibits Host Hemoglobin Scavenging to Promote Heme Acquisition by the Pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sæderup, Kirstine Lindhardt; Stødkilde, Kristian; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Dickson, Claire F; Etzerodt, Anders; Hansen, Søren Werner Karlskov; Fago, Angela; Gell, David; Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2016-11-11

    Hemolysis is a complication in septic infections with Staphylococcus aureus, which utilizes the released Hb as an iron source. S. aureus can acquire heme in vitro from hemoglobin (Hb) by a heme-sequestering mechanism that involves proteins from the S. aureus iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system. However, the host has its own mechanism to recapture the free Hb via haptoglobin (Hp) binding and uptake of Hb-Hp by the CD163 receptor in macrophages. It has so far remained unclear how the Isd system competes with this host iron recycling system in situ to obtain the important nutrient. By binding and uptake studies, we now show that the IsdH protein, which serves as an Hb receptor in the Isd system, directly interferes with the CD163-mediated clearance by binding the Hb-Hp complex and inhibiting CD163 recognition. Analysis of truncated IsdH variants including one or more of three near iron transporter domains, IsdH(N1), IsdH(N2), and IsdH(N3), revealed that Hb binding of IsdH(N1) and IsdH(N2) accounted for the high affinity for Hb-Hp complexes. The third near iron transporter domain, IsdH(N3), exhibited redox-dependent heme extraction, when Hb in the Hb-Hp complex was in the oxidized met form but not in the reduced oxy form. IsdB, the other S. aureus Hb receptor, failed to extract heme from Hb-Hp, and it was a poor competitor for Hb-Hp binding to CD163. This indicates that Hb recognition by IsdH, but not by IsdB, sterically inhibits the receptor recognition of Hb-Hp. This function of IsdH may have an overall stimulatory effect on S. aureus heme acquisition and growth. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Shigella Iron Acquisition Systems and their Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yahan; Murphy, Erin R

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Shigella within the host is strictly dependent on the ability of the pathogen to acquire essential nutrients, such as iron. As an innate immune defense against invading pathogens, the level of bio-available iron within the human host is maintained at exceeding low levels, by sequestration of the element within heme and other host iron-binding compounds. In response to sequestration mediated iron limitation, Shigella produce multiple iron-uptake systems that each function to facilitate the utilization of a specific host-associated source of nutrient iron. As a mechanism to balance the essential need for iron and the toxicity of the element when in excess, the production of bacterial iron acquisition systems is tightly regulated by a variety of molecular mechanisms. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the iron-uptake systems produced by Shigella species, their distribution within the genus, and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their production.

  6. Heme oxygenase reveals its strategy for catalyzing three successive oxygenation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Toshitaka; Unno, Masaki; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2010-02-16

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is an enzyme that catalyzes the regiospecific conversion of heme to biliverdin IXalpha, CO, and free iron. In mammals, HO has a variety of physiological functions, including heme catabolism, iron homeostasis, antioxidant defense, cellular signaling, and O(2) sensing. The enzyme is also found in plants (producing light-harvesting pigments) and in some pathogenic bacteria, where it acquires iron from the host heme. The HO-catalyzed heme conversion proceeds through three successive oxygenations, a process that has attracted considerable attention because of its reaction mechanism and physiological importance. The HO reaction is unique in that all three O(2) activations are affected by the substrate itself. The first step is the regiospecific self-hydroxylation of the porphyrin alpha-meso carbon atom. The resulting alpha-meso-hydroxyheme reacts in the second step with another O(2) to yield verdoheme and CO. The third O(2) activation, by verdoheme, cleaves its porphyrin macrocycle to release biliverdin and free ferrous iron. In this Account, we provide an overview of our current understanding of the structural and biochemical properties of the complex self-oxidation reactions in HO catalysis. The first meso-hydroxylation is of particular interest because of its distinct contrast with O(2) activation by cytochrome P450. Although most heme enzymes oxidize exogenous substrates by high-valent oxo intermediates, HO was proposed to utilize the Fe-OOH intermediate for the self-hydroxylation. We have succeeded in preparing and characterizing the Fe-OOH species of HO at low temperature, and an analysis of its reaction, together with mutational and crystallographic studies, reveals that protonation of Fe-OOH by a distal water molecule is critical in promoting the unique self-hydroxylation. The second oxygenation is a rapid, spontaneous auto-oxidation of the reactive alpha-meso-hydroxyheme; its mechanism remains elusive, but the HO enzyme has been shown not to

  7. An autocatalytic radical chain pathway in formation of an iron(IV)-oxo complex by oxidation of an iron(II) complex with dioxygen and isopropanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuma; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-03-28

    Evidence of an autocatalytic radical chain pathway has been reported in formation of a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex by oxidation of an iron(II) complex with dioxygen and isopropanol in acetonitrile at 298 K. The radical chain reaction is initiated by hydrogen abstraction from isopropanol by the iron(IV)-oxo complex.

  8. Modulation of Antiviral Immunity by Heme Oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Janyra A; González, Pablo A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible, anti-inflammatory, and cytoprotective enzyme expressed in most cell types in the organism. Under several stress stimuli, HO-1 expression and activity is up-regulated to catalyze the rate-limiting enzymatic step of heme degradation into carbon monoxide, free iron, and biliverdin. Besides its effects on cell metabolism, HO-1 is also capable of modulating host innate and adaptive immune responses in response to sepsis, transplantation, and autoimmunity, and preventing oxidative damage associated with inflammation. In addition, recent studies have reported that HO-1 can exert a significant antiviral activity against a wide variety of viruses, including HIV, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, enterovirus 71, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, dengue virus, and Ebola virus, among others. Herein, we address the current understanding of the functional significance of HO-1 against a variety of viruses and its potential as a therapeutic strategy to prevent and control viral infections. Furthermore, we review the most important features of the immunoregulatory functions for this enzyme.

  9. Study on the Gas Phase Stability of Heme-binding Pocket in Cytochrome Tb5 and Its Mutants by Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU,Chong-Tian(余翀天); GUO,Yin-Long(郭寅龙); L(U),Long(吕龙); WANG,Yun-Hua(王韵华); YAO,Ping(姚萍); HUANG,Zhong-Xian(黄仲贤)

    2002-01-01

    To ehucidate the effect of various amino acid residues on the heme-binding pocket in cytochrome Tbs, several residues were chosen for replacement by means of site-directed mutagenesis.Comparison of the mass spectrmn between the F35Y mutant and the wild type shows that the relative abundance of holoprotein ion of F35Y is lower than that of the wild type in gas phase. It is concluded that mutation from Phe35 residue to tyrosine decreases the hydrophobic character of cytochrome Tbs heme pocket, which decreases the stability of heme-binding pocket. ESI-MS spectra of the mutants V61E, V61K, V61H and V61Y show various contribution of amino acid to the stability of heme-binding pocket. The small and non-polar residue Vat61 was replaced with large or polar residues, resulting in enhancing the trend of heme leaving from the pocket. In addition, comparison of the mass relative abundance of bolo-proteins among all the Va161-mutants, shows that their stability in gas phase appropriately submit the following order: wild type > V61H > V61E > V61K ≈ V61Y. The extra great stability of quadruple sites mutant E44/48/56A/D60A shows that reduction of electrostatic or hydrogen bond interactions among the residues locating in the outside region of the heme edge remarkably affect the stability of heme. The results of analyzing the oxidation states of heme iron in Tbs and its mutants by insource-CAD experiment suggest that the charge states of heme iron maintain inflexible in mutation process.

  10. Duodenal Cytochrome b (DCYTB in Iron Metabolism: An Update on Function and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius J. R. Lane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron and ascorbate are vital cellular constituents in mammalian systems. The bulk-requirement for iron is during erythropoiesis leading to the generation of hemoglobin-containing erythrocytes. Additionally; both iron and ascorbate are required as co-factors in numerous metabolic reactions. Iron homeostasis is controlled at the level of uptake; rather than excretion. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that in addition to the known ability of dietary ascorbate to enhance non-heme iron absorption in the gut; ascorbate regulates iron homeostasis. The involvement of ascorbate in dietary iron absorption extends beyond the direct chemical reduction of non-heme iron by dietary ascorbate. Among other activities; intra-enterocyte ascorbate appears to be involved in the provision of electrons to a family of trans-membrane redox enzymes; namely those of the cytochrome b561 class. These hemoproteins oxidize a pool of ascorbate on one side of the membrane in order to reduce an electron acceptor (e.g., non-heme iron on the opposite side of the membrane. One member of this family; duodenal cytochrome b (DCYTB; may play an important role in ascorbate-dependent reduction of non-heme iron in the gut prior to uptake by ferrous-iron transporters. This review discusses the emerging relationship between cellular iron homeostasis; the emergent “IRP1-HIF2α axis”; DCYTB and ascorbate in relation to iron metabolism.

  11. Subpicosecond oxygen trapping in the heme pocket of the oxygen sensor FixL observed by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglik, Sergei G; Jasaitis, Audrius; Hola, Klara; Yamashita, Taku; Liebl, Ursula; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H

    2007-05-01

    Dissociation of oxygen from the heme domain of the bacterial oxygen sensor protein FixL constitutes the first step in hypoxia-induced signaling. In the present study, the photodissociation of the heme-O2 bond was used to synchronize this event, and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution was implemented to characterize the heme configuration of the primary photoproduct. TR(3) measurements on heme-oxycomplexes are highly challenging and have not yet been reported. Whereas in all other known six-coordinated heme protein complexes with diatomic ligands, including the oxymyoglobin reported here, heme iron out-of-plane motion (doming) occurs faster than 1 ps after iron-ligand bond breaking; surprisingly, no sizeable doming is observed in the oxycomplex of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum FixL sensor domain (FixLH). This assessment is deduced from the absence of the iron-histidine band around 217 cm(-1) as early as 0.5 ps. We suggest that efficient ultrafast oxygen rebinding to the heme occurs on the femtosecond time scale, thus hindering heme doming. Comparing WT oxy-FixLH, mutant proteins FixLH-R220H and FixLH-R220Q, the respective carbonmonoxy-complexes, and oxymyoglobin, we show that a hydrogen bond of the terminal oxygen atom with the residue in position 220 is responsible for the observed behavior; in WT FixL this residue is arginine, crucially implicated in signal transmission. We propose that the rigid O2 configuration imposed by this residue, in combination with the hydrophobic and constrained properties of the distal cavity, keep dissociated oxygen in place. These results uncover the origin of the "oxygen cage" properties of this oxygen sensor protein.

  12. Structural mechanisms of nonplanar hemes in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective is to assess the occurrence of nonplanar distortions of hemes and other tetrapyrroles in proteins and to determine the biological function of these distortions. Recently, these distortions were found by us to be conserved among proteins belonging to a functional class. Conservation of the conformation of the heme indicates a possible functional role. Researchers have suggested possible mechanisms by which heme distortions might influence biological properties; however, no heme distortion has yet been shown conclusively to participate in a structural mechanism of hemoprotein function. The specific aims of the proposed work are: (1) to characterize and quantify the distortions of the hemes in all of the more than 300 hemoprotein X-ray crystal structures in terms of displacements along the lowest-frequency normal coordinates, (2) to determine the structural features of the protein component that generate and control these nonplanar distortions by using spectroscopic studies and molecular-mechanics calculations for the native proteins, their mutants and heme-peptide fragments, and model porphyrins, (3) to determine spectroscopic markers for the various types of distortion, and, finally, (4) to discover the functional significance of the nonplanar distortions by correlating function with porphyrin conformation for proteins and model porphyrins.

  13. Heme electron transfer in peroxidases: the propionate e-pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guallar, Victor

    2008-10-23

    Computational modeling offers a new insight about the electron transfer pathway in heme peroxidases. Available crystal structures have revealed an intriguing arrangement of the heme propionate side chains in heme-heme and heme-substrate complexes. By means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics calculations, we study the involvement of these propionate groups into the substrate oxidation in ascorbate peroxidase and into the heme to heme electron transfer in bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase. By selectively turning on/off different quantum regions, we obtain the electron transfer pathway which directly involves the porphyrin ring and the heme propionates. Furthermore, in ascorbate peroxidase the presence of the substrate appears to be crucial for the activation of the electron transfer channel. The results might represent a general motif for electron transfer from/to the heme group and change our view for the propionate side chains as simple electrostatic binding anchors. We name the new mechanism "the propionate e-pathway".

  14. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  15. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  16. Characterization of a gene family encoding SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin-domain proteins with lectin-like and heme-binding properties from Schistosoma japonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaristus Chibunna Mbanefo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously identified a novel gene family dispersed in the genome of Schistosoma japonicum by retrotransposon-mediated gene duplication mechanism. Although many transcripts were identified, no homolog was readily identifiable from sequence information. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we utilized structural homology modeling and biochemical methods to identify remote homologs, and characterized the gene products as SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin-domain containing proteins. A common extracellular domain in this family was structurally similar to SEA-domain. SEA-domain is primarily a structural domain, known to assist or regulate binding to glycans. Recombinant proteins from three members of this gene family specifically interacted with glycosaminoglycans with high affinity, with potential implication in ligand acquisition and immune evasion. Similar approach was used to identify a heme-binding site on the SEA-domain. The heme-binding mode showed heme molecule inserted into a hydrophobic pocket, with heme iron putatively coordinated to two histidine axial ligands. Heme-binding properties were confirmed using biochemical assays and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, which showed high affinity heme-binding (K D = 1.605×10(-6 M and cognate spectroscopic attributes of hexa-coordinated heme iron. The native proteins were oligomers, antigenic, and are localized on adult worm teguments and gastrodermis; major host-parasite interfaces and site for heme detoxification and acquisition. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest potential role, at least in the nucleation step of heme crystallization (hemozoin formation, and as receptors for heme uptake. Survival strategies exploited by parasites, including heme homeostasis mechanism in hemoparasites, are paramount for successful parasitism. Thus, assessing prospects for application in disease intervention is warranted.

  17. Structures of the substrate-free and product-bound forms of HmuO, a heme oxygenase from corynebacterium diphtheriae: x-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Masaki; Ardèvol, Albert; Rovira, Carme; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2013-11-29

    Heme oxygenase catalyzes the degradation of heme to biliverdin, iron, and carbon monoxide. Here, we present crystal structures of the substrate-free, Fe(3+)-biliverdin-bound, and biliverdin-bound forms of HmuO, a heme oxygenase from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, refined to 1.80, 1.90, and 1.85 Å resolution, respectively. In the substrate-free structure, the proximal and distal helices, which tightly bracket the substrate heme in the substrate-bound heme complex, move apart, and the proximal helix is partially unwound. These features are supported by the molecular dynamic simulations. The structure implies that the heme binding fixes the enzyme active site structure, including the water hydrogen bond network critical for heme degradation. The biliverdin groups assume the helical conformation and are located in the heme pocket in the crystal structures of the Fe(3+)-biliverdin-bound and the biliverdin-bound HmuO, prepared by in situ heme oxygenase reaction from the heme complex crystals. The proximal His serves as the Fe(3+)-biliverdin axial ligand in the former complex and forms a hydrogen bond through a bridging water molecule with the biliverdin pyrrole nitrogen atoms in the latter complex. In both structures, salt bridges between one of the biliverdin propionate groups and the Arg and Lys residues further stabilize biliverdin at the HmuO heme pocket. Additionally, the crystal structure of a mixture of two intermediates between the Fe(3+)-biliverdin and biliverdin complexes has been determined at 1.70 Å resolution, implying a possible route for iron exit.

  18. Heme biosynthesis and its regulation: Towards understanding and improvement of heme biosynthesis in filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, A.C.W.; Lokman, B.C.; Ram, A.F.J.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Weert, S. de

    2011-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis in fungal host strains has acquired considerable interest in relation to the production of secreted heme-containing peroxidases. Class II peroxidase enzymes have been suggested as eco-friendly replacements of polluting chemical processes in industry. These peroxidases are naturally

  19. Measurement of Heme Ruffling Changes in MhuD Using UV-vis Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Amanda B; Graves, Max T; Liptak, Matthew D

    2016-04-28

    For decades it has been known that an out-of-plane ruffling distortion of heme perturbs its UV-vis absorption (Abs) spectrum, but whether increased ruffling induces a red or blue shift of the Soret band has remained a topic of debate. This debate has been resolved by the spectroscopic and computational characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MhuD presented here, an enzyme that converts heme, oxygen, and reducing equivalents to nonheme iron and mycobilin. W66F and W66A MhuD have been characterized using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance, Abs, and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopies, and the data have been used to develop an experimentally validated theoretical model of ruffled, ferric heme. The PBE density functional theory (DFT) model that has been developed accurately reproduces the observed spectral changes from wild type enzyme, and the underlying quantum mechanical origins of these ruffling-induced changes were revealed by analyzing the PBE DFT description of the electronic structure. Small amounts of heme ruffling have no influence on the energy of the Q-band and blue-shift the Soret band due to symmetry-allowed mixing of the Fe 3dxy and porphyrin a2u orbitals. Larger amounts of ruffling red-shift both the Q and Soret bands due to disruption of π-bonding within the porphyrin ring.

  20. Structural characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 in complex with azole-based inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Roman, Gheorghe; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2010-03-01

    The development of inhibitors specific for heme oxygenases (HO) aims to provide powerful tools in understanding the HO system. Based on the lead structure (2S, 4S)-2-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-2-[(1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl]-4-[((4-aminophenyl)thio)methyl]-1,3-dioxolane (azalanstat, QC-1) we have synthesized structural modifications to develop novel and selective HO inhibitors. The structural study of human HO-1 (hHO-1) in complex with a select group of the inhibitors was initiated using X-ray crystallographic techniques. Comparison of the structures of four such compounds each in complex with hHO-1 revealed a common binding mode, despite having different structural fragments. The compounds bind to the distal side of heme through an azole "anchor" which coordinates with the heme iron. An expansion of the distal pocket, mainly due to distal helix flexibility, allows accommodation of the compounds without displacing heme or the critical Asp140 residue. Rather, binding displaces a catalytically critical water molecule and disrupts an ordered hydrogen-bond network involving Asp140. The presence of a triazole "anchor" may provide further stability via a hydrogen bond with the protein. A hydrophobic pocket acts to stabilize the region occupied by the phenyl or adamantanyl moieties of these compounds. Further, a secondary hydrophobic pocket is formed via "induced fit" to accommodate bulky substituents at the 4-position of the dioxolane ring. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Deconstruction of Activity-Dependent Covalent Modification of Heme in Human Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase by Multistage Mass Spectrometry (MS[superscript 4])

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoghegan, Kieran F.; Varghese, Alison H.; Feng, Xidong; Bessire, Andrew J.; Conboy, James J.; Ruggeri, Roger B.; Ahn, Kay; Spath, Samantha N.; Filippov, Sergey V.; Conrad, Steven J.; Carpino, Philip A.; Guimarães, Cristiano R.W.; Vajdos, Felix F. (Pfizer)

    2013-03-07

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is known to be inactivated and covalently modified by treatment with hydrogen peroxide and agents similar to 3-(2-ethoxypropyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-purin-6(9H)-one (1), a 254.08 Da derivative of 2-thioxanthine. Peptide mapping by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detected modification by 1 in a labile peptide-heme-peptide fragment of the enzyme, accompanied by a mass increase of 252.08 Da. The loss of two hydrogen atoms was consistent with mechanism-based oxidative coupling. Multistage mass spectrometry (MS{sup 4}) of the modified fragment in an ion trap/Orbitrap spectrometer demonstrated that 1 was coupled directly to heme. Use of a 10 amu window delivered the full isotopic envelope of each precursor ion to collision-induced dissociation, preserving definitive isotopic profiles for iron-containing fragments through successive steps of multistage mass spectrometry. Iron isotope signatures and accurate mass measurements supported the structural assignments. Crystallographic analysis confirmed linkage between the methyl substituent of the heme pyrrole D ring and the sulfur atom of 1. The final orientation of 1 perpendicular to the plane of the heme ring suggested a mechanism consisting of two consecutive one-electron oxidations of 1 by MPO. Multistage mass spectrometry using stage-specific collision energies permits stepwise deconstruction of modifications of heme enzymes containing covalent links between the heme group and the polypeptide chain.

  2. Binding modes of aromatic ligands to mammalian heme peroxidases with associated functional implications: crystal structures of lactoperoxidase complexes with acetylsalicylic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, and benzylhydroxamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit K; Singh, Nagendra; Sinha, Mau; Bhushan, Asha; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2009-07-24

    The binding and structural studies of bovine lactoperoxidase with three aromatic ligands, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), salicylhydoxamic acid (SHA), and benzylhydroxamic acid (BHA) show that all the three compounds bind to lactoperoxidase at the substrate binding site on the distal heme side. The binding of ASA occurs without perturbing the position of conserved heme water molecule W-1, whereas both SHA and BHA displace it by the hydroxyl group of their hydroxamic acid moieties. The acetyl group carbonyl oxygen atom of ASA forms a hydrogen bond with W-1, which in turn makes three other hydrogen-bonds, one each with heme iron, His-109 N(epsilon2), and Gln-105 N(epsilon2). In contrast, in the complexes of SHA and BHA, the OH group of hydroxamic acid moiety in both complexes interacts with heme iron directly with Fe-OH distances of 3.0 and 3.2A respectively. The OH is also hydrogen bonded to His-109 N(epsilon2) and Gln-105N(epsilon2). The plane of benzene ring of ASA is inclined at 70.7 degrees from the plane of heme moiety, whereas the aromatic planes of SHA and BHA are nearly parallel to the heme plane with inclinations of 15.7 and 6.2 degrees , respectively. The mode of ASA binding provides the information about the mechanism of action of aromatic substrates, whereas the binding characteristics of SHA and BHA indicate the mode of inhibitor binding.

  3. ApoHRP-based Assay to Measure Intracellular Regulatory Heme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamna, Hani; Brahmbhatt, Marmik; Atamna, Wafa; Shanower, Gregory A.; Dhahbi, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the heme-binding proteins possess a “heme-pocket” that stably binds with heme. Usually known as housekeeping heme-proteins, they participate in a variety of metabolic reactions (e.g., catalase). Heme also binds with lower affinity to the “Heme-Regulatory Motifs” (HRM) in specific regulatory proteins. This type of heme binding is known as exchangeable or regulatory heme (RH). Heme binding to HRM proteins regulates their function (e.g., Bach1). Although there are well-established methods for assaying total cellular heme (e.g., heme-proteins plus RH), currently there is no method available for measuring RH independently from the total heme (TH). The current study describes and validates a new method to measure intracellular RH. The method is based on the reconstitution of apo-horseradish peroxidase (apoHRP) with heme to form holoHRP. The resulting holoHRP activity is then measured with a colorimetric substrate. The results show that apoHRP specifically binds RH but not with heme from housekeeping heme-proteins. The RH assay detects intracellular RH. Furthermore, using conditions that create positive (hemin) or negative (N-methyl protoporphyrin IX) controls for heme in normal human fibroblasts (IMR90), the RH assay shows that RH is dynamic and independent from TH. We also demonstrated that short-term exposure to subcytotoxic concentrations of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), or amyloid-β(Aβ) significantly alters intracellular RH with little effect on TH. In conclusion the RH assay is an effective assay to investigate intracellular RH concentration and demonstrates that RH represents ~6% of total heme in IMR90 cells. PMID:25525887

  4. 口服铁剂致急性肝损伤%Acute liver injury induced by oral iron preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫菊; 童茵; 高彦荣

    2016-01-01

    1例65岁女性患者因缺铁性贫血给予琥珀酸亚铁0.1g口服、3次/d,第2天出现恶心、反酸及腹泻;第3天ALT155 U/L,AST 438 U/L;第4天ALT 470 U/L,AST 867 U/L.考虑为急性药物性肝损伤,停用琥珀酸亚铁,给予多烯磷脂酰胆碱465 mg静脉滴注、1次/d.1周后患者胃肠道症状缓解,ALT 37U/L,AST 25 U/L.给予蔗糖铁注射液100 mg静脉滴注,隔天1次,用药10 d,患者未出现消化道症状及肝功能异常,10 d后Hb上升至97 g/L.6个月后患者再次出现缺铁性贫血,给予硫酸亚铁维生素复合物口服、1片/d,第4天ALT 98 U/L,AST 209 U/L,停用硫酸亚铁维生素复合物并给予护肝治疗,3d后ALT 36 U/L,AST 34 U/L.随访3年,患者缺铁性贫血反复发作,每次给予蔗糖铁注射液静脉补铁,未再出现肝损伤.%A 65-year-old female patient with iron-deficiency anemia received conventional ferrous succinate 0.1 g thrice daily by mouth.On the second day of treatment,the patient developed nausea,acid reflux,and diarrhea.On the third day and the 4th day,her alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were 155 U/L and 438 U/L,470 U/L and 867 U/L,respectively.Acute drug-induced liver injury (DILI) was considered.Ferrous succinate was withdrawn and an Ⅳ infusion of polyene phosphatidylcholine 465 mg once daily was given.Her gastrointestinal symptoms relieved and ALT and AST levels returned to 37 U/L and 25 U/L after a week of treatment.Then the patient was given Ⅳ infusion of iron sucrose injection 100 mg every other day.Ten days later,hemoglobin level increased to 97 g/L and no gastrointestinal symptoms and liver injury appeared.Then she was discharged.Six months later,the patient was admitted to hospital again because of IDA.Ferrous sulfate and vitamin one pill once daily was given.On the 4th day,the levels of ALT and AST were 98 U/L and 209 U/L,respectively.Ferrous sulfate and vitamin was stopped and liver-protective treatment was given.Three days

  5. Regulation of intracellular heme trafficking revealed by subcellular reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaojing; Rietzschel, Nicole; Kwon, Hanna; Walter Nuno, Ana Beatriz; Hanna, David A; Phillips, John D; Raven, Emma L; Reddi, Amit R; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-08-30

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group in proteins that reside in virtually every subcellular compartment performing diverse biological functions. Irrespective of whether heme is synthesized in the mitochondria or imported from the environment, this hydrophobic and potentially toxic metalloporphyrin has to be trafficked across membrane barriers, a concept heretofore poorly understood. Here we show, using subcellular-targeted, genetically encoded hemoprotein peroxidase reporters, that both extracellular and endogenous heme contribute to cellular labile heme and that extracellular heme can be transported and used in toto by hemoproteins in all six subcellular compartments examined. The reporters are robust, show large signal-to-background ratio, and provide sufficient range to detect changes in intracellular labile heme. Restoration of reporter activity by heme is organelle-specific, with the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum being important sites for both exogenous and endogenous heme trafficking. Expression of peroxidase reporters in Caenorhabditis elegans shows that environmental heme influences labile heme in a tissue-dependent manner; reporter activity in the intestine shows a linear increase compared with muscle or hypodermis, with the lowest heme threshold in neurons. Our results demonstrate that the trafficking pathways for exogenous and endogenous heme are distinct, with intrinsic preference for specific subcellular compartments. We anticipate our results will serve as a heuristic paradigm for more sophisticated studies on heme trafficking in cellular and whole-animal models.

  6. Iron acquisition and regulation systems in Streptococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ruiguang; Sun, Xuesong

    2014-05-01

    Gram-positive Streptococcus species are responsible for millions of cases of meningitis, bacterial pneumonia, endocarditis, erysipelas and necrotizing fasciitis. Iron is essential for the growth and survival of Streptococcus in the host environment. Streptococcus species have developed various mechanisms to uptake iron from an environment with limited available iron. Streptococcus can directly extract iron from host iron-containing proteins such as ferritin, transferrin, lactoferrin and hemoproteins, or indirectly by relying on the employment of specialized secreted hemophores (heme chelators) and small siderophore molecules (high affinity ferric chelators). This review presents the most recent discoveries in the iron acquisition system of Streptococcus species - the transporters as well as the regulators.

  7. Moessbauer spectroscopic evidence on the heme binding to the proximal histidine in unfolded carbonmonoxy myoglobin by guanidine hydrochloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harami, Taikan, E-mail: harami.taikan@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Kitao, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro [Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute (Japan); Mitsui, Takaya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    The unfolded heme structure in myoglobin is controversial because of no chance of direct X-ray structure analyses. The unfolding of carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO) by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) was studied by the Moessbauer spectroscopy. The spectra show the presence of a sort of spectrum in the unfolded MbCO, independent on the concentration of GdnHCl from 1 to 6 M and the increase of the fraction of unfolded MbCO, depending on the GdnHCl concentration. The isomer shift of the iron of heme in the unfolded MbCO was identified to be different from that of the native MbCO as the globin structure in Mb collapses under the unfolded conditions. This result and the existing related Moessbauer data proved that the heme in the unfolded MbCO may remain coordinated to the proximal histidine.

  8. Magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy as a probe of axial heme ligand replacement in semisynthetic mutants of cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rux, J J; Dawson, J H

    1991-09-23

    Horse heart cytochrome c with either histidine or cysteine replacing the endogenous axial methionine ligand at position 80 has been characterized with magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy in the UV-visible region. Comparison of the MCD spectra of the mutant proteins in the ferric state to those of authentic bis-imidazole- and imidazole/thiolate-ligated ferric heme proteins clearly shows that the histidine-imidazole and cysteine-thiolate groups of the replacement amino acids at position 80 are coordinated to the heme iron in the mutant proteins. This study demonstrates the power of MCD spectroscopy in identifying axial ligands in mutant heme proteins. Accurate axial ligand assignment is essential for proper interpretation of the altered properties of such novel proteins.

  9. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  10. Role of heme-protein covalent bonds in mammalian peroxidases. Protection of the heme by a single engineered heme-protein link in horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liusheng; Wojciechowski, Grzegorz; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2006-07-14

    Oxidation of SCN-, Br-, and Cl- (X-) by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and other plant and fungal peroxidases results in the addition of HOX to the heme vinyl group. This reaction is not observed with lactoperoxidase (LPO), in which the heme is covalently bound to the protein via two ester bonds between carboxylic side chains and heme methyl groups. To test the hypothesis that the heme of LPO and other mammalian peroxidases is protected from vinyl group modification by the hemeprotein covalent bonds, we prepared the F41E mutant of HRP in which the heme is attached to the protein via a covalent bond between Glu41 and the heme 3-methyl. We also examined the E375D mutant of LPO in which only one of the two normal covalent heme links is retained. The prosthetic heme groups of F41E HRP and E375D LPO are essentially not modified by the HOBr produced by these enzymes. The double E375D/D225E mutant of LPO that can form no covalent bonds is inactive and could not be examined. These results unambiguously demonstrate that a single heme-protein link is sufficient to protect the heme from vinyl group modification even in a protein (HRP) that is normally highly susceptible to this reaction. The results directly establish that one function of the covalent heme-protein bonds in mammalian peroxidases is to protect their prosthetic group from their highly reactive metabolic products.

  11. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and pre