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Sample records for oral fusobacterium nucleatum

  1. Carcinogenesis mechanisms of Fusobacterium nucleatum.

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    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2017-03-07

    Transformed cells of cancers may be related to stromal cells, immune cells, and some bacteria such as Fusobacterium nucleatum. This review aimed to evaluate carcinogenesis mechanisms of Fusobacterium spp. in the oral cavity, pancreatic and colorectal cancers. These cancers are the three of the ten most prevalence cancer in the worldwide. Recent findings demonstrated that F. nucleatum could be considered as the risk factor for these cancers. The most important carcinogenesis mechanisms of F. nucleatum are chronic infection, interaction of cell surface molecules of these bacteria with immune system and stromal cells, immune evasion and immune suppression. However, there are some uncertainty carcinogenesis mechanisms about these bacteria, but this review evaluates almost all the known mechanisms. Well-characterized virulence factors of F. nucleatum such as FadA, Fap2, LPS and cell wall extracts may act as effector molecules in the shift of normal epithelial cells to tumor cells. These molecules may provide new targets, drugs, and strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Oral Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum binds to human salivary α-amylase.

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    Zulfiqar, M; Yamaguchi, T; Sato, S; Oho, T

    2013-12-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum acts as an intermediate between early and late colonizers in the oral cavity. In this study, we showed that F. nucleatum subsp. polymorphum can bind to a salivary component with a molecular weight of approximately 110 kDa and identified the protein and another major factor of 55 kDa, as salivary α-amylase by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and immuno-reactions. Salivary α-amylase is present in both monomeric and dimeric forms and we found that formation of the dimer depends on copper ions. The F. nucleatum adhered to both monomeric and dimeric salivary α-amylases, but the numbers of bacteria bound to the dimeric form were more than those bound to the monomeric form. The degree of adherence of F. nucleatum to four α-amylases from different sources was almost the same, however its binding to β-amylase was considerably decreased. Among four α-amylase inhibitors tested, acarbose and type 1 and 3 inhibitors derived from wheat flour showed significant activity against the adhesion of F.nucleatum to monomeric and dimeric amylases, however voglibose had little effect. Moreover F. nucleatum cells inhibited the enzymatic activity of salivary α-amylase in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that F. nucleatum plays more important and positive role as an early colonizer for maturation of oral microbial colonization.

  3. Virulence of oral Fusobacterium nucleatum from humans and non-human primates in mice

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    Gaetti-Jardim Júnior Elerson

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The lethal action in Balb/c mice of 80 oral Fusobacterium nucleatum recovered from patients with adult periodontitis, healthy subjects or Cebus apella monkeys was studied. Mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with each bacterial inoculum of 5 x 10(8 CFU/ml. All the clinical isolates induced weight and coordinated movements loss. Pathological alterations in liver, CNS, heart, and kidney with inflammatory reactions or vascular congestion were observed. Of all the tested F. nucleatum isolates, 61.2% from periodontal patients, 57.1% from healthy subjects and 60% from monkeys, were capable of killing the mice in 48h. The clinical isolates were significantly more pathogenic than F. nucleatum ATCC 10953 or ATCC 25586. B. fragilis ATCC 23745 showed lethality against control mice. Our results suggest that LPS could be involved in lethal action against mice and it may play an important role in producing tissue damage or death of mice.

  4. Plasmid profile in oral Fusobacterium nucleatum from humans and Cebus apella monkeys

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    Paula Marcia O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is a strict anaerobe and is indigenous of the human oral cavity. This organism is commonly recovered from different monomicrobial and mixed infections in humans and animals. In this study, the plasmid profile, the plasmid stability and the penicillin-resistance association in oral F. nucleatum isolated from periodontal patients, healthy subjects and Cebus apella monkeys were evaluated. Forty-five F. nucleatum strains from patients, 38 from healthy subjects and seven from C. apella were identified and analyzed. Plasmid extraction was performed in all the isolated strains. These elements were found in 26.7% strains from patients and one strain from C. apella. Strains from healthy subjects did not show any plasmid. Most of strains showed two plasmid bands ranging from 4 to 16 Kb, but digestions with endonucleases showed that they belonged to a single plasmid. The plasmid profile was similar and stable in human and monkey strains. Also, plasmids were classified into three groups according to size. Two strains were positive to beta-lactamase production and no plasmid DNA-hybridization with a beta-lactamase gene probe was observed, suggesting a chromosomal resistance.

  5. Genetic diversity of oral Fusobacterium nucleatum isolated from patients with different clinical conditions Diversidade genética de Fusobacterium nucleatum orais isolados de pacientes com diferentes condições clínicas

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    Mario J. Avila-Campos

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of 23 oral Fusobacterium nucleatum isolated from 15 periodontal patients, eight from seven healthy subjects, nine from nine AIDS patients and two from two Cebus apella monkeys were analyzed. EcoRI restricted the bacterial DNA and 28 ribotypes grouped from A to J groups were obtained. Isolates formed 24 ribotypes which were contained into A, B, C, D, E and F groups, and three reference strains and two clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and E. coli CDC formed four different ribotypes into the G, H, I and J groups. Moreover, from nine F. nucleatum from AIDS patients, six were ribotyped as group C and three as group D. By using ribotyping we distinguished F. nucleatum recovered from different sources. It is possible that isolates from AIDS patients may contain some phenotypic or genotypic factor did not observed in this study.Neste estudo foi avaliada a diversidade genética de 23 amostras de Fusobacterium nucleatum isoladas da cavidade bucal de 15 pacientes com doença periodontal, de oito cepas isoladas de sete indivíduos sadios, de nove isoladas de nove pacientes com AIDS e de duas isoladas de dois macacos Cebus apella. Pela ação da enzima EcoRI sobre o DNA bacteriano foram reconhecidos 28 ribotipos agrupados de A a J. Os isolados testados formaram 24 ribotipos os quais foram contidos nos grupos A, B, C, D, E e F, e as três cepas de referência e dois isolados clínicos de A. actinomycetemcomitans e E. coli CDC formaram quatro diferentes ribotipos contidos nos grupos G, H, I e J. Em adição, as nove cepas de F. nucleatum isoladas de pacientes com AIDS, seis pertenciam ao grupo C e três ao grupo D. Usando-se a ribotipagem foi possível distinguir F. nucleatum isolados de diferentes origens.

  6. Bacteriocin-like activity of oral Fusobacterium nucleatum isolated from human and non-human primates Atividade semelhante a bacteriocina de Fusobacterium nucleatum orais isolados de primatas humanos e não-humanos

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    Elerson Gaetti-Jardim Júnior

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is indigenous of the human oral cavity and has been involved in different infectious processes. The production of bacteriocin-like substances may be important in regulation of bacterial microbiota in oral cavity. The ability to produce bacteriocin-like substances by 80 oral F. nucleatum isolates obtained from periodontal patients, healthy individuals and Cebus apella monkeys, was examinated. 17.5% of all tested isolates showed auto-antagonism and 78.8% iso- or hetero-antagonism. No isolate from monkey was capable to produce auto-inhibition. In this study, the antagonistic substances production was variable in all tested isolates. Most of the F. nucleatum showed antagonistic activity against tested reference strains. These data suggest a possible participation of these substances on the oral microbial ecology in humans and animals. However, the role of bacteriocins in regulating dental plaque microbiota in vivo is discussed.Fusobacterium nucleatum é indígena da cavidade oral humana e tem sido envolvido em diferentes processos infecciosos. A produção de substâncias semelhantes a bacteriocinas pode ser importante na regulação da microbiota bacteriana da cavidade oral. A capacidade de produzir substâncias tipo bacteriocina de 80 isolados de F. nucleatum orais, obtidos de pacientes com doença periodontal, indivíduos sadios e macaco Cebus apella, foi avaliada. 17,5% de todos os isolados mostrou auto-antagonismo e 78,8% iso- ou hetero-antagonismo. Nenhum isolado de macaco foi capaz de produzir auto-inibição. Neste estudo, a produção de substâncias antagonístas foi variável em todos os isolados testados. A maioria dos F. nucleatum mostrou atividade antagonísta para as cepas de referência testadas. Esses dados sugerem a possível participação dessas substâncias sobre a ecologia microbiana em humanos e animais. Entretanto, o papel das bacteriocinas na regulação da microbiota da placa dental in vivo

  7. Biofilm formation enhances the oxygen tolerance and invasiveness of Fusobacterium nucleatum in an oral mucosa culture model.

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    Gursoy, Ulvi Kahraman; Pöllänen, Marja; Könönen, Eija; Uitto, Veli-Jukka

    2010-07-01

    The present study evaluates the survival capability of Fusobacterium nucleatum strains in an aerobic environment and compares the invasive capability of F. nucleatum in biofilm and planktonic forms in an organotypic cell culture (OCC) model. Biofilms of F. nucleatum American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 25586 or Anaerobe Helsinki Negative (AHN) 9508 were produced by culturing on semipermeable membranes on brucella agar plates. The oxygen tolerance of the F. nucleatum strains was examined by incubating 3-day-old anaerobically grown biofilms in an aerobic environment (CO(2) [5% in air] incubator) for an additional 48 hours. The OCC model was constructed by seeding keratinocytes on a fibroblast-containing collagen gel. In invasion assays, a 3-day-old anaerobically grown biofilm (and planktonic bacteria in solution as the control) was placed upside down on the top of OCC and incubated under 5% CO(2) for 24 hours. Invasion of the bacteria and morphologic changes in OCC were assessed using hematoxylin and eosin, Ki-67, and periodic acid-Schiff stainings. In biofilms, both F. nucleatum strains continuously increased their cell numbers in an aerobic environment for 48 hours. After incubating the bacterial biofilm in contact with the OCC model, F. nucleatum AHN 9508 was able to pass through the epithelial/basement membrane barrier and invade the collagen matrix. The invasiveness of biofilm F. nucleatum ATCC 25586 was limited to the epithelium. Cytotoxic effects and invasiveness of F. nucleatum on the OCC were much stronger when the bacteria were in biofilms than in the planktonic form. Biofilm formation regulates the survival and invasiveness of F. nucleatum in an aerobic environment.

  8. Periodontal disease induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in Wistar rats

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    Storrer, Carmen Mueller; Aun, Juliana Cleaver; Pustiglioni, Francisco E.; Romito,Giuseppe Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that it is necessary to place ligatures around molars to study periodontal destruction in rats. The present research aims to examine a periodontal disease model in which specific pathogen-free Wistar rats are orally exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with Fusobacterium nucleatum. Periodontitis was induced by specific infection with P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were divided into two groups. The control animals were not infec...

  9. Cytology of pulmonary Fusobacterium nucleatum infection. A case report.

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    Hsu, C Y; Luh, K T

    1995-01-01

    A patient with pulmonary Fusobacterium nucleatum infection presenting as a solitary nodule is reported. The infectious nature of the lung nodule was disclosed by ultrasound-guided percutaneous transthoracic fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) with Liu's stain. The cytologic characteristics of F nucleatum infection are described. The usefulness of real-time ultrasound in fine needle aspiration diagnosis of a peripheral lung lesion is demonstrated, and the role of Liu's stain in FNAC is emphasized.

  10. Fusobacterium nucleatum Promotes Chemoresistance to Colorectal Cancer by Modulating Autophagy.

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    Yu, TaChung; Guo, Fangfang; Yu, Yanan; Sun, Tiantian; Ma, Dan; Han, Jixuan; Qian, Yun; Kryczek, Ilona; Sun, Danfeng; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Chen, Yingxuan; Chen, Haoyan; Hong, Jie; Zou, Weiping; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2017-07-27

    Gut microbiota are linked to chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis. Chemotherapy failure is the major cause of recurrence and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. Here, we investigated the contribution of gut microbiota to chemoresistance in patients with colorectal cancer. We found that Fusobacterium (F.) nucleatum was abundant in colorectal cancer tissues in patients with recurrence post chemotherapy, and was associated with patient clinicopathological characterisitcs. Furthermore, our bioinformatic and functional studies demonstrated that F. nucleatum promoted colorectal cancer resistance to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, F. nucleatum targeted TLR4 and MYD88 innate immune signaling and specific microRNAs to activate the autophagy pathway and alter colorectal cancer chemotherapeutic response. Thus, F. nucleatum orchestrates a molecular network of the Toll-like receptor, microRNAs, and autophagy to clinically, biologically, and mechanistically control colorectal cancer chemoresistance. Measuring and targeting F. nucleatum and its associated pathway will yield valuable insight into clinical management and may ameliorate colorectal cancer patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of aid1, a novel gene involved in Fusobacterium nucleatum interspecies interactions.

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    Kaplan, Aida; Kaplan, Christopher W; He, Xuesong; McHardy, Ian; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2014-08-01

    The oral opportunistic pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum is known to interact with a large number of different bacterial species residing in the oral cavity. It adheres to a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including oral streptococci via the arginine-inhibitable adhesin RadD. In this study, we describe a novel protein encoded by the predicted open reading frame FN1253 that appears to play a role in interspecies interactions of F. nucleatum, particularly with oral streptococci and related Gram-positive species. We designated FN1253 as aid1 (Adherence Inducing Determinant 1). Expression analyses demonstrated that this gene was induced in F. nucleatum single species biofilms, while the presence of representative members of the oral microbiota known to adhere to F. nucleatum triggered its suppression. Inactivation as well as overexpression of aid1 affected the ability of F. nucleatum to coaggregate with oral streptococci and the closely related Enterococcus faecalis, but not other Gram-positive oral species tested. Furthermore, overexpression of aid1 led to a drastic change in the structure of dual species biofilms of F. nucleatum with oral streptococci. Aid1 function was abolished in the presence of arginine and found to be dependent on RadD. Interestingly, differential expression of aid1 did not affect messenger RNA and protein levels of RadD. These findings indicate that RadD-mediated adhesion to oral streptococci involves more complex cellular processes than the simple interaction of adhesins on the surface of partner strains. Aid1 could potentially play an important role in facilitating RadD-mediated interaction with oral streptococci by increasing binding specificity of F. nucleatum to other microbial species.

  12. Influence of subinhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials on hydrophobicity, adherence and ultra-structure of Fusobacterium nucleatum

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    Okamoto Ana C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is considered a bridge organism between earlier and later colonizers in dental biofilms and a putative periodontopathogen. In Dentistry, antimicrobial agents are used for treatment and control of infectious diseases associated with dental plaque. Antiseptics have been used in association with antibiotics to reduce infections after oral surgeries. In this study, the influence of subinhibitory concentrations (SC of chlorhexidine, triclosan, penicillin G and metronidazole, on hydrophobicity, adherence to oral epithelial cells, and ultra-structure of F. nucleatum was examined. All isolates were susceptible to chlorhexidine, triclosan, and metronidazole; however, most of the isolates were susceptible to penicillin G, and all of them were hydrophilic when grown with or without antimicrobials. Adherence was decreased by all antimicrobials. Results suggest that adherence of F. nucleatum was influenced by adhesins because structures such as fimbries or capsule were not observed by transmission electronic microscope.

  13. Antimicrobial effect of human serum on oral Fusobacterium nucleatum isolates from humans and monkeys Atividade antimicrobiana do soro humano sobre isolados de Fusobacterium nucleatum obtidos de humanos e macacos

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    Elerson GAETTI-JARDIM JÚNIOR

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of eighty F. nucleatum isolates from periodontal patients, healthy subjects and Cebus apella monkeys to human pooled sera was tested. The resistance to serum bactericidal effects was observed in 46.9% of the isolates from periodontal patients, 28.6% of the healthy subjects and 40% of the monkeys. These results support the hypothesis that serum plays an ecological role by controlling the microbial population inside either the gingival crevice or periodontal pocket.Foi avaliada a susceptibilidade de oitenta isolados de F. nucleatum obtidos de pacientes com doença periodontal, indivíduos sadios e Cebus apella (macaco-prego frente ao soro humano. A resistência à atividade bactericida do soro foi observada em 46,9% das fusobactérias isoladas de pacientes com doença periodontal, 28,6% das obtidas de indivíduos sadios e em 40% das fusobactérias de primatas não humanos. Esses resultados suportam o conceito de que o soro possui um papel ecológico em controlar a população microbiana no interior do sulco gengival ou bolsa periodontal.

  14. Characterization of Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 23726 adhesins involved in strain-specific attachment to Porphyromonas gingivalis

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    Jane Park; Bhumika Shokeen; Susan K Haake; Renate Lux

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adherence is an essential virulence factor in pathogenesis and infection. Fusobacterium nucleatum has a central role in oral biofilm architecture by acting as a bridge between early Gram-positive and late Gram-negative colonizers that do not otherwise adhere to each other. In this study, we survey a key adherence interaction of F. nucleatum with Porphyromonas gingivalis, and present evidence that multiple fusobacterial adhesins have a role in the attachment of F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 to P. gingivalis in a highly strain-dependent manner. Interaction between these species displayed varying sensitivities to arginine, galactose and lactose. Arginine was found to hamper coaggregation by at least 62%and up to 89%with several P. gingivalis strains and galactose inhibition ranged from no inhibition up to 58%with the same P. gingivalis strains. Lactose consistently inhibited F. nucleatum interaction with these P. gingivalis strains ranging from 40% to 56%decrease in coaggregation. Among the adhesins involved are the previously described Fap2 and surprisingly, RadD, which was described in an earlier study for its function in attachment of F. nucleatum to Gram-positive species. We also provide evidence for the presence of at least one additional adhesin that is sensitive to arginine but unlike Fap2 and RadD, is not a member of the autotransporter family type of fusobacterial large outer membrane proteins. The strain-specific binding profile of multiple fusobacterial adhesins to P. gingivalis highlights the heterogeneity and complexity of interspecies interactions in the oral cavity.

  15. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum with immunity and molecular alterations in colorectal cancer.

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    Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Adachi, Yasushi; Ito, Miki; Mitsuhashi, Kei; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Itaru; Ishigami, Keisuke; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Maruyama, Reo; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-14

    The human intestinal microbiome plays a major role in human health and diseases, including colorectal cancer. Colorectal carcinogenesis represents a heterogeneous process with a differing set of somatic molecular alterations, influenced by diet, environmental and microbial exposures, and host immunity. Fusobacterium species are part of the human oral and intestinal microbiota. Metagenomic analyses have shown an enrichment of Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) in colorectal carcinoma tissue. Using 511 colorectal carcinomas from Japanese patients, we assessed the presence of F. nucleatum. Our results showed that the frequency of F. nucleatum positivity in the Japanese colorectal cancer was 8.6% (44/511), which was lower than that in United States cohort studies (13%). Similar to the United States studies, F. nucleatum positivity in Japanese colorectal cancers was significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI)-high status. Regarding the immune response in colorectal cancer, high levels of infiltrating T-cell subsets (i.e., CD3+, CD8+, CD45RO+, and FOXP3+ cells) have been associated with better patient prognosis. There is also evidence to indicate that molecular features of colorectal cancer, especially MSI, influence T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Concerning the association between the gut microbiome and immunity, F. nucleatum has been shown to expand myeloid-derived immune cells, which inhibit T-cell proliferation and induce T-cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer. This finding indicates that F. nucleatum possesses immunosuppressive activities by inhibiting human T-cell responses. Certain microRNAs are induced during the macrophage inflammatory response and have the ability to regulate host-cell responses to pathogens. MicroRNA-21 increases the levels of IL-10 and prostaglandin E2, which suppress antitumor T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity through the inhibition of the antigen-presenting capacities of dendritic cells and T-cell proliferation in

  16. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Tannerella forsythia induce synergistic alveolar bone loss in a mouse periodontitis model.

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    Settem, Rajendra P; El-Hassan, Ahmed Taher; Honma, Kiyonobu; Stafford, Graham P; Sharma, Ashu

    2012-07-01

    Tannerella forsythia is strongly associated with chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, leading to tooth loss. Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic pathogen, is thought to promote dental plaque formation by serving as a bridge bacterium between early- and late-colonizing species of the oral cavity. Previous studies have shown that F. nucleatum species synergize with T. forsythia during biofilm formation and pathogenesis. In the present study, we showed that coinfection of F. nucleatum and T. forsythia is more potent than infection with either species alone in inducing NF-κB activity and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in monocytic cells and primary murine macrophages. Moreover, in a murine model of periodontitis, mixed infection with the two species induces synergistic alveolar bone loss, characterized by bone loss which is greater than the additive alveolar bone losses induced by each species alone. Further, in comparison to the single-species infection, mixed infection caused significantly increased inflammatory cell infiltration in the gingivae and osteoclastic activity in the jaw bones. These data show that F. nucleatum subspecies and T. forsythia synergistically stimulate the host immune response and induce alveolar bone loss in a murine experimental periodontitis model.

  17. Fusobacterium nucleatum-associated beta-defensin inducer (FAD-I): identification, isolation, and functional evaluation.

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    Gupta, Sanhita; Ghosh, Santosh K; Scott, Mary E; Bainbridge, Brian; Jiang, Bin; Lamont, Richard J; McCormick, Thomas S; Weinberg, Aaron

    2010-11-19

    Human β-defensins (hBDs) are small, cationic antimicrobial peptides, secreted by mucosal epithelial cells that regulate adaptive immune functions. We previously reported that Fusobacterium nucleatum, a ubiquitous gram-negative bacterium of the human oral cavity, induces human β-defensin 2 (hBD2) upon contact with primary oral epithelial cells. We now report the isolation and characterization of an F. nucleatum (ATCC 25586)-associated defensin inducer (FAD-I). Biochemical approaches revealed a cell wall fraction containing four proteins that stimulated the production of hBD2 in human oral epithelial cells (HOECs). Cross-referencing of the N-terminal sequences of these proteins with the F. nucleatum genome revealed that the genes encoding the proteins were FadA, FN1527, FN1529, and FN1792. Quantitative PCR of HOEC monolayers challenged with Escherichia coli clones expressing the respective cell wall proteins revealed that FN1527 was most active in the induction of hBD2 and hence was termed FAD-I. We tagged FN1527 with a c-myc epitope on the C-terminal end to identify and purify it from the E. coli clone. Purified FN1527 (FAD-I) induced hBD2 mRNA and protein expression in HOEC monolayers. F. nucleatum cell wall and FAD-I induced hBD2 via TLR2. Porphorymonas gingivalis, an oral pathogen that does not induce hBD2 in HOECs, was able to significantly induce expression of hBD2 in HOECs only when transformed to express FAD-I. FAD-I or its derivates offer a potentially new paradigm in immunoregulatory therapeutics because they may one day be used to bolster the innate defenses of vulnerable mucosae.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data of the FadA adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum

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    Nithianantham, Stanley [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Xu, Minghua [Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4905 (United States); Wu, Nan [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Han, Yiping W., E-mail: ywh2@case.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4905 (United States); Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Shoham, Menachem, E-mail: ywh2@case.edu [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States)

    2006-12-01

    The FadA adhesin from F. nucleatum, which is involved in bacterial attachment and invasion of human oral epithelial cells, has been crystallized in space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, and X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å resolution. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative anaerobe prevalent in the oral cavity that is associated with periodontal disease, preterm birth and infections in other parts of the human body. The bacteria attach to and invade epithelial and endothelial cells in the gum tissue and elsewhere via a 13.7 kDa adhesin protein FadA (Fusobacterium adhesin A). FadA exists in two forms: the intact form (pre-FadA), consisting of 129 amino acids, and the mature form (mFadA), which lacks an 18-residue signal sequence. Both forms have been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. mFadA has been crystallized. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 59.3, c = 125.7 Å and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals exhibit an unusually high solvent content of 74%. Synchrotron X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å. The crystals are suitable for X-ray structure determination. The crystal structure of FadA may provide a basis for the development of therapeutic agents to combat periodontal disease and other infections associated with F. nucleatum.

  19. Direct recognition of Fusobacterium nucleatum by the NK cell natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp46 aggravates periodontal disease.

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    Stella Chaushu

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a common human chronic inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of the tooth attachment apparatus and tooth loss. Although infections with periopathogenic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum are essential for inducing periodontitis, the nature and magnitude of the disease is determined by the host's immune response. Here, we investigate the role played by the NK killer receptor NKp46 (NCR1 in mice, in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Using an oral infection periodontitis model we demonstrate that following F. nucleatum infection no alveolar bone loss is observed in mice deficient for NCR1 expression, whereas around 20% bone loss is observed in wild type mice and in mice infected with P. gingivalis. By using subcutaneous chambers inoculated with F. nucleatum we demonstrate that immune cells, including NK cells, rapidly accumulate in the chambers and that this leads to a fast and transient, NCR1-dependant TNF-α secretion. We further show that both the mouse NCR1 and the human NKp46 bind directly to F. nucleatum and we demonstrate that this binding is sensitive to heat, to proteinase K and to pronase treatments. Finally, we show in vitro that the interaction of NK cells with F. nucleatum leads to an NCR1-dependent secretion of TNF-α. Thus, the present study provides the first evidence that NCR1 and NKp46 directly recognize a periodontal pathogen and that this interaction influences the outcome of F. nucleatum-mediated periodontitis.

  20. Identification of an L-methionine γ-lyase involved in the production of hydrogen sulfide from L-cysteine in Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586.

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    Suwabe, Kyosuke; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2011-10-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum produces an abundance of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the oral cavity that is mediated by several enzymes. The identification and characterization of three distinct enzymes (Fn0625, Fn1055 and Fn1220) in F. nucleatum that catalyse the production of H(2)S from l-cysteine have been reported. In the current study, a novel enzyme involved in the production of H(2)S in F. nucleatum ATCC 25586, whose molecular mass had been estimated to be approximately 130 kDa, was identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF MS. The enzyme, Fn1419, has previously been characterized as an l-methionine γ-lyase. SDS-PAGE and gel-filtration chromatography indicated that Fn1419 has a molecular mass of 43 kDa and forms tetramers in solution. Unlike other enzymes associated with H(2)S production in F. nucleatum, the quaternary structure of Fn1419 was not completely disrupted by exposure to SDS. The purified recombinant enzyme exhibited a K(m) of 0.32±0.02 mM and a k(cat) of 0.69±0.01 s(-1). Based on current and published data, the enzymic activity for H(2)S production from l-cysteine in F. nucleatum is ranked as follows: Fn1220>Fn1055>Fn1419>Fn0625. Based on kinetic values and relative mRNA levels of the respective genes, as determined by real-time quantitative PCR, the amount of H(2)S produced by Fn1419 was estimated to be 1.9 % of the total H(2)S produced from l-cysteine in F. nucleatum ATCC 25586. In comparison, Fn1220 appeared to contribute significantly to H(2)S production (87.6 %).

  1. High occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Clostridium difficile in the intestinal microbiota of colorectal carcinoma patients

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    Márcia H. Fukugaiti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractColorectal carcinoma is considered the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Several microorganisms have been associated with carcinogenesis, including Enterococcus spp., Helicobacter pylori, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, pathogenic E. coli strains and oral Fusobacterium. Here we qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the presence of oral and intestinal microorganisms in the fecal microbiota of colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls. Seventeen patients (between 49 and 70 years-old visiting the Cancer Institute of the Sao Paulo State were selected, 7 of whom were diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma. Bacterial detection was performed by qRT-PCR. Although all of the tested bacteria were detected in the majority of the fecal samples, quantitative differences between the Cancer Group and healthy controls were detected only for F. nucleatum and C. difficile. The three tested oral microorganisms were frequently observed, suggesting a need for furthers studies into a potential role for these bacteria during colorectal carcinoma pathogenesis. Despite the small number of patients included in this study, we were able to detect significantly more F. nucleatumand C. difficile in the Cancer Group patients compared to healthy controls, suggesting a possible role of these bacteria in colon carcinogenesis. This finding should be considered when screening for colorectal cancer.

  2. Fap2 Mediates Fusobacterium nucleatum Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Enrichment by Binding to Tumor-Expressed Gal-GalNAc.

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    Abed, Jawad; Emgård, Johanna E M; Zamir, Gideon; Faroja, Mouhammad; Almogy, Gideon; Grenov, Amalie; Sol, Asaf; Naor, Ronit; Pikarsky, Eli; Atlan, Karine A; Mellul, Anna; Chaushu, Stella; Manson, Abigail L; Earl, Ashlee M; Ou, Nora; Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S; Bachrach, Gilad

    2016-08-10

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with colorectal cancer and promotes colonic tumor formation in preclinical models. However, fusobacteria are core members of the human oral microbiome and less prevalent in the healthy gut, raising questions about how fusobacteria localize to CRC. We identify a host polysaccharide and fusobacterial lectin that explicates fusobacteria abundance in CRC. Gal-GalNAc, which is overexpressed in CRC, is recognized by fusobacterial Fap2, which functions as a Gal-GalNAc lectin. F. nucleatum binding to clinical adenocarcinomas correlates with Gal-GalNAc expression and is reduced upon O-glycanase treatment. Clinical fusobacteria strains naturally lacking Fap2 or inactivated Fap2 mutants show reduced binding to Gal-GalNAc-expressing CRC cells and established CRCs in mice. Additionally, intravenously injected F. nucleatum localizes to mouse tumor tissues in a Fap2-dependent manner, suggesting that fusobacteria use a hematogenous route to reach colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, targeting F. nucleatum Fap2 or host epithelial Gal-GalNAc may reduce fusobacteria potentiation of CRC.

  3. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (pgingivitis group than in health people (pgingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis.

  4. Biologic Activity of Type I and Type II Fusobacterium nucleatum Isolates from Clinically Characterized Sites,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-26

    journal of choice is the Journal of Periodontology . 1 ncl JACK W. VINCENT as COL, DC Microbiology Branch SGRD-UDZ (19 Jul 84) TO COL Jack W. Vincent...Activitity of Type I and Type II Manuscript for Publication Fusobacterium nucleatum Isolates From Clinically Chatacterized Sites. 6. PERFORMING ONG...120) were obtained from subgingival plaque samples taken from 27 clinically characterized sites utilizing a selec- tive culture medium. All isolates

  5. Antibody and T cell responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in health and chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Shin

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the T cell response to the members of oral flora are poorly understood. We characterized the antibody and T cell responses to FadA and Td92, adhesins from Fusobacterium nucleatum, an oral commensal, and Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, respectively. Peripheral blood and saliva were obtained from healthy individuals and patients with untreated chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 11 paris and after successful treatment of the disease (n = 9. The levels of antigen-specific antibody were measured by ELISA. In plasma, IgG1 was the most abundant isotype of Ab for both Ags, followed by IgA and then IgG4. The levels of FadA-specific salivary IgA (sIgA were higher than Td92-specific sIgA and the FadA-specific IgA levels observed in plasma. However, the periodontal health status of the individuals did not affect the levels of FadA- or Td92-specific antibody. Even healthy individuals contained FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells, as determined by the detection of intracytoplasmic CD154 after short-term in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs with the antigens. Patients with CP tended to possess increased numbers of FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells but reduced numbers of Td92-specific Foxp3(+CD4(+ Tregs than the healthy subjects. Both FadA and Td92 induced the production of IFNγ and IL-10 but inhibited the secretion of IL-4 by PBMCs. In conclusion, F. nucleatum induced Th3 (sIgA- and Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant immune responses, whereas T. denticola induced a Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant response. This IFNγ-dominant cytokine response was impaired in CP patients, and the Td92-induced IFNγ levels were negatively associated with periodontal destruction in patients. These findings may provide new insights into the homeostatic interaction between the immune system and oral bacteria and the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  6. Effect of kefir on Fusobacterium nucleatum in potentially preventing intestinal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Banu Guzel-Seydim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fusobacterium spp. are known to be part of mouth and intestinal microbiota. Fusobacterium nucleatum is an obligate anaerobe, Gram negative, non-spore forming pleomorphic bacillus that can cause diseases not only in the mouth and teeth but also in the brain, pleura, lungs and liver. It was noted that F. nucleatum induces fetal death (fetal demise in pregnant women. Recent studies indicate that F. nucleatum could lead to colon cancer by binding to the epithelial tissue. Kefir is produced from kefir grains that are a source of probiotics. Fermented dairy products and especially kefir and yogurt are significant for functional nutrition. In kefir grains, lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria and yeasts are embedded in a polysaccharide matrix, called kefiran. When kefir grains are added to milk and incubated for approximately 22 h at 25°C, microorganisms in the grains continue to proliferate in milk with the production of functional metabolic compounds. While yogurt has mainly two bacteria, authentic kefir has its characteristic Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactobacillus kefir and Lactobacillus kefirgranum, in addition to many other types of lactic acid bacteria (LAB. Previous studies have indicated that fermented dairy products can cause probiotic effects such as improvement in digestive system health, reduction in serum cholesterol, improvement in lactose tolerance, improvement in immune function, control of irritable bowel symptoms, and anticarcinogenic properties. Objective: The aim of this research was to report the effects of fermented dairy products in vitro on the growth of F. nucleatum. Milk, kefir made from natural kefir grains, commercial kefir produced from kefir starter culture, yogurt produced from natural yogurt starter culture and commercial yogurt produced from yogurt starter culture were used against F. nucleatum. Methods: F. nucleatum (ATCC 25586 was grown in Fluid Thioglycollate Medium at 37°C for 3 days under

  7. Osteomyelitis of a long bone due to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces meyeri in an immunocompetent adult: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Min

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fusobacterium species are uncommon causes of osteomyelitis. These organisms are normal flora of the oral cavity. Therefore, they mostly cause osteomyelitis of the head and neck. Hematogenous osteomyelitis at distant sites other than the head and neck has rarely been reported in pediatric or immunocompromised patients. Here, we report the first case of osteomyelitis of a long bone combined with a muscle abscess due to Fusobacterium nucleatum in an otherwise healthy adult. Case presentation A 59-year-old Korean man was admitted for pain and swelling of the right lower leg, which had been persistent for two weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging showed osteomyelitis of the right fibula with a surrounding muscle abscess of the right lower leg. Incision and drainage was performed, and repetitive tissue cultures grew F. nucleatum. In this patient, it was presumed that recurrent periodontitis caused hematogenous seeding of F. nucleatum to a distant site leading to osteomyelitis with a muscle abscess. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous ampicillin-sulbactam for three weeks and oral amoxicillin-clavulanate for eight weeks. He also underwent repeated surgical drainage. He has no evidence of recurrence after seven months of follow-up. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware that F. nucleatum could be the etiologic agent of hematogenous osteomyelitis of a long bone in an immunocompetent patient.

  8. The Danger Signal Extracellular ATP Is an Inducer of Fusobacterium nucleatum Biofilm Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qinfeng; Tan, Kai Soo

    2016-01-01

    Plaque biofilm is the primary etiological agent of periodontal disease. Biofilm formation progresses through multiple developmental stages beginning with bacterial attachment to a surface, followed by development of microcolonies and finally detachment and dispersal from a mature biofilm as free planktonic bacteria. Tissue damage arising from inflammatory response to biofilm is one of the hallmark features of periodontal disease. A consequence of tissue damage is the release of ATP from within the cell into the extracellular space. Extracellular ATP (eATP) is an example of a danger associated molecular pattern (DAMP) employed by mammalian cells to elicit inflammatory and damage healing responses. Although, the roles of eATP as a signaling molecule in multi-cellular organisms have been relatively well studied, exogenous ATP also influences bacteria biofilm formation. Since plaque biofilms are continuously exposed to various stresses including exposure to the host damage factors such as eATP, we hypothesized that eATP, in addition to eliciting inflammation could potentially influence the biofilm lifecycle of periodontal associated bacteria. We found that eATP rather than nutritional factors or oxidative stress induced dispersal of Fusobacterium nucleatum, an organism associated with periodontal disease. eATP induced biofilm dispersal through chelating metal ions present in biofilm. Dispersed F. nucleatum biofilm, regardless of natural or induced dispersal by exogenous ATP, were more adhesive and invasive compared to planktonic or biofilm counterparts, and correspondingly activated significantly more pro-inflammatory cytokine production in infected periodontal fibroblasts. Dispersed F. nucleatum also showed higher expression of fadA, a virulence factor implicated in adhesion and invasion, compared to planktonic or biofilm bacteria. This study revealed for the first time that periodontal bacterium is capable of co-opting eATP, a host danger signaling molecule to detach

  9. 具核梭杆菌在牙菌斑生物膜中的作用%The role of Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque biofilms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛红蕾(综述); 杨德琴(审校)

    2013-01-01

    具核梭杆菌广泛存在于牙菌斑生物膜中,在生物膜的形成、演替、代谢交流及水平基因转移方面起着重要的作用。具核梭杆菌在维护口腔微生态环境动态平衡的过程中具有重要意义。本文就具核梭杆菌在牙菌斑生物膜中发挥的作用作一综述。%Fusobacterium nucleatum(F. nucleatum)?is?a?prominent?component?in?dental?plaque?biofilms.?It?is?also?regarded?as?a?key?organism?for?dental?plaque?biofilm?formation,?shifts,?metabolic?exchanges,?and?horizontal?gene?transfer.?Meanwhile,?F. nucleatum?is?an?important?pathogen?implicated?in?periodontitis?and?dental?caries,?and?it?acts?as?a?“bridge”?of?coaggregation?between?supragingival?and?subgingival?plaque?microbiota.?In?summary,?F. nucleatum?significantly?affects?oral?health?balance.?This?review?focused?on?F. nucleatum?and?its?role?in?the?ecology?of?dental?plaque?biofilms.

  10. Rapid detection of nusG and fadA in Fusobacterium nucleatum by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Simo; Yang, Zhan; Zou, Dayang; Dong, Derong; Liu, Anheng; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-08-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with various human diseases such as periodontal disease and colorectal cancer (CRC); thus, F. nucleatum detection might serve as a novel diagnostic tool. Here, we describe the development of a sensitive and rapid molecular method for detecting two F. nucleatum genes: the highly conserved nusG and fadA, which encode a critical host colonization factor. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) primer sets for the rapid detection of nusG and fadA were designed and optimized. The nusG primers yielded consistent negative results for 20 non-F. nucleatum bacterial strains, confirming the high specificity of the primers. LAMP reaction primer sensitivity was determined, and its detection rate in comparison to conventional PCR was assessed using 57 clinical stool samples. The LAMP detection limit for nusG and fadA was 22.5 and 0.225 pg µl-1, respectively, indicating that the sensitivity of this method was 10-fold higher than that of conventional PCR. These results suggest that the LAMP technique is able to effectively identify F. nucleatum via nusG as well as detect its virulence factor. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report the application of LAMP for the detection of nusG and fadA in F. nucleatum. The LAMP method constitutes a sensitive and specific visual assay for the rapid detection of the pathogen F. nucleatum.

  11. EFECTO ANTIBACTERIANO IN VITRO DEL ACEITE ESENCIAL DE CINNAMOMUM ZEYLANICUM (CANELA) SOBRE EL FUSOBACTERIUM NUCLEATUM ATCC 25586

    OpenAIRE

    GARCÍA RUBIO, KHATTERYNE MARISOL

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research work was to determine in vitro the antibacterial effect of the essential oil of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. The study was carried out in the laboratories of Pharmacognosy and microbiological laboratories in the School of Medicine at the National University of Trujillo. Samples consisted in two sets of 12 repeats for each concentration of cinnamon and sample control (penicillin). One set was used to determine the se...

  12. Fusobacterium nucleatum, the first Gram-negative bacterium demonstrated to produce polyglutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Thomas; Moya, Marie; Haustant, Michel; Fouet, Agnès

    2009-05-01

    Poly-gamma-glutamate has been described in many Gram-positive organisms. When anchored to the surface, it is a capsule and as such a virulence factor. Based on sequence similarities, few Gram-negative organisms have been suggested to synthesize poly-gamma-glutamate. For the first time, a Gram-negative bacterium, Fusobacterium nucleatum, is shown to produce and secrete poly-gamma-glutamate. Putative poly-gamma-glutamate-synthesizing genes from Gram-negative organisms have been compared with their Gram-positive homologs by in silico analysis, i.e., gene sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Clusters of three instead of four genes were highlighted by our screen. The products of the first two genes display similarity with their Gram-positive equivalents, yet the sequences from the Gram-negative organisms can be distinguished from those of the Gram-positives. Interestingly, the sequence of the predicted product of the third gene is conserved among Gram-negative bacteria but displays no similarity to that of either the third or fourth gene of the Gram-positive operons. It is suggested that, like for Gram-positive bacteria, poly-gamma-glutamate has a role in virulence for pathogens and one in survival for other Gram-negative bacteria.

  13. Characterization of extracellular polymeric matrix, and treatment of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms with DNase I and proteinase K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Mansoor Ali Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilms are organized communities of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM, often with great phylogenetic variety. Bacteria in the subgingival biofilm are key factors that cause periodontal diseases; among these are the Gram-negative bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The objectives of this study were to characterize the major components of the EPM and to test the effect of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I and proteinase K. Methods: F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis bacterial cells were grown in dynamic and static biofilm models. The effects of DNase I and proteinase K enzymes on the major components of the EPM were tested during biofilm formation and on mature biofilm. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used in observing biofilm structure. Results: Proteins and carbohydrates were the major components of the biofilm matrix, and extracellular DNA (eDNA was also present. DNase I and proteinase K enzymes had little effect on biofilms in the conditions used. In the flow cell, F. nucleatum was able to grow in partially oxygenated conditions while P. gingivalis failed to form biofilm alone in similar conditions. F. nucleatum supported the growth of P. gingivalis when they were grown together as dual species biofilm. Conclusion: DNase I and proteinase K had little effect on the biofilm matrix in the conditions used. F. nucleatum formed biofilm easily and supported the growth of P. gingivalis, which preferred anaerobic conditions.

  14. A case of adolescent pelvic inflammatory disease caused by a rare bacterium: Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Allison; Black, Amanda Y; Lortie, Karine; Fleming, Nathalie A

    2013-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a polymicrobial infection that typically occurs in sexually active females. PID is rare in premenarchal and/or noncoital young women; however, there are case reports of PID occurring in virginal females. We present the first reported case of PID associated with F. nucleatum. In this unusual case of PID in an adolescent, the responsible organism may have originated from the patient's oral cavity. A 13-year-old noncoital Caucasian female presented to a tertiary children's hospital with fever and acute abdominal/pelvic pain. She had experienced a perforated appendix 14 months prior, which was treated by laparoscopy. Postoperatively, she experienced intermittent episodes of recurrent abdominal pain. During this presentation, the physical examination and ultrasound findings were suspicious for an ovarian torsion. She was taken to the operating room where she had an examination under anesthesia and a diagnostic laparoscopy. Findings at the time of laparoscopy were in keeping with a diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease. Oral and pelvic fluid cultures were positive for F. nucleatum. She was subsequently treated with antibiotics and her symptoms resolved. This case highlights the importance of including PID in the differential diagnosis of noncoital adolescent females presenting with an acute abdomen. Although most Fusobacteria infections are periodontal in nature, translocated infections to the pelvis may have long-term implications for reproductive health. This case also highlights the importance of the role of diagnostic laparoscopy in young women who have persistent pain following previous surgery due to the potential of missed pathology or subclinical infection. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. FAD-I, a Fusobacterium nucleatum Cell Wall-Associated Diacylated Lipoprotein That Mediates Human Beta Defensin 2 Induction through Toll-Like Receptor-1/2 (TLR-1/2) and TLR-2/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Santosh K; Shokeen, Bhumika; Eapan, Betty; Lux, Renate; Kiselar, Janna; Nithianantham, Stanley; Young, Andrew; Pandiyan, Pushpa; McCormick, Thomas S; Weinberg, Aaron

    2016-05-01

    We previously identified a cell wall-associated protein from Fusobacterium nucleatum, a Gram-negative bacterium of the oral cavity, that induces human beta defensin 2 (hBD-2) in primary human oral epithelial cells (HOECs) and designated it FAD-I (Fusobacterium-associated defensin inducer). Here, we report differential induction of hBD-2 by different strains of F. nucleatum; ATCC 25586 and ATCC 23726 induce significantly more hBD-2 mRNA than ATCC 10953. Heterologous expression of plasmid-borne fadI from the highly hBD-2-inducing strains in a ΔfadI mutant of ATCC 10953 resulted in hBD-2 induction to levels comparable to those of the highly inducing strains, indicating that FAD-I is the principal F. nucleatum agent for hBD-2 induction in HOECs. Moreover, anti-FAD-I antibodies blocked F. nucleatum induction of hBD-2 by more than 80%. Recombinant FAD-I (rFAD-I) expressed in Escherichia coli triggered levels of hBD-2 transcription and peptide release in HOECs similar to those of native FAD-I (nFAD-I) isolated from F. nucleatum ATCC 25586. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed a diacylglycerol modification at the cysteine residue in position 16 for both nFAD-I and rFAD-I. Cysteine-to-alanine substitution abrogated FAD-I's ability to induce hBD-2. Finally, FAD-I activation of hBD-2 expression was mediated via both Toll-like receptor-1/2 (TLR-1/2) and TLR-2/6 heterodimerization. Microbial molecules like FAD-I may be utilized in novel therapeutic ways to bolster the host innate immune response at mucosal surfaces.

  16. Tea polyphenols inhibit the activation of NF-κB and the secretion of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases by macrophages stimulated with Fusobacterium nucleatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagha, Amel Ben; Grenier, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum has been associated with both periodontal disease and inflammatory bowel disease. This Gram-negative bacterium possesses a high inflammatory potential that may contribute to the disease process. We hypothesized that green and black tea polyphenols attenuate the inflammatory response of monocytes/macrophages mediated by F. nucleatum. We first showed that the tea extracts, EGCG and theaflavins reduce the NF-κB activation induced by F. nucleatum in monocytes. Since NF-κB is a key regulator of genes coding for inflammatory mediators, we tested the effects of tea polyphenols on secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and CXCL8 by macrophages. A pre-treatment of macrophages with the tea extracts, EGCG, or theaflavins prior to a stimulation with F. nucleatum significantly inhibited the secretion of all four cytokines and reduced the secretion of MMP-3 and MMP-9, two tissue destructive enzymes. TREM-1 expressed by macrophages is a cell-surface receptor involved in the propagation of the inflammatory response to bacterial challenges. Interestingly, tea polyphenols inhibited the secretion/shedding of soluble TREM-1 induced by a stimulation of macrophages with F. nucleatum. The anti-inflammatory properties of tea polyphenols identified in the present study suggested that they may be promising agents for the prevention and/or treatment of periodontal disease and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27694921

  17. Actividad antibacteriana in vitro del extracto etanólico de propóleo de Oxapampa-Perú, sobre cepas de Porphyromonas gingivalis y Fusobacterium nucleatum

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Suyo, Juan A.; Practica privada; Proaño de Casalino, Doris; Facultad de Estomatología, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima,

    2014-01-01

    En la presente investigación se buscó comparar la actividad antibacteriana in vitro del extracto etanólico de propóleo de Oxapampa, Perú, en concentraciones al 1%, 5% y 10% con gluconato de clorhexidina al 0,2% sobre cepas de Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 y Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. La actividad antibacteriana se determinó usando el método de difusiónen el agar. Los halos de inhibición se midieron con un calibrador y fueron anotados en una ficha de registro. Los datos fueron a...

  18. Signal peptide of FadA adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum plays a novel structural role by regulating the filament's length and width

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    FadA, a novel adhesin of periodontal pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum is composed of two forms, pre-FadA and mature FadA (mFadA), constituting the functional FadA complex (FadAc). By electron microscopy, we observed that mFadA formed uniformly long and thin filaments, while FadAc formed heterogeneous filaments of varying lengths and widths, as well as “knots”. Mutants in signal peptide or in the non-alpha helical loop retaining heterogeneous structures had binding activity while those forming...

  19. "Messieurs, c'est les microbes qui auront le dernier mot": Gentlemen, it is the microbes who have the last word (Louis Pasteur)-Fusobacterium nucleatum protect tumors from killing by immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Chamutal; Mandelboim, Ofer; Bachrach, Gilad

    2015-09-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is present in colon cancers where it was shown to generate a proinflammatory microenvironment that supports colorectal neoplasia progression. Remarkably, alongside with proinflammatory stimulation, fusobacteria also inhibit cytotoxicity of immune cells. Thus, it appears as if tumors exploit fusobacteria to generate a favorable proinflammatory and anti-cytotoxic microenvironment.

  20. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease.

  1. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitrostudy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj Bharath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, Prevotella intermedia (Pi, Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa. Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease.

  2. Fusobacterium canifelinum sp. nov., from the oral cavity of cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Georg; Citron, Diane M; Mutters, Reinier; Jang, Spencer; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2004-08-01

    Fourteen strains of Gram-negative, anaerobic, fluoroquinolone-resistant, non-sporulating rods were isolated from various infections in cats and dogs, as well as from wounds in humans after cat- or dog-bites. These strains were characterized by sequencing of the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, 16S rDNA, DNA-DNA hybridization, phylogenetic analysis, and phenotypic tests. The results indicate that the novel strains belong to a distinct species, closely related to Fusobacterium nucleatum. The species Fusobacterium canifelinum sp. nov. is proposed, with strain ATCC BAA 689T as the type strain.

  3. The reduction of Fusobacterium nucleatum in mice is irrelevant to the nitric oxide induced by iNOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Chihomi; Mikami, Masato; Suzuki, Anri; Saito, Kazuko

    2003-01-01

    Previously we reported that mice infected recurrently with live Fusobacterim nucleatum (Fn) synthesize a significant amount of NO between 12 hr and 24 hr after the Fn injection. We now investigated whether the NO has the capability of killing Fn, a gram-negative rod periodontal pathogen. The mice were divided into three groups: treated with live bacteria (LB), treated with heat-killed bacteria (HKB) and untreated: normal (N). The Fn reduction, NO production and cell number after Fn injection were then compared in these mice. In the LB group, no Fn was detected at 6 hr, whereas it was still detected in the HKB and N groups at 24 hr as assessed by both colony counts and PCR assays. A significant amount of NO was synthesized in the LB group at 24 hr after the Fn injection. Fn is not killed by SNAP-generated NO in vitro. An increase in the total cell number was accompanied by an increase of the neutrophil numbers in the LB group. Intracellular O2(-) generation (including ONOO(-)) was visualized using dihydrorhodamine (DHR)-123. The peak of O2(-) generation by PEC was shown to be at 3 hr in all 3 groups. The number of O2(-) positive cells in the LB group at 3 hr was remarkably high, and most of them were likely to be neutrophils. The Fn reduction would be performed cooperatively via oxygen dependent and oxygen independent mechanisms. Thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) included in the oxygen dependent mechanism appear to be important for Fn reduction. However the significant amounts of NO derived from the iNOS synthesized in the LB group between 12 hr and 24 hr after injection of LFn were not involved in the Fn reduction.

  4. Synergic phototoxic effect of visible light or Gallium-Arsenide laser in the presence of different photo-sensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Ghanbari

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the synergic phototoxic effect of visible light in combination with each of the photosensitizers on P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. However, the synergic phototoxic effect of laser exposure and hydrogen peroxide and curcumin as photosensitizers on F. nucleatum was not shown.

  5. In vivo dynamics of Streptococcus spp.and Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque biofilm analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization%荧光原位杂交观察口腔原位菌斑中链球菌和具核梭杆菌的动态变化的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘靖; 王韦玮; 胡凡; 陈武

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察口腔原位菌斑形成过程中链球菌和具核梭杆菌的动态变化.方法 专业洁治后,7个志愿者佩戴可形成口内菌斑生物膜以供原位菌斑研究的上颌装置,分别佩戴12 h、1d、2d、3d、5d后,取下样本,与链球菌和具核梭杆菌的特异性寡核苷酸探针进行荧光原位杂交,于激光共聚焦显微镜下观察菌斑生物膜的形成过程及2种细菌在菌斑形成发育中的分布及比例.结果 菌斑生物膜厚度由5.26 μm逐渐发育增加为46.93 μm.12h细菌仅形成平铺片状,链球菌占绝大多数,未见具核梭杆菌;此后细菌排列趋于密集,菌斑厚度逐渐增加,最后形成团块状菌斑.链球菌在2、3d菌斑中比例下降;具核梭杆菌在5d菌斑中比例比3d上升107%.结论 链球菌在早期菌斑中为优势菌,具核梭杆菌在菌斑发育中期数量逐渐增加.2种细菌在菌斑形成中起到重要作用.%Objective To quantify formation and composition of Streptococcus spp. And Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque u-sing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Methods After professional toothcleaning, seven volunteers had to wear a special acrylic appliance, in which six specimens were inserted to allow the build-up of intra-oral biofilms. After (12 h/1 d/2 d/3 d/5 d) wearing, the specimens with the adhering biofilms were removed from the splints and stained with three oligonu-cleotide probes. Under the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm thickness (BT) was evaluated. Formation and composition of Streptococcus spp. And Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque were examined the biofilms were scanned and digital images were made. Results The thickness of formed biofilm increased from 5. 26 jjum after 12 hours after wearing to 46. 93 u,m 5 days after wearing. Streptococcus spp. Were predominant in 1 -day-old dental plaque and decreased 2 days later( P < 0.05 ). Compared to the first day

  6. Halitosis vaccines targeting FomA, a biofilm-bridging protein of fusobacteria nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P-F; Huang, I-F; Shu, C-W; Huang, C-M

    2013-09-01

    Halitosis (bad breath) is estimated to influence more than half of the world's population with varying degree of intensity. More than 85% of halitosis originates from oral bacterial infections. Foul-smelling breath mainly results from bacterial production of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) such as hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. To date, major treatments for elimination of oral malodor include periodontal therapy combined with antibiotics or antimicrobial agents, and mechanical approaches including tooth and tongue cleaning. These treatments may transiently reduce VSCs but carry risks of generating toxicity, increasing resistant strains and misbalancing the resident human flora. Therefore, there is a need to develop alternative therapeutic modalities for halitosis. Plaque biofilms are the principal source for generating VSCs which are originally metabolized from amino acids during co-aggregation of oral bacteria. Blocking the bacterial coaggregation, therefore, may prevent various biofilm-associated oral diseases such as periodontitis and halitosis. Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum), a Gram-negative anaerobe oral bacterium, is a main bacterial strain related to halitosis. Aggregation of F. nucleatum with other bacteria to form plaque biofilms in oral cavity causes bad breath. FomA, the major outer membrane protein of F. nucleatum, recruits other oral pathogenic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) in the periodontal pockets. A halitosis vaccine targeting F. bacterium FomA significantly abrogates the enhancement of bacterial co-aggregation, biofilms, production of VSCs, and gum inflammation mediated by an inter-species interaction of F. nucleatum with P. gingivalis, which suggests FomA of F. nucleatum to be a potential target for development of vaccines or drugs against bacterial biofilm formation and its associated pathogenicities.

  7. Comparison of Lactoperoxidase System in Saliva and Buffer Solution on the Inhibition of the Growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum%不同溶液中乳过氧化物酶系统对Pg和Fn的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红旭; 胡德渝

    2005-01-01

    比较唾液和缓冲液对含硫氰酸根离子(SCN -)或I -的乳过氧化物酶(LP)抗菌系统抑制牙龈卟啉单胞菌(Porphyromonas gingivalis,Pg)和具核梭杆菌(Fusobacterium nucleatum,Fn) 生长的影响.以Pg(6.0×10 8 /mL)为例,根据所含底物不同,将实验分 2 大组:第 1 大组(含SCN -),分 3 小组:Saliva(对照组),Saliva+(LP-SCN -)组,Buffer+(LP-SCN -)组;第 2 大组(含I -)分 3 小组:Saliva(对照组),Saliva+(LP-I -)组,Buffer+(LP-I -) 组;各组均含H 2O 2(对照组除外),Fn (1.0×10 8 /mL) 分组同Pg.将 2 大组分别在 37 ℃震荡水浴培养 30 min和 60 min,5 μL DTT终止反应,10 倍浓度系列稀释,接种于BHI-S琼脂培养基厌氧培养 4 d并记数CFU.反应至 30 min时,实验组抑制Pg和Fn生长的作用明显高于对照组(P<0.05),Buffer+(LP-I -) 组抑制Pg和Fn生长的作用明显高于Saliva+(LP-I -) 组,且持续到 60 min(P<0.05);反应 60 min时,Buffer+(LP-SCN -) 组抑制Pg生长的作用明显高于Saliva+(LP-SCN -) 组(P<0.05).LP系统在唾液和缓冲液中均能有效抑制Pg和Fn的生长,但是唾液的存在可削弱LP抗菌系统的抑菌作用.

  8. Prelude to Oral Microbes and Chronic Diseases: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Atanasova, Kalina R.; Yilmaz, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Associations between oral and systemic health are ancient. Oral opportunistic bacteria, particularly, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, have recently been deviated from their traditional roles and arguably ascended to central players based on their participations in complex co-dependent mechanisms of diverse systemic chronic diseases risk and pathogenesis, including cancers, rheumatoid-arthritis, and diabetes.

  9. Infections caused by Fusobacterium in children: a 14-year single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamriz, Oded; Engelhard, Dan; Temper, Violeta; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Benenson, Shmuel; Brooks, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Ariel; Stepensky, Polina; Koplewitz, Benjamin; Kaufmann, Michal; Averbuch, Diana

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed at reviewing our experience with infections caused by Fusobacterium in children. A retrospective analysis of medical records of children admitted to Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center from 2000 to 2013, in whom Fusobacterium spp. was identified in any specimen. A total of 22 patients (males = 12) at a mean ± SE age of 5 ± 1 (range 1-17) years, were identified. The most common complication was abscess formation (n = 11, 50 %). Eight children (36.4 %) had intracranial complications, including brain abscess (n = 4), meningitis (n = 4) and cerebral sinus vein thrombosis (CSVT, n = 5). Seventeen children (77 %) had bacteremia. Primary site of infection was otogenic (n = 9), oropharyngeal (n = 7), respiratory (n = 2), sinuses (n = 2), intra-abdominal (n = 1) and mucositis (n = 1). Fourteen cases were caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, including four cases with CSVT, 7/8 cases of mastoiditis, four of them with subperiosteal abscess formation; all four cases with meningitis and two brain abscesses. Fifteen (68 %) patients required surgical intervention and 3 (14 %) received anti-coagulation therapy. Excluding one patient with overwhelming sepsis with fatal outcome, all patients recovered. Fusobacterium infections in children can cause a diverse spectrum of disease and is associated with high rates of abscess formation and intracranial complications. Although Fusobacterium nucleatum is abundant in the oral cavity, F. necrophorum is the main pathogen that causes severe infections in healthy children.

  10. Study of Antagonistic Effects of Sanguicin on Salivary Biofilm of Porphyromonas Gingivalis and Fusobacterium Nucleatum in Vitro.%血链球菌细菌素对唾液生物膜中牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌拮抗作用的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晟利; 李旭明; 王琪波; 李海清; 李春梅

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects ot sanguicin extracted from streptococcus sanguis on salivary biofilm of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F.n) in vitro.Methods: Ultrasonic, centrifugation and ammonium sulfate were used to extract sanguicin.The minimal inhibitory concentration(MIC) of sanguicin against P.g and F.n was measured by the broth dilution technique.Biofilms formed by P.g and F.n were observed by confocal laser scan microscope(CLSM) to determine the percentage of vital cells.Results: The MIC of Sanguicin on planktonic P.g and F.n was 0.5mg/ml and the percentage of vital bacteria of biofilm reduced significantly after using Sanguicin (P<0.05).Conclusion: Sanguicin is an effective anti-P.g and F.n agent in both planktonic and the biofilms.%目的:提取血链球菌标准菌株(ATCC10556)细菌素,研究其对唾液生物膜中牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌的拮抗作用.方法:通过超声破碎,高速离心,盐析等方法提取血链球菌细菌素;采用二倍稀释法,测定血链球菌细菌素对浮游状态下牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌的最小抑制浓度(MIC);在体外建立牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌唾液生物膜模型,利用激光共聚焦扫描电镜观察该生物膜中细菌活性的变化.结果:血链球菌细菌素对浮游状态下的牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌的MIC为0.5 g/L;使用血链球菌细菌素作用牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌生物膜,活菌百分比显著下降,与对照组相比具有显著性差异(P<0.05).结论:血链球菌细菌素对浮游状态下和生物膜中的牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌生长均有显著的抑制作用.

  11. Gingival Epithelial Cell Transcriptional Responses to Commensal and Opportunistic Oral Microbial Species▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Mans, Jeffrey J.; Mao, Song; Lopez, M. Cecilia; Baker, Henry V.; Handfield, Martin; Lamont, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling and ontology tools were utilized to define the biological pathways of gingival epithelial cells modulated by coculture with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii and the opportunistic commensal Fusobacterium nucleatum. Overall, F. nucleatum and S. gordonii perturbed the gingival epithelial cell transcriptome much less significantly than the oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans perturbed the transcriptome, indicating that there was a greater degree of host adaptation by the commensal species (M. Handfield, J. J. Mans, G. Zheng, M. C. Lopez, S. Mao, A. Progulske-Fox, G. Narasimhan, H. V. Baker, and R. J. Lamont, Cell. Microbiol. 7:811-823, 2005). The biological pathways significantly impacted by F. nucleatum and S. gordonii included the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. Differential regulation of GADD45 and DUSP4, key components of the MAPK pathway, was confirmed at the protein level by Western blotting. Modulation of the MAPK pathway is likely to affect host cell proliferation and differentiation. In addition, both the MAPK and Toll-like receptor pathways ultimately converge on cytokine gene expression. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of secreted interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 demonstrated that F. nucleatum induced production of these cytokines, whereas S. gordonii inhibited secretion from the epithelial cells. Stimulation of secretion of proinflammatory cytokines from epithelial cells may reflect the invasive phenotype of F. nucleatum and contribute to the greater pathogenic potential of F. nucleatum than of S. gordonii. PMID:17307939

  12. Gingival epithelial cell transcriptional responses to commensal and opportunistic oral microbial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Mans, Jeffrey J; Mao, Song; Lopez, M Cecilia; Baker, Henry V; Handfield, Martin; Lamont, Richard J

    2007-05-01

    Transcriptional profiling and ontology tools were utilized to define the biological pathways of gingival epithelial cells modulated by coculture with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii and the opportunistic commensal Fusobacterium nucleatum. Overall, F. nucleatum and S. gordonii perturbed the gingival epithelial cell transcriptome much less significantly than the oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans perturbed the transcriptome, indicating that there was a greater degree of host adaptation by the commensal species (M. Handfield, J. J. Mans, G. Zheng, M. C. Lopez, S. Mao, A. Progulske-Fox, G. Narasimhan, H. V. Baker, and R. J. Lamont, Cell. Microbiol. 7:811-823, 2005). The biological pathways significantly impacted by F. nucleatum and S. gordonii included the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. Differential regulation of GADD45 and DUSP4, key components of the MAPK pathway, was confirmed at the protein level by Western blotting. Modulation of the MAPK pathway is likely to affect host cell proliferation and differentiation. In addition, both the MAPK and Toll-like receptor pathways ultimately converge on cytokine gene expression. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of secreted interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 demonstrated that F. nucleatum induced production of these cytokines, whereas S. gordonii inhibited secretion from the epithelial cells. Stimulation of secretion of proinflammatory cytokines from epithelial cells may reflect the invasive phenotype of F. nucleatum and contribute to the greater pathogenic potential of F. nucleatum than of S. gordonii.

  13. Fusobacterium infections in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arane, Karen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Question A 2-year-old patient in my practice with acute otitis media that has progressed to mastoiditis with a high fever returns with positive culture results for Fusobacterium. What should I do next? Answer Fusobacterium is a genus of anaerobic bacteria. Although Fusobacterium infections are rare, they can become severe if not treated promptly. Appropriate treatment is combination antibiotic therapy consisting of a β-lactam (penicillin, cephalosporin) and an anaerobic antimicrobial agent (metronidazole, clindamycin). At times surgical involvement is required for mastoiditis such as drainage of abscesses or insertion of a ventilation tube. Delayed treatment of an infection caused by Fusobacterium can lead to serious complications, including Lemierre syndrome. Children should be seen in a hospital for close monitoring. PMID:27737977

  14. Fusobacterium Liver Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben D. Buelow

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium is well characterized as an oropharyngeal pathogen that may induce a septic thrombophlebitis by direct extension of abscess into an adjacent neck vessel (Lemierre's syndrome; its potential for visceral abscess formation, however, remains under-recognized. A 65-year-old man with a recent history of multiple rim-enhancing liver lesions presented to the emergency room with fever and abdominal pain. Based on interval increase in the size of the lesions, abscess was suspected. A liver biopsy was performed, and although no organism could be identified on routine microscopy, Warthin-Starry stain revealed Gram-negative bacilli consistent with an anaerobic Fusobacterium species as the underlying etiology of liver abscess formation. Subsequent anaerobic culture results confirmed the diagnosis. This case highlights the importance of consideration for Fusobacterium infection in the setting of liver abscess if anaerobic organisms have not yet been excluded on initial culture evaluation.

  15. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  16. Empiema por Fusobacterium necrophorum

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    ML. Valle Feijoo

    2014-09-01

    Systemic infection by Fusobacerium necrophorum is characterized by the classic triad of thrombosis of the jugular internal vein, bacteriemia and metastatic spread and it is known as Lemiere syndrome (LS, post-amigdalitis sepsis or necrobacillosis. Pulmonary impairement due to septic embolism is very common in LS, but Fusobacterium necrophorum is hardly ever found in empyemas without LS. We report a new case.

  17. Interaction of oral bacteria with gingival epithelial cell multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, B C; Moffatt, C E; Hagerty, D; Whitmore, S E; Brown, T A; Graves, D T; Lamont, R J

    2011-06-01

    Primary gingival epithelial cells were cultured in multilayers as a model for the study of interactions with oral bacteria associated with health and periodontal disease. Multilayers maintained at an air-liquid interface in low-calcium medium displayed differentiation and cytokeratin properties characteristic of junctional epithelium. Multilayers were infected with fluorescently labeled Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum or Streptococcus gordonii, and bacterial association was determined by confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis. Porphyromonas gingivalis invaded intracellularly and spread from cell to cell; A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum remained extracellular and showed intercellular movement through the multilayer; whereas S. gordonii remained extracellular and predominantly associated with the superficial cell layer. None of the bacterial species disrupted barrier function as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. P. gingivalis did not elicit secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. However, A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. gordonii induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6 and IL-8 secretion; and F. nucleatum stimulated production of IL-1β and TNF-α. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum and S. gordonii, but not P. gingivalis, increased levels of apoptosis after 24 h infection. The results indicate that the organisms with pathogenic potential were able to traverse the epithelium, whereas the commensal bacteria did not. In addition, distinct host responses characterized the interaction between the junctional epithelium and oral bacteria.

  18. Inactivating effects of the lactoperoxidase system on bacterial lyases involved in oral malodour production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Manabu; Shin, Kouichirou; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Hironaka, Shouji

    2015-10-01

    The main components of oral malodour have been identified as volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), including hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH). The lactoperoxidase (LPO) system (consisting of LPO, glucose oxidase, glucose and thiocyanate) was previously shown to exhibit antimicrobial activities against some oral bacteria in vitro and suppressive effects on VSCs in mouth air in a clinical trial. Here, we examined the in vitro effects of the LPO system on the activities of the bacterial lyases involved in the production of VSCs by oral anaerobes. The exposure of crude bacterial extracts of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis or purified methionine γ-lyase to the LPO system resulted in the inactivation of their lyase activities through l-cysteine and l-methionine, which was linked to the production of H(2)S and CH(3)SH, respectively. The exposure of living F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis cells to the LPO system resulted in the suppression of cell numbers and lyase activities. The inactivation of the crude bacterial extracts of F. nucleatum and purified methionine γ-lyase by the LPO system was partly recovered by the addition of DTT. Therefore, the LPO system may inactivate bacterial lyases including methionine γ-lyase by reacting with the free cysteine residues of lyases. These results suggested that the LPO system suppresses the production of VSCs not only through its antimicrobial effects, but also by its inactivating effects on the bacterial lyases of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis.

  19. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to analyze multispecies oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karygianni, Lamprini; Hellwig, Elmar; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) constitutes a favorable microbiological method for the analysis of spatial distribution of highly variable phenotypes found in multispecies oral biofilms. The combined use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) produces high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of individual bacteria in their natural environment. Here, we describe the application of M-FISH on early (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces naeslundii) and late colonizers (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Veillonella spp.) of in situ-formed oral biofilms, the acquisition of CLSM images, as well as the qualitative and quantitative analysis of these digitally obtained and processed images.

  20. Empiema por Fusobacterium necrophorum

    OpenAIRE

    ML. Valle Feijoo; M. Rodriguez Arias; A. Cobas Paz; J. De la Fuente Aguado

    2014-01-01

    Resumen La infección sistémica por Fusobacterium necrophorum se caracteriza por la tríada clásica de trombosis de la vena yugular interna, bacteriemia y focos metastásicos y se conoce como Síndrome de Lemierre (SL), sepsis post-angina o necrobacilosis. El compromiso pulmonar precipitado por la embolización séptica es extremadamente común en el SL, sin embargo el F. necrohorum raramente se asila en empiemas sin SL concurrente, por lo que hemos estimado oportuno comunicar un nuevo caso clíni...

  1. Strain-specific colonization patterns and serum modulation of multi-species oral biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyikoğlu, Basak; Ricker, Austin; Diaz, Patricia I

    2012-08-01

    Periodontitis results from an ecological shift in the composition of subgingival biofilms. Subgingival community maturation is modulated by inter-organismal interactions and the relationship of communities with the host. In an effort to better understand this process, we evaluated biofilm formation, with oral commensal species, by three strains of the subgingivally prevalent microorganism Fusobacterium nucleatum and four strains of the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. We also tested the effect of serum, which resembles gingival exudates, on subgingival biofilms. Biofilms were allowed to develop in flow cells using salivary medium. We found that although not all strains of F. nucleatum were able to grow in mono-species biofilms, forming a community with health-associated partners Actinomyces oris and Veillonella parvula promoted biofilm growth of all F. nucleatum strains. Strains of P. gingivalis also showed variable ability to form mono-species biofilms. P. gingivalis W50 and W83 did not form biofilms, while ATCC 33277 and 381 formed biofilm structures, but only strain ATCC 33277 grew over time. Unlike the enhanced growth of F. nucleatum with the two health-associated species, no strain of P. gingivalis grew in three-species communities with A. oris and V. parvula. However, addition of F. nucleatum facilitated growth of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 with health-associated partners. Importantly, serum negatively affected the adhesion of F. nucleatum, while it favored biofilm growth by P. gingivalis. This work highlights strain specificity in subgingival biofilm formation. Environmental factors such as serum alter the colonization patterns of oral microorganisms and could impact subgingival biofilms by selectively promoting pathogenic species.

  2. Perfil de isolamento e resistência a antimicrobianos de Fusobacterium spp. isolados do sulco gengival eqüino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva I.N.G.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 30 strains of Fusobacterium sp. isolated from gengival sulcus of 28 equines was studied in the period between January/1997 and April/1998. Bacterial isolation and antimicrobial resistance were determined by biochemical analyses and by the disk elution method. The species most frequently isolated was Fusobacterium nucleatum. The following resistance rates were observed: 10% for penicillin G, 87% for eritromycin, and 97% for sulfonamide. Theses results emphasize the need for monitoring the susceptibility patterns of this important bacterial group frequently isolated from normal sites in equines.

  3. Comparative Study on the Characteristics of Weissella cibaria CMU and Probiotic Strains for Oral Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Jang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics have been demonstrated as a new paradigm to substitute antibiotic treatment for dental caries, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis. The present work was conducted to compare the characteristics of oral care probiotics: Weissella cibaria CMU (Chonnam Medical University and four commercial probiotic strains. Survival rates under poor oral conditions, acid production, hydrogen peroxide production, as well as inhibition of biofilm formation, coaggregation, antibacterial activity, and inhibition of volatile sulfur compounds were evaluated. The viability of W. cibaria CMU was not affected by treatment of 100 mg/L lysozyme for 90 min and 1 mM hydrogen peroxide for 6 h. Interestingly, W. cibaria produced less acid and more hydrogen peroxide than the other four probiotics. W. cibaria inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans at lower concentrations (S. mutans/CMU = 8 and efficiently coaggregated with Fusobacterium nucleatum. W. cibaria CMU and two commercial probiotics, including Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus reuteri, showed high antibacterial activities (>97% against cariogens (S. mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus, and against periodontopathogens (F. nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. All of the lactic acid bacterial strains in this study significantly reduced levels of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan produced by F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis (p < 0.05. These results suggest that W. cibaria CMU is applicable as an oral care probiotic.

  4. Comparative Study on the Characteristics of Weissella cibaria CMU and Probiotic Strains for Oral Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hye-Jin; Kang, Mi-Sun; Yi, Sung-Hun; Hong, Ji-Young; Hong, Sang-Pil

    2016-12-20

    Probiotics have been demonstrated as a new paradigm to substitute antibiotic treatment for dental caries, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis. The present work was conducted to compare the characteristics of oral care probiotics: Weissella cibaria CMU (Chonnam Medical University) and four commercial probiotic strains. Survival rates under poor oral conditions, acid production, hydrogen peroxide production, as well as inhibition of biofilm formation, coaggregation, antibacterial activity, and inhibition of volatile sulfur compounds were evaluated. The viability of W. cibaria CMU was not affected by treatment of 100 mg/L lysozyme for 90 min and 1 mM hydrogen peroxide for 6 h. Interestingly, W. cibaria produced less acid and more hydrogen peroxide than the other four probiotics. W. cibaria inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans at lower concentrations (S. mutans/CMU = 8) and efficiently coaggregated with Fusobacterium nucleatum. W. cibaria CMU and two commercial probiotics, including Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus reuteri, showed high antibacterial activities (>97%) against cariogens (S. mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus), and against periodontopathogens (F. nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis). All of the lactic acid bacterial strains in this study significantly reduced levels of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan produced by F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis (p CMU is applicable as an oral care probiotic.

  5. Proteomics of Streptococcus gordonii within a model developing oral microbial community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrickson Erik L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus gordonii is one of several species that can initiate the formation of oral biofilms that develop into the complex multispecies microbial communities referred to as dental plaque. It is in the context of dental plaque that periodontal pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis cause disease. We have previously reported a whole cell quantitative proteomics investigation of P. gingivalis in a model dental plaque community of S. gordonii, P. gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Here we report the adaptation of S. gordonii to the same model. Results 1122 S. gordonii proteins were detected in S. gordonii control samples, 915 in communities with F. nucleatum, 849 with P. gingivalis, and 649 with all three organisms. Quantitative comparisons showed extensive proteome changes in association with F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis individually or both P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum together. The changes were species specific, though the P. gingivalis interaction may be dominant, indicated by large differences between the proteomes with F. nucleatum or P. gingivalis but limited changes between communities with P. gingivalis or both P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. The results were inspected manually and an ontology analysis conducted using DAVID. Extensive changes were seen in nutrition pathways with increases in energy metabolism and changes in the resulting byproducts, while the acid and sugar repressed PTS (phosphoenolpyruvate dependent phosphotransferase system sugar transport systems showed decreases. These results were seen across all the multispecies samples, though with different profiles according to the partner species. F. nucleatum association decreased proteins for the metabolic end products acetate and ethanol but increased lactate, the primary source of acidity from streptococcal cultures. P. gingivalis containing samples had a reduction in levels of proteins for ethanol and formate but increased proteins for

  6. Role of oral microbiome on oral cancers, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Yousefi, Mehdi; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-12-01

    The oral cavity is inhibited by many of the bacterial species. Some of them have a key role in the development of oral disease. Interrelationships between oral microbiome and systemic conditions such as head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Emerging evidence also suggests a link between periodontal disease and oral cancer, and the explanation being that chronic inflammation could be a major factor in both diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma is that the most frequently occurring malignancy of the oral cavity and adjacent sites, representing over 90% of all cancers. The incidence of oral cancer is increasing, significantly among young people and women. Worldwide there are 350,000-400,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. In this review we will discuss the association between the development of oral cancer in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic periodontitis, chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, candida, other microbes and described mechanisms which may be involved in these carcinoma.

  7. Decreased interleukin-2 responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis in generalized aggressive periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Tanja Skuldbøl; Løbner, Morten; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compromised T-cell responses to periodontal pathogens may contribute to the pathogenesis of generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP). In this study, we attempted to characterize T-helper cell (Th1, Th2, and Th17) responses in patients with GAgP and healthy controls upon stimulation...... with GAgP to Pg and Fn combined with adequate IL-2 responses to TT suggest an impaired antigen-specific T-cell reactivity with periodontal pathogens in GAgP. The decreased IFN-gamma responses of smokers within the patient group suggest that smoking may aggravate this impairment....

  8. Clinical Fusobacterium mortiferum Isolates Cluster with Undifferentiated Clostridium rectum Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Phylogenetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yangsoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The most commonly encountered clinical Fusobacterium species are F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum; other Fusobacteria, such as F. mortiferum and F. varium, have occasionally been isolated from human specimens. Clostridium rectum is a gram-positive species characterized as a straight bacillus with oval sub-terminal spores. The close 16S rRNA gene sequence relationship of C. rectum with the genus Fusobacterium is unexpected given their very different phenotypic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2015, a total of 19 Fusobacterium isolates were recovered from the colonic tissue of 10 patients at a university hospital. All isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The phylogenetic relationship among these isolates was estimated using the neighbor-joining method and the Molecular Evolutionary Genetic Analysis (MEGA) version 6. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the F. mortiferum isolates clustered into two groups - F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) and F. mortiferum ATCC 25557 (group II) - even though they are of the same species. Furthermore, the F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) showed a close phylogenetic relationship with C. rectum, even though C. rectum is classified as a gram-positive spore-producing bacillus. C. rectum is clearly unrelated to the genus Clostridium as it shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species from the genus Fusobacterium Therefore, additional methods such as Gram staining and other biochemical methods should be performed for Fusobacterium identification.

  9. Oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, R; Kirakodu, S S; Novak, K F; Ebersole, J L

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the use of a novel model of multispecies biofilms to stimulate profiles of cytokines/chemokines from oral epithelial cells that contribute to local inflammation in the periodontium. Streptococcus gordonii (Sg)/S. oralis (So)/S. sanguinis (Ss) and Sg/Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn)/Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) biofilms elicited significantly elevated levels of IL-1α and showed synergistic stimulatory activity compared with an additive effect of the 3 individual bacteria. Only the Sg/Actinomyces naeslundii (An)/Fn multispecies biofilms elicited IL-6 levels above those of control. IL-8 was a primary response to the Sg/An/Fn biofilms, albeit the level was not enhanced compared with a predicted composite level from the monospecies challenges. These results represent some of the first data documenting alterations in profiles of oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies biofilms.

  10. MPC-polymer reduces adherence and biofilm formation by oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, K; Yumoto, H; Miyamoto, K; Yamamoto, N; Murakami, K; Hoshino, Y; Matsuo, T; Miyake, Y

    2011-07-01

    Oral biofilms such as dental plaque cause dental caries and periodontitis, as well as aspiration pneumonia and infectious endocarditis by translocation. Hence, the suppression of oral biofilm formation is an issue of considerable importance. Mechanical removal, disinfectants, inhibition of polysaccharide formation, and artificial sugar have been used for the reduction of oral biofilm. From the viewpoint of the inhibition of bacterial adherence, we investigated whether aqueous biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-polymer can reduce streptococcal colonization and biofilm formation. We examined the effects of MPC-polymer on streptococcal adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and oral epithelial cells, and the adherence of Fusobacterium nucleatum to streptococcal biofilm. MPC-polymer application markedly inhibited both the adherence and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and streptococcal adherence to oral epithelial cells, and reduced the adherence of F. nucleatum to streptococcal biofilms. A small-scale clinical trial revealed that mouthrinsing with MPC-polymer inhibited the increase of oral bacterial numbers, especially of S. mutans. These findings suggest that MPC-polymer is a potent inhibitor of bacterial adherence and biofilm development, and may be useful to prevent dental-plaque-related diseases. (UMIN Clinical Trial Registry UMIN000003471).

  11. Nanoparticle-encapsulated chlorhexidine against oral bacterial biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaminda Jayampath Seneviratne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chlorhexidine (CHX is a widely used antimicrobial agent in dentistry. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel mesoporous silica nanoparticle-encapsulated pure CHX (Nano-CHX, and its mechanical profile and antimicrobial properties against oral biofilms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The release of CHX from the Nano-CHX was characterized by UV/visible absorption spectroscopy. The antimicrobial properties of Nano-CHX were evaluated in both planktonic and biofilm modes of representative oral pathogenic bacteria. The Nano-CHX demonstrated potent antibacterial effects on planktonic bacteria and mono-species biofilms at the concentrations of 50-200 µg/mL against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Enterococccus faecalis. Moreover, Nano-CHX effectively suppressed multi-species biofilms such as S. mutans, F. nucleatum, A. actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis up to 72 h. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This pioneering study demonstrates the potent antibacterial effects of the Nano-CHX on oral biofilms, and it may be developed as a novel and promising anti-biofilm agent for clinical use.

  12. Antibacterial activity of commercially available plant-derived essential oils against oral pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardají, D K R; Reis, E B; Medeiros, T C T; Lucarini, R; Crotti, A E M; Martins, C H G

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the antibacterial activity of 15 commercially available plant-derived essential oils (EOs) against a panel of oral pathogens. The broth microdilution method afforded the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the assayed EOs. The EO obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Lauraceae) (CZ-EO) displayed moderate activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL), Actinomyces naeslundii (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL), Prevotella nigrescens (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL) and Streptococcus mutans (MIC = 200 μg/mL; MBC = 400 μg/mL). (Z)-isosafrole (85.3%) was the main chemical component of this oil. We did not detect cinnamaldehyde, previously described as the major constituent of CZ-EO, in specimens collected in other countries.

  13. Oral microbial biofilm stimulation of epithelial cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Novak, Karen F; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    Oral bacterial biofilms trigger chronic inflammatory responses in the host that can result in the tissue destructive events of periodontitis. However, the characteristics of the capacity of specific host cell types to respond to these biofilms remain ill-defined. This report describes the use of a novel model of bacterial biofilms to stimulate oral epithelial cells and profile select cytokines and chemokines that contribute to the local inflammatory environment in the periodontium. Monoinfection biofilms were developed with Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses. Biofilms, as well as planktonic cultures of these same bacterial species, were incubated under anaerobic conditions with a human oral epithelial cell line, OKF4, for up to 24h. Gro-1α, IL1α, IL-6, IL-8, TGFα, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, and IP-10 were shown to be produced in response to a range of the planktonic or biofilm forms of these species. P. gingivalis biofilms significantly inhibited the production of all of these cytokines and chemokines, except MIP-1α. Generally, the biofilms of all species inhibited Gro-1α, TGFα, and Fractalkine production, while F. nucleatum biofilms stimulated significant increases in IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and IP-10. A. naeslundii biofilms induced elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10. The oral streptococcal species in biofilms or planktonic forms were poor stimulants for any of these mediators from the epithelial cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that oral bacteria in biofilms elicit a substantially different profile of responses compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Moreover, certain oral species are highly stimulatory when in biofilms and interact with host cell receptors to trigger pathways of responses that appear quite divergent from individual bacteria.

  14. Preventive Effects of Houttuynia cordata Extract for Oral Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Sekita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Houttuynia cordata (HC (Saururaceae has been used internally and externally as a traditional medicine and as an herbal tea for healthcare in Japan. Our recent survey showed that HC poultice (HCP prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC had been frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases with high effectiveness. Our experimental study also demonstrated that ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP has antibacterial, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory effects against S. aureus which caused purulent skin diseases. In this study, we focused on novel effects of HCP against oral infectious diseases, such as periodontal disease and dental caries. We determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of water solution of HCP ethanol extract (wHCP against important oral pathogens and investigated its cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects on human oral epithelial cells. wHCP had moderate antimicrobial effects against some oral microorganisms and profound antibiofilm effects against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In addition, wHCP had no cytotoxic effects and could inhibit interleukin-8 and CCL20 productions by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human oral keratinocytes. Our findings suggested that wHCP may be clinically useful for preventing oral infectious diseases as a mouthwash for oral care.

  15. Preventive Effects of Houttuynia cordata Extract for Oral Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekita, Yasuko; Murakami, Keiji; Amoh, Takashi; Ogata, Shohei; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Kashiwada, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (HC) (Saururaceae) has been used internally and externally as a traditional medicine and as an herbal tea for healthcare in Japan. Our recent survey showed that HC poultice (HCP) prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC had been frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases with high effectiveness. Our experimental study also demonstrated that ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP) has antibacterial, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory effects against S. aureus which caused purulent skin diseases. In this study, we focused on novel effects of HCP against oral infectious diseases, such as periodontal disease and dental caries. We determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of water solution of HCP ethanol extract (wHCP) against important oral pathogens and investigated its cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects on human oral epithelial cells. wHCP had moderate antimicrobial effects against some oral microorganisms and profound antibiofilm effects against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In addition, wHCP had no cytotoxic effects and could inhibit interleukin-8 and CCL20 productions by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human oral keratinocytes. Our findings suggested that wHCP may be clinically useful for preventing oral infectious diseases as a mouthwash for oral care. PMID:27413739

  16. Clinical Research of Synthetic Antibacterial Peptide in Antibacterial Properties of Oral Bacteria%人工合成抗菌肽对口腔细菌抗菌性能的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓丹

    2016-01-01

    菌肽对口腔细菌的抗菌性能不同,Temporin-1CEa的最小抑菌浓度较小,且抑菌效果佳。%Objective To investigate synthetic antibacterial peptide in antibacterial properties of oral bacteria.Methods 9 kinds of synthetic antibacterial peptide(Brevinin,chensinin-1,chensinin-1b,L-K5V1,L-K6,L-K6V1, L-K6V2 and temporin lcea,Temporin-1CEb)and 6 kinds of oral bacteria(Candida albicans,Fusobacterium nucleatum, Lactobacilus acidophilus,Streptococcus mutans,Streptococcus salivarius,Streptococcus sanguinis)were used to vitro experiment.Synthetic antibacterial peptide in antibacterial properties of oral bacteria was analyzed.Results Chensinin-1b,L-K5V1,L-K6,L-K6V1,L-K6V2,Temporin-1CEa had high inhibitory rate with Candida albicans.Brevinin, chensinin-1b,L-K5V1,L-K6,L-K6V1,L-K6V2,Temporin-1CEa,Temporin-1CEb had high inhibitory rate with Fusobacterium nucleatum,Streptococcus mutans,Streptococcus salivarius,Streptococcus sanguinis.Brevinin,chensinin-1,chensinin-1b, L-K5V1,L-K6,L-K6V1,L-K6V2,Temporin-1CEa,Temporin-1CEb had high inhibitory rate with Lactobacilus acidophilus. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of Brevinin:Streptococcus sanguinis>Fusobacterium nucleatum>Streptococcus salivarius>Streptococcus mutans>Lactobacilus acidophilus.Minimum inhibitory concentrations of chensinin-1: Lactobacilus acidophilus.Minimum inhibitory concentrations of chensinin-1b:Lactobacilus acidophilus>Streptococcus salivarius>Streptococcus sanguinis>Fusobacterium nucleatum>Candida albicans>Streptococcus mutans. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of L-K5V1:Lactobacilus acidophilus>Fusobacterium nucleatum>Streptococcus mutans>Candida albicans>Streptococcus salivarius>Streptococcus sanguinis.Minimum inhibitory concentrations of L-K6:Streptococcus salivarius>Streptococcus sanguinis>Candida albicans>Streptococcus mutans>Fusobacterium nucleatum>Lactobacilus acidophilus.Minimum inhibitory concentrations of L-K6V1:Lactobacilus acidophilus>Streptococcus sanguinis>Streptococcus salivarius

  17. Oral biofilm architecture on natural teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M Barbara M; Degener, John E; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmür, Rudolf; Harmsen, Hermie J M

    2010-02-24

    Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and accessibility. Despite descriptions of initial plaque formation on the tooth surface, studies on mature plaque and plaque structure below the gum are limited to landmark studies from the 1970s, without appreciating the breadth of microbial diversity in the plaque. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization to localize in vivo the most abundant species from different phyla and species associated with periodontitis on seven embedded teeth obtained from four different subjects. The data showed convincingly the dominance of Actinomyces sp., Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes in subgingival plaque. The latter proved to be new with a possibly important role in host-pathogen interaction due to its localization in close proximity to immune cells. The present study identified for the first time in vivo that Lactobacillus sp. are the central cells of bacterial aggregates in subgingival plaque, and that Streptococcus sp. and the yeast Candida albicans form corncob structures in supragingival plaque. Finally, periodontal pathogens colonize already formed biofilms and form microcolonies therein. These in vivo observations on oral biofilms provide a clear vision on biofilm architecture and the spatial distribution of predominant species.

  18. Oral biofilm architecture on natural teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Zijnge

    Full Text Available Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and accessibility. Despite descriptions of initial plaque formation on the tooth surface, studies on mature plaque and plaque structure below the gum are limited to landmark studies from the 1970s, without appreciating the breadth of microbial diversity in the plaque. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization to localize in vivo the most abundant species from different phyla and species associated with periodontitis on seven embedded teeth obtained from four different subjects. The data showed convincingly the dominance of Actinomyces sp., Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes in subgingival plaque. The latter proved to be new with a possibly important role in host-pathogen interaction due to its localization in close proximity to immune cells. The present study identified for the first time in vivo that Lactobacillus sp. are the central cells of bacterial aggregates in subgingival plaque, and that Streptococcus sp. and the yeast Candida albicans form corncob structures in supragingival plaque. Finally, periodontal pathogens colonize already formed biofilms and form microcolonies therein. These in vivo observations on oral biofilms provide a clear vision on biofilm architecture and the spatial distribution of predominant species.

  19. Oral Gram-negative anaerobic bacilli as a reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes facilitating infections with multiresistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, Clarisse; Tamanai-Shacoori, Zohreh; Ehrmann, Elodie; Dupont, Anais; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Bousarghin, Latifa; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Many β-lactamases have been described in various Gram-negative bacilli (Capnocytophaga, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, etc.) of the oral cavity, belonging to class A of the Ambler classification (CepA, CblA, CfxA, CSP-1 and TEM), class B (CfiA) or class D in Fusobacterium nucleatum (FUS-1). The minimum inhibitory concentrations of β-lactams are variable and this variation is often related to the presence of plasmids or other mobile genetic elements (MGEs) that modulate the expression of resistance genes. DNA persistence and bacterial promiscuity in oral biofilms also contribute to genetic transformation and conjugation in this particular microcosm. Overexpression of efflux pumps is facilitated because the encoding genes are located on MGEs, in some multidrug-resistant clinical isolates, similar to conjugative transposons harbouring genes encoding β-lactamases. All these facts lead us to consider the oral cavity as an important reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes and a privileged place for genetic exchange, especially in commensal strictly anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Hangeshashinto on Growth of Oral Microorganisms

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    Haruka Fukamachi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis (OM in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy has a significant impact on quality of life, and causes considerable morbidity. Oral microorganisms are likely to intensify the inflammatory process and aggravate the formation of ulcers. Hangeshashinto (HST, a Japanese kampo medicine, has been reported to be effective when used as a gargle for the treatment of OM. To clarify the effects of HST on oral microorganisms, we assessed its antimicrobial activity against 27 microbial species, including 19 oral bacteria and one fungus. HST extract inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria, including Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella melaninogenica, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, though inhibitory effects were less pronounced for Gram-positive bacteria and the fungal strain. We then investigated the effects of antibacterial activities on 15 purified ingredients of HST and determined that baicalein, berberine, coptisine, [6]-shogaol, and homogentisic acid actively inhibited the growth of these bacteria. These findings showed that HST inhibits the growth of specific Gram-negative periodontopathogenic bacteria, which are significant pathogens in OM, without disturbing the normal oral flora. Our data suggest that HST may be a useful treatment for OM in patients undergoing anticancer treatment.

  1. Antimicrobial efficacy of 3 oral antiseptics containing octenidine, polyhexamethylene biguanide, or Citroxx: can chlorhexidine be replaced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Nadine; Widmer, Andreas F; Waltimo, Tuomas; Kulik, Eva M; Weiger, Roland; Filipuzzi-Jenny, Elisabeth; Walter, Clemens

    2010-07-01

    Use of oral antiseptics decreases the bacterial load in the oral cavity. To compare the antimicrobial activity of 3 novel oral antiseptics with that of chlorhexidine, which is considered the "gold standard" of oral hygiene. Comparative in vitro study. Four common oral microorganisms (Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, and Fusobacterium nucleatum) were tested under standard conditions and at different concentrations, by use of a broth dilution assay and an agar diffusion assay and by calculating the log10 reduction factor (RF). The antimicrobial activity of each antiseptic was assessed by counting the difference in bacterial densities (ie, the log10 number of colony-forming units of bacteria) before and after the disinfection process. The oral antiseptics containing octenidine (with an RF in the range of 7.1-8.24 CFU/mL) and polyhexamethylene biguanide (with an RF in the range of 7.1-8.24 CFU/mL) demonstrated antimicrobial activity comparable to that of chlorhexidine (with an RF in the range of 1.03-8.24 CFU/mL), whereas the mouth rinse containing Citroxx (Citroxx Biosciences; with an RF in the range of 0.22-1.36 CFU/mL) showed significantly weaker antimicrobial efficacy. Overall, octenidine and polyhexamethylene biguanide were more active at lower concentrations.conclusion. Oral antiseptics containing the antimicrobial agent octenidine or polyhexamethylene biguanide may be considered as potent alternatives to chlorhexidine-based preparations.

  2. Emerging role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis: a review with special reference to perio-pathogenic bacteria

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    Manosha Perera

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer, primarily oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, continues to be a major global health problem with high incidence and low survival rates. While the major risk factors for this malignancy, mostly lifestyle related, have been identified, around 15% of oral cancer cases remain unexplained. In light of evidence implicating bacteria in the aetiology of some cancer types, several epidemiological studies have been conducted in the last decade, employing methodologies ranging from traditional culture techniques to 16S rRNA metagenomics, to assess the possible role of bacteria in OSCC. While these studies have demonstrated differences in microbial composition between cancerous and healthy tissues, they have failed to agree on specific bacteria or patterns of oral microbial dysbiosis to implicate in OSCC. On the contrary, some oral taxa, particularly Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, show strong oral carcinogenic potential in vitro and in animal studies. Bacteria are thought to contribute to oral carcinogenesis via inhibition of apoptosis, activation of cell proliferation, promotion of cellular invasion, induction of chronic inflammation, and production of carcinogens. This narrative review provides a critical analysis of and an update on the association between bacteria and oral carcinogenesis and the possible mechanisms underlying it.

  3. Emerging role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis: a review with special reference to perio-pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Manosha; Al-hebshi, Nezar Noor; Speicher, David J.; Perera, Irosha; Johnson, Newell W.

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer, primarily oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), continues to be a major global health problem with high incidence and low survival rates. While the major risk factors for this malignancy, mostly lifestyle related, have been identified, around 15% of oral cancer cases remain unexplained. In light of evidence implicating bacteria in the aetiology of some cancer types, several epidemiological studies have been conducted in the last decade, employing methodologies ranging from traditional culture techniques to 16S rRNA metagenomics, to assess the possible role of bacteria in OSCC. While these studies have demonstrated differences in microbial composition between cancerous and healthy tissues, they have failed to agree on specific bacteria or patterns of oral microbial dysbiosis to implicate in OSCC. On the contrary, some oral taxa, particularly Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, show strong oral carcinogenic potential in vitro and in animal studies. Bacteria are thought to contribute to oral carcinogenesis via inhibition of apoptosis, activation of cell proliferation, promotion of cellular invasion, induction of chronic inflammation, and production of carcinogens. This narrative review provides a critical analysis of and an update on the association between bacteria and oral carcinogenesis and the possible mechanisms underlying it. PMID:27677454

  4. Oral microbiota species in acute apical endodontic abscesses

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    Noelle George

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Acute apical abscesses are serious endodontic diseases resulting from pulpal infection with opportunistic oral microorganisms. The objective of this study was to identify and compare the oral microbiota in patients (N=18 exhibiting acute apical abscesses, originating from the demographic region in Portland, Oregon. The study hypothesis is that abscesses obtained from this demographic region may contain unique microorganisms not identified in specimens from other regions. Design: Endodontic abscesses were sampled from patients at the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU School of Dentistry. DNA from abscess specimens was subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification using 16S rRNA gene-specific primers and Cy3-dCTP labeling. Labeled DNA was then applied to microbial microarrays (280 species generated by the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray Laboratory (Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA. Results: The most prevalent microorganisms, found across multiple abscess specimens, include Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Megasphaera species clone CS025, Prevotella multisaccharivorax, Atopobium rimae, and Porphyromonas endodontalis. The most abundant microorganisms, found in highest numbers within individual abscesses, include F. nucleatum, P. micra, Streptococcus Cluster III, Solobacterium moorei, Streptococcus constellatus, and Porphyromonas endodontalis. Strong bacterial associations were identified between Prevotella multisaccharivorax, Acidaminococcaceae species clone DM071, Megasphaera species clone CS025, Actinomyces species clone EP053, and Streptococcus cristatus (all with Spearman coefficients >0.9. Conclusions: Cultivable and uncultivable bacterial species have been identified in endodontic abscesses obtained from the Portland, Oregon demographic region, and taxa identifications correlated well with other published studies, with the exception of Treponema and Streptococcus cristae, which

  5. Effect of disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora on the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, G. R.; Thornton, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Oral pretreatment of mice with either a mixture of kanamycin and erythromycin or metronidazole to modify the gut microflora greatly enhanced the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A given by mouth. This lends support to the suggestion that disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora in animals such as cattle, which often carry the organism in the rumen, may lead to intestinal multiplication and faecal excretion, thereby providing a source of infection that may lead to nec...

  6. Synergistic Antibacterial Effects of Nanoparticles Encapsulated with Scutellaria baicalensis and Pure Chlorhexidine on Oral Bacterial Biofilms

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    Ken Cham-Fai Leung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Scutellaria baicalensis (SB is a traditional Chinese medicine for treating infectious and inflammatory diseases. Our recent study shows potent antibacterial effects of nanoparticle-encapsulated chlorhexidine (Nano-CHX. Herein, we explored the synergistic effects of the nanoparticle-encapsulated SB (Nano-SB and Nano-CHX on oral bacterial biofilms. Loading efficiency of Nano-SB was determined by thermogravimetric analysis, and its releasing profile was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatographyusing baicalin (a flavonoid compound of SB as the marker. The mucosal diffusion assay on Nano-SB was undertaken in a porcine model. The antibacterial effects of the mixed nanoparticles (Nano-MIX of Nano-SB and Nano-CHX at 9:1 (w/w ratio were analyzed in both planktonic and biofilm modes of representative oral bacteria. The Nano-MIX was effective on the mono-species biofilms of Streptococcus (S. mutans, S. sobrinus, Fusobacterium (F. nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter (A. actinomycetemcomitans (MIC 50 μg/mL at 24 h, and exhibited an enhanced effect against the multi-species biofilms such as S. mutans, F. nucleatum, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas (P. gingivalis (MIC 12.5 μg/mL at 24 h that was supported by the findings of both scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM. This study shows enhanced synergistic antibacterial effects of the Nano-MIX on common oral bacterial biofilms, which could be potentially developed as a novel antimicrobial agent for clinical oral/periodontal care.

  7. The oral microbiome and adverse pregnancy outcomes

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    Cobb CM

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Charles M Cobb,1 Patricia J Kelly,2 Karen B Williams,3 Shilpa Babbar,4 Mubashir Angolkar,5 Richard J Derman6 1Department of Periodontics, School of Dentistry, 2Department of Public Health Nursing, School of Nursing and Health Studies, 3Department of Biomedical & Health Informatics, School of Medicine, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, 4Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Women’s Health, Division of Maternal & Fetal Medicine, School of Medicine, Saint Louis University, St Louis, MO, USA; 5Department of Public Health, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College (JNMC, KLE University, Karnataka, India; 6Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Significant evidence supports an association between periodontal pathogenic bacteria and preterm birth and preeclampsia. The virulence properties assigned to specific oral pathogenic bacteria, for example, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Filifactor alocis, Campylobacter rectus, and others, render them as potential collaborators in adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Several pathways have been suggested for this association: 1 hematogenous spread (bacteremia of periodontal pathogens; 2 hematogenous spread of multiple mediators of inflammation that are generated by the host and/or fetal immune response to pathogenic bacteria; and 3 the possibility of oral microbial pathogen transmission, with subsequent colonization, in the vaginal microbiome resulting from sexual practices. As periodontal disease is, for the most part, preventable, the medical and dental public health communities can address intervention strategies to control oral inflammatory disease, lessen the systemic inflammatory burden, and ultimately reduce the potential for adverse pregnancy outcomes. This article reviews the oral, vaginal, and placental microbiomes, considers their potential impact on preterm labor, and the future

  8. Oral bacteria in placental tissues: increased molecular detection in pregnant periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, V; O'Valle, F; Pozo, E; Puertas, A; León, R; Mesa, F

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the DNA of oral bacteria in placental samples from women with and without periodontitis who had or had not had preterm births and/or low birthweight (PB/LBW) neonates. Data were gathered from 57 puerperal women in relation to socio-demographic, gynaecological, and periodontal variables and to placental histomorphology. Fifty-seven biopsies, 28 from mothers with periodontitis, were taken aseptically from preterm placentas (n = 36) and from full-term placentas (n = 21). Total DNA was extracted, and the presence of 15 oral bacteria was assessed using Nested-PCR. The placentas from women with periodontitis showed a higher prevalence of periodontopathogens compared to those from women without periodontitis (P = 0.009). Samples showed low prevalences of Actinomyces israelii, Parvimonas micra and Tannerella forsythia. An association was found between Eikenella corrodens in placenta and periodontitis (P = 0.002). The most ubiquitous bacterium, Fusobacterium nucleatum, was more prevalent in mothers with periodontitis and PB/LBW (P = 0.033). Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were not detected. These results, along with previous findings, show that oral bacteria may be normally present in the placenta, however, the levels of certain oral pathogens in the placenta would highly depend on the mother's periodontal state. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effect of metalloporphyrins on red autofluorescence from oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; van der Veen, Monique H; de Soet, Johannes J; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the red autofluorescence from bacterial species related to dental caries and periodontitis in the presence of different nutrients in the growth medium. Bacteria were grown anaerobically on tryptic soy agar (TSA) supplemented with nutrients, including magnesium-porphyrins from spinach and iron-porphyrins from heme. The autofluorescence was then assessed at 405 nm excitation. On the TSA without additives, no autofluorescence was observed from any of the species tested. On the TSA containing sheep blood, red autofluorescence was observed only from Parvimonas micra. When the TSA was supplemented with blood, hemin, and vitamin K, red autofluorescence was observed from Actinomyces naeslundii, Bifidobacterium dentium, and Streptococcus mutans. Finally, on the TSA supplemented with spinach extract, red autofluorescence was observed from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, A. naeslundii, Enterococcus faecalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Lactobacillus salivarius, S. mutans, and Veillonella parvula. We conclude that the bacteria related to dental caries and periodontal disease exhibit red autofluorescence. The autofluorescence characteristics of the tested strains depended on the nutrients present, such as metalloporphyrins, suggesting that the metabolic products of the oral biofilm could be responsible for red autofluorescence. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  10. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility of Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium species isolated from patients of the N. N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilnikova, Irina I; Dmitrieva, Natalia V

    2015-02-01

    In total 122 non-duplicate Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium spp isolated from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014 were involved in this study. Most of the strains belonged to the B. fragilis group (55%), followed by Prevotella strains (34.4%) and Fusobacterium spp (10.6%). The species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and they were identified on species level with a log (score) >2.0. The most common isolates were B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus and B. vulgatus. Among Prevotella species, the most frequently isolated species were P. buccae, P. buccalis, P. oris, P. denticola and P. nigrescens, and most of the Fusobacterium spp. were F. nucleatum. Susceptibilities of the strains were determined by the E-test methodology. The percentage of the susceptibility of B. fragilis group isolates were: metronidazole (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 97%; imipenem (MIC ≤2 μg/ml), 95.5%; amoxicillin/clavulanate (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 95.5% and clindamycin (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 77.6%. Three B. fragilis isolates proved to be multidrug-resistant (parallel resistance to imipenem, amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole or clindamycin was observed). All Prevotella strains tested were susceptible to imipenem and amoxicillin/clavulanate, whereas 78.6% of the pigmented Prevotella species and 46.4% of the non-pigmented species were resistant to penicillin (MIC >0.5 μg/ml). The susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin were 93% and 88%, respectively. All Fusobacterium strains were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, including penicillin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcriptional responses of Treponema denticola to other oral bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Juni; McHardy, Ian H; Simanian, Emil J; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2014-01-01

    The classic organization by Socransky and coworkers categorized the oral bacteria of the subgingival plaque into different complexes. Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia are grouped into the red complex that is highly correlated with periodontal disease. Socransky's work closely associates red with orange complex species such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia but not with members of the other complexes. While the relationship between species contained by these complexes is in part supported by their ability to physically attach to each other, the physiological consequences of these interactions and associations are less clear. In this study, we employed T. denticola as a model organism to analyze contact-dependent responses to interactions with species belonging to the same complex (P. gingivalis and T. forsythia), the closely associated orange complex (using F. nucleatum and P. intermedia as representatives) and the unconnected yellow complex (using Streptococcus sanguinis and S. gordonii as representatives). RNA was extracted from T. denticola alone as well as after pairwise co-incubation for 5 hrs with representatives of the different complexes, and the respective gene expression profiles were determined using microarrays. Numerous genes related to motility, metabolism, transport, outer membrane and hypothetical proteins were differentially regulated in T. denticola in the presence of the tested partner species. Further analysis revealed a significant overlap in the affected genes and we identified a general response to the presence of other species, those specific to two of the three complexes as well as individual complexes. Most interestingly, many predicted major antigens (e.g. flagella, Msp, CTLP) were suppressed in responses that included red complex species indicating that the presence of the most closely associated species induces immune-evasive strategies. In summary, the data presented here provide

  12. Transcriptional responses of Treponema denticola to other oral bacterial species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juni Sarkar

    Full Text Available The classic organization by Socransky and coworkers categorized the oral bacteria of the subgingival plaque into different complexes. Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia are grouped into the red complex that is highly correlated with periodontal disease. Socransky's work closely associates red with orange complex species such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia but not with members of the other complexes. While the relationship between species contained by these complexes is in part supported by their ability to physically attach to each other, the physiological consequences of these interactions and associations are less clear. In this study, we employed T. denticola as a model organism to analyze contact-dependent responses to interactions with species belonging to the same complex (P. gingivalis and T. forsythia, the closely associated orange complex (using F. nucleatum and P. intermedia as representatives and the unconnected yellow complex (using Streptococcus sanguinis and S. gordonii as representatives. RNA was extracted from T. denticola alone as well as after pairwise co-incubation for 5 hrs with representatives of the different complexes, and the respective gene expression profiles were determined using microarrays. Numerous genes related to motility, metabolism, transport, outer membrane and hypothetical proteins were differentially regulated in T. denticola in the presence of the tested partner species. Further analysis revealed a significant overlap in the affected genes and we identified a general response to the presence of other species, those specific to two of the three complexes as well as individual complexes. Most interestingly, many predicted major antigens (e.g. flagella, Msp, CTLP were suppressed in responses that included red complex species indicating that the presence of the most closely associated species induces immune-evasive strategies. In summary, the data

  13. 5-Fluorouracil sensitivity varies among oral micro-organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlancker, Eline; Vanhoecke, Barbara; Smet, Rozel; Props, Ruben; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2016-08-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, often causes oral mucositis, an inflammation and ulceration of the oral mucosa. Micro-organisms in the oral cavity are thought to play an important role in the aggravation and severity of mucositis, but the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Although 5-FU has been shown to elicit antibacterial effects at high concentrations (>100 µM), its antibacterial effect at physiologically relevant concentrations in the oral cavity is unknown. This study reports the effect of different concentrations of 5-FU (range 0.1-50 µM) on the growth and viability of bacterial monocultures that are present in the oral cavity and the possible role in the activity of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), an enzyme involved in 5-FU resistance. Our data showed a differential sensitivity among the tested oral species towards physiological concentrations of 5-FU. Klebsiellaoxytoca, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Lactobacillus salivarius appeared to be highly resistant to all tested concentrations. In contrast, Lactobacillusoris, Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus pyogenes, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Neisseria mucosa showed a significant reduction in growth and viability starting from very low concentrations (0.2-3.1 µM). We can also provide evidence that DPD is not involved in the 5-FU resistance of the selected species. The observed variability in response to physiological 5-FU concentrations may explain why certain microbiota lead to a community dysbiosis and/or an overgrowth of certain resistant micro-organisms in the oral cavity following cancer treatment.

  14. Axenic culture of a candidate division TM7 bacterium from the human oral cavity and biofilm interactions with other oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soro, Valeria; Dutton, Lindsay C; Sprague, Susan V; Nobbs, Angela H; Ireland, Anthony J; Sandy, Jonathan R; Jepson, Mark A; Micaroni, Massimo; Splatt, Peter R; Dymock, David; Jenkinson, Howard F

    2014-10-01

    The diversity of bacterial species in the human oral cavity is well recognized, but a high proportion of them are presently uncultivable. Candidate division TM7 bacteria are almost always detected in metagenomic studies but have not yet been cultivated. In this paper, we identified candidate division TM7 bacterial phylotypes in mature plaque samples from around orthodontic bonds in subjects undergoing orthodontic treatment. Successive rounds of enrichment in laboratory media led to the isolation of a pure culture of one of these candidate division TM7 phylotypes. The bacteria formed filaments of 20 to 200 μm in length within agar plate colonies and in monospecies biofilms on salivary pellicle and exhibited some unusual morphological characteristics by transmission electron microscopy, including a trilaminated cell surface layer and dense cytoplasmic deposits. Proteomic analyses of cell wall protein extracts identified abundant polypeptides predicted from the TM7 partial genomic sequence. Pleiomorphic phenotypes were observed when the candidate division TM7 bacterium was grown in dual-species biofilms with representatives of six different oral bacterial genera. The TM7 bacterium formed long filaments in dual-species biofilm communities with Actinomyces oris or Fusobacterium nucleatum. However, the TM7 isolate grew as short rods or cocci in dual-species biofilms with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra, or Streptococcus gordonii, forming notably robust biofilms with the latter two species. The ability to cultivate TM7 axenically should majorly advance understanding of the physiology, genetics, and virulence properties of this novel candidate division oral bacterium.

  15. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome, oral microbiota and systemic antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Akcalı

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a hormonal disorder of women that not only is the leading cause of infertility but also shows a reciprocal link with oral health. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that the levels of putative periodontal pathogens in saliva and their antibody response in serum are elevated in PCOS, compared to systemic health. A total of 125 women were included in four groups; 45 women with PCOS and healthy periodontium, 35 women with PCOS and gingivitis, 25 systemically and periodontally healthy women, 20 systemically healthy women with gingivitis. Salivary levels of seven putative periodontal pathogens were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum antibody levels were analyzed by ELISA. In women with PCOS, salivary Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis and Tannerella forsythia levels were higher than matched systemically healthy women, particularly in the case of gingivitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola levels were similar among study groups. The presence of PCOS also enhanced P. gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and S. oralis serum antibody levels, when gingivitis was also present. Gingival inflammation correlated positively with levels of the studied taxa in saliva, particularly in PCOS. The presence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum in saliva also exhibited a strong positive correlation with the corresponding serum antibody levels. In conclusion, as an underlying systemic endocrine condition, PCOS may quantitatively affect the composition of oral microbiota and the raised systemic response to selective members of this microbial community, exerting a confounding role in resultant gingival inflammation and periodontal health. The most consistent effect appeared to be exerted on P. gingivalis.

  16. The antibacterial activity of various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids against several oral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Park, Nam-Hee; Hwang, Seon-Yeong; Sohn, Jae Hak; Kwak, Inseok; Cho, Kwang Keun; Choi, In Soon

    2013-07-01

    The antibacterial activity of various saturated fatty acids (SFA) and unsaturated fatty acids (USFA) against different oral pathogens which are implicated in the cause of dental caries, stomatitis, gingivitis, and periodontitis was examined. The saturated fatty acids Pa, StA and ArA, and the unsaturated omega-7 fatty acids PLA and omega-9 fatty acids OA showed either none to low antimicrobial activity against all of the 12 oral pathogenic strains used in this study. In contrast, the omega-3 PUFAs, ALA, SDA, EPA and DHA, and the omega-6 PUFAs, LA, GLA, and AA showed considerable antimicrobial activity against 8, 7, 6 and 5 strains, and 6, 10 and 5 strains, respectively. In particular, the omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs showed strong antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis KCTC 381, the cause of periodontitis, and against Aggregatibacter segnis KCTC 5968, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. Polymorphum KCTC 5172 and Prevotella intermedia KCTC 25611, all organisms implicated in the cause of gingivitis. To date, no bacterial resistance to free fatty acids has been encountered and no resistance phenotype has emerged. Therefore, these results suggest that PUFAs may be useful in the development of therapeutic agents for oral diseases, and in particular, in the development of agents that have minimal side effects and against which there is no bacterial resistance.

  17. High-level antimicrobial efficacy of representative Mediterranean natural plant extracts against oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karygianni, Lamprini; Cecere, Manuel; Skaltsounis, Alexios Leandros; Argyropoulou, Aikaterini; Hellwig, Elmar; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Wittmer, Annette; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Nature is an unexplored reservoir of novel phytopharmaceuticals. Since biofilm-related oral diseases often correlate with antibiotic resistance, plant-derived antimicrobial agents could enhance existing treatment options. Therefore, the rationale of the present report was to examine the antimicrobial impact of Mediterranean natural extracts on oral microorganisms. Five different extracts from Olea europaea, mastic gum, and Inula viscosa were tested against ten bacteria and one Candida albicans strain. The extraction protocols were conducted according to established experimental procedures. Two antimicrobial assays--the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) assay--were applied. The screened extracts were found to be active against each of the tested microorganisms. O. europaea presented MIC and MBC ranges of 0.07-10.00 mg mL(-1) and 0.60-10.00 mg mL(-1), respectively. The mean MBC values for mastic gum and I. viscosa were 0.07-10.00 mg mL(-1) and 0.15-10.00 mg mL(-1), respectively. Extracts were less effective against C. albicans and exerted bactericidal effects at a concentration range of 0.07-5.00 mg mL(-1) on strict anaerobic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Parvimonas micra). Ethyl acetate I. viscosa extract and total mastic extract showed considerable antimicrobial activity against oral microorganisms and could therefore be considered as alternative natural anti-infectious agents.

  18. Oral polymorphonuclear neutrophil characteristics in relation to oral health:a cross-sectional, observational clinical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrick Rijkschroeff; Ineke DC Jansen; Fridus A van der Weijden; Bart JF Keijser; Bruno G Loos; Elena A Nicu

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) have a major role in the innate immune system. However, little is known about PMN contribution in relation to oral health. The objective of this study was to investigate the numbers and functional characteristics of oral PMNs (oPMNs) compared with circulatory PMNs (cPMNs). Oral rinse and venous blood samples were obtained from 268 systemically and orally healthy volunteers in a cross-sectional observational study. PMN counts, cell cycle analysis and cellular activation state were investigated. Also, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was analyzed, with and without bacterial stimulation (Fusobacterium nucleatum). In males, 1.2 × 106 ± 1.0 × 106 oPMNs were collected, and showed a tendency to correlate with the levels of gingival bleeding (r=0.215, P=0.008). Comparable oPMNs counts were found among females (1.0 × 106 ± 0.7 × 106). More late-stage apoptotic/necrotic cells were found among the oPMNs (53.1%) compared with the cPMNs (8.5%;Po0.001). Without additional stimulation, oPMNs were more activated than cPMNs, as indicated by higher expression of CD11b, CD63 and CD66b, and higher constitutive ROS levels (Po0.001). Notably, in response to bacterial stimulation, oPMNs released comparable ROS levels as cPMNs (P=0.042). In conclusion, this study provides data on viable oPMNs showing high levels of activation in orally and systemically healthy individuals, free of apparent caries lesions and periodontal disease. These data suggests that although the oPMNs are in a more mature stage of their life cycle compared with the cPMNs, oPMNs are still responsive to stimulation, which indicates their functional potential and possible contribution to a healthy oral ecosystem.

  19. Fusobacterium necrophorum Pharyngitis Complicated by Lemierre's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Antonio; Fortini, Alberto; Nenci, Gabriele; Boccadori, Costanza; Mangani, Valerio; Oggioni, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of an 18-year-old woman who was referred to our outpatient clinic because of a 2-week history of sore throat, high fever, and neck tenderness unresponsive to a 7-day amoxicillin/clavulanic acid course. Infectious mononucleosis was initially suspected, but an extremely high value of procalcitonin and clinical deterioration suggested a bacterial sepsis, prompting the patient admission to our internal medicine ward. Blood cultures were positive for Fusobacterium necrophorum. CT scan detected a parapharyngeal abscess, a right internal jugular vein thrombosis, and multiple bilateral lung abscesses, suggesting the diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome. The patient was treated with a 2-week course of metronidazole and meropenem with a gradual clinical recovery. She was thereafter discharged home with metronidazole and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid for 14 days and a 3-month course of enoxaparin, experiencing an uneventful recovery. The present case highlights the importance of taking into consideration the Lemierre's syndrome whenever a pharyngotonsillitis has a severe and unusual course.

  20. Methods for optimizing DNA extraction before quantifying oral bacterial numbers by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Mangala A; Martin, F Elizabeth; Hunter, Neil; Jacques, Nicholas A

    2009-07-01

    Methods for the optimal extraction of genomic DNA for real-time PCR enumeration of oral bacteria using the muramidase, mutanolysin, were developed using a simple in vitro oral flora model comprised of the facultative anaerobic gram-positive bacteria, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Streptococcus mutans, the gram-positive anaerobe, Parvimonas micra, and the gram-negative anaerobes, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella melaninogenica and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Traditional, as well as more elaborate, methods of quantifying bacterial numbers, including colony counting and estimation of DNA content using 4',6-diamino-2-phenylindole were compared in order to validate the real-time PCR approach. Evidence was obtained that P. gingivalis nuclease activity adversely affected the extraction of double-stranded DNA from this bacterium either alone or when it formed part of a consortium with the other bacteria. This nuclease activity could be overcome by treatment of the bacteria with either 20 mM diethyl pyrocarbonate or 70% ethanol at 4 degrees C overnight. A final purification of the DNA to remove any potential PCR inhibitors was added to the protocol in order to accurately quantify the amount of DNA by real-time PCR and hence the number of bacteria in a sample.

  1. The influence of orthodontic fixed appliances on the oral microbiota: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Osório Ayres de Freitas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate whether there is scientific evidence to support the hypothesis that the presence of orthodontic fixed appliances influences the oral microbiota. Methods: The search for articles was conducted in PubMed; ISI Web of Knowledge and Ovid databases, including articles published in English until May 17th, 2012. They should report human observational studies presenting the following keywords: "fixed orthodontic appliance" AND "microbiological colonization"; OR "periodontal pathogens"; OR "Streptococcus"; OR "Lactobacillus"; OR "Candida"; OR "Tannerella forsythia"; OR "Treponema denticola"; OR "Fusobacterium nucleatum"; OR "Actimomyces actinomycetemcomitans"; OR "Prevotella intermedia", OR "Prevotella nigrescens"; OR "Porphyromonas gingivalis". Articles were previously selected by title and abstract. Articles that met the inclusion criteria were analyzed and classified as having low, moderate or high methodology quality. A new detailed checklist for quality assessment was developed based on the information required for applicable data extraction for reviews. The study design, sample, follow-up period, collection and microbial analysis methods, statistical treatment, results and discussion were assessed. Results: The initial search retrieved 305 articles of which 33 articles were selected by title and abstract. After full-text reading, 8 articles met the inclusion criteria, out of which 4 articles were classified as having low and 4 as moderate methodological quality. The moderate methodological quality studies were included in the systematic review. Conclusions: The literature revealed moderate evidence that the presence of fixed appliances influences the quantity and quality of oral microbiota.

  2. In vitro evaluation of a multispecies oral biofilm on different implant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violant, Deborah; Galofré, Marta; Nart, José; Teles, Ricardo Patricio

    2014-06-01

    Biofilm accumulation on implant surfaces is one of the most important factors for early and late implant failure. Because of the related clinical implications, the aim of this in vitro study was to compare the bacterial cell attachment of a four-species oral biofilm on titanium discs of purity grade 2 and 4, with machined surfaces and etched-thermochemically modified with Avantblast®. The in vitro biofilm model was composed of early (Actinomyces naeslundii, Streptococcus gordonii), secondary (Veillonella parvula), and intermediate (Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp. polymorphum) colonizers of tooth surfaces. A total of 36 discs were divided into four groups: Tigr2-c (titanium grade 2, machined surface), Tigr2-t (titanium grade 2, modified surface with Avantblast®), Tigr4-c (titanium grade 4, machined surface), Tigr4-t (titanium grade 4, modified surface with Avantblast®). The experiment was repeated three times. Biofilm viability was tested with 1% 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride solution and bacterial cell quantification by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Descriptive analysis was performed to evaluate biofilm composition and differences between groups were checked with the Mann-Whitney test (p biofilms showed a similar pattern of bacterial composition on all analyzed implant surfaces. The most prevalent bacterium was V. parvula (∼50% of the total biomass), followed by S. gordonii (∼30%), F. nucleatum ssp. polymorphum (∼10%) and A. naeslundii (<5%). Total bacterial biomass was significantly higher in both grade-4-titanium surfaces (p < 0.05). The results demonstrated that not only implant surface treatment, but also titanium purity, influence early bacterial colonization.

  3. Antibacterian in vitro determinatíon of Menthostachys mollis (Muña) opposite to oral bacterial stomatological importance

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz L., Karin; Bachiller en Odontología. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Moromi N., Hilda; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas,Microbiología. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to determine the antimícrobial action of the essential oil of Methosthachys mollis (Muña); in design at random one strains standard ATCC of Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus sp, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Actinobacillus actinomicetencomitans and Actinomyces sp, to: Amoxicilina (positive witness), essential oil of Methosthachys mollis and, distilled water (negative witness); to measure the halos of antitmicrobial action. For the mentioned bacteria one found, respectively, in Amoxi...

  4. [Antimicrobial effects of tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) on oral microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, E; Lenkeit, K; Meyer, J

    2000-01-01

    The essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil) exhibits antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. In this study the bacteriostatic and bacteriocidal/fungicidal activity of a tea tree oil solution, of a new tea tree oil (Tebodont) and the respective placebo-gel, of a chlorhexidindigluconate-solution and of PlakOut was tested in vitro against ten different oral microorganisms. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were in the range from 0.0293% to 1.25% for the tea tree oil solution and from 0.0082% to 1.25% for the tea tree oil gel. The values for minimum bacteriocidal/fungicidal concentrations were in the range from 0.0521% to 2.5% for the tea tree oil solution and from tea tree oil gel. The most susceptible microorganisms were Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, whereas Streptococcus mutans and Prevotella intermedia were the least susceptible ones. Both for the chlorhexidindigluconate solution and for PlakOut the values for the minimal inhibitory concentration and for the minimal cidal concentration were between <0.0002% and 0.0125%.

  5. The surface layer of Tannerella forsythia contributes to serum resistance and oral bacterial coaggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotahira, Naohiro; Oogai, Yuichi; Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Yamada, Sakuo; Fukutsuji, Kenji; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2013-04-01

    Tannerella forsythia is an anaerobic, Gram-negative bacterium involved in the so-called "red complex," which is associated with severe and chronic periodontitis. The surface layer (S-layer) of T. forsythia is composed of cell surface glycoproteins, such as TfsA and TfsB, and is known to play a role in adhesion/invasion and suppression of proinflammatory cytokine expression. Here we investigated the association of this S-layer with serum resistance and coaggregation with other oral bacteria. The growth of the S-layer-deficient mutant in a bacterial medium containing more than 20% non-heat-inactivated calf serum (CS) or more than 40% non-heat-inactivated human serum was significantly suppressed relative to that of the wild type (WT). Next, we used confocal microscopy to perform quantitative analysis on the effect of serum. The survival ratio of the mutant exposed to 100% non-heat-inactivated CS (76% survival) was significantly lower than that of the WT (97% survival). Furthermore, significant C3b deposition was observed in the mutant but not in the WT. In a coaggregation assay, the mutant showed reduced coaggregation with Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus salivarius, and Porphyromonas gingivalis but strong coaggregation with Fusobacterium nucleatum. These results indicated that the S-layer of T. forsythia plays multiple roles in virulence and may be associated with periodontitis.

  6. Individual growth detection of bacterial species in an in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabenski, L; Maisch, T; Santarelli, F; Hiller, K-A; Schmalz, G

    2014-11-01

    Most in vitro studies on the antibacterial effects of antiseptics have used planktonic bacteria in monocultures. However, this study design does not reflect the in vivo situation in oral cavities harboring different bacterial species that live in symbiotic relationships in biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a simple in vitro polymicrobial model consisting of only three bacterial strains of different phases of oral biofilm formation to simulate in vivo oral conditions. Therefore, we studied the biofilm formation of Actinomyces naeslundii (An), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), and Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) on 96-well tissue culture plates under static anaerobic conditions using artificial saliva according to the method established by Pratten et al. that was supplemented with 1 g l(-1) sucrose. Growth was separately determined for each bacterial strain after incubation periods of up to 72 h by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and live/dead staining. Presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) was visualized by Concanavalin A staining. Increasing incubation times of up to 72 h showed adhesion and propagation of the bacterial strains with artificial saliva formulation. An and Ef had significantly higher growth rates than Fn. Live/dead staining showed a median of 49.9 % (range 46.0-53.0 %) of living bacteria after 72 h of incubation, and 3D fluorescence microscopy showed a three-dimensional structure containing EPS. An in vitro oral polymicrobial biofilm model was established to better simulate oral conditions and had the advantage of providing the well-controlled experimental conditions of in vitro testing.

  7. Effect of an oxygenating agent on oral microorganisms in vitro and on dental plaque composition in healthy young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes eFernandez y Mostajo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral bacteria live in symbiosis with the host. Therefore, when mouthwashes are indicated, selective inhibition of taxa contributing to disease is preferred instead of broad-spectrum antimicrobials. The potential selectivity of an oxygenating mouthwash, Ardox-X® (AX, has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial potential of AX and the effects of a twice-daily oral rinse on dental plaque composition. Material and methods: In vitro, 16 oral bacterial strains were tested using agar diffusion susceptibility, minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentration tests. A pilot clinical study was performed with 25 healthy volunteers. Clinical assessments and microbiological sampling of supragingival plaque were performed at one month before the experiment (Pre-exp, at the start of the experiment (Baseline and after the one-week experimental period (Post-exp. During the experiment individuals used AX mouthwash twice daily in absence of other oral hygiene measures. The microbiological composition of plaque was assessed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Results: AX showed high inter-species variation in microbial growth inhibition. The tested Prevotella strains and Fusobacterium nucleatum showed the highest sensitivity, while streptococci and Lactobacillus acidophilus were most resistant to AX. Plaque scores at Pre-exp and Baseline visits did not differ significantly (p = 0.193, nor did the microbial composition of plaque during a period of 7-days non-brushing but twice daily rinsing. Plaque scores increased from 2.21 (0.31 at Baseline to 2.43 (0.39 Post-exp. A significant microbial shift in composition was observed: genus Streptococcus and Veillonella increased while Corynebacterium, Haemophilus, Leptotrichia, Cardiobacterium and Capnocytophaga decreased (p ≤ 0.001. Conclusion: AX has the potential for selective inhibition of oral bacteria. The shift in oral microbiome after one week of rinsing deserves

  8. BUSQUEDA Y CARACTERIZACION DE BACTERIOFAGOS ESPECIFICOS PARA AGGREGATIBACTER ACTINOMYCETEMCOMITANS Y FUSOBACTERIUM NUCLEATUM: DETERMINACION DEL EFECTO BACTERIOLITICO SOBRE ESTAS BACTERIAS EMBEBIDAS EN UNA BIOPELICULA DENTAL

    OpenAIRE

    CASTILLO RUIZ, MARIO HERNAN

    2012-01-01

    Las enfermedades periodontales asociadas a la placa dental son un importante problema de salud pública, tanto en nuestro país como en todo el mundo. Se estima que en Chile la prevalencia de esta enfermedad en la población adulta es mayor al 90%. Los tratamientos actuales son largos y en algunos casos muy costosos lo que impide que todas las personas tengan acceso a ellos. La etiología de las enfermedades periodontales es atribuida tanto a factores del hospedero como a la placa dental, que cor...

  9. Preterm low birthweight and the role of oral bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Shira Davenport

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Preterm and low birthweight (PTLBW continues to be a major cause of mortality and morbidity across the world. In recent years, maternal periodontal disease has been implicated as a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes. There is conflicting evidence to support such an outcome as illustrated by descriptive, case control and randomised controlled trials involving pregnant women from across the world, using different measurement tools to determine the level of periodontal disease. Whilst considering the literature, there is evidence for both arguments, based on the effect of periodontal inflammatory by products. Bacteria associated with periodontal disease are not dissimilar to those known to be associated with genito-urinary bacterial infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Several groups have demonstrated the apparent translocation of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonus gingivalis, Treponema denticola to the foetal placental unit whereby a maternal or foetal response has been detected resulting in premature birth or low birthweight. The normal process of parturition involves a cascade of events including a build-up of inflammatory mediators as linked to inflammation, whereby the maternal environment becomes hostile and threatens the well-being of the infant, and the foetus expelled. The question remains therefore, is there a greater risk of delivering a PTLBW infant when the mother has detectable periodontal disease, or is the release of inflammatory mediators and their translocation via the haematogenous route sufficient to induce a poor pregnancy outcome? The data investigated would suggest that there is a positive outcome when certain oral gram-negative bacteria create a cumulative effect sufficient to trigger early delivery, which represents the final straw to result in preterm or low birthweight delivery. There is equally sufficient epidemiological evidence that does not support this

  10. Antimicrobial effect of acidified nitrate and nitrite on six common oral pathogens in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Deng-sheng; LIU Yin; ZHANG Chun-mei; YANG Sheng-hui; WANG Song-lin

    2006-01-01

    Background Salivary nitrate is positively correlated with plasma nitrate and its level is 9 times the plasma level after nitrate loading. Nitrate in saliva is known to be reduced to nitrite by oral bacteria. Nitrate and nitrite levels in saliva are 3-5 times those in serum in physiological conditions respectively in our previous study. The biological functions of high salivary nitrate and nitrite are still not well understood. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of nitrate and nitrite on main oral pathogens under acidic conditions.Methods Six common oral pathogens including Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4646, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, Capnocytophaga gingivalis ATCC 33624, Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953, and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were cultured in liquid medium. Sodium nitrate or sodium nitrite was added to the medium to final concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 10 mmol/L. All of the microorganisms were incubated for 24 to 48 hours. The optical densities (OD) of cell suspensions were determined and the cultures were transferred to solid nutrient broth medium to observe the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration for the six tested pathogens.Results Nitrite at concentrations of 0.5 to 10 mmol/L had an inhibitory effect on all tested organisms at low pH values. The antimicrobial effect of nitrite increased with the acidity of the medium. Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449 was highly sensitive to nitrite at low pH values. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4646 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were relatively resistant to acidified nitrite. Nitrate at the given concentrations and under acidic conditions had no inhibitory effect on the growth of any of the tested pathogens.Conclusion Nitrite, at a concentration equal to that in human saliva, is both cytocidal and cytostatic to six principal oral pathogens in vitro, whereas nitrate at a similar

  11. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia.

  12. High-Level Antimicrobial Efficacy of Representative Mediterranean Natural Plant Extracts against Oral Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamprini Karygianni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature is an unexplored reservoir of novel phytopharmaceuticals. Since biofilm-related oral diseases often correlate with antibiotic resistance, plant-derived antimicrobial agents could enhance existing treatment options. Therefore, the rationale of the present report was to examine the antimicrobial impact of Mediterranean natural extracts on oral microorganisms. Five different extracts from Olea europaea, mastic gum, and Inula viscosa were tested against ten bacteria and one Candida albicans strain. The extraction protocols were conducted according to established experimental procedures. Two antimicrobial assays—the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC assay and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC assay—were applied. The screened extracts were found to be active against each of the tested microorganisms. O. europaea presented MIC and MBC ranges of 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.60–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. The mean MBC values for mastic gum and I. viscosa were 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.15–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. Extracts were less effective against C. albicans and exerted bactericidal effects at a concentration range of 0.07–5.00 mg mL−1 on strict anaerobic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Parvimonas micra. Ethyl acetate I. viscosa extract and total mastic extract showed considerable antimicrobial activity against oral microorganisms and could therefore be considered as alternative natural anti-infectious agents.

  13. Microscope-based imaging platform for large-scale analysis of oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karygianni, L; Follo, M; Hellwig, E; Burghardt, D; Wolkewitz, M; Anderson, A; Al-Ahmad, A

    2012-12-01

    A microscopic method for noninvasively monitoring oral biofilms at the macroscale was developed to describe the spatial distribution of biofilms of different bacterial composition on bovine enamel surfaces (BES). For this purpose, oral biofilm was grown in situ on BES that were fixed at approximal sites of individual upper jaw acrylic devices worn by a volunteer for 3 or 5 days. Eubacteria, Streptococcus spp., and Fusobacterium nucleatum were stained using specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. The resulting fluorescence signals were subsequently tested by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and monitored by an automated wide-field microscope-based imaging platform (Scan∧R). Automated image processing and data analysis were conducted by microscope-associated software and followed by statistical evaluation of the results. The full segmentation of biofilm images revealed a random distribution of bacteria across the entire area of the enamel surfaces examined. Significant differences in the composition of the microflora were recorded across individual as well as between different enamel surfaces varying from sparsely colonized (47.26%) after 3 days to almost full surface coverage (84.45%) after 5 days. The enamel plates that were positioned at the back or in the middle of the oral cavity were found to be more suitable for the examination of biofilms up to 3 days old. In conclusion, automated microscopy combined with the use of FISH can enable the efficient visualization and meaningful quantification of bacterial composition over the entire sample surface. Due to the possibility of automation, Scan∧R overcomes the technical limitations of conventional CLSM.

  14. Livstruende appendicitis forårsaget af Fusobacterium necrophorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Trine Langfeldt; Maeda, Yasuko; Lindberg, Jens Aage;

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a well-known cause of Lemierre's syndrome. Recent studies suggest a causative association between F. necrophorum and acute appendicitis. We present a case of a 15-year-old previously healthy girl who presented with acute non-perforated appendicitis, intra......-abdominal abscesses and thrombosis that led to omental necrosis. This resulted in a life-threatening septic shock with the need for prolonged intensive care. We suggest that F. necrophorum identified in pus from the abdomen caused this fulminant variation of appendicitis with findings similar to those seen...

  15. Characterization of Fusobacterium necrophorum isolated from llama and alpaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Anderson, David; Amachawadi, Raghavendra G; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Narayanan, Sanjeev K

    2013-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium, is an opportunistic animal and human pathogen that causes a variety of infections termed necrobacillosis. There are 2 subspecies of F. necrophorum (subsp. necrophorum and subsp. funduliforme) that differ morphologically and biochemically and in virulence. Leukotoxin, a secreted protein, is considered to be the major virulence factor. In camelids, F. necrophorum causes a variety of infections, generally involving the lips, tongue, pharynx, interdigital spaces, foot pad, larynx, mandible, or maxillary bones. The objective of the current study was to characterize the presumptive Fusobacterium isolates from a variety of necrotic infections in llama (Lama glama) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) and determine whether the strains possess leukotoxin activities. A total of 7 isolates from alpaca and 2 isolates from llama were characterized. Based on growth characteristics in broth culture, and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analyses, all 9 isolates belonged to subsp. necrophorum and possessed the putative hemagglutinin gene. Western blot analysis with antileukotoxin antibodies raised in rabbit showed the presence of leukotoxin protein in the culture supernatant of all isolates. Furthermore, flow cytometry of the culture supernatants demonstrated cytotoxicity to bovine and alpaca polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The extent of cytotoxicity to either alpaca or bovine PMNs differed among camelid strains. The cytotoxicity of many of the camelid strains was higher (P llama and alpaca are similar to bovine isolates, and leukotoxin may be a major virulence factor.

  16. A Rare Case of Fusobacterium Necrophorum Liver Abscesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannoodi, Faris; Sabbagh, Hussam; Kulairi, Zain; Kumar, Sarwan

    2017-01-01

    Liver abscesses are an uncommon disease that can present with vague symptoms. Fusobacterium necrophorum causing liver abscesses is a rare condition and only a few cases have been reported. An 88-year-old female presented to her primary care physician with one week of fevers, night sweats, chills, fatigue and vague right upper quadrant abdominal pain. She denied nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea and unintentional weight loss. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed two liver abscesses in the right lobe as well as extensive diverticulosis. Percutaneous drainage was performed and draining catheters were placed in the abscesses. Culture of the abscess fluid grew Fusobacterium necrophorum. She was treated with ceftriaxone and metronidazole as per sensitivities. Rare cases of F. necrophorum hepatic abscesses have been published. The source of infection described in reported cases included hematogenous spread from dental caries/peritonsillar abscess and those involving the gastrointestinal tract resulting from inflammation of the bowel wall or from inflamed diverticuli via the portal circulation. In one study, thirteen cases of liver abscess due to F. necrophorum were studied, and two of these cases had diverticular disease without inflammation.

  17. Targeted profiling of oral bacteria in human saliva and in vitro biofilms with quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, R R; Viscount, H B; Stanley, M C; Leung, K-P

    2007-01-01

    An in vitro plaque model based on the use of human salivary bacteria and tooth-like surfaces was previously developed for studying the formation of oral biofilm and its use for pre-clinical testing of candidate antimicrobial or antiplaque agents. In this study, a quantitative Taqman PCR assay (QPCR) was developed to compare the bacterial compositions of in vitro biofilms to parent saliva samples, and to determine the relative contributions of different species in the formation of the oral biofilm. In addition, the growth inhibition of saliva-derived plaque was evaluated by chlorhexidine. With this assay, which consisted of primer/probe sets targeting either 16S rDNA sequences present in public databases or cloned ribosomal intergenic spacer region (ISR) sequences, 15 oral bacteria derived from saliva as well as those that were responsible for biofilm formation in an in vitro plaque model were rapidly identified and quantified. Among the target organisms were Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Micromonas micros, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Tannerella forsythensis, and Veillonella parvula. Primer and probe sets developed were both sensitive and specific. The relative profiles of a number of bacteria in 45-h-old biofilms were determined and, when compared to saliva samples, it was found that most of the bacteria identified in saliva also populated the in vitro plaque, including some anaerobes. Brief exposure of biofilms to chlorhexidine resulted in significant losses in viability. This new broad spectrum QPCR assay in combination with the in vitro plaque model will be of significant value in the quantitative study of the microbial composition of human saliva, saliva-derived plaque, and pre-clinical evaluation of potential antimicrobial and antiplaque molecules.

  18. Effect of S-PRG Eluate on Biofilm Formation and Enzyme Activity of Oral Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Yoneda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the antibacterial activity of a composite resin containing prereacted glass ionomer (S-PRG filler was revealed. We examined the effect of an S-PRG eluate on various biologic activities of Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Adherence ability of S. mutans was evaluated by microtiter plate assay; protease and gelatinase activities of P. gingivalis were examined by synthetic substrate hydrolysis and gelatin film spot assay, respectively. Coaggregation of P. gingivalis with Fusobacterium nucleatum was also examined. S-PRG eluate was found to suppress streptococcal adherence. S-PRG eluate inhibited the protease and gelatinase activities of P. gingivalis and the coaggregation between P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. These results indicate that S-PRG eluate suppresses streptococcal adherence and inhibits the protease and coaggregation activities of P. gingivalis. These findings may prompt research into novel strategies for preventing caries and periodontitis.

  19. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of dentifrices on human oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraszthy, Violet I; Zambon, Joseph J; Sreenivasan, Prem K

    2010-01-01

    In vitro testing of antimicrobial agents is an important tool in the testing hierarchy, and may provide interesting insights into their potential clinical efficacy. Agents with demonstrable in vitro antimicrobial activity may be effective against the same microorganisms in vivo, whereas agents without demonstrable in vitro antimicrobial activity are unlikely to exhibit in vivo antimicrobial activity. In addition, these methods may also be useful in screening antimicrobial agents in product formulations because such agents with both in vitro and in vivo activity may have reduced antimicrobial effects when formulated into a dentifrice. Accordingly, this study examined the in vitro and ex vivo antimicrobial activity of three commercial dentifrices: one formulated with 0.243% sodium fluoride (Crest Cavity Protection Toothpaste-Regular); one with 0.454% stannous fluoride, sodium hexametaphosphate, and zinc lactate (Crest Pro-Health), and one with 0.3% triclosan, 2.0% PVM/MA copolymer, and 0.243% sodium fluoride (Colgate Total). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each dentifrice was determined for resident oral bacterial species, including bacteria that are associated with dental caries; periodontitis, and oral halitosis. Evaluations were performed on individual laboratory strains, and on oral bacteria from supragingival plaque samples obtained from 10 adults and from oral rinse samples obtained from 18 adults. The lowest MICs against the oral strains and human samples, i.e., greatest antimicrobial activity, were seen for the triclosan/ copolymer dentifrice. There was, in general, a four-fold difference in MICs between the triclosan/copolymer dentifrice and the stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate/zinc lactate dentifrice. The triclosan/copolymer dentifrice significantly inhibited periodontal pathogens, such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. In ex vivo tests measuring antimicrobial effects, the

  20. Fusobacterium necrophorum Pharyngitis Complicated by Lemierre’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Faraone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of an 18-year-old woman who was referred to our outpatient clinic because of a 2-week history of sore throat, high fever, and neck tenderness unresponsive to a 7-day amoxicillin/clavulanic acid course. Infectious mononucleosis was initially suspected, but an extremely high value of procalcitonin and clinical deterioration suggested a bacterial sepsis, prompting the patient admission to our internal medicine ward. Blood cultures were positive for Fusobacterium necrophorum. CT scan detected a parapharyngeal abscess, a right internal jugular vein thrombosis, and multiple bilateral lung abscesses, suggesting the diagnosis of Lemierre’s syndrome. The patient was treated with a 2-week course of metronidazole and meropenem with a gradual clinical recovery. She was thereafter discharged home with metronidazole and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid for 14 days and a 3-month course of enoxaparin, experiencing an uneventful recovery. The present case highlights the importance of taking into consideration the Lemierre’s syndrome whenever a pharyngotonsillitis has a severe and unusual course.

  1. Fusobacterium necrophorum otitis and mastoiditis in infants and young toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulou, T; Walsh, T J

    2016-05-01

    There is an increased recovery of Fusobacterium necrophorum from cases of otitis media and mastoiditis in the pediatric population. These infections may be highly severe, causing local osteomyelitis, bacteremia, and Lemierre's syndrome. The severity and difficulties in providing optimal treatment for these infections may be especially difficult in this age group due to immunological immaturity and delayed presentation. In this review of literature, we present and analyze the clinical presentation, management, and outcome of otic infections caused by F. necrophorum in infants and young toddlers less than 2 years old. Search in Pubmed was conducted for reported cases in the English literature for the time period of the last 50 years. Twelve well-described cases were retrieved with F. necrophorum otitis and mastoiditis and complications reported in all cases. Treatment included both intravenously with antimicrobial agents (beta lactams plus metronidazole) and mastoidectomy. Lemierre's syndrome and Lemierre's syndrome variants developed in 60 % of the patients. Dissemination of the infection as distal osteomyelitis and septic shock were also reported. The outcome was favorable in all the cases. Otitis and mastoiditis infections in children less then 2 years old are invasive infections, and severe complications can occur.

  2. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Fusobacterium massiliense sp. nov. isolated from human duodenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mailhe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The strain Marseille-P2749T (= CSUR P2749=DSM 103085 was isolated as part of culturomics study from a liquid duodenum sample from a French man. Bacterial cells were Gram-negative bacilli, fusiform shaped and non–spore forming, and they grew in microaerophilic and anaerobic atmosphere. Its genome is 1 809 169 bp long and contains 1646 protein-coding genes. The DNA G+C content was 27.33 mol%. This strain exhibited a 95.9% sequence similarity with Fusobacterium periodonticum, the phylogenetically closest species with standing in nomenclature. Strain Marseille-P2749T is suggested to be a novel species belonging to the genus Fusobacterium, for which the name Fusobacterium massiliense sp. nov. is proposed.

  3. Espondilodiscitis por Fusobacterium necrophorum: a propósito de un caso

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Se presenta un caso de espondilodiscitis por Fusobacterium necrophorum que es un germen gramnegativo. El paciente evolucionó de forma satisfactoria, a pesar de que no siguió correctamente las indicaciones terapéuticas. A propósito del caso, se hacen algunas reflexiones sobre el diagnóstico y el tratamiento de las infecciones raquídeas The authors report a case of spondylodiscitis due to Fusobacterium necrophorum, an anaerobic gram-negative bacillus. The patient's recovery was s...

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. funduliforme Bovine Liver Abscess Isolate B35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Stewart, George C

    2014-05-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that causes foot rot and liver abscesses in cattle. F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and the less virulent organism F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme are recognized. We present here a draft genome sequence of the bovine liver abscess isolate F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme strain B35, which affords a genomic perspective of virulence and bovine adaptation.

  5. Fusobacterium necrophorum findings in Denmark from 2010 to 2014 using data from the Danish microbiology database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Steffen; Jensen, Anders; Nielsen, Hanne Merete; Kristensen, Lena Hagelskjaer; Voldstedlund, Marianne; Prag, Jørgen

    2016-12-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum findings in Denmark and estimation of the incidence of F. necrophorum bacteraemia was described using data from the nationwide Danish microbiology database (MiBa). All microbiological reports on any Fusobacterium species in Denmark were extracted for a period of 5 years from 2010 to 2014 from MiBa and from the local department of clinical microbiology. The overall incidence of F. necrophorum bacteraemia from 2010 to 2014 was 2.8 cases per million/year vs 9.4 in the age group 15-24 years. F. necrophorum was rare in blood cultures from children and middle-aged patients and then raised again. However, 48 of 232 cases of Fusobacterium bacteraemia were not identified to species level, so the incidences of F. necrophorum bacteraemia may be underestimated in our study. F. necrophorum was found in throat swabs in the age group between 13 and 40 years and in otitis media in children below 2 years in those departments which performed anaerobic culture. The incidence of F. necrophorum bacteraemia found was comparable to earlier reported figures for Lemierre's syndrome. Fusobacterium bacteraemia should always be identified to species level. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. FUSOBACTERIUM PYOMYOSITIS OF THE SHOULDER AFTER TONSILLITIS - REPORT OF A CASE OF LEMIERRES SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; KONINGS, JG; PRINS, TR; WEITS, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of nontropical pyomyositis is reported in a young male without predisposing factors. The disease was preceded by a tonsillitis, and the presentation initially suggested a septic arthritis of the shoulder. Fusobacterium, a highly unusual pathogen in pyomyositis, was isolated from an abscess in

  7. FUSOBACTERIUM PYOMYOSITIS OF THE SHOULDER AFTER TONSILLITIS - REPORT OF A CASE OF LEMIERRES SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; KONINGS, JG; PRINS, TR; WEITS, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of nontropical pyomyositis is reported in a young male without predisposing factors. The disease was preceded by a tonsillitis, and the presentation initially suggested a septic arthritis of the shoulder. Fusobacterium, a highly unusual pathogen in pyomyositis, was isolated from an abscess in

  8. Effects of a mouthwash with chlorine dioxide on oral malodor and salivary bacteria: a randomized placebo-controlled 7-day trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown the oxidizing properties and microbiological efficacies of chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Its clinical efficacies on oral malodor have been evaluated and reported only in short duration trials, moreover, no clinical studies have investigated its microbiological efficacies on periodontal and malodorous bacteria. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the inhibitory effects of a mouthwash containing ClO2 used for 7 days on morning oral malodor and on salivary periodontal and malodorous bacteria. Methods/Design A randomized, double blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among 15 healthy male volunteers, who were divided into 2 groups. Subjects were instructed to rinse with the experimental mouthwash containing ClO2 or the placebo mouthwash, without ClO2, twice per day for 7 days. After a one week washout period, each group then used the opposite mouthwash for 7 days. At baseline and after 7 days, oral malodor was evaluated with Organoleptic measurement (OM), and analyzed the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH) and dimethyl sulfide ((CH3)2S), the main VSCs of human oral malodor, were assessed by gas chromatography (GC). Clinical outcome variables included plaque and gingival indices, and tongue coating index. The samples of saliva were microbiologically investigated. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed using the polymerase chain reaction-Invader method. Results and Discussion The baseline oral condition in healthy subjects in the 2 groups did not differ significantly. After rinsing with the mouthwash containing ClO2 for 7 days, morning bad breath decreased as measured by the OM and reduced the concentrations of H2S, CH3SH and (CH3)2S measured by GC, were found. Moreover ClO2 mouthwash used over a 7-day period appeared effective in reducing plaque, tongue coating accumulation and the counts of Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva. Future research is needed to examine long

  9. Effects of a mouthwash with chlorine dioxide on oral malodor and salivary bacteria: a randomized placebo-controlled 7-day trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnuki Mari

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has shown the oxidizing properties and microbiological efficacies of chlorine dioxide (ClO2. Its clinical efficacies on oral malodor have been evaluated and reported only in short duration trials, moreover, no clinical studies have investigated its microbiological efficacies on periodontal and malodorous bacteria. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the inhibitory effects of a mouthwash containing ClO2 used for 7 days on morning oral malodor and on salivary periodontal and malodorous bacteria. Methods/Design A randomized, double blind, crossover, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among 15 healthy male volunteers, who were divided into 2 groups. Subjects were instructed to rinse with the experimental mouthwash containing ClO2 or the placebo mouthwash, without ClO2, twice per day for 7 days. After a one week washout period, each group then used the opposite mouthwash for 7 days. At baseline and after 7 days, oral malodor was evaluated with Organoleptic measurement (OM, and analyzed the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S, methyl mercaptan (CH3SH and dimethyl sulfide ((CH32S, the main VSCs of human oral malodor, were assessed by gas chromatography (GC. Clinical outcome variables included plaque and gingival indices, and tongue coating index. The samples of saliva were microbiologically investigated. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were performed using the polymerase chain reaction-Invader method. Results and Discussion The baseline oral condition in healthy subjects in the 2 groups did not differ significantly. After rinsing with the mouthwash containing ClO2 for 7 days, morning bad breath decreased as measured by the OM and reduced the concentrations of H2S, CH3SH and (CH32S measured by GC, were found. Moreover ClO2 mouthwash used over a 7-day period appeared effective in reducing plaque, tongue coating accumulation and the counts of Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva. Future research is

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-03-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-03-0025 ref|NP_602793.1| Permease [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleat...um ATCC 25586] gb|AAL94092.1| Permease [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586] NP_602793.1 1.4 23% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-26-0282 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-26-0282 ref|NP_603571.1| Transporter [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucl...eatum ATCC 25586] gb|AAL94870.1| Transporter [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586] NP_603571.1 0.12 26% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0175 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0175 ref|NP_603288.1| hypothetical protein FN0384 [Fusobacterium nucle...atum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586] gb|AAL94587.1| Hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586] NP_603288.1 9.0 32% ...

  13. Rendimento dos meios seletivos para bactérias do gênero Fusobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson C. de Araújo

    1968-10-01

    Full Text Available Meios seletivos para Fusobacterium foram, comparados no aspecto de sua eficiência no isolamento dos microrganismos fusiformes e quanto à inibição da flora concomitante. Material não calcificado do sulco gengival foi homogeneizado e diluído em tampão de fosfato (0,067 M - pH 7,2; 0,1 ml foi semeado em agar sangue, no meio de Omata & Disraely, meio de Omata & Disraely sem sôro, meio de McMarthy & Snyder, agar sangue com vancomicina, meio de Onisi, meio de Onisi com sôro de cavalo e meio de Onisi com pH 7,0. Em todos os casos a incubação foi realizada em anaerobiose, em jarra tipo Brewer, com 95% nitrogênio e 5% gás carbônico, durante 4 dias. O meio de McCarthy & Snyder mostrou-se tão eficiente quanto o agar sangue em relação ao isolamento de Fusobacterium, ainda inibindo a flora concomitante, o meio de Omata & Disraely, com cristal violeta e estreptomicina, foi de certo modo inibidor também para Fusobacterium. O meio de Onisi, sugerido, sem sôro, possibilitou o isolamento de pequeno número de fusobactérias, provàvelmente as amostras não exigentes de proteínas naturais.

  14. [Brain abscess due to Fusobacterium necrophorum in a patient with convulsion and no signs of meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohata, Mitsuteru; Naruse, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yumiko; Koyama, Miyako; Ito, Yasushi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report brain abscess due to Fusobacterium necrophorum (F. necrophorum) in a 78-year-old healthy man. He developed convulsion and did not have any signs of meningitis. Although the brain magnetic resonance imaging findings of the left occipital lobe were typical of a brain abscess, his cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed only slight pleocytosis and mild increase in protein levels. Thus, it was difficult to rule out the possibility of metastatic brain tumor; the patient's condition was provisionally diagnosed as symptomatic epilepsy secondary to brain abscess. His convulsion disappeared soon after administration of antiepileptic, antibacterial, and steroid agents. A craniotomy was performed to evacuate the abscess, and F. necrophorum was identified by culturing the abscess contents. After the operation, he was treated with appropriate antibacterial agents, which resulted in resolution of the brain abscess. Although Fusobacterium species are gram-negative anaerobic bacilli commensal of the human oropharynx, we need to recognize that Fusobacterium species can be a primary pathogen causing brain abscesses and may leave residual neurological sequelae without early appropriate treatment.

  15. Detection of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp funduliforme in tonsillitis in young adults by real-time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Hagelskjær Kristensen, Lena; Prag, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    Throat swabs from 61 patients, aged 18-32 years, with non-streptococcal tonsillitis (NST) and 92 healthy controls were examined for the presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum DNA using a novel TaqMan-based real-time quantitative PCR assay for F. necrophorum subspecies. The assay was based on the gyr...... that on swabs from controls (p compared to patients with acute NST (p 0.04). In addition, 26 patients with tonsillitis and group C streptococci (GCS) had a significantly higher load of F. necrophorum DNA...... compared to the NST group (p

  16. Growth requirements and fermentation products of Fusobacterium prausnitzii, and a proposal to reclassify it as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii gen. nov., comb. nov.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duncan, SH; Hold, GL; Harmsen, HJM; Stewart, CS; Flint, HJ

    2002-01-01

    Two newly isolated strains of obligately anaerobic bacteria from human faeces are shown here to be related to Fusobacterium prausnitzii, which is regarded as one of the most abundant colonizers of the human colon. These strains, along with Fusobacterium prausnitzii ATCC 27768(T) and 27766, are

  17. Growth requirements and fermentation products of Fusobacterium prausnitzii, and a proposal to reclassify it as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii gen. nov., comb. nov.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duncan, SH; Hold, GL; Harmsen, HJM; Stewart, CS; Flint, HJ

    2002-01-01

    Two newly isolated strains of obligately anaerobic bacteria from human faeces are shown here to be related to Fusobacterium prausnitzii, which is regarded as one of the most abundant colonizers of the human colon. These strains, along with Fusobacterium prausnitzii ATCC 27768(T) and 27766, are non-m

  18. The detection of Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum from ovine footrot in Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Shaheen; Wani, Shakil A; Hassan, Mir Nadeem; Nazir, Nazima; Nyrah, Qazi Javed

    2015-10-01

    In a study conducted, a total of 450 swab samples from footrot lesions of naturally infected sheep were collected in all the ten districts of the Kashmir valley and were examined for the presence of Dichelobacter nodosus (D. nodosus) and Fusobacterium necrophorum (F. necrophorum), in order to determine if F. necrophorum was associated with ovine footrot. The detection of F. necrophorum and D. nodosus was carried out by polymerase chain reaction targeting the leukotoxin (lktA) and 16S rRNA genes, respectively. In this study, only less than 50% of positive samples contained both the bacteria, so it is not possible to conclude with certainty that both bacteria are together required for the disease manifestation.

  19. Fusobacterium necrophorum determined as abortifacient in sheep by laser capture microdissection and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Mette; Aalbæk, Bent; Agerholm, Jørgen S.

    2006-01-01

    at late pregnancy by a technique that combines laser capture microdissection (LCM) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (LCM-FISH). Cultural bacteriological examination had failed to identify an infectious agent but by histological examination, large colonies of bacteria associated with tissue......Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been extensively used for identification of individual microbial cells within their natural environment. The present work describes the identification of Fusobacterium necrophorum in formalin-fixed tissue samples from three sets of ovine twins aborted......RNA-targeting oligonucleotide probe specific for F. necrophorum was used in a FISH assay. In situ hybridization showed a high density of F. necrophorum in all examined tissue sections. Simultaneous probing with a general bacterial probe EUB338 and the specific probe for F. necrophorum showed that no other bacteria could...

  20. The pathogenic potential of oral anaerobic microorganisms in rat periapical lesions%感染根管优势菌致病能力的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王变红; 葛丽华; 侯本祥

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the pathological effect of three oral anaerobic bacterial species on periapical lesions. Methods Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were inoculated into the first molars' pulp of SD rats respectively, and saline inoculated as control. Another group of molars' pulp was open to the oral cavity without any inoculation. The maxillary and mandibular bone was harvested at 1, 2, 4, 8 weeks, and periapical X-ray was taken and the absorption area of the periapical bone measured and analyzed. The periapical lesions were sliced and their pathology was observed. Results The periapical bone absorption area was increased with time and became biggest at 8 weeks. There were no significant difference in area of periapical lesions and in inflammation degree between the P. e group, P. g group and saline group at 1,2, 4, 8 weeks( P >0. 05 ). At 4 weeks, the bone absorption area of F. n group was bigger than that of P. e group and P. g group ( P < 0. 01 ). The inflammation degree in F. n group was severer than that in P. e or P. g group. Conclusion Compared with P. g and P. e, the F. n plays an more important role in the progress of apical periodontitis. Mixed infection of several kinds of bacteria was the main cause of periapical diseases.%目的 研究感染根管优势菌在根尖周炎发病过程中的作用,探讨不同细菌致病能力的差异.方法 选择牙髓卟啉单胞菌(Porphyromonas endodontalis,P.e)、牙龈卟啉单胞菌(Porphyromonas gingivalis,P.g)、具核梭杆菌(Fusobacterium nudeatum,F.n)分别接种于SD大鼠第一磨牙髓腔内,以生理盐水和髓腔开放作为对照.术后1、2、4、8周处死大鼠,取上、下颌骨拍摄X线片,测量并比较各组第一磨牙根尖周透射影面积;组织学切片观察各组根尖周组织病理变化,评价根尖周组织炎症程度.结果 X线片测量结果显示根尖阴影面积在术后8周最大,组织学评价结果为术后4周

  1. Effect of bacteria on the wound healing behavior of oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Rupa; Xu, Fanxing; Dong, Guangyu; Li, Shuai; Tian, Chen; Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Graves, Dana T

    2014-01-01

    Wounded tissue offers opportunity to microflora to adhere, colonize, invade and infect surrounding healthy tissue. The bacteria of the oral cavity have the potential to alter the wound healing process by interacting with keratinocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate mechanisms through which oral bacteria may influence re-epithelialization by interacting with gingival keratinocytes. By an in vitro scratch assay we demonstrate that primary gingival keratinocytes have impaired closure when exposed to two well characterized oral bacteria, P. gingivalis, and to a lesser extent, F. nucleatum. P. gingivalis reduced wound closure by ∼ 40%, which was partially dependent on proteolytic activity, and bacteria was still present within infected cells 9 days later despite exposure to bacteria for only 24 h. Both oral bacteria caused keratinocyte apoptosis at the wound site with cell death being greatest at the wound edge. P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum adversely affected cell proliferation and the effect also had a spatial component being most striking at the edge. The impact of the bacteria was long lasting even when exposure was brief. Cell migration was compromised in bacteria challenged keratinocytes with P. gingivalis having more severe effect (pbacteria challenged cells showed that P. gingivalis and to a lesser extent F. nucleatum significantly downregulated cell cycle genes cyclin1, CDK1, and CDK4 (pcell migration such as integrin beta-3 and -6 were significantly downregulated by P. gingivalis (p<0.05).

  2. Proteomics of Porphyromonas gingivalis within a model oral microbial community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tiansong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen that resides in a complex multispecies microbial biofilm community known as dental plaque. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that P. gingivalis can assemble into communities in vitro with Streptococcus gordonii and Fusobacterium nucleatum, common constituents of dental plaque. Whole cell quantitative proteomics, along with mutant construction and analysis, were conducted to investigate how P. gingivalis adapts to this three species community. Results 1156 P. gingivalis proteins were detected qualitatively during comparison of the three species model community with P. gingivalis incubated alone under the same conditions. Integration of spectral counting and summed signal intensity analyses of the dataset showed that 403 proteins were down-regulated and 89 proteins up-regulated. The proteomics results were inspected manually and an ontology analysis conducted using DAVID. Significant decreases were seen in proteins involved in cell shape and the formation of the cell envelope, as well as thiamine, cobalamin, and pyrimidine synthesis and DNA repair. An overall increase was seen in proteins involved in protein synthesis. HmuR, a TonB dependent outer membrane receptor, was up-regulated in the community and an hmuR deficient mutant was deficient in three species community formation, but was unimpaired in its ability to form mono- or dual-species biofilms. Conclusion Collectively, these results indicate that P. gingivalis can assemble into a heterotypic community with F. nucleatum and S. gordonii, and that a community lifestyle provides physiologic support for P. gingivalis. Proteins such as HmuR, that are up-regulated, can be necessary for community structure.

  3. Prevalence of Fusobacterium necrophorum in tonsils from patients with chronic tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapefrid, Anna; Lundström, Birgitta; Tano, Krister

    2017-03-01

    There was a high prevalence of Fusobacterium necrophorum (FN) in patients with chronic tonsillitis in the age group 15-23 years. This indicates that FN might play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic tonsillitis in this age group, which is also the age group in which chronic or recurrent tonsillitis is most common. The role of FN in patients with acute and chronic tonsillitis is unclear. Thus, this study investigated the occurrence of FN in tonsils of patients with chronic tonsillitis. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of FN in patients that underwent tonsillectomy due to chronic tonsillitis. This study also investigated if FN was found at different areas in the tonsils. One hundred and twenty-six consecutive patients undergoing tonsillectomy due to chronic tonsillitis were included from the ENT clinics at Sunderby Hospital and Gällivare Hospital, Sweden. Both children and adults were included to encompass various age groups (age =2-57 years). Culture swabs were taken from three different levels of the tonsils - the surface, the crypts, and the inner core of the tonsils. Selective agar plates for detecting FN were used for culture. Culture was also made for detecting β-hemolytic streptococci, Haemophilus influenzae, and Arcanobacterium. FN was the most common pathogen (19%). The highest prevalence of FN was found in the age group 15-23 years (in 34% of the patients). FN was detected both at the surface and in the core of the tonsils. Furthermore, in the few patients where FN was not detected in all three areas, FN was always detected at the tonsillar surface, in spite of being an anaerobic bacterium. Streptococci group G and C also occurred most frequently (30%) in the same age group as FN (15-23 years), whereas Streptococci group A was more evenly spread among the age groups.

  4. 糖尿病酮症酸中毒患者口腔菌群改变的相关因素研究%Study on the changes of oral flora in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余秀颜; 刘平; 窦宇红; 贝奕冰; 华志英; 张旭芳

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the changes of oral flora in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis,in order to provide evidence for making oral nursing intervention and hygiene education. Methods 35 patients with diabetic ketoacidosis were named as group A,35 non-diabetic patients with chronic periodontitis (diagnostic criteria:periodontal pocket 14 mm) were named as group B,35 nonketotic patients with diabetes mellitus were named as group C,then all the patients were detected for the oral disease and the oral hygiene was evaluated. Results The gingival index,plaque index,tooth mobility,probing depth and hemorrhage after the detection of three groups had no significant differences. The detection rate of streptococcus oralis, lactobacillus,fusobacterium nucleatum,black-pigment bacteria,Capnocytophaga gingivalis,actinomycetes, escherichia coli,staphylococcus aureus and pseudomonas aeruginosa had no significant differences,there was a positive correlation between quantity of black-pigment bacteria, Capnocytophaga gingivalis and fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. Conclusions Diabetic ketoacidosis strengthened the bacterial invasion and oral colonization of patients.%目的 探讨糖尿病酮症酸中毒患者口腔菌群的改变,为糖尿病患者制订口腔护理干预和口腔卫生宣教提供理论依据.方法 糖尿病酮症酸中毒患者35例(A组),同时选择35例非糖尿病慢性牙周炎(诊断标准:患牙牙周袋>14 mm)患者(B组)和35例糖尿病非酮症患者(C组)作为对照组,检查记录口腔疾病状况,评估口腔卫生状况.结果 3组牙龈指数、菌斑指数、牙齿松动、探诊深度、探诊后出血情况比较,均无显著差异;3组口腔链球菌、口腔乳杆菌、核梭杆菌、产黑菌、二氧化碳噬纤维菌无显著差异,放线菌、大肠埃希菌、金黄色葡萄球菌、铜绿假单胞菌、肺炎克雷伯菌、鲍曼复合醋酸钙不动杆菌、白假丝酵母菌

  5. Bad news itself or just the messenger? The high mortality of Fusobacterium spp. infections is related to disseminated malignancy and other comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Dessau, Ram Benny; Heltberg, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Background Fusobacterium species are pleomorphic, obligate anaerobic gram-negative bacilli. They are difficult to culture and grow slowly. If antibiotic treatment is initiated prior to blood cultures, the bacteria might evade detection. This is a comprehensive report on mortality in non...

  6. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie S Viljoen

    Full Text Available Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF, Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a the presence and b the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5. We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05, age (FDR = 0.03 or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01. Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-33-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-33-0017 ref|ZP_00144285.1| hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium nucleatum ...subsp. vincentii ATCC 49256] gb|EAA24117.1| hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. vincentii ATCC 49256] ZP_00144285.1 0.002 28% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-01-0134 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-01-0134 ref|ZP_00144067.1| Transporter [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. vi...ncentii ATCC 49256] gb|EAA24330.1| Transporter [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. vincentii ATCC 49256] ZP_00144067.1 0.038 30% ...

  9. Bad news itself or just the messenger? The high mortality of Fusobacterium spp. infections is related to disseminated malignancy and other comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine Marie Harries; Dessau, Ram; Heltberg, Ole;

    2016-01-01

    -bacteraemia fusobacterial infection. Methods Data were collected retrospectively in adults having a positive culture with Fusobacterium spp. admitted during 2000–2012 at the medical department. Data on culture specimens, number of cultures, admission and culture dates, patient age, gender, clinical disease, Charlson......'s index of co-morbidity, CRP level and survival were obtained. For comparison, we traced 60 consecutive, similarly obtained cultures from 2009 to 2010 containing Staphylococcus aureus. Results Within a 12-year period, we identified 28 patients with a positive culture of Fusobacterium spp. in a medical...... ward serving a population of 220,000. Only a minority (39%) had a positive blood culture, and 54% had focus in respiratory tract or pleura. Overall 6-month mortality was 32%, and unrelated to subspecies, treatment or anatomic location but significantly related to age >60 years, admission for severe...

  10. Fastidious anaerobe agar compared with Wilkins-Chalgren agar, brain heart infusion agar, and brucella agar for susceptibility testing of Fusobacterium species.

    OpenAIRE

    Brazier, J. S.; Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Ostovari, M I

    1990-01-01

    Fastidious anaerobe agar supported the growth of 82 strains of fusobacteria better than brain heart infusion agar, brucella agar, and Wilkins-Chalgren agar. Fastidious anaerobe agar showed less hazing and fewer tailing endpoints with beta-lactam antibiotics. Whole-blood supplementation improved the performance of all media. Wilkins-Chalgren agar without blood failed to support the growth of 17% of the strains. All Fusobacterium ulcerans strains were resistant to clindamycin.

  11. Mixed species biofilms of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Porphyromonas levii impair the oxidative response of bovine neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Joey S; Buret, Andre G; Ceri, Howard; Storey, Douglas G; Anderson, Stefanie J; Morck, Douglas W

    2017-10-01

    Biofilms composed of anaerobic bacteria can result in persistent infections and chronic inflammation. Host immune cells have difficulties clearing biofilm-related infections and this can result in tissue damage. Neutrophils are a vital component of the innate immune system and help clear biofilms. The comparative neutrophilic response to biofilms versus planktonic bacteria remains incompletely understood, particularly in the context of mixed infections. The objective of this study was to generate mixed species anaerobic bacterial biofilms composed of two opportunistic pathogens, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Porphyromonas levii, and evaluate neutrophil responses to extracellular fractions from both biofilms and planktonic cell co-cultures of the same bacteria. Purified bovine neutrophils exposed to culture supernatants from mixed species planktonic bacteria showed elevated oxidative activity compared to neutrophils exposed to biofilms composed of the same bacteria. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide plays a significant role in the stimulation of neutrophils; biofilms produced substantially more lipopolysaccharide than planktonic bacteria under these experimental conditions. Removal of lipopolysaccharide significantly reduced neutrophil oxidative response to culture supernatants of planktonic bacteria. Oxidative responses to LPS-removed biofilm supernatants and LPS-removed planktonic cell supernatants were similar. The limited neutrophil response to biofilm bacteria observed in this study supports the reduced ability of the innate immune system to eradicate biofilm-associated infections. Lipopolysaccharide is likely important in neutrophil response; however, the presence of other extracellular, immune modifying molecules in the bacterial media also appears to be important in altering neutrophil function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. EFFECTS OF REGULAR PERIODONTAL SCALING ON FUSOBACTERIUM NUCLEATUM OF SUBGINGIVAL PLAQUE IN FIXED ORTHODONTIC PATIENTS%定期牙周洁治对固定正畸病人龈下菌斑中具核梭杆菌的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏青; 白雪雁; 于新波; 申勇; 金娜; 范存晖

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨定期牙周洁治对固定正畸病人龈下菌斑中具核梭杆菌(Fn)的影响.方法 选取固定正畸病人48例,随机分为A、B、C共3组,每组16例,牙周洁治周期分别为1、3、6个月,分别于矫治前及矫治1、3、6、9个月时,采用荧光定量PCR法检测各组龈下菌斑中Fn的百分含量.结果 A组和B组矫治1、3、6、9个月时龈下菌斑中Fn的百分含量与矫治前比较差异无显著性(P>0.05),C组在矫治6个月时龈下菌斑中Fn的百分含量较矫治前显著升高(t=2.81,P<0.05).矫治6个月时,C组龈下菌斑中Fn的百分含量明显高于A组(F=6.62,q=5.14,P<0.05),而其他各组间各时间点龈下菌斑中Fn的百分含量比较差异无显著性(P>0.05).结论 定期牙周洁治对控制固定正畸病人龈下菌斑中Fn的含量具有一定作用.

  13. Rehabilitation and functional outcomes after extensive surgical debridement of a knee infected by fusobacterium necrophorum: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Andrew R; Briggs, Matthew S; Kegelmeyer, Deborah K; Kloos, Anne D

    2013-06-01

    Joint infection is a rare but serious complication after knee injury that should be part of a physical therapist's differential diagnosis. This case report presents the care of a 17 year-old female athlete with septic arthritis from a Fusobacterium infection after sustaining a right lateral meniscus tear. Joint pathology combined with the aggressive infectious agent led to arthrofibrosis of her knee joint and resultant activity limitations and participation restrictions. The purpose of this case report is to highlight a rare and unique pathology, the serious effects that a joint infection can have on musculoskeletal function, and the challenges encountered during the rehabilitation process. The subject was a 17 year-old volleyball player who injured her right knee while playing volleyball. Within 7 days, the subject developed a severe joint infection that spread into surrounding gluteal, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius musculature. The infection was surgically debrided eight times during a 10-week inpatient hospital stay. A manipulation under anesthesia was performed to restore range of motion in her knee joint. Outpatient physical therapy was initiated 4 days later in order to restore musculoskeletal function. Over eight months of physical therapy services were utilized to address the impairments and activity limitations caused by her joint dysfunction. She met her physical therapy goals and made significant improvements on the Knee Outcome Survey and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Success in physical therapy and completion of additional strength training exercise allowed this subject to return to competitive softball at the club level during her freshman year of college. Though rare after musculoskeletal injury, joint infection can lead to soft tissue damage, partial or complete degradation of articular cartilage, and arthrofibrosis causing significant disability. Physical therapists must incorporate evidence-based treatment principles including eccentric

  14. In vivo antianaerobe activity of DS-8587, a new fluoroquinolone, against Fusobacterium necrophorum in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Kurosaka, Yuichi; Hoshino, Kazuki; Kohno, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    DS-8587 is a novel parenteral fluoroquinolone, which has an activity equivalent to sitafloxacin against various pathogens including anaerobes. We examined the in vivo anti-anaerobic activity of DS-8587, and compared it with that of levofloxacin (LVFX), using a murine model of Fusobacterium necrophorum-induced liver abscess developed via blood borne infection. Mice with liver abscess infection caused by F. necrophorum were treated with saline (control), DS-8587 (0.8, 4, and 20 mg/kg twice daily), or LVFX (20 and 100 mg/kg) for a day. After treatment, the number of viable bacteria in liver was analyzed. We also analyzed the pharmacokinetics of these agents in plasma and the liver after initial treatment. The MICs of DS-8587 and LVFX were 0.015 and 1 mg/mL, respectively. DS-8587 eradicated the viable bacteria in the liver even at doses as low as 4 mg/kg. In contrast, the liver bacteria were not eradicated in any of the LVFX-treated mice even at a dose of 100 mg/kg (P DS-8587, 4 or 20 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic parameter AUC/MIC ratios for DS-8587 (4 mg/kg) and LVFX (100 mg/kg) were 96.7 and 60.8 in plasma and 600 and 145.6 in the liver, respectively. The AUC/MIC ratio showed the best correlation with efficacy of DS-8587. DS-8587 significantly reduced the number of viable bacteria in a murine model of F. necrophorum-induced liver abscess compared to LVFX. Our study demonstrated that the anti-anaerobic activity of quinolones in vivo was different from the MICs in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. REHABILITATION AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER EXTENSIVE SURGICAL DEBRIDEMENT OF A KNEE INFECTED BY FUSOBACTERIUM NECROPHORUM: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Matthew S.; Kegelmeyer, Deborah K.; Kloos, Anne D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Joint infection is a rare but serious complication after knee injury that should be part of a physical therapist's differential diagnosis. This case report presents the care of a 17 year‐old female athlete with septic arthritis from a Fusobacterium infection after sustaining a right lateral meniscus tear. Joint pathology combined with the aggressive infectious agent led to arthrofibrosis of her knee joint and resultant activity limitations and participation restrictions. The purpose of this case report is to highlight a rare and unique pathology, the serious effects that a joint infection can have on musculoskeletal function, and the challenges encountered during the rehabilitation process. Case Description: The subject was a 17 year‐old volleyball player who injured her right knee while playing volleyball. Within 7 days, the subject developed a severe joint infection that spread into surrounding gluteal, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius musculature. The infection was surgically debrided eight times during a 10‐week inpatient hospital stay. A manipulation under anesthesia was performed to restore range of motion in her knee joint. Outpatient physical therapy was initiated 4 days later in order to restore musculoskeletal function. Outcome: Over eight months of physical therapy services were utilized to address the impairments and activity limitations caused by her joint dysfunction. She met her physical therapy goals and made significant improvements on the Knee Outcome Survey and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Success in physical therapy and completion of additional strength training exercise allowed this subject to return to competitive softball at the club level during her freshman year of college. Discussion: Though rare after musculoskeletal injury, joint infection can lead to soft tissue damage, partial or complete degradation of articular cartilage, and arthrofibrosis causing significant disability. Physical therapists must

  16. Antibacterial activity of synthetic antimicrobial decapeptide against oral bacteria%人工合成抗菌肽对口腔细菌抗菌性能的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘奕; 费伟; 王丽娜; 董广艳; 吴红崑

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of decapeptide, a novel antimicrobial peptide, against several major cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria in vitro. Methods In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of decapeptide against Streptococcus mutans (S.mutans), Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces viscosus, Actinomyces naeslundii, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Saccharomyces albicans in vitro using the agar diffusion method and broth dilution method. Furthermore, a time–kill kinetic study of decapeptide against S. mutans was performed. Results The results showed that decapeptide exhibited antimicrobial activity against various oral bacteria and fungi. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of main cariogenic bacteria ranged from 62.5 μg·mL-1 to 125 μg·mL-1, and the MIC of periodontopathogenic bacteria tested ranged from 250 μg·mL-1 to 1 000 μg·mL-1. Among the bacteria tested, decapeptide had a strong inhibitory effect on cariogenic S.mutans. Results of the time–kill kinetic studies showed that decapeptide reduced the viable counts of S. mutans by more than one order of magnitude after 20 min of incubation, and thoroughly killed S.mutans after 30 min. No viable cells could be detected after 24 h of incubation. Conclusion This study suggest that decapeptide might have potential clinical application in treating dental caries by killing S.mutans within dental plaque.%目的:  评价人工合成抗菌肽(十肽)对口腔常见感染性疾病主要致病菌的抑菌活性。方法  采用琼脂扩散法及液体稀释法体外评价十肽对变异链球菌、表兄链球菌、嗜酸乳杆菌、血链球菌、格氏链球菌、黏性放线菌、内氏放线菌、牙龈卟啉单胞菌、中间普雷沃菌、具核梭杆菌、伴放线嗜

  17. 口臭与主要产臭菌的相关性分析%Analysis of the relationship between halitosis and oral bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范亚贤; 王者玲; 杨圣辉; 李金陆; 果梅英; 刘颖

    2005-01-01

    目的分析口臭与主要产臭菌的相关性.方法选择口臭患者29名,用鼻闻法确定口臭的来源和部位,使用口气测量仪测量口腔中挥发性硫化物(volatile sulfur compounds,VSCs)的浓度;分别从产臭牙周袋、舌苔和唾液中采集标本,进行厌氧培养,并进行菌落计数.结果VSCs水平与龈下菌斑中的厌氧菌总数明显正相关(P<0.01),与龈下菌斑中产黑菌数(black-pigment bacteria,BPB)和具核梭杆菌数(Fusobacterium nucleatum,FN)也相关(P<0.05),舌苔上的厌氧菌总数、产黑菌和具核梭杆菌与VSCs水平呈正相关(P<0.05).结论牙周病和大量舌苔可能是引起口臭的主要原因,而细菌(主要包括产黑菌和具核梭杆菌)在口臭的形成中起重要作用.

  18. The protective effect of recombinant FomA-expressing Lactobacillus acidophilus against periodontal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Ding, Qinfeng; Feng, Xiping; Li, Fei

    2013-10-01

    A number of studies have shown that the outer membrane protein FomA found in Fusobacterium nucleatum demonstrates great potential as an immune target for combating periodontitis. Lactobacillus acidophilus is a useful antigen delivery vehicle for mucosal immunisation, and previous studies by our group have shown that L. acidophilus acts as a protective factor in periodontal health. In this study, making use of the immunogenicity of FomA and the probiotic properties of L. acidophilus, we constructed a recombinant form of L. acidophilus expressing the FomA protein and detected the FomA-specific IgG in the serum and sIgA in the saliva of mice through oral administration with the recombinant strains. When serum containing FomA-specific antibodies was incubated with the F. nucleatum in vitro, the number of Porphyromonas gingivalis cells that coaggregated with the F. nucleatum cells was significantly reduced. Furthermore, a mouse gum abscess model was successfully generated, and the range of gingival abscesses in the immune mice was relatively limited compared with the control group. The level of IL-1β in the serum and local gum tissues of the immune mice was consistently lower than in the control group. Our findings indicated that oral administration of the recombinant L. acidophilus reduced the risk of periodontal infection with P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum.

  19. Oral Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  20. Oral myiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Thalaimalai Saravanan; Mathan A Mohan; Meera Thinakaran; Saneem Ahammed

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability ...

  1. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces, viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva-coate...

  2. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces, viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva...

  3. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  4. Oral Thrush

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feeding mothers In addition to the distinctive white mouth lesions, infants may have trouble feeding or be fussy ... candidiasis (yeast infection) patient information. American Academy of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology. http://www.aaomp.org/public/oral-candidiasis.php. ...

  5. Oral Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 規子; スズキ, ノリコ; Noriko, SUZUKI

    2004-01-01

    The major oral functions can be categorized as mastication, swallowing, speech and respiratory functions. Dysfunction of these results in dysphagia, speech disorders and abnormal respiration (such as Sleep Apnea). These functions relate to dentistry in the occurrence of : (1) oral preparatory and oral phases, (2) articulation disorders and velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI), and (3) mouth breathing, respiratory and blowing disorders. These disorders are related to oral and maxillofacial diseas...

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12288-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available onomously Replicating Sequence(ARS) of pLLE1. 36 3.2 3 ( X51832 ) Lentinus edodes m...nome. 32 3.0 15 ( AE009951 ) Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 255... 34 3.2 19 ( E06069 ) Aut

  7. The effect of blue light on periodontal biofilm growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Carla R; Song, Xiaoqing; Polymeri, Angeliki; Goodson, J Max; Wang, Xiaoshan; Soukos, Nikolaos S

    2015-11-01

    We have previously shown that blue light eliminates the black-pigmented oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella melaninogenica. In the present study, the in vitro photosensitivity of the above black-pigmented microorganisms and four Fusobacteria species (Fusobacterium nucleatum ss. nucleatum, F. nucleatum ss. vincentii, F. nucleatum ss. polymorphum, Fusobacterium periodonticum) was investigated in pure cultures and human dental plaque suspensions. We also tested the hypothesis that phototargeting the above eight key periodontopathogens in plaque-derived biofilms in vitro would control growth within the dental biofilm environment. Cultures of the eight bacteria were exposed to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 80 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 4.8 J/cm2. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of bacteria was performed to demonstrate the presence and amounts of porphyrin molecules within microorganisms. Suspensions of human dental plaque bacteria were also exposed once to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 50 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 12 J/cm2. Microbial biofilms developed from the same plaque were exposed to 455 nm blue light at 50 mW/cm2 once daily for 4 min (12 J/cm2) over a period of 3 days (4 exposures) in order to investigate the cumulative action of phototherapy on the eight photosensitive pathogens as well as on biofilm growth. Bacterial growth was evaluated using the colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. The selective phototargeting of pathogens was studied using whole genomic probes in the checkerboard DNA-DNA format. In cultures, all eight species showed significant growth reduction (p biofilms, respectively, (p biofilms. The cumulative blue light treatment suppressed biofilm growth in vitro. This may introduce a new avenue of prophylactic treatment for periodontal diseases.

  8. Traditional Medicinal Plant Extracts and Natural Products with Activity against Oral Bacteria: Potential Application in the Prevention and Treatment of Oral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo A. Palombo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases are major health problems with dental caries and periodontal diseases among the most important preventable global infectious diseases. Oral health influences the general quality of life and poor oral health is linked to chronic conditions and systemic diseases. The association between oral diseases and the oral microbiota is well established. Of the more than 750 species of bacteria that inhabit the oral cavity, a number are implicated in oral diseases. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria (mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and actinomycetes. Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium. Given the incidence of oral disease, increased resistance by bacteria to antibiotics, adverse affects of some antibacterial agents currently used in dentistry and financial considerations in developing countries, there is a need for alternative prevention and treatment options that are safe, effective and economical. While several agents are commercially available, these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicines are considered as good alternatives. In this review, plant extracts or phytochemicals that inhibit the growth of oral pathogens, reduce the development of biofilms and dental plaque, influence the adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and reduce the symptoms of oral diseases will be discussed further. Clinical studies that have investigated the safety and efficacy of such plant-derived medicines will also be described.

  9. Oral histoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Karthikeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal disease that takes various clinical forms, among which oral lesions are rare. The disseminated form of the disease that usually occurs in association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV is one of the AIDS-defining diseases. Isolated oral histoplasmosis, without systemic involvement, with underlying immunosuppression due to AIDS is very rare. We report one such case of isolated oral histoplasmosis in a HIV-infected patient.

  10. Oral bacterial DNA findings in pericardial fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Mari Louhelainen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We recently reported that large amounts of oral bacterial DNA can be found in thrombus aspirates of myocardial infarction patients. Some case reports describe bacterial findings in pericardial fluid, mostly done with conventional culturing and a few with PCR; in purulent pericarditis, nevertheless, bacterial PCR has not been used as a diagnostic method before. Objective: To find out whether bacterial DNA can be measured in the pericardial fluid and if it correlates with pathologic–anatomic findings linked to cardiovascular diseases. Methods: Twenty-two pericardial aspirates were collected aseptically prior to forensic autopsy at Tampere University Hospital during 2009–2010. Of the autopsies, 10 (45.5% were free of coronary artery disease (CAD, 7 (31.8% had mild and 5 (22.7% had severe CAD. Bacterial DNA amounts were determined using real-time quantitative PCR with specific primers and probes for all bacterial strains associated with endodontic disease (Streptococcus mitis group, Streptococcus anginosus group, Staphylococcus aureus/Staphylococcus epidermidis, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra and periodontal disease (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatus, and Dialister pneumosintes. Results: Of 22 cases, 14 (63.6% were positive for endodontic and 8 (36.4% for periodontal-disease-associated bacteria. Only one case was positive for bacterial culturing. There was a statistically significant association between the relative amount of bacterial DNA in the pericardial fluid and the severity of CAD (p=0.035. Conclusions: Oral bacterial DNA was detectable in pericardial fluid and an association between the severity of CAD and the total amount of bacterial DNA in pericardial fluid was found, suggesting that this kind of measurement might be useful for clinical purposes.

  11. Comparison of the Oral Microbiomes of Canines and Their Owners Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changin Oh

    Full Text Available The oral microbiome, which is closely associated with many diseases, and the resident pathogenic oral bacteria, which can be transferred by close physical contact, are important public health considerations. Although the dog is the most common companion animal, the composition of the canine oral microbiome, which may include human pathogenic bacteria, and its relationship with that of their owners are unclear. In this study, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing was used to compare the oral microbiomes of 10 dogs and their owners and to identify zoonotic pathogens. Pyrosequencing revealed 246 operational taxonomic units in the 10 samples, representing 57 genera from eight bacterial phyla. Firmicutes (57.6%, Proteobacteria (21.6%, Bacteroidetes (9.8%, Actinobacteria (7.1%, and Fusobacteria (3.9% were the predominant phyla in the human oral samples, whereas Proteobacteria (25.7%, Actinobacteria (21%, Bacteroidetes (19.7%, Firmicutes (19.3%, and Fusobacteria (12.3% were predominant in the canine oral samples. The predominant genera in the human samples were Streptococcus (43.9%, Neisseria (10.3%, Haemophilus (9.6%, Prevotella (8.4%, and Veillonella (8.1%, whereas the predominant genera in the canine samples were Actinomyces (17.2%, Unknown (16.8, Porphyromonas (14.8, Fusobacterium (11.8, and Neisseria (7.2%. The oral microbiomes of dogs and their owners were appreciably different, and similarity in the microbiomes of canines and their owners was not correlated with residing in the same household. Oral-to-oral transfer of Neisseria shayeganii, Porphyromonas canigingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Streptococcus minor from dogs to humans was suspected. The finding of potentially zoonotic and periodontopathic bacteria in the canine oral microbiome may be a public health concern.

  12. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-02-20

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  13. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The idea of identifying oral lesions with a precancerous nature, i.e. in the sense of pertaining to a pathologic process with an increased risk for future malignant development, of course is to prevent frank malignancy to occur in the affected area. The most common oral lesion with a precancerous...... nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  14. Oral pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  15. Herpes - oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000606.htm Herpes - oral To use the sharing features on this page, ... 374. Read More Atopic dermatitis Cancer Fever Genital herpes Mouth ulcers Vesicles Review Date 8/14/2015 Updated ...

  16. Disparities in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020: Oral Health Objectives Site Map Disparities in Oral Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Oral health ... to get and keep dental insurance. Disparities in Oral Health Some of the oral health disparities that exist ...

  17. Microbiological basis of oral infections and sensitivity to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Prieto, José; Calvo, Almudena

    2004-01-01

    Because oral infections are common, the physician must understand the underlying etiology, pathogeny, and other variables that determine how these processes evolve in order to choose the most appropriate antibiotic drug. The special characteristics of the oral cavity determine the make-up of the microflora that lives there. Different anaerobic species belonging to the Peptostreptococcus, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, Gemella, and Porphyromonas genera are of particular interest, as are the aerobic species Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and Corynebacterium. Each of these microorganisms occupies a different microniche within the oral cavity, and the prevailing balance is upset when conditions become modified as a result of illness or due to dental interventions such as tooth extraction or tooth scaling and polishing. Pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria (Actinomyces, Prevotella intermedia species, etc.) can develop in these conditions, as can yeasts (Candida sp., Histoplasma capsulatum), virus (herpes simplex, papilomavirus), and parasites (Entamoeba gingivalis, Trichomonas tenax). When infection occurs, the patients s immune system reacts by means of inborn immunity (non-specific) and acquired immunity (specific). Empirical treatment is administered that should be based on etiological data and on the antimicrobial sensitivity of the pathogen that is causing the infection. However, oral microflora sensitivity to different antibiotics is currently declining and there is a noticeable trend towards resistances. As a consequence of all this, the treatment of oral infections must also aim to restore the ecological balance of the oral cavity and to minimize the emergence of resistance in the microorganisms present in the mouth. Hence, epidemiological oral pathogen sensitivity studies must be conducted, fostering the administration of appropriate antibiotics at proper doses and keeping specialists abreast of the latest trends. In recent decades, oral infections comprise one of

  18. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options.

  19. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  20. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  1. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  2. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  3. Anaerobic co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells and anaerobic pathogens - a new in vitro model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Kriebel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are multipotent by nature and are originally isolated from bone marrow. In light of a future application of hMSCs in the oral cavity, a body compartment with varying oxygen partial pressures and an omnipresence of different bacterial species i.e. periodontitis pathogens, we performed this study to gain information about the behavior of hMSC in an anaerobic system and the response in interaction with oral bacterial pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established a model system with oral pathogenic bacterial species and eukaryotic cells cultured in anaerobic conditions. The facultative anaerobe bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were studied. Their effects on hMSCs and primary as well as permanent gingival epithelial cells (Ca9-22, HGPEC were comparatively analyzed. We show that hMSCs cope with anoxic conditions, since 40% vital cells remain after 72 h of anaerobic culture. The Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells are significantly more sensitive to lack of oxygen. All bacterial species reveal a comparatively low adherence to and internalization into hMSCs (0.2% and 0.01% of the initial inoculum, respectively. In comparison, the Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells present better targets for bacterial adherence and internalization. The production of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8 is higher in both gingival epithelial cell lines compared to hMSCs and Fusobacterium nucleatum induce a time-dependent cytokine secretion in both cell lines. Porphyromonas gingivalis is less effective in stimulating secretion of IL-8 in the co-cultivation experiments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HMSCs are suitable for use in anoxic regions of the oral cavity. The interaction with local pathogenic bacteria does not result in massive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. The test system established in this study allowed further investigation of parameters prior to set up of

  4. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Desai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dirofilaria is parasitic nematodes of domestic and wild animals that can infect humans accidentally via vectors. Its occurrence in the oral cavity is extremely rare. The most frequent presentation of human dirofilariasis is a single submucosal nodule without signs of inflammation. We hereby, report a case of human dirofilariasis affecting the buccal mucosa in a 32-year-old farmer caused by D. repens.

  5. Oral leiomyomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, D D; Neville, B W

    1979-04-01

    Oral leiomyomas are considered to be rare neoplasms, but they may be encountered more frequently than generally believed. Three types of leiomyomas are commonly described: solid leiomyomas, angiomyomas, and epithelioid leiomyomas. Three cases of solid leiomyoma are presented, all of which occurred in the anterior mandibular mucobuccal fold. Leiomyomas can be easily confused with other spindle-cell tumors. The necessity of using special stains, especially Mallory's phosphotungstic acid hematoxylin, is discussed.

  6. Detection and measurement of oral malodour in periodontitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Mathew

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND &OBJECTIVES : Malodour has been correlated with the concentration of volatile sulphur compounds produced in the oral cavity by metabolic activity of bacteria colonizing the periodontal sites and the dorsum of the tongue. The aim of this study was to detect malodour in mouth air organoleptically and using a portable sulphide monitor and to correlate it with the clinical parameters, halitosis linked toxins and BANA, using tongue and subgingival plaque samples. The halitosis grading is also correlated with the microbial colonies of the subgingival plaque sample. METHODS : 20 patients with chronic periodontitis with 5-7 mm pocket depth, radiographic evidence of bone loss and presence of oral malodour participated in this study. Assessment of mouth air was done organoleptically and by using a portable sulphide monitor. The clinical parameter, plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, gingival bleeding index (BI, were obtained from all the areas. Samples for BANA and to detect halitosis linked toxins were taken from the dorsal surface of the tongue and periodontal pockets ranging 5-7 mm. Halitosis related microbial colonies were identified using anaerobic culturing from the subgingival plaque. RESULTS : The scores of PI, GI, BI and sample that tested positive for halitosis linked toxins and with the halitosis grading were not significant. The presence of tongue coating and the halitosis grading and toxin levels were significant. BANA has shown to be non contributory due to technical problems. Anaerobic culture has shown to identify Streptococcus, Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas and Prevotella colonies. INTERPRETATION &CONCLUSION : The results confirmed that there was no correlation between the clinical parameters, halitosis linked toxins and halitosis grading. The microbial colonies have shown to correlate with the presence of oral malodour.

  7. The in Vitro Antimicrobial Efficacy of Propolis against Four Oral Pathogens: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Michèle Waldner-Tomic

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study screened the available evidence for the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of propolis, a natural herbal resin bee product, against a selection of three bacterial species of relevance to oral diseases. For this purpose, papers dealing with laboratory studies assessing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC or the agar diffusion method to analyze the antimicrobial properties of propolis on three oral pathogens (S. mutans, P. gingivalis, F. nucleatum and a yeast (C. albicans are reviewed. Overall, a positive antimicrobial effect could be shown. However, when compared to the commonly used control substances (e.g., specific antibiotics, antiseptics and antifungals, propolis appeared less effective, depending on the bacterial strain, and required higher concentrations than the control substances, in order to show a measurable effect. Nevertheless, propolis as a natural herbal resin bee product can be considered as a natural antiseptic agent within the range of other herbal products, like sanguinarine. Therefore, it may be a valuable compound of non-synthetic, natural origin for patients seeking complementary agents and alternatives for “hard” chemicals.

  8. Chromosomal DNA probes for the identification of Bacteroides tectum and Bacteroides fragilis from the oral cavity of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, D N; Bailey, G D

    1993-01-01

    A dot-blot hybridisation assay using high molecular weight DNA as whole chromosomal probes was used to differentiate Bacteroides tectum from Bacteroides fragilis. 32P-labelled probes were compared with digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled probes. The whole chromosomal probes were specific--differentiating B. tectum from B. fragilis and both from a variety of other species (including other members of the genera Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Prevotella) found in normal and abnormal mouths of cats and horses. However, even at very high stringencies, B. tectum homology groups I, II and III were not distinguishable from one another using either 32P-labelled or DIG-labelled probes. Thus, DIG-labelled whole chromosome probes directed against cellular DNA released directly onto nitrocellulose membranes is considered a useful method for diagnostic veterinary laboratories wishing to identify B. tectum and distinguish it from B. fragilis and other oral anaerobic flora of cats.

  9. Tobacco smoking affects bacterial acquisition and colonization in oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Purnima S; Matthews, Chad R; Joshi, Vinayak; de Jager, Marko; Aspiras, Marcelo

    2011-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that smoking affects the composition of the disease-associated subgingival biofilm, yet little is known about its effects during the formation of this biofilm. The present investigation was undertaken to examine the contributions of smoking to the composition and proinflammatory characteristics of the biofilm during de novo plaque formation. Marginal and subgingival plaque and gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected from 15 current smokers and from 15 individuals who had never smoked (nonsmokers) following 1, 2, 4, and 7 days of undisturbed plaque formation. 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used for bacterial identification, and multiplex bead-based flow cytometry was used to quantify the levels of 27 immune mediators. Smokers demonstrated a highly diverse, relatively unstable initial colonization of both marginal and subgingival biofilms, with lower niche saturation than that seen in nonsmokers. Periodontal pathogens belonging to the genera Fusobacterium, Cardiobacterium, Synergistes, and Selenomonas, as well as respiratory pathogens belonging to the genera Haemophilus and Pseudomonas, colonized the early biofilms of smokers and continued to persist over the observation period, suggesting that smoking favors early acquisition and colonization of pathogens in oral biofilms. Smokers also demonstrated an early proinflammatory response to this colonization, which persisted over 7 days. Further, a positive correlation between proinflammatory cytokine levels and commensal bacteria was observed in smokers but not in nonsmokers. Taken together, the data suggest that smoking influences both the composition of the nascent biofilm and the host response to this colonization.

  10. Oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  11. Reducing the bioactivity of Tannerella forsythia lipopolysaccharide by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sung-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    Tannerella forsythia is considered a pathogen of periodontitis and forms a biofilm with multi-species bacteria in oral cavity. Lipopolysaccharide is a powerful immunostimulator and induces inflammation and shock. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of T. forsythia LPS in its co-cultivation with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Porphyromonas gingivalis. T. forsythia was co-cultured in the presence and absence of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis and then T. forsythia LPS was extracted. The extracts were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and NF-κB reporter CHO cell lines. THP-1 cells were treated with the LPS and evaluated induction of cytokine expression by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. For analysis of the bioactivity of T. forsythia LPS, the binding assay on LPS-binding protein (LBP) and CD14 was processed. The extracts did not contaminate other molecules except LPS and showed TLR4 agonists. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower level of induction of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression than single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum in the conditions of human serum. However, the three T. forsythia LPS did not show difference of cytokine induction in the serum free conditions. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower affinity to LBP and CD14 as binding site of O-antigen and attached at a lower level to THP-1 cells compared to single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum. The virulence of T. forsythia LPS was decreased by co-culturing with P. gingivalis and their affinity to LBP and CD14 was reduced, which may due to modification of O-antigen chain by P. gingivalis.

  12. Oral dirofilariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahija Janardhanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Filariasis affecting animals can rarely cause infections in human beings through the accidental bite of potential vectors. The resulting infection in man, known as zoonotic filariasis occur worldwide. Human dirofilariasis, the most common zoonotic filariasis, is caused by the filarial worm belonging to the genus Dirofilaria. Dirofilarial worms, which are recognized as pathogenic in man can cause nodular lesions in the lung, subcutaneous tissue, peritoneal cavity or eyes. Oral dirofilariasis is extremely rare and only a few cases have been documented. We report an interesting case of dirofilariasis due to Dirofilaria repens involving buccal mucosa in a patient who presented with a facial swelling. The clinical features, diagnostic issues and treatment aspects are discussed. This paper stresses the importance of considering dirofilariasis as differential diagnosis for subcutaneous swelling of the face, especially in areas where it is endemic.

  13. Detection and measurement of oral malodor in chronic periodontitis patients and its correlation with levels of select oral anaerobes in subgingival plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H S Grover

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral malodor is generally ascribable to oral microbial putrefaction generating malodorous volatile sulfur compounds. The aim of the present study is to correlate organoleptic recordings with a small handheld portable volatile sulfide monitor and periodontal clinical parameters and correlate the levels of halitosis causing bacteria in plaque between baseline, 1-week, and 1-month. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 systemically healthy subjects with self-reported halitosis were subjected to organoleptic examination and FitScan®. Subgingival plaque samples for anaerobic culturing were harvested followed by an assessment of plaque index (PI, gingival bleeding index (GBI, and pocket probing depth. Data derived were subjected to statistical analysis using Wilcoxon signed rank test and Spearman's rank test (P < 0.05. Results: No correlation was seen between organoleptic measurements and portable volatile sulfide monitor at any time interval. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.05 correlation between the scores of PI, gingival index, GBI, and myeloproliferative disease with organoleptic readings at all-time intervals. Anaerobic culture has shown to identify Fusobacterium species, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia. However, no correlation could be established in between total microbial load with organoleptic and FitScan®reading at any time interval (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Significant correlation could be established between organoleptic readings and periodontal parameters.

  14. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  15. Oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    Full Text Available A amiloidose é uma doença complexa rara de difícil diagnóstico que ocorre devido à deposição de substância amilóide no meio extracelular. Ao ser diagnosticado na cavidade bucal, deve-se monitorar o paciente a fim de avaliar possíveis complicações sistêmicas da doença. Diante disso, o objetivo do presente estudo é relatar um caso de amiloidose oral em uma paciente do gênero feminino de 72 anos de idade. Baseado nos sinais clínicos observados, a hipótese diagnóstica foi de fibroma traumático. Após realização de biópsia e exame histopatológico, o diagnóstico foi de amiloidose oral, o que foi confirmado com a coloração do espécime com o reagente vermelho congo. Depósitos de amilóide foram encontrados no tecido conjuntivo, na avaliação através da luz polarizada, que apresentou birrefringência. Tal achado foi preocupante, já que a amiloidose geralmente acomete diversos tecidos levando a comprometimentos sistêmicos. Por essa razão a paciente foi encaminhada a procurar atendimento médico. No entanto, houve abandono do tratamento e a mesma veio a óbito 6 meses após o diagnóstico da doença. Lesões orais aparentemente simples podem revelar doenças raras e de difícil tratamento. O diagnóstico preciso e acompanhamentos médicos são fundamentais na sobrevida do paciente.

  16. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  17. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ... detection and treatment of oral cancers. Note: For materials specific to African American men, please see: Oral ...

  18. Oral Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral lichen planus Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Oral lichen planus (LIE-kun PLAY-nus) is an ongoing (chronic) ... that affects mucous membranes inside your mouth. Oral lichen planus may appear as white, lacy patches; red, ...

  19. Oral Health Glossary

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    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health Mouth Breathing Can Cause Major Health Problems Over ... news feeds delivered directly to your desktop! more... Oral Health Glossary Article Chapters Oral Health Glossary print full ...

  20. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  1. Coaggregation of Streptococcus salivarius with periodontopathogens: evidence for involvement of fimbriae in the interaction with Prevotella intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, C; Lamothe, J; Frenette, M

    2003-10-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is divided into two serological subgroups that carry either fibrils or fimbriae. Although fimbriae have been observed on up to 50% of S. salivarius strains in the human oral cavity, no function has yet been assigned to them. To determine whether S. salivarius fimbriae have a role in adhesion, we examined the ability of S. salivarius to coaggregate with selected microorganisms involved in periodontal diseases. Our results show that S. salivarius coaggregated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia. However, only fimbriated S. salivarius cells were able to coaggregate with P. intermedia, suggesting a specific role for these structures in the interaction. Heat treatment, sensitivity to sugars, amino acids, and EDTA, as well as protease treatment were also used to further characterize coaggregation between S. salivarius and periodontopathogens.

  2. Diversity and site-specificity of the oral microflora in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preza, Dorita; Olsen, Ingar; Willumsen, Tiril; Grinde, Bjørn; Paster, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the bacterial diversity in the oral cavity of the elderly without root caries using bacterial microarrays, and to determine the site- and subject-specificity of bacterial colonization. Samples were collected from the tongue dorsum, mucosa of the buccal fold, hard palate, supragingival plaque from sound root surfaces, and subgingival plaque from the same roots. A new 16S rRNA gene based microarray method was used for the simultaneous detection of approximately 300 bacterial species. Overall, 175 species and clusters were detected, representing 8 phyla. Species belonging to the genera Streptococcus, Veillonella and Fusobacterium were common in all sites. The number of species per subject varied from 51 to 81. Statistical analyses revealed about 40 species or clusters with significant associations with at least one of the sites. The bacterial diversity was highest in the cheek and palate regions. Species typically associated with caries and periodontitis were detected rarely or not at all. The oral bacterial flora of the elderly appears to be diverse, and to a large extent site- rather than subject-specific. PMID:19373498

  3. Defining the healthy "core microbiome" of oral microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crielaard Wim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most studies examining the commensal human oral microbiome are focused on disease or are limited in methodology. In order to diagnose and treat diseases at an early and reversible stage an in-depth definition of health is indispensible. The aim of this study therefore was to define the healthy oral microbiome using recent advances in sequencing technology (454 pyrosequencing. Results We sampled and sequenced microbiomes from several intraoral niches (dental surfaces, cheek, hard palate, tongue and saliva in three healthy individuals. Within an individual oral cavity, we found over 3600 unique sequences, over 500 different OTUs or "species-level" phylotypes (sequences that clustered at 3% genetic difference and 88 - 104 higher taxa (genus or more inclusive taxon. The predominant taxa belonged to Firmicutes (genus Streptococcus, family Veillonellaceae, genus Granulicatella, Proteobacteria (genus Neisseria, Haemophilus, Actinobacteria (genus Corynebacterium, Rothia, Actinomyces, Bacteroidetes (genus Prevotella, Capnocytophaga, Porphyromonas and Fusobacteria (genus Fusobacterium. Each individual sample harboured on average 266 "species-level" phylotypes (SD 67; range 123 - 326 with cheek samples being the least diverse and the dental samples from approximal surfaces showing the highest diversity. Principal component analysis discriminated the profiles of the samples originating from shedding surfaces (mucosa of tongue, cheek and palate from the samples that were obtained from solid surfaces (teeth. There was a large overlap in the higher taxa, "species-level" phylotypes and unique sequences among the three microbiomes: 84% of the higher taxa, 75% of the OTUs and 65% of the unique sequences were present in at least two of the three microbiomes. The three individuals shared 1660 of 6315 unique sequences. These 1660 sequences (the "core microbiome" contributed 66% of the reads. The overlapping OTUs contributed to 94% of the reads

  4. [Lemierre's syndrome as differential diagnosis of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt Jensen, Jacob; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2012-05-28

    Lemierre's syndrome is a disseminated infection which is usually caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. An oropharyngeal infection progresses to a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and later metastatic infections throughout the body occur. We present a clinical case in which a patient, initially presenting with symptoms characteristic of pulmonary cancer, turned out to have a rare variant of Lemierre's syndrome caused by Fusobacterium nucleatum.

  5. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... and Deadlines Grant Application Forms Application Receipt Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write ... detection and treatment of oral cancers. Note: For materials specific to African American men, please see: Oral ...

  6. Oral Appliances Therapy

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    ... your sleep doctor may schedule you for a sleep study to verify treatment success. Follow-Up Visits Follow-up visits with your dentist will be needed to ensure the optimal fit of the oral appliance. Effective oral appliances ...

  7. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected ...

  8. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... the exam can detect oral cancer early—when it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health ... and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. The Oral Cancer Exam Step-by- ...

  9. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order ... Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents an overview of physical, mental, ...

  10. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, ... not collect any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are leaving ...

  11. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected medical terms and resource information. Oral ... of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD 20892-2190 301-496-4261 NIH… ...

  12. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected ...

  13. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings ... of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected medical terms and resource information. Oral Cancer A fact ...

  14. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that ... any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are leaving ...

  15. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... the exam can detect oral cancer early—when it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health ... and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. The Oral Cancer Exam Step-by- ...

  16. HAD Oral History Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2014-01-01

    The Historical Astronomy Division is the recipient of an American Institute of Physics Neils Bohr Library Grant for Oral History. HAD has assembled a team of volunteers to conduct oral history interviews since May 2013. Each oral history interview varies in length between two and six hours. This presentation is an introduction to the HAD Oral History Project and the activities of the team during the first six months of the grant.

  17. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment.

  18. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order Publications ...

  19. Oral Health and Aging

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    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of ... years. He spoke with NIH MedlinePlus magazine about oral health issues common in older adults. What has been ...

  20. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A– ... Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral ...

  1. Oral Health in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide Rural Health Topics & States Topics View more Oral Health in Rural Communities Adequate access to oral healthcare ... about oral health programs in my area? What oral health disparities are present in rural America? According to ...

  2. Infant oral health and oral habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, A J; Warren, J J

    2000-10-01

    Many oral diseases and conditions, including dental caries (cavities) and malocclusions, have their origins early in life. Prudent anticipatory guidance by the medical and dental professions can help prevent many of the more common oral health problems. This article provides information on the rationale for early dental examination and instructions for pediatric and family practitioners in scheduling and conducting an early oral intervention appointment. In addition, feeding practices, non-nutritive sucking, mouth breathing, and bruxing are discussed, including their effects on orofacial growth and development.

  3. Oral steroid contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sech, Laura A; Mishell, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Oral steroid contraception is a popular method of family planning worldwide. Over the past several decades, this method of contraception has changed significantly by decreasing the estrogen dose, changing the progestin component, and reducing the hormone free interval. Despite the popularity of oral steroid contraception, there has been much criticism regarding the associated risks of venous thromboembolism and stroke. Despite these established, yet uncommon risks, oral steroid contraception has many important health benefits. This review highlights the available formulations of oral contraceptives along with their evidence-based associated risks and benefits. Highlights regarding future directions for development of novel oral contraceptives are also addressed.

  4. Preliminary characterization of the oral microbiota of Chinese adults with and without gingivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Shi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial communities inhabiting human mouth are associated with oral health and disease. Previous studies have indicated the general prevalence of adult gingivitis in China to be high. The aim of this study was to characterize in depth the oral microbiota of Chinese adults with or without gingivitis, by defining the microbial phylogenetic diversity and community-structure using highly paralleled pyrosequencing. Methods Six non-smoking Chinese, three with and three without gingivitis (age range 21-39 years, 4 females and 2 males were enrolled in the present cross-sectional study. Gingival parameters of inflammation and bleeding on probing were characterized by a clinician using the Mazza Gingival Index (MGI. Plaque (sampled separately from four different oral sites and salivary samples were obtained from each subject. Sequences and relative abundance of the bacterial 16 S rDNA PCR-amplicons were determined via pyrosequencing that produced 400 bp-long reads. The sequence data were analyzed via a computational pipeline customized for human oral microbiome analyses. Furthermore, the relative abundances of selected microbial groups were validated using quantitative PCR. Results The oral microbiomes from gingivitis and healthy subjects could be distinguished based on the distinct community structures of plaque microbiomes, but not the salivary microbiomes. Contributions of community members to community structure divergence were statistically accessed at the phylum, genus and species-like levels. Eight predominant taxa were found associated with gingivitis: TM7, Leptotrichia, Selenomonas, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Prevotella, Lautropia, and Haemophilus. Furthermore, 98 species-level OTUs were identified to be gingivitis-associated, which provided microbial features of gingivitis at a species resolution. Finally, for the two selected genera Streptococcus and Fusobacterium, Real-Time PCR based quantification of relative bacterial

  5. Subgingival Microbiota in White Patients With Desquamative Gingivitis: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Paolo G; Romano, Federica; Sasia, Danilo; Broccoletti, Roberto; Ricceri, Fulvio; Barbui, Anna Maria; Brossa, Silvia; Cipriani, Raffaella; Cricenti, Luca; Cabras, Marco; Aimetti, Mario

    2017-07-01

    Presence of epithelial desquamation, erythema, and erosions on gingival tissue is usually described in the literature as desquamative gingivitis (DG). A wide range of autoimmune/dermatologic disorders can manifest as DG, although the two more common are oral lichen planus and mucous membrane pemphigoid. The aim of this study is to investigate prevalence of 11 periodontopathogenic microorganisms in patients with DG and to compare it with the microbiologic status of individuals affected by plaque-induced gingivitis (pGI). Cross-sectional clinical and microbiologic data were obtained from 66 patients (33 in each group). Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed using semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Statistically significant difference, but with little clinical significance, was observed in gingival conditions between the two groups, probably due to the worse home control hygiene of patients with DG. Prevalence and levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodonticum were statistically higher in samples from patients with DG than in those with pGI. In multivariate regression models, subgingival colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum/periodonticum was not statistically associated with DG, whereas, high levels of E. corrodens were associated with 13-fold increased odds for DG. Microbiologic differences were found in subgingival plaque for patients with DG and pGI. This may suggest possible association between periodontal pathogens and DG.

  6. The relationship between physiologic halitosis and periodontopathic bacteria of the tongue and gingival sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Toshiyuki; Ohmori, Misaki; Sato, Soh

    2010-02-01

    To determine the influence of oral status on halitosis, the relationship between halitosis and periodontopathic bacteria present in plaque on the tongue and the subgingival sulcus was examined in 62 periodontally healthy adults. Halitosis indicators used were the organoleptic score; gas chromatography results [total volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) = H(2)S + CH(3)SH + (CH(3))(2)S]; Halimeter values; and the results of three clinical tests, plaque control record (PlCR), plaque index (PlI), and tongue coat status. Significant correlations with organoleptic scores was observed for PlCR, PlI, tongue coat status, VSC amounts, and Halimeter values, indicating that halitosis in periodontally healthy subjects tended to originate from tongue plaque deposits. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to detect six periodontopathic bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis, and Treponema denticola) from the tongue and subgingival plaque. Significant effects on the organoleptic scores, tongue coat status, total VSC, H(2)S and CH(3)SH amounts, and Halimeter values were observed only for T. denticola and F. nucleatum and only in the tongue plaque, not in the subgingival plaque. Thus, therapies developed to inhibit the growth of these bacteria may lead to future treatments of halitosis.

  7. Oral biopsy: Oral pathologist′s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K L Kumaraswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions.

  8. Eikenella corrodens: Patogénesis y aspectos clínicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Darío Jaramillo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available El ambiente microbiológico oral es único y tiene una dinámica compleja. Se calcula que cerca de 500 especies de bacterias habitan la cavidad oral humana, y alrededor de 22 géneros son los predominantes. Las bacterias que se aíslan con más frecuencia de los sitios infectados de la cavidad oral, y que son también patógenos potenciales, forma un grupo pequeño de microorganismos gramnegativos, entre los que se incluyen los siguientes: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides forsythus, Campylobacter spp., Capnocytophoga spp., Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia y el grupo-Streptococcus milleri. E. corrodens se reconoce como un microbio patógeno oportunista en la cavidad oral; también, puede causar infecciones extra orales, como un agente infeccioso solo o en combinaciones con diversas bacterias. La presente revisión, con un énfasis en E. corrodens, mostrará varios aspectos de sus características microbiológicas y bioquímicas, también se sistematizan y discuten el conocimiento actual sobre los mecanismos de patogénesis, como los lipopolisacáridos, proteínas externas de membrana, complejo de adesina, pili y otros; infecciones oral y extra oral; factores predisponentes; endocarditis; osteomielitis, infecciones intra-abdominales; diagnóstico y agentes antimicrobianos.

  9. Eikenella corrodens: Patogénesis y aspectos clínicos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Darío Jaramillo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available El ambiente microbiológico oral es único y tiene una dinámica compleja. Se calcula que cerca de 500 especies de bacterias habitan la cavidad oral humana, y alrededor de 22 géneros son los predominantes. Las bacterias que se aíslan con más frecuencia de los sitios infectados de la cavidad oral, y que son también patógenos potenciales, forma un grupo pequeño de microorganismos gramnegativos, entre los que se incluyen los siguientes: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides forsythus, Campylobacter spp., Capnocytophoga spp., Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia y el grupo-Streptococcus milleri. E. corrodens se reconoce como un microbio patógeno oportunista en la cavidad oral; también, puede causar infecciones extra orales, como un agente infeccioso solo o en combinaciones con diversas bacterias. La presente revisión, con un énfasis en E. corrodens, mostrará varios aspectos de sus características microbiológicas y bioquímicas, también se sistematizan y discuten el conocimiento actual sobre los mecanismos de patogénesis, como los lipopolisacáridos, proteínas externas de membrana, complejo de adesina, pili y otros; infecciones oral y extra oral; factores predisponentes; endocarditis; osteomielitis, infecciones intra-abdominales; diagnóstico y agentes antimicrobianos.

  10. Phylogenetic and functional gene structure shifts of the oral microbiomes in periodontitis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; He, Jinzhi; He, Zhili; Zhou, Yuan; Yuan, Mengting; Xu, Xin; Sun, Feifei; Liu, Chengcheng; Li, Jiyao; Xie, Wenbo; Deng, Ye; Qin, Yujia; VanNostrand, Joy D; Xiao, Liying; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Shi, Wenyuan; Zhou, Xuedong

    2014-01-01

    Determining the composition and function of subgingival dental plaque is crucial to understanding human periodontal health and disease, but it is challenging because of the complexity of the interactions between human microbiomes and human body. Here, we examined the phylogenetic and functional gene differences between periodontal and healthy individuals using MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and a specific functional gene array (a combination of GeoChip 4.0 for biogeochemical processes and HuMiChip 1.0 for human microbiomes). Our analyses indicated that the phylogenetic and functional gene structure of the oral microbiomes were distinctly different between periodontal and healthy groups. Also, 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis indicated that 39 genera were significantly different between healthy and periodontitis groups, and Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, Treponema, Filifactor, Eubacterium, Tannerella, Hallella, Parvimonas, Peptostreptococcus and Catonella showed higher relative abundances in the periodontitis group. In addition, functional gene array data showed that a lower gene number but higher signal intensity of major genes existed in periodontitis, and a variety of genes involved in virulence factors, amino acid metabolism and glycosaminoglycan and pyrimidine degradation were enriched in periodontitis, suggesting their potential importance in periodontal pathogenesis. However, the genes involved in amino acid synthesis and pyrimidine synthesis exhibited a significantly lower relative abundance compared with healthy group. Overall, this study provides new insights into our understanding of phylogenetic and functional gene structure of subgingival microbial communities of periodontal patients and their importance in pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:24671083

  11. The oral microbial community of gingivitis and lumpy jaw in captive macropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiabong, John F; Boardman, Wayne; Moore, Robert B; Brown, Melissa H; Ball, Andrew S

    2013-12-01

    Gingivitis and lumpy jaw are diseases of polymicrobial aetiology. Although Fusobacterium necrophorum has been associated with these diseases in macropods, little is known about other organisms associated with these diseases in this animal species. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed the potential pathogens associated with gingivitis and lumpy jaw in macropods. PCR-DGGE profile comparison between the healthy and disease groups indicated a shift in the oral bacterial community structures with similarity coefficients of 48% and 35% for gingivitis and lumpy jaw respectively. Moreover, gingivitis was associated with increase in bacterial diversity (Shannon index = 2.87; PL curve = 45%) while lumpy jaw resulted in a decline in bacterial diversity (Shannon index = 2.47; PL curve = 74%). This study suggest that the establishment of gingivitis and lumpy jaw diseases follows the ecological plaque hypothesis. This forms the basis for an expanded investigation in an epidemiological scale and suggests the need for the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agent(s) and for the effective management and control of polymicrobial diseases.

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-1271 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-1271 ref|ZP_04969615.1| cobalt (Co2+) ABC superfamily ATP binding cass...ette transporter membrane protein CbiQ [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum ATCC 10953] gb|EDK87699.1| cobalt (Co2

  13. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  14. Screening of the indicator strain for oral malodor%口源性口臭指示菌的筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金陆; 杨圣辉; 刘颖

    2011-01-01

    Objective To establish the indicator strain of oral bacteriology for aiding clinical diagnosis, and screen main representative bacteria related to oral malodor. Method Organoleptic test ( the nose smelling method), gas chromatography, halimeter and easicult S were used to examine 8 main bacteria of periodontitis or caries. Indicator strain was identified by nose smelling degree, volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and short chain fat acid level. Result P. gingivalis( P. g), P. intermedius( P. i) and F. subsp nucleatum( F. n) smelled malodorous obviously, and other bacteria smelled malodorous slightly or odorless by organoleptic test examination. The content of butyric acid was detected as 40% ~66% in P. g, P. i, F. n and Aggregatibscter actinomycetemcomitans( A. a), While that in other bacteria was very low by gas chromatography. The VSCs produced by P. g, P. i and F. n were higher than 1 000 ppbs measured by halimeter. The concentrations of H2S produced by P. g, P. i and F. n were higher than 600 ppbs by easicult S, and those by other bacteria were lower than 36 ppbs. Conclusion P. g, P. i and F. n are the main oral malodor bacteria which may be used as the indicator bacteria for aiding clinical diagnosis.%目的 从口源性口臭(Oral Malodor)相关菌种中筛选主要代表菌,用以建立口臭细菌学(Oral Bacteriology)临床辅助诊断的指示菌(Indicator bacteria).方法 用感官检测(鼻闻法)(Organoleptic test)、气相色谱(Gas Chromatography)、硫化物检测仪(Halimeter)和硫化氢检测仪(Easicult S)等4种方法,在实验室检测常见的8种牙周及龋病致病菌,通过检测鼻闻臭味程度、硫化物(Volatile sulfur compounds,VSCs)、硫化氢(Hydrogen sulfide,H2S)及有异味的短链脂肪酸(Short Chain Fatlf acid)含量来确定指示菌.结果 鼻闻:牙龈卟啉单胞菌(P.gingivalis,P.g)、中间普雷沃菌(P.intermedius,P.I)和具核梭杆菌具核梭亚种(F.subsp nucleatum,F.n)恶臭明显,

  15. Combined antioxidant effects of Neem extract, bacteria, red blood cells and Lysozyme: possible relation to periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Leali; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Heyman, Samuel N; Ginsburg, Isaac; Gleitman, Yossi; Feuerstein, Osnat

    2017-08-10

    The common usage of chewing sticks prepared from Neem tree (Azadirachta indica) in India suggests its potential efficacy in periodontal diseases. The objective of this study is to explore the antibacterial effects of Neem leaf extract on the periodontophatic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, and its antioxidant capacities alone and in combination with bacteria and polycationic peptides that may be at the site of inflammation. Neem leaf extract was prepared by ethanol extraction. The growth kinetics of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum under anaerobic conditions in the presence of Neem leaf extract were measured. Broth microdilution test was used to determine the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of Neem leaf extract against each bacterial strain. The effect of Neem leaf extract on the coaggregation of the bacteria was assessed by a visual semi-quantitative assay. The antioxidant capacities of Neem leaf extract alone and in combination with bacteria, with the addition of red blood cells or the polycationic peptides chlorhexidine and lisozyme, were determined using a chemiluminescence assay. Neem leaf extract showed prominent dose-dependent antibacterial activity against P. gingivalis, however, had no effect on the growth of F. nucleatum nor on the coaggregation of the two bacteria. Yet, it showed intense antioxidant activity, which was amplified following adherence to bacteria and with the addition of red blood cells or the polycationic peptides. Neem leaf extract, containing polyphenols that adhere to oral surfaces, have the potential to provide long-lasting antibacterial as well as synergic antioxidant activities when in complex with bacteria, red blood cells and lisozyme. Thus, it might be especially effective in periodontal diseases.

  16. Bimaxillary Oral Focal Mucinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sunil; Malik, Sunita; Mittal, Hitesh Chander; Singh, Gurdarshan; Kamra, Hemlata

    2016-10-01

    Oral focal mucinosis is considered as oral counterpart of cutaneous focal mucinosis. The preoperative diagnosis of mucinosis is almost impossible because of its rarity and clinical similarity to other lesions of various etiologies. The histological diagnosis of oral mucinosis is important to better understand the etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities, and any recurrence of the lesion besides differentiating from the other soft tissue lesions.The purpose of this paper is to report the first case of bimaxillary involvement with dome-shaped elevated, rounded, asymptomatic, normally colored swelling in left posterior palatal mucosa and left mandibular posterior region in a 25-year old woman who was diagnosed as oral focal mucinosis histopathologically.

  17. Chrysomya Bezziana oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Vijay Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is an opportunistic infestation of human and vertebrate animals with dipterous larvae. Oral myiasis is a rare condition associated with poor oral hygiene, mental disability, halitosis and other conditions. We present a case report of an adult mentally challenged woman with extensive necrotic oral lesion burrowing into the hard palate through which three live maggots (larvae were seen emerging out. The larvae were removed using forceps and the patient was treated with oral ivermectin. The maggots were identified as larvae of the Chrysomya bezziana fly.

  18. Oral microbiota and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka H. Meurman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion.

  19. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Receipt Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) ... Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ...

  20. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships ... Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents an overview of physical, mental, ...

  1. Towards understanding oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations.

  2. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  3. Shared Oral Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Børge; Elmelund Poulsen,, Johan; Christophersen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Shared Oral Care - Forebyggelse af orale sygdomme på plejecentre Introduktion og formål: Mangelfuld mundhygiejne hos plejekrævende ældre er et alment og veldokumenteret sundhedsproblem, der kan føre til massiv udvikling af tandsygdomme, og som yderligere kan være medvirkende årsag til alvorlige...

  4. Visual overview, oral detail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    and with the coordinating nurse, who is the main keeper of the whiteboard. On the basis of observations, we find that coordination is accomplished through a highly intertwined process of technologically mediated visual overview combined with orally communicated details. The oral details serve to clarify and elaborate...

  5. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected medical terms and ...

  6. Oral Microbiology and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlén, Gunnar; Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Olsen, Ingar

    , dental assistants and trainees may find it a useful source of reference. The contents are based on general microbiology and immunology. Oral microbiology is given particular attention, with examples relevant to oral infectious diseases. Each chapter opens with a relatively short pre-reading section...

  7. Epilepsy and oral care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Janice; Boyle, Carole

    2002-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common symptom of an underlying neurological disorder. The seizures can take a variety of forms. Both the condition and its medical management can affect oral health. Prevention of oral disease and carefully planned dental treatment are essential to the well-being of people with epilepsy.

  8. Oral environment and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasusei; Tada, Hidesuke; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Tada, Yoshiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Japan. A rapid increase in cancer mortality is expected as Japan is facing a super-aged society. Many causes of cancer are known to be closely linked to life style factors, such as smoking, drinking, and diet. The oral environment is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and development of various diseases such as bronchitis, pneumonia, diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Because the oral cavity acts as the bodily entrance for air and food, it is constantly exposed to foreign substances, including bacteria and viruses. A large number of bacteria are endemic to the oral cavity, and indigenous oral flora act to prevent the settlement of foreign bacteria. The oral environment is influenced by local factors, including dental plaque, tartar, teeth alignment, occlusion, an incompatible prosthesis, and bad lifestyle habits, and systemic factors, including smoking, consumption of alcohol, irregular lifestyle and eating habits, obesity, stress, hormones, and heredity. It has recently been revealed that the oral environment is associated with cancer. In particular, commensal bacteria in the oral cavity are involved in the development of cancer. Moreover, Candida, human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus as well as commensal bacteria have been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of cancer. In this review, we introduce recent findings of the correlation between the oral environment and cancer.

  9. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  10. Oral syringe use survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J N; Wedemeyer, H F

    1980-09-01

    Use of oral syringes at children's and ASHP-accredited residency hospitals in the United States was surveyed. Questionnaires were mailed to 131 hospitals; 117 (89.3%) were returned. Of the responding hospitals, 54.5% of children's hospitals and 67.1% of residency hospitals used oral syringes. There was no definite preference for a particular brand or type (glass vs. plastic) of syringe. Patients who often required liquid dosage forms, including pediatric and geriatric patients and patients with nasogastric tubes, were most frequently included in oral syringe distribution systems. Twenty-six of the 73 hospitals utilizing oral syringes used them for most unit dose liquids in all drug distribution systems. The remainder reported use for specific medications or circumstances. Expiration dating policies varied from 24 hours to one year to the manufacturer's expiration dating. The survey indicates widespread use of oral syringes and identifies a need for evaluation of medication stability in these devices.

  11. [Oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, O F; Abramova, E S

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of examination of oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral mucosa disbiosis was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients were included in complex clinical and laboratory studies. The patients were divided in two groups: main group (30 patients exhibiting various grades of oral mucosa disbiosis) and control group (7 patients with no signs of oral disbiosis). The oral fluid bacteriocidal activity was examined by means of laser flow cytometry. Study results proved oral fluid bacteriocidal activity increase to correlate with the grade of oral mucosa disbiosis thus confirming the usefulness of the method in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis.

  12. American Academy of Oral Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statements Newsletters AAOM: Representing the Discipline of Oral Medicine Oral Medicine is the discipline of dentistry concerned with the ... offers credentialing, resources and professional community for oral medicine practitioners. Our membership provides care to thousands. We ...

  13. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  14. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  15. Detection of odoriferous subgingival and tongue microbiota in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with oral malodor using polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh R Kamaraj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Halitosis has been correlated with the concentration of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs produced in the oral cavity by metabolic activity of bacteria colonizing the periodontal pockets and the dorsum of the tongue. It has been assumed that there is a relationship between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus. Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the malodor using the organoleptic method and tanita device; to quantify odoriferous microorganisms of subgingival plaque and tongue coating, such as P. gingivalis (Pg, T. forsythia (Tf, and F. nucleatum (Fn using polymerase chain reaction (PCR in nondiabetic and diabetic chronic periodontitis patients. Patients and Methods: Thirty chronic periodontitis patients (with and without diabetes with 5-7 mm pocket depth, radiographic evidence of bone loss, and presence of oral malodor participated in this study. Subjective assessment of mouth air was done organoleptically and by using a portable sulfide monitor. Tongue coating was also assessed. Results: The scores of plaque index, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, VSC levels, and tongue coating between the nondiabetic and diabetic patients were not significant (P>0.5. In nondiabetic patients, Fn was found to be significantly (P0.5. In diabetic patients, Fn and Tf have shown significant (P<0.5 an increase in subgingival and tongue samples, respectively, whereas Pg has not shown significant difference between subgingival and tongue samples. Interpretation and Conclusion: The results confirm that there is no difference in clinical parameters between nondiabetic and diabetic periodontitis patients, but the odoriferous microbial profiles in tongue samples of diabetic patients were found to be high. However, there is a weak positive correlation between VSC levels, clinical parameters, and odoriferous microbial profiles.

  16. Oral health and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, G W

    1994-03-01

    The relationships between oral health conditions, dietary practices and nutritional status, and general health status in the older American are complex, with many interrelating factors. Just as inadequate nutrition can affect oral health, poor oral health status affects food choices and, thus, nutritional status. It is clearly essential that the primary care practitioner and/or screening health professionals always include an evaluation of oral status in assessment of an elderly person. Effective care for the elderly dental patient requires knowledge about the disease of aging and the impact of those diseases on oral health and nutrition, pharmacology and drug interactions and their impact on oral health status, the biology of aging including sensory changes, the relationship of general medicine and systemic diseases, and psychology and sociology. The attitudes of empathy and understanding, caring and compassion, respect and a positive attitude toward the older patient, and flexibility in treatment planning are also critical elements. The interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, nutrition professionals, dentists, and social service professionals must all work together to ensure that good oral health status and adequate nutrition are maintained in older Americans. Recognizing and treating oral health and nutrition problems are important in improving the health and quality of life for the elderly population. Research that can provide more answers to health care problems in this growing group; educating professionals with respect to the relationships between oral health and nutrition; and public policy changes with regard to provision and funding of nutrition services, especially when provided by registered and/or licensed nutrition professionals, contribute to improving the health and quality of life for elders.

  17. Etiology of oral habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayardo, R E; Mejia, J J; Orozco, S; Montoya, K

    1996-01-01

    The pedodontic admission histories of 1600 Mexican children were analyzed, to determine general epidemiologic factors or oral habits, as well as their relationship with identifiable biopsychosociologic factors. Fifty-six percent of the children gave evidence of an oral habit, with significant predisposition among female patients, single children, subjects in poor physical health (particularly from allergies), as well as children with histories of chronic health problems. Oral habits should be considered a major health hazard because of their high incidence. Successful treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach to the basic cause of the problem.

  18. Microbioma oral humano

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Joana Pinto Oliveira e

    2016-01-01

    O microbioma oral humano é constituído por um vasto conjunto de microrganismos presentes na cavidade oral. Analisando a cavidade oral podemos verificar que nela existem mais de 700 espécies de bactérias responsáveis pelo domínio de parte do microbioma humano, tornando-a um importante local de estudo. É um dos habitats com maior diversidade no corpo humano onde esses microrganismos se apresentam de forma organizada e estruturada. Estes habitats estão intimamente relacionados ...

  19. Amiloidosis oral nodular Oral nodular amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Martos Díaz

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La amiloidosis constituye una entidad marcada por el depósito de amiloide en diferentes tejidos. En la cavidad oral se manifiesta habitualmente en forma de macroglosia, y más raramente, como nódulos dispuestos en la superficie. Caso clínico. Varón afecto de Mieloma Múltiple, que comienza con lesiones nodulares en labio inferior y lengua. A raíz de estas lesiones, mediante estudio histológico, es diagnosticado de Amiloidosis Sistémica. Discusión. Los nódulos amiloideos en la cavidad oral, constituyen una manifestación rara de la amiloidosis sistémica. Su aparición conlleva la necesidad de realizar un diagnostico diferencial con otras entidades y el diagnostico de certeza se obtiene mediante el análisis histológico.Introduction. Amyloidosis is a condition characterized by the deposit of amyloid in different tissues. In the oral cavity it is usually manifested as macroglossia and, more rarely, as nodules on the surface. Clinical case. A man had multiple myeloma that began with nodular lesions of the lower lip and tongue. As a result of these lesions, the patient was diagnosed of systemic amyloidosis by histological study. Discussion. Amyloid nodules in the oral cavity are a rare manifestation of systemic amyloidosis. Its appearance entails the necessity to make I diagnose differential with other organizations and I diagnose of certainty is obtained by means of the histological analysis.

  20. Oral sex and oral health: An enigma in itself

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active couples of various age groups, including male-female and same-gender adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus, and analingus. Oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital infections from one site in body to the other. Oral health has a direct correlation on the transmission of infection; a cut in the mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of life-threatening infections. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues, and oral hygiene and dental issues. The ulcerations or unhealthy periodontium in mouth accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus, consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  1. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ ... site’s privacy policy when you follow the link. Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA ...

  2. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order Publications English and Spanish brochures available free ...

  3. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by-step, illustrated guide ...

  4. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & ... successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by- ...

  5. Oral Cancer Exam

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    Full Text Available ... Research Programs (Extramural Research) NIDCR Laboratories (Intramural Research) Science News in Brief Study Takes First Comprehensive Look ... Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ...

  6. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... food, food additives, drugs, oral hygiene products, and dental materials. Q: Are there any specific foods that are ... dental treatment trigger a hypersensitivity reaction? A: Some dental materials used by the dentist can cause a hypersensitivity ...

  7. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Skip to Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities ...

  8. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by-step, illustrated guide ...

  9. Leucoplasia oral: Conceptos actuales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Escribano-Bermejo

    Full Text Available La leucoplasia es la lesión premaligna más frecuente de la cavidad oral. La Organización Mundial de la Salud la define clínicamente como una lesión predominantemente blanca de la mucosa oral que no puede caracterizarse como ninguna otra lesión conocida y con una elevada tendencia a convertirse en un cáncer oral. El objetivo de esta revisión es hacer un repaso al conocimiento actual acerca de la leucoplasia oral prestando especial atención a su nomenclatura, su etiología, su potencial maligno y su tratamiento.

  10. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes ... Browse Studies by Topic NIDCR-Sponsored Clinical Trials Research NIDCR Strategic Plan Research Results Tools for Researchers ...

  11. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ...

  12. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order Publications English and Spanish brochures available free of charge. ... early—when it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide ...

  13. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & ... successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by- ...

  14. Fostering oral presentation performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van Stan; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research revealed significant differences in the effectiveness of various feedback sources for encouraging students’ oral presentation performance. While former studies emphasised the superiority of teacher feedback, it remains unclear whether the quality of feedback actually differs bet

  15. Oral Cancer Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shown to participate in their development. These include lichen planus, an inflammatory disease of the oral soft ... at an uncontrolled rate, is unable to repair DNA damage within itself, or refuses to self destruct ...

  16. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College ... signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. ...

  17. Oral Cancer Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College ... signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. ...

  18. Probiotics and oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Rastogi, Pavitra; Saini, Himani; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Rameshwari

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics utilize the naturally occurring bacteria to confer health benefits. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and are being mainly utilized for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and disease; however, recently, several studies have suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to understand the potential mechanism of action of probiotic bacteria in the oral cavity and summarize their observed effects wi...

  19. Oral Somatosensory Awareness

    OpenAIRE

    De Boer, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Oral somatosensory awareness refers to the somatic sensations arising within the mouth, and to the information these sensations provide about the state and structure of the mouth itself, and objects in the mouth. Because the oral tissues have a strong somatosensory innervation, they are the locus of some of our most intense and vivid bodily experiences. The salient pain of toothache, or the habit of running one's tongue over one's teeth when someone mentions "dentist", provide two very differ...

  20. Oral and esophageal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyer, C M; Simon, D

    1997-06-01

    This article focused on the approach to oral and esophageal disorders in patients with AIDS. Most of these disorders respond to various therapeutic regimens. Some of the oral complications can be prevented with dental prophylaxis, whereas recurrent esophageal disease in some patients may require long-term suppressive therapy. As patients with AIDS live longer with lower CD4 counts, gastroenterologists need to become familiar with the approach to and management of the more common lesions of the mouth and esophagus.

  1. Oral pigmentation: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, C; Ramakrishnan, K; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations.

  2. ON ORAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Svetitsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes a rise in the incidence of oral cancer in the Rostov Region since the 1990s. The study has indicated that this rise is associated with regional population growth due to the forced migrants after the collapse of the USSR. Financial problems, unbalanced nutrition, poor oral hygiene, and depression in this group of patients have contributed to the higher incidence of precancers and cancers.

  3. Maintaining women's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  4. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  5. A suspected virus infection of the oral mucosa in Swedish reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rehbinder

    1985-05-01

    Full Text Available During the winter 1980 reindeer herds in the Tornedalen area, along the Finnish border, were hit by grazing difficulties. Thus minor parts of the reindeer her*ds in this area were given supplementary feed in pens. Some of the supplementary fed animals were taken ill and some deaths occurred. According to the owners sick animals showed loss of appetite and signs of fever. A total of 8 carcasses were necropsied at The National Veterinary Institute. In 5 of these cases oral lesions were observed. The histological investigation of the oral mucosa revealed intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, inter- and intracellular oedema and vesicle formation. An electron-microscopical study of 2 of the cases confirmed the histological findings. At the bacteriological investigations Coli, ß-haemolyzing streptococci, Conrynebacterium pyogenes and Fusobacterium necrophorum could be indentified. The found bacteria were all considered secondary invaders. Serological samples from four affected reindeer flocks were tested for antibodies against BVD-, P13 and IBR-virus as well as Chlamydia. A few samples showed low positive titres for agents tested but for BVDV. The result of the investigation indicates that a still unidentified virus could be the primary cause of this enzootically appearing disease of the oral mucosa in reindeer.Misstanke om virusinfektion i munnslemhinnan på svensk ren.Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning: Under vintern 1980 drabbades renhjordar i Tornedalsområdet av betessvårigheter. Av denna anledning fördes mindre flockar, ur hjordarna, till inhägnader och tillskottsutfodrades. En del av de tillskottsutfodrade djuren insjuknade och dödsfall inträffade. Enligt djurägarna förlorade de sjuka djuren aptiten och uppvisade tecken på feber. Av de döda renarna erhölls åtta fôr obduktion vid Statens Veterinärmedicinska anstalt. Hos fem av de obducerade renarna forelåg skador i munhålan. Vid histologisk undersokning av munslemhinnan p

  6. Oral and systemic photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew C; Damian, Diona L; Halliday, Gary M

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection can be provided not only by ultraviolet (UV) blockers but also by oral substances. Epidemiologically identified associations between foods and skin cancer and interventional experiments have discovered mechanisms of UV skin damage. These approaches have identified oral substances that are photoprotective in humans. UV inhibits adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production causing an energy crisis, which prevents optimal skin immunity and DNA repair. Enhancing ATP production with oral nicotinamide protects from UV immunosuppression, enhances DNA repair and reduces skin cancer in humans. Reactive oxygen species also contribute to photodamage. Nontoxic substances consumed in the diet, or available as oral supplements, can protect the skin by multiple potential mechanisms. These substances include polyphenols in fruit, vegetables, wine, tea and caffeine-containing foods. UV-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) contributes to photodamage. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and food substances reduce production of this lipid mediator. Fish oils are photoprotective, at least partially by reducing PGE2 . Orally consumed substances, either in the diet or as supplements, can influence cutaneous responses to UV. A current research goal is to develop an oral supplement that could be used in conjunction with other sun protective strategies in order to provide improved protection from sunlight.

  7. Melatonin and oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  8. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat İnanç Cengiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  9. Personality and oral health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, W. Murray; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Broadbent, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated age-26 personality characteristics and age-32 oral health in a prospective study of a complete birth cohort born in Dunedin, New Zealand. Personality was measured using the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). Oral health was measured using the short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14), a global measure, and dental examinations. Personality profiles were constructed for 916 individuals (50.8% men) using standardized MPQ scores, and multivariate analyses examined their association with oral health. Those reporting 1+ OHIP-14 impacts had higher Negative Emotionality scores (and lower Constraint and Positive Emotionality MPQ superfactor scores) than those who did not. After controlling for gender, clinical status, and the other two MPQ superfactors, those scoring higher on Negative Emotionality had a greater risk of reporting 1+ OHIP-14 impacts, as well as 3+ OHIP-14 impacts and worse-than-average oral health. They also had a greater risk of having lost at least one tooth from caries and of having 3+ decayed surfaces. Personality characteristics appear to shape self-reports of oral health. Personality is also a risk factor for clinical disease status, at least with respect to dental caries and its sequelae. Because the attitudes and values tapped into by personality tests can be altered by brief cognitive interventions, those might be useful in preventive dentistry. PMID:21896053

  10. HPV-associated oral warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Wood, N H; Marnewick, J C; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is strictly epitheliotropic, infecting stratified squamous cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells. Oral HPV infection may be subclinical or putatively associated with benign or malignant oral neoplasms. The benign HPV-associated oral lesions, focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck disease), oral squamous cell papilloma, oral verruca vulgaris (common wart) and oral condyloma acuminatum, are collectively referred to as oral warts. Oral warts are usually asymptomatic, may be persistent or uncommonly, may regress spontaneously. HPV-associated oral warts have a prevalence of 0.5% in the general population, occur in up to 5% of HIV-seropositive subjects, and in up to 23% of HIV-seropositive subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy. This paper is a clinico-pathological review of HPV-associated oral warts.

  11. Strengthening of oral health systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care...... is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral...... diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work...

  12. ORAL MYIASIS CONVERTING TO ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oral Myiasis, a condition of infestation of the body by fly larvae (maggots is a rare pathology in humans. It is associated with poor oral hygiene, alcoholism, senility, suppurating lesions, severe halitosis. It is seen frequently in tropical countries and hot climatic regions. The reported cases in literature of oral Myiasis associated with oral cancer are few. The treatment is a mechanical removal of the maggots but a systemic treatment with Ivermectin, a semi - synthetic macrolide antibiotic, has been used successfully for treatment for oral m yiasis. We present a case of 55 yr old male alcoholic patient with oral myiasis with extensive proliferative growth of oral cavity. Our patient was managed with manual debridement and administration of systemic ivermect in along with antibiotic coverage. Incisional biopsy of the proliferative lesion showed well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Thus our patient showed presence of oral myiasis in association with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  13. Paracoccidioidomicosis en cavidad oral Oral cavity paracoccidioidomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    D. Antunes Freitas; C.I. Vergara Hernández; A. Díaz Caballero; G. Moreira

    2012-01-01

    La paracoccidioidomicosis (PCM) o blastomicosis suramericana es la micosis sistémica más importante de América latina que es relativamente común en Brasil, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador y Argentina. Los casos esporádicos también pueden verse en algunos otros países, la cual es progresiva y con un infrecuente desenlace fatal si no es tratada a tiempo. Se considera como una enfermedad multifocal, con lesiones orales como la característica prominente. Es causada por un hongo dimórfico, Paracoccid...

  14. [MICROFLORA AND ORAL DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavkin, A I; Ippolitov, Y A; Aleshina, E O; Komarova O N

    2015-01-01

    Acid-producing microorganisms are base etiological agents of lesions of tooth enamel and destruction of dentin. The process start by specific microflora of tooth deposit--Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacteria and Actinomycetis viscosus which ferment food carbogydrate to form acids. High titre of them in oral cavity may be considered like a marker of carbohydrate food. But the pathogenic bacteria don't have aggression to host organism until they will have virulent factors which help to get over protection of host organism. At the same time, microflora of oral cavity is involved to form pellicula. Pellicula is a biofilm which to protect tooth enamel and dentin. Understanding relationships between safety factors of host and pathogenic microflora of oral cavity will give to create effective methods of prevention and treatment.

  15. Oral pregnancy tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh M Gondivkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granuloma is one of the inflammatory hyperplasias seen in the oral cavity. This term is a misnomer because the lesion is unrelated to infection and in reality arises in response to various stimuli such as low-grade local irritation, traumatic injury, or hormonal factors. It predominantly occurs in the second decade of life in young females, possibly because of the vascular effects of female hormones. Clinically, oral pyogenic granuloma is a smooth or lobulated exophytic lesion manifesting as small, red erythematous growth on a pedunculated or sometimes sessile base, which is usually hemorrhagic. Although excisional surgery is the treatment of choice , some other treatment protocols such as the use of Nd:YAG laser, flash lamp pulsed dye laser, cryosurgery, intralesional injection of ethanol or corticosteroids, and sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy have been proposed. We present the case of a 25-year-old pregnant woman with large oral pyogenic granuloma.

  16. Oral heparin: status review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez-Orellana Isabel

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparin are the most commonly used antithrombotic and thromboprophylactic agents in hospital practice. Extended out-of-hospital treatment is inconvenient in that these agents must be administered parenterally. Current research is directed at development of a safe and effective oral antithrombotic agent as an alternative for the effective, yet difficult to use vitamin K antagonists. A novel drug delivery technology that facilitates transport of drugs across the gastrointestinal epithelium has been harnessed to develop an oral dosage form of unfractionated heparin. Combining unfractionated heparin with the carrier molecule, sodium N-(8 [2-hydroxybenzoyl]amino caprylate, or SNAC has markedly increased the gastrointestinal absorption of this drug. Preclinical and clinical studies to-date suggests that oral heparin-SNAC can confer a clinical efficacious effect; further confirmation is sought in planned clinical trials.

  17. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fi elds of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fl uorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fl uoride......The discovery during the fi rst half of the 20th century of the link between natural fl uoride, adjusted fl uoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fl uoride in improving oral health...... including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fl uorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision...

  18. [Oral problems in divers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, W A; Lobbezoo, F; Eijkman, M A J

    2005-05-01

    Divers can have several oral problems. Firstly, problems caused by pressure changes. These are barodontalgia and odontocrexis. Barodontalgia is toothache by barotrauma. Odontocrexis is restorations coming lose or breaking or tooth fractures by expansion of air beneath restorations. Other problems can occur by cements used to fix casted restorations, by inflammations in the orofacial region, and by not yet fully healed oral wounds. Secondly, there are problems related to the diver's mouthpiece. To keep the mouthpiece in place, the mandible has to be forced in a forward position. Holding this position often and for long periods of time, may develop or aggravate temporomandibular dysfunction. Insufficient fit of the mouthpiece may induce oral mucosal lesions. Therefore, it is recommended to produce individual diver mouthpieces. It is also recommended to produce individual diver mouthpieces for complete dentures wearing divers and for divers with fixed orthodontic appliances.

  19. Oral myiasis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M. H. Raghunath; Das, Nagarajappa; Vivekananda, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Oral myiasis is a rare condition in humans and is associated with poor oral hygiene, severe halitosis, mouth breathing during sleep, mental handicap, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, anterior open bite, incompetent lips, and other conditions. In this report, a 14 year-old boy who had an orofacial trauma in the maxillary dentoalveolar region,which was neglected, has been described. There was a deep lacerated wound on the upper vestibule which was infected and maggots were found on the same wound. The clinical features, management, treatment are discussed and relevant literature is reviewed. PMID:22629058

  20. Oral environment and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kudo, Yasusei; Tada, Hidesuke; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Tada, Yoshiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Japan. A rapid increase in cancer mortality is expected as Japan is facing a super-aged society. Many causes of cancer are known to be closely linked to life style factors, such as smoking, drinking, and diet. The oral environment is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and development of various diseases such as bronchitis, pneumonia, diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Because the oral cavity acts as the bodily entrance for air and food, it...

  1. Oral myiasis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M H Raghunath; Das, Nagarajappa; Vivekananda, M R

    2012-04-01

    Oral myiasis is a rare condition in humans and is associated with poor oral hygiene, severe halitosis, mouth breathing during sleep, mental handicap, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, anterior open bite, incompetent lips, and other conditions. In this report, a 14 year-old boy who had an orofacial trauma in the maxillary dentoalveolar region,which was neglected, has been described. There was a deep lacerated wound on the upper vestibule which was infected and maggots were found on the same wound. The clinical features, management, treatment are discussed and relevant literature is reviewed.

  2. Oral myiasis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M H Raghunath Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral myiasis is a rare condition in humans and is associated with poor oral hygiene, severe halitosis, mouth breathing during sleep, mental handicap, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, anterior open bite, incompetent lips, and other conditions. In this report, a 14 year-old boy who had an orofacial trauma in the maxillary dentoalveolar region,which was neglected, has been described. There was a deep lacerated wound on the upper vestibule which was infected and maggots were found on the same wound. The clinical features, management, treatment are discussed and relevant literature is reviewed.

  3. Oral inflammation in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommer, Milinda J

    2013-05-01

    The oral cavity can be affected by a wide variety of disorders characterized by inflammation of the gingiva and/or oral mucosa. In dogs and cats, differential diagnoses for generalized oral inflammatory disorders include plaque-reactive mucositis, chronic gingivostomatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex, pemphigus and pemphigoid disorders, erythema multiforme, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, endodontic or periodontal abscesses, infectious conditions, reactive lesions, and neoplastic conditions may initially present with localized or generalized inflammation of the oral mucosa. Determination of the underlying cause of an oral inflammatory condition relies on a thorough history, complete physical and oral examination, and incisional biopsy and histopathologic examination of lesions.

  4. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Tanaka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances for detecting high-risk patients, monitoring preventive interventions, and assessing cancer risk and pharmacogenomics. In addition, novel chemopreventive agents based on molecular mechanisms and targets against oral cancers will be derived from studies using appropriate animal carcinogenesis models. New approaches, such as molecular-targeted agents and agent combinations in high-risk oral individuals, are undoubtedly needed to reduce the devastating worldwide consequences of oral malignancy.

  5. Oral and written instruction of oral hygiene: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnacke, Daniela; Beldoch, Magdalena; Bohn, Gertrude-Heidi; Seghaoui, Ouarda; Hegel, Nicole; Deinzer, Renate

    2012-10-01

    This randomized, evaluator-masked, controlled study evaluates the effectiveness of oral in contrast to written instruction of oral hygiene. Eighty-three students without clinical signs of periodontitis were randomly assigned to either a control group or one of three experimental conditions: 1) written instruction, 2) standardized oral instruction, or 3) individualized oral instruction. Plaque and bleeding indices were assessed to analyze intervention effects on oral health and oral hygiene skills. Measurements took place at baseline and 4 weeks after intervention. Groups differed significantly with respect to gingival bleeding and were tentatively significant with respect to oral hygiene skills. Participants who had received oral individualized instructions showed the best results. A gradient of effectiveness of the instruction methods was observed with most favorable results for the individualized instruction.

  6. Paracoccidioidomicosis en cavidad oral Oral cavity paracoccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Antunes Freitas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available La paracoccidioidomicosis (PCM o blastomicosis suramericana es la micosis sistémica más importante de América latina que es relativamente común en Brasil, Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador y Argentina. Los casos esporádicos también pueden verse en algunos otros países, la cual es progresiva y con un infrecuente desenlace fatal si no es tratada a tiempo. Se considera como una enfermedad multifocal, con lesiones orales como la característica prominente. Es causada por un hongo dimórfico, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, que afecta principalmente la piel, los ganglios linfáticos, los pulmones y membranas mucosas oral, nasal y gastrointestinal. Dependiendo de la inmunidad específica del huésped, la infección puede asumir muchas formas y afecta a uno o varios órganos, llegando a ser una enfermedad grave y potencialmente fatal. Es muy importante para los profesionales de la salud de todo el mundo tener conocimiento acerca de la Paracoccidioidomicosis porque a veces la enfermedad sólo se manifiesta muchos años después de que haya abandonado la zona endémica. Para proporcionar información útil sobre el diagnóstico y tratamiento de la enfermedad se presenta caso clínico de un paciente masculino de 48 años de edad procedente de una zona rural de Juramento Brasil, por presentar múltiples úlceras dolorosas en encía y paladar de 3 meses de evolución; refiere antecedentes de fumador crónico, al examen clínico extraoral se descartan lesiones en otros órganos y al examen intraoral se observan múltiples úlceras con fondo necrótico y granulomatoso localizadas en encía y paladar. Se realizó una biopsia incisional de la lesión y el material fue enviado para estudio anatomopatológico. El informe histopatológico confirmó la impresión clínica de Paracoccidioidomicosis. El paciente fue tratado con el uso de sulfametoxazol + trimetoprima - 800/60 mg/día, vía oral, cada 12 horas durante 30 días. Las lesiones bucales desaparecieron

  7. ORAL MYIASIS CONVERTING TO ORAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Akshay; Aparna; Kriti Bagri

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oral Myiasis, a condition of infestation of the body by fly larvae (maggots) is a rare pathology in humans. It is associated with poor oral hygiene, alcoholism, senility, suppurating lesions, severe halitosis. It is seen frequently in tropical countries and hot climatic regions. The reported cases in literature of oral Myiasis associated with oral cancer are few. The treatment is a mechanical removal of the m...

  8. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Washio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  9. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Oral diagnosis is the area of dental practice that deals with gathering, recording, and evaluating information contributing to the identification of abnormalities of the head and neck region. A statement of general curricular goals in oral diagnosis/oral medicine is presented. (MLW)

  10. Fossilization of Oral Comoetence and Enlightenments on Oral English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马桂花

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is going m demonstrate the fossilized or fossilizing tendency in oral productions, to explore its underlying causes and to probe possible approaches to postpone or defossilize these phenomena in oral language training and teaching so that the overall level of oral competence for English learners can be further promoted.

  11. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  12. AAS Oral History Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Holbrook, Jarita; AAS Oral History Team

    2016-06-01

    Now in its fourth year, the AAS Oral History Project has interviewed over 80 astronomers from all over the world. Led by the AAS Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) and partially funded by the American Institute of Physics Niels Bohr Library and ongoing support from the AAS, volunteers have collected oral histories from astronomers at professional meetings starting in 2015, including AAS, DPS, and the IAU general assembly. Each interview lasts one and a half to two hours and focuses on interviewees’ personal and professional lives. Questions include those about one’s family, childhood, strong influences on one’s scientific career, career path, successes and challenges, perspectives on how astronomy is changing as a field, and advice to the next generation. Each interview is audio recorded and transcribed, the content of which is checked with each interviewee. Once complete, interview transcripts are posted online as part of a larger oral history library at https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories. Future analysis will reveal a rich story of astronomers and will help the community address issues of diversity, controversies, and the changing landscape of science. We are still recruiting individuals to be interviewed from all stages of career from undergraduate students to retired and emeritus astronomers. Contact Jarita Holbrook to schedule an interview or to find out more information about the project (astroholbrook@gmail.com). Also, contact Jarita Holbrook if you would like to become an interviewer for the project.

  13. Oral Manifestations of Menopause

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oral manifestations may vary for each patient in the form of burning mouth syndrome .... as chlorhexidine aids in reduction of the accumulation of dental plaque.[5,10 ... women with missing teeth may have a higher risk of hypertension and ...

  14. Imaging in oral cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreeta Arya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist.

  15. Oral Health and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-12

    This women's health podcast focuses on the importance of maintaining good oral health during pregnancy.  Created: 5/12/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/12/2009.

  16. The new oral anticoagulants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2010-01-01

    In patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation oral anticoagulation with the vitamin K antagonists acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon and warfarin reduces the risk of stroke by more than 60%, whereas single or double antiplatelet therapy is much less effective and sometimes associated with a similar ble

  17. History of oral contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  18. Improving your oral English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kylafree

    2005-01-01

    The most common question my students ask is ""How can I improve my oral English?"" My answer is always the same: practice. There is no quick way to learn another language. You cannot magically learn new words and have perfect pronunciation. The only way to improve is with practice and patience.

  19. Older Adults (and Oral Health)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Sorted by ... > OlderAdults Older Adults and Oral Health Main Content ​ Is dry mouth a natural part ... from fiction by reading this web page about oral health and growing older. Having the right information can ...

  20. Age-related oral changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mckenna, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    Age-related oral changes are seen in the oral hard and soft tissues as well as in bone, the temporomandibular joints and the oral mucosa. As older patients retain their natural teeth for longer, the clinical picture consists of normal physiological age changes in combination with pathological and iatrogenic effects. Clinical Relevance: With an ageing population retaining more of its natural teeth for longer, dental professionals should expect to observe oral age changes more frequently.

  1. Prevention of oral diseases and oral health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gift, H C

    1991-06-01

    Research and activities, as promoted in 1989 and 1990, in oral disease prevention and health promotion are summarized. Significant syntheses of research findings have occurred, as a result of planning and workship activities, which will direct oral health promotion in the 1990s. Original research on established and new preventive therapies for dental caries, periodontal diseases, oral mucosal alterations, soft-tissue lesions, precancers and cancers, and trauma are reported, opportunities to prevent oral diseases or maintain oral health through changes in individual behaviors, professional orientation, and social and environmental changes are addressed.

  2. Systemic manifestations of oral diseases

    OpenAIRE

    N Chaitanya Babu; Andrea Joan Gomes

    2011-01-01

    The oral cavity is the site of much infectious and inflammatory disease which has been associated with systemic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and pre-term low births. This article emphasizes on the oral-systemic disease connection which is now a rapidly advancing area of research. The possible systemic diseases which arise from oral microorganisms are hereby focused.

  3. Tips for Good Oral Health during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tips for Good Oral Health During Pregnancy B elow are tips for taking care of your oral health while you are pregnant. Getting oral health care, practicing good oral hygiene, eating healthy foods, ...

  4. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, Jesper; Hietanen, J

    2012-01-01

    as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral......In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must...... medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide...

  5. Comparative evaluation of sutures coated with triclosan and chlorhexidine for oral biofilm inhibition potential and antimicrobial activity against periodontal pathogens: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Sunder Sethi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical site plaque accumulation is one of the challenging problems leading to unfavorable healing. The antibacterial sutures can be used to reduce or inhibit plaque formation. Presently there is no study comparing efficacy of sutures coated with triclosan and chlorhexidine in terms of oral biofilm inhibition and antimicrobial property against periodontal pathogens. Aim: The aim of present study was to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy and oral biofilm inhibition around chlorhexidine and triclosan coated polyglactin sutures in comparison to uncoated sutures. Materials and Method: Equal segments of chlorhexidine and triclosan coated polyglactin sutures (3-0 were incubated at 370°C in saliva collected from 10 chronic periodontitis patients for 7 days. Plain uncoated suture served as control. Biofilm formation was analyzed with Confocal Laser-Scanning Microscopy (CLSM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Quantitative assessment was done using Colony Forming Units (CFU/mL.The antibacterial efficacy of the sutures was tested against specific periodontal pathogens (S.mutans, F.nucleatum, A.actinomycetomcomitans, P.intermedia, P.gingivalis using agar diffusion method. CLSM and SEM were not subjected to statistical analysis. ANOVA test was used for colony forming units and agar diffusion test. (P < 0.05 Results: CLSM and SEM showed substantial biofilm inhibition around chlorhexidine-coated sutures followed by triclosan-coated when compared to plain uncoated suture. The antibacterial coated sutures showed statistically significant difference in CFUs/ml and zone of inhibition compared to plain uncoated sutures. Among coated sutures, chlorhexidine-coated sutures showed better results. Conclusion: The antibacterial coated sutures have a promising potential in preventing the colonization of periodontal pathogens around it thereby inhibiting biofilm formation.

  6. Setup of an in vitro test system for basic studies on biofilm behavior of mixed-species cultures with dental and periodontal pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Standar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caries and periodontitis are important human diseases associated with formation of multi-species biofilms. The involved bacteria are intensively studied to understand the molecular basis of the interactions in such biofilms. This study established a basic in vitro single and mixed-species culture model for oral bacteria combining three complimentary methods. The setup allows a rapid screening for effects in the mutual species interaction. Furthermore, it is easy to handle, inexpensive, and reproducible. METHODS: Streptococcus mitis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis, typical inhabitants of the healthy oral cavity, S. mutans as main carriogenic species, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, S. intermedius and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as periodontitis-associated bacteria, were investigated for their biofilm forming ability. Different liquid growth media were evaluated. Safranin-staining allowed monitoring of biofilm formation under the chosen conditions. Viable counts and microscopy permitted investigation of biofilm behavior in mixed-species and transwell setups. FINDINGS: S. mitis, F. nucleatum, P. gingivalis and P. micra failed to form biofilm structures. S. mutans, S. sanguinis, S. intermedius and S. salivarius established abundant biofilm masses in CDM/sucrose. A. actinomycetemcomitans formed patchy monolayers. For in depth analysis S. mitis, S. mutans and A. actinomycetemcomitans were chosen, because i they are representatives of the physiological-, cariogenic and periodontitis-associated bacterial flora, respectively and ii their difference in their biofilm forming ability. Microscopic analysis confirmed the results of safranin staining. Investigation of two species combinations of S. mitis with either S. mutans or A. actinomycetemcomitans revealed bacterial interactions influencing biofilm mass, biofilm structure and cell viability. CONCLUSIONS: This setup shows safranin staining

  7. Active invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis and infection-induced complement activation in ApoE-/- mice brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Sophie; Singhrao, Sim K; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Rivera, Mercedes; Velsko, Irina; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Crean, StJohn

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

  8. Oral health policies in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Alfredo Pucca Junior

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Since Oral Health policies in Brazil have been constructed according to circumstances and possibilities, they should be understood within a given context. The present analysis contextualizes several issues of the Brazilian Oral Health Policy, called "Smiling Brazil", and describes its present stage of development. Today it involves re-organizing basic oral health care by deploying Oral Health Teams within the Family Health strategy, setting up Centers of Dental Specialists within an Oral Health network as a secondary care measure, setting up Regional Laboratories of Dental Prosthesis and a more extensive fluoridation of the public water supply.

  9. Damaging oral habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Rajesh J; Al-Shahrani, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Oral habits, if persist beyond certain developmental age, can pose great harm to the developing teeth, occlusion, and surrounding oral tissues. In the formative years, almost all children engage in some non-nutritive sucking habits. Clinicians, by proper differential diagnosis and thorough understanding of natural growth and developmental processes, should take a decision for intervening. This article describes case series reports of thumb sucking, finger sucking, and tongue thrusting habits, which have been successfully treated by both removable and fixed orthodontic appliances. The cases shown are ranging from the age group of 9-19 years presenting combination of both mixed and permanent dentition development. All cases show satisfactory correction of habits and stable results.

  10. Oral chemotherapy in tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, N J

    1981-05-01

    A double-blind triple cross-over trial was designed for 21 patients suffering from tinnitus; mexiletine, diazapam, betahistine and placebo were taken each for a month sequentially during which time the patients recorded their tinnitus loudness subjectively on a visual analogue scale. The results showed that these medications did not influence the tinnitus loudness. Since mexiletine is an oral analogue of lignocaine and a cardiovascular drug, any untoward cardiovascular history and clinical finding disqualified such patients from the trial. Twenty-one such patients were rejected from an original group of 42 patients. In a volunteer trial mexiletine unrelated to this, it was reported that a vasovagal attack was suffered by someone who had just consumed 400 mg mexiletine orally. After ethical considerations the tinnitus trial was stopped. Eleven patients completed the cycle of medications, 10 did not. The dangers of using a cardiovascular drug for a non-cardiovascular condition is thus exposed.

  11. Probiotics and Oral Health

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnu, Harini Priya

    2010-01-01

    The number of products containing probiotics, viable bacteria with proven health benefits, entering the market is increasing. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and most clinical interest has been focused on their use for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and diseases; however, during the last decade several investigators have also suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to examine potential mechanis...

  12. Feline oral pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, S.; Pais, B.; Almeida, D.; Simões, J.; Mega, A. C.; Vala, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The main pathologies of the oral cavity are of utmost importance, not only by the number of exposed individuals, but also by the consequences which stems. With the development of this work, we intend to conduct a brief approach to the same, since, specifically affecting domestic felines. Feline Lymphoplasmatic Gingivostomatitis (GELF), the Feline Odontoclastic Reabsorption Lesions (LROF) Complex and gingivitis-stomatitis-pharyngitis, have been studied, some of which are considered an enigma i...

  13. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  14. Challenges in Comparative Oral Epic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Miles Foley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Originally written in 2001 and subsequently published in China, this collaborative essay explores five questions central to comparative oral epic with regard to Mongolian, South Slavic, ancient Greek, and Old English traditions: “What is a poem in oral epic tradition?” “What is a typical scene or theme in oral epic tradition?” “What is a poetic line in oral epic tradition?” “What is a formula in an oral epic tradition?” “What is the register in oral epic poetry?” Now available for the first time in English, this essay reflects a foundational stage of what has become a productive and long-term collaboration between the Center for Studies in Oral Tradition and the Institute of Ethnic Literature of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

  15. Chemoprevention of oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Chhaparwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one among the ten most common cancers in the world and shows a marked geographic variation in occurrence. It causes considerable morbidity and is associated with a 5-year survival rate of less than 50%. Current treatment primarily consists of surgery and radiotherapy and improvement in long-term cure rates with these modalities has reached a plateau. As, curative therapy available for oral cancer often results in debilitating changes in appearance, speech, swallowing and breathing, preventive strategies are desirable. Cancer chemoprevention is the use of natural, synthetic or biologic chemical agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent carcinogenic progression. Chemoprevention has been an extensively-studied strategy and continues to hold promise in the management of oral cancer. Many agents have been evaluated as possible chemopreventive agents including vitamin A and retinoids, betacarotene, vitamin E and dietary agents. Recently, molecularly targeted approach has generated interest among researchers worldwide which includes cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors, EGFR inhibitors and adenovirus vectors. This article reviews the various aspects of chemoprevention and describes important chemopreventive agents and design of chemopreventive trials.

  16. Dementia and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Spezzia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a neurodegenerative disease that progressively and irreversibly affects the central nervous system, leading to a decline in cognitive function. There is loss of brain function, which affects memory, thought, language, judgment and behavior. Since the patients present difficulties with self-care, there is a compromised oral hygiene. There will inevitably be loss of self-care during the course of the disease. The moment one diagnoses dementia, one should refer the patient to a dentist for evaluation, since the more severe the disease is, the harder it is to perform orthodontic procedures, due to loss of patient cooperation. Dental treatment will include guidance on essential oral hygiene for caregivers and family members, since these will be responsible for its performance, as the patient will be unable to perform basic self-care. When a proper dental plan with preventive approach is performed, acting from the diagnosis of the disease on, one can assist in improving the quality of life of these individuals. This paper aims to conduct an update of studies on the oral effects caused by dementia.

  17. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T.; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C.

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  18. In vitro efficacy of cefovecin against anaerobic bacteria isolated from subgingival plaque of dogs and cats with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazandi, Manouchehr; Bird, Philip S; Owens, Jane; Wilson, Gary; Meyer, James N; Trott, Darren J

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal disease is a common disease of dogs and cats often requiring antimicrobial treatment as an adjunct to mechanical debridement. However, correct compliance with oral antimicrobial therapy in companion animals is often difficult. Cefovecin is a recently introduced veterinary cephalosporin that has demonstrated prolonged concentrations in extracellular fluid, allowing for dosing intervals of up to 14 days. Subgingival samples were collected from the oral cavity of 29 dogs and eight cats exhibiting grade 2 or grade 3 periodontal disease. Samples were cultivated on Wilkin Chalgrens agar and incubated in an anaerobic chamber for seven days. Selected anaerobic bacteria were isolated and identified to species level using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for cefovecin and six additional antimicrobials using the agar dilution methodology recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The 65 clinical isolates were identified as Porphyromonas gulae (n = 45), Porphyromonas crevioricanis (n = 12), Porphyromonas macacae (n = 1), Porphyromonas cangingivalis (n = 1) Fusobacterium nucleatum (n = 2), Fusobacterium russii (n = 1) and Solobacterium moorei (n = 3). This is the first report of S. moorei being isolated from companion animals with periodontal disease. All isolates were highly susceptible to cefovecin, with a MIC90 of ≤0.125 μg/ml. Conversely, different resistance rates to ampicillin, amoxicillin and erythromycin between isolates were detected. Cefovecin is thus shown to be effective in vitro against anaerobic bacteria isolated from dogs and cats with periodontal disease.

  19. Leucoplasia oral: Conceptos actuales Oral leukoplakia: Current considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Escribano-Bermejo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available La leucoplasia es la lesión premaligna más frecuente de la cavidad oral. La Organización Mundial de la Salud la define clínicamente como una lesión predominantemente blanca de la mucosa oral que no puede caracterizarse como ninguna otra lesión conocida y con una elevada tendencia a convertirse en un cáncer oral. El objetivo de esta revisión es hacer un repaso al conocimiento actual acerca de la leucoplasia oral prestando especial atención a su nomenclatura, su etiología, su potencial maligno y su tratamiento.The oral leukoplakia is the most frequent premalignancy of the oral cavity. Clinically, it was defined by the WHO as a predominantly white lesion of the oral mucosa that cannot be characterized as any other definable lesion, with an obvious tendency to become an oral cancer. The aim of this article is to review the current concepts related with the oral leukoplakia, paying special attention to terminology, aetiology, malignant potential and treatment.

  20. Oral Literature in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Finnegan, Ruth; Turin, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Ruth Finnegan’s Oral Literature in Africa was first published in 1970, and since then has been widely praised as one of the most important books in its field. Based on years of fieldwork, the study traces the history of storytelling across the continent of Africa. This revised edition makes Finnegan’s ground-breaking research available to the next generation of scholars. It includes a new introduction, additional images and an updated bibliography, as well as its original chapters on poetry, ...

  1. Oral verruciform xanthoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lydia; Staines, Konrad; Pring, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Verruciform xanthoma (VX) of the oral cavity is a benign mucosal growth that often presents as a pink, yellow or grey raised plaque or papule with granular, papillary or verrucous surface morphology. Intraorally this often presents on the masticatory mucosa and extraorally often involves the skin and anogenital mucosa. There are several proposed aetiological factors and the clinical features of VX can be misleading; clinically it can resemble malignancy. Histopathological diagnosis is a key for the correct management of this lesion. Excision of this lesion is curative. PMID:25819830

  2. Oral Literature in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Finnegan, Ruth; Turin, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Ruth Finnegan’s Oral Literature in Africa was first published in 1970, and since then has been widely praised as one of the most important books in its field. Based on years of fieldwork, the study traces the history of storytelling across the continent of Africa. This revised edition makes Finnegan’s ground-breaking research available to the next generation of scholars. It includes a new introduction, additional images and an updated bibliography, as well as its original chapters on poetry, ...

  3. Oral iron chelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Janet L

    2010-02-01

    Effective chelation therapy can prevent or reverse organ toxicity related to iron overload, yet cardiac complications and premature death continue to occur, largely related to difficulties with compliance in patients who receive parenteral therapy. The use of oral chelators may be able to overcome these difficulties and improve patient outcomes. A chelator's efficacy at cardiac and liver iron removal and side-effect profile should be considered when tailoring individual chelation regimens. Broader options for chelation therapy, including possible combination therapy, should improve clinical efficacy and enhance patient care.

  4. [Accidental oral mercurochrome poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Curiel J; Nieto Conde C; Santana Rodríguez C; Urbón Artero A; Gracia Remiro R

    2000-11-01

    Neonatal mercury poisoning, especially that due to merbromin ingestion, is uncommon. We describe the case of a 10 day old newborn infant who was given mercurochrome orally for 7 days due to misunderstanding of medical instructions. Initial symptoms included loss of appetite and low weight increase. Elevated blood mercury concentrations were found. Chelating therapy with dimercaprol was initiated and the patient's evolution was good. We discuss the potential toxicity of mercury and emphasise the importance of the transmission of information by physicians, especially to the immigrant population.

  5. Canine and feline oral pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, S.; Pais, B.; Almeida, D.; Simões, J.; Mega, A. C.; Vala, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to present a brief review of the main conditions affecting the oral cavity of dogs and cats. In recent years there has been increased attention with regard to veterinary dentistry, being several and frequent the pathologies located in the oral cavity of our pets. These diseases mainly affect the teeth and the mucous membranes of the oral cavity, and may, in chronic cases, also affect vital organs. This condition could have different causes, including hereditary, conge...

  6. Oral complications in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  7. Pediatric oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutcipal, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric oral and maxillofacial surgery is rarely seen as a separate entity from adult oral and maxillofacial surgery. Many procedures are similar on adults and children; however, children have unique behavioral, anatomic, and physiologic considerations. Children also have a propensity for certain injuries and pathologic lesions. Children born with congenital anomalies may also have a special subset of needs. This article is a brief review of oral and maxillofacial surgery on the pediatric population.

  8. [Oral transmission of Chagas' disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso M, Alberto; Vial U, Felipe; Galanti, Norbel

    2011-02-01

    The traditional transmission pathways of Chagas' disease are vectorial, transfusional, transplacental and organ transplantation. However, oral transmission is gaining importance. The first evidence of oral transmission was reported in Brazil in 1965. Nowadays the oral route is the transmission mode in 50% of cases in the Amazon river zone. Oral infection is produced by the ingestion of infected triatomine bugs or their feces, undercooked meat from infested host animals and food contaminated with urine or anal secretion of infected marsupials. Therefore travelers to those zones should be advised about care to be taken with ingested food. In Chile, this new mode of transmission should be considered in public health policies.

  9. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine: guidelines for oral pathology and oral medicine in the dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragelund, C; Reibel, J; Hietanen, J; Hadler-Olsen, E; Johannessen, A C; Kenrad, B; Nylander, K; Puranen, M; Salo, T; Syrjänen, S; Søland, T M; van der Waal, I; van der Wal, J E; Warfvinge, G

    2012-11-01

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must have knowledge of clinical symptoms, local and systemic signs and clinical differential diagnoses to make an accurate diagnosis. The dentist must be competent in selecting appropriate diagnostic tests, for example, tissue biopsy and microbiological samples, and conducting them correctly, as well as in interpreting test results and taking appropriate action accordingly. Furthermore, the dentist must be aware of diseases demanding multidisciplinary cooperation and be able to recognise his/her professional limitation, and to refer to other specialists when required. The dental curriculum changes over time as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide subject representatives in curriculum development and planning. We have created an advisory topic list in oral pathology and oral medicine.

  10. Parietal cheiro-oral syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Y; Watanabe, T; Ogura, A

    2000-12-01

    Cheiro-oral syndrome due to a parietal lesion has been reported in conjuction with a brain tumor, infarction and migraine. Only six reports of cheiro-oral syndrome due to a parietal infarction have been reported to date. We treated a 45-year-old woman with cheiro-oral syndrome due to a parietal infarction. Her sensory disturbance was characterized by paresthesia in the lower face and hand on the left side, and severe involvement of stereognosis and graphesthesia in the left hand. The pathogenesis of parietal cheiro-oral syndrome is discussed.

  11. Improving oral hygiene for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Debbie; Hampson, Victoria; Queen, Kerry; Kirk, Donna; Clarkson, Jan; Young, Linda

    2015-01-13

    Systematic reviews and patient safety initiatives recommend that oral hygiene should be part of routine patient care. However, evidence suggests it is often neglected in hospitals and care homes. Research recommends encouraging beliefs that support oral hygiene, and teaching nurses appropriate skills, as necessary prerequisites to implementing best practice in hospital wards. This article describes a pilot study of an educational workshop on oral hygiene. Results from the pilot study suggest that this workshop is a feasible intervention for a service-wide trial. The literature suggests that other interventions are required to complement this approach if nurses are to make oral hygiene a priority in daily patient care.

  12. ORAL ALLERGY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sergeev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as a set of clinical manifestations caused by IgE-mediated allergic  reactions  that  occur  at  oral  and  pharyngeal  mucosae  in  the  patients  with  pollen  sensitization  after ingestion of certain fruits, vegetables, nuts and spices. OAS arises from cross-reactivity between specific pollen and food allergens, due to similarity of a configuration and amino acid sequence of allergenic molecules. OAS is considered as class II food allergy, being caused by thermo- and chemolabile allergens, and it is rarely combined with generalized manifestations of food allergy. Prevalence and spectrum of the causal allergens depend on a kind of pollen sensitization. In Moscow region, as well as in Northern Europe, allergic sensitization most commonly occurs to the pollen of leaf trees, whereas OAS is mostly connected with ingestion of fruits from Rosaceae family and nuts. Since last years, a newly developed technique of component-resolved molecular diagnosis (CR diagnostics allows of more precise detection of OAS-causing allergen molecules. These data are of extreme importance for administration of adequate nutritional therapy and prediction of SIT efficiency. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 1, pp 17-28

  13. [Oral jewelry: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeger, Franziska; Lussi, Adrian; Zimmerli, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Oral jewelry is popular. One of the most widely spread types are so-called tooth diamonds made of composite materials which are applied to the teeth with an adhesive. Note that parents are required to sign a release form for under-aged patients in Switzerland. Tooth cap grills and gold teeth are considered status symbols within the Hip-Hop fashion scene. However, tooth ornaments favour the accumulation of plaque and can diminish the ability to articulate. With respect to jewelry in oral soft tissue especially tongue and lip piercings are of significance to dentists. Besides the systemic complications, which are mostly caused by a lack of hygiene or the failure of noting medical contraindications by the piercer, local complications occur frequently. After surgery, pain, swelling, infections as well as hemorrhages or hematomas can be observed. Long-term effects can be problematic: gingival recession can be discernes mainly in the case of lip piercings the loss of hard tooth substance in the case of tongue piercings. Because of that, conservation therapies can become indespensable. Patients wearing dental jewelry have to be aware of risks of tooth damage, and they regularly have to undergo dental check-ups. Information campaigns--for dentists as well as patients--are necessary.

  14. Oral Allergy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuto Kondo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral allergy syndrome (OAS is defined as the symptoms of IgE-mediated immediate allergy localized in the oral mucosa, and the characteristics depend on the lability of the antigen. Another term used for this syndrome is pollen-food allergy (PFS; the patient is sensitized with pollen via the airways and exhibits an allergic reaction to food antigen with a structural similarity to the pollen (class 2 food allergy. In addition to PFS, latex-fruit syndrome is also well-known as the disease exhibiting OAS. In treating the condition, it must be noted that most but not all symptoms of PFS are those of OAS. In many cases, antigens become edible by heating, but some are resistant to heating. Also, since the exacerbation of atopic dermatitis is occasionally observed after the intake of cooked antigens in asymptomatic individuals, careful inquiry of the history is important in designing the treatment. Immunotherapy against the cross-reacting pollen has also been attempted in PFS.

  15. Can the oral microflora affect oral ulcerative mucositis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; de Soet, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review: Oral mucositis is one of the most prevalent toxicities after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Mucositis is initiated by the chemotherapy or radiotherapy preceding the transplantation. It is commonly accepted that microorganisms play a role in the process of oral mucositis.

  16. Le Discours Oral (Oral Discourse). Melanges Pedagogiques, 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, C.; And Others

    The contrast between written language and oral language did not really begin to attract attention until second language teaching defined as its goal the acquisition of a communicative tool rather than a literary tool. This focus on communication made necessary the distinction between language used for oral communication and language used for…

  17. Oral History and the Special Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Rebecca S.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion of the relationship between oral history and libraries notes the character of oral history (both auditory and visual); types of oral history interviews (focused or subject-oriented, life review); forming an oral history collection (audiotapes, videotapes, transcripts); legal agreements and oral history; and collecting versus creating…

  18. Assessing Oral Hygiene in Hospitalized Older Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health for all older adults can result in higher risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and oral cancer. Findings from this study indicated older veterans needed to improve their oral hygiene habits but barriers to oral hygiene performance prevented them from receiving and performing oral hygiene measures.

  19. Microbial dynamics during conversion from supragingival to subgingival biofilms in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurnheer, T; Bostanci, N; Belibasakis, G N

    2016-04-01

    The development of dental caries and periodontal diseases result from distinct shifts in the microbiota of the tooth-associated biofilm. This in vitro study aimed to investigate changes in biofilm composition and structure, during the shift from a 'supragingival' aerobic profile to a 'subgingival' anaerobic profile. Biofilms consisting of Actinomyces oris, Candida albicans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mutans and Veillonella dispar were aerobically grown in saliva-containing medium on hydroxyapatite disks. After 64 h, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia and Streptococcus anginosus were further added along with human serum, while culture conditions were shifted to microaerophilic. After 96 h, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola were finally added and the biofilm was grown anaerobically for another 64 h. At the end of each phase, biofilms were harvested for species-specific quantification and localization. Apart from C. albicans, all other species gradually increased during aerobic and microaerophilic conditions, but remained steady during anaerobic conditions. Biofilm thickness was doubled during the microaerophilic phase, but remained steady throughout the anaerobic phase. Extracellular polysaccharide presence was gradually reduced throughout the growth period. Biofilm viability was reduced during the microaerophilic conversion, but was recovered during the anaerobic phase. This in vitro study has characterized the dynamic structural shifts occurring in an oral biofilm model during the switch from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, potentially modeling the conversion of supragingival to subgingival biofilms. Within the limitations of this experimental model, the findings may provide novel insights into the ecology of oral biofilms.

  20. Putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in pregnant women: a case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Danying; Feng, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about herpesvirus and putative periodontopathic bacteria in maternal chronic periodontitis. The present case-control study aimed to explore the potential relationship between putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in maternal chronic periodontitis.Saliva samples were collected from 36 pregnant women with chronic periodontitis (cases) and 36 pregnant women with healthy periodontal status (controls). Six putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], Aggregatibacer actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Prevotella intermedia [Pi], Tannerella forsythia [Tf], and Treponema denticola [Td]) and three herpesviruses (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], human cytomegalovirus [HCMV], and herpes simplex virus [HSV]) were detected. Socio-demographic data and oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels were also collected. The results showed no significant differences in socio-demographic background, oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The detection rates of included periodontopathic microorganisms were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05), but the coinfection rate of EBV and Pg was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.028). EBV and Pg coinfection may promote the development of chronic periodontitis among pregnant women. PMID:27301874

  1. Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Effects of Artemisinin Extracts from Artemisia annua L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wan-Su; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Woo Joong; Lee, Dong Chae; Sohn, Uy Dong; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties of artemisinin derived from water, methanol, ethanol, or acetone extracts of Artemisia annua L. were evaluated. All 4 artemisinin-containing extracts had anti-inflammatory effects. Of these, the acetone extract had the greatest inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β , IL-6, and IL-10) production. Antioxidant activity evaluations revealed that the ethanol extract had the highest free radical scavenging activity, (91.0±3.2%), similar to α-tocopherol (99.9%). The extracts had antimicrobial activity against the periodontopathic microorganisms Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. animalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, and Prevotella intermedia. This study shows that Artemisia annua L. extracts contain anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial substances and should be considered for use in pharmaceutical products for the treatment of dental diseases. PMID:25605993

  2. Minimum inhibitory concentration of the plant extracts′ combinations against dental caries and plaque microorganisms: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B R Chandra Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral health status has witnessed marked advances in many industrialized countries. However, dental caries is consistently increasing in developing countries, and periodontal diseases are among most common afflictions to humankind. Approach best suited for developing countries is to focus on the prevention with innovative strategies. Hence, evolution of novel, innovative strategies to prevent dental caries and periodontal diseases is need of hour. Objective: To determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of combinations of Acacia nilotica, Murraya koenigii L. Sprengel, Eucalyptus hybrid, and Psidium guajava against dental caries and plaque microorganisms and to qualitatively identify various phytochemical constituents in individual plant extracts and their quadruple combinations. Materials and Methods: MIC of the combinations of A. nilotica, M. koenigii L. Sprengel, Eucalyptus hybrid, and P. guajava on Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus (dental caries bacteria, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus salivarius (primary plaque colonizers, Fusobacterium nucleatum (secondary plaque colonizer, and Porphyromonas gingivalis (tertiary plaque colonizer was determined using broth dilution method. Series of dilutions of quadruple combinations ranging from 0.05% to 1.5% were prepared. 100 μL of each serial dilution of quadruple combinations was added to each tube containing bacterial culture. The optical density was noted after incubation in each tube to estimate the MIC for each bacterium. Results: MIC of the polyherbal combinations on S. mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius, L. acidophilus, F. nucleatum, and P. gingivalis was found to be 0.25%, 0.05%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, and 0.25%, respectively. Conclusion: The quadruple combinations of these four plant extracts could be considered in the evolution of an indigenous polyherbal mouth rinse as the formulation inhibited all the bacteria tested in the present study at low

  3. Molecular analysis of 16S rRNA genes identifies potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria and archaea in the plaque of partially erupted third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, J M; Campbell, J H; Bhandari, A R; Jesionowski, A M; Vickerman, M M

    2012-07-01

    Small subunit rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to identify cultivable and uncultivable microorganisms present in the dental plaque of symptomatic and asymptomatic partially erupted third molars to determine the prevalence of putative periodontal pathogens in pericoronal sites. Template DNA prepared from subgingival plaque collected from partially erupted symptomatic and asymptomatic mandibular third molars and healthy incisors was used in polymerase chain reaction with broad-range oligonucleotide primers to amplify 16S rRNA bacterial and archaeal genes. Amplicons were cloned, sequenced, and compared with known nucleotide sequences in online databases to identify the microorganisms present. Two thousand three hundred two clones from the plaque of 12 patients carried bacterial sequences from 63 genera belonging to 11 phyla, including members of the uncultivable TM7, SR1, and Chloroflexi, and difficult-to-cultivate Synergistetes and Spirochaetes. Dialister invisus, Filifactor alocis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, which have been associated with periodontal disease, were found in significantly greater abundance in pericoronal compared with incisor sites. Dialister invisus and F nucleatum were found in greater abundance in sites exhibiting clinical symptoms. The archaeal species, Methanobrevibacter oralis, which has been associated with severe periodontitis, was found in 3 symptomatic patients. These findings have provided new insights into the complex microbiota of pericoronitis. Several bacterial and archaeal species implicated in periodontal disease were recovered in greater incidence and abundance from the plaque of partially erupted third molars compared with incisors, supporting the hypothesis that the pericoronal region may provide a favored niche for periodontal pathogens in otherwise healthy mouths. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and

  4. Oral rehydration solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-18

    In the US oral glucose electrolyte solutions have been marketed for over 30 years for the treatment of infantile diarrhea. Recently, oral solutions have been widely used instead of intravenous fluids for treatment of dehydration from diarrhea, especially in developing countries, where diarrhea is a major cause of death in infants and young children and facilities for intravenous fluid replacement are limited or unavailable. The high concentrations of glucose and other carbohydrates in older preparations may make the diarrhea worse. The use of 2-2 1/2% glucose, as in "Infalyte, Pedialyte R.S." and the World Health Organization (WHO) solution avoids the osmotic effect of unabsorbed glucose, makes the taste tolerable, and promotes coupled absorption of sodium from the intestine. Replacement solutions for fluid loss due to diarrhea should also contain about 20 mEq/L of potassium because diarrhea invariably results in a substantial loss of potassium. Although homemade mixtures of glucose electrolyte solutions and commercial powders that require dilution are less costly than ready to use commercial solutions, errors in mixing or diluting occur often and can have serious consequences. For rehydration after volume depletion, the sodium concentration of the replacement fluid should be between 50-90 mEq/L, regardless of the cause of the diarrhea, patient's age, or the serum sodium concentration. For early treatment of diarrhea to prevent dehydration or for maintenance of hydration after parenteral fluid replacement, 90 mEq/L of sodium is acceptable for adults and children, but may not be appropriate for infants who have a higher insensible water loss. When diarrhea in infants is not caused by cholera, some consultants prefer to use more dilute fluids that contain 50-60 mEq/L of sodium. When circulatory insufficiency (10-15% weight loss), severe vomiting, inability to drink, or severe gastric distention is present, parenteral fluid replacement is indicated. With 5-8% acute

  5. Oral health in frail elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Ageing points towards increasing health problems and rising costs for the society. One of these health problems is the deteriorating oral health in care dependent elderly. The latter is related to the high need for care on many levels in these elderly. The lack of attention for oral care can be cons

  6. Oral endotoxin in healthy adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanSaene, JJM; vanSaene, HKF; Martin, MV; Leenstra, T.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a study that measured oral endotoxin levels in healthy persons with the Limulus amoebocyte lysate microassay. Only young nonsmoking adults with a healthy dentition measured with the plaque index and a good level of oral hygiene based on a twice-daily (morning and evening)

  7. Sentinel Node in Oral Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tartaglione, Girolamo; Stoeckli, Sandro J; de Bree, Remco;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nuclear imaging plays a crucial role in lymphatic mapping of oral cancer. This evaluation represents a subanalysis of the original multicenter SENT trial data set, involving 434 patients with T1-T2, N0, and M0 oral squamous cell carcinoma. The impact of acquisition techniques, tracer...

  8. Embracing Plurality through Oral Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bich; Oliver, Rhonda; Rochecouste, Judith

    2015-01-01

    The transmission and dissemination of knowledge in Aboriginal societies for the most part occurs orally in an Aboriginal language or in Aboriginal English. However, whilst support is given to speaking skills in Indigenous communities, in our education system less emphasis is given to developing equivalent oral communicative competence in Standard…

  9. Looking into the mouth - oral

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these lesions a sound classification had to be constructed. In September 1992 ... on Oral Problems Related to HIV Ii1le(it.i(>ii met in London, together with members of the US Workshop on Oral ..... diseases. HIV Clin Mctnagement 1999; 8:1-.

  10. [Hexetidine--an oral antiseptic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapić, Elvedina; Becić, Fahir; Becić, Ervina

    2002-01-01

    Hexetidine is very safe oral antiseptic with broad antibacterial and antifungal activity in vivo and in vitro. It has local-anesthetics, astringent and deodorant activity. Also, it has very strong antiplac effects. Resistention of microorganisms on hexetidine is short and transient. These characteristics give important therapeutic role in treatment of oral infections.

  11. Oral complications of cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreizen, S.; Daly, T.E.; Drane, J.B.; Brown, L.R.

    1977-02-01

    Injury to surrounding tissues during radiotherapy for oral cancer can have devastating physical and psychologic consequences for the patient. Oral complications include xerostomia, dental decay, mucositis, taste loss, osteoradionecrosis, infection, and trismus. In many instances, these problems can be eradicated or controlled with appropriate treatment.

  12. Tobacco Use and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seffrin, John R.; Randall, B. Grove

    1982-01-01

    Oral disease risks regarding the use of tobacco arise not only from smoking but also from the oral use of tobacco in the form of snuff. Such diseases range from simple tooth decay to various forms of cancer. A fact list is suggested for presenting the risks to school-age youth. (JN)

  13. Phonetics drills in oral English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    皮继伟

    2014-01-01

    Phonetics teaching is one of the important parts of English teaching .To improve the students’ pronunciation in oral English ,the paper indicates the relation between English phonetics and oral English, the problems of speech sounds, and the methods of phonetic drills.

  14. Phonetics drills in oral English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    皮继伟

    2014-01-01

    Phonetics teaching is one of the important parts of English teaching.To improve the students’pronunciation in oral English,the paper indicates the relation between English phonetics and oral English,the problems of speech sounds,and the methods of phonetic drills.

  15. BETTER ORAL HEALTH TO ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Murtomaa

    2016-12-01

    The behavioral science experts are of opinion that only comprehensive and integrated common-risk-factor-based health promotion activities can enhance oral health and its equity as a part of general health. Are health professionals ready to assume their responsibility for promoting better oral health?

  16. Cheiro-oral syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-yu DONG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and imaging features of 11 cheiro-oral syndrome (COS cases were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were unilaterally involved, including 10 cases of acute lacunar cerebral infarction, and one case of cerebral hemorrhage. Thalamic ischemic stroke (5 cases was most common, and secondly were parietal lobe infarction (3 cases and brainstem infarction (3 cases. Three of 11 cases developed progressive stroke during treatment. All patients were followed up for 3 months after discharge, 2 cases still presented ipsilateral fingertips and perioral numbness, one progressive case left hemi-dysesthesia. Damage of nerve conduction from medulla oblongata to parietal lobe can induce COS. Although the prognosis of COS is good, progressive risk can be seen in some cases. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.12.015

  17. Potencies of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgren, R A; Sturtevant, F M

    1976-08-15

    Oral contraceptives are combinations of estrogens and progestogens or, in the case of the mini-pills, progestogens alone. With specific test procedures in laboratory animals or human subjects, it is possible to assign potency evaluations to the components relative to the progestational, estrogenic, or antiestrogenic activities of the progestogen or to the estrogenic potencies of the estrogenic component. It might even be possible to quantify the synergistic effects of the estrogen on the progestational agent. Unfortunately, however, it is impossible now to amalgamate such assay results into single estimates of the potencies of the combinations (either the combination products per se or the combination tablets of sequential products). For example, an over-all estrogenic potency of a combination preparation would involve the integration of contributions form the estrogen itself plus the estrogenic products of metabolism of the progestogen minus the antagonistic effect of the progestational agent, if any. These factors cannot now be quantified independently, much less merged into a single figure of clinical significance. Further, even if it were possible to produce such an estimate, it is unlikely that the evaluation would be meaningful in relation to any putative side effect or adverse reaction, i.e., the alleged thrombogenic effects of oral contraceptives cannot currently be related directly to any measure of potency that will allow prediction of these clinical conditions from laboratory models. Any evaluation of the potential of a given contraceptive to produce a specific side effect will depend upon data generated with specific regard to that adverse reaction and the individual product in question.

  18. Oral lichen planus: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupaa, R Jayasri; Sankari, S Leena; Masthan, K M K; Rajesh, E

    2015-04-01

    Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment.

  19. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  20. Oral health promotion at worksites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    1989-01-01

    Many workplace-based health promotion programmes have been reported but only a few include or focus specifically on oral health. Although certain obstacles to oral health promotion in the workplace exist from the management side, from the dental profession and from the employees, these seem...... is at present sparse and there are few guidelines to actual strategies for effective oral health promotion. However, elements of strategies that have been successful in various geographical and economic environments include: active involvement of the work force, the use of dental auxiliaries, voluntary daily...... mouthrinsing, screening activities, use of mass media, oral hygiene instruction and prophylaxis and paraprofessional training. It is recommended that future research concentrates on these elements to build up a meaningful and relevant data base upon which effective oral health promotion programmes can...

  1. Oral lichen planus: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jayasri Krupaa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen planus is an immunologically mediated mucocutaneous disease that is triggered by varied etiological agents. The oral lichenoid reaction is considered a variant of the disease that needs to be clearly diagnosed as a separate entity from oral lichen planus and treated. They follow a strict cause-effector relationship, protocols that suggest the differentiation. Lichen planus has varied clinical forms in the oral mucosa and cutaneously that has different prognosis. This condition also arises in association with various other systemic conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus. There have been cases reported in the esophagus, larynx, scalp, nail, cutaneous areas, especially arms and wrists, trunk. There is reported malignant transformation that essentiates careful examination, treatment protocol and regular follow-up sessions. This article throws light on the disease condition of oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reaction that is essential for the differentiation and treatment.

  2. The Oral Paradigm and Snapchat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Soffer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this short essay, I argue that the ephemeral nature of emerging instant-messaging applications, such as Snapchat, applies an oral paradigm. While online discourse of computer-mediated communication shares many qualities with oral communication, the case of ephemeral applications is unique, as the oral features are already integrated in the application technology design and as orality is often implemented on highly visual products. Snapchat applies technology that fades visual contents as if they were spoken words fading in the air after utterance. Moreover, Snapchat’s promise to delete all messages from its database after they are viewed echoes a key characteristic of primary oral culture: that is, the inability (and in our case, the obligation not to store knowledge. In this, Snapchat demonstrates counter-logic to the contemporary grammar of new media, which is based on information aggregation.

  3. Role of micronucleus in oral exfoliative cytology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shashikala, R; Indira, A P; Manjunath, G S; Rao, K Arathi; Akshatha, B K

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, the interest for oral cytology as a diagnostic and prognostic methodology, for monitoring patients in oral potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer has re-emerged substantially...

  4. The Fungal Biome of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Retuerto, Mauricio; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Organisms residing in the oral cavity (oral microbiota) contribute to health and disease, and influence diseases like gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral candidiasis (the most common oral complication of HIV-infection). These organisms are also associated with cancer and other systemic diseases including upper respiratory infections. There is limited knowledge regarding how oral microbes interact together and influence the host immune system. Characterizing the oral microbial community (oral microbiota) in health and disease represents a critical step in gaining insight into various members of this community. While most of the studies characterizing oral microbiota have focused on bacterial community, there are few encouraging studies characterizing the oral mycobiome (the fungal component of the oral microbiota). Our group recently characterized the oral mycobiome in health and disease focusing on HIV. In this chapter we will describe the methods used by our group for characterization of the oral mycobiome.

  5. Oral Health in the US: Key Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy Oral Health in the U.S.: Key Facts Oral Health in the U.S.: Key Facts Jun 01, 2012 ... Email Print This fact sheet provides data on oral health care coverage and access for children, nonelderly adults ...

  6. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health Mouth Breathing Can Cause Major Health Problems Over ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why Is Oral Health Important for Women? Article Chapters Why Is Oral ...

  7. Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health Mouth Breathing Can Cause Major Health Problems Over ... your desktop! more... Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health Article Chapters Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral ...

  8. Why Is Oral Health Important for Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health Mouth Breathing Can Cause Major Health Problems Over ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why is Oral Health Important for Men? Article Chapters Why is Oral ...

  9. Effects by periodontitis on pristane-induced arthritis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Kaja; Lönnblom, Erik; Tour, Gregory; Kats, Anna; Mydel, Piotr; Georgsson, Pierre; Hultgren, Catharina; Kharlamova, Nastya; Norin, Ulrika; Jönsson, Jörgen; Lundmark, Anna; Hellvard, Annelie; Lundberg, Karin; Jansson, Leif; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background An infection-immune association of periodontal disease with rheumatoid arthritis has been suggested. This study aimed to investigate the effect of pre-existing periodontitis on the development and the immune/inflammatory response of pristane-induced arthritis. Methods We investigated the effect of periodontitis induced by ligature placement and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) infection, in combination with Fusobacterium nucleatum to promote its colonization, on the develop...

  10. Atividade antimicrobiana de infusões de vegetais sobre fusobactérias bucais e sua capacidade de adesão a eritrócitos humanos

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the result of the interrelationship between microbiotic aggression and the host’s organic defence. Amongst the microorganisms involved in periodontopathies, Fusobacterium nucleatum is conspicuous by establishing a link between the initial and final colonizers, besides producing toxic compounds and adhering to the host’s cells. Control of bacterial biofilm can be achieved by use of chemical agents, many of which extracted from plants. Thus the object of this study was to...

  11. Antibacterial effect of chlorine dioxide and hyaluronate on dental biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Al-bayaty, F.; Taiyeb-ali, T.; Abdulla, M. A.; Hashim, F.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate antimicrobial action of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gel and hyaluronate gel (Gengigel (R)) on dental biofilm. Pooled supra and subgingival dental biofilm were obtained from healthy individuals and incubated aerobically and anaerobically. Plaque bacteria investigated including Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus mitis, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, dental plaque pool samples (aerobic and anaerobic) and Staphylococcus aureus and ...

  12. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Ethan B.; Xiong, Yong; Wang, Jimin; Strobel, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6Å crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for ho...

  13. Antibakterijska svojstva retrogradnih punila korijenskih kanala

    OpenAIRE

    Provenzano, José C.; Julio C. M. de Oliveira; Flávio R F Alves; Rôças, Isabela N.; Siqueira Jr, José F.; Uzeda, Milton de

    2011-01-01

    Svrha istraživanja bila je ocijeniti i usporediti antibakterijsku učinkovitost pet retrogradnih punila korijenskih kanala. Materijal i metode: Metodom difuzije u agru ocijenjena je zona inhibicije bakterijskog rasta na podlozi pet retrogradnih punila korijenskih kanala: Pro Root MTA, cementa Portland, Super-EBA, IRM-a, Sealera 26 te amalgama. Za ciljane mikroorganizme bilo je odabrano pet anaeroba (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Parvimonas micra, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Propionibacterium acnes i ...

  14. The influence of biofilm formation by Gardnerella vaginalis and other anaerobes on bacterial vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, António; Cerca, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the worldwide leading vaginal disorder in women of reproductive age. BV is characterized by the replacement of beneficial lactobacilli and the augmentation of anaerobic bacteria. Gardnerella vaginalis is a predominant bacterial species, however, BV is also associated with other numerous anaerobes, such as Atopobium vaginae, Mobiluncus mulieris, Prevotella bivia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptoniphilus sp.. Currently, the role of G. vaginalis in the etiology of BV...

  15. Partial characterization of antagonistic substance produced by a Clostridium butyricum strain

    OpenAIRE

    Nely Cristina Medeiros Caires; Aline Magalhães Matos; Luiz Macedo Farias; Maria Auxiliadora Roque Carvalho; Regina Maria Nardi Drummond; Jacques Robert Nicoli; Antônio Paulino Ribeiro Sobrinho

    2007-01-01

    The production of antagonistic substance by bacterium present in the infected root canal system (RCS) probably is an important ecological factor for its successful colonization of the local. The objective of this study was to partially characterize an antagonistic substance produced by a Clostridium butyricum isolated from infected RCS.Production of inhibitory compound was evaluated by the agar double layer diffusion technique using Fusobacterium nucleatum and Bifidobacterium adolescentis as ...

  16. Oral melanoacanthoma: A rare case of diffuse oral pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Ashok Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical presentation of diffuse pigmentation can be alarming to the patient as well as the clinician. A histopathologic examination of a pigmented lesion is necessary in most of the cases in the oral cavity. Oral melanoacanthoma is a very rare diffuse pigmentation with no specific treatment required. It shows increased number of dendritic melanocytes in an acanthotic epithelium. We present a rare case of diffuse pigmentation in the oral cavity whose diagnosis was done on the basis of clinical presentation and histopathology. Also immunohistochemistry was done.

  17. Noma affected children from Niger have distinct oral microbial communities based on high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine L Whiteson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We aim to understand the microbial ecology of noma (cancrum oris, a devastating ancient illness which causes severe facial disfigurement in>140,000 malnourished children every year. The cause of noma is still elusive. A chaotic mix of microbial infection, oral hygiene and weakened immune system likely contribute to the development of oral lesions. These lesions are a plausible entry point for unidentified microorganisms that trigger gangrenous facial infections. To catalog bacteria present in noma lesions and identify candidate noma-triggering organisms, we performed a cross-sectional sequencing study of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from sixty samples of gingival fluid from twelve healthy children, twelve children suffering from noma (lesion and healthy sites, and twelve children suffering from Acute Necrotizing Gingivitis (ANG (lesion and healthy sites. Relative to healthy individuals, samples taken from lesions in diseased mouths were enriched with Spirochaetes and depleted for Proteobacteria. Samples taken from healthy sites of diseased mouths had proportions of Spirochaetes and Proteobacteria that were similar to healthy control individuals. Samples from noma mouths did not have a higher abundance of Fusobacterium, casting doubt on its role as a causative agent of noma. Microbial communities sampled from noma and ANG lesions were dominated by the same Prevotella intermedia OTU, which was much less abundant in healthy sites sampled from the same mouths. Multivariate analysis confirmed that bacterial communities in healthy and lesion sites were significantly different. Several OTUs in the Orders Erysipelotrichales, Clostridiales, Bacteroidales, and Spirochaetales were identified as indicators of noma, suggesting that one or more microbes within these Orders is associated with the development of noma lesions. Future studies should include longitudinal sampling of viral and microbial components of this community, before and early in noma lesion

  18. Noma affected children from Niger have distinct oral microbial communities based on high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteson, Katrine L; Lazarevic, Vladimir; Tangomo-Bento, Manuela; Girard, Myriam; Maughan, Heather; Pittet, Didier; Francois, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2014-12-01

    We aim to understand the microbial ecology of noma (cancrum oris), a devastating ancient illness which causes severe facial disfigurement in>140,000 malnourished children every year. The cause of noma is still elusive. A chaotic mix of microbial infection, oral hygiene and weakened immune system likely contribute to the development of oral lesions. These lesions are a plausible entry point for unidentified microorganisms that trigger gangrenous facial infections. To catalog bacteria present in noma lesions and identify candidate noma-triggering organisms, we performed a cross-sectional sequencing study of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from sixty samples of gingival fluid from twelve healthy children, twelve children suffering from noma (lesion and healthy sites), and twelve children suffering from Acute Necrotizing Gingivitis (ANG) (lesion and healthy sites). Relative to healthy individuals, samples taken from lesions in diseased mouths were enriched with Spirochaetes and depleted for Proteobacteria. Samples taken from healthy sites of diseased mouths had proportions of Spirochaetes and Proteobacteria that were similar to healthy control individuals. Samples from noma mouths did not have a higher abundance of Fusobacterium, casting doubt on its role as a causative agent of noma. Microbial communities sampled from noma and ANG lesions were dominated by the same Prevotella intermedia OTU, which was much less abundant in healthy sites sampled from the same mouths. Multivariate analysis confirmed that bacterial communities in healthy and lesion sites were significantly different. Several OTUs in the Orders Erysipelotrichales, Clostridiales, Bacteroidales, and Spirochaetales were identified as indicators of noma, suggesting that one or more microbes within these Orders is associated with the development of noma lesions. Future studies should include longitudinal sampling of viral and microbial components of this community, before and early in noma lesion development.

  19. Amiloidosis bucal Oral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A amiloidose é uma doença complexa rara de difícil diagnóstico que ocorre devido à deposição de substância amilóide no meio extracelular. Ao ser diagnosticado na cavidade bucal, deve-se monitorar o paciente a fim de avaliar possíveis complicações sistêmicas da doença. Diante disso, o objetivo do presente estudo é relatar um caso de amiloidose oral em uma paciente do gênero feminino de 72 anos de idade. Baseado nos sinais clínicos observados, a hipótese diagnóstica foi de fibroma traumático. Após realização de biópsia e exame histopatológico, o diagnóstico foi de amiloidose oral, o que foi confirmado com a coloração do espécime com o reagente vermelho congo. Depósitos de amilóide foram encontrados no tecido conjuntivo, na avaliação através da luz polarizada, que apresentou birrefringência. Tal achado foi preocupante, já que a amiloidose geralmente acomete diversos tecidos levando a comprometimentos sistêmicos. Por essa razão a paciente foi encaminhada a procurar atendimento médico. No entanto, houve abandono do tratamento e a mesma veio a óbito 6 meses após o diagnóstico da doença. Lesões orais aparentemente simples podem revelar doenças raras e de difícil tratamento. O diagnóstico preciso e acompanhamentos médicos são fundamentais na sobrevida do paciente.La amiloidosis es una enfermedad compleja, rara, de difícil diagnóstico, que ocurre debido al depósito de sustancia amiloidea en medio extracelular. Al ser diagnosticada en la cavidad bucal, el paciente debe tener supervisión médica para evaluar las posibles complicaciones sistémicas de la enfermedad. El objetivo del presente estudio fue presentar un caso de amiloidosis bucal en un paciente del género femenino de 72 años de edad. Basados en las señales clínicas observadas, la hipótesis diagnóstica fue de un fibroma traumático. Después de la realización de una biopsia y del examen histopatológico, el diagnóstico fue de amiloidosis

  20. Next generation sequencing of oral microbiota in Type 2 diabetes mellitus prior to and after neem stick usage and correlation with serum monocyte chemoattractant-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbalagan, Rubini; Srikanth, Padma; Mani, Monika; Barani, Ramya; Seshadri, Krishna G; Janarthanan, R

    2017-08-01

    Oral microbiome impacts health and disease. T2DM and periodontitis are associated. Neem (Azadiracta indica) has antibacterial activity against oral microbiota. To characterize oral microbiota (OMB) in saliva samples of T2DM patients by Next generation sequencing. To analyze MCP-1 levels among the T2DM patients before and after a month of neem stick usage as a toothbrush. Blood and saliva samples were collected from adult T2DM patients before and after the neem stick usage. Metagenomic sequencing was performed on saliva samples targeting V6 region of 16s rRNA. Serum MCP-1 levels were determined using a quantitative sandwich Human MCP-1 standard ABTS development kit (Peprotech, USA). The profile of oral microbiota of T2DM patients (n=24) consists of Streptococcus (95.8%) counts ranging from 2644 to 27,214, Veillonella (72.2%, counts 25-19,709, Neisseria (87.5%) 453-33,445), Rothia (63.6%, 233-6734), Actinomycetes (25%, 161-3730), Fusobacterium (21%, 2252-21,334), and Pigmentiphaga (12.5% 3-16,644). Oral microbiota in healthy controls (n=10), consists of Streptococcus (26.1%), Veillonella (21.9%), Neisseria (16.9%), Haemophilus (10.7%), Actinomycetes (2.6%), Rothia (3.1%), Oribacterium (1.7%). Post neem samples showed drastic reduction in the load of bacteria which was statistically significant. The mean serum MCP-1 before the use of neem stick was 265.18±79.44 (range 141.6-980.5pg/ml) and dropped to 33.6±7.35 after a month of neem stick usage (P value>0.001). OMB of T2DM patients and healthy controls were similar, however bacterial loads were significantly higher in T2DM patients. Use of neem stick has a statistically significant reduction on bacterial loads and MCP-1 levels in T2DM patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Oral lichen planus to oral lichenoid lesions: Evolution or revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavin B Dudhia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis between different diseases may be impaired by clinical and histopathologic similarities, as observed in the oral lichen planus (OLP and oral lichenoid lesion (OLL. Inspite of similar clinicopathological features; etiology, diagnosis and prognosis differ which mandates separation of OLL from OLP. Hence, it is essential for the oral physician and oral pathologist to be familiarized with the individual variations among clinicopathological features of OLP and OLL as well as to obtain a thorough history and perform a complete mucocutaneous examination in addition to specific diagnostic testing. The difficulties faced to establish the diagnosis between these two pathologies are widely investigated in the literature with a lack of definite conclusion. This review is an attempt to throw some light on these clinicopathologic entities with the aim to resolve the diagnostic dilemma.

  2. Oral lichen planus to oral lichenoid lesions: Evolution or revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhia, Bhavin B; Dudhia, Sonal B; Patel, Purv S; Jani, Yesha V

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis between different diseases may be impaired by clinical and histopathologic similarities, as observed in the oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesion (OLL). Inspite of similar clinicopathological features; etiology, diagnosis and prognosis differ which mandates separation of OLL from OLP. Hence, it is essential for the oral physician and oral pathologist to be familiarized with the individual variations among clinicopathological features of OLP and OLL as well as to obtain a thorough history and perform a complete mucocutaneous examination in addition to specific diagnostic testing. The difficulties faced to establish the diagnosis between these two pathologies are widely investigated in the literature with a lack of definite conclusion. This review is an attempt to throw some light on these clinicopathologic entities with the aim to resolve the diagnostic dilemma.

  3. Oral anticoagulant therapy related to oral surgery procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Knežević Milan; Petrović Dragan; Jović Nebojša; Bosch Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Today there must be established protocol in oral surgery treatment for the patients which are under anticoagulant treatment via oral (ATO). This is due to danger of the possible complications and also for increased demand for hospital treatment of these patients, which can be estimated now days as high as 8%. In the present study, the authors intent to define all the parameters for creation of one acting protocol applicable to this group of patients and concluding that there is no necessary n...

  4. Oral contraceptives and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostardi, R A; Woebkenberg, N R; Jarrett, M T

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken with volunteer females (aged 20-25) to determine the effect of OCs (oral contraceptives) on hematologic and metabolic variables during exercise. 5 of the women studied were naturally cycling and 7 were taking OCs. The women worked at 2 workloads on a bicycle ergometer at 50% and 90% of their maximal aerobic capacity during 3 different phases of their menstrual cycle. There was no better time of the month for doing the 50% or the 90% workload in either group. Heartrate for the OC group was significantly higher at the 50% maximal capacity. Results of the test indicate tha women on OCs have somewhat reduced cardiac efficiency and are ventilating more to carry out a given amount of work when compared to women who are naturally cycling. Possible explanations for the higher heart rate are put forward. The main limitation of the study is that the subject numbers involved are small and the number of cycles studied is also small.

  5. Oral cavity eumycetoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; Stuani, Maria Luiza de Toledo; Stuani, Luís Antonio Sasso

    2011-01-01

    Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal) or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  6. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  7. Oral contraception following abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707). In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P abortion (P abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. PMID:27399060

  8. As-yet-uncultivated oral bacteria: breadth and association with oral and extra-oral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Siqueira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that 40–60% of the bacteria found in different healthy and diseased oral sites still remain to be grown in vitro, phenotypically characterized, and formally named as species. The possibility exists that these as-yet-uncultivated bacteria play important ecological roles in oral bacterial communities and may participate in the pathogenesis of several oral infectious diseases. There is also a potential for these as-yet-uncultivated oral bacteria to take part in extra-oral infections. For a comprehensive characterization of physiological and pathogenic properties as well as antimicrobial susceptibility of individual bacterial species, strains need to be grown in pure culture. Advances in culturing techniques have allowed the cultivation of several oral bacterial taxa only previously known by a 16S rRNA gene sequence signature, and novel species have been proposed. There is a growing need for developing improved methods to cultivate and characterize the as-yet-uncultivated portion of the oral microbiome so as to unravel its role in health and disease.

  9. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a bright light and a mirror: Remove any dentures Look and feel inside the lips and the ... Early treatment may well be the key to complete recovery. Head, Neck & Oral Cancer Facts The information ...

  10. Oral candidosis in lichen planus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Kieffer-Kristensen, L; Reibel, J;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen in humans, but other Candida species cause candidosis. Candida species display significant differences in their susceptibility to antimycotic drugs. Patients with symptomatic or erythematous oral lichen planus (OLP) commonly have...

  11. [Oral rehydration immediately after appendectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azabache, W; Johanson, L

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of 20 patients with appendicitis was carried out in order to know if after the appendectomy they tolerate the hidratation with rehidratant salts by mouth in place of endovenous hydratation. The oral hydratation was indicated in all the cases immediately after the operation and only was one failure (5%). In the 95% the oral hydratation was tolerated, 45% without gastric symptoms, 35% with mild gastric symptoms and in 15% with moderate gastric symptoms. The association of gentamycin-metronidazol administered by intramuscular and oral way respectively was used in 100% of the patients. In 80% as profilaxis and in 20% as treatment. Two cases had complication as sepsis of the wound one of the profilactic group (5.9%) and another of the treatment group. In conclusion the oral hydratation with rehydrating salts were tolerated for the patients immediately after the appendectomy.

  12. Sleep disorders and oral devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanhoe, J R; Attanasio, R

    2001-10-01

    Many patients with upper airway sleep disorders can be successfully treated with oral appliance therapy. It is necessary for dentists to recognize these patients and refer them to a physician for further evaluation. Dentists must not become the primary care providers for these patients or attempt to treat a medical problem with an oral appliance without a proper diagnosis, which usually requires a sleep study and can only be diagnosed by a physician. Dentists must also be able to treat the patients referred by physicians and to follow accepted procedures when fabricating, inserting, titrating, and providing follow-up care for oral appliance therapy. In addition, the dental community needs to continue to heighten the awareness in their local medical community and in their patient population as to the possible contribution of oral appliance therapy to the management of snoring and some of the sleep-related breathing disorders.

  13. Unusual presentation of oral amyloidosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    William Silva; Bruna Wastner; Joslei Bohn; Juliana Jung; Juliana Schussel; Laurindo Sassi

    2015-01-01

    .... This study reports a case of a 58-year-old melanoderm male patient referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with white plaques on the tongue and multiple nodules in the region...

  14. Epidemiological studies of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindborg, J J

    1977-06-01

    The FDI has shown considerable interest in the oral cancer and has in recent years arranged three symposia on the subject. The incidence of oral cancer shows marked geographic differences mostly depending upon environmental factors. In the present paper the epidemiology of oral cancer is illustrated by the relative frequency to total number of cancers and incidence rates from a number of countries. Canada has the highest rate of cancer of the vermilion border, which is extremely rare among dark-skinned people. Even within one country differences may be found, a fact which is illustrated by findings from Czechoslovakia and India. In most of the studies dealing with the etiology of oral cancer tobacco usage in its various forms is shown to be the outstanding factor.

  15. Cereal based oral rehydration solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenya, P R; Odongo, H W; Oundo, G; Waswa, K; Muttunga, J; Molla, A M; Nath, S K; Molla, A; Greenough, W B; Juma, R

    1989-07-01

    A total of 257 boys (age range 4-55 months), who had acute diarrhoea with moderate to severe dehydration, were randomly assigned to treatment with either the World Health Organisation/United Nations Childrens Fund (WHO/Unicef) recommended oral rehydration solution or cereal based oral rehydration solution made either of maize, millet, sorghum, or rice. After the initial rehydration was achieved patients were offered traditional weaning foods. Treatment with oral rehydration solution continued until diarrhoea stopped. Accurate intake and output was maintained throughout the study period. Efficacy of the treatment was compared between the different treatment groups in terms of intake of the solution, stool output, duration of diarrhoea after admission, and weight gain after 24, 48, and 72 hours, and after resolution of diarrhoea. Results suggest that all the cereal based solutions were as effective as glucose based standard oral rehydration solution in the treatment of diarrhoea.

  16. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  17. Partial oral treatment of endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper; Høst, Nis Baun; Bruun, Niels Eske;

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for the treatment of left-sided infective endocarditis (IE) recommend 4 to 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics. Conversion from intravenous to oral antibiotics in clinically stabilized patients could reduce the side effects associated with intravenous treatment and shorten the length...... of hospital stay. Evidence supporting partial oral therapy as an alternative to the routinely recommended continued parenteral therapy is scarce, although observational data suggest that this strategy may be safe and effective....

  18. Oral phenoxymethylpenicillin treatment during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Olsen, Jørn

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the human teratogenic potential of oral penicillin V: phenoxymethylpenicillin treatment during pregnancy in the large population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980–1996. The dataset included 22......, i.e. in the critical period for most major congenital abnormalities in case-matched control pairs. Thus, treatment with oral phenoxymethylpenicillin during pregnancy presents very little if any teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  19. Menopause and the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Mutneja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is associated with a large number of symptoms ranging from physical to psychological. These symptoms may unfavorably affect oral health and treatment needs requiring dentists to be aware of the symptoms and health care needs of peri-menopausal/menopausal/postmenopausal women. This article attempts to provide an insight into the multifarious oral manifestations at menopause along with the relevant prosthodontic implications.

  20. Imaging of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesa, Indu Rekha; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is a challenging area in head and neck imaging because of its complex anatomy and the numerous pathophysiologies that involve its contents. This challenge is further compounded by the ubiquitous artifacts that arise from the dental amalgam, which compromise image quality. In this article, the anatomy of the oral cavity is discussed in brief, followed by a description of the imaging technique and some common pathologic abnormalities.

  1. [Oral habits. Etiology and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanou-Kouvelas, K; Kouvelas, N

    1988-01-01

    Oral habits have been described by psychologists and psychyatrists as psychodynamic phenomena. Dentists are concerned with oral habits because of the detrimental consequences they have in the oral facial system. The dentist who is in a position to confront a child with an oral habit in order to treat his dentinofacial problems is required to be aware of the psychological background of his patient as well as of the conditions under which the children do the habit in order to overcome emotional difficulties. The dentist should also search into the child's family to find out what the causes of the child's oral habit maybe. For the treatment of an oral habit the dentist should ensure both the child's and the family's cooperation and he should be aware of the advantages and disadvantages of every available method for treatment. Methods of treatment are: Use of orthodontic appliances: This method has the disadvantage that disturbs the child's psychological need for the habit, it can be interpreted as a punishment, it is visible and it causes speaking difficulties. It should be applied only in cooperation with the child. Behavioristic technique: This method aims to reinforce the child's positive behavior according to the Skinnerian principle: stimulus-response-reward. It has fast results but it is a conditioned treatment. Psychoanalytic method: It could solve the problem of the child's primary need for the oral habit in a radical manner. However it is practically impossible to be applied in Dentistry. Behavior modification according to ego psychology. With this method we attempt to analyse and understand the psychological cause of an oral habit.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Autophagy analysis in oral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, T B; Paz, A H R; Rados, P V; Leonardi, R; Bufo, P; Pedicillo, M C; Santoro, A; Cagiano, S; Aquino, G; Botti, G; Pannone, G; Visioli, F

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of autophagy in oral leukoplakia and squamous cell carcinoma and to correlate with clinical pathological features, as well as, the evolution of these lesions. 7 Normal oral mucosa, 51 oral leukoplakias, and 120 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were included in the study. Histological sections of the mucosa and leukoplakias were evaluated throughout their length, while the carcinomas were evaluated using Tissue Microarray. After the immunohistochemical technique, LC3-II positive cells were quantified in the different epithelial layers of the mucosa and leukoplakias and in the microarrays of the squamous cell carcinomas. The correlation between positive cells with the different clinical-pathological variables and with the evolution of the lesions was tested using the t test, ANOVA, and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. We observed increased levels of autophagy in the oral squamous cell carcinomas (p<0.001) in relation to the other groups, but without any association with poorer evolution or survival of these patients. Among the leukoplakias, we observed a higher percentage of positive cells in the intermediate layer of the dysplastic leukoplakias (p=0.0319) and in the basal layer of lesions with poorer evolution (p=0.0133). The levels of autophagy increased during the process of oral carcinogenesis and are correlated with poorer behavior of the leukoplakias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. 31 CFR 103.83 - Oral communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oral communications. 103.83 Section... AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS Administrative Rulings § 103.83 Oral communications... response to oral requests. Oral opinions or advice by Treasury, the Customs Service, the Internal...

  4. Developing Oral History in Chinese Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songhui, Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Compared with oral history in most Western countries, oral history theory and practice in Mainland China lag behind in both study and practice. This paper outlines the experience of oral history work in the Shantou university library, and the types and features of the oral history collected by the library. It examines problems in the development…

  5. Developing Oral History in Chinese Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songhui, Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Compared with oral history in most Western countries, oral history theory and practice in Mainland China lag behind in both study and practice. This paper outlines the experience of oral history work in the Shantou university library, and the types and features of the oral history collected by the library. It examines problems in the development…

  6. Oral health promotion efficiency in the control of oral biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélio Jorge Veiga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the efficacy of oral health instructions, particularly in the control of dental plaque, as well as assess the effectiveness of the reinforcement of the same instructions. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted at the University Clinic of the Portuguese Catholic University (UCP in Viseu-Portugal from January to June 2012. Three different assessments were performed with 30 participants using the O’Leary Plaque Index and a questionnaire on oral health behavior, with a one-month interval between each assessment. In the first assessment, all participants received the same instructions of oral hygiene and the O’Leary Plaque Index registration and the application of the questionnaire were performed; in the second assessment, a new registration of the O’Leary Index was made, but only the experimental group (n=16 received the reinforcement of oral health instructions, and in the third assessment, a new registration of the O’Leary Plaque Index was made for all the individuals (n=30. Results: Both control and experimental groups showed a decrease in the O’Leary Plaque Index, but the latter showed a more significant decrease in the last assessment: 38.19% (n=16 vs. 69.57% (n=14, p <0.05. Regarding the frequency of toothbrushing, in the experimental group, 68.8% (n=11 brushed the teeth at least twice a day, while in the control group only 57.1% (n=8 performed the same frequency of toothbrushing. In this case, statistically significant differences were found between the two groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: Oral health promotion through oral hygiene instruction was effective in improving oral health behaviors, and, consequentely, the control of dental biofilm. doi:10.5020/18061230.2014.p117

  7. Oral health as a predictive factor for oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Luiz Coracin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Oral mucositis is a complication frequently associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, decreasing a patient's quality of life and increasing the occurrence of opportunistic infections. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and severity of oral mucositis and to assess the correlation of this disease with the oral health of an individual at the time of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODS: Before transplantation, patients' oral health and inflammatory conditions were determined using the gingival index and the plaque index, which are based on gingival bleeding and the presence of dental plaque, respectively. Additionally, the dental health status was determined using the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index. The monitoring of oral mucositis was based on the World Health Organization grading system and was performed for five periods: from Day 0 to D+5, from D+6 to D+10, from D+11 to D+15, from D+16 to D+20, and from D+21 to D+30. RESULTS: A total of 97 patients (56% male and 44% female who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo between January 2008 and July 2009 were prospectively examined. The incidence of ulcerative mucositis was highest from days +6 to +10 and from days +11 to +15 in the patients who underwent autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, respectively. CONCLUSION: The data, including the dental plaque and periodontal status data, showed that these oral health factors were predictive of the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in a cohort of patients with similar conditioning regimens before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  8. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Huisman, Paulien M.; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Methods Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or orophar

  9. Relationship between oral health literacy and oral health behaviors and clinical status in Japanese adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Ueno

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Our findings indicate that oral health literacy is associated with differences in oral health behaviors and clinical oral health status. An understanding of participants’ oral health literacy levels is crucial for designing effective health educational materials and creating intervention programs to promote oral health.

  10. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Huisman, Paulien M.; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    Purpose This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Methods Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or

  11. Hierarchical micro/nanostructured titanium with balanced actions to bacterial and mammalian cells for dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Y

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yu Zhu,1,* Huiliang Cao,2,* Shichong Qiao,1,* Manle Wang,2,3 Yingxin Gu,1 Huiwen Luo,1 Fanhao Meng,2 Xuanyong Liu,2 Hongchang Lai1 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Implantology, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3School of Materials Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A versatile strategy to endow dental implants with long-term antibacterial ability without compromising the cytocompatibility is highly desirable to combat implant-related infection. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs have been utilized as a highly effective and broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for surface modification of biomedical devices. However, the high mobility and subsequent hazardous effects of the particles on mammalian cells may limit its practical applications. Thus, Ag NPs were immobilized on the surface of sand-blasted, large grit, and acid-etched (SLA titanium by manipulating the atomic-scale heating effect of silver plasma immersion ion implantation. The silver plasma immersion ion implantation-treated SLA surface gave rise to both good antibacterial activity and excellent compatibility with mammalian cells. The antibacterial activity rendered by the immobilized Ag NPs was assessed using Fusobacterium nucleatum and Staphylococcus aureus, commonly suspected pathogens for peri-implant disease. The immobilized Ag NPs offered a good defense against multiple cycles of bacteria attack in both F. nucleatum and S. aureus, and the mechanism was independent of silver release. F. nucleatum showed a higher susceptibility to Ag NPs than S. aureus, which might be explained by the presence of different wall structures. Moreover, the

  12. Clinical and microbiological diagnosis of oral candidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Coronado Castellote, Laura; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Candidiasis or oral candidiasis is the most frequent mucocutaneous mycosis of the oral cavity. It is produced by the genus Candida, which is found in the oral cavity of 53% of the general population as a common commensal organism. One hundred and fifty species have been isolated in the oral cavity, and 80% of the isolates correspond to Candida albicans, which can colonize the oral cavity alone or in combination with other species. Transformation from commensal organism to pathog...

  13. Benign Papules and Nodules of Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Salih Gürel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews some of the more common benign oral papules and nodules of oral mucosa with emphasis on their etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, histopathology, and treatment. These lesions include mucocele, traumatic fibroma, epulis, pyogenic granuloma, oral papilloma, oral warts, lymphangioma, hemangioma, lipoma, oral nevi and some soft tissue benign tumors. These benign lesions must be separated clinically and histologically from precancerous and malign neoplastic lesions. Accurate clinico-pathological diagnosis is mandatory to insure appropriate therapy.

  14. [Oral medicine 8. Leukoplakia of the oral mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepman, K P; van der Meij, E H; de Visscher, J G A M

    2013-01-01

    Leukoplakia of the oral mucosa is a potentially malignant disorder, which means that there is an elevated risk oftransformation into a squamous cell carcinoma. The term oral leukoplakia is a clinical diagnosis for a predominantly white lesion which is not immediately recognizable as another well definable lesion which is white in appearance. Oral leukoplakia is generally an asymptomatic disorder of the mucosa with a prevalence of less than 2 per cent in the adult population. Tobacco usage is considered to be the most important etiological factor. Malignant transformation into a squamous cell carcinoma occurs in about I per cent per year. A patient with oral leukoplakia is generally referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, who takes a biopsy for a definitive histopathological diagnosis. The outcome of the histopathological study, which may vary from hyperkeratosis to invasive squamous cell carcinoma, will determine the treatment. It is preferable that every leukoplakia is removed to reduce the risk of malignant transformation. Long term follow-up is indicated. Follow-up may in some cases be performed by the general dental practitioner.

  15. Oral perception in tongue thrust and other oral habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, J S; Lelong, O; Celant, S; Leysen, V

    2000-10-01

    Oral stereognosis is the ability of the mouth to recognize shape and texture. Oral shape recognition is sensitive to repetition and to topical mucosal anesthesia. Age, upper and lower arch perimeter, and labiolingual dysfunction also interact with oral stereognosis. The purpose of this investigation was to define the influence of age, arch size, and oral dysfunction on oral stereognosis when submitted to repeated trials. Fifty subjects were selected before orthodontic treatment. Each subject underwent 4 trials: T1 and T4 without anesthesia and strictly similar, T2 with topical anesthesia of the tongue, and T3 with topical anesthesia of the palate. Five test pieces or stimuli were used. The recognition time (RT) of each stimulus, the perimeter of upper and lower anterior dental arch, and the labiolingual dysfunction index (LLDI) were the main variables statistically evaluated. Subjects with a mild degree of dysfunction needed more time to recognize the stimuli in T3 when compared with T2. The number of RT3 > RT2 was 2.5 +/- 1.12 in the group with a low LLDI (12 +/- 1.5), and 1.57 +/- 0.63 in the group with an LLDI of 16 +/- 2.5 (P >.05). This may be attributed to different manipulation of the test pieces between the 2 groups, which could have been modified through sensory deprivation. Bolus recognition before the swallowing act needs to be paralleled to stereognostic performance.

  16. Adolescents and oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, J S

    1991-01-01

    Oral contraceptive (OC) options for adolescents are provides. Clarification for those desiring a birth control method is necessary and the benefits of decreased acne and dysmenorrhea with low dose OCs should be stressed along with the importance of compliance. A community effort is suggested to communicate the sexual and contraceptive alternatives, including abstinence and outercourse (sexual stimulation to orgasm without intercourse). Attention is given to concerns associated with teenage sexual activity, prevention of adolescent pregnancy, contraceptive options for the adolescent patient, adolescent attitudes toward birth control OCs, management of the adolescent OC user, manipulation of steroid components of OCs to respond to adolescent concerns, and other hormonal contraceptive options such as minipills or abstinence. The text is supplemented with tables: the % of US women by single years of age for 1971, 1976, 1979, and 1982; comparative pregnancy and abortion rates for the US and 5 other countries; federal cost for teen childbearing; adolescent nonhormonal contraceptive methods (advantages, disadvantages, and retail cost); checklist to identify those at risk for noncompliance with OCs; hormonal side effects of OCs; risks from OCs to adolescents; and benefits of OCs. Concern about adolescent pregnancy dates back to Aristotle. A modern profile shows girls form single-parent families are sexually active at an earlier age, adolescent mothers produce offspring who repeat the cycle, victims of sexual abuse are more likely to be sexually active, and teenagers in foster care are 4 times more likely to be sexually active and 8 times more likely to become pregnant. Prevention involves a multifaceted approach. OCs are the most appropriate contraceptive choice for adolescents. Frequency of intercourse is closely associated with OC use after approximately 15 months of unprotected sexual activity. At risk for noncompliance variables are scales of personality development

  17. Antibacterial activity of sphingoid bases and fatty acids against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Carol L; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity--the sphingoid bases D-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid--against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection.

  18. Selective responses of human gingival fibroblasts and bacteria on carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone with multilevel nanostructured TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Lu, Tao; Wen, Jin; Xu, Lianyi; Zeng, Deliang; Wu, Qianju; Cao, Lingyan; Lin, Shuxian; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-03-01

    The long-term success of dental implants relies not only on stable osseointegration but also on the integration of implant surfaces with surrounding soft tissues. In our previous work, titanium plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique was applied to modify the carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) surface, constructing a unique multilevel TiO2 nanostructure thus enhancing certain osteogenic properties. However, the interactions between the modified surface and soft-tissue cells are still not clear. Here, we fully investigate the biological behaviors of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and oral pathogens on the structured surface, which determine the early peri-implant soft tissue integration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the formation of nanopores with TiO2 nanoparticles embedded on both the sidewall and bottom. In vitro studies including cell adhesion, viability assay, wound healing assay, real-time PCR, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) disclose improved adhesion, migration, proliferation, and collagen secretion ability of HGFs on the modified CFRPEEK. Moreover, the structured surface exhibits sustainable antibacterial properties towards Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Our results reveal that the multilevel TiO2 nanostructures can selectively enhance soft tissue integration and inhibit bacterial reproduction, which will further support and broaden the adoption of CFRPEEK materials in dental fields.

  19. Assessment of Periodontopathogens in Subgingival Biofilm of Banded and Bonded Molars in Early Phase of Fixed Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mártha, Krisztina; Lőrinczi, Lilla; Bică, Cristina; Gyergyay, Réka; Petcu, Blanka; Lazăr, Luminița

    2016-03-01

    To assess the prevalence and occurrence of eleven periodontopathogens in subgingival biofilm of banded and bonded molars during the first period of fixed orthodontic treatment. Subjects were selected from patients referred to orthodontic treatment and were divided in two groups: group A comprised fifteen patients (14.4±2.45 years of age) who received orthodontic bands on first permanent molars and group B of ten patients (15.7±1.87 years of age) with directly bonded tubes on the labial surface of the same teeth. Subgingival sample collection was performed before bands and tubes application and 4-7 weeks after attachment placement. DNA-strip tehnique was used to assess the presence of eleven putative periodontopathogens at each time point. Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eikenella corrodens and Capnocytophaga spp. were found in a large number of samples, other periodontopathogens were present in a smaller rate. The 4-7 weeks after attachment placement a slight increase of putative species was observed in both groups. The presence of orthodontic tubes and bands influence the accumulation and composition of subgingival microbiota. Higher level of oral hygiene should be achieved before and during orthodontic treatment in order to prevent any side effects on periodontal tissues.

  20. 16S rRNA based microarray analysis of ten periodontal bacteria in patients with different forms of periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcuoglu, Nursen; Kulekci, Guven

    2015-10-01

    DNA microarray analysis is a computer based technology, that a reverse capture, which targets 10 periodontal bacteria (ParoCheck) is available for rapid semi-quantitative determination. The aim of this three-year retrospective study was to display the microarray analysis results for the subgingival biofilm samples taken from patient cases diagnosed with different forms of periodontitis. A total of 84 patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP,n:29), generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP, n:25), peri-implantitis (PI,n:14), localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP,n:8) and refractory chronic periodontitis (RP,n:8) were consecutively selected from the archives of the Oral Microbiological Diagnostic Laboratory. The subgingival biofilm samples were analyzed by the microarray-based identification of 10 selected species. All the tested species were detected in the samples. The red complex bacteria were the most prevalent with very high levels in all groups. Fusobacterium nucleatum was detected in all samples at high levels. The green and blue complex bacteria were less prevalent compared with red and orange complex, except Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitas was detected in all LAP group. Positive correlations were found within all the red complex bacteria and between red and orange complex bacteria especially in GCP and GAP groups. Parocheck enables to monitoring of periodontal pathogens in all forms of periodontal disease and can be alternative to other guiding and reliable microbiologic tests.

  1. Periodontal microbioma and rheumatoid arthritis: The role of Porhyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, L; Rania, S; Vinci, R; Spadari, F; Croveri, F; Scognamiglio, C; Farronato, D; Tettamanti, L; Tagliabue, A; Silvestre-Rangil, J; Bellintani, C

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis is a disease, which can be described as an autoimmune response after molecular mimicry caused by infective agents. The current study aims at evaluating the correlation between Rhematoid Arthritis (RA) and Periodontal Disease (PD), with special attention to the microbioma detected in the gums. Thirty-four patients with RD were recruited into the current study. Among rheumatic parameters, Rheumatoid Factor (RF), anti-citrullinated protein antibody (CCP), HLA-BDR1 and DAS28 were collected. A dental clinician evaluated the periodontal screening record (PSR). Afterwards, 1 paper cone was inserted for 30 seconds into the gingival sulcus then sent to the laboratory for evaluation. Quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA genes was performed with the hydrolysis probes method to identify and evaluate the amount Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Campylobacter rectus. There were no statistical differences in the composition of oral microbioma between PSR groups. There were no statistical significant differences between bacterial loads and serum values. On the contrary, a positive correlation was found between the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontal pockets on one side and RF and CCP on the other. Therefore, the presence of Porhyromonas gingivalis in periodontal pockets is associated to RA inflammatory indices.

  2. The OxyR homologue in Tannerella forsythia regulates expression of oxidative stress responses and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Kiyonobu; Mishima, Elina; Inagaki, Satoru; Sharma, Ashu

    2009-06-01

    Tannerella forsythia is an anaerobic periodontal pathogen that encounters constant oxidative stress in the human oral cavity due to exposure to air and reactive oxidative species from coexisting dental plaque bacteria as well as leukocytes. In this study, we sought to characterize a T. forsythia ORF with close similarity to bacterial oxidative stress response sensor protein OxyR. To analyse the role of this OxyR homologue, a gene deletion mutant was constructed and characterized. Aerotolerance, survival after hydrogen peroxide challenge and transcription levels of known bacterial antioxidant genes were then determined. Since an association between oxidative stress and biofilm formation has been observed in bacterial systems, we also investigated the role of the OxyR protein in biofilm development by T. forsythia. Our results showed that aerotolerance, sensitivity to peroxide challenge and the expression of oxidative stress response genes were significantly reduced in the mutant as compared with the wild-type strain. Moreover, the results of biofilm analyses showed that, as compared with the wild-type strain, the oxyR mutant showed significantly less autoaggregation and a reduced ability to form mixed biofilms with Fusobacterium nucleatum. In conclusion, a gene annotated in the T. forsythia genome as an oxyR homologue was characterized. Our studies showed that the oxyR homologue in T. forsythia constitutively activates antioxidant genes involved in resistance to peroxides as well as oxygen stress (aerotolerance). In addition, the oxyR deletion attenuates biofilm formation in T. forsythia.

  3. [Oral medicine 7: white lesions of the oral mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visscher, J G A M; van der Meij, E H; Schepman, K P

    2013-06-01

    White lesions of the oral mucosa may be due to highly diverse disorders. Most of these disorders are benign but some may be a malignant or premalignant condition. The disease is often confined to the oral mucosa. There are also disorders which are accompanied by skin disorders or systemic diseases. Many white oral mucosa disorders have such characteristic clinical aspects that a diagnosis can be made on clinical grounds only. When the clinical diagnosis is not clear, histopathological examination is carried out. Treatment depends on the histological diagnosis. In some cases, treatment is not necessary while in other cases, treatment is not possible since an effective treatment is not available. Potentially malignant disorders are treated.

  4. Changes in abundance of oral microbiota associated with oral cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Schmidt

    Full Text Available Individual bacteria and shifts in the composition of the microbiome have been associated with human diseases including cancer. To investigate changes in the microbiome associated with oral cancers, we profiled cancers and anatomically matched contralateral normal tissue from the same patient by sequencing 16S rDNA hypervariable region amplicons. In cancer samples from both a discovery and a subsequent confirmation cohort, abundance of Firmicutes (especially Streptococcus and Actinobacteria (especially Rothia was significantly decreased relative to contralateral normal samples from the same patient. Significant decreases in abundance of these phyla were observed for pre-cancers, but not when comparing samples from contralateral sites (tongue and floor of mouth from healthy individuals. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinates analysis based on 12 taxa separated most cancers from other samples with greatest separation of node positive cases. These studies begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence.

  5. Oral manifestations of acute leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukaemia is the most common form of chilhood cancer. The aim of this paper was to underline the importance of oral manifestations in children with acute leukaemia. The disease and its treatment can directly or indirectly affect oral health. Oral manifestations are gingival inflammation and enlargement. Leukaemic cells are capable of infiltrating the gingiva and the deeper periodontal tissues which leads to ulceration and infection of oral tissues. Gingival bleeding is a common sign in patients with leukaemia. Symptoms include local lymphadenopathy, mucous membrane Petechiae and ecchymoses. Cytotoxic drugs have direct effects like mucositis, involving atrophy, desquamation and ulceration of the mucosa, with increasing the risk for local and systemic infections. Leukaemia can directly influence dental care and dental treatment, while oral lesions may have life-threatening consequences. Knowledge and skills among dentists may also not be adequate to treat children with acute leukaemia. It is therefore imperative that all stomatologists be aware of dental problems that occur in leukaemia in order to be able to effectively carry out appropriate measures to mitigate these problems.

  6. Oral submucous fibrosis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina,1 Shyam B Verma,2 Fareedi Mukram Ali,3 Kishor Patil4 1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Nirvana Skin Clinic, Vadodara, Gujarat, India; 3Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, SMBT Dental College, Sangamner, Maharashtra, India; 4Departments of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, SMBT Dental College, Sangamner, Maharashtra, India Abstract: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF is a premalignant condition caused by betel chewing. It is very common in Southeast Asia but has started to spread to Europe and North America. OSF can lead to squamous cell carcinoma, a risk that is further increased by concomitant tobacco consumption. OSF is a diagnosis based on clinical symptoms and confirmation by histopathology. Hypovascularity leading to blanching of the oral mucosa, staining of teeth and gingiva, and trismus are major symptoms. Major constituents of betel quid are arecoline from betel nuts and copper, which are responsible for fibroblast dysfunction and fibrosis. A variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways might be involved. Treatment of OSF is difficult, as not many large, randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The principal actions of drug therapy include antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxygen radical mechanisms. Potential new drugs are on the horizon. Surgery may be necessary in advanced cases of trismus. Prevention is most important, as no healing can be achieved with available treatments. Keywords: betel nut, betel quid, oral disease, squamous cell carcinoma, tobacco, fibrosis

  7. Graphite oral tattoo: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Renata Mendonça; Gouvêa Lima, Gabriela de Morais; Guilhermino, Marinaldo; Vieira, Mayana Soares; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2015-10-16

    Pigmented oral lesions compose a large number of pathological entities, including exogenous pigmentat oral tattoos, such as amalgam and graphite tattoos. We report a rare case of a graphite tattoo on the palate of a 62-year-old patient with a history of pencil injury, compare it with amalgam tattoos, and determine the prevalence of oral tattoos in our Oral Pathology Service. We also compare the clinical and histological findings of grafite and amalgam tattoos. Oral tattoos affect women more frequently in the region of the alveolar ridge. Graphite tattoos occur in younger patients when compared with the amalgam type. Histologically, amalgam lesions represent impregnation of the reticular fibers of vessels and nerves with silver, whereas in cases of graphite tattoos, this impregnation is not observed, but it is common to observe a granulomatous inflammatory response, less evident in cases of amalgam tattoos. Both types of lesions require no treatment, but in some cases a biopsy may be done to rule out melanocytic lesions.

  8. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropha...

  9. Oral health in patients with liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard Grønkjær, Lea; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the oral care habits and self-perceived oral health in patients with liver cirrhosis, as well as to evaluate the impact of oral health on well-being and the relation to nutritional status. Participants and methods: From October 2012 to May 2013, we...... carried out a prospective study on patients with liver cirrhosis. Questions on oral care habits and self-perceived oral health were answered, and the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14) provided information on oral conditions. The findings were compared with The Danish Institute for Health......’ nutritional risk score (P=0.01). Conclusion: Our results showed that cirrhosis patients cared less for oral health than the background population. Their resulting problems may be contributing factors to their nutritional risk and decreased well-being. Oral health problems may thus have adverse prognostic...

  10. Oral health in patients with liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard Grønkjær, Lea; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the oral care habits and self-perceived oral health in patients with liver cirrhosis, as well as to evaluate the impact of oral health on well-being and the relation to nutritional status. Participants and methods: From October 2012 to May 2013, we...... carried out a prospective study on patients with liver cirrhosis. Questions on oral care habits and self-perceived oral health were answered, and the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14) provided information on oral conditions. The findings were compared with The Danish Institute for Health...... Services Research report on the Danish population’s dental status. Results: One hundred and seven patients participated. Their oral care habits and self-perceived oral health were poorer than the Danish population; the patients had fewer teeth (on average 19 vs. 26, P=0.0001), attended the dentist less...

  11. Oral lichenoid tissue reactions: diagnosis and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudhur, Ahmed Salih; Di Zenzo, Giovanni; Carrozzo, Marco

    2014-03-01

    The concept of lichenoid tissue reaction/interface dermatitis was introduced in dermatology to define a number of diverse inflammatory skin diseases linked together by the presence of common histopathological features. Similarly to the skin, the oral mucosa is affected by a variety of oral lichenoid lesions. Oral LTRs (OLTRs) include: oral lichen planus; oral lichenoid contact lesion; oral lichenoid drug reaction; oral lichenoid lesions of graft-versus-host disease; oral discoid lupus erythematosus; oral lesions of systemic lupus erythematosus; erythema multiforme; paraneoplastic pemphigus/paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome; chronic ulcerative stomatitis and lichen planus pemphigoid. Traditionally, diagnosis of OLTRs relies on clinical and histological correlation but in several instances this approach fails to provide a reliable diagnosis. Inclusion of molecular techniques may refine our ability to differentiate OLTRs.

  12. [Oral candidiasis: clinical features and control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2010-10-01

    Candidiasis is the most commonly encountered fungal infection, and oral candidiasis is often observed as a local opportunistic infection. Oral candidiasis is clinically divided into three types: acute forms, chronic forms, and Candida-associated lesions. Candida adhesion and multiplication are largely regulated by the local and systemic factors of the host. The local factors include impairment of the oral mucosal integrity, which is usually impaired by hyposalivation, anticancer drugs/radiation for head and neck cancers, denture wearing, a decrease in the oral bacterial population, and poor oral hygiene. Among Candida species, oral candidiasis is mostly caused by Candida albicans (C. albicans), C. glabrata, or C. tropicalis. Oral Candida induces a variety of symptoms, such as oral mucosal inflammation manifesting as an uncomfortable feeling, pain, erythema, erosion, taste abnormalities, and hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. Candida overgrowth in the oral cavity may disseminate to distant organs. Therefore, in order to avoid the sequelae of systemic candidiasis, oral candidiasis should be rapidly controlled. Oral candidiasis is usually treated by the local application of antifungal drugs. However, oral candidiasis occasionally escapes the control of such local treatment due to the development of multi-drug resistant Candida strains and species or due to the suppression of salivation or cellular immune activity. When drug-resistant strains are suspected as the pathogens and when the host is generally compromised, the oral administration of combinations of antifungal drugs, enhancement of cellular immune activity, and improvement of the nutritional condition are recommended.

  13. Oral medicine and the elderly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCreary, Christine

    2011-03-15

    A focus often exists in dental practice on the maintenance and management of the dentition and the periodontium, however, conditions of the oral mucosa and orofacial pain can cause significant problems for older patients. Oral mucosal conditions are more prevalent in older patients and many orofacial pain disorders, such as burning mouth syndrome and trigeminal neuralgia, are more common in patients over the age of 50 years. Although these conditions may not be routinely managed in general practice, identification of these patients in primary care and appropriate referral will lead to more prompt and effective treatment. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Dental practitioners need to be able to identify what is considered to be within the normal physiological limits of the ageing oral tissue and hence what is abnormal and requires further investigation to facilitate appropriate referral.

  14. Integrating Pronunciation into Oral Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢鑫莹

    2013-01-01

      The usefulness of pronunciation teaching is a widely debated subject in the language teaching world. Some of the current research would suggest that teachers can make little or no difference in improving their students’pronunciation. In contrast, there is research that indicates that the teacher can make a noticeable difference if certain criteria, such as the teaching of suprasegmen⁃tals and the linking of pronunciation with oral practice, are fulfilled. This paper intends to address the practical challenges related to integrating pronunciation into oral communication. First, the central difficulty in integrating pronunciation into the speaking classroom is described. Next, all-skill principles to guide the incorporation of pronunciation into oral communication courses are suggested. Finally, possible implementation strategies that can be applied to a wide variety of instructional settings are explored.

  15. GAMES IN ORAL ENGLISH TEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhaoXiaohong

    2004-01-01

    A game is an activity with a mixture of rules, a goal and an element of fun. Successful completion of the game will involve the carrying out of a variety of activities, in which the participants will communicate with each other co-operte with each other. This article gives a rough description of the current approach in teaching English as a foreign language in the home situation and an overview of the advantages of using games in class.It also discusses the application of games in oral English teaching, aiming at promoting students' motivation to learn oral English and thus providing a more effective English lesson.

  16. Staging N0 oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Grupe, Peter

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1......%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel...

  17. Oral Complications of HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leao, Jair C.; Ribeiro, Camila M. B.; Carvalho, Alessandra A. T.; Frezzini, Cristina; Porter, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS. PMID:19488613

  18. Oral complications of HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair C. Leao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Oral lesions are among the early signs of HIV infection and can predict its progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. A better understanding of the oral manifestations of AIDS in both adults and children has implications for all health care professionals. The knowledge of such alterations would allow for early recognition of HIV-infected patients. The present paper reviews epidemiology, relevant aspects of HIV infection related to the mouth in both adults and children, as well as current trends in antiretroviral therapy and its connection with orofacial manifestations related to AIDS.

  19. UNIQUE ORAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raphael M. Ottenbrite; ZHAO Ruifeng; Sam Milstein

    1995-01-01

    An oral drug delivery system using proteinoid microspheres is discussed with respect to its unique dependence on pH. It has been found that certain drugs such as insulin and heparin can be encapsulated in proteinoid spheres at stomach pH's (1-3). These spheres also dissemble at intestinal pH's (6-7) releasing the drug for absorption. Using this technique low molecular weight heparin and human growth hormone have been orally delivered successfully to several animal species. Future work has been proposed to study the interaction and binding of the specific drugs with synthesized oligopeptides.

  20. Dispensacion de anticonceptivos hormonales orales

    OpenAIRE

    Molinero Crespo, Ana María; Diego Martinez , Cristina de; Méndez Mora-Figueroa, Pilar; Esteso, Pilar; García Valiente, Paloma; González, Ana; Peiró Martínez, Alicia; Pérez Martín, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    El 80% de las mujeres españolas en edad fértil utilizan métodos anticonceptivos. Los anticonceptivos orales hormonales son los que obtienen mayor grado de satisfacción entre las usuarias siendo el segundo método utilizado. Método Estudio observacional descriptivo en 7 farmacias de la Comunidad de Madrid. Durante seis meses (enero-junio de 2009) se realizó una entrevista en el mostrador a las usuarias de métodos anticonceptivos hormonales orales para conocer qué tipo de paciente los dema...

  1. Ways to Improve Oral English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婧婧

    2015-01-01

    Speaking has been the bottom of the list in college English teaching since last few decades. This dissertation focus on this topic and it is mainly divided into following parts:Firstly, it analyses why college students make no significant progress in oral English. Secondly, it argues how to reform college English teaching to change this situation. It is concluded that teachers should em⁃phasize the importance of oral English in commercial lives and incent students to make great effort to improve speaking. Finally, ways to improve students' English speaking skill both in and outside the classroom are suggested.

  2. Exfoliative cytology for diagnosing oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sayánsm, M; Somoza-Martín, J M; Barros-Angueira, F; Reboiras-López, M D; Gándara-Vila, P; Gándara Rey, J M; García-García, A

    2010-04-28

    Exfoliative cytology is a minimally invasive technique for obtaining oral cell specimens from patients for diagnostic purposes. Classical applications of oral cytology studies, such as oral candidiasis, have been extended to include oral precancerous and cancerous lesions. A number of analytical methods are available for studying cytology specimens. The development of molecular analysis techniques, the oral cancer etiopathogenic process, and improvements in liquid-based exfoliative cytology are leading to renewed interest in exfoliative cytology. Results sometimes are disputed, so the aim of our review was to clarify the applicability of exfoliative cytology to the diagnosis of oral precancerous and cancerous lesions.

  3. Oral hygiene and oral flora evaluation in psychiatric patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Aims: The aims of this study were to document the oral hygiene of individuals with ..... because a fissure in the tongue is a suitable environment for .... of adults with learning disabilities living in residential institutions and in the.

  4. Authentic Progress Assessment of Oral Language: Oral Portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yuichi

    Student testing in Japan is not effectively used. In many cases test results are used only for ranking and sorting students into whatever the designated purposes of the tests are. They are not focused on monitoring individual student progress. This is an especially inadequate approach for teaching oral communications courses. This paper proposes a…

  5. ORAL HYGIENE PRACTICES AND RISK OF ORAL LEUKOPLAKIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-01

    Apr 1, 2006 ... Faculty of Dental Sciences, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 19676 - 00202, Nairobi, Kenya. Request for .... history of smoking tobacco, the RR increased from 4.6 in those who .... removable partial dentures and age on oral.

  6. Curriculum Guidelines for Postdoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' Curriculum Guidelines for oral diagnosis and medicine include a definition of the discipline, its interrelationships with other disciplines, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives, and notes on sequencing, faculty, and…

  7. Oral cryotherapy reduced oral mucositis in patients having cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivakovsky, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CANCERLIT, CINAHL, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment compared to usual care, no treatment or other interventions to prevent mucositis. The primary outcome was incidence of mucositis and its severity.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers carried out study assessment and data extraction independently. Treatment effect for continuous data was calculated using mean values and standard deviations and expressed as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Meta-analysis was performed.ResultsFourteen studies with 1280 participants were included. Subgroup analysis was undertaken according to the main cancer treatment type. Cryotherapy reduced the risk of developing mucositis by 39% (RR = 0.61; 95%CI, 0.52 to 0.72) on patients treated with fluorouracil (5FU). For melphalan-based treatment the risk of developing mucositis was reduced by 41% (RR =0.59; 95%CI, 0.35 to 1.01). Oral cryotherapy was shown to be safe, with very low rates of minor adverse effects, such as headaches, chills, numbness/taste disturbance and tooth pain. This appears to contribute to the high rates of compliance seen in the included studies.ConclusionsThere is confidence that oral cryotherapy leads to a large reduction in oral mucositis in adults treated with 5FU. Although there is less certainty on the size of the reduction on patients treated with melphalan, it is certain there is reduction of severe mucositis.

  8. Advancing oral health in physician assistant education: evaluation of an innovative interprofessional oral health curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser, Jonathan; Sivahop, Jacqueline; Glicken, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The impact of an oral health curriculum was evaluated by measuring increases in knowledge about oral health topics and implementation of oral health skills in the clinical year. A 3-year, longitudinal oral health curriculum was developed and implemented. Student knowledge of oral health concepts was evaluated before and 2 years after the curriculum was implemented. Student performance of oral health skills was evaluated in the clinical year by electronic patient logging. Students demonstrated significant and persistent gains in knowledge following the initiation of the curriculum. Students used oral health skills in the clinical year, particularly in the area of patient education about oral health. Incorporation of an oral health curriculum can lead to lasting knowledge about basic oral health concepts and increased performance of oral health skills in the clinical year.

  9. Current management of oral cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Ord

    2008-01-01

    @@ This presentation will summarize some of the current areas of interest in the management of oral cancer. The presentation will be divided into a brief review of epidemiology and diagnosis, with a more extensive discussion regarding the controversial areas in surgery and a review of the adjuvant roles of radiation and chemotherapy.

  10. Techniques for Teaching Oral English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘家森

    2015-01-01

    I evaluated my teaching practice from the following perspective, namely: the application of whole language approach, emphasis on the variety of English being taught, error correction, adopting authentic task in both teaching and exam as well as strategy instruction. They play a role in enhancing oral English.

  11. Adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Olivera-Fernandez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral chemotherapy agents offer advantages including cost, patient comfort and potential improvement in quality of life versus intravenous drugs. However ensuring adherence and monitoring adverse effects is more difficult. The aim of this study was to examine the real adherence in patients with oral chemotherapy agents in our hospital, to assess the influence of patient and treatment characteristics, to identify reasons for non adherence, to identify pportunities for improvement pharmaceutical care and to assess the potential relation between adherence and treatment outcomes. Method: observational, prospective study for a period of four month, in the patients who were dispensing oral chemotherapy agents in outpatient setting. The medical prescriptions, medical history and patient interviews were used to collect data. Results: 141 patients were assessing. 72% were considered as fully adherent, while 28% reported some kind of non adherence. Adherence was influenced by time from diagnosis and adverse effects. No relationship between adherence and treatment outcomes was found. Conclusions: Adherence to oral chemotherapy was 72%, identifing opportunities for improvement pharmaceutical care to prevent adverse effects and to improve our patient adherence

  12. Pharmacogenetics of oral antidiabetic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Becker (Matthijs); E. Pearson (Ewan); I. Tkáč (Ivan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) are used for more than a half-century in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Only in the last five years, intensive research has been conducted in the pharmacogenetics of these drugs based mainly on the retrospective register studies, but only a handful of as

  13. [Adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera-Fernandez, R; Fernandez-Ribeiro, F; Piñeiro-Corrales, G; Crespo-Diz, C

    2014-11-03

    Introducción: Los tratamientos antineoplasicos orales presentan ventajas en cuanto a coste, comodidad y mejora potencial en la calidad de vida respecto al tratamiento endovenoso, pero es mas dificil controlar la adherencia y monitorizar los efectos adversos. El objetivo de este estudio fue conocer la adherencia real en pacientes con antineoplasicos orales en nuestro centro, analizar la influencia de las caracteristicas del paciente y del tratamiento, identificar motivos de no adherencia, oportunidades de mejora en la atencion farmaceutica y evaluar la posible relacion adherencia y respuesta al tratamiento. Método: estudio prospectivo observacional de cuatro meses de duracion, en los pacientes con tratamiento antineoplasico oral dispensado desde la consulta de farmacia oncologica. Para la recogida de datos se utilizaron: orden medica, historia clinica y visita con entrevistas al paciente. Resultados: Se evaluaron un total de 141 pacientes. Un 72% se considero totalmente adherente, mientras que en un 28% se detecto algun tipo de no adherencia. El tiempo desde el diagnostico y la presencia de efectos adversos fueron las variables que afectaron a la adherencia. No se pudo demostrar relacion entre adherencia y respuesta al tratamiento. Conclusiones: La adherencia al tratamiento antineoplasico oral en nuestro centro fue del 72%, identificando oportunidades de mejora en la atencion farmaceutica dirigidas a prevenir los efectos adversos y a potenciar la adherencia de nuestros pacientes.

  14. Oral Communication across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2011-01-01

    Proficiency in oral communication is necessary in school and in society. To do well in the different curriculum areas, pupils must speak with clarity and understanding. For example, in a discussion group in the social studies involving the topic "the pros and cons of raising taxes," pupils need to express knowledgeable ideas with appropriate voice…

  15. Views on Oral English Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xiaomei

    2008-01-01

    With the rapid development of Chinese economy,exchanges between countries and communication with west erners are becoming increasingly popular.As the important tool and universal language,the significance of Eng lish is,no doubt,self-evident.A good command of English,especially oral English,would be highly supported and hailed by the university students.

  16. Orality, Literacy, and Star Wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelock, Eric A.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that the educational system should encourage "down to earth" language by including oral recitation in the curricula, particularly recitation of popular poetry with accompaniment. Using the shuttle disaster as a striking example, claims that the modern media overuses conceptual language to disguise the hard meaning of what is being…

  17. Oral Assessment in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an oral assessment technique that has been used for over 20 years at the Centre of Maritime Studies and Engineering in the Faroe Islands. The technique has proven less laborious for the examiners and the students agree that this technique not only assesses their surface...

  18. Teaching Strategies for Oral Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang dongyang

    2004-01-01

    Owing to the lack of language environment, communicating in English is often regarded as one of the most difficult aspects of English learning. On the basis of considering the aims of conversation course, this paper attempts to analyze the roles of the teacher and students in class and puts forward some teaching strategies, which help students gain oral communicative competence effectively.

  19. Oral Health and Older Adults

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-27

    This podcast discusses the importance of older adults maintaing good oral health habits. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 10/27/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/27/2008.

  20. Oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnakulasuriya, S; Reibel, J; Bouquot, J

    2008-01-01

    ) and was of the view that reducing the number of choices from 3 to 2 may increase the likelihood of agreement between pathologists. The utility of this need to be tested in future studies. The variables that are likely to affect oral epithelial dysplasia scoring were discussed and are outlined here; these need...

  1. Ecstasy (MDMA) and oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.S. Brand; S.N. Dun; A.V. Nieuw Amerongen

    2008-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), more commonly known as 'ecstasy' or XTC, is frequently used by young adults in the major cities. Therefore, it is likely that dentists might be confronted with individuals who use ecstasy. This review describes systemic and oral effects of ecstasy. Life-thre

  2. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine : guidelines for oral pathology and oral medicine in the dental curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kragelund, C.; Reibel, J.; Hietanen, J.; Hadler-Olsen, E.; Johannessen, A. C.; Kenrad, B.; Nylander, K.; Puranen, M.; Salo, T.; Syrjanen, S.; Soland, T. M.; van der Waal, I.; van der Wal, J. E.; Warfvinge, G.

    2012-01-01

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must

  3. Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine: guidelines for oral pathology and oral medicine in the dental curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kragelund, C.; Reibel, J.; Hietanen, J.; Hadler-Olsen, E.; Johannessen, A.C.; Kenrad, B.; Nylander, K.; Puranen, M.; Salo, T.; Syrjänen, S.; Søland, T.M.; van der Waal, I.; van der Wal, J.E.; Warfvinge, G.

    2012-01-01

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must

  4. Resúmenes Presentaciones Orales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor Gabriel Vargas Arana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se pueden encontrar los resúmenes de las presentaciones orales del III Congreso Latinoamericano de Plantas Medicinales, desarrollado del 12 al 14 de agosto de 2015 en la ciudad de Iquitos, Perú.

  5. Xerostomia and the oral microflora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Almståhl, A.; Carpenter, G.

    2015-01-01

    Xerostomia is the feeling of a dry mouth usually caused by hyposalivation. It may occur after radiation therapy of the head and neck, in systemic diseases such as Sjögren’s syndrome, or as a side effect of medication. Hyposalivation changes the oral microbiome with the most dramatic changes after ra

  6. Voces subalternas e historia oral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Archila Neira

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo busca relacionar los desarrollos de la historia social con los métodosligados a la historia oral, siempre pensando en el contexto latinoamericano ycolombiano. Para ello, se hace un recuento de la trayectoria historiográfica que vade la histori

  7. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oral contraceptive pill is much more than a birth control pill. Adolescent girls and young women are frequently prescribed the ... Control Pills: General Information Medical Uses of the Birth Control Pill PCOS: All ... Chat with us! Our PCOS chats are safe places for teens and young women who share a common condition ...

  8. Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor-Q.D.® ... only oral contraceptives are safe for use by breast-feeding mothers. If you are fully breastfeeding (not ... 6 weeks after delivery. If you are partially breast-feeding (giving your baby some food or formula), ...

  9. Techniques for Teaching Oral English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘家森

    2015-01-01

    I evaluated my teaching practice from the following perspective,namely:the application of whole language approach,emphasis on the variety of English being taught,error correction,adopting authentic task in both teaching and exam as well as strategy instruction.They play a role in enhancing oral English.

  10. The Oral Accentuation of Greek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, W. Sidney

    1967-01-01

    A brief review of theory and traditional approaches to the problem of oral reading of Greek dating from the fall of Constantinople (1453) focuses on the importance of two major linguistic features of Byzantine pronunciation. The first examines the nature of the dynamic (stress) accent and the second is concerned with differences in vowel lengths…

  11. 75 FR 62591 - Oral Argument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... given of the scheduling of oral argument in the matters of: Hyginus U. Aguzie v. Office of Personnel Management, MSPB Docket Number DC-0731-09-0261-R-1; Jenee Ella Hunt-O'Neal v. Office of Personnel Management, MSPB Docket Number AT-0731-09-0240-I-1; James A. Scott v. Office of Personnel Management, MSPB...

  12. Oral Contraceptives after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Schlatter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bariatric surgery offers a highly effective mode of treatment for obese patients. Some procedures such as bypass cause an alteration in normal gastrointestinal tract with possible consequences for the uptake of orally administered drugs. Methods: We assessed the literature to ascertain whether the use of oral drugs and especially oral contraceptives is effective and adequate after bariatric surgery. Results: The bioavailability of drugs could be affected by the solubility and pH of the modified medium after bariatric surgery and by the loss of gastrointestinal transporters. Bariatric surgery could potentially result in a transient change in the absorption of drugs such as analgesics, antibiotics, antiarrhythmics, anticoagulants, psychotropic, and oral contraceptive drugs. Effective contraception is especially critical in the postoperative period, and implants might be representing a safe contraceptive method in women undergoing bariatric surgery. Conclusion: Each drug will have to be evaluated with respect to its site of absorption and its mechanism of absorption, with special attention on parameters influencing the effectiveness of the absorption processes.

  13. Methamphetamine Use and Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    FOR THE DENTAL PATIENT ... Methamphetamine use and oral health M ethamphetamine is an inexpensive, easy-to-make illicit drug. It is known by several street names: “meth,” “speed,” “ice,” “chalk,” “crank,” “fire,” “ ...

  14. Oral Hygiene. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on oral hygiene is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, a list of definitions, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  15. Refugees, Migrants, and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sonia; Infirri, Jennifer Sardo

    1996-01-01

    Migrant and refugee communities must be considered as high-risk groups for poor general and oral health. Limited access to basic necessities, risky behavior, and a mismatch between services and health belief systems of migrants and refugees are contributing factors. (SLD)

  16. ORAL GLUCOSE TOLERANCE TEST REVISITED

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determinant for the usefulness or otherwise of oral glucose tolerance test for the diagnosis ... personnel, poverty and poor economic management, 8'9 that are known to .... Symptoms of diabetes plus casual plasma glucose ... WHO 2-hr plasma glucose criteria of 1l.1mmol/L .... Diagnostic criteria and performance revisited.

  17. Comparative cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells in normal, tobacco users, oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadoon Nivia

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The cytomorphometric changes observed in samples from oral SCC and oral leukoplakia were consistent with the current diagnostic features. Hence, the semi-automated cytomorphometric analysis of oral mucosal cells can be used as an objective adjunct diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  18. Oral desmopressin in neonatal diabetes insipidus.

    OpenAIRE

    Stick, S M; Betts, P R

    1987-01-01

    A neonate with cranial diabetes insipidus was successfully treated with oral desmopressin. The patient had a midline cleft lip and palate and we obtained a more consistent response using the oral route than using the usual nasal route.

  19. Fungal infections of the oral mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Anitha Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the various predisposing factors, clinical presentations, clinical differential diagnosis, diagnosis and management of oral candidiasis, as well as briefly highlights upon a few of the more exotic non-Candidal fungi that infect the oral mucosa.

  20. Diagnosis and management of oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Peter J; Shetty, Kishore V

    2011-02-01

    Oral candidiasis is the most common fungal infection in both the immunocompetent and the immunocompromised populations. This article reviews the clinical presentations of the different forms of oral candidiasis, as well as the diagnosis and management.