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Sample records for oral contrast agent

  1. Pineapple juice as a negative oral contrast agent in magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography: a preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, R D; Khonsari, M; Jeffries, J; Maskell, G F; Cook, P G

    2004-12-01

    The quality of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) images is frequently degraded by high signal from the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study is to evaluate pineapple juice (PJ) as an oral negative contrast agent in MRCP. Preliminary in vitro evaluation demonstrated that PJ shortened T(2) relaxation time and hence decreased T(2) signal intensity on a standard MRCP sequence to a similar degree to a commercially available negative contrast agent (ferumoxsil). Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry assay demonstrated a high manganese concentration in PJ of 2.76 mg dl(-1), which is likely to be responsible for its T(2) imaging properties. MRCP was subsequently performed in 10 healthy volunteers, before and at 15 min and 30 min following ingestion of 400 ml of PJ. Images were assessed blindly by two Consultant Radiologists using a standard grading technique based on contrast effect (degree of suppression of bowel signal), and image effect (diagnostic quality). There were statistically significant improvements in contrast and image effect between pre and post PJ images. There was particularly significant improvement in visualization of the pancreatic duct, but no significant difference between 15 min and 30 min post PJ images. Visualization of the ampulla, common bile duct, common hepatic and central intrahepatic ducts were also significantly improved at 15 min following PJ. Our results demonstrate that PJ, may be used as an alternative to commercially available negative oral contrast agent in MRCP.

  2. Computed tomography enterography: a comparison of different neutral oral contrast agents

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    D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Department of Imaging Diagnosis, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Braga, Fernanda Angeli; Resende, Marcelo Cardoso; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Nunes, Thiago Franchi; Rosas, George de Queiroz; Tiferes, Dario Arie [Abdominal Imaging Section, Department of Imaging Diagnosis - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (Unifesp), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of neutral oral contrast agents, comparing intestinal distension, distinction of intestinal wall, acceptance and side effects. Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized, and double-blinded study involving 30 patients who underwent computed tomography of abdomen and pelvis with administration of neutral oral contrast agents, divided into three groups according the contrast agent type: milk, water, and polyethylene glycol. The images were consensually analyzed by two observers, considering the degree of bowel distension and intestinal wall distinction. The patients responded to a questionnaire regarding the taste of the ingested solution and on their side effects. Kruskal-Wallis and chi-square tests were employed for statistical analysis. Results: Among 40 studied intestinal segments, appropriate bowel distension (intestinal loop diameter > 2 cm) was observed in 14 segments (35%) in the milk group, 10 segments (25%) in the water group and 23 segments (57%) in the polyethylene glycol group (p = 0.01). Preparation with polyethylene glycol resulted in the best bowel distension, but it presented the worst taste and highest incidence of diarrhea as reported by patients. Conclusion: Bowel preparation with oral polyethylene glycol results in higher degree of bowel distension than with water or milk, but presents worst acceptance related to its taste and frequency of diarrhea as a side effect. (author)

  3. Helical CT of the abdomen: whole milk as a low-density oral contrast agent; Tomografia helicoidal do abdome: avaliacao do leite integral como contraste oral de baixa densidade

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    Collares, Felipe Birchal; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira; Motta, Emilia Guerra Pinto Coelho; Moreira, Wanderval; Ribeiro, Marcelo Almeida [Hospital Mater Dei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    2000-08-01

    We evaluated 90 abdominal helical computed tomography scans from patients who received 1% iodine solution, whole milk or no oral contrast agent before scanning. Four parameters were evaluated: gastrointestinal distension, mural visualization, pancreas-duodenum discrimination and bowel loop discrimination. Better results were obtained with the use of whole milk compared to iodine contrast or no oral contrast agent. Whole milk is an effective low density oral contrast agent. (author)

  4. In vitro evaluation of alternative oral contrast agents for MRI of the gastrointestinal tract

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    Babos, Magor [University of Szeged, Faculty of Science (Hungary); Euromedic Diagnostics Szeged, 6720 Szeged, Semmelweiss u. 6 (Hungary)], E-mail: babosmagor@yahoo.com; Schwarcz, Attila [University of Pecs, Department of Neurosurgery, Pecs Diagnostic Institute, 7624 Pecs, Retu. 2 (Hungary)], E-mail: attila.schwarcz@aok.pte.hu; Randhawa, Manjit Singh [University of Szeged, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 6720 Szeged, Semmelweiss u. 6 (Hungary)], E-mail: majyaal@hotmail.com; Marton, Balazs [University of Szeged, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 6720 Szeged, Semmelweiss u. 6 (Hungary)], E-mail: balazsmarton@freemail.hu; Kardos, Lilla [Euromedic Diagnostics Szeged, 6720 Szeged, Semmelweiss u. 6 (Hungary)], E-mail: medlis@tiszanet.hu; Palko, Andras [Euromedic Diagnostics Szeged, 6720 Szeged, Semmelweiss u. 6 (Hungary); University of Szeged, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 6720 Szeged, Semmelweiss u. 6 (Hungary)], E-mail: palko@radio.szote.u-szeged.hu

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: In vitro evaluation of different materials as potential alternative oral contrast agents for small bowel MRI. Materials and methods: The T1 and T2 relaxation times of rose hip syrup, black currant extract, cocoa, iron-deferoxamine solution and a commonly used oral contrast material (1 mM Gd-DTPA) were determined in vitro at different concentrations on a 1.0 T clinical MR scanner. T1 values were obtained with an inversion prepared spoiled gradient echo sequence. T2 values were obtained using multiple echo sequences. Finally the materials were visualized on T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted MR images. Results: The relaxation times of the undiluted rose hip syrup (T1 = 110 {+-} 5 ms, T2 = 86 {+-} 3 ms), black currant extract (T1 = 55 {+-} 3 ms, T2 = 39 {+-} 2 ms) and 5 mM iron-deferoxamine solution (T1 = 104 {+-} 4 ms, T2 = 87 {+-} 2 ms) were much shorter than for a 1 mM Gd-DTPA solution (T1 = 180 {+-} 8 ms, T2 = 168 {+-} 5 ms). Dilution of black currant extract to 30% or a 3 mM iron-deferoxamine solution conducted to T1 relaxation times which are quite comparable to a 1 mM Gd-DTPA solution. Despite its much lower metal content an aqueous cocoa suspension (100 g/L) produced T2 relaxation times (T1 = 360 {+-} 21 ms, T2 = 81 {+-} 3 ms) more or less in the same range like the 5 mM iron-deferoxamine solution. Imaging of our in vitro model using clinical sequences allowed to anticipate the T1-, T2- and T2*-depiction of all used substances. Cocoa differed from all other materials with its low to moderate signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. While all substances presented a linear 1/T1 and 1/T2 relationship towards concentration, rose hip syrup broke ranks with a disproportionately high increase of relaxation at higher concentrations. Conclusions: Rose hip syrup, black currant extract and iron-deferoxamine solution due to their positive T1 enhancement characteristics and drinkability appear to be valuable oral contrast agents for T1-weighted small bowel MRI

  5. Gastric stromal tumor: two-phase dynamic CT findings with water as oral contrast agents

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    Lee, Se Hyo; Cho, June Sik; Shin, Kyung Sook; Jeong, Ki Ho; Park, Jin Yong; Yu, Ho Jun; Kim, Young Min; Jeon, Kwang Jin [College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate two-phase dynamic CT with water as oral contrast agents in the CT diagnosis of gastric stromal tumors. We retrospectively reviewed the CT findings in 21 patients with pathologically proven gastric stromal tumors. Six were found to be benign, twelve were malignant, and there were three cases of STUMP (stromal tumor uncertain malignant potential). Two-phase dynamic CT scans with water as oral contrast agents were obtained 60-70 secs (portal phase) and 3 mins (equilibrium phase) after the start of IV contrast administration. We determined the size, growth pattern, and enhancement pattern of the tumors and overlying mucosa, the presence or absence of ulceration and necrosis, tumor extent, and lymph nod and distant metastasis. The CT and pathologic findings were correlated. All six benign tumors and three STUMP were less than 5.5 cm in size, and during the portal phase showed round endogastric masses with highly enhanced, intact overlying mucosa. Twelve malignant tumors were 4.5-15.5 cm in size (mean, 11.5 cm); an endogastric mass was seen in three cases, an exogastric mass in one, and a mixed pattern in eight. On portal phase images the tumors were not significantly enhanced, but highly enhanced feeding vessels were noted in five larger tumors (greater than 10 cm). All 12 malignant tumors showed ulceration and necrosis, and interruption of overlying mucosa was clearly seen during the portal phase. We were readily able to evaluate tumor extent during this phase, and in ten malignant tumors there was no invasion of adjacent organs. Seven malignant tumors showed air density within their necrotic portion (p less than 0.05). On equilibrium phase images, all malignant tumors showed heterogeneous enhancement due to necrosis, and poorly enhanced overlying mucosa. Dynamic CT during the portal phase with water as oral contrast agents was useful for depicting the submucosal origin of gastric stromal tumors and for evaluating the extent of malignant stromal tumors. Our

  6. Efficacy of Black Tea as a Negative Oral Contrast Agent for MR Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Jalali

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Evaluation of the use of black tea as negative oral contrast agent in MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP."nPatients and Methods: Thirty-five patients (mean age, 50.3±19.2 years, who were referred for MRCP, entered in this study. MRCP was performed before, after 5 minutes and after 15 minutes following consumption of 300 ml of black tea. Depiction of the gall bladder, cystic duct, proximal and distal parts of the common bile duct (CBD, intra hepatic ducts, ampula of Vater, main pancreatic duct (MPD and signal loss of the stomach and three different segments of the duodenum were investigated according to VAS and Lickert scores."nResults: Regarding visibility of seven different anatomical parts of the pancreatobiliary tree (gall bladder, cystic duct, CBD, common hepatic duct, intrahepatic duct, ampula of Vater and MPD, the post procedure images were better visualized only in the distal part of CBD, ampula of vater and MPD both in Lickert and VAS scoring (all Ps≤0.001."nThere was no significant difference between the images 5 and 15 minutes after tea consumption. Regarding the obliteration of high signal in the stomach and three different parts of the duodenum, all post tea images of the mentioned parts showed significant disappearance of high signal in Lickert and VAS scoring systems (all Ps≤0.001. "nConclusion: Black tea is an affordable, cheap, available, safe, and efficient oral negative contrast agent for MRCP which reduces the signal intensity of fluids in the gastrointestinal tract and is also efficient for better depiction of MPD, distal part of CBD and ampula.

  7. Imaging liver metastases with a new oral manganese-based contrast agent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chabanova, E.; Logager, V.; Moller, J.M.; Dekker, H.M.; Barentsz, J.O.; Thomsen, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was a preliminary evaluation of a new oral, manganese-based, liver-specific contrast medium (CMC-001; CMC Contrast AB, Malmoe, Sweden) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with liver metastases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included

  8. Imaging liver metastases with a new oral manganese-based contrast agent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chabanova, E.; Logager, V.; Moller, J.M.; Dekker, H.M.; Barentsz, J.O.; Thomsen, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was a preliminary evaluation of a new oral, manganese-based, liver-specific contrast medium (CMC-001; CMC Contrast AB, Malmoe, Sweden) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with liver metastases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included

  9. Small Bowel Obstruction Following Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Enterography Using Psyllium Seed Husk As an Oral Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingming Amy Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case series describing four patients who developed small bowel obstruction following the use of psyllium seed husk as an oral contrast agent for computed tomography or magnetic resonance enterography. Radiologists who oversee computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography should be aware of this potential complication when using psyllium seed husk and other bulking agents, particularly when imaging patients with known or suspected small bowel strictures or active inflammation.

  10. Small bowel obstruction following computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography using psyllium seed husk as an oral contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingming Amy; Cervini, Patrick; Kirpalani, Anish; Vlachou, Paraskevi A; Grover, Samir C; Colak, Errol

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a case series describing four patients who developed small bowel obstruction following the use of psyllium seed husk as an oral contrast agent for computed tomography or magnetic resonance enterography. Radiologists who oversee computed tomography and magnetic resonance enterography should be aware of this potential complication when using psyllium seed husk and other bulking agents, particularly when imaging patients with known or suspected small bowel strictures or active inflammation.

  11. A new manganese-based oral contrast agent (CMC-001) for liver MRI. Pharmacological and pharmaceutical aspects

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    Joergensen, Jan Troest [Research and Development, CMC Contrast AB, Scion DTU, Lyngby (Denmark)], email: jtj@cmc-contrast.dk; Rief, Matthias; Wagner, Moritz [Dept. of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Brismar, Torkel B.; Albiin, Nils [Dept. of Radiology, Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metals on earth and is found as a component of more than 100 different minerals. Besides being an essential trace element in relation to the metabolic processes in the body, manganese is also a paramagnetic metal that possesses similar characteristics to gadolinium with regards to T1-weighted (T1-w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Manganese, in the form of manganese (II) chloride tetrahydrate, is the active substance in a new targeted oral contrast agent, currently known as CMC-001, indicated for hepatobiliary MRI. Under physiological circumstances manganese is poorly absorbed from the intestine after oral intake, but by the use of specific absorption promoters, L-alanine and vitamin D3, it is possible to obtain a sufficiently high concentration in the liver in order to achieve a significant signal enhancing effect. In the liver manganese is exposed to a very high first-pass effect, up to 98 %, which prevents the metal from reaching the systemic circulation, thereby reducing the number of systemic side-effects. Manganese is one of the least toxic trace elements, and due to its favorable safety profile it may be an attractive alternative to gadolinium-based contrast agents for patients undergoing an MRI evaluation for liver metastases in the future. In this review the basic pharmacological and pharmaceutical aspects of this new targeted oral hepatobiliary specific contrast agent will be discussed.

  12. A new manganese-based oral contrast agent (CMC-001) for liver MRI: pharmacological and pharmaceutical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Jan Trøst; Rief, Matthias; Brismar, Torkel B; Wagner, Moritz; Albiin, Nils

    2012-09-01

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metals on earth and is found as a component of more than 100 different minerals. Besides being an essential trace element in relation to the metabolic processes in the body, manganese is also a paramagnetic metal that possesses similar characteristics to gadolinium with regards to T1-weighted (T1-w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Manganese, in the form of manganese (II) chloride tetrahydrate, is the active substance in a new targeted oral contrast agent, currently known as CMC-001, indicated for hepatobiliary MRI. Under physiological circumstances manganese is poorly absorbed from the intestine after oral intake, but by the use of specific absorption promoters, L-alanine and vitamin D(3), it is possible to obtain a sufficiently high concentration in the liver in order to achieve a significant signal enhancing effect. In the liver manganese is exposed to a very high first-pass effect, up to 98%, which prevents the metal from reaching the systemic circulation, thereby reducing the number of systemic side-effects. Manganese is one of the least toxic trace elements, and due to its favorable safety profile it may be an attractive alternative to gadolinium-based contrast agents for patients undergoing an MRI evaluation for liver metastases in the future. In this review the basic pharmacological and pharmaceutical aspects of this new targeted oral hepatobiliary specific contrast agent will be discussed.

  13. Uso do contraste oral negativo em exames de colangiografia por ressonância magnética Use of oral negative contrast agent in magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário de Melo Galvão Filho

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizamos estudo prospectivo das vias biliares e pancreáticas através de colangiografia por ressonância magnética, com a utilização de meio de contraste oral negativo. Os nossos objetivos foram verificar se este novo meio de contraste melhora a visualização das vias biliar e pancreática, além de identificar a freqüência de efeitos colaterais ao contraste e sua aceitação pelo paciente. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Quinze voluntários (oito homens e sete mulheres com idades variando entre 18 e 54 anos (média de 29 anos, sem queixas ou cirurgias abdominais, foram submetidos a colangiografia por ressonância magnética. Foram realizadas duas seqüências colangiográficas em apnéia, antes e cinco minutos após a ingestão de 300 ml de contraste oral negativo. Os exames foram realizados em equipamento operando a 1,0 T. RESULTADOS: Setenta e três por cento dos voluntários consideraram o gosto ruim ou muito ruim, sugerindo uma aceitação discutível; 27% dos voluntários apresentaram náuseas; 20%, cólicas; 14%, azia ou parestesia labial; e 7%, diarréia. A visualização da via biliar extra-hepática foi considerada melhor após o contraste oral negativo em 9/15 voluntários (60% e do ducto pancreático principal em todos os cinco em que havia interposição de alças. CONCLUSÃO: O contraste oral negativo melhora a visualização dos ductos hepatocolédoco e pancreático principal em exames de colangiografia por ressonância magnética, apesar da baixa aceitação e dos seus efeitos colaterais.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the feasibility of using a negative oral contrast agent to null the bowel signal during magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Fifteen healthy volunteers with no previous history of pancreaticobiliary disease or surgery were imaged with a single-shot fast spin-echo pulse sequence, using a magnetic resonance imaging system operating at 1.0 T. Data

  14. Comparison of neutral oral contrast versus positive oral contrast medium in abdominal multidetector CT

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    Berther, Ralph; Eckhardt, Boris; Zollikofer, Christoph L. [Kantonsspital, Institute of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Patak, Michael A. [Kantonsspital, Institute of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Inselspital, University Hospital of Bern, Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Erturk, Sukru M. [Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    To determine whether neutral contrast agents with water-equivalent intraluminal attenuation can improve delineation of the bowel wall and increase overall image quality for a non-selected patient population, a neutral oral contrast agent (3% mannitol) was administered to 100 patients referred for abdominal multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT). Their results were compared with those of 100 patients given a positive oral contrast agent. Qualitative and quantitative measurements were done on different levels of the gastrointestinal tract by three experienced readers. Patients given the neutral oral contrast agent showed significant better qualitative results for bowel distension (P<0.001), homogeneity of the luminal content (P<0.001), delineation of the bowel-wall to the lumen (P<0.001) and to the mesentery (P<0.001) and artifacts (P<0.001), leading to a significant better overall image quality (P<0.001) than patients receiving positive oral contrast medium. The quantitative measurements revealed significant better distension (P<0.001) and wall to lumen delineation (P<0.001) for the patients receiving neutral oral contrast medium. The present results show that the neutral oral contrast agent (mannitol) produced better distension, better homogeneity and better delineation of the bowel wall leading to a higher overall image quality than the positive oral contrast medium in a non-selected patient population. (orig.)

  15. Multimodal nanoparticulate bioimaging contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Parvesh; Singh, Amit; Brown, Scott C; Bengtsson, Niclas; Walter, Glenn A; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Iwakuma, Nobutaka; Santra, Swadeshmukul; Scott, Edward W; Moudgil, Brij M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of bioimaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed X-ray tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography) are commonly employed for clinical diagnostics and scientific research. While all of these methods use a characteristic "energy-matter" interaction to provide specific details about biological processes, each modality differs from another in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, anatomical and molecular details, imaging depth, as well as the desirable material properties of contrast agents needed for augmented imaging. On many occasions, it is advantageous to apply multiple complimentary imaging modalities for faster and more accurate prognosis. Since most imaging modalities employ exogenous contrast agents to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, the development and use of multimodal contrast agents is considered to be highly advantageous for obtaining improved imagery from sought-after imaging modalities. Multimodal contrast agents offer improvements in patient care, and at the same time can reduce costs and enhance safety by limiting the number of contrast agent administrations required for imaging purposes. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of nanoparticulate-based multimodal contrast agent for noninvasive bioimaging using MRI, optical, and photoacoustic tomography (PAT)-imaging modalities. The synthesis of these agents is described using microemulsions, which enable facile integration of the desired diversity of contrast agents and material components into a single entity.

  16. Optimization of dose and technique for magnetic resonance studies with an oral contrast agent; Ottimizzazione della dose e della tecnica di esame nell'utilizzazione di un mezzo di contrasto orale nella risonanza magnetica

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    Broglia, L.; Tortora, A.; Maccioni, F.; Arpesani, R.; Marcelli, G.; Ascarelli, A.; Rossi, P. [Rome Policlinico Umberto I, Rome (Italy). Ist. di radiologia

    1999-05-01

    The aim of the study was to optimize the dose, scan delay and sequences for use in magnetic resonance (MR) studies with an oral contrast agent (FerriSeltz, Bracco Spa, Milan, Italy) to obtain positive or negative contrast enhancement in the bowel lumen. Ferric ammonium citrate, being positive or negative contrast agent according to its dilution, permits to tailor the dose to optimize bowel lumen opacification. [Italian] Obiettivo del lavoro e' stato di ottimizzare la dose, il ritardo dell'esecuzione dell'esame e le sequenze da selezionare utilizzando un mezzo di contrasto in risonanza magnetica con somministrazione orale (FerriSeltz, Bracco SpA) per ottenere l'opacizzazione positiva o negativa dell'intestino. Il FerriSeltz si comporta come un mdc positivo o negativo sulla base della sua diluizione e pertanto consente di adattare la dose per ottenere il tipo di opacizzazione adeguata alla malattia da esaminare.

  17. SU-F-P-29: Impact of Oral Contrast Agent for Assisting in Outlining Small Intestine On Pelvic IMAT Dose in Patients with Cervical Cancer

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    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Fan, X [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: As the advanced intensity modulated arc therapy(IMAT) delivery systems becoming a main role of treatment ways, which places even greater demands on delivering accuracy. The impact of oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) for assisting in outlining the small intestine on pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer was investigated. Methods: Ten cervical cancer patients for postoperative radiotherapy underwent CT scans, and the planning target volumes (PTV) and organs at risk (including the small intestine, rectum, bladder, colon and the left and right femoral head) were contoured. The IMAT plans were generated on Oncentra v4.1 planning system for each case, PTV was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Then another plan was generated by re-calculating the radiation dose after changing the electron density of the small bowel. The first plan (plan A) was the conventional IMAT plan (with oral contrast agent), and the second one (plan B) specified the electron density of the small bowel (without oral contrast agent). Paired t-test was used to compare the dose distribution between the two plans. Results: The PTV’s D2, D50, D95, V110, conformity index, and homogeneity index of plans A and B were 5610.5 vs. 5611.4 cGy (P=0.175), 5348.5 vs. 5348.0 cGy (P=0.869), 5039 vs. 5042.3 (P=0.518), 6.0% vs. 6.1 %( P=0.886), 0.1269 vs. 0.1271 (P=0.34) and 0.8421 vs. 0.8416 (P=0.598), respectively. The volumes of the small bowel receiving at least 30 Gy (V30) and the minimum dose of 2% volume accepted (D2) for plans A and B were 31.6% vs. 31.9% (P=0.371) and 5067.8 vs. 5085.4 cGy (P=0.377), while rectum V50 of the two plans was 12.4% vs. 12.1% (P=0.489). Conclusion: The oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) filling the small intestine does not lead to a significant increase in the pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer.

  18. Subharmonic imaging of contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, F; Shi, W T; Goldberg, B B

    2000-03-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents promise to improve the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic ultrasound imaging. It is of great importance to adapt ultrasound equipment for optimal use with contrast agents e.g., by exploiting the nonlinear properties of the contrast microbubbles. Harmonic imaging is one technique that has been extensively studied and is commercially available. However, harmonic imaging is associated with problems, due to second harmonic generation and accumulation within the tissue itself. Given the lack of subharmonic generation in tissue, one alternative is the creation of subharmonic images by transmitting at the fundamental frequency (fo) and receiving at the subharmonic (fo/2). Subharmonic imaging should have a much better lateral resolution and may be suitable for scanning deep-lying structures owing to the higher transmit frequency and the much smaller attenuation of scattered subharmonic signals. In this paper, we will review different aspects of subharmonic imaging including implementation, in-vitro gray-scale imaging and subharmonic aided pressure estimation.

  19. 两种口服对比剂在多层螺旋CT小肠造影中的应用对比%Contrast of Application of Two Kinds of Oral Contrast Agent in Multislice CT Enterography of Small Intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪军; 夏裕平; 黄永平

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究多层螺旋CT小肠造影(MSCTE)中口服对比剂的选择应用。方法:回顾性分析70例进行MSCTE检查患者口服对比剂应用情况,50例检查前口服中性对比剂等渗2.5%甘露醇溶液,20例检查前口服阳性对比剂碘海醇的稀释液。结果:两组患者十二指肠、空肠、回肠扩张程度比较:t值分别为7.7807、6.6994和7.9721(P<0.05),差异有统计学意义,中性对比剂组优于阳性对比剂组;两组患者十二指肠和回盲部显示良好率比较χ2=6.6546(P<0.05),差异有统计学意义,中性对比剂组优于阳性对比剂组。结论:在MSCTE检查中,等渗中性对比剂扩张小肠的效果优于低渗的阳性对比剂,等渗中性对比剂可作为MSCTE检查的首选,但最终的选择还要根据临床的实际情况决定。%Objective:Study the application of two kinds of oral contrast agent in multislice CT enterography(MSCTE). Methods:The situation of application of oral contrast agent in 70 patiants who were checked MSCTE, 50 cases took orally neutral contrast agent-2.5%mannitol solution before the check, and 20 cases took orally positive contrast agent-diluent of iohexol. Results:Compared the degree of the expansion of duodenum、jejunum and ileum of the two groups of patients, t-value were 7.7807、6.6994 and 7.972(P<0.05), the difference was statistically significant, neutral contrast group was better than the positive contrast group. Compared the excellent rate that duodenum and ileocecal junction appeared.χ2=6.6546(P<0.05), the difference was statistically significant, the neutral contrast group was better than the positive contrast group. Conclusion:The neutral contrast was better than the positive contrast in the dilatation effects of small intestine in MSCTE check, isotonic neutral contrast can be used as the first choice in MSCTE check, But the final choice should be decided according the clinical condition.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of small intestine ultrasonography using an oral contrast agent in Crohn's disease: Comparative study from the UK

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    Chatu, S., E-mail: schatu@hotmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology, St George' s Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Pilcher, J. [Department of Radiology, St George' s Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Saxena, S.K. [Department of Primary Care and Public Health Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Fry, D.H. [P.N. Lee Statistics and Computing Ltd, Sutton (United Kingdom); Pollok, R.C.G. [Department of Gastroenterology, St George' s Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of small intestine contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (SICUS) using an oral contrast agent in routine clinical practice by assessing the level of agreement with the established techniques, small bowel follow-through (SBFT) and computed tomography (CT), and diagnostic accuracy compared with the final diagnosis in the detection of small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) and luminal complications in a regional centre. Materials and methods: All symptomatic known or suspected cases of CD who underwent SICUS were retrospectively reviewed. The level of agreement between SICUS and SBFT, CT, histological findings, and C-reactive protein (CRP) level was assessed using kappa ({kappa}) coefficient. Sensitivity was demonstrated using the final diagnosis as the reference standard defined by the outcome of clinical assessment, follow-up, and results of investigations other than SICUS. Results: One hundred and forty-three patients underwent SICUS of these 79 (55%) were female. Eighty-six (60%) were known to have CD and 57 (40%) had symptoms suggestive of intestinal disease with no previous diagnosis. Forty-six (55%) of the known CD patients had had at least one previous surgical resection. The sensitivity of SICUS in detecting active small bowel CD in known CD and undiagnosed cases was 93%. The kappa coefficient was 0.88 and 0.91 with SBFT and CT, respectively. SICUS detected nine patients who had one or more small bowel strictures and six patients with a fistula all detected by SBFT or CT. Conclusion: SICUS is not only comparable to SBFT and CT but avoids radiation exposure and should be more widely adopted in the UK as a primary diagnostic procedure and to monitor disease complications in patients with CD.

  1. Bioadhesive agents in addition to oral contrast media - evaluation in an animal model; Evaluierung der Wirkung bioadhaesiver Substanzen als Zugabe zu oralen Kontrastmitteln - eine experimentelle Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, R.; Schneider, G.; Textor, J.; Schild, H.H. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, R. [Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik und Datenverarbeitung; Sachse, A. [Schering AG, Berlin (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the additional effect of bioadhesives in combination with iotrolan and barium as oral contrast media in an animal model. Method: The bioadhesives Noveon, CMC, Tylose and Carbopol 934 were added to iotrolan and barium. The solutions were administered to rabbits by a feeding tube. The animals were investigated by computed tomography (CT) and radiography after 0,5, 4, 12, 24 and in part after 48 hours. Mucosal coating and contrast filling of the bowel were evaluated. Results: Addition of bioadhesives to oral contrast media effected long-term contrast in the small intestine and colon, but no improvement in continuous filling and coating of the gastrointestinal tract was detected. Mucosal coating was seen only in short regions of the caecum and small intestine. In CT the best results for coating were observed with tylose and CMC, in radiography additionally with carbopol and noveon. All contrast medium solutions were well tolerated. Conclusion: The evaluated contrast medium solutions with bioadhesives have shown long-term contrast but no improvement in coating in comparison to conventional oral contrast media. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Pruefung der Wirkung von bioadhaesiven Substanzen als Zugabe zu den oralen Kontrastmitteln (KM) Iotrolan und Barium im Tierexperiment. Methode: Die bioadhaesiven Substanzen Noveon, Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), Tylose und Carbopol 934 wurden Iotrolan-Loesungen und Bariumsulfatsuspensionen beigemischt und anschliessend 30 Kaninchen ueber Magensonde verabreicht. In der Spiral-CT und Radiographie wurden die Tiere nach 0,5, 4, 12, 24 und teilweise nach 48 Stunden untersucht und hinsichtlich Schleimhautbeschlag und kontinuierlicher KM-Fuellung bewertet. Ergebnisse: Die Zugabe adhaesiver Stubstanzen beguenstigte eine langanhaltende Kontrastierung von Duenn- und Dickdarm. Es konnte jedoch weder eine vollstaendige Kontrastierung noch ein durchgehender Beschlag des gesamten Gastrointestinaltraktes bewirkt werden. Ein

  2. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA. Technique and contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Yousef W. [Dept. of Radiology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital Bispebjerg, Bispebjerg (Denmark)], e-mail: ywnielsen@gmail.com; Thomsen, Henrik S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Copenhagen Univ. Hospital Herlev, Herlev (Denmark)

    2012-09-15

    In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast agents. Peripheral CE-MRA is defined as an MR angiogram of the arteries from the aortic bifurcation to the feet. Advantages of CE-MRA include minimal invasiveness and lack of ionizing radiation. The basic technique employed for peripheral CE-MRA is the bolus-chase method. With this method a paramagnetic MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic field strength of the MRI system, receiver coil configuration, use of parallel imaging, contrast bolus timing technique, and k-space filling strategies. Furthermore, it is possible to optimize peripheral CE-MRA using venous compression techniques, hybrid scan protocols, time-resolved imaging, and steady-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged intravascular stay, due to macromolecular structure or protein binding. These agents can be used for first-pass, as well as steady-state MRA. Some Gd-based contrast agents with low thermodynamic stability have been linked to development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal insufficiency. Using optimized technique and a stable MRI contrast agent, peripheral CE-MRA is a safe procedure with diagnostic accuracy close to that of conventional catheter X

  3. Process for preparation of MR contrast agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for the preparation of an MR contrast agent, said process comprising: i) obtaining a solution in a solvent of a hydrogenatable, unsaturated substrate compound and a catalyst for the hydrogenation of said substrate compound; ii) introducing said solution...... in droplet form into a chamber containing hydrogen gas (H2) enriched in para-hydrogen (p-1H2) and/or ortho-deuterium (o-2H2) whereby to hydrogenate said substrate to form a hydrogenated imaging agent; iii) optionally subjecting said hydrogenated imaging agent to a magnetic field having a field strength below...

  4. Nonspherical Oscillations of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dollet, Benjamin; Meer, van der Sander M.; Garbin, Valeria; Jong, de Nico; Lohse, Detlef; Versluis, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of nonspherical oscillations (or surface modes) of coated microbubbles, used as ultrasound contrast agents in medical imaging, is investigated using ultra–high-speed optical imaging. Optical tweezers designed to micromanipulate single bubbles in 3-D are used to trap the bubbles far fr

  5. Superhydrophobic silica nanoparticles as ultrasound contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Lin, Chih-Yu; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yang, Chia-Min; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2017-05-01

    Microbubbles have been widely studied as ultrasound contrast agents for diagnosis and as drug/gene carriers for therapy. However, their size and stability (lifetime of 5-12min) limited their applications. The development of stable nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents would therefore benefit both. Generating bubbles persistently in situ would be one of the promising solutions to the problem of short lifetime. We hypothesized that bubbles could be generated in situ by providing stable air nuclei since it has been found that the interfacial nanobubbles on a hydrophobic surface have a much longer lifetime (orders of days). Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with large surface areas and different levels of hydrophobicity were prepared to test our hypothesis. It is clear that the superhydrophobic and porous nanoparticles exhibited a significant and strong contrast intensity compared with other nanoparticles. The bubbles generated from superhydrophobic nanoparticles sustained for at least 30min at a MI of 1.0, while lipid microbubble lasted for about 5min at the same settings. In summary MSNs have been transformed into reliable bubble precursors by making simple superhydrophobic modification, and made into a promising contrast agent with the potentials to serve as theranostic agents that are sensitive to ultrasound stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrasonic characterization of ultrasound contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. de Jong (Nico); M. Emmer (Marcia); A. van Wamel (Annemieke); M. Versluis (Michel)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe main constituent of an ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) is gas-filled microbubbles. An average UCA contains billions per ml. These microbubbles are excellent ultrasound scatterers due to their high compressibility. In an ultrasound field they act as resonant systems, resulting in

  7. Acoustic properties of ultrasound contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. de Jong (Nico)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractSafety of contrast agents is reported in the years after. Both the intracoronary use of sonicated Renografin as well as intravenous use of commercial product as Albunex and Lechovist has been investigated. Thereafter more pathophysiologic studies were performed. Ten Cate described the po

  8. Advanced detection strategies for ultrasound contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.G. Borsboom (Jerome)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Ultrasound contrast agent was discovered serendipitously by Gramiak and Shah in I968 when they injected indocyanine green dye into the heart and observed increased echogenicity of the blood containing the dye. Small cavitation bubbles that were formed upon injection of

  9. Nano/microparticles and ultrasound contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Guang; Zheng; Hui-Xiong; Xu; Hang-Rong; Chen

    2013-01-01

    Microbubbles have been used for many years now in clinical practice as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging.Recently,their therapeutic applications have also attracted more attention.However,the short circulation time(minutes)and relatively large size(two to ten micrometers)of currently used commercial microbubbles do not allow effective extravasation into tumor tissue,preventing efficient tumor targeting.Fortunately,more multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles with some special advantages over the traditional microbubbles have been widely investigated and explored for biomedical applications.The way to synthesize an ideal ultrasound contrast agent based on nanoparticles in order to achieve an expected effect on contrast imaging is a key technique.Currently a number of nanomaterials,including liposomes,polymers,micelles,dendrimers,emulsions,quantum dots,solid nanoparticles etc.,have already been applied to pre or clinical trials.Multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles with some special advantages,such as the tumor-targeted(passive or active),multi-mode contrast agents(magnetic resonance imaging,ultrasonography or fluorescence),carrier or enhancer of drug delivery,and combined chemo or thermal therapy etc.,are rapidly gaining popularity and have shown a promising application in the field of cancer treatment.In this mini review,the trends and the advances of multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles are briefly discussed.

  10. Liver-targeting macromolecular MRI contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Macromolecular ligands with liver-targeting group (pyridoxamine, PM) PHEA-DTPA-PM and PAEA-DTPA-PM were prepared by the incorporation of different amount of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid monopyridoxamine group (DTPA-PM) into poly-a, b-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-L- aspartamide] (PHEA) and poly-a, b-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-L-aspartamide] (PAEA). The macromolecular ligands thus obtained were further complexed with gadolinium chloride to give macromolecular MRI contrast agents with different Gd(Ⅲ) contents. These macromolecular ligands and their gadolinium complexes were characterized by 1H NMR, IR, UV and elementary analysis. Relaxivity studies showed that these polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes possess higher relaxation effectiveness than that of the clinically used Gd-DTPA. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in rats and experimental data of biodistribution in mice indicate that these macromolecular MRI contrast agents containing pyridoxamine exhibit liver-targeting property.

  11. Ultrasound contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquart, F; Arditi, M; Bettinger, T; Frinking, P; Hyvelin, J M; Nunn, A; Pochon, S; Tardy, I

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound is a real-time imaging technique which is widely used in many clinical applications for its capacity to provide anatomic information with high spatial and temporal resolution. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents in combination with contrast-specific imaging modes has given access to perfusion assessments at an organ level, leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy. More recently, the development of biologically-targeted ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the role of ultrasound even further into molecular imaging applications. Ultrasound molecular imaging can be used to visualize the expression of intravascular markers, and to assess their local presence over time and/or during therapeutic treatment. Major applications are in the field of inflammation and neoangiogenesis due to the strictly intravascular presence of microbubbles. Various technologies have been investigated for attaching the targeting moiety to the shell from simple biotin-avidin constructs to more elaborated insertion within the shell through attachment to PEG residues. This important improvement has allowed a clinical translation of initial pre-clinical investigations, opening the way for an early detection and an accurate characterization of lesions in patients. The combination of anatomic, functional and molecular information/data provided by contrast ultrasound is a powerful tool which is still in its infancy due to the lack of agents suitable for clinical use. The advantages of ultrasound techniques combined with the molecular signature of lesions will represent a significant advance in imaging in the field of personalized medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Acoustic Nonlinear Behaviour of Microbubble Contrast Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞金飞; 陆荣荣; 龚秀芬; 石涛

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the nonlinear characteristics of a microbubble contrast agent Sonazoid R (Nycomed,Norway), including the second, third, 1/2-order, 3/2-order and 5/2-order harmonics. We have measured the 1/2-order subharmonic response to different transmission sound pressures. We have found that subharmonic signals cannot be generated until the acoustic pressure reaches a certain value, which is the most different subharmonic from high harmonics. This result is favourable for the further study of the subharmonic in the bubbly liquid.The 3/2-order ultraharmonic response to acoustic pressure was also measured.

  13. Photoacoustic cell for ultrasound contrast agent characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alippi, A.; Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; D'Orazio, A.; Germano, M.; Passeri, D.

    2010-10-01

    Photoacoustics has emerged as a tool for the study of liquid gel suspension behavior and has been recently employed in a number of new biomedical applications. In this paper, a photoacoustic sensor is presented which was designed and realized for analyzing photothermal signals from solutions filled with microbubbles, commonly used as ultrasound contrast agents in echographic imaging techniques. It is a closed cell device, where photothermal volume variation of an aqueous solution produces the periodic deflection of a thin membrane closing the cell at the end of a short pipe. The cell then acts as a Helmholtz resonator, where the displacement of the membrane is measured through a laser probe interferometer, whereas photoacoustic signal is generated by a laser chopped light beam impinging onto the solution through a glass window. Particularly, the microbubble shell has been modeled through an effective surface tension parameter, which has been then evaluated from experimental data through the shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor. This shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor caused by microbubble solutions is high enough for making such a cell a reliable tool for testing ultrasound contrast agent, particularly for bubble shell characterization.

  14. Oral hypoglycaemic agents in 118 diabetic pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmuth, E; Damm, P; Mølsted-Pedersen, L

    2000-01-01

    AIMS: To assess maternal and neonatal complications in pregnancies of diabetic women treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents during pregnancy. METHODS: A cohort study including all consecutively registered, orally treated pregnant diabetic patients set in a diabetic obstetrical service at a univer......AIMS: To assess maternal and neonatal complications in pregnancies of diabetic women treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents during pregnancy. METHODS: A cohort study including all consecutively registered, orally treated pregnant diabetic patients set in a diabetic obstetrical service...... compared to women treated with sulphonylurea or insulin (32 vs. 7 vs. 10%, P neonatal morbidity was observed between the orally treated and insulin-treated group; no cases of severe hypoglycaemia or jaundice were seen in the orally treated groups. However, in the group of women...

  15. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  16. Impact factors investigation in oral ultrasonic contrast agent on diagnosis of ulcerative type gastric neoplasms on T staging%胃窗超声造影对溃疡型胃癌T分期判断的影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛改琴; 冯秀荣; 郭荣荣; 王宇翔

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨影响胃窗超声造影检查对溃疡型胃癌T分期准确性的因素.方法 收集术后经病理确诊且术前做过胃窗超声造影检查的82例溃疡型胃癌患者资料,并与术后病理结果进行比较,分析病变部位、大小对溃疡型胃癌T分期的影响.结果 胃窗超声造影检查对胃小弯病变、胃窦病变T分期的准确率分别为91.3 %(21/23) 、85.7 %(24/28),两者与病理结果一致性较好(Kappa值分别为0.763、0.68,P< 0.05),对贲门位置病变的T分期准确率为68.0%(17/25),与术后病理结果比较一致性一般(Kappa值为0.446,P<0.05);因胃大弯病变资料较少,对T分期准确性的影响有待进一步研究;对癌灶最大径≤5.0 cm病灶组T分期的准确率为92.3%(36/39),对>5.0 cm病灶组T分期的准确率为72.1%(31/43),两者比较差异有统计学意义(x2=5.591,P< 0.05).结论 胃窗超声造影对胃小弯和胃窦溃疡性胃癌以及对≤5.0 cm的溃疡型病灶T分期诊断准确性较高.%Objective To explore the factors affecting diagnosis accuracy on T stage of oral ultrasonic contrast agent examination on ulcerative gastric neoplasms.Methods Data from 82 patients were analyzed who were pathologically diagnosed as ulcerative gastric neoplasms ultrasounds data of oral ultrasonic contrast agent before surgery were compared to postoperative pathology,analysis had been done on influence of the lesion site,size of the T staging on ulcerative gastric neoplasms.Results The diagnosis accuracy rate of T stage on lesser curvature of stomach and gastric antrum were 91.3 % (21/23) and 85.7 % (24/28),compared with the pathological results were in good concordancy (Kappa =0.763,0.68,P < 0.05).The accuracy rate of T stage on cardiac lesions was 68.0 % (17/25),compared with the pathological results consistency in general (Kappa =0.446,P < 0.05).Further research on the effects of T stage accuracy would be necessary.The accuracy rate ofT staging on

  17. MRI contrast agents from molecules to particles

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri; Boutry, Sébastien; Lipani, Estelle; Belaid, Sarah; Muller, Robert N; Vander Elst, Luce

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the multiple aspects of (i) preparation of the magnetic core, (ii) the stabilization with different coatings, (iii) the physico-chemical characterization and (iv) the vectorization to obtain specific nanosystems. Several bio-applications are also presented in this book. In the early days of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), paramagnetic ions were proposed as contrast agents to enhance the diagnostic quality of MR images. Since then, academic and industrial efforts have been devoted to the development of new and more efficient molecular, supramolecular and nanoparticular systems. Old concepts and theories, like paramagnetic relaxation, were revisited and exploited, leading to new scientific tracks. With their high relaxivity payload, the superparamagnetic nanoparticles are very appealing in the context of molecular imaging but challenges are still numerous: absence of toxicity, specificity, ability to cross the biological barriers, etc. .

  18. Research progress of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a clinical diagnostic modality, which has become popular in hospitals around the world. Approximately 30% of MRI exams include the use of contrast agents. The research progress of the paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents was described briefly. Three important approaches in the soluble paramagnetic resonance imaging contrast agents design including nonionic, tissue-specific and macromolecular contrast agents were investigated. In addition, the problems in the research and development in future were discussed.

  19. Synthesis of Laboratory Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaemin Oh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCAs were developed to maximize reflection contrast so that organs can be seen clearly in ultrasound imaging. UCAs increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR by linear and non-linear mechanisms and thus help more accurately visualize the internal organs and blood vessels. However, the UCAs on the market are not only expensive, but are also not optimized for use in various therapeutic research applications such as ultrasound-aided drug delivery. The UCAs fabricated in this study utilize conventional lipid and albumin for shell formation and perfluorobutane as the internal gas. The shape and density of the UCA bubbles were verified by optical microscopy and Cryo SEM, and compared to those of the commercially available UCAs, Definity® and Sonovue®. The size distribution and characteristics of the reflected signal were also analyzed using a particle size analyzer and ultrasound imaging equipment. Our experiments indicate that UCAs composed of spherical microbubbles, the majority of which were smaller than 1 um, were successfully synthesized. Microbubbles 10 um or larger were also identified when different shell characteristics and filters were used. These laboratory UCAs can be used for research in both diagnoses and therapies.

  20. Oral Gastrointestinal Echogenic Contrast Agent in Imaging of the Common Bile Duct%口服胃肠超声助显剂对胆总管显像的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李加平; 孙宇; 朱婷; 龙劲松; 雷震; 程春生

    2013-01-01

      目的探讨口服胃肠超声助显剂对胆总管全程显像的改善情况。资料与方法78例经术后病理证实的胆总管梗阻患者,术前均行常规超声、口服胃肠超声助显剂后超声(超声造影)、磁共振胆管造影(MRCP)、经内镜逆行胰胆管造影(ERCP)检查,并与手术病理结果比较,评价4种影像方法的诊断效果。结果超声造影、常规超声、MRCP、ERCP对胆总管全程的显示率分别为93.59%、21.79%、97.44%、100.00%,对胆管病灶的显示率分别为91.03%、58.97%、92.31%、97.44%,超声造影与MRCP、ERCP对胆总管全程及胆管病灶的显示率均无显著差异(χ2=0.598、3.306, P>0.05),但超声造影对胆总管全程及胆管病灶的显示率明显高于常规超声(χ2=82.360、21.368, P0.05). Ultrasound contrast was superior to routine ultrasound in displaying the whole common bile duct and bile duct lesions (χ2=82.360, 21.368; P<0.001). The rate of ultrasound contrast in displaying whole pancreas head and duodenal papilla was 100.00% and 71.79%, respectively, which was much higher than those of routine ultrasound (χ2=48.504, 80.031; P<0.001). Conclusion Oral gastrointestinal echogenic contrast agent may improve the display rate of the common bile duct and the lesions in it, which is a simple and reliable method in practice.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging using gadolinium-based contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumori, Lee M; Bhargava, Puneet; Essig, Marco; Maki, Jeffrey H

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the basic properties of available gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents, discuss their fundamental differences, and explore common and evolving applications of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast throughout the body excluding the central nervous system. A more specific aim of this article was to explore novel uses of these gadolinium-based contrast agents and applications where a particular agent has been demonstrated to behave differently or be better suited for certain applications than the other contrast agents in this class.

  2. Gadolinium-based contrast agents in pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, Eric M.; Caravan, Peter [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, The Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Boston, MA (United States); Rao, Anil G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); McDonald, Robert J. [College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Winfeld, Matthew [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Gee, Michael S. [MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Division of Pediatric Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents can increase the accuracy and expediency of an MRI examination. However the benefits of a contrast-enhanced scan must be carefully weighed against the well-documented risks associated with administration of exogenous contrast media. The purpose of this review is to discuss commercially available gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in the context of pediatric radiology. We discuss the chemistry, regulatory status, safety and clinical applications, with particular emphasis on imaging of the blood vessels, heart, hepatobiliary tree and central nervous system. We also discuss non-GBCA MRI contrast agents that are less frequently used or not commercially available. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents: A Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sahraei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI contrast agents most commonly agents used in diagnosing different diseases. Several agents have been ever introduced with different peculiar characteristics. They vary in potency, adverse reaction and other specification, so it is important to select the proper agent in different situations. We conducted a systematic literature search in MEDLINE/PUBMED, Web of Science (ISI, Scopus,Google Scholar by using keywords "gadolinium" and "MRI contrast Medias", "Gadofosvest", "Gadobenate" and "Gadoxetate". The most frequent contrast media agents made based on gadolinium (Gd. These are divided into two categories based on the structure of their chelating parts, linear agents and macrocyclic agents. All characteristics of contrast media factors, including efficiency, kinetic properties, stability, side effects and the rate of resolution are directly related to the structure of chelating part of that formulation.In vitro data has shown that the macrocyclic compounds are the most stable Gd-CA as they do not bind to serum proteins, they all possess similar and relatively low relaxivity and the prevalence of Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF has decreased by increasing the use of macrocyclic agents in recent years. No cases of NSF have been recorded after the administration of any of the high-relaxivity protein interacting agents, the vascular imaging agent gadofosveset trisodium (Ablavar, the hepatic imaging agent gadoxetate meglumine (Eovist, and the multipurpose agent gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance. In pregnancy and lactating women, stable macrocyclic agent is recommended.

  4. High-speed optical observations of contrast agent destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouakaz, Ayache; Versluis, Michel; Jong, de Nico

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are now available since a few years and used for diagnostic purposes. Improved diagnostic decisions have been made possible with new imaging methods that are mainly based on the nonlinear properties of gas microbubbles. Since it is well known that contrast agents are destr

  5. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  6. Iopamidol as a gastrointestinal contrast agent. Lack of peritoneal reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, S L; Schreiman, J S; Rouse, J W; Rysavy, J A; Cheng, S C; Frick, M P

    1990-02-01

    The ideal contrast agent in patients suspected of having gastrointestinal perforation is an iso-osmolar, or nearly iso-osmolar substance, that causes no peritoneal reaction. Iopamidol is a nonionic water-soluble contrast medium that may be considered in such situations. Intraperitoneal injections of ionic and nonionic contrast agents were compared in rats to study potentially harmful peritoneal inflammation. Only intraperitoneal barium injection produced any significant tissue reaction, such as adhesions and ascites. There was no difference between iopamidol and the other water-soluble contrast agents. Iopamidol may satisfy the need for nonreactive and nearly iso-osmolar contrast agents for evaluating patients with possible bowel perforation. However, the high cost of this agent may make its clinical application impractical.

  7. Basic MR relaxation mechanisms and contrast agent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De León-Rodríguez, Luis M; Martins, André F; Pinho, Marco C; Rofsky, Neil M; Sherry, A Dean

    2015-09-01

    The diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have undergone continuous and substantial evolution by virtue of hardware and software innovations and the development and implementation of exogenous contrast media. Thirty years since the first MRI contrast agent was approved for clinical use, a reliance on MR contrast media persists, largely to improve image quality with higher contrast resolution and to provide additional functional characterization of normal and abnormal tissues. Further development of MR contrast media is an important component in the quest for continued augmentation of diagnostic capabilities. In this review we detail the many important considerations when pursuing the design and use of MR contrast media. We offer a perspective on the importance of chemical stability, particularly kinetic stability, and how this influences one's thinking about the safety of metal-ligand-based contrast agents. We discuss the mechanisms involved in MR relaxation in the context of probe design strategies. A brief description of currently available contrast agents is accompanied by an in-depth discussion that highlights promising MRI contrast agents in the development of future clinical and research applications. Our intention is to give a diverse audience an improved understanding of the factors involved in developing new types of safe and highly efficient MR contrast agents and, at the same time, provide an appreciation of the insights into physiology and disease that newer types of responsive agents can provide.

  8. Preclinical Studies of a Kidney Safe Iodinated Contrast Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, Elizabeth S.; Rowe, Vernon D.; Biswas, Sangita; Mosher, Gerold; Insisienmay, Lovella; Ozias, Marlies K.; Gralinski, Michael R.; Hunter, John; Barnett, James S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Contrast‐induced acute kidney injury (CI‐AKI) is a serious complication of the use of iodinated contrast agents. This problem is particularly acute in interventional neurology and interventional cardiology, probably due to the intra‐arterial route of injection, high contrast volumes, and preexisting risk factors of these patients. In an attempt to develop a contrast agent that is less damaging to the kidneys, we have studied the effects of adding a small amount...

  9. Classification and basic properties of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Laurent, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive classification of contrast agents currently used or under development for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presented. Agents based on small chelates, macromolecular systems, iron oxides and other nanosystems, as well as responsive, chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and hyperpolarization agents are covered in order to discuss the various possibilities of using MRI as a molecular imaging technique. The classification includes composition, magnetic properties, biodistribution and imaging applications. Chemical compositions of various classes of MRI contrast agents are tabulated, and their magnetic status including diamagnetic, paramagnetic and superparamagnetic are outlined. Classification according to biodistribution covers all types of MRI contrast agents including, among others, extracellular, blood pool, polymeric, particulate, responsive, oral, and organ specific (hepatobiliary, RES, lymph nodes, bone marrow and brain). Various targeting strategies of molecular, macromolecular and particulate carriers are also illustrated.

  10. The use of dilute Calogen as a fat density oral contrast medium in upper abdominal computed tomography, compared with the use of water and positive oral contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, D W; Markham, D H; Morgan, B; Rodgers, P M; Liddicoat, A J

    2001-08-01

    Oral contrast media are commonly given prior to computed tomography (CT) examination of the upper abdomen. Although positive oral contrast media are normally used, there is increasing interest in using negative agents such as water and less commonly fat density products. The aim of this study was to compare a positive oral contrast medium, water, and a diluted emulsion of arachis oil Calogen, a fat density food supplement) for assessment of the upper abdomen. Seventy-one patients referred for upper abdominal CT were randomized to receive either 500 ml water, 2% sodium diatrizoate or a dilute suspension of Calogen. The CT images were scored independently by three radiologists. Distension and anatomical identification was assessed for the stomach, duodenum and jejunum; with anatomical identification recorded for the pancreas, retroperitoneum, liver, gallbladder and spleen. Dilute Calogen produced a significant improvement (P < 0.01) in distension and anatomical visualization of the stomach and proximal duodenum. Only minimal differences were demonstrated between the three contrast media for visualization of more distal small bowel or identification of the other upper abdominal viscera. Significantly more artifacts were caused by positive contrast media than with the Calogen mixture. A dilute suspension of Calogen as an oral contrast medium is recommended when disease is suspected within the stomach or proximal duodenum.

  11. Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with new oral agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Esquivel, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease is a major leading cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries. Currently, the management of these patients is challenging due to the availability of new drugs with proven efficacy and security compared to traditional oral vitamin K antagonists. These compounds are characterized by a predictable pharmacokinetic profile for which blood monitoring is not routinely needed. Nevertheless, some data have suggested inter-patient variability in the anticoagulant effect of these drugs, raising concerns about their effectiveness and safety. Although mass-spectrometry is the gold standard to determine drug plasma concentrations, this method is not widely available in every-day practice and some coagulation assays are commonly used to determine the anticoagulant effect of these drugs. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding the clinical question of how and when to monitor patients with new anticoagulant oral agents. PMID:26713281

  12. Oral anticancer agent medication adherence by outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Michio; Usami, Eiseki; Iwai, Mina; Nakao, Toshiya; Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, medication adherence and factors affecting adherence were examined in patients taking oral anticancer agents. In June 2013, 172 outpatients who had been prescribed oral anticancer agents by Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Gifu, Japan) completed a questionnaire survey, with answers rated on a five-point Likert scale. The factors that affect medication adherence were evaluated using a customer satisfaction (CS) analysis. For patients with good and insufficient adherence to medication, the median ages were 66 years (range, 21-85 years) and 73 years (range, 30-90 years), respectively (P=0.0004), while the median dosing time was 131 days (range, 3-3,585 days) and 219 days (24-3,465 days), respectively (P=0.0447). In 36.0% (62 out of 172) of the cases, there was insufficient medication adherence; 64.5% of those cases (40 out of 62) showed good medication compliance (4-5 point rating score). However, these patients did not fully understand the effects or side-effects of the drugs, giving a score of three points or less. The percentage of patients with good medication compliance was 87.2% (150 out of 172). Through the CS analysis, three items, the interest in the drug, the desire to consult about the drug and the condition of the patient, were extracted as items for improvement. Overall, the medication compliance of the patients taking the oral anticancer agents was good, but the medication adherence was insufficient. To improve medication adherence, a better understanding of the effectiveness and necessity of drugs and their side-effects is required. In addition, the interest of patients in their medication should be encouraged and intervention should be tailored to the condition of the patient. These steps should lead to improved medication adherence.

  13. Novel nanomedicine-based MRI contrast agents for gynecological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Vicky V; Nounou, Mohamed Ismail; Bikram, Malavosklish

    2009-08-10

    Gynecological cancers result in significant morbidity and mortality in women despite advances in treatment and diagnosis. This is due to detection of the disease in the late stages following metastatic spread in which treatment options become limited and may not result in positive outcomes. In addition, traditional contrast agents are not very effective in detecting primary metastatic tumors and cells due to a lack of specificity and sensitivity of the diagnostic tools, which limits their effectiveness. Recently, the field of nanomedicine-based contrast agents offers a great opportunity to develop highly sophisticated devices that can overcome many traditional hurdles of contrast agents including solubility, cell-specific targeting, toxicities, and immunological responses. These nanomedicine-based contrast agents including liposomes, micelles, dendrimers, multifunctional magnetic polymeric nanohybrids, fullerenes, and nanotubes represent improvements over their traditional counterparts, which can significantly advance the field of molecular imaging.

  14. Neutral vs positive oral contrast in diagnosing acute appendicitis with contrast-enhanced CT: sensitivity, specificity, reader confidence and interpretation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeger, D M; Chang, S D; Kolli, P; Shah, V; Huang, W; Thoeni, R F

    2011-01-01

    Objective The study compared the sensitivity, specificity, confidence and interpretation time of readers of differing experience in diagnosing acute appendicitis with contrast-enhanced CT using neutral vs positive oral contrast agents. Methods Contrast-enhanced CT for right lower quadrant or right flank pain was performed in 200 patients with neutral and 200 with positive oral contrast including 199 with proven acute appendicitis and 201 with other diagnoses. Test set disease prevalence was 50%. Two experienced gastrointestinal radiologists, one fellow and two first-year residents blindly assessed all studies for appendicitis (2000 readings) and assigned confidence scores (1=poor to 4=excellent). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated. Total interpretation time was recorded. Each reader's interpretation with the two agents was compared using standard statistical methods. Results Average reader sensitivity was found to be 96% (range 91–99%) with positive and 95% (89–98%) with neutral oral contrast; specificity was 96% (92–98%) and 94% (90–97%). For each reader, no statistically significant difference was found between the two agents (sensitivities p-values >0.6; specificities p-values>0.08), in the area under the ROC curve (range 0.95–0.99) or in average interpretation times. In cases without appendicitis, positive oral contrast demonstrated improved appendix identification (average 90% vs 78%) and higher confidence scores for three readers. Average interpretation times showed no statistically significant differences between the agents. Conclusion Neutral vs positive oral contrast does not affect the accuracy of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosing acute appendicitis. Although positive oral contrast might help to identify normal appendices, we continue to use neutral oral contrast given its other potential benefits. PMID:20959365

  15. Gadobutrol: an alternative contrast agent for digital subtraction dacryocystography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priebe, M.; Mohr, A.; Brossmann, J.; Heller, M.; Frahm, C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Strasse 9, 24105 Kiel (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    We report the application of gadobutrol as a contrast medium for digital subtraction dacryocystography (DS-DCG) in patients with known allergy to iodinated contrast agent. Gadobutrol has the double gadolinium concentration (1.0 mmol/ml) of other gadolinium-based contrast agents. Quality of the DS-DCG images obtained with gadobutrol was comparable to DS-DCG images obtained with iodinated contrast medium. Radiodensity measurements using a micro-CT scanner confirmed a high radiodensity of gadobutrol which was comparable to the radiodensity of iopentol with a iodine concentration of 250 mg/ml and only approximately 20% lower than the radiodensity of iopentol with a concentration of 300 mg/l. Gadobutrol is a well-suited substitute for DS-DCG in patients with allergy to iodinated contrast agents. (orig.)

  16. Multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrids as MRI contrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikodem Kuźnik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most commonly used tomography techniques in medical diagnosis due to the non-invasive character, the high spatial resolution and the possibility of soft tissue imaging. Contrast agents, such as gadolinium complexes and superparamagnetic iron oxides, are administered to spotlight certain organs and their pathologies. Many new models have been proposed that reduce side effects and required doses of these already clinically approved contrast agents. These new candidates often possess additional functionalities, e.g., the possibility of bioactivation upon action of particular stimuli, thus serving as smart molecular probes, or the coupling with therapeutic agents and therefore combining both a diagnostic and therapeutic role. Nanomaterials have been found to be an excellent scaffold for contrast agents, among which carbon nanotubes offer vast possibilities. The morphology of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, their magnetic and electronic properties, the possibility of different functionalization and the potential to penetrate cell membranes result in a unique and very attractive candidate for a new MRI contrast agent. In this review we describe the different issues connected with MWCNT hybrids designed for MRI contrast agents, i.e., their synthesis and magnetic and dispersion properties, as well as both in vitro and in vivo behavior, which is important for diagnostic purposes. An introduction to MRI contrast agent theory is elaborated here in order to point to the specific expectations regarding nanomaterials. Finally, we propose a promising, general model of MWCNTs as MRI contrast agent candidates based on the studies presented here and supported by appropriate theories.

  17. Methods for blood flow measurements using ultrasound contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2003-10-01

    Blood flow measurements using ultrasound contrast agents are being investigated for myocardial perfusion and more recently in other organ systems. The methods are based largely on the relative increase in echogenicity due to the concentration of bubbles present in the ultrasound beam. In the simplest form, regional differences in blood volume can be inferred but the possibility exists to extract perfusion from the transit of contrast agent through tissue. Perfusion measurements rely on determining the flux of blood through a tissue volume and as such require knowledge of the fractional blood volume (FBV), i.e., ml blood/g tissue and the rate of exchange, commonly measured as the mean transit time (MTT). This presentation will discuss methods of determining each of these values and their combination to estimate tissue perfusion. Underlying principles of indicator-dilution theory will be provided in the context of ultrasound contrast agents. Current methods for determining MTT will include imaging of the intravenous bolus, in-plane contrast disruption with interval and real-time contrast recovery imaging, and control of contrast agent flow using arterial disruption (contrast interruption). The advantages and limitations of the methods will be examined along with current applications. [Work supported in part by NIH.

  18. Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging (PAI and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed.

  19. Contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic imaging: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-12-18

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed.

  20. Hybrid material as contrast agent in magnetic resonance images

    OpenAIRE

    Botella Asunción, Pablo; Cabrera García, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a contrast agent of magnetic resonance based on a hybrid material formed by an organo-metallic core derived from Prussian blue and a silica cover, and optionally, molecules of a poly(ethylene glycol), a fluorescent agent, a radio nucleus and/or a substance that directs to specific receptors, cells or tissues, joined by covalent bonding to the surface of the inorganic cover.

  1. Hybrid material as contrast agent in magnetic resonance images

    OpenAIRE

    Botella Asunción, Pablo; Cabrera García, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a contrast agent of magnetic resonance based on a hybrid material formed by an organo-metallic core derived from Prussian blue and a silica cover, and optionally, molecules of a poly(ethylene glycol), a fluorescent agent, a radio nucleus and/or a substance that directs to specific receptors, cells or tissues, joined by covalent bonding to the surface of the inorganic cover.

  2. Gd-HOPO Based High Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Ankona; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-11-06

    Tris-bidentate HOPO-based ligands developed in our laboratory were designed to complement the coordination preferences of Gd{sup 3+}, especially its oxophilicity. The HOPO ligands provide a hexadentate coordination environment for Gd{sup 3+} in which all he donor atoms are oxygen. Because Gd{sup 3+} favors eight or nine coordination, this design provides two to three open sites for inner-sphere water molecules. These water molecules rapidly exchange with bulk solution, hence affecting the relaxation rates of bulk water olecules. The parameters affecting the efficiency of these contrast agents have been tuned to improve contrast while still maintaining a high thermodynamic stability for Gd{sup 3+} binding. The Gd- HOPO-based contrast agents surpass current commercially available agents ecause of a higher number of inner-sphere water molecules, rapid exchange of inner-sphere water molecules via an associative mechanism, and a long electronic relaxation time. The contrast enhancement provided by these agents is at least twice that of commercial contrast gents, which are based on polyaminocarboxylate ligands.

  3. Improvement of distension and mural visualization of bowel loops using neutral oral contrasts in abdominal computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jahanbakhsh; Hashemi; Yasmin; Davoudi; Mina; Taghavi; Masoud; Pezeshki; Rad; Amien; Mahajeri; Moghadam

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess and compare the image quality of 4% sorbitol and diluted iodine 2%(positive oral contrast agent) in abdomino-pelvic multi-detector computed tomography.METHODS: Two-hundred patients, referred to the Radiology Department of a central educational hospital for multi-detector row abdominal-pelvic computed tomography, were randomly divided into two groups: the first group received 1500 m L of 4% sorbitol solution as a neutral contrast agent, while in the second group 1500 m L of meglumin solution as a positive contrast agent was administered in a one-way randomized prospective study. The results were independently reviewed by two radiologists. Luminal distension and mural thickness and mucosal enhancement were compared between the two groups. Statistical analysis of the results was performed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software version 16 and the Mann-Whitney test at a confidence level of 95%. RESULTS: Use of neutral oral contrast agent significantly improved visualization of the small bowel wall thickness and mural appearance in comparison with administration of positive contrast agent(P < 0.01). In patients who received sorbitol, the small bowel showed better distention compared with those who received iodine solution as a positive contrast agent(P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The results of the study demonstrated that oral administration of sorbitol solution allows better luminal distention and visualization of mural features than iodine solution as a positive contrast agent.

  4. Sonophoresis Using Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Dependence on Concentration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghee Park

    Full Text Available Sonophoresis can increase skin permeability to various drugs in transdermal drug delivery. Cavitation is recognized as the predominant mechanism of sonophoresis. Recently, a new logical approach to enhance the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery was tried. It is to utilize the engineered microbubble and its resonant frequency for increase of cavitation activity. Actively-induced cavitation with low-intensity ultrasound (less than ~1 MPa causes disordering of the lipid bilayers and the formation of aqueous channels by stable cavitation which indicates a continuous oscillation of bubbles. Furthermore, the mutual interactions of microbubble determined by concentration of added bubble are also thought to be an important factor for activity of stable cavitation, even in different characteristics of drug. In the present study, we addressed the dependence of ultrasound contrast agent concentration using two types of drug on the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery. Two types of experiment were designed to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery according to ultrasound contrast agent concentration. First, an experiment of optical clearing using a tissue optical clearing agent was designed to assess the efficiency of sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. Second, a Franz diffusion cell with ferulic acid was used to quantitatively determine the amount of drug delivered to the skin sample by sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. The maximum enhancement ratio of sonophoresis with a concentration of 1:1,000 was approximately 3.1 times greater than that in the ultrasound group without ultrasound contrast agent and approximately 7.5 times greater than that in the control group. These results support our hypothesis that sonophoresis becomes more effective in transdermal drug delivery due to the presence of engineered bubbles, and that the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery using sonophoresis with

  5. Bubble sorting in pinched microchannels for ultrasound contrast agent enrichment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, M.P.; Segers, T.J.; Versluis, M.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) suspensions contain encapsulated microbubbles with a wide size distribution, with radii between 1 and 10 μm. Medical transducers generally operate at a narrow frequency bandwidth, severely limiting the fraction of bubbles that resonates to the driving ultrasound. Thus

  6. Nanomaterials incorporated ultrasound contrast agents for cancer theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    FU, LEI; Ke, Heng-Te

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology provides various nanomaterials with tremendous functionalities for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently, theranostics has been developed as an alternative strategy for efficient cancer treatment through combination of imaging diagnosis and therapeutic interventions under the guidance of diagnostic results. Ultrasound (US) imaging shows unique advantages with excellent features of real-time imaging, low cost, high safety and portability, making US contrast agents (UCAs)...

  7. Biological in situ characterization of polymeric microbubble contrast agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan, Sha; Egri, Gabriella; Oddo, Letizia; Cerroni, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Paradossi, Gaio; Salvati, Anna; Lynch, Iseult; Dawson, Kenneth A; Monopoli, Marco P

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric microbubbles (MBs) are gas filled particles composed of a thin stabilized polymer shell that have been recently developed as valid contrast agents for the combined use of ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) imaging.

  8. Acoustic characterization of single ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijl, Jeroen; Gaud, Emmanuel; Frinking, Peter J.A.; Arditi, Marcel; Jong, de Nico; Lohse, Detlef; Versluis, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Individual ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles (BR14) were characterized acoustically. The bubbles were excited at a frequency of 2 MHz and at peak-negative pressure amplitudes of 60 and 100 kPa. By measuring the transmit and receive transfer functions of both the transmit and receive transduce

  9. Contrast agents for functional and cellular MRI of the kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenier, Nicolas [ERT CNRS ' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle' , Universite Victor Segalen-Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux (France) and Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle de l' Adulte, Groupe Hospitalier Pellegrin, Place Amelie Raba-Leon, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex (France)]. E-mail: nicolas.grenier@chu-bordeaux.fr; Pedersen, Michael [MR Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Hauger, Olivier [ERT CNRS ' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle' , Universite Victor Segalen-Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux (France); Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle de l' Adulte, Groupe Hospitalier Pellegrin, Place Amelie Raba-Leon, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex (France)

    2006-12-15

    Low-molecular-weight gadolinium (Gd) chelates are glomerular tracers but their role in evaluation of renal function with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is still marginal. Because of their small size, they diffuse freely into the interstitium and the relationship between measured signal intensity and concentration is complex. New categories of contrast agents, such as large Gd-chelates or iron oxide particules, with different pharmacokinetic and magnetic properties have been developed. These large molecules could be useful for both functional (quantification of perfusion, quantification of glomerular filtration rate, estimation of tubular function) and cellular imaging (intrarenal phagocytosis in inflammatory renal diseases). Continuous development of new contrast agents remains worthwhile to get the best adequacy between the physiological phenomenon of interest and the pharmacokinetic of the agent.

  10. Macromolecular and dendrimer-based magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumb, Ambika; Brechbiel, Martin W. (Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)), e-mail: pchoyke@mail.nih.gov; Choyke, Peter (Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that can provide an assessment of function or molecular expression in tandem with anatomic detail. Over the last 20-25 years, a number of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents have been developed to enhance signal by altering proton relaxation properties. This review explores a range of these agents from small molecule chelates, such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, to macromolecular structures composed of albumin, polylysine, polysaccharides (dextran, inulin, starch), poly(ethylene glycol), copolymers of cystamine and cystine with GD-DTPA, and various dendritic structures based on polyamidoamine and polylysine (Gadomers). The synthesis, structure, biodistribution, and targeting of dendrimer-based MR contrast agents are also discussed

  11. Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Small Bowel: Comparison of Different Oral Contrast Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asbach, P.; Breitwieser, C.; Diederichs, G.; Eisele, S.; Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Zeitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Klessen, C. [Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate several substances regarding small bowel distension and contrast on balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: Luminal contrast was evaluated in 24 volunteers after oral application of two different contrast agent groups leading to either bright lumen (pineapple, blueberry juice) or dark lumen (tap water, orange juice) on T1-weighted images. Bowel distension was evaluated in 30 patients ingesting either methylcellulose or mannitol solution for limiting intestinal absorption. Fifteen patients with duodeno-jejunal intubation served as the control. Quantitative evaluation included measurement of luminal signal intensities and diameters of four bowel segments, qualitative evaluation assessed luminal contrast and distension on a five-point scale. Results: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the four contrast agents revealed no significant differences regarding luminal contrast on bSSFP images. Quantitative evaluation revealed significantly lower (P<0.05) small bowel distension for three out of four segments (qualitative evaluation: two out of four segments) for methylcellulose in comparison to the control. Mannitol was found to be equal to the control. Conclusion: Oral ingestion of tap water or orange juice in combination with mannitol is recommended for cine MR imaging of the small bowel regarding luminal contrast and small bowel distension on bSSFP sequences.

  12. Ultrasound imaging beyond the vasculature with new generation contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Reshani H; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan; Exner, Agata A

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 µm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer.

  13. Contrast enhanced cartilage imaging: Comparison of ionic and non-ionic contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, Edzard [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: ewiener@roe.med.tu-muenchen.de; Woertler, Klaus [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany); Weirich, Gregor [Institute of Pathology, Technical University Munich, Troger Str. 18, D-81675 Munich (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J. [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany); Settles, Marcus [Department of Radiology, Technical University Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    Our objective was to compare relaxation effects, dynamics and spatial distributions of ionic and non-ionic contrast agents in articular cartilage at concentrations typically used for direct MR arthrography at 1.5 T. Dynamic MR-studies over 11 h were performed in 15 bovine patella specimens. For each of the contrast agents gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadobenate dimeglumine, gadoteridol and mangafodipir trinatrium three patellae were placed in 2.5 mmol/L contrast solution. Simultaneous measurements of T {sub 1} and T {sub 2} were performed every 30 min using a high-spatial-resolution 'MIX'-sequence. T {sub 1}, T {sub 2} and {delta}R {sub 1}, {delta}R {sub 2} profile plots across cartilage thickness were calculated to demonstrate the spatial and temporal distributions. The charge is one of the main factors which controls the amount of the contrast media diffusing into intact cartilage, but independent of the charge, the spatial distribution across cartilage thickness remains highly inhomogeneous even after 11 h of diffusion. The absolute {delta}R {sub 2}-effect in cartilage is at least as large as the {delta}R {sub 1}-effect for all contrast agents. Maximum changes were 5-12 s{sup -1} for {delta}R {sub 1} and 8-15 s{sup -1} for {delta}R {sub 2}. This study indicates that for morphologically intact cartilage only the amount of contrast agents within cartilage is determined by the charge but not the spatial distribution across cartilage thickness. In addition, {delta}R {sub 2} can be considered for quantification of contrast agent concentrations, since it is of the same magnitude and less time consuming to measure than {delta}R {sub 1}.

  14. A Nanocomplex System as Targeted Contrast Agent Delivery Vehicle for MRI Dynamic Contrast Enhancement Study

    OpenAIRE

    Korotcov, Alexandru; Shan, Liang; Meng, Huan; Wang, Tongxin; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Zhao, Yuliang; Liang, Xing-Jie; Wang, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and tested a liposomal nanocomplex system, which contains Gd-DTPA as a payload and transferrin on the surface, as a tumor specific targeting MRI contrast agent for studying prostate cancer tumors in mice. In vivo, the probe significantly enhanced the MRI signal. The image contrast between the peripheral region of the tumor and the non-involved muscle was nearly 50% higher two hours after administration of the nanocomplex. The liposomal nanocomplex increased the amount of Gd ...

  15. Effects of ultrasound and ultrasound contrast agent on vascular tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Steven C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound (US imaging can be enhanced using gas-filled microbubble contrast agents. Strong echo signals are induced at the tissue-gas interface following microbubble collapse. Applications include assessment of ventricular function and virtual histology. Aim While ultrasound and US contrast agents are widely used, their impact on the physiological response of vascular tissue to vasoactive agents has not been investigated in detail. Methods and results In the present study, rat dorsal aortas were treated with US via a clinical imaging transducer in the presence or absence of the US contrast agent, Optison. Aortas treated with both US and Optison were unable to contract in response to phenylephrine or to relax in the presence of acetylcholine. Histology of the arteries was unremarkable. When the treated aortas were stained for endothelial markers, a distinct loss of endothelium was observed. Importantly, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick-end-labeling (TUNEL staining of treated aortas demonstrated incipient apoptosis in the endothelium. Conclusions Taken together, these ex vivo results suggest that the combination of US and Optison may alter arterial integrity and promote vascular injury; however, the in vivo interaction of Optison and ultrasound remains an open question.

  16. Magnetic nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H; Hickling, William J; Japp, Emily A; Rodriguez, Olga C; Ghosh, Anup; Albanese, Chris; Nishida, Maki; Van Keuren, Edward; Fricke, Stanley; Dollahon, Norman; Stoll, Sarah L

    2013-10-22

    Metal-oxo clusters have been used as building blocks to form hybrid nanomaterials and evaluated as potential MRI contrast agents. We have synthesized a biocompatible copolymer based on a water stable, nontoxic, mixed-metal-oxo cluster, Mn8Fe4O12(L)16(H2O)4, where L is acetate or vinyl benzoic acid, and styrene. The cluster alone was screened by NMR for relaxivity and was found to be a promising T2 contrast agent, with r1 = 2.3 mM(-1) s(-1) and r2 = 29.5 mM(-1) s(-1). Initial cell studies on two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCap, reveal that the cluster has low cytotoxicity and may be potentially used in vivo. The metal-oxo cluster Mn8Fe4(VBA)16 (VBA = vinyl benzoic acid) can be copolymerized with styrene under miniemulsion conditions. Miniemulsion allows for the formation of nanometer-sized paramagnetic beads (~80 nm diameter), which were also evaluated as a contrast agent for MRI. These highly monodispersed, hybrid nanoparticles have enhanced properties, with the option for surface functionalization, making them a promising tool for biomedicine. Interestingly, both relaxivity measurements and MRI studies show that embedding the Mn8Fe4 core within a polymer matrix decreases r2 effects with little effect on r1, resulting in a positive T1 contrast enhancement.

  17. Dual-frequency transducer for nonlinear contrast agent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiroy, Axel; Novell, Anthony; Ringgaard, Erling; Lou-Moeller, Rasmus; Grégoire, Jean-Marc; Abellard, André-Pierre; Zawada, Tomasz; Bouakaz, Ayache; Levassort, Franck

    2013-12-01

    Detection of high-order nonlinear components issued from microbubbles has emerged as a sensitive method for contrast agent imaging. Nevertheless, the detection of these high-frequency components, including the third, fourth, and fifth harmonics, remains challenging because of the lack of transducer sensitivity and bandwidth. In this context, we propose a new design of imaging transducer based on a simple fabrication process for high-frequency nonlinear imaging. The transducer is composed of two elements: the outer low-frequency (LF) element was centered at 4 MHz and used in transmit mode, whereas the inner high-frequency (HF) element centered at 14 MHz was used in receive mode. The center element was pad-printed using a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) paste. The outer element was molded using a commercial PZT, and curved porous unpoled PZT was used as backing. Each piezoelectric element was characterized to determine the electromechanical performance with thickness coupling factor around 45%. After the assembly of the two transducer elements, hydrophone measurements (electroacoustic responses and radiation patterns) were carried out and demonstrated a large bandwidth (70% at -3 dB) of the HF transducer. Finally, the transducer was evaluated for contrast agent imaging using contrast agent microbubbles. The results showed that harmonic components (up to the sixth harmonic) of the microbubbles were successfully detected. Moreover, images from a flow phantom were acquired and demonstrated the potential of the transducer for high-frequency nonlinear contrast imaging.

  18. Assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Sandra L; Given, Charles W

    2011-05-01

    The increase in oral anticancer medications with complex regimens creates a need to assure that patients are taking therapeutic dosages as prescribed. This article reviews the assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents. Research and journal articles from CINAHL and PubMed. Assessing and measuring adherence to oral antineoplastics should include three dimensions: the percentage of medications taken, the duration, and the timing of taking the medication. Clinicians need to conduct ongoing assessment and measurement of adherence to oral antineoplastic agents. This includes eliciting patient report of adherence, pill counts, drug diaries, and pharmacy or medical record audits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbon nanoparticles as a multimodal thermoacoustic and photoacoustic contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xin; Wu, Lina; Xing, Wenxin; Xia, Jun; Nie, Liming; Zhang, Ruiying; Lanza, Gregory M.; Shen, Baozhong; Pan, Dipanjan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrated the potential of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) as exogenous contrast agents for both thermoacoustic (TA) tomography (TAT) and photoacoustic (PA) tomography (PAT). In comparison to deionized water, the CNPs provided a four times stronger signal in TAT at 3 GHz. In comparison to blood, The CNPs provided a much stronger signal in PAT over a broad wavelength range of 450-850 nm. Specifically, the maximum signal enhancement in PAT was 9.4 times stronger in the near-infrared window of 635-670 nm. In vivo blood-vessel PA imaging was performed non-invasively on a mouse femoral area. The images, captured after the tail vein injection of CNPs, show a gradual enhancement of the optical absorption in the vessels by up to 230%. The results indicate that CNPs can be potentially used as contrast agents for TAT and PAT to monitor the intravascular or extravascular pathways in clinical applications.

  20. Agents described in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database for imaging carbonic anhydrase IX expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Deborah; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2014-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is selectively expressed in a range of hypoxic tumours and is a validated endogenous hypoxia marker with prognostic significance; hence, CA IX is of great interest as a molecular imaging target in oncology. In this review, we present an overview of the different imaging agents and imaging modalities that have been applied for the in vivo detection of CA IX. The imaging agents reviewed are all entries in the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD) and comprise antibody, antibody fragments and small molecule imaging agents. The effectiveness of these agents for imaging CA IX in vivo gave variable performance; however, a number of agents proved very capable. As molecular imaging has become indispensable in current medical practice we anticipate that the clinical significance of CA IX will see continued development and improvements in imaging agents for targeting this enzyme.

  1. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Caixin; Jin, Yushen; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-05-21

    Among all the imaging techniques, ultrasound imaging has a unique advantage due to its features of real-time, low cost, high safety, and portability. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely used to enhance ultrasonic signals. One of the most exciting features of UCAs for use in biomedicine is the possibility of easily putting new combinations of functional molecules into microbubbles (MBs), which are the most routinely used UCAs. Various therapeutic agents and medical nanoparticles (quantum dots, gold, Fe3O4, etc.) can be loaded into ultrasound-responsive MBs. Hence, UCAs can be developed as multifunctional agents that integrate capabilities for early detection and diagnosis and for imaging guided therapy of various diseases. The current review will focus on such state-of-the-art UCA platforms that have been exploited for multimodal imaging and for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  2. Towards MRI T2 contrast agents of increased efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branca, Marlène [CNRS, LCC (Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination), 205, route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LCC, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Marciello, Marzia, E-mail: marziamarciello@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ciuculescu-Pradines, Diana [CNRS, LCC (Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination), 205, route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LCC, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Respaud, Marc [LPCNO, INSA, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Morales, Maria del Puerto [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Serra, Raphael; Casanove, Marie-José [CNRS, CEMES (Centre d' Elaboration des Matériaux et d' Etudes Structurales) (France); Amiens, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.amiens@lcc-toulouse.fr [CNRS, LCC (Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination), 205, route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LCC, F-31077 Toulouse (France)

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles can be efficient contrast agents for T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after tuning of some key parameters such as size, surface state, colloidal stability and magnetization, thus motivating the development of new synthetic pathways. In this paper we report the effects of surface coating on the efficiency of two different types of iron based nanoparticles (NPs) as MRI contrast agents. Starting from well-defined hydrophobic iron oxide nanospheres and iron nanocubes of 13 nm size, we have used three methods to increase their hydrophilicity and transfer them into water: surface ligand modification, ligand exchange or encapsulation. The NPs obtained have been characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, and the relaxivities of their stable colloidal solutions in water have been determined. Among all samples prepared, iron nanocubes coated by silica display the highest relaxivity (r{sub 2}) value: 628 s{sup −1} mM{sup −1}. - Highlights: • Surface coating effect on the efficiency of iron based nanoparticles (NPs) as MRI contrast agents. • Synthesis of 2 different types of hydrophobic iron based NPs: iron oxide nanospheres and iron nanocubes (13 nm). • Development of three different procedures to stabilize iron based NPs in water. • Iron nanocubes coated by silica displayed the highest r{sub 2} value (628 s{sup −1} mM{sup −1})

  3. Advances in Ultrasound Mediated Gene Therapy Using Microbubble Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank R. Sirsi, Mark A. Borden

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents have the potential to dramatically improve gene therapy treatments by enhancing the delivery of therapeutic DNA to malignant tissue. The physical response of microbubbles in an ultrasound field can mechanically perturb blood vessel walls and cell membranes, enhancing drug permeability into malignant tissue. In this review, we discuss literature that provided evidence of specific mechanisms that enhance in vivo gene delivery utilizing microbubble contrast agents, namely their ability to 1 improving cell membrane permeability, 2 modulate vascular permeability, and 3 enhance endocytotic uptake in cells. Additionally, we review novel microbubble vectors that are being developed in order to exploit these mechanisms and deliver higher gene payloads with greater target specificity. Finally, we discuss some future considerations that should be addressed in the development of next-generation microbubbles in order to improve in vivo microbubble gene delivery. Overall, microbubbles are rapidly gaining popularity as efficient gene carriers, and combined with their functionality as imaging contrast agents, they represent powerful theranostic tools for image guided gene therapy applications.

  4. Advances in ultrasound mediated gene therapy using microbubble contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirsi, Shashank R; Borden, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents have the potential to dramatically improve gene therapy treatments by enhancing the delivery of therapeutic DNA to malignant tissue. The physical response of microbubbles in an ultrasound field can mechanically perturb blood vessel walls and cell membranes, enhancing drug permeability into malignant tissue. In this review, we discuss literature that provided evidence of specific mechanisms that enhance in vivo gene delivery utilizing microbubble contrast agents, namely their ability to 1) improving cell membrane permeability, 2) modulate vascular permeability, and 3) enhance endocytotic uptake in cells. Additionally, we review novel microbubble vectors that are being developed in order to exploit these mechanisms and deliver higher gene payloads with greater target specificity. Finally, we discuss some future considerations that should be addressed in the development of next-generation microbubbles in order to improve in vivo microbubble gene delivery. Overall, microbubbles are rapidly gaining popularity as efficient gene carriers, and combined with their functionality as imaging contrast agents, they represent powerful theranostic tools for image guided gene therapy applications.

  5. Site-specific tumor-targeted fluorescent contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilefu, Samuel I.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Dorshow, Richard B.; Jimenez, Hermo N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan; Wilhelm, R. Randy; Webb, Elizabeth G.; Erion, Jack L.

    2001-01-01

    Site-specific delivery of drugs and contrast agents to tumors protects normal tissues from the cytotoxic effect of drugs, and enhances the contrast between normal and diseased tissues. In optical medicine, biocompatible dyes can be used as photo therapeutics or as contrast agents. Previous studies have shown that the use of covalent or non-covalent dye conjugates of carries such as antibodies, liposomes, and polysaccharides improves the delivery of such molecules to tumors. However, large biomolecules can elicit adverse immunogenic reactions and also result in prolonged blood circulation times, delaying visualization of target tissues. A viable alternative to this strategy is to use small bioactive molecule-dye conjugates. These molecules have several advantages over large biomolecules, including ease of synthesis of a variety of high purity compounds for combinatorial screening of new targets, enhanced diffusivity to solid tumors, and the ability to affect the pharmocokinetics of the conjugates by minor structural changes. Thus, we conjugated a near IR light absorbing dye to bioactive peptides that specifically target over expressed tumor receptors in established rat tumor lines. High tumor uptake of the conjugates was obtained without loss of either the peptide receptor affinity or the dye fluorescence. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a small peptide-dye conjugate strategy for in vivo tumor imaging. Site-specific delivery of photodynamic therapy agents may also benefit form this approach.

  6. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Galiè

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 μm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes.

  7. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijin; Yu, Dexin; Wang, Shaojie; Zhang, Na; Ma, Chunhong; Lu, Zaijun

    2009-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid-polyethylene glycol/gadolinium-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA) nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA-PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd-DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was -12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed ( r = 0.987). The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd-DTPA. PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular targeted imaging contrast agent.

  8. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Dexin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid–polyethylene glycol/gadolinium–diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. The PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA–PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd–DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was −12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed (r = 0.987. The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd–DTPA. PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular

  9. Nanomaterials incorporated ultrasound contrast agents for cancer theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lei; Ke, Heng-Te

    2016-09-01

    Nanotechnology provides various nanomaterials with tremendous functionalities for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently, theranostics has been developed as an alternative strategy for efficient cancer treatment through combination of imaging diagnosis and therapeutic interventions under the guidance of diagnostic results. Ultrasound (US) imaging shows unique advantages with excellent features of real-time imaging, low cost, high safety and portability, making US contrast agents (UCAs) an ideal platform for construction of cancer theranostic agents. This review focuses on the development of nanomaterials incorporated multifunctional UCAs serving as theranostic agents for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, via conjugation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), CuS nanoparticles, DNA, siRNA, gold nanoparticles (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshell (GNS), graphene oxides (GOs), polypyrrole (PPy) nanocapsules, Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles and so on to different types of UCAs. The cancer treatment could be more effectively and accurately carried out under the guidance and monitoring with the help of the achieved theranostic agents. Furthermore, nanomaterials incorporated theranostic agents based on UCAs can be designed and constructed by demand for personalized and accurate treatment of cancer, demonstrating their great potential to address the challenges of cancer heterogeneity and adaptation, which can provide alternative strategies for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  10. Nanomaterials incorporated ultrasound contrast agents for cancer theranostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Fu; Heng-Te Ke

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology provides various nanomaterials with tremendous functionalities for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently, theranostics has been developed as an alternative strategy for efficient cancer treatment through combination of imaging diagnosis and therapeutic interventions under the guidance of diagnostic results. Ultrasound (US) imaging shows unique advantages with excellent features of real-time imaging, low cost, high safety and portability, making US contrast agents (UCAs) an ideal platform for construction of cancer theranostic agents. This review focuses on the development of nanomaterials incorporated multifunctional UCAs serving as theranostic agents for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, via conjugation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), CuS nanoparticles, DNA, siRNA, gold nanoparticles (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshell (GNS), graphene oxides (GOs), polypyrrole (PPy) nanocapsules, Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles and so on to different types of UCAs. The cancer treatment could be more effectively and accurately carried out under the guidance and monitoring with the help of the achieved theranostic agents. Furthermore, nanomaterials incorporated theranostic agents based on UCAs can be designed and constructed by demand for personalized and accurate treatment of cancer, demonstrating their great potential to address the challenges of cancer heterogeneity and adaptation, which can provide alternative strategies for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  11. Oral Antineoplastic Agents: Assessing the Delay in Care

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the length of time between when a prescription for an oral antineoplastic agent is written by the provider and when the medication is received by the patient and to identify risk factors that significantly increase time to medication receipt. First-time fill prescriptions for oral antineoplastic agents were identified. The date the prescription was written and received by the patient was determined. A retrospective review was completed to gather additiona...

  12. Functional imaging with MR T1 contrast: a feasibility study with blood-pool contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majos, Agata; Stefanczyk, Ludomir [Medical University of Lodz, Radiology Department, Lodz (Poland); Bogorodzki, Piotr; Piatkowska-Janko, Ewa; Kurjata, Robert [Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Radioelectronics, Warsaw (Poland); Wolak, Tomasz [Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw (Poland)

    2009-04-15

    The aim of this study was to prove the concept of using a long intravenous half-life blood-pool T1 contrast agent as a new functional imaging method. For each of ten healthy subjects, two dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) protocols were carried out: (1) a reference run with a typical T2* echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence based on the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect and (2) a run with a T1-sensitive three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo (GRE) sequence using cerebral blood volume (CBV) contrast after intravenous administration of a contrast agent containing a chelate of gadolinium diethylene-triamine-pentaacetate with a phosphono-oxymethyl substituent. All sequences were performed during the execution of a block-type finger-tapping paradigm. SPM5 software was used for statistical analysis. For both runs maximum activations (peak Z-score = 5.5, cluster size 3,449 voxels) were localized in the left postcentral gyrus. Visual inspection of respective signal amplitudes suggests the T1 contrast to be substantially smaller than EPI (0.5% vs 1%). A new functional imaging method with potentially smaller image artefacts due to the nature of CBV contrast and characteristics of the T1 sequence was proposed and verified. (orig.)

  13. Multifunctional photosensitizer-based contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U S; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-18

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  14. Multifunctional Photosensitizer-Based Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U. S.; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  15. 口服低浓度顺磁性造影剂对十二指肠憩室的诊断价值研究%The Diagnostic Value of Gd-DTPA at Low Concentration as an oral positive MRI Contrast Agents for the Duodenal Diverticulum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈锦华; 朱斌; 田为中; 王秀兰; 张继; 张剑

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨以低浓度钆喷酸葡胺(Gd-DTPA注射液)作为阳性造影剂进行MRI检查对诊断十二指肠憩室的可行性.方法 对常规检查疑似十二指肠憩室患者进行MRI薄层及口服低浓度造影剂MRI薄层检查.结果 55例患者65个憩室被检出,46例位于十二指肠降部,9例位于十二指肠水平部.MRI薄层检查59个憩室内含气液平或气体,6个憩室仅表现为十二指肠壁外囊袋状影;口服低浓度造影剂MRI薄层检查65个憩室内均充填造影剂,重建图像清晰显示憩室颈部及憩室腔形态.结论 口服低浓度造影剂MRI薄层检查有助于十二指肠憩室的明确诊断,MRI三维后处理可以与上消化道钡餐检查相媲美.口服低浓度造影剂MRI薄层检查可以作为十二指肠憩室诊断有疑问时的有力补充.%Objective To investigate the feasibility of using the gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA injection) at low concentration as a positive MRI contrast agents to diagnose the duodenal diverticulum.Methods Thin layer MRI scans with and without oral contrast agents were performed in the patients with suspected duodenal diverticula.Results Among 55 patients, 46 cases were found in the descending duodenum, 9 were found in the horizontal part of duodenum. Sixty-five diverticula were detected in all the patients. Routinely thin layer MRI scans showed that 59 diverticulum contains gas-liquid borderline or gas, 6 diverticulum just exhibited as the pocket hernia shadow in duodenal wall. Thin layer MRI scans with oral contrast agent showed all 65 diverticula were filled with contrast agent. Reconstructed images displayed the cervical part and cavity of the diverticula clearly.Conclusion MRI thin layer scan with oral low concentration of contrast agent can help to the diagnosis of duodenal diverticulum. Three-dimensional reconstruction was comparable with upper gastrointestinal barium meal examination. It can be used as a powerful supplement for the suspicious diverticula

  16. The effective use of acai juice, blueberry juice and pineapple juice as negative contrast agents for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittman, Mark E. [Cohen Children' s Medical Center of New York, North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Department of Radiology, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Callahan, Michael J. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is commonly performed in the evaluation of known or suspected pancreaticobiliary disease in children. The administration of a negative oral contrast agent can improve the quality of the examination without significant additional cost. We describe our experience with certain brands of acai juice, blueberry juice and pineapple juice as negative oral contrast agents in children. We believe these fruit juices are safe, palatable and may improve MRCP image quality. (orig.)

  17. Impact of dispersants on relaxivities of magnetite contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ji; Cheng, Lingchao; Chen, Kezheng

    2015-04-01

    Particle size is normally thought to be a major factor to evaluate MRI performance of contrast agents in biological systems. In this regard, three size-relevant regimes, including motional averaging regime, static dephasing regime, and echo-limited regime, have been well developed. In this study, we find the dispersant, which is often used as the subordinate additive in MRI measurements, is another key factor that determines the application of these three regimes in real systems. Our results show that the identically sized particle systems can separately exhibit static dephasing and echo-limited behaviors merely by altering the dispersants in aqueous solution.

  18. Characterization of Cysteine Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles as MRI Contrast Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Ahmadi; Ning Gu; Hamid Reza Madaah Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a kind of stabilized ferrofluid based on magnetite nanoparticles (mean core and its coating size about 21.9 and 1.6 nm, respectively) was synthesized via coprecipitation method. Cysteine was used as surfactant due to its proper conjunction to the surface of magnetite nanoparticles. Coating density and synthesized ferrofluids were characterized by using transmission electron microscope, thermogravimetry analysis, dynamic light scattering and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Magnetic resonance imaging studies show that the synthesized ferrofluid can be used as a potential contrast enhancement agent especially for imaging lymphatic system.

  19. Gadolinium nanoparticles and contrast agent as radiation sensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Florence; Flaender, Mélanie; Delorme, Rachel; Brochard, Thierry; Mayol, Jean-François; Arnaud, Josiane; Perriat, Pascal; Sancey, Lucie; Lux, François; Barth, Rolf F; Carrière, Marie; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Elleaume, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing properties of gadolinium nanoparticles (NPs) with the gadolinium contrast agent (GdCA) Magnevist(®) in order to better understand the mechanisms by which they act as radiation sensitizers. This was determined following either low energy synchrotron irradiation or high energy gamma irradiation of F98 rat glioma cells exposed to ultrasmall gadolinium NPs (GdNPs, hydrodynamic diameter of 3 nm) or GdCA. Clonogenic assays were used to quantify cell survival after irradiation in the presence of Gd using monochromatic x-rays with energies in the 25 keV-80 keV range from a synchrotron and 1.25 MeV gamma photons from a cobalt-60 source. Radiosensitization was demonstrated with both agents in combination with X-irradiation. At the same concentration (2.1 mg mL(-1)), GdNPS had a greater effect than GdCA. The maximum sensitization-enhancement ratio at 4 Gy (SER4Gy) was observed at an energy of 65 keV for both the nanoparticles and the contrast agent (2.44   ±   0.33 and 1.50   ±   0.20, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). At a higher energy (1.25 MeV), radiosensitization only was observed with GdNPs (1.66   ±   0.17 and 1.01   ±   0.11, for GdNPs and GdCA, respectively). The radiation dose enhancements were highly 'energy dependent' for both agents. Secondary-electron-emission generated after photoelectric events appeared to be the primary mechanism by which Gd contrast agents functioned as radiosensitizers. On the other hand, other biological mechanisms, such as alterations in the cell cycle may explain the enhanced radiosensitizing properties of GdNPs.

  20. Gestational diabetes mellitus management with oral hypoglycemic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Rachel J; Hays, Karen E; Hebert, Mary F

    2014-12-01

    Oral hypoglycemic agents such as glyburide (second-generation sulfonylurea) and metformin (biguanide) are attractive alternatives to insulin due to lower cost, ease of administration, and better patient adherence. The majority of evidence from retrospective and prospective studies suggests comparable efficacy and safety of oral hypoglycemic agents such as glyburide and metformin as compared to insulin when used in the treatment of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Glyburide and metformin have altered pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and both agents cross the placenta. In this article, we review the efficacy, safety, and dosage of oral hypoglycemic agents for the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus. Additional research is needed to evaluate optimal dosage for glyburide and metformin during pregnancy. Comparative studies evaluating the effects of glyburide and metformin on long-term maternal and fetal outcomes are also needed.

  1. Modified Gadonanotubes as a Promising Novel MRI Contrasting Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouzbeh Jahanbakhsh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose of the study:Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are emerging drug and imaging carrier systems which show significant versatility. One of the extraordinary characteristics of CNTs as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI contrasting agent is the extremely large proton relaxivities when loaded with gadolinium ion (Gdn3+ clusters.Methods:In this study equated Gdn3+ clusters were loaded in the sidewall defects of oxidized multiwalled (MW CNTs. The amount of loaded gadolinium ion into the MWCNTs was quantified by inductively coupled plasma (ICP method. To improve water solubility and biocompatibility of the system, the complexes were functionalized using diamine-terminated oligomeric poly (ethylene glycol via a thermal reaction method.Results:Gdn3+ loaded PEGylated oxidized CNTs (Gdn3+@CNTs-PEG is freely soluble in water and stable in phosphate buffer saline having particle size of about 200 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM images clearly showed formation of PEGylated CNTs. MRI analysis showed that the prepared solution represents 10% more signal intensity even in half concentration of Gd3+ in comparison with commerciality available contrasting agent Magnevist®. In addition hydrophilic layer of PEG at the surface of CNTs could prepare stealth nanoparticles to escape RES.Conclusion:It was shown that Gdn3+@CNTs-PEG was capable to accumulate in tumors through enhanced permeability and retention effect. Moreover this system has a potential for early detection of diseases or tumors at the initial stages.

  2. Assessment of tumor angiogenesis using fluorescence contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Liu, Qian; Huang, Ping; Hyman, Shay; Intes, Xavier; Lee, William; Chance, Britton

    2003-12-01

    Angiogenesis is an important factor for further tumor growth and thus could be an attractive therapeutic target. Optical imaging can provide a non-invasive way to measure the permeability of tumor blood vessels and assess the tumor vasculature. We have developed a dual-channel near-infrared fluorescence system for simultaneous measurement of the pharmacokinetics of tumorous and normal tissues with exogenous contrast agents. This frequency-domain system consists of the light source (780 nm laser diode), fiber optics, interference filter (830 nm) and the detector (PMT). The fluorescent contrast agent used in this study is Indocyanine Green (ICG), and the normal dosage is 100 μl at a concentration of 5 μM. In vivo animal study is performed on the K1735 melanoma-bearing mouse. The fluorescence signals both tumorous and normal tissues after the bolus injection of ICG through the tail vein are continuously recorded as a function of time. The data is fitted by a double-exponential model to reveal the wash-in and wash-out parameters of different tissues. We observed an elongated wash-out from the tumor compared with normal tissue (leg). The effect of radiation therapy on the tumor vasculature is also discussed.

  3. Micro-radiography of biological samples with medical contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammer, J., E-mail: jiri.dammer@lf1.cuni.cz [Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Salmovská 1, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Hospital Na Bulovce, Department of Radiological Physics, Budinova 2, 180 81 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Weyda, F. [Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branisovska 31, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Benes, J. [Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Salmovská 1, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Sopko, V. [Hospital Na Bulovce, Department of Radiological Physics, Budinova 2, 180 81 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Gelbic, I. [Biology Centre, AS CR, Institute of Entomology, Department of Biochemistry and Physiology, Branisovska 31, CZ-37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2013-12-01

    Micro-radiography is an imaging technique that uses X-rays to study the internal structures of objects. This fast and easy imaging tool is based on differential X-ray attenuation by various tissues and structures within biological samples. The experimental setup described is based on the semiconductor pixel X-ray detector Medipix2 and X-ray micro-focus tube. Our micro-radiographic system has been recently used not only for the examination of internal structures of various arthropods and other biological objects but also for tracing some processes in selected model species (we used living larvae of mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus). Low concentrations of iodine, lanthanum or gold particles were used as a tracer (contrast agent). Such contrast agents increase the absorption of X-rays and allow a better visibility of internal structures of model organisms (especially the various cavities, pores, etc.). In addition, the movement of tracers in selected timing experiments demonstrates some physiological functions of digestive and excretory system.

  4. [Progress in study of oral biofilm dispersal-inducing agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhu; Jingmei, Yang; Dingyu, Duan; Yi, Xu

    2014-12-01

    Communities of bacteria wrapped in self-generated extracellular polymeric matrix and attached to a solid surface are known as biofilm. Biofilm formation and development can be divided into three stages: adhesion of cells to a surface, reproduction of the cells, and dispersion of cells. The procedure, which surface-attached biofilm disperses bacterial cells into the environment to colonize new sites, is defined as biofilm dispersal. Biofilm dispersal is an essential stage of biofilm life cycle. It plays an important role in the transmission of bacteria. For many pathogenic bacteria, biofilm dispersal can transform bacteria in biofilm into planktonic state and promote the spread of infection. The formation of biofilm may increase the resistance of bacteria to antimicrobial agent and host defence response compared with planktonic cells. In the oral cavity, oral microorganism can attach to the surface of oral tissue and prosthesis to form biofilm. Dental caries and periodontal disease are oral chronic infections diseases of the oral tissue. The occurrence of them has a close relationship with biofilm. The mechanism of dispersal is a hot topic in recent years. Some agents which promote dispersal might be a therapeutic potential against biofilm infections. The clinical implication of dispersal agents and potential application are promising. This article reviews the dispersal-inducing agents of oral biofilms.

  5. Cellulose nanoparticles: photoacoustic contrast agents that biodegrade to simple sugars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-03-01

    In photoacoustic imaging, nanoparticle contrast agents offer strong signal intensity and long-term stability, but are limited by poor biodistribution and clearance profiles. Conversely, small molecules offer renal clearance, but relatively low photoacoustic signal. Here we describe a cellulose-based nanoparticle with photoacoustic signal superior to gold nanorods, but that undergoes enzymatic cleavage into constituent glucose molecules for renal clearance. Cellulose nanoparticles (CNPs) were synthesized through acidic cleavage of cellulose linters and purified with centrifugation. TEM indicated that the nanoparticles were 132 +/- 46 nm; the polydispersity index was 0.138. Ex vivo characterization showed a photoacoustic limit of detection of 0.02 mg/mL CNPs, and the photoacoustic signal of CNPs was 1.5- to 3.0-fold higher than gold nanorods (also at 700 nm resonance) on a particle-to-particle basis. Cell toxicity assays suggested that overnight doses below 0.31 mg/mL CNPs produced no significant (p>0.05) impact on cell metabolism. Intravenous doses up to 0.24 mg were tolerated well in nude mice. Subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor xenografts of the OV2008 ovarian cancer cell line were then created in nude mice. Data was collected with a Nexus128 scanner from Endra LifeSciences. Spectral data used a LAZR system from Visualsonics both at 700 nm excitation. We injected CNPs (0.024 mg, 0.048 mg, and 0.80 mg) via tail vein and showed that the tumor photoacoustic signal reached maximum increase between 10 and 20 minutes. All injected concentrations were statistically (p0.96 suggesting quantitative signal. CNP biodegradation was demonstrated ex vivo with a glucose assay. CNPs in the presence of cellulase were reduced to free glucose in under than four hours. The glucose concentration before addition of cellulase was not detectable, but increased to 92.1 μg/mL in four hours. CNPs in the absence of cellulase did not produce glucose. Small fragments of nanoparticle in the

  6. Ferric ammonium citrate as a positive bowel contrast agent for MR imaging of the upper abdomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivelitz, D.; Taupitz, M.; Hamm, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Charite, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Gehl, H.B. [Medizinische Univ. Luebeck (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Heuck, A. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Krahe, T. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Lodemann, K.P. [Bracco-Byk Gulden GmbH, Konstanz (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and diagnostic efficacy of two different doses of ferric ammonium citrate as a paramagnetic oral contrast agent for MR imaging of the upper abdomen. Material and methods: Ninety-nine adult patients referred for MR imaging for a known or suspected upper abdominal pathology were included in this randomized multicenter double-blind clinical trial. Imaging was performed with spin-echo (T1- and T2-weighted) and gradient-echo (T1-weighted) techniques before and after administration of either 1200 mg or 2400 mg of ferric ammonium citrate dissolved in 600 ml of water. Safety analysis included monitoring of vital signs, assessment of adverse events, and laboratory testing. Efficacy with regard to organ distension, contrast distribution, bowel enhancement and delineation of adjacent structures was graded qualitatively. Results: No serious adverse events were reported for either of the two concentrations. A total of 31 minor side effects were noted, of which significantly more occurred in the higher dose group (p<0.01). The diagnostic confidence in defining or excluding disease was graded as better after contrast administration for 48% of all images. Marked or moderate enhancement of the upper gastrointestinal tract was achieved at both doses in 69.5% of cases with no evident difference between the two doses. The higher dose tended to show better results in terms of the contrast assessment parameters. Conclusion: Ferric ammonium citrate is a safe and effective oral contrast agent for MR imaging of the upper abdomen at two different dose levels. The higher dose showed a tendency toward better imaging results while the lower dose caused significantly fewer side effects. Therefore, the 1200 mg dose can be recommended in view of the risk-to-benefit ratio. (orig.)

  7. A model for ultrasound contrast agent in a phantom vessel

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2014-02-01

    A theoretical framework to model the dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agent (UCA) inside a phantom vessel is presented. The model is derived from the reduced Navier-Stokes equation and is coupled with the evolving flow field solution inside the vessel by a similarity transformation approach. The results are computed, and compared with experiments available in literature, for the initial UCA radius of Ro=1.5 μm and 2 μm for the vessel diameter of D=12 μm and 200 μm with the acoustic parameters as utilized in the experiments. When compared to other models, better agreement on smaller vessel diameter is obtained with the proposed coupled model. The model also predicts, quite accurately, bubble fragmentation in terms of acoustic and geometric parameters. © 2014 IEEE.

  8. HIFU Hemostasis of Liver Injuries Enhanced by Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zderic, Vesna; Vaezy, Shahram; Brayman, Andrew A.; Matula, Thomas J.; O'Keefe, Grant E.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2005-03-01

    Our objective was to investigate whether High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) hemostasis can be achieved faster in the presence of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA). Incisions (3 cm long and 0.5 cm deep) were made in surgically exposed rabbit liver. Optison at a concentration of 0.18 ml/kg was injected into the mesenteric vein, immediately before the incision was made. The HIFU applicator (frequency of 5.5 MHz, and intensity of 3,700 W/cm2) was scanned manually over the incision (at an approximate rate of 1 mm/s) until hemostasis was achieved. The times to complete hemostasis were measured and normalized with the initial blood loss. The hemostasis times were 59±23 s in the presence of Optison and 70±23 s without Optison. The presence of Optison produced a 37% reduction in the normalized hemostasis times (phemostasis of internal organ injuries.

  9. The use of contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammer, J; Sopko, V; Jakubek, J [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Horska 3a/22, CZ 12800 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Weyda, F, E-mail: jiri.dammer@utef.cvut.cz [Biological center of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Entomology, Branisovska 31, CZ-37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2011-01-15

    The technique of X-ray transmission imaging has been available for over a century and is still among the fastest and easiest approaches to the studies of internal structure of biological samples. Recent advances in semiconductor technology have led to the development of new types of X-ray detectors with direct conversion of interacting X-ray photon to an electric signal. Semiconductor pixel detectors seem to be specially promising; compared to the film technique, they provide single-quantum and real-time digital information about the objects being studied. We describe the recently developed radiographic apparatus, equipped with Medipix2 semiconductor pixel detector. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by an X-ray tube (micro- or nano-focus FeinFocus). Thanks to the wide dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and its high spatial resolution better than 1{mu}m, the setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples, including in-vivo observations with contrast agent (Optiray). Along with the description of the apparatus we provide examples of the use iodine contrast agent as a tracer in various insects as model organisms. The motivation of our work is to develop our imaging techniques as non-destructive and non-invasive. Microradiographic imaging helps detect organisms living in a not visible environment, visualize the internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of their body (morphology). Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  10. Stable and transient subharmonic emissions from isolated contrast agent microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Elena; Breschi, Luca; Vannacci, Enrico; Masotti, Leonardo

    2007-03-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely studied in recent years in order to improve and develop new, sophisticated imaging techniques for clinical applications. In order to improve the understanding of microbubble-ultrasound interactions, an acoustic dynamic characterization of UCA microbubble behavior was performed in this work using a high frame-rate acquiring and processing system. This equipment is connected to a commercial scanner that provides RF beam-formed data with a frame-rate of 30 Hz. Acquired RF sequences allows us to follow the dynamics of cavitation mechanisms in its temporal evolution during different insonifying conditions. The experimental setup allowed us to keep the bubbles free in a spatial region of the supporting medium, thus avoiding boundary effects that can alter the ultrasound field and the scattered echo from bubbles. The work focuses on the study of subharmonic emission from an isolated bubble of contrast agent. In particular, the acoustic pressure threshold for a subharmonic stable emission was evaluated for a subset of 50 microbubbles at 3.3 MHz and at 5 MHz of insonation frequencies. An unexpected second pressure threshold, which caused the stand still of the subharmonic emission, was detected at 3.3 MHz and 5 MHz excitation frequencies. A transient subharmonic emission, which is hypothesized as being related to the formation of new free gas bubbles, was detected during the ultrasound-induced destruction of microbubbles. An experimental procedure was devised in order to investigate these behaviors and several sequences of RF echo signals and the related spectra, acquired from an isolated bubble in different insonation conditions, are presented and discussed in this paper.

  11. Therapeutic options for herpes labialis, I: Oral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elish, Diana; Singh, Fiza; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2004-07-01

    Given the prevalence of herpes labialis, effective therapy has the potential to affect the lives of many and presents a challenge for clinicians. Over the last several years, most of the focus of herpes research has been on the treatment of genital herpes. Recently, however, several studies have been published examining the efficacy of therapies specifically for herpes labialis. Several therapeutic agents, both prescription and over-the-counter, are available for controlling and managing the disease. In this series of articles, we review oral and topical therapeutic agents that are available in the treatment of herpes labialis and its associated symptoms. This article will review oral treatment options.

  12. Mechanically Tunable Hollow Silica Ultrathin Nanoshells for Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, A.; Wang, J.; Lu, N.; Viveros, R.D.; Allen, C. A.; Mattrey, R.F.; Blair, S.L.; Trogler, W.C.; Kim, M. J.; Kummel, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoropentane (PFP) gas filled biodegradable iron-doped silica nanoshells have been demonstrated as long-lived ultrasound contrast agents. Nanoshells are synthesized by a sol-gel process with tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and iron ethoxide. Substituting a fraction of the TMOS with R-substituted trialkoxysilanes produces ultrathin nanoshells with varying shell thicknesses and morphologies composed of fused nanoflakes. The ultrathin nanoshells had continuous ultrasound Doppler imaging lifetimes exceeding 3 hours, were twice as bright using contrast specific imaging, and had decreased pressure thresholds compared to control nanoshells synthesized with just TMOS. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the R-group substituted trialkoxysilanes could reduce the mechanically critical nanoshell layer to 1.4 nm. These ultrathin nanoshells have the mechanical behavior of weakly linked nanoflakes but the chemical stability of silica. The synthesis can be adapted for general fabrication of three-dimensional nanostructures composed of nanoflakes, which have thicknesses from 1.4–3.8 nm and diameters from 2–23 nm. PMID:26955300

  13. Ultrasound contrast agents for bleeding detection and acoustic hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zderic, Vesna; Luo, Wenbo; Brayman, Andrew; Crum, Lawrence; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    Objective: To investigate the application of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) in improving both therapeutic and diagnostic aspects of ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. Methods: Incisions (3 cm long, 0.5 cm deep) were made in rabbit livers (in anterior surface for HIFU treatment, or posterior surface for bleeding detection). UCA Optison (~0.1 ml/kg) was injected into mesenteric vein or ear vein. A HIFU applicator (5.5 MHz, 6400 W/cm2) was scanned manually over the incision until hemostasis was achieved. Occult bleeding was monitored with Doppler ultrasound. Results: The presence of Optison produced 37% reduction in hemostasis times normalized to initial bleeding rates. Gross and histological observations showed similar appearance of HIFU lesions produced in the presence of Optison and control HIFU lesions. The temperature reached 100°C in both HIFU only and HIFU+UCA treatments. Tension strength of hemostatic liver incisions was 0.9+/-0.5 N. Almost no bleeding could be detected before Optison injection. First appearance of contrast enhancement localized at the bleeding site was 15 s after Optison injection, and lasted for ~50 s. Conclusion: The presence of UCA during HIFU treatment of liver incisions resulted in shortening of HIFU application times and better visualization of bleeding sites.

  14. Garcinia xanthones as orally active antitumor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojin; Li, Xiang; Sun, Haopeng; Wang, Xiaojian; Zhao, Li; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Xiaorong; Zhang, Shenglie; Wang, Yanyan; Yang, Yingrui; Zeng, Su; Guo, Qinglong; You, Qidong

    2013-01-10

    Using a newly developed strategy whose key step is the regioselective propargylation of hydroxyxanthone substrates, 99 structurally diverse Garcinia natural-product-like xanthones based on gambogic acid were designed and synthesized and their in vitro antitumor activity was evaluated. A set of 40 related compounds was chosen for determination of their physicochemical properties including polar surface area, log D₇.₄, aqueous solubility, and permeability at pH 7.4. In the light of the in vitro antitumor activity and the physicochemical properties, two compounds were advanced into in vivo efficacy experiments. The antitumor activity of compound 112, administered po, showed more potent in vivo oral antitumor activity than gambogic acid.

  15. Nanoparticle-Based Systems for T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Derong; Liu, Fuyao; Ma, Lina; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents play a vital role in diagnosing diseases, demand for new MRI contrast agents, with an enhanced sensitivity and advanced functionalities, is very high. During the past decade, various inorganic nanoparticles have been used as MRI contrast agents due to their unique properties, such as large surface area, easy surface functionalization, excellent contrasting effect, and other size-dependent properties. This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of nanoparticle-based T1-weighted MRI contrast agents. The chemical synthesis of the nanoparticle-based contrast agents and their potential applications were discussed and summarized. In addition, the recent development in nanoparticle-based multimodal contrast agents including T1-weighted MRI/computed X-ray tomography (CT) and T1-weighted MRI/optical were also described, since nanoparticles may curtail the shortcomings of single mode contrast agents in diagnostic and clinical settings by synergistically incorporating functionality. PMID:23698781

  16. Optical contrast agents to visualize molecular expression in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsner, Robert James

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death of women in the United States. Improvements in screening technology have increased the breast cancer incidence rate, as smaller lesions are being detected. Due to the small size of lesions, patients can choose to receive breast conservation therapy (BCT) rather than a modified radical mastectomy. Even though the breast retains cosmesis after BCT, there is an increased risk of the patient having residual microscopic disease, known as positive margins. Patients with positive margins receive increased radiation and have an increased chance of second surgery. Pathology with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) remains the gold standard for diagnosing margin status in patients. Intraoperative pathology has been shown to reduce the rate of positive margins in BCT. However, a minority of surgery centers have intraoperative pathology centers, limiting the number of patients that receive this standard of care. The expression profiles of surface receptors such as ErbB2 (HER2-positive) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) provide information about the aggressiveness of a particular tumor. Recent research has shown that there was elevated EGFR expression in patients with a local recurrence even though the biopsies were assessed to be disease free using standard H&E. If the physicians had known the molecular expression of these biopsies, a different treatment regimen or excision of more tissue might have prevented the recurrence. This thesis investigates targeted molecular contrast agents that enhance the visualization of molecular markers such as glucose transporters (GLUTs) and growth factor receptors in tissue specimens. First, application of 2-NBDG, a fluorescent deoxyglucose, enhances signal in cancerous tissue with a 20-minute incubation. Then, antibody functionalized silica-gold nanoshells enhance the visualization of ErbB2 overexpression in specimens with a 5-minute incubation. To image these contrast agents in cancerous

  17. Mn porphyrins as novel molecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Tovmasyan, Artak; Kimura, Masaki; Tsivian, Matvey; Mouravieva, Vladimira; Polascik, Tom J; Wang, Haichen; Amrhein, Timothy J; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Lascola, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential of a new class of therapeutic Mn porphyrins as molecular MRI probes for prostate cancer imaging. Two compounds of different bioavailibility were investigated: Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTE-2-PyP(5+)) and Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-n-hexylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTnHex-2-PyP(5+)). These compounds have previously been shown to have adjunctive antineoplastic activity through their actions as powerful superoxide dismutase mimics, peroxynitrite scavengers, and modulators of cellular redox-based signaling pathways. Strong paramagnetic MRI contrast properties and affinity for cancer cells suggest their potential application as novel diagnostic imaging agents. MRI experiments were performed at 7.0T on a Bruker Biospec horizontal bore scanner. All in-vivo experiments were performed on 12 C57 black mice implanted with RM-9 prostate cancer cells on the hind limb. Two mg/kg of MnTnHex-2-PyP(5+) (n=6) and 8 mg/kg MnTE-2-PyP(5+) (n=6) were administered intraperitoneally 90 minutes before imaging. All the images were collected using a volume coil and processed using Paravision 4.0. Phantom studies reveal remarkably high T1 relaxivity changes for both metalloporphyrins, which are twofold to threefold higher than commercially available gadolinium chelates. Observable detection limits using conventional T1-weighted MRI are in the low micromolar range for both compounds. In vivo, MR relaxation changes in prostate tumor xenografts were readily observed after a single injection of either MnTE-2-PyP(5+)or MnTnHex-2-PyP(5+), with tumor contrast to background ratio greatest after MnTE-2-PyP(5+) administration. After a single dose of MnTE-2-PyP(5+), contrast changes in prostate tumors are up to sixfold greater than in surrounding, noncancerous tissues, suggesting the potential use of this metalloporphyrin as a novel diagnostic probe for detecting prostate malignancy using MRI.

  18. Gauging the likelihood of stable cavitation from ultrasound contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2013-01-07

    The mechanical index (MI) was formulated to gauge the likelihood of adverse bioeffects from inertial cavitation. However, the MI formulation did not consider bubble activity from stable cavitation. This type of bubble activity can be readily nucleated from ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and has the potential to promote beneficial bioeffects. Here, the presence of stable cavitation is determined numerically by tracking the onset of subharmonic oscillations within a population of bubbles for frequencies up to 7 MHz and peak rarefactional pressures up to 3 MPa. In addition, the acoustic pressure rupture threshold of an UCA population was determined using the Marmottant model. The threshold for subharmonic emissions of optimally sized bubbles was found to be lower than the inertial cavitation threshold for all frequencies studied. The rupture thresholds of optimally sized UCAs were found to be lower than the threshold for subharmonic emissions for either single cycle or steady state acoustic excitations. Because the thresholds of both subharmonic emissions and UCA rupture are linearly dependent on frequency, an index of the form I(CAV) = P(r)/f (where P(r) is the peak rarefactional pressure in MPa and f is the frequency in MHz) was derived to gauge the likelihood of subharmonic emissions due to stable cavitation activity nucleated from UCAs.

  19. The use of dilute calogen[reg] as a fat density oral contrast medium in upper abdominal computed tomography, compared with the use of water and positive oral contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsay, Duncan W.; Markham, Derrian H.; Morgan, Bruno; Rodgers, Peter M.; Liddicoat, Amanda J

    2001-08-01

    AIM: Oral contrast media are commonly given prior to computed tomography (CT) examination of the upper abdomen. Although positive oral contrast media are normally used, there is increasing interest in using negative agents such as water and less commonly fat density products. The aim of this study was to compare a positive oral contrast medium, water, and a diluted emulsion of arachis oil (Calogen[reg], a fat density food supplement) for assessment of the upper abdomen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-one patients referred for upper abdominal CT were randomized to receive either 500 ml water, 2% sodium diatrizoate or a dilute suspension of Calogen[reg]. The CT images were scored independently by three radiologists. Distension and anatomical identification was assessed for the stomach, duodenum and jejunum; with anatomical identification recorded for the pancreas, retroperitoneum, liver, gallbladder and spleen. RESULTS: Dilute Calogen[reg] produced a significant improvement (P < 0.01) in distension and anatomical visualization of the stomach and proximal duodenum. Only minimal differences were demonstrated between the three contrast media for visualization of more distal small bowel or identification of the other upper abdominal viscera. Significantly more artifacts were caused by positive contrast media than with the Calogen[reg] mixture. CONCLUSION: A dilute suspension of Calogen[reg] as an oral contrast medium is recommended when disease is suspected within the stomach or proximal duodenum. Ramsay, D.W. et al. (2001)

  20. A phase contrast cytomorphometric study of squames of normal oral mucosa and oral leukoplakia: Original study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afreen Nadaf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral leukoplakia represents the most common potentially malignant oral disorder, representing 85% of such lesions. The worldwide prevalence of leukoplakia is 1.5- 4.3%. Leukoplakia is often associated with carcinogenic exposures, such as from use of tobacco, alcohol or betel nut. The level of risk for malignant transformation of leukoplakia is associated with lesion histology. The overall malignant transformation rates for dysplastic lesions range from 11% to 36%, depending on the length of follow-up. Exfoliative cytology is a simple and minimally invasive method. Phase contrast microscope, an essential tool in the field of biology and medical research provides improved discrimination of cellular details. Aims: To study and compare the cytomorphological and cytomorphometric features of squames obtained from the mucosa of normal individuals, tobacco habituates with and without clinically evident leukoplakia. To assess the role of phase contrast microscopy as an alternative and easy method of cytological evaluation of wet and unstained smears. Materials and Methods: Fifty cases from each group were taken. Fixed, unstained smears were viewed under phase contrast microscope and were evaluated morphologically and morphometrically for nuclear and cellular diameters. Results: The study showed a significant increase in the mean nuclear diameter and decrease in the mean cellular diameter. Conclusion: Cytomorphometric changes could be the earliest indicators of cellular alterations. This indicates that there could be a cause-effect relationship between tobacco and quantitative alterations.

  1. Potential role of Calogen as an oral contrast medium in the evaluation of the gastric wall at MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohan, Derek G.; Walsh, Sinead M.; Allen, Ruaridh H.; Cronin, Carmel G.; Meehan, Conor P.; Murphy, Joseph M.; McCarthy, Peter A. [University College Hospital, Department of Radiology, Galway (Ireland)

    2006-12-15

    Evaluation of gastric wall pathology using cross-sectional imaging has proved difficult, particularly in the imaging of early, localized disease. The properties of Calogen as a negative oral contrast agent for the evaluation of the upper gastro-intestinal tract and retroperitoneum in CT has been well described. We assess the suitability of this agent as an oral contrast medium for use in MRI examination of the gastric wall, finding the mean scores for Calogen and water with regard to gastric distension to be 8.46 and 5.49, respectively (P<0.01). Concerning obliteration of mucosal detail, the respective scores are 8.48 and 3.84 (P<0.01). Calogen is also statistically superior to water with regard to prevention of peristalsis and homogeneity (mean scores 8.15 vs. 5.74 and 8.69 vs. 6.30, respectively). Oral Calogen, therefore, is superior to water as an oral contrast agent for MRI examination of the gastric wall. Its ingestion allows identification of the gastric wall with fat intensity material on both sides, further aiding characterisation of subtle mural anomalies. (orig.)

  2. Positive intraluminal bowel contrast on computed tomography following oral ingestion of Kayexelate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R.; Stackievicz, R.; Osadchy, A. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging Meir Medical Center, Kfar-Saba, affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv (Israel)], E-mail: zisinrivka@clalit.org.il; Gayer, G. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging Assaf Harofe Medical Center, Zrifin, affiliated to the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2008-12-15

    Our study presents the computed tomography (CT) manifestations of orally ingested kayexelate (a powdered form of sodium polystyrene sulphonate) used to treat hyperkalemia. Five patients with whom kayexelate appeared as high-attenuating intraluminal enteric content, similar to oral contrast material or leakage of intravascular contrast, are reported. Radiologists should be familiar with its appearance as it may mimic oral or vascular contrast within the gastrointestinal tract, a finding that may lead to a diagnostic error or misinterpretation. (author)

  3. Double agents and secret agents: the emerging fields of exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer and T2-exchange magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryaei, Iman; Pagel, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Two relatively new types of exogenous magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents may provide greater impact for molecular imaging by providing greater specificity for detecting molecular imaging biomarkers. Exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents rely on the selective saturation of the magnetization of a proton on an agent, followed by chemical exchange of a proton from the agent to water. The selective detection of a biomarker-responsive CEST signal and an unresponsive CEST signal, followed by the ratiometric comparison of these signals, can improve biomarker specificity. We refer to this improvement as a "double-agent" approach to molecular imaging. Exogenous T2-exchange agents also rely on chemical exchange of protons between the agent and water, especially with an intermediate rate that lies between the slow exchange rates of CEST agents and the fast exchange rates of traditional T1 and T2 agents. Because of this intermediate exchange rate, these agents have been relatively unknown and have acted as "secret agents" in the contrast agent research field. This review exposes these secret agents and describes the merits of double agents through examples of exogenous agents that detect enzyme activity, nucleic acids and gene expression, metabolites, ions, redox state, temperature, and pH. Future directions are also provided for improving both types of contrast agents for improved molecular imaging and clinical translation. Therefore, this review provides an overview of two new types of exogenous contrast agents that are becoming useful tools within the armamentarium of molecular imaging.

  4. Optimization of the protocols for the use of contrast agents in PET/CT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrí Martínez, L; Kohan, A A; Vercher Conejero, J L

    The introduction of PET/CT scanners in clinical practice in 1998 has improved care for oncologic patients throughout the clinical pathway, from the initial diagnosis of disease through the evaluation of the response to treatment to screening for possible recurrence. The CT component of a PET/CT study is used to correct the attenuation of PET studies; CT also provides anatomic information about the distribution of the radiotracer. CT is especially useful in situations where PET alone can lead to false positives and false negatives, and CT thereby improves the diagnostic performance of PET. The use of intravenous or oral contrast agents and optimal CT protocols have improved the detection and characterization of lesions. However, there are circumstances in which the systematic use of contrast agents is not justified. The standard acquisition in PET/CT scanners is the whole body protocol, but this can lead to artifacts due to the position of patients and respiratory movements between the CT and PET acquisitions. This article discusses these aspects from a constructive perspective with the aim of maximizing the diagnostic potential of PET/CT and providing better care for patients.

  5. Oral Antineoplastic Agents: Assessing the Delay in Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi Anders

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to determine the length of time between when a prescription for an oral antineoplastic agent is written by the provider and when the medication is received by the patient and to identify risk factors that significantly increase time to medication receipt. First-time fill prescriptions for oral antineoplastic agents were identified. The date the prescription was written and received by the patient was determined. A retrospective review was completed to gather additional information, including prescribed medication, indication, insurance coverage, patient assistance program use, dispensing pharmacy, and prior authorization requirements. The data was analyzed through multivariate statistical analysis and used to identify risk factors that may significantly increase the time to medication receipt. A total of 58 patients were included in the study. A median of 8 days elapsed between when the medication was prescribed and when it was received by the patient. Medication prescribed, absence of a Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategies (REMS program, and insurance type are factors that increased time to medication receipt. An understanding of the median time involved, as well as factors affecting the time to delivery of prescriptions, will help healthcare providers better plan and prepare for the use of oral antineoplastic agents.

  6. Oral Antineoplastic Agents: Assessing the Delay in Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Brandi; Shillingburg, Alexandra; Newton, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the length of time between when a prescription for an oral antineoplastic agent is written by the provider and when the medication is received by the patient and to identify risk factors that significantly increase time to medication receipt. First-time fill prescriptions for oral antineoplastic agents were identified. The date the prescription was written and received by the patient was determined. A retrospective review was completed to gather additional information, including prescribed medication, indication, insurance coverage, patient assistance program use, dispensing pharmacy, and prior authorization requirements. The data was analyzed through multivariate statistical analysis and used to identify risk factors that may significantly increase the time to medication receipt. A total of 58 patients were included in the study. A median of 8 days elapsed between when the medication was prescribed and when it was received by the patient. Medication prescribed, absence of a Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategies (REMS) program, and insurance type are factors that increased time to medication receipt. An understanding of the median time involved, as well as factors affecting the time to delivery of prescriptions, will help healthcare providers better plan and prepare for the use of oral antineoplastic agents.

  7. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-09-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, 4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  8. Ultrasonic microbubble contrast agents and the transplant kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, D.H., E-mail: davidhkay@doctors.org.u [Department of Radiology, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Mazonakis, M.; Geddes, C. [Department of Renal Medicine, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Baxter, G. [Department of Radiology, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    Aim: To evaluate the potential application of microbubble agents in the immediate post-transplant period, by studying contrast uptake and washout, and to correlate these values with clinical indices, and thus, assess the potential prognostic value of this technique. Materials and methods: The study group comprised 20 consecutive renal transplant patients within 7 days of transplantation. Sonovue was administered as an intravenous bolus with continuous imaging of the transplant kidney at low mechanical index (MI) for 1 min post-injection. These data were analysed off-line by two observers, and time intensity curves (TIC) for the upper, mid, and lower poles constructed. Within each pole, a region of interest (5 mm square) was placed over the cortex, medullary pyramid, and interlobar artery, resulting in a total of nine TIC for each patient. TIC parameters included the arrival time (AT), time to peak (TTP), peak intensity (Max), gradient of the slope (M), and the area under curve (AUC). Results: For both observers there was good agreement for all values measured from the cortex and medulla, but poor interobserver correlation for the vascular values. In addition, there was only agreement for these values in the upper and mid-pole of the transplant with poor agreement for the lower pole values. The mid-pole of the transplant kidney was chosen as the point of measurement for subsequent studies. Mid-pole values were correlated with clinical data and outcome over the 3-month post-transplant period. Renal microbubble perfusion correlated with the transplant estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at 3 months post-transplantation (p = 0.016). Discussion: In conclusion, this is the first study to confirm reproducibility of the Sonovue TIC data in transplant patients and to quantify regional variation and perfusion. The statistically significant estimates of transplant perfusion may be of future benefit to transplant recipients and potentially utilized as a prognostic tool

  9. High frequency nonlinear scattering from a micrometer to submicrometer sized lipid encapsulated contrast agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goertz, David E.; Frijlink, Martijn E.; de Jong, N.; van der Steen, A.F.W.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental lipid encapsulated contrast agent comprised substantially of micrometer to submicrometer diameter bubbles was evaluated for its capacity to produce nonlinear scattering in response to high transmit frequencies. Agent characterization experiments were conducted at transmit frequencies

  10. Targeted contrast agents--an adjunct to whole-body imaging: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Paul; Bolster, Ferdia; Crosbie, Ian; MacMahon, Peter; O'Kennedy, Richard; Eustace, Stephen J

    2010-03-01

    This article reviews the potential use of a combination of whole-body imaging and targeted contrast agents in improving diagnostics, with a particular focus on oncology imaging. It looks at the rationale for nanoparticles and their development as targeted contrast agents. It subsequently describes many of the advances made thus far in developing tissue-specific contrast agents capable of targeting tumors that combined with whole-body imaging may enable superior cancer detection and characterization.

  11. Ultrasound contrast-agent improves imaging of lower limb occlusive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Jensen, F

    2003-01-01

    to evaluate if ultrasound contrast-agent infusion could improve duplex-ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and increase the agreement with digital subtraction arteriography (DSA)....

  12. Methodology and imaging contrast agent in the arthography of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M.; Taenzer, V.; Wenzel-Hora, B.I.

    1987-11-01

    Arthrography of the shoulder using an isotonic non-ionic contrast medium is performed at a markedly reduced complication rate compared with contrast agents used previously. Diagnostic gain is considerable.

  13. Subharmonic behavior of phospholipid-coated ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijl, Jeroen; Dollet, Benjamin; Overvelde, Marlies; Garbin, Valeria; Rozendal, Timo; Jong, de Nico; Lohse, Detlef; Versluis, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Coated microbubbles, unlike tissue are able to scatter sound subharmonically. Therefore, the subharmonic behavior of coated microbubbles can be used to enhance the contrast in ultrasound contrast imaging. Theoretically, a threshold amplitude of the driving pressure can be calculated above which subh

  14. Ultrasound contrast-agent improves imaging of lower limb occlusive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Jensen, F

    2003-01-01

    to evaluate if ultrasound contrast-agent infusion could improve duplex-ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and increase the agreement with digital subtraction arteriography (DSA).......to evaluate if ultrasound contrast-agent infusion could improve duplex-ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and increase the agreement with digital subtraction arteriography (DSA)....

  15. OUR APPROACH TOWARDS DEVELOPING A SPECIFIC TUMOR-TARGETED MRI CONTRAST AGENT FOR THE BRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GO, KG; BULTE, JWM; DELEY, L; THE, TH; KAMMAN, RL; HULSTAERT, CE; BLAAUW, EH; MA, LD

    1993-01-01

    This review presents various aspects of the technological development, and their assessment in the design of a contrast agent for MRI, tailored to visualise tumours in the brain. First, it was demonstrated that magnetite as a contrast agent exhibited a much stronger relaxivity than gadolinium. The p

  16. Congenital heart disease: cardiovascular MR imaging by using an intravascular blood pool contrast agent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makowski, M.R.; Wiethoff, A.J.; Uribe, S.; Parish, V.; Botnar, R.M.; Bell, A.; Kiesewetter, C.; Beerbaum, P.B.J.; Jansen, C.H.; Razavi, R.; Schaeffter, T.; Greil, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the image quality and diagnostic performance of a contrast agent-specific inversion-recovery (IR) steady-state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence performed by using an intravascular contrast agent (gadofosveset trisodium) with those of a commonly used

  17. Synthetic Ni3S2/Ni hybrid architectures as potential contrast agents in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J.; Chen, K.

    2016-04-01

    Traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents mainly include superparamagnetic (SPM) iron oxide nanoparticle as T 2 contrast agent for liver and paramagnetic Gd (III)-chelate as T 1 contrast agent for all organs. In this work, weak ferromagnetic kale-like and SPM cabbage-like Ni3S2@Ni hybrid architectures were synthesized and evaluated as potential T 1 MRI contrast agents. Their relatively small r 2/r 1 ratios of 2.59 and 2.38, and high r 1 values of 11.27 and 4.89 mmol-1 L s-1 (for the kale-like and cabbage-like Ni3S2@Ni, respectively) will shed some light on the development of new-type MRI contrast agents.

  18. Does Limiting Oral Contrast Decrease Emergency Department Length of Stay?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Barton

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact on emergency department (EDlength of stay (LOS of a new protocol for intravenous (IV-contrast only abdominal/pelvic computedtomography (ABCT compared to historical controls.Methods: This was a retrospective case-controlled study performed at a single academic medicalcenter. Patients ≥ 18 undergoing ABCT imaging for non-traumatic abdominal pain were included inthe study. We compared ED LOS between historical controls undergoing ABCT imaging with PO/IVcontrast and study patients undergoing an IV-contrast-only protocol. Imaging indications were thesame for both groups and included patients with clinical suspicion for appendicitis, diverticulitis, smallbowel obstruction, or perforation. We identified all patients from the hospital’s electronic storehouse(imaging code, ordering department, imaging times, and we abstracted ED LOS and dispositionfrom electronic medical records.Results: Two hundred and eleven patients who underwent PO/IV ABCT prep were compared to 184patients undergoing IV-contrast only ABCT prep. ED LOS was shorter for patients imaged with theIV-contrast only protocol (4:35 hrs vs. 6:39 hrs, p < 0.0001.Conclusion: Implementation of an IV-contrast only ABCT prep for select ED patients presentingfor evaluation of acute abdominal pain significantly decreased ED LOS.

  19. Iopamidol: a non-ionic contrast agent for peripheral arteriography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widrich, W C; Robbins, A H; Rommel, A J; Andrews, R

    1982-10-01

    Ten patients undergoing peripheral arteriography with iopamidol were evaluated in a carefully controlled Phase I study using a variety of objective and subjective tests of discomfort. There was minimal objective evidence of pain, and the patients reported that they perceived minor discomfort and a warm sensation during the contrast injections. Five patients who had previously undergone arteriography using 2 mg of lidocaine per ml of methylglucamine diatrizoate noted a marked decrease in discomfort when iopamidol was used. Opacification of peripheral arteries was excellent. Multiple physical examinations, chemical tests, electrocardiograms, and intra-arterial pressure recordings showed that iopamidol is safe.

  20. Nanodiamond-Manganese dual mode MRI contrast agents for enhanced liver tumor detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Weixin; Toh, Tan Boon; Abdullah, Lissa Nurrul; Yvonne, Tay Wei Zheng; Lee, Kuan J; Guenther, Ilonka; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-04-01

    Contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is critical for the diagnosis and monitoring of a number of diseases, including cancer. Certain clinical applications, including the detection of liver tumors, rely on both T1 and T2-weighted images even though contrast agent-enhanced MR imaging is not always reliable. Thus, there is a need for improved dual mode contrast agents with enhanced sensitivity. We report the development of a nanodiamond-manganese dual mode contrast agent that enhanced both T1 and T2-weighted MR imaging. Conjugation of manganese to nanodiamonds resulted in improved longitudinal and transverse relaxivity efficacy over unmodified MnCl2 as well as clinical contrast agents. Following intravenous administration, nanodiamond-manganese complexes outperformed current clinical contrast agents in an orthotopic liver cancer mouse model while also reducing blood serum concentration of toxic free Mn(2+) ions. Thus, nanodiamond-manganese complexes may serve as more effective dual mode MRI contrast agent, particularly in cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diffusion and near-equilibrium distribution of MRI and CT contrast agents in articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvast, Tuomo S.; Kokkonen, Harri T.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Quinn, Thomas M.; Nieminen, Miika T.; Töyräs, Juha

    2009-11-01

    Charged contrast agents have been used both in vitro and in vivo for estimation of the fixed charge density (FCD) in articular cartilage. In the present study, the effects of molecular size and charge on the diffusion and equilibrium distribution of several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) contrast agents were investigated. Full thickness cartilage disks (Ø = 4.0 mm, n = 64) were prepared from fresh bovine patellae. Contrast agent (gadopentetate: Magnevist®, gadodiamide: Omniscan™, ioxaglate: Hexabrix™ or sodium iodide: NaI) diffusion was allowed either through the articular surface or through the deep cartilage. CT imaging of the samples was conducted before contrast agent administration and after 1, 5, 9, 16, 25 and 29 h (and with three samples after 2, 3, 4 and 5 days) diffusion using a clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) instrument. With all contrast agents, the diffusion through the deep cartilage was slower when compared to the diffusion through the articular surface. With ioxaglate, gadopentetate and gadodiamide it took over 29 h for diffusion to reach the near-equilibrium state. The slow diffusion of the contrast agents raise concerns regarding the validity of techniques for FCD estimation, as these contrast agents may not reach the equilibrium state that is assumed. However, since cartilage composition, i.e. deep versus superficial, had a significant effect on diffusion, imaging of the nonequilibrium diffusion process might enable more accurate assessment of cartilage integrity.

  2. Phthalocyanine photosensitizers as contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Amalina Bte Ebrahim; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2015-02-01

    There is a need for contrast agents for non-invasive diagnostic imaging of tumors. Herein, Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) was employed to evaluate phthalocyanines commonly used in photodynamic therapy as photoacoustic contrast agents. We studied the photoacoustic activity of three water-soluble phthalocyanine photosensitizers: phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (PcS4), Zn(II) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid (ZnPcS4) and Al(III) phthalocyanine chloride tetrasulfonic acid (AlPcS4) in phantom and in tumor-bearing mice to investigate the biodistribution and fate of the phthalocyanines in the biological tissues. PcS4 was observed to grant good contrast between the different reticuloendothelial organs and accumulate in the tumor within an hour of post-administration. ZnPcS4 and AlPcS4 offered little contrast in photoacoustic signals between the organs. PcS4 is a promising photoacoustic contrast agent and can be exploited as a photodiagnostic agent.

  3. Subharmonic behavior of phospholipid-coated ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijl, Jeroen; Dollet, Benjamin; Overvelde, Marlies; Garbin, Valeria; Rozendal, Timo; de Jong, Nico; Lohse, Detlef; Versluis, Michel

    2010-11-01

    Coated microbubbles, unlike tissue are able to scatter sound subharmonically. Therefore, the subharmonic behavior of coated microbubbles can be used to enhance the contrast in ultrasound contrast imaging. Theoretically, a threshold amplitude of the driving pressure can be calculated above which subharmonic oscillations of microbubbles are initiated. Interestingly, earlier experimental studies on coated microbubbles demonstrated that the threshold for these bubbles is much lower than predicted by the traditional linear viscoelastic shell models. This paper presents an experimental study on the subharmonic behavior of differently sized individual phospholipid coated microbubbles. The radial subharmonic response of the microbubbles was recorded with the Brandaris ultra high-speed camera as a function of both the amplitude and the frequency of the driving pulse. Threshold pressures for subharmonic generation as low as 5 kPa were found near a driving frequency equal to twice the resonance frequency of the bubble. An explanation for this low threshold pressure is provided by the shell buckling model proposed by Marmottant et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 118, 3499-3505 (2005)]. It is shown that the change in the elasticity of the bubble shell as a function of bubble radius as proposed in this model, enhances the subharmonic behavior of the microbubbles.

  4. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  5. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Joyce T. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, 225 E. Chicago Ave., Box 21, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Deng, Jie [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam. (orig.)

  6. Detection of ultrasound contrast agent microbubble with constructed bubble wavelet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bin; WAN Mingxi

    2005-01-01

    To detect the echo irradiated by microbubble out from the signal reflected by surrounding tissues, a mother wavelet named bubble wavelet according to the modified Herring oscillation equation was constructed and then applied to the original ultrasound radio frequency signal to perform the wavelet transformation. The transformed wavelet coefficients were extracted by selected threshold values to differentiate the echo of microbubble from signal of surround tissues. The effect of bubble wavelet was compared with other three commonly used mother wavelets by computer simulation and phantom experiment. The results demonstrated that there existed a highly correlation between the bubble wavelet and the experimental echo irradiated by microbubble because bubble wavelet had represented the dynamics of microbubble in advance. Furthermore, the wavelet transform results showed a better signal-noise-ratio and a sharper contrast between the echo of microbubble and the signal of surrounding tissues. Finally,constructing an overall mother wavelet library can improve the applicability and robustness of this detection method.

  7. Correction of oral contrast artifacts in CT-based attenuation correction of PET images using an automated segmentation algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadian, Alireza; Ay, Mohammad R.; Sarkar, Saeed [Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran); Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tehran (Iran); Bidgoli, Javad H. [Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran); East Tehran Azad University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tehran (Iran); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-10-15

    Oral contrast is usually administered in most X-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations of the abdomen and the pelvis as it allows more accurate identification of the bowel and facilitates the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT studies. However, the misclassification of contrast medium with high-density bone in CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) is known to generate artifacts in the attenuation map ({mu}map), thus resulting in overcorrection for attenuation of positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this study, we developed an automated algorithm for segmentation and classification of regions containing oral contrast medium to correct for artifacts in CT-attenuation-corrected PET images using the segmented contrast correction (SCC) algorithm. The proposed algorithm consists of two steps: first, high CT number object segmentation using combined region- and boundary-based segmentation and second, object classification to bone and contrast agent using a knowledge-based nonlinear fuzzy classifier. Thereafter, the CT numbers of pixels belonging to the region classified as contrast medium are substituted with their equivalent effective bone CT numbers using the SCC algorithm. The generated CT images are then down-sampled followed by Gaussian smoothing to match the resolution of PET images. A piecewise calibration curve was then used to convert CT pixel values to linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. The visual assessment of segmented regions performed by an experienced radiologist confirmed the accuracy of the segmentation and classification algorithms for delineation of contrast-enhanced regions in clinical CT images. The quantitative analysis of generated {mu}maps of 21 clinical CT colonoscopy datasets showed an overestimation ranging between 24.4% and 37.3% in the 3D-classified regions depending on their volume and the concentration of contrast medium. Two PET/CT studies known to be problematic demonstrated the applicability of the technique

  8. In vivo ultrasound visualization of non-occlusive blood clots with thrombin-sensitive contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Matthew A; Barback, Christopher V; Fitch, Kirsten R; Farwell, Alexander R; Esener, Sadik C; Mattrey, Robert F; Cha, Jennifer N; Goodwin, Andrew P

    2013-12-01

    The use of microbubbles as ultrasound contrast agents is one of the primary methods to diagnose deep venous thrombosis. However, current microbubble imaging strategies require either a clot sufficiently large to produce a circulation filling defect or a clot with sufficient vascularization to allow for targeted accumulation of contrast agents. Previously, we reported the design of a microbubble formulation that modulated its ability to generate ultrasound contrast from interaction with thrombin through incorporation of aptamer-containing DNA crosslinks in the encapsulating shell, enabling the measurement of a local chemical environment by changes in acoustic activity. However, this contrast agent lacked sufficient stability and lifetime in blood to be used as a diagnostic tool. Here we describe a PEG-stabilized, thrombin-activated microbubble (PSTA-MB) with sufficient stability to be used in vivo in circulation with no change in biomarker sensitivity. In the presence of actively clotting blood, PSTA-MBs showed a 5-fold increase in acoustic activity. Specificity for the presence of thrombin and stability under constant shear flow were demonstrated in a home-built in vitro model. Finally, PSTA-MBs were able to detect the presence of an active clot within the vena cava of a rabbit sufficiently small as to not be visible by current non-specific contrast agents. By activating in non-occlusive environments, these contrast agents will be able to detect clots not diagnosable by current contrast agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Design Principles of Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Liang; Gu, Xinbin; Wang, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that introduces molecular agents into traditional imaging techniques, enabling visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The promise of molecular imaging lies in its potential for selective potency by targeting biomarkers or molecular targets and the imaging agents serve as reporters for the selectivity of targeting. Development of an efficient molecular imaging agent depends on well-controlled high-quality experiment design involving target selection, agent synthesis, in vitro characterization, and in vivo animal characterization before it is applied in humans. According to the analysis from the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD, books/NBK5330/">), more than 6000 molecular imaging agents with sufficient preclinical evaluation have been reported to date in the literature and this number increases by 250-300 novel agents each year. The majority of these agents are radionuclides, which are developed for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) account for only a small part. This is largely due to the fact that MRI is currently not a fully quantitative imaging technique and is less sensitive than PET and SPECT. However, because of the superior ability to simultaneously extract molecular and anatomic information, molecular MRI is attracting significant interest and various targeted nanoparticle contrast agents have been synthesized for MRI. The first and one of the most critical steps in developing a targeted nanoparticle contrast agent is target selection, which plays the central role and forms the basis for success of molecular imaging. This chapter discusses the design principles of targeted contrast agents in the emerging frontiers of molecular MRI.

  10. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:25834422

  11. Prolonged in vivo circulation time by zwitterionic modification of magnetite nanoparticles for blood pool contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wangchuan; Lin, Jiang; Li, Mingli; Ma, Yongjie; Chen, Yuxin; Zhang, Chunfu; Li, Dan; Gu, Hongchen

    2012-01-01

    Long circulation time is critical for blood pool contrast agents used in high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. For iron oxide particle contrast agents, size and surface properties significantly influence their in vivo performance. We developed a novel long-circulating blood pool contrast agent by introducing zwitterionic structure onto the particle surface. Zwitterionic structure was fabricated by 3-(diethylamino)propylamine (DEAPA) grafted onto the surface of ployacrylic acid coated magnetite nanoparticles via EDC/NHS [N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbo-diimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide] coupling chemistry. Zwitterionic particles demonstrated five times lower macrophage cell uptake than the original particles and low cell toxicity. Magnetic resonance angiography indicated that zwitterionic nanoparticles had much longer in vivo circulation time than the original particles and were an ideal candidate for blood pool contrast agent. We suppose that zwitterionic modification by DEAPA and EDC/NHS can be used generally for coating nanoparticles with carboxyl surface and to prolong their circulating time.

  12. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K.

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications.

  13. The evolution of gadolinium based contrast agents: from single-modality to multi-modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Ruiqing; Peng, Hui; Li, Penghui; Xu, Zushun; Whittaker, Andrew K

    2016-05-19

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are extensively used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their outstanding signal enhancement and ease of chemical modification. However, it is increasingly recognized that information obtained from single modal molecular imaging cannot satisfy the higher requirements on the efficiency and accuracy for clinical diagnosis and medical research, due to its limitation and default rooted in single molecular imaging technique itself. To compensate for the deficiencies of single function magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, the combination of multi-modality imaging has turned to be the research hotpot in recent years. This review presents an overview on the recent developments of the functionalization of gadolinium-based contrast agents, and their application in biomedicine applications.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of ethosomal contrast agents containing iodine for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hanjin; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Kangtaek; Lee, Chang-Ha; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2014-06-01

    As a first step in the development of novel liver-specific contrast agents using ethosomes for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications, we entrapped iodine within ethosomes, which are phospholipid vesicular carriers containing relatively high alcohol concentrations, synthesized using several types of alcohol, such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. The iodine containing ethosomes that were prepared using methanol showed the smallest vesicle size (392 nm) and the highest CT density (1107 HU). The incorporation of cholesterol into the ethosomal contrast agents improved the stability of the ethosomes but made the vesicle size large. The ethosomal contrast agents were taken up well by macrophage cells and showed no cellular toxicity. The results demonstrated that ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents for applications in CT imaging.

  15. Effect of MR contrast agents on quantitative accuracy of PET in combined whole-body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lois, Cristina [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Particle Physics, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Health Research Institute of Santiago de Compostela (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); Bezrukov, Ilja [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Max Plank Institute for Intelligent Systems, Department of Empirical Inference, Tuebingen (Germany); Schmidt, Holger [Eberhard Karls University, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Schwenzer, Nina; Werner, Matthias K. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Kupferschlaeger, Juergen [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Beyer, Thomas [Imaging Science Institute, Tuebingen (Germany); cmi-experts GmbH, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15

    Clinical PET/MR acquisition protocols entail the use of MR contrast agents (MRCA) that could potentially affect PET quantification following MR-based attenuation correction (AC). We assessed the effect of oral and intravenous (IV) MRCA on PET quantification in PET/MR imaging. We employed two MRCA: Lumirem {sup registered} (oral) and Gadovist {sup registered} (IV). First, we determined their reference PET attenuation values using a PET transmission scan (ECAT-EXACT HR+, Siemens) and a CT scan (PET/CT Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens). Second, we evaluated the attenuation of PET signals in the presence of MRCA. Phantoms were filled with clinically relevant concentrations of MRCA in a background of water and {sup 18}F-fluoride, and imaged using a PET/CT scanner (Biograph 16 HI-REZ, Siemens) and a PET/MR scanner (Biograph mMR, Siemens). Third, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant volumes of MRCA on MR-based AC using human pilot data: a patient study employing Gadovist {sup registered} (IV) and a volunteer study employing two different oral MRCA (Lumirem {sup registered} and pineapple juice). MR-based attenuation maps were calculated following Dixon-based fat-water segmentation and an external atlas-based and pattern recognition (AT and PR) algorithm. IV and oral MRCA in clinically relevant concentrations were found to have PET attenuation values similar to those of water. The phantom experiments showed that under clinical conditions IV and oral MRCA did not yield additional attenuation of PET emission signals. Patient scans showed that PET attenuation maps are not biased after the administration of IV MRCA but may be biased, however, after ingestion of iron oxide-based oral MRCA when segmentation-based AC algorithms are used. Alternative AC algorithms, such as AT and PR, or alternative oral contrast agents, such as pineapple juice, can yield unbiased attenuation maps. In clinical PET/MR scenarios MRCA are not expected to lead to markedly increased attenuation

  16. Oral available agents in the treatment of RRMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aupérin T

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Thierry Aupérin Medical Communications, Global MS Medical Affairs, Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA, USAWe read with interest the article by Drs Thöne and Ellrichmann entitled "Oral available agents in the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: an overview of merits and culprits" recently published in Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety.1 The review provides a valuable overview of a number of new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS, with a focus on proposed mechanisms of action and efficacy and safety profiles of the respective agents.In reading the article, however, we did note a number of errors pertaining to teriflunomide, a once-daily oral immunomodulator approved in several countries for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS (RMS and relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS. The most significant error pertains to a statement made within the safety section, which states: "Serious adverse effects (AEs included pathological liver function, neutropenia, and trigeminal neuralgia as well as one case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus." We would like to draw the authors’ attention to the fact that this case of PML pertains to the use of the related drug, leflunomide, and not teriflunomide as suggested. It is important to note that leflunomide is licensed to treat active rheumatoid arthritis in adults, and has not been evaluated or approved for the treatment of MS; as such it is inappropriate to extrapolate this observation to the use of teriflunomide. Furthermore, the case of PML cited in the article is complicated by the fact that the patient received prior multiple immunosuppressant therapies before leflunomide (ie, prednisone, azathioprine, chloroquine, danazol, cyclosporin A and methotrexate, which may have contributed to the development of PML.View original paper by Thöne and Ellrichmann.

  17. Contrast Agent-Enhanced Computed Tomography of Articular Cartilage: Association with Tissue Composition and Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvast, T.S.; Jurvelin, J.S.; Aula, A.S.; Lammi, M.J.; Toeyraes, J. (Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Kuopio (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography may enable the noninvasive quantification of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of articular cartilage. It has been reported that penetration of the negatively charged contrast agent ioxaglate (Hexabrix) increases significantly after enzymatic degradation of GAGs. However, it is not known whether spontaneous degradation of articular cartilage can be quantitatively detected with this technique. Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic potential of contrast agent-enhanced cartilage tomography (CECT) in quantification of GAG concentration in normal and spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage by means of clinical peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Material and Methods: In this in vitro study, normal and spontaneously degenerated adult bovine cartilage (n=32) was used. Bovine patellar cartilage samples were immersed in 21 mM contrast agent (Hexabrix) solution for 24 hours at room temperature. After immersion, the samples were scanned with a clinical pQCT instrument. From pQCT images, the contrast agent concentration in superficial as well as in full-thickness cartilage was calculated. Histological and functional integrity of the samples was quantified with histochemical and mechanical reference measurements extracted from our earlier study. Results: Full diffusion of contrast agent into the deep cartilage was found to take over 8 hours. As compared to normal cartilage, a significant increase (11%, P<0.05) in contrast agent concentration was seen in the superficial layer of spontaneously degenerated samples. Significant negative correlations were revealed between the contrast agent concentration and the superficial or full-thickness GAG content of tissue (|R|>0.5, P<0.01). Further, pQCT could be used to measure the thickness of patellar cartilage. Conclusion: The present results suggest that CECT can be used to diagnose proteoglycan depletion in spontaneously degenerated articular cartilage with a

  18. Characterisation of contrast agent microbubbles for ultrasound imaging and therapy research

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The high efficiency with which gas microbubbles can scatter ultrasound compared to the surrounding blood pool or tissues has led to their widespread employment as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging. In recent years their applications have been extended to include super-resolution imaging and the stimulation of localized bio-effects for therapy. The growing exploitation of contrast agents in ultrasound, and in particular these recent developments, have amplified the need to characterize and...

  19. In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0242 TITLE: In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0242 5b...men with false positive PSA elevation and to ensure successful biopsy for those with small cancers. Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging functional

  20. Update on the safety and efficacy of commercial ultrasound contrast agents in cardiac applications

    OpenAIRE

    Appis, Andrew W; Tracy, Melissa J; Feinstein, Steven B.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are currently used throughout the world in both clinical and research settings. The concept of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging originated in the late 1960s, and the first commercially available agents were initially developed in the 1980s. Today's microbubbles are designed for greater utility and are used for both approved and off-label indications. In October 2007, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) imposed additional product label warnings that ...

  1. Radioprotection and contrast agent use in pediatrics: what, how, and when.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancharro Zapata, Á M; Rodríguez, C Marín

    2016-05-01

    It is essential to minimize exposure to ionizing radiation in children for various reasons. The risk of developing a tumor from exposure to a given dose of radiation is greater in childhood. Various strategies can be used to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation. It is fundamental to avoid unnecessary tests and tests that are not indicated, to choose an alternative test that does not use ionizing radiation, and/or to take a series of measures that minimize the dose of radiation that the patient receives, such as avoiding having to repeat tests, using the appropriate projections, using shields, adjusting the protocol (mAs, Kv, or pitch) to the patient's body volume, etc… When contrast agents are necessary, intracavitary ultrasound agents can be used, although the use of ultrasound agents is also being extended to include intravenous administration. In fluoroscopy, contrast agents with low osmolarity must be used, as in CT where we must adjust the dose and speed of injection to the patient's weight and to the caliber of the peripheral line, respectively. In MRI, only three types of contrast agents have been approved for pediatric use. It is sometimes necessary to use double doses or organ-specific contrast agents in certain clinical situations; the safety of contrast agents for these indications has not been proven, so they must be used off label.

  2. EPR and DNP Properties of Certain Novel Single Electron Contrast Agents Intended for Oximetric Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, J. H.; Laursen, I; Leunbach, I.;

    1998-01-01

    Parameters of relevance to oximetry with Overhauser magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) have been measured for three single electron contrast agents of the triphenylmethyl type. The single electron contrast agents are stable and water soluble. Magnetic resonance properties of the agents have been...... examined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.5 mT in water, isotonic saline, plasma, and blood at 23 and 37°C. The relaxivities of the agents are about 0.2–0.4 mM−1s−1and the DNP enhancements extrapolate close...... to the dipolar limit. The agents have a single, narrow EPR line, which is analyzed as a Voigt function. The linewidth is measured as a function of the agent concentration and the oxygen concentration. The concentration broadenings are about 1–3 μT/mM and the Lorentzian linewidths at infinite dilution are less...

  3. Solute Transport of Negatively Charged Contrast Agents Across Articular Surface of Injured Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, H T; Chin, H C; Töyräs, J; Jurvelin, J S; Quinn, T M

    2017-04-01

    Solute transport through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to chondrocyte metabolism. Cartilage injury affects solute transport in cartilage due to alterations in ECM structure and solute-matrix interactions. Therefore, cartilage injury may be detected by using contrast agent-based clinical imaging. In the present study, effects of mechanical injury on transport of negatively charged contrast agents in cartilage were characterized. Using cartilage plugs injured by mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusion fluxes of iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents were measured using high resolution microCT imaging. For all contrast agents studied, effective diffusion fluxes increased significantly, particularly at early times during the diffusion process (38 and 33% increase after 4 min, P integrity in cartilage superficial zone. This study suggests that alterations in contrast agent diffusion flux, a non-equilibrium transport parameter, provides a more sensitive indicator for assessment of cartilage matrix integrity than partition coefficient and the equilibrium distribution of solute. These findings may help in developing clinical methods of contrast agent-based imaging to detect cartilage injury.

  4. Detection of Sulfatase Enzyme Activity with a CatalyCEST MRI Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Fernández-Cuervo, Gabriela; Acfalle, Jasmine P; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI contrast agent has been developed that detects sulfatase enzyme activity. The agent produces a CEST signal at δ=5.0 ppm before enzyme activity, and a second CEST signal appears at δ=9.0 ppm after the enzyme cleaves a sulfate group from the agent. The comparison of the two signals improved detection of sulfatase activity.

  5. Sudden death after intravenous administration of a perflutren contrast agent: a case of pseudocomplication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoub, Haïfa; Roméo, Philippe; Leung, Tack-Ki; Burelle, Denis; Cartier, Raymond; Basmadjian, Arsène J

    2009-06-01

    Perflutren cardiac ultrasound agents improve diagnostic accuracy in patients whose imaging is technically difficult. This report describes a case of sudden death approximately 5 minutes after the intravenous administration of 0.5 mL of perflutren contrast agent (Definity) during transthoracic echocardiography with suboptimal baseline images performed 10 days after coronary artery bypass graft surgery because of hypotension and tachycardia in a 73-year-old patient with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Autopsy did not reveal a clear direct relationship between perflutren and death. This is the first reported case of death related temporally to an echocardiographic contrast agent occurring in Canada and could represent a case of pseudocomplication.

  6. Quantitative Imaging of Cell-Permeable Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agents Using X-Ray Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Endres

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III–diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III–1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8–amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylaminostilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF. Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 103 better than 153Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T1 analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination.

  7. Intraosseous injection of iodinated computed tomography contrast agent in an adult blunt trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Thomas E; Paxton, James H; Myers, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Intraosseous venous access can be life-saving in trauma patients when traditional methods for obtaining venous access are difficult or impossible. Because many blunt trauma patients require expeditious evaluation by computed tomography (CT) scans with intravenous contrast, it is important to evaluate whether intraosseous catheters can be used for administering CT contrast agents in lieu of waiting until secure peripheral intravenous or central venous catheter access can be established. Previous case reports have demonstrated that tibial intraosseous catheters can be used to safely administer CT contrast in the pediatric patient population. Here we report a case in which intraosseous access was the only means of administering intravenous contrast agent in an adult blunt trauma patient. An intraosseous catheter was placed in the standard manner in the right proximal humerus. Intravenous contrast agent was administered through the intraosseous catheter, using the standard blunt trauma protocol at our institution. CT scans were evaluated by a staff radiologist and assessed for the adequacy of diagnosis for blunt traumatic injuries. CT scans of the thorax, abdomen, and pelvis were considered to be adequate for diagnostic purposes and subjectively equivalent to those of studies using traditional central venous access. The intraosseous catheter was discontinued the following day. No complications of intraosseous placement or of contrast administration were identified. Intraosseous catheterization appears to be a feasible and effective alternative to traditional methods of venous access in the administration of iodinated contrast agents for CT evaluation in adult blunt trauma patients. Further study is warranted.

  8. Clinical experience with a commercially available negative oral contrast medium in PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.; Reinprecht, P. [Roentgendiagnostisches Zentralinstitut, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria); Kau, T. [Roentgendiagnostisches Zentral Inst., Klagenfurt (Austria); Igerc, I.; Lind, P. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Endokrinologie, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: to evaluate a commercially available negative oral contrast material for PET/CT. Material and methods: in a prospective series of 49 patients, Mukofalk {sup registered}, which is a vegetarian-based substance, was used as a negative oral contrast medium in whole body PET/CT studies. Mukofalk was administered during a time period of 1.5 hours before the examination. Quality of small bowl distension and eventual pathological tracer uptake in the intestine were evaluated. Results: distension of the small bowel was excellent or good in 41 (85%) and poor in 8 (15%) patients. Mild tracer uptake in the small bowel was observed in 5 patients (10.2%) and moderate uptake in another 2 patients (4%). In none of these patients did the F-18 FDG uptake interfere with image interpretation. Conclusion: Mukofalk {sup registered} can be used as a negative oral contrast medium in PET/CT studies. (orig.)

  9. High-Relaxivity MRI Contrast Agents: Where Coordination Chemistry Meets Medical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Eric J.; Datta, Ankona; Jocher, Christoph J.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-01-15

    The desire to improve and expand the scope of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has prompted the search for contrast agents of higher efficiency. The development of better agents requires consideration of the fundamental coordination chemistry of the gadolinium(III) ion and the parameters that affect its efficacy as a proton relaxation agent. In optimizing each parameter, other practical issues such as solubility and in vivo toxicity must also be addressed, making the attainment of safe, high-relaxivity agents a challenging goal. Here we present recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the hydroxypyridinone family of Gd{sup III} chelates.

  10. VMAT宫颈癌患者口服造影剂勾画小肠对盆腔剂量的影响%Impact of oral contrast agent for assisting in outlining small bowel on pelvic VMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾文栋; 李齐林; 高旻; 裴红蕾; 吴昌平

    2014-01-01

    目的 观察VMAT宫颈癌患者口服造影剂勾画小肠对盆腔放疗剂量的影响.方法 共9例子宫颈癌术后放疗患者行定位CT扫描并勾画靶区及小肠等.每例患者先设定VMAT计划,再人为改变小肠电子密度行第2次剂量计算,分别形成常规VMAT计划和指定小肠电子密度的VMAT计划.配对t检验2个计划的剂量分布差异.结果 9例患者常规VMAT计划与指定小肠电子密度VMAT计划的靶区D98、D50分别为4989.1、5000.1 cGy与5208.6、5 191.6 cGy (P =0.026、0.005),CI值分别为0.766、0.765(P =0.920),HI值分别为0.081、0.074(P=0.055);OAR中小肠接受30 Gy照射体积分别为309.3、314.3 cm3(P =0.207),膀胱V45分别为52.4%、51.1% (P =0.168);在相同靶区处方剂量下的机器跳数分别为893.3、865.8 MU (P=0.093).结论 宫颈癌术后放疗时小肠内充盈的造影剂对盆腔剂量的增加未达统计学意义.%Objective To investigate the impact of oral contrast agent for assisting in outlining the small bowel on pelvic volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose in patients with cervical cancer.Methods Nine cervical cancer patients for postoperative radiotherapy underwent CT scans,and the target volumes and organs at risk including the small bowel were contoured.The VMAT plan was designed for each case.Then another plan was generated by re-calculating the radiation dose after changing the electron density of the small bowel.The first plan (plan A) was the conventional VMAT plan,and the second one (plan B) specified the electron density of the small bowel.Paired t-test was used to compare the dose distribution between the two plans.Results The Dg8,D5o,conformity index,and homogeneity index of plans A and B were 4 989.1 vs.5 000.1 cGy (P =0.026),5 208.6 vs.5 191.6 cGy (P =0.005),0.766 vs.0.765 (P =0.920),and 0.081 vs.0.074(P =0.055),respectively.The volumes of the small bowel receiving at least 30 Gy for plans A and B were 309.3 vs.314.3 cm3(P =0.207),while bladder V45

  11. New dual mode gadolinium nanoparticle contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan B Ghaghada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liposomal-based gadolinium (Gd nanoparticles have elicited significant interest for use as blood pool and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents. Previous generations of liposomal MR agents contained gadolinium-chelates either within the interior of liposomes (core-encapsulated gadolinium liposomes or presented on the surface of liposomes (surface-conjugated gadolinium liposomes. We hypothesized that a liposomal agent that contained both core-encapsulated gadolinium and surface-conjugated gadolinium, defined herein as dual-mode gadolinium (Dual-Gd liposomes, would result in a significant improvement in nanoparticle-based T1 relaxivity over the previous generations of liposomal agents. In this study, we have developed and tested, both in vitro and in vivo, such a dual-mode liposomal-based gadolinium contrast agent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: THREE TYPES OF LIPOSOMAL AGENTS WERE FABRICATED: core-encapsulated, surface-conjugated and dual-mode gadolinium liposomes. In vitro physico-chemical characterizations of the agents were performed to determine particle size and elemental composition. Gadolinium-based and nanoparticle-based T1 relaxivities of various agents were determined in bovine plasma. Subsequently, the agents were tested in vivo for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA studies. Characterization of the agents demonstrated the highest gadolinium atoms per nanoparticle for Dual-Gd liposomes. In vitro, surface-conjugated gadolinium liposomes demonstrated the highest T1 relaxivity on a gadolinium-basis. However, Dual-Gd liposomes demonstrated the highest T1 relaxivity on a nanoparticle-basis. In vivo, Dual-Gd liposomes resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and contrast-to-noise ratio in CE-MRA studies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The dual-mode gadolinium liposomal contrast agent demonstrated higher particle-based T1 relaxivity, both in vitro and in vivo, compared to either the

  12. The Subharmonic Behavior and Thresholds of High Frequency Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are encapsulated micro-bubbles used for diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical ultrasound. The agents oscillate nonlinearly about their equilibrium radii upon sufficient acoustic forcing and produce unique acoustic signatures that allow them to be distinguished from scattering from the surrounding tissue. The subharmonic response occurs below the fundamental and is associated with an acoustic pressure threshold. Subharmonic imaging using ultrasound contrast agents has been established for clinical applications at standard diagnostic frequencies typically below 20 MHz. However, for emerging applications of high frequency applications (above 20 MHz) subharmonic imaging is an area of on-going research. The effects of attenuation from tissue are more significant and the characterization of agents is not as well understood. Due to specificity and control production, polymer agents are useful for high frequency applications. In this study, we highlight novel measurement techniques to measure and characterize the mechanical properties of the shell of polymer contrast agents. The definition of the subharmonic threshold is investigated with respect to mono-frequency and chirp forcing waveforms which have been used to achieve optimal subharmonic content in the backscattered signal. Time frequency analysis using the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and the Hilbert-Huang transform facilitates a more sensitive and robust methodology for characterization of subharmonic content with respect to non-stationary forcing. A new definition of the subharmonic threshold is proposed with respect to the energy content of the associated adaptive basis decomposition. Additional studies with respect to targeted agent behavior and cardiovascular disease are discussed. NIH, ONR.

  13. The delayed onset of subharmonic and ultraharmonic emissions from a phospholipid-shelled microbubble contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Awuor, Ivy; Thomas, Keri; Rychak, Joshua J; Doyley, Marvin M

    2014-04-01

    Characterizing the non-linear response of microbubble contrast agents is important for their efficacious use in imaging and therapy. In this article, we report that the subharmonic and ultraharmonic response of lipid-shelled microbubble contrast agents exhibits a strong temporal dependence. We characterized non-linear emissions from Targestar-p microbubbles (Targeson Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) periodically for 60 min, at 10 MHz excitation frequency. The results revealed a considerable increase in the subharmonic and ultraharmonic response (nearly 12-15 and 5-8 dB) after 5-10 min of agent preparation. However, the fundamental and the harmonic response remained almost unchanged in this period. During the next 50 min, the subharmonic, fundamental, ultraharmonic, and harmonic responses decreased steadily by 2-5 dB. The temporal changes in the non-linear behavior of the agent appeared to be primarily mediated by gas-exchange through the microbubble shell; temperature and prior acoustic excitation based mechanisms were ruled out. Further, there was no measurable change in the agent size distribution by static diffusion. We envisage that these findings will help obtain reproducible measurements from agent characterization, non-linear imaging, and fluid-pressure sensing. These findings also suggest the possibility for improving non-linear imaging by careful design of ultrasound contrast agents.

  14. Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid as a Carrier for Imaging Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Amber L.; Homan, Kimberly A.; Emelianov, Stanislav; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose With the broadening field of nanomedicine poised for future molecular level therapeutics, nano-and microparticles intended for the augmentation of either single- or multimodal imaging are created with PLGA as the chief constituent and carrier. Methods Emulsion techniques were used to encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic imaging contrast agents in PLGA particles. The imaging contrast properties of these PLGA particles were further enhanced by reducing silver onto the PLGA surface, creating a silver cage around the polymeric core. Results The MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA and the exogenous dye rhodamine 6G were both encapsulated in PLGA and shown to enhance MR and fluorescence contrast, respectively. The silver nanocage built around PLGA nanoparticles exhibited strong near infrared light absorbance properties, making it a suitable contrast agent for optical imaging strategies such as photoacoustic imaging. Conclusions The biodegradable polymer PLGA is an extremely versatile nano- and micro-carrier for several imaging contrast agents with the possibility of targeting diseased states at a molecular level. PMID:19034628

  15. Forearm Compartment Syndrome of a Newborn Associated with Extravasation of Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egemen Altan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extravasation of contrast agents is a possible complication of imaging studies. Although extravasations typically cause minimal swelling or erythema, they can lead to compartment syndrome when the volume of extravasation is high. In this article, we will present an exceptional case where an insignificant amount of contrast agent extravasation led to a forearm compartment syndrome in a newborn, who was treated with an extended fasciotomy. We would like to emphasize the preventive techniques and treatment options of this iatrogenic complication in newborns. Close followup of the patient by the nurses, awareness of the parents and the personnel in the radiology department are the most important preventive measures in this extremity-threatening complication. Forearm compartment syndrome due to contrast agent extravasation may progress more rapidly in newborns even with smaller amounts of extravasation and prompt recognition of the pathology and immediate intervention are unevitable.

  16. Technique: imaging earliest tooth development in 3D using a silver-based tissue contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Muhammad T; Prusinkiewicz, Martin; Cooper, David M L; George, Belev; Webb, M Adam; Boughner, Julia C

    2014-02-01

    Looking in microscopic detail at the 3D organization of initiating teeth within the embryonic jaw has long-proved technologically challenging because of the radio-translucency of these tiny un-mineralized oral tissues. Yet 3D image data showing changes in the physical relationships among developing tooth and jaw tissues are vital to understand the coordinated morphogenesis of vertebrate teeth and jaws as an animal grows and as species evolve. Here, we present a new synchrotron-based scanning solution to image odontogenesis in 3D and in histological detail using a silver-based contrast agent. We stained fixed, intact wild-type mice aged embryonic (E) day 10 to birth with 1% Protargol-S at 37°C for 12-32 hr. Specimens were scanned at 4-10 µm pixel size at 28 keV, just above the silver K-edge, using micro-computed tomography (µCT) at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron. Synchrotron µCT scans of silver-stained embryos showed even the earliest visible stages of tooth initiation, as well as many other tissue types and structures, in histological detail. Silver stain penetration was optimal for imaging structures in intact embryos E15 and younger. This silver stain method offers a powerful yet straightforward approach to visualize at high-resolution and in 3D the earliest stages of odontogenesis in situ, and demonstrates the important of studying the tooth organ in all three planes of view. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelrich J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Joan Estelrich,1,2 María Jesús Sánchez-Martín,1 Maria Antònia Busquets1,2 1Departament de Fisicoquímica, Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; 2Institut de Nanociència I Nanotecnologia (IN2UB, Barcelona, Catalonia, SpainAbstract: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions, providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of

  18. Clinical superiority of a new nonionic contrast agent (iopamidol) for cardiac angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertz, E W; Wisneski, J A; Chiu, D; Akin, J R; Hu, C

    1985-02-01

    The hemodynamic and electrophysiologic alterations induced by ionic contrast agents during cardiac angiography are well described. Recently nonionic contrast agents have become available for cardiac angiography. To evaluate the safety of these new agents, a double-blind randomized study was performed comparing a new nonionic agent (iopamidol) with a commonly used ionic contrast agent (Renografin-76). Eighty-one patients undergoing left ventriculography and coronary angiography were included; 41 received iopamidol and 40 received sodium meglumine diatrizoate (Renografin-76). After left ventriculography, there was a decrease in the arterial pressure with both contrast agents. However, the severity and the duration of hypotension were both significantly greater with Renografin-76 compared with the new nonionic agent (p less than 0.001). After selective injections of the coronary arteries, electrocardiographic analysis demonstrated that the increase in the QT interval (p less than 0.0002) and the changes in both the ST segment and T wave amplitude (p less than 0.001) were significantly greater in the Renografin-76 group compared with the iopamidol group. During coronary angiography, 8 of the 40 patients receiving Renografin-76 required temporary pacing for sinus pauses of 2.5 seconds or more, and 2 of the 40 also developed ventricular fibrillation. None of the 41 patients receiving iopamidol had these complications. This report demonstrates that the electrocardiographic changes, the severity and duration of hypotension and the incidence of serious arrhythmias are significantly greater with Renografin-76 than with iopamidol. Thus, this new nonionic agent appears to enhance the safety of cardiac angiography.

  19. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents for Vessel Wall Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagno, Claudia; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Millon, Antoine; Robson, Philip M; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi

    2013-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease due to atherosclerosis is the number one killer in the Western world, and threatens to become the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is therefore paramount to develop non-invasive methods for the detection of high-risk, asymptomatic individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms or events. In the recent past, great strides have been made in the understanding of the pathological mechanisms involved in the atherosclerotic cascade down to the molecular details. This has allowed the development of contrast agents that can aid in the in vivo characterization of these processes. Gadolinium chelates are among the contrast media most commonly used in MR imaging. Originally used for MR angiography for the detection and quantification of vascular stenosis, more recently they have been applied to improve characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. In this manuscript, we will briefly review gadolinium-chelates (Gd) based contrast agents for non-invasive MR imaging of atherosclerosis. We will first describe Gd-based non-targeted FDA approved agents, used routinely in clinical practice for the evaluation of neovascularization in other diseases. Secondly, we will describe non-specific and specific targeted contrast agents, which have great potential for dissecting specific biological processes in the atherosclerotic cascade. Lastly, we will briefly compare Gd-based agents to others commonly used in MRI and to other imaging modalities.

  20. Safe handling and administration considerations of oral anticancer agents in the clinical and home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Joanne

    2012-12-01

    The use of hormonal, chemotherapeutic, and targeted biologic oral agents has exponentially increased since the early 2000s. Oral therapies have the advantage of persistent exposure of the cytotoxic drug to tumor cells and the tumor environment. The use of oral anticancer agents provides therapeutic drug treatment for patients with cancer in the comfort of their home or alternative settings, such as retirement homes and assisted living or extended-care facilities. Practices to ensure safe storage, handling, administration, and disposal of oral agents are necessary to prevent additional exposure of hazardous substances to the environment, professionals, patients, family members, and caretakers. Providers should consider potential barriers to adherence and compliance, and develop strategies to ensure optimal therapeutic benefit prior to initiation of oral agents.

  1. T(2) relaxation time of hyaline cartilage in presence of different gadolinium-based contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Edzard; Settles, Marcus; Diederichs, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    The transverse relaxation time, T(2), of native cartilage is used to quantify cartilage degradation. T(2) is frequently measured after contrast administration, assuming that the impact of gadolinium-based contrast agents on cartilage T(2) is negligible. To verify this assumption the depth-dependent variation of T(2) in the presence of gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadobenate dimeglumine and gadoteridol was investigated. Furthermore, the r(2)/r(1) relaxivity ratios were quantified in different cartilage layers to demonstrate differences between T(2) and T(1) relaxation effects. Transverse high-spatial-resolution T(1)- and T(2)-maps were simultaneously acquired on a 1.5 T MR scanner before and after contrast administration in nine bovine patellae using a turbo-mixed sequence. The r(2)/r(1) ratios were calculated for each contrast agent in cartilage. Profiles of T(1), T(2) and r(2)/r(1) across cartilage thickness were generated in the absence and presence of contrast agent. The mean values in different cartilage layers were compared for global variance using the Kruskal-Wallis test and pairwise using the Mann-Whitney U-test. T(2) of unenhanced cartilage was 98 +/- 5 ms at 1 mm and 65 +/- 4 ms at 3 mm depth. Eleven hours after contrast administration significant differences (p cartilage thickness were close to 1.0 (range 0.9-1.3). At 1.5 T, T(2) decreased significantly in the presence of contrast agents, more pronounced in superficial than in deep cartilage. The change in T(2) relaxation rate was similar to the change in T(1). Cartilage T(2) measurements after contrast administration will lead to systematic errors in the quantification of cartilage degradation. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Iodinated contrast agents in patients with myasthenia gravis: a retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Rath, Jakob; Mauritz, Matthias; Zulehner, Gudrun; Hilger, Eva; Cetin, Hakan; Kasprian, Gregor; Auff, Eduard; Zimprich, Fritz

    2017-01-01

    Currently, it has not been satisfactorily established, whether modern low-osmolality iodinated contrast agents (ICAs) used in computed tomography (CT) studies are a risk factor for exacerbation of myasthenic symptoms. The rate of acute adverse events as well as delayed clinical worsening up to 30?days were analyzed in 73 patients with confirmed myasthenia gravis (MG) who underwent contrast-enhanced CT studies and compared to 52 patients who underwent unenhanced CT studies. One acute adverse e...

  3. Comparison of voiding cystourethrography and urosonography with second-generation contrast agents in simultaneous prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świętoń, Dominik; Rybczyńska, Dorota; Czarniak, Piotr; Szarmach, Arkadiusz; Kaszubowski, Mariusz; Szurowska, Edyta

    2016-01-01

    Background The invasiveness and exposure to radiation in voiding cystourethrography led to the introduction of alternative methods of diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux, including contrast enhanced voiding urosonography. While there is a limited number of studies comparing these methods using new generation ultrasound contrast agents, none of them compared both methods simultaneously. This study is aimed at assessing agreement between contrast enhanced voiding urosonography with second-generation ultrasound contrast agents and voiding cystourethrography. Methods From April 2013 to May 2014, 83 children (37 female and 46 male), mean age 3.5 years, age range from 1 month to 17.5 years, underwent prospective simultaneous assessment by contrast enhanced voiding urosonography and voiding cystourethrography, with a total of 166 uretero-renal units evaluated. Results The sensitivity of voiding cystourethrography and contrast enhanced voiding urosonography were comparable, amounting to 88%, however, neither reached 100% for the entire studied population. The negative predictive value of voiding urosonography and voiding cystourethrography was 97%, and there was no difference between both methods. Conclusion Voiding cystourethrography and contrast enhanced voiding urosonography are comparable methods in diagnosis of vesicoureteral reflux, and can be performed alternatively. However, some limitations of contrast enhanced voiding urosonography must be remembered.

  4. Characterization of a Novel Hafnium-Based X-ray Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Thomas; Bauser, Marcus; Berger, Markus; Hilger, Christoph Stephan; Hegele-Hartung, Christa; Jost, Gregor; Neis, Christian; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar; Riefke, Björn; Suelzle, Detlev; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2016-12-01

    Characterization of BAY-576, a new x-ray contrast agent which is not based on iodine, but rather on the heavy metal hafnium. Compared with iodine, hafnium provides better x-ray absorption in the energy range of computed tomography (CT) and allows images of comparable quality to be acquired at a significantly reduced radiation dose. A range of standard methods were used to explore the physicochemistry of BAY-576 as well as its tolerability in in vitro assays, its pharmacokinetics and toxicology in rats, and its performance in CT imaging in rabbits. BAY-576 is an extraordinarily stable chelate with a metal content of 42% (wt/wt) and with excellent water solubility. Formulations of 300 mg Hf/mL exhibited viscosity (3.3-3.6 mPa) and osmolality (860-985 mOsm/kg) in the range of nonionic x-ray agents. No relevant effects on erythrocytes, the coagulation, or complement system or on a panel of 87 potential biological targets were observed. The compound did not bind to plasma proteins of a number of species investigated. After intravenous injection in rats, it was excreted fast and mainly via the kidneys. Its pharmacokinetics was comparable to known extracellular contrast agents. A dose of 6000 mg Hf/kg, approximately 10 to 20 times the expected diagnostic dose, was well tolerated by rats with only moderate adverse effects. Computed tomography imaging in rabbits bearing a tumor in the liver demonstrated excellent image quality when compared with iopromide at the same contrast agent dose in angiography during the arterial phase. At 70% of the radiation dose, BAY-576 provided a contrast-to-noise ratio of the tumor, which was equivalent to iopromide at 100% radiation dose. The profile of BAY-576 indicates its potential as the first compound in a new class of noniodine x-ray contrast agents, which can contribute to the reduction of the radiation burden in contrast-enhanced CT imaging.

  5. Molecular MR Imaging of CD44 in Breast Cancer with Hyaluronan-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    macromolecule as a contrast agent for MR angiography: preparation, properties, and animal studies. Radiology 1993;187(3):701- 706. 6. Frenzel T...Investigative radiology 2008;43(12):817-828. 7. Sieber MA, Lengsfeld P, Frenzel T, Golfier S, Schmitt-Willich H, Siegmund F, Walter J, Weinmann HJ

  6. Non-invasive ambient pressure estimation using non-linear ultrasound contrast agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup

    Many attempts to find a non-invasive procedure to measure the blood pressure locally in the body have been made. This dissertation focuses on the approaches which utilize highly compressible ultrasound contrast agents as ambient pressure sensors. The literature within the topic has been reviewed...

  7. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M.D.; De Jong, N.; Vos, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher

  8. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peruzzini, D.; J. Viti (Jacopo); P. Tortoli (Piero); M.D. Verweij (Martin D.); N. de Jong (Nico); H.J. Vos (Rik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the

  9. Relaxivity of blood pool contrast agent depends on the host tissue as suggested by semianalytical simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birgitte Fuglsang; Østergaard, Leif; Kiselev, Valerij G

    Concentration of MRI contrast agents (CA) is commonly determined indirectly using their relaxation effect. In quantitative perfusion studies, the change in the relaxation following a bolus passage is converted into concentrations assuming identical relaxivities for tissue and blood. Simulations...... can be applied to quantitation of perfusion, functional MRI and vessel size imaging...

  10. Unbinding of targeted ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles by secondary acoustic forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Garbin (Valeria); M. Overvelde (Marlies); B. Dollet (Benjamin); N. de Jong (Nico); D. Lohse (Detlef); M. Versluis (Michel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTargeted molecular imaging with ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles is achieved by incorporating targeting ligands on the bubble coating and allows for specific imaging of tissues affected by diseases. Improved understanding of the interplay between the acoustic forces acting on the b

  11. Dynamic Assessment of the Focal Hepatic Lesion in Rats Using Ultrasonic Contrast Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chao; DENG Youbin; HUANG Daozhong; ZHANG Qingping

    2006-01-01

    The focal hepatic lesion caused by local injection of absolute alcohol in rats was evaluated with ultrasonic contrast agent and pathologic examination. Twenty adult Wistar rats weighing about 200 g were injected with absolute alcohol (0.05-0.1 mL each one) on the exterior left lobe of the liver under the monitoring of ultrasound. Pulse inversion harmonic imaging was used to evaluate the focal lesion after bolus injection of ultrasonic contrast agent (0.05 mL/200 g) through caudal vein.Seven days later, the focal lesion was studied again as before. The exterior left lobe of liver with focal lesion was incised and underwent pathologic examination. The results showed that all of the focal lesions could be defined clearly after bolus injection of the ultrasonic contrast agent under the mode of pulse inversion harmonic imaging. There was good correlation between the size of the focal lesion measured by ultrasound on the 7th day after the "ablation" under the mode of pulse inversion harmonic imaging and that gotten by pathologic examination (P=0.39). The focus size measured by ultrasound right after the ablation was larger than that gotten by pathologic examination (P= 0.002). It was concluded that ultrasonic contrast agent plus pulse inversion harmonic imaging could be used to assess the size of the focal hepatic lesion caused by local injection of absolute alcohol in rats.

  12. Counterbalancing the use of ultrasound contrast agents by a cavitation-regulated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjouy, C; Fouqueray, M; Lo, C W; Muleki Seya, P; Lee, J L; Bera, J C; Chen, W S; Inserra, C

    2015-09-01

    The stochastic behavior of cavitation can lead to major problems of initiation and maintenance of cavitation during sonication, responsible of poor reproducibility of US-induced bioeffects in the context of sonoporation for instance. To overcome these disadvantages, the injection of ultrasound contrast agents as cavitation nuclei ensures fast initiation and lower acoustic intensities required for cavitation activity. More recently, regulated-cavitation devices based on the real-time modulation of the applied acoustic intensity have shown their potential to maintain a stable cavitation state during an ultrasonic shot, in continuous or pulsed wave conditions. In this paper is investigated the interest, in terms of cavitation activity, of using such regulated-cavitation device or injecting ultrasound contrast agents in the sonicated medium. When using fixed applied acoustic intensity, results showed that introducing ultrasound contrast agents increases reproducibility of cavitation activity (coefficient of variation 62% and 22% without and with UCA, respectively). Moreover, the use of the regulated-cavitation device ensures a given cavitation activity (coefficient of variation less 0.4% in presence of UCAs or not). This highlights the interest of controlling cavitation over time to free cavitation-based application from the use of UCAs. Interestingly, during a one minute sonication, while ultrasound contrast agents progressively disappear, the regulated-cavitation device counterbalance their destruction to sustain a stable inertial cavitation activity.

  13. Can focused US with a diagnostic US contrast agent favorably affect renal function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Domenic A

    2009-12-01

    Focused ultrasonography (US) with simultaneous administration of a US microbubble contrast agent was used to transiently increase the glomerular filtration rate while altering the sieving properties of glomeruli in normal rabbits. In its current form, this process has very limited application potential to states of abnormal renal function.

  14. Modeling contrast agent flow in cerebral aneurysms: comparison of CFD with medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayz, Vitaliy; Vali, Alireza; Sigovan, Monica; Lawton, Michael; Saloner, David; Boussel, Loic

    2016-11-01

    PURPOSE: The flow in cerebral aneurysms is routinely assessed with X-ray angiography, an imaging technique based on a contrast agent injection. In addition to requiring a patient's catheterization and radiation exposure, the X-ray angiography may inaccurately estimate the flow residence time, as the injection alters the native blood flow patterns. Numerical modeling of the contrast transport based on MRI imaging, provides a non-invasive alternative for the flow diagnostics. METHODS: The flow in 3 cerebral aneurysms was measured in vivo with 4D PC-MRI, which provides time-resolved, 3D velocity field. The measured velocities were used to simulate a contrast agent transport by solving the advection-diffusion equation. In addition, the flow in the same patient-specific geometries was simulated with CFD and the velocities obtained from the Navier-Stokes solution were used to model the transport of a virtual contrast. RESULTS: Contrast filling and washout patterns obtained in simulations based on MRI-measured velocities were in agreement with those obtained using the Navier-Stokes solution. Some discrepancies were observed in comparison to the X-ray angiography data, as numerical modeling of the contrast transport is based on the native blood flow unaffected by the contrast injection. NIH HL115267.

  15. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  16. Liposomes loaded with hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles: Preparation and application as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, S V; Navolokin, N A; Kuznetsova, N R; Zuev, V V; Inozemtseva, O A; Anis'kov, A A; Volkova, E K; Bucharskaya, A B; Maslyakova, G N; Fakhrullin, R F; Terentyuk, G S; Vodovozova, E L; Gorin, D A

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic fluid-loaded liposomes (MFLs) were fabricated using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and natural phospholipids via the thin film hydration method followed by extrusion. The size distribution and composition of MFLs were studied using dynamic light scattering and spectrophotometry. The effective ranges of magnetite concentration in MNPs hydrosol and MFLs for contrasting at both T2 and T1 relaxation were determined. On T2 weighted images, the MFLs effectively increased the contrast if compared with MNPs hydrosol, while on T1 weighted images, MNPs hydrosol contrasting was more efficient than that of MFLs. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasting properties of MFLs and their effects on tumor and normal tissues morphology, were investigated in rats with transplanted renal cell carcinoma upon intratumoral administration of MFLs. No significant morphological changes in rat internal organs upon intratumoral injection of MFLs were detected, suggesting that the liposomes are relatively safe and can be used as the potential contrasting agents for MRI.

  17. Comparison of the optoacoustic signal generation efficiency of different nanoparticular contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Wolfgang; Lemor, Robert; Fournelle, Marc

    2012-11-20

    Optoacoustic imaging represents a new modality that allows noninvasive in vivo molecular imaging with optical contrast and acoustical resolution. Whereas structural or functional imaging applications such as imaging of vasculature do not require contrast enhancing agents, nanoprobes with defined biochemical binding behavior are needed for molecular imaging tasks. Since the contrast of this modality is based on the local optical absorption coefficient, all particle or molecule types that show significant absorption cross sections in the spectral range of the laser wavelength used for signal generation are suitable contrast agents. Currently, several particle types such as gold nanospheres, nanoshells, nanorods, or polymer particles are used as optoacoustic contrast agents. These particles have specific advantages with respect to their absorption properties, or in terms of biologically relevant features (biodegradability, binding to molecular markers). In the present study, a comparative analysis of the signal generation efficiency of gold nanorods, polymeric particles, and magnetite particles using a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser for signal generation is described.

  18. Near-infrared dye-loaded magnetic nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agent for enhanced tumor imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuang Gao; Zhi-Fei Dai; Chang-Hui Li; Xiao-Long Liang; Zi-Jian Deng; Dong Peng; Yu-Shen Jin; Yan Ma; Yan-Yan Li; Yu-Kun Zhu; Jian-Zhong Xi; Jie Tian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Photoacoustic (PA) tomography (PAT) has attracted extensive interest because of its optical absorption contrast and ultrasonic detection. This study aims to develop a biocompatible and biodegradable PA contrast agent particularly promising for clinical applications in human body. Methods: In this study, we presented a PA contrast agent: 1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy (polyethylene glycol)] (DSPE-PEG)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with indocyanine green (ICG). We used ICG and SPIO NPs because both drugs are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Given the strong absorption of near-infrared laser pulses, SPIO@DSPE-PEG/ICG NPs with a uniform diameter of ~28 nm could significantly enhance PA signals. Results: We demonstrated the contrast enhancement of these NPs in phantom and animal experiments, in which thein vivo circulation time of SPIO@DSPE-PEG/ICG NPs was considerably longer than that of free ICG. These novel NPs also displayed a high efficiency of tumor targeting. Conclusions: SPIO@DSPE-PEG/ICG NPs are promising PAT contrast agents for clinical applications.

  19. Novel nano-sized MR contrast agent mediates strong tumor contrast enhancement in an oncogene-driven breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Olof Eriksson

    Full Text Available The current study was carried out to test the potential of a new nanomaterial (Spago Pix as a macromolecular magnetic MR contrast agent for tumor detection and to verify the presence of nanomaterial in tumor tissue. Spago Pix, synthesized by Spago Nanomedical AB, is a nanomaterial with a globular shape, an average hydrodynamic diameter of 5 nm, and a relaxivity (r1 of approximately 30 (mM Mn-1 s-1 (60 MHz. The material consists of an organophosphosilane hydrogel with strongly chelated manganese (II ions and a covalently attached PEG surface layer. In vivo MRI of the MMTV-PyMT breast cancer model was performed on a 3 T clinical scanner. Tissues were thereafter analyzed for manganese and silicon content using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES. The presence of nanomaterial in tumor and muscle tissue was assessed using an anti-PEG monoclonal antibody. MR imaging of tumor-bearing mice (n = 7 showed a contrast enhancement factor of 1.8 (tumor versus muscle at 30 minutes post-administration. Contrast was retained and further increased 2-4 hours after administration. ICP-AES and immunohistochemistry confirmed selective accumulation of nanomaterial in tumor tissue. A blood pharmacokinetics analysis showed that the concentration of Spago Pix gradually decreased over the first hour, which was in good agreement with the time frame in which the accumulation in tumor occurred. In summary, we demonstrate that Spago Pix selectively enhances MR tumor contrast in a clinically relevant animal model. Based on the generally higher vascular leakiness in malignant compared to benign tissue lesions, Spago Pix has the potential to significantly improve cancer diagnosis and characterization by MRI.

  20. Contrast-enhanced US-guided Interventions: Improving Success Rate and Avoiding Complications Using US Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dean Y; Yusuf, Gibran T; Daneshi, Mohammad; Husainy, Mohammad Ali; Ramnarine, Raymond; Sellars, Maria E K; Sidhu, Paul S

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is an established modality for intervention. The introduction of microbubble US contrast agents (UCAs) has the potential to further improve US imaging for intervention. According to licensing, UCAs are currently approved for clinical use in restricted situations, but many additional indications have become accepted as having clinical value. The use of UCAs has been shown to be safe, and there is no risk of renal toxic effects, unlike with iodinated or gadolinium contrast medium. Broadly speaking, UCAs can be injected into the bloodstream (intravascular use) or instilled into almost any accessible body cavity (endocavitary use), either in isolation or synchronously. In microvascular applications, contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) enhances delineation of necrotic areas and the vascularized target to improve real-time targeting. The ability of CEUS to allow true assessment of vascularity has also been used in follow-up of devascularizing intervention. In macrovascular applications, real-time angiographic images can be obtained with CEUS without nephrotoxic effects or radiation. In endocavitary applications, CEUS can achieve imaging similar to that of iodinated contrast medium-based fluoroscopy; follow-up to intervention (eg, tubography and nephrostography) can be performed at the bedside, which may be advantageous. The use of UCAs is a natural progression in US-guided intervention. The aim of this article is to describe the indications, contraindications, and techniques of using UCAs as an adjunctive tool for US-guided interventional procedures to facilitate effective treatment, improve complication management, and increase the overall success of interventional procedures. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  1. Silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods as multimodal contrast agents for a non-invasive visualization of the gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaopeng; Shi, Junxin; Bu, Yang; Tian, Gan; Zhang, Xiao; Yin, Wenyan; Gao, Bifen; Yang, Zhiyong; Hu, Zhongbo; Liu, Xiangfeng; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-07-01

    Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile solvothermal method and then coated with a SiO2 layer to improve their biocompatibility and stability in the harsh environments of the GI tract, such as the stomach and the small intestine. Due to their strong X-ray- and near infrared-absorption abilities, we demonstrate that, following oral administration in mice, the Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs can be used as a dual-modal contrast agent for the real-time and non-invasive visualization of NRs distribution and the GI tract via both X-ray computed tomography (CT) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) techniques. Importantly, integration of PAT with CT provides complementary information on anatomical details with high spatial resolution. In addition, we use Caenorhabditis Elegans (C. Elegans) as a simple model organism to investigate the biological response of Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs by oral administration. The results indicate that these NRs can pass through the GI tract of C. Elegans without inducing notable toxicological effects. The above results suggest that Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs pave an alternative way for the fabrication of multi-modal contrast agents which integrate CT and PAT modalities for a direct and non-invasive visualization of the GI tract with low toxicity.Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile

  2. Assessment of MRI Contrast Agent Kinetics via Retro-Orbital Injection in Mice: Comparison with Tail Vein Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Nojima, Masanori; Inoue, Yusuke; Ohtomo, Kuni; Kiryu, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    It is not known whether administration of contrast agent via retro-orbital injection or the tail vein route affects the efficiency of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, we compared the effects of retro-orbital and tail vein injection on the kinetics of the contrast agent used for MRI in mice. The same group of nine healthy female mice received contrast agent via either route. An extracellular contrast agent was infused via the tail vein and retro-orbital vein, in random order. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed before and after administering the contrast agent. The contrast effects in the liver, kidney, lung, and myocardium were assessed. The average total times of venous puncture and mounting of the injection system were about 10 and 4 min for the tail vein and retro-orbital route, respectively. For all organs assessed, the maximum contrast ratio occurred 30 s after administration and the time course of the contrast ratio was similar with either routes. For each organ, the contrast ratios correlated strongly; the contrast ratios were similar. The retro-orbital and tail vein routes afforded similar results in terms of the kinetics of the contrast agent. The retro-orbital route can be used as a simple efficient alternative to tail vein injection for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of mice.

  3. Assessment of MRI Contrast Agent Kinetics via Retro-Orbital Injection in Mice: Comparison with Tail Vein Injection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    Full Text Available It is not known whether administration of contrast agent via retro-orbital injection or the tail vein route affects the efficiency of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Therefore, we compared the effects of retro-orbital and tail vein injection on the kinetics of the contrast agent used for MRI in mice. The same group of nine healthy female mice received contrast agent via either route. An extracellular contrast agent was infused via the tail vein and retro-orbital vein, in random order. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed before and after administering the contrast agent. The contrast effects in the liver, kidney, lung, and myocardium were assessed. The average total times of venous puncture and mounting of the injection system were about 10 and 4 min for the tail vein and retro-orbital route, respectively. For all organs assessed, the maximum contrast ratio occurred 30 s after administration and the time course of the contrast ratio was similar with either routes. For each organ, the contrast ratios correlated strongly; the contrast ratios were similar. The retro-orbital and tail vein routes afforded similar results in terms of the kinetics of the contrast agent. The retro-orbital route can be used as a simple efficient alternative to tail vein injection for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of mice.

  4. Management of Antithrombotic Agents in Oral Surgery Maria Martinez and Dimitrios A. Tsakiris *

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Martinez; Dimitrios A. Tsakiris

    2015-01-01

    Systemic anticoagulation with intravenous or oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents is an efficient treatment against thromboembolic or cardiovascular disease. Invasive dental procedures or oral surgery might be associated with bleeding complications if carried out under anticoagulants. Patients on vitamin K antagonists, new direct anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents having dental interventions with low-risk for bleeding do not need interruption of anticoagulation. In case of bleeding ...

  5. Preparation and initial characterization of biodegradable particles containing gadolinium-DTPA contrast agent for enhanced MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Amber L.; Chu, Kevin; Ali, Adeel; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Accurate imaging of atherosclerosis is a growing necessity for timely treatment of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique for plaque imaging. The goal of this study was to create polymeric particles of a small size with high loading of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium (III) (Gd-DTPA) and demonstrate their usefulness for MRI. A water-in-oil-in-oil double emulsion solvent evaporation technique was used to encapsulate the MRI agent in a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or polylactide-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) particle for the purpose of concentrating the agent at an imaging site. PLGA particles with two separate average sizes of 1.83 μm and 920 nm, and PLA-PEG particles with a mean diameter of 952 nm were created. Loading of up to 30 wt % Gd-DTPA was achieved, and in vitro release occurred over 5 h. PLGA particles had highly negative zeta potentials, whereas the particles incorporating PEG had zeta potentials closer to neutral. Cytotoxicity of the particles on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was shown to be minimal. The ability of the polymeric contrast agent formulation to create contrast was similar to that of Gd-DTPA alone. These results demonstrate the possible utility of the contrast agent-loaded polymeric particles for plaque detection with MRI. PMID:18796605

  6. The effect of palatability of oral contrast media on compliance with drinking protocols, and on bowel opacification, in abdominal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Bruno [Department of Radiology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Infirmary Square, Leicester LE1 5WW (United Kingdom)], E-mail: bm11@le.ac.uk; Basu, Avi; Kithoray, Surjinder; Tyagi, Raman; Campbell, Shona; Liddicoat, Amanda [Department of Radiology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Infirmary Square, Leicester LE1 5WW (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    Purpose: To assess whether palatability of oral contrast in CT has an impact on adherence to oral contrast media drinking protocols; and whether such variation has an impact on bowel opacification. Three different types of contrast media were compared; ionic and non-ionic iodinated oral contrast (Gastrografin, Diatrizoate, Schering AG), Gastromiro (Iopamidol, Bracco SpA) and the barium based contrast E-Z-Cat (E-Z-EM). Materials and methods: In the first stage of the study 101 prospective patients were randomly given 1 L of a {approx}2% solution of Gastrografin or Gastromiro prior to a body CT scan. Data was recorded concerning the palatability of the oral contrast, drinking protocol compliance and bowel opacification. The second stage involved 66 prospective patients given Gastromiro or E-Z-Cat (again 1 L of {approx}2% solution). Results: Gastromiro had better palatability than Gastrografin (p = 0.001) and improved protocol compliance. E-Z-Cat had similar palatability to Gastromiro . Patients who found the oral contrast more palatable had improved drinking protocol compliance (p = 0.007) and improved small bowel opacification (p = 0.03). E-Z-Cat had similar palatability and protocol compliance to Gastromiro but better overall small bowel opacification (p = 0.001). Conclusion: In conclusion we suggest that the palatability of oral contrast is not only important to the patients overall experience of body CT, but that it is also linked to adherence with oral contrast drinking protocols leading to better bowel opacification.

  7. Colloidal dispersions of maghemite nanoparticles produced by laser pyrolysis with application as NMR contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Morales, Maria del Puerto [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bomati-Miguel, Oscar [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bautista, Carmen [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Zhao, Xinqing [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bonville, Pierre [CEA, CE Saclay, DSM/DRECAM/SPEC, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Alejo, Rigoberto Perez de [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Unidad de RMN, Paseo Juan XXIII, 1, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz-Cabello, Jesus [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Unidad de RMN, Paseo Juan XXIII, 1, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santos, Martin [Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. C/San Martin de Porres 4, 28035 Madrid (Spain); Tendillo-Cortijo, Francisco J [Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro, Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. C/San Martin de Porres 4, 28035 Madrid (Spain); Ferreiros, Joaquin [Hospital Clinico de Madrid ' San Carlos' , Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2004-08-07

    Biocompatible magnetic dispersions have been prepared from {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (5 nm) synthesized by continuous laser pyrolysis of Fe(CO){sub 5} vapours. The feasibility of using these dispersions as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents has been analysed in terms of chemical structure, magnetic properties, {sup 1}H NMR relaxation times and biokinetics. The magnetic nanoparticles were dispersed in a strong alkaline solution in the presence of dextran, yielding stable colloids in a single step. The dispersions consist of particle-aggregates 25 nm in diameter measured using transmission electron microscope and a hydrodynamic diameter of 42 nm measured using photon correlation spectroscopy. The magnetic and relaxometric properties of the dispersions were of the same order of magnitude as those of commercial contrast agents produced using coprecipitation. However, these dispersions, when injected intravenously in rats at standard doses showed a mono-exponential blood clearance instead of a biexponential one, with a blood half-life of 7 {+-} 1 min. Furthermore, an important enhancement of the image contrast was observed after the injection, mainly located at the liver and the spleen of the rat. In conclusion, the laser pyrolysis technique seems to be a good alternative to the coprecipitation method for producing MRI contrast agents, with the advantage of being a continuous synthesis method that leads to very uniform particles capable of being dispersed and therefore transformed in a biocompatible magnetic liquid.

  8. Complications from the use of intravenous gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias Junior, Jorge; Santos, Antonio Carlos dos; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica]. E-mail: jejunior@fmrp.usp.br

    2008-07-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are much safer than the iodinated ones; however complications may occur and should be recognized for appropriate orientation and management. The total incidence of adverse reactions to contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging ranges between 2% and 4%. Cases of severe acute reactions to gadolinium, such as laryngospasm and anaphylactic shock, are rare. Chronic complications secondary to the use of gadolinium also can occur and, recently an association between its use and a rare dermatologic disease occurring in patients with renal failure has been reported. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was the subject of an official health notification issued by the American Food and Drug Administration. This progressive disease is characterized by hardened skin with fibrotic nodules and plaques which may involve other parts of the body. Patients who have been affected by this disorder presented chronic renal failure, with metabolic acidosis and had been submitted to magnetic resonance angiography, probably involving exposure to large amounts of intravenous paramagnetic contrast. This review is aimed at presenting a succinct description of the gadolinium-based contrast agent types, possible secondary complications, their preventive measures and management. (author)

  9. Thermal dependence of ultrasound contrast agents scattering efficiency for echographic imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Angelo; Bettucci, Andrea; Passeri, Daniele; Alippi, Adriano

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are used in echographic imaging techniques to enhance image contrast. In addition, they may represent an interesting solution to the problem of non-invasive temperature monitoring inside the human body, based on some thermal variations of their physical properties. Contrast agents, indeed, are inserted into blood circulation and they reach the most important organs inside the human body; consequently, any thermometric property that they may possess, could be exploited for realizing a non-invasive thermometer. They essentially are a suspension of microbubbles containing a gas enclosed in a phospholipid membrane; temperature variations induce structural modifications of the microbubble phospholipid shell, thus causing thermal dependence of contrast agent's elastic characteristics. In this paper, the acoustic scattering efficiency of a bulk suspension of of SonoVue® (Bracco SpA Milan, Italy) has been studied using a pulse-echo technique in the frequency range 1-17 MHz, as it depends upon temperatures between 25 and 65°C. Experimental data confirm that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of SonoVue® depends on temperature between 25 and 60°C. Chemical composition of the bubble shell seem to support the hypothesis that a phase transition in the microstructure of lipid-coated microbubbles could play a key role in explaining such effect.

  10. Photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality contrast agent and its application to thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Hsin; Liao, Ai-Ho; Chen, Jui-Hao; Chris Wang, Churng-Ren; Li, Pai-Chi

    2012-04-01

    This study investigates a photoacoustic/ultrasound dual-modality contrast agent, including extending its applications from image-contrast enhancement to combined diagnosis and therapy with site-specific targeting. The contrast agent comprises albumin-shelled microbubbles with encapsulated gold nanorods (AuMBs). The gas-filled microbubbles, whose diameters range from submicrometer to several micrometers, are not only echogenic but also can serve as drug-delivery vehicles. The gold nanorods are used to enhance the generation of both photoacoustic and photothermal signals. The optical absorption peak of the gold nanorods is tuned to 760 nm and is invariant after microbubble encapsulation. Dual-modality contrast enhancement is first described here, and the applications to cellular targeting and laser-induced thermotherapy in a phantom are demonstrated. Photoacoustic imaging can be used to monitor temperature increases during the treatment. The targeting capability of AuMBs was verified, and the temperature increased by 26°C for a laser power of 980 mW, demonstrating the potential of combined diagnosis and therapy with the dual-modality agent. Targeted photo- or acoustic-mediated delivery is also possible.

  11. Magnetic resonance angiography with blood-pool contrast agents: future applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C. [Univ. Hospitals, Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Goyen, M. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Lotz, J. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Blood pool agents remain in the intravascular space for a longer time period. Therefore the optimal imaging window for vascular structures is widened to about 30 minutes. Gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is the first blood-pool contrast agent approved in Europe for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of vessels in the abdomen, pelvis and lower extremity in adults. Other possible applications of blood-pool agents are now being considered, such as assessment of venous thromboembolism, coronary artery disease or sinus venous thrombosis. Perfusion MR imaging holds promise for detecting lung perfusion defects with higher spatial resolution and reduced scan time compared with radionuclide scintigraphy. In coronary artery disease, blood-pool agents enable a substantial increase in the quality of coronary artery imaging. Quantitative myocardial perfusion and myocardial viability seem to be possible, although modifications in protocols and sequence design are necessary for optimal results. Other novel applications of blood-pool agents include monitoring of inflammatory changes in systemic lupus erythematosus and evaluation of tumour invasion into lymph nodes and more reliable assessment of cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis. (orig.)

  12. Biocompatible KMnF3 nanoparticular contrast agent with proper plasma retention time for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-jun; Song, Xiao-xia; Xu, Xian-zhu; Tang, Qun

    2014-04-18

    Nanoparticular MRI contrast agents are rapidly becoming suitable for use in clinical diagnosis. An ideal nanoparticular contrast agent should be endowed with high relaxivity, biocompatibility, proper plasma retention time, and tissue-specific or tumor-targeting imaging. Herein we introduce PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles as a new type of T1 contrast agent. Studies showed that the nanoparticular contrast agent revealed high bio-stability with bovine serum albumin in PBS buffer solution, and presented excellent biocompatibility (low cytotoxicity, undetectable hemolysis and hemagglutination). Meanwhile the new contrast agent possessed proper plasma retention time (circulation half-life t1/2 is approximately 2 h) in the body of the administrated mice. It can be delivered into brain vessels and maintained there for hours, and is mostly cleared from the body within 48 h, as demonstrated by time-resolved MRI and Mn-biodistribution analysis. Those distinguishing features make it suitable to obtain contrast-enhanced brain magnetic resonance angiography. Moreover, through the process of passive targeting delivery, the T1 contrast agent clearly illuminates a brain tumor (glioma) with high contrast image and defined shape. This study demonstrates that PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles represent a promising biocompatible vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into an active targeted tumor MRI contrast agent.

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of nanoglobule-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A, a biodegradable nanosized magnetic resonance contrast agent for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance urography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzuo Xu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rongzuo Xu1, Todd Lyle Kaneshiro1, Eun-Kee Jeong2, Dennis L Parker2, Zheng-Rong Lu31Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging has been recently shown to be effective for diagnostic urography. High-resolution urographic images can be acquired with T1 contrast agents for the kidney and urinary tract with minimal noise in the abdomen. Currently, clinical contrast agents are low molecular weight agents and can rapidly extravasate from blood circulation, leading to slow contrast agent elimination through kidney and consequently providing limited contrast enhancement in urinary tract. In this study, a new biodegradable macromolecular contrast agent, nanoglobule-G4-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A, was prepared by conjugating Gd-DO3A chelates on the surface of a generation 4 nanoglobule, poly-l-lysine octa(3-aminopropylsilsesquioxane dendrimer, via a disulfide spacer, where the carrier had a precisely defined nanosize that is far smaller than the renal filtration threshold. The in vivo contrast enhancement and dynamic imaging of the urinary tract of the agent was evaluated in nude mice using a low molecular weight agent Gd(DTPA-BMA as a control. The agent eliminated rapidly from blood circulation and accumulated more abundantly in urinary tract than Gd(DTPA-BMA. The fast elimination kinetics is ideal for functional evaluation of the kidneys. The morphology of the kidneys and urinary tract was better visualized by the biodegradable nanoglobular contrast agent than Gd(DTPA-BMA. The agent also resulted in low liver contrast enhancement, indicating low nonspecific tissue deposition. These features render the G4 nanoglobule-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A conjugate a promising contrast agent for magnetic

  14. Identification of chronic myocardial infarction with extracellular or intravascular contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian WANG; Hong-yu LIU; Hang L(U); Bo XIANG; Marco GRUWEL; Boguslaw TOMANEK; Roxanne DESLAURIERS; Gang-hong TIAN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether extracellular or intravascular contrast agents could detect chronic scarred myocardium in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Eighteen pigs underwent a 4 week ligation of 1 or 2 diagonal coronary arteries to induce chronic myocardial infarction. The hearts were then removed and perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. Eighteen hearts were divided into 2 groups. The hearts in groups Ⅰ (n=9) and Ⅱ (n=9) 收稿日期the bolus injection of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA, 0.05 mmol/kg) and ga-dolinium-based macromolecular agent (P792, 15 μmol/kg), respectively. First pass T2* MRI was acquired using a FLASH sequence. Delayed enhancement T1 MRI was acquired with an inversion recovery prepared TurboFLASH sequence.Results: Wash-in of both agents resulted in a sharp and dramatic T2* signal loss of scarred myocardium similar to that of normal myocardium. The magnitude and velocity of T2* signal recovery caused by wash-out of extracellular agents in normal myocardium was significantly less than that in scarred myocardium. Conversely, the T2* signal of scarred and normal myocardium recovered to plateau rapidly and simultaneously due to wash-out of intravascular agents. At the fol-lowing equilibrium, extracellular agent-enhanced T1 signal intensity was signifi-cantly greater in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium, whereas there was no significantly statistical difference in intravascular agent-enhanced T1 sig-nal intensity between scarred and normal myocardium. Conclusion: After admin-istration of extracellular agents, wash-out T2* first-pass and delayed enhanced T1 MRI could identify scarred myocardium as a hyperenhanced region. Conversely, scarred myocardium was indistinguishable from normal myocardium during first-pass and the steady state of intravascular agents.

  15. Hafnium-Based Contrast Agents for X-ray Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Markus; Bauser, Marcus; Frenzel, Thomas; Hilger, Christoph Stephan; Jost, Gregor; Lauria, Silvia; Morgenstern, Bernd; Neis, Christian; Pietsch, Hubertus; Sülzle, Detlev; Hegetschweiler, Kaspar

    2017-05-15

    Heavy-metal-based contrast agents (CAs) offer enhanced X-ray absorption for X-ray computed tomography (CT) compared to the currently used iodinated CAs. We report the discovery of new lanthanide and hafnium azainositol complexes and their optimization with respect to high water solubility and stability. Our efforts culminated in the synthesis of BAY-576, an uncharged hafnium complex with 3:2 stoichiometry and broken complex symmetry. The superior properties of this asymmetrically substituted hafnium CA were demonstrated by a CT angiography study in rabbits that revealed excellent signal contrast enhancement.

  16. Whole tissue AC susceptibility after superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agent administration in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, Francisco Jose [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales y Fluidos, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain) and Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: osoro@unizar.es; Gutierrez, Lucia [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales y Fluidos, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Rosa Abadia, Ana [Dept. Farmacologia y Fisiologia, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50013 Zaragoza (Spain); Soledad Romero, Maria [Dept. Medicina y Psiquiatria, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Lopez, Antonio [CNAM - Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Jesus Munoz, Maria [Dept. Farmacologia y Fisiologia, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50013 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-04-15

    A magnetic AC susceptibility characterisation of rat tissues after intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Endorem{sup (R)}), at the same dose as established for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement in humans, has been carried out. The measurements reveal the presence of the contrast agent as well as that of physiological ferritin in liver and spleen while no traces have been magnetically detected in heart and kidney. This preliminary work opens suggestive possibilities for future biodistribution studies of any type of magnetic carriers.

  17. Gadolinium contrast agent selection and optimal use for body MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G; Gupta, Shiva

    2014-07-01

    Proper selection of a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) for body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cases requires understanding the indication for the MRI exam, the key features of the different GBCAs, and the effect that the GBCA has on the selected imaging protocol. The different categories of GBCAs require timing optimization on postcontrast sequences and adjusting imaging parameters to obtain the highest T1 contrast. Gadoxetate disodium has many advantages when evaluating liver lesions, although there are caveats and limitations that need to be understood. Gadobenate dimeglumine, a high-relaxivity GBCA, can be used for indications when stronger T1 relaxivity is needed.

  18. Relaxivity of blood pool contrast agent depends on the host tissue as suggested by semianalytical simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølby, Birgitte Fuglsang; Østergaard, Leif; Kiselev, Valerij

    Concentration of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CA) cannot be measured directly and is commonly determined indirectly using their relaxation effect. This requires knowledge of the relaxivity of the used CA. Quantitative perfusion studies involve measurement of CA concentration...... studies (3,4) as demonstrated in (5). It was previously found (6) that the perfusion measurements using dynamic susceptibility contrast inherently overestimate cerebral blood flow and volume. In view of the present result, this is attributed to the significant difference in the relaxivity of the CA...

  19. Hydroxy double salts intercalated with Mn(II) complexes as potential contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Miao; Li, Wanjing; Spillane, Dominic E. M.; Geraldes, Carlos F. G. C.; Williams, Gareth R.; Bligh, S. W. Annie

    2016-03-01

    A series of Mn(II) aminophosphonate complexes were successfully synthesized and intercalated into the hydroxy double salt [Zn5(OH)8]Cl2·yH2O. Complex incorporation led to an increase in the interlayer spacing from 7.8 to 10-12 Å. Infrared spectroscopy showed the presence of the characteristic vibration peaks of the Mn(II) complexes in the intercalates' spectra, indicating successful incorporation. The complex-loaded composites had somewhat lower proton relaxivities than the pure complexes. Nevertheless, these intercalates may have use as MRI contrast agents for patients with poor kidney function, where traditional Gd(III)-based contrast agents cause severe renal failure.

  20. Small animal optoacoustic tomography system for molecular imaging of contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Richard; Liopo, Anton; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new and improved Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-3D for preclinical research applications in small animal models. The advancements include (i) a new stabilized imaging module with a more homogeneous illumination of the mouse yielding a better spatial resolution (research applications, such as imaging vascularization and measuring hemoglobin / oxyhemoglobin distribution in the organs as well as imaging exogenous or endogenous optoacoustic contrast agents. As examples, we present in vivo experiments using phantoms and mice with and without tumor injected with contrast agents with indocyanine green (ICG). LOIS-3D was capable of detecting ~1-2 pmole of the ICG, in tissues with relatively low blood content. With its high sensitivity and excellent spatial resolution LOIS-3D is an advanced alternative to fluorescence and bioluminescence based modalities for molecular imaging in live mice.

  1. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Farshad; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe3O4-SiO2-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting.

  2. X-ray Scatter Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in a Mouse Model Using Nanoparticle Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Danielle; Derdak, Zoltan; Carlson, Rolf; Wands, Jack R.; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide and is almost uniformly fatal. Current methods of detection include ultrasound examination and imaging by CT scan or MRI; however, these techniques are problematic in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and the detection of early tumors (contrast agents can be detected using SFHI. We also demonstrate that directed targeting and SFHI of HCC tumors in a mouse model is possible through the use of HCC-specific antibodies. The enhanced sensitivity of SFHI relative to currently available techniques enables the x-ray imaging of tumors that are just a few millimeters in diameter and substantially reduces the amount of nanoparticle contrast agent required for intravenous injection relative to absorption-based x-ray imaging.

  3. Synthesis of cytocompatible Fe3O4@ZSM-5 nanocomposite as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashi, Zahra; Divband, Baharak; Keshtkar, Ahmad; Khatamian, Maasoumeh; Farahmand-Zahed, Farzane; Nazarlo, Ali Kiani; Gharehaghaji, Nahideh

    2017-09-01

    In this study, ZSM-5 nano zeolite was used as a support material for iron oxide nanoparticles and the potential ability of the nanocomposite for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent was investigated. The nanocomposite was synthesized by hydrothermal method and characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. MRI was carried out by use of a 1.5 Tesla clinical scanner. The T2 weighted images were prepared and the r2 relaxivity was calculated. The sizes of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and related nanocomposite were 13-24 nm and 80-150 nm, respectively. Results of MTT assay confirmed that the prepared nanocomposite is cytocompatible. The r2 relaxivity of the Fe3O4@ZSM-5 nanocomposite was 457.1 mM-1 s-1. This study suggests that the Fe3O4@ZSM-5 nanocomposite has potential to use as an MRI T2 contrast agent.

  4. Preclinical animal acute toxicity studies of new developed MRI contrast agent based on gadolinium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, I. F.; Zhuk, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    Acute toxicity test of new developed MRI contrast agent based on disodium salt of gadopentetic acid complex were carried out on Mus musculus and Sprague Dawley rats according to guidelines of preclinical studies [1]. Groups of six animals each were selected for experiment. Death and clinical symptoms of animals were recorded during 14 days. As a result the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for female mice is 2.8 mM/kg of body weight, male mice - 1.4 mM/kg, female rats - 2.8 mM/kg, male rats - 5.6 mM/kg of body weight. No Observed Adverse Effect Dose (NOAEL) for female mice is 1.4 mM/kg, male mice - 0.7 mM/kg, male and female rats - 0.7 mM/kg. According to experimental data new developed MRI contrast agent based on Gd-DTPA complex is low-toxic.

  5. Novel ultrasound contrast agents--Biodegradable poly(lactic acid) microcapsules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王身国; 崔文瑾; 李光明; 蔡晴; 智光; 赵玉英; 杨波; 徐勇

    2003-01-01

    As a novel ultrasound diagnostic contrast agent, the preparation, characterization and ultrasound imaging in the body of dog about poly(lactic acid) (PLLA) microcapsules have been studied. The behavior of this kind of contrast agent in the microcirculation was also investigated. Prepared by (water/oil/water) emulsion-solvent evaporation protocol, the PLLA microcapsules with hollow structure can enhance the ultrasound image both in vitro and in vivo, and the enduring time can last as long as 3 h. The microcirculation examination shows that the PLLA microcapsules with a diameter ranging from 2 to 8 μm could pass through the pulmonary capillaries without retention. All the results prove the PLLA microcapsules for potential use for the clinical application.

  6. Biocompatible Polyhydroxyethylaspartamide-based Micelles with Gadolinium for MRI Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hyo Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biocompatible poly-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl-d,l-aspartamide]-methoxypoly(ethyleneglycol-hexadecylamine (PHEA-mPEG-C16 conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecan-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-gadolinium (DOTA-Gd via ethylenediamine (ED was synthesized as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. Amphiphilic PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd forms micelle in aqueous solution. All the synthesized materials were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR. Micelle size and shape were examined by dynamic light scattering (DLS and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Micelles with PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd showed higher relaxivities than the commercially available gadolinium contrast agent. Moreover, the signal intensity of a rabbit liver was effectively increased after intravenous injection of PHEA-mPEG-C16-ED-DOTA-Gd.

  7. A Gadolinium-containing Magnetic Resonance Image Contrast Agent Promotes Fibrocyte Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Vakil, Varsha; Sung, Joanna J.; Piecychna, Marta; Crawford, Jeffrey R.; Kuo, Philip; Abu-Alfa, Ali K.; Cowper, Shawn E.; Bucala, Richard; Gomer, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Gadolinium-containing magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents such as Omniscan are associated with Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF). To determine if Omniscan can affect the differentiation of monocytes into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes that are found in the fibrotic lesions of NSF, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from NSF patients, hemodialysis patients without NSF, and healthy, renally sufficient controls were exposed to Omniscan in a standardized in vitro fibrocy...

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of a high relaxivity manganese(II)-based MRI contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troughton, Jeffrey S; Greenfield, Matthew T; Greenwood, Jaclyn M; Dumas, Stéphane; Wiethoff, Andrea J; Wang, Jufeng; Spiller, Marga; McMurry, Thomas J; Caravan, Peter

    2004-10-04

    The manganese(II) ion has many favorable properties that lead to its potential use as an MRI contrast agent: high spin number, long electronic relaxation time, labile water exchange. The present work describes the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a novel Mn(II) complex (MnL1) based on EDTA and also contains a moiety that noncovalently binds the complex to serum albumin, the same moiety used in the gadolinium based contrast agent MS-325. Ultrafiltration albumin binding measurements (0.1 mM, pH 7.4, 37 degrees C) indicated that the complex binds well to plasma proteins (rabbit: 96 +/- 2% bound, human: 93 +/- 2% bound), and most likely to serum albumin (rabbit: 89 +/- 2% bound, human 98 +/- 2% bound). Observed relaxivities (+/- 5%) of the complex were measured (20 MHz, 37 degrees C, 0.1 mM, pH 7.4) in HEPES buffer (r(1) = 5.8 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)), rabbit plasma (r(1) = 51 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)), human plasma (r(1) = 46 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)), 4.5% rabbit serum albumin (r(1) = 47 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)), and 4.5% human serum albumin (r(1) = 48 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)). The water exchange rate was near optimal for an MRI contrast agent (k(298) = 2.3 +/- 0.9 x 10(8) s(-)(1)). Variable temperature NMRD profiles indicated that the high relaxivity was due to slow tumbling of the albumin-bound complex and fast exchange of the inner sphere water. The concept of a high relaxivity Mn(II)-based contrast agent was validated by imaging at 1.5 T. In a rabbit model of carotid artery injury, MnL1 clearly delineated both arteries and veins while also distinguishing between healthy tissue and regions of vessel damage.

  9. Determination of gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents in biological and environmental samples: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telgmann, Lena [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany); Sperling, Michael [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany); European Virtual Institute for Speciation Analysis (EVISA), Münster (Germany); Karst, Uwe, E-mail: uk@uni-muenster.de [University of Münster, Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Münster (Germany)

    2013-02-18

    Highlights: ► All major methods for the analysis of Gd-based MRI contrast agents are discussed. ► Biological and environmental samples are covered. ► Pharmacokinetics and species transformation can be investigated. ► The figures of merit as limit of detection and analysis time are described. -- Abstract: The development of analytical methods and strategies to determine gadolinium and its complexes in biological and environmental matrices is evaluated in this review. Gadolinium (Gd) chelates are employed as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since the 1980s. In general they were considered as safe and well-tolerated, when in 2006, the disease nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) was connected to the administration of MRI contrast agents based on Gd. Pathogenesis and etiology of NSF are yet unclear and called for the development of several analytical methods to obtain elucidation in this field. Determination of Gd complex stability in vitro and in vivo, as well as the quantification of Gd in body fluids like blood and urine was carried out. Separation of the Gd chelates was achieved with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE). For detection, various methods were employed, including UV–vis absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A second challenge for analysts was the discovery of high concentrations of anthropogenic Gd in surface waters draining populated areas. The source could soon be determined to be the increasing administration of Gd complexes during MRI examinations. Identification and quantification of the contrast agents was carried out in various surface and groundwater samples to determine the behavior and fate of the Gd chelates in the environment. The improvement of limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) was and still is the goal of past and ongoing

  10. Ultrasound in Biomedical Engineering: Ultrasound Microbubble Contrast Agents Promote Transdermal Permeation of Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Ho Liao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This report discusses a new development in the use of ultrasound microbubble contrast agents on transdermal drug delivery. The medium surrounding the microbubbles at the optimum concentration from liquid to gel can be modified and it can still achieve the same enhancement for transdermal drug permeation as liquid medium. It was also found that under the same ultrasound power density, microbubbles of larger particle sizes can extend the penetration depths of dye at the phantom surface.

  11. Enhanced relaxivity of Gd3+-based contrast agents geometrically confined within porous nanoconstructs

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi, Richa; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Karmonik, Christof; Zhong, Meng; Steve H. Fung; Liu, Xuewu; Li, King; Ferrari, Mauro; Wilson, Lon J.; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Gadolinium chelates, which are currently approved for clinical MRI use, provide relaxivities well below their theoretical limit, and they also lack tissue specificity. Recently, the geometrical confinement of Gd3+-based contrast agents (CAs) within porous structures has been proposed as a novel, alternative strategy to improve relaxivity without chemical modification of the CA. Here, we have characterized and optimized the performance of MRI nanoconstructs obtained by loading [Gd(DTPA)(H2O)]2...

  12. Metal-oxo containing polymer nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablico, Michele Huelar

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has greatly revolutionized the way diseases are detected and treated, as it is a non-invasive imaging modality solely based on the interaction of radiowaves and hydrogen nuclei in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is widely used today for the diagnosis of diseases as it offers an efficient method of mapping structure and function of soft tissues in the body. Most MRI examinations utilize paramagnetic materials known as contrast agents, which enhance the MR signal by decreasing the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times of the surrounding water protons in biological systems. This results into increased signal intensity differences thereby allowing better interpretation and analysis of pathological tissues. Contrast agents function by lowering the T1 or lowering the T2, resulting into bright and dark contrasts, respectively. The most common MRI contrast agents that are in clinical use today are gadolinium chelates and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, both of which have their own advantages in terms of contrast enhancement properties. In the past few years, however, there has been interest in utilizing metal-containing clusters for MRI contrast enhancement as these materials bridge the gap between the constrained structure and magnetic properties of the gadolinium chelates with the superparamagnetic behavior of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Recently, metallic clusters containing Mn and Fe metal centers have received increased attention mainly because of their potential for high spin states and benign nature. In the quest to further develop novel imaging agents, this research has focused on investigating the use of metal-oxo clusters as potential contrast agents for MRI. The primary goal of this project is to identify clusters that meet the following criteria: high paramagnetic susceptibility, water-soluble, stable, cheap, contain environmentally benign metals, and easily derivatized. This work is

  13. Multi-detector CT enterography with iso-osmotic mannitol as oral contrast for detecting small bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-He Zhang; Shi-Zheng Zhang; Hong-Jie Hu; Min Gao; Ming Zhang; Qian Cao; Qiao-wei Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility and usefulness of multi-detector CT enterography with orally administered iso-osmotic mannitol as negative contrast in demonstrating small bowel disease.METHODS: Thirteen volunteers and 38 patients with various kinds of small bowel disease were examined. We administered about 1 500 mL iso-osmotic mannitol as negative contrast agent and then proceeded with helical CT scanning on a Siemens Sensation 16 scanner. All volunteers and patients were interviewed about their tolerance of the procedure. Two radiologists postprocessed imaging data with MPR, thin MIP, VRT and INSPACE when necessary and then interpreted the scans,and adequacy of luminal distention was evaluated on a four-point scale. Demonstration of features of various kinds of small bowel disease was analyzed.RESULTS: The taste of iso-osmotic mannitol is good (slightly sweet) and acceptable by all. Small bowel distention was excellent and moderate in most volunteers and patients. CT features of many kinds of diseases such as tumors, Crohn's disease,and small bowel obstruction,etc. were clearly displayed.CONCLUSION: Multi-detector CT enterography with iso-osmotic mannitol as negative contrast to distend the small bowel is a simple, rapid, noninvasive and effective method of evaluating small bowel disease.

  14. Current status of superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for liver magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J

    2015-12-21

    Five types of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), i.e. Ferumoxides (Feridex(®) IV, Berlex Laboratories), Ferucarbotran (Resovist(®), Bayer Healthcare), Ferumoxtran-10 (AMI-227 or Code-7227, Combidex(®), AMAG Pharma; Sinerem(®), Guerbet), NC100150 (Clariscan(®), Nycomed,) and (VSOP C184, Ferropharm) have been designed and clinically tested as magnetic resonance contrast agents. However, until now Resovist(®) is current available in only a few countries. The other four agents have been stopped for further development or withdrawn from the market. Another SPIO agent Ferumoxytol (Feraheme(®)) is approved for the treatment of iron deficiency in adult chronic kidney disease patients. Ferumoxytol is comprised of iron oxide particles surrounded by a carbohydrate coat, and it is being explored as a potential imaging approach for evaluating lymph nodes and certain liver tumors.

  15. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing Zhanwen; Ke Hengte; Yue Xiuli; Dai Zhifei [Nanobiotechnology Division, State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resources and Environment, School of Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Wang Jinrui; Zhao Bo [Department of Ultrasonography, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu Jibin, E-mail: zhifei.dai@hit.edu.cn, E-mail: ji-bin.liu@jefferson.edu [Ultrasound Research and Education Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2010-04-09

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors.

  16. Ultrasmall Nanoplatforms as Calcium-Responsive Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaron, Albert; Vibhute, Sandip; Bianchi, Andrea; Gündüz, Serhat; Kotb, Shady; Sancey, Lucie; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Rizzitelli, Silvia; Crémillieux, Yannick; Lux, Francois; Logothetis, Nikos K; Tillement, Olivier; Angelovski, Goran

    2015-10-07

    The preparation of ultrasmall and rigid platforms (USRPs) that are covalently coupled to macrocycle-based, calcium-responsive/smart contrast agents (SCAs), and the initial in vitro and in vivo validation of the resulting nanosized probes (SCA-USRPs) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is reported. The synthetic procedure is robust, allowing preparation of the SCA-USRPs on a multigram scale. The resulting platforms display the desired MRI activity—i.e., longitudinal relaxivity increases almost twice at 7 T magnetic field strength upon saturation with Ca(2+). Cell viability is probed with the MTT assay using HEK-293 cells, which show good tolerance for lower contrast agent concentrations over longer periods of time. On intravenous administration of SCA-USRPs in living mice, MRI studies indicate their rapid accumulation in the renal pelvis and parenchyma. Importantly, the MRI signal increases in both kidney compartments when CaCl2 is also administrated. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy experiments confirm accumulation of SCA-USRPs in the renal cortex. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first studies which demonstrate calcium-sensitive MRI signal changes in vivo. Continuing contrast agent and MRI protocol optimizations should lead to wider application of these responsive probes and development of superior functional methods for monitoring calcium-dependent physiological and pathological processes in a dynamic manner.

  17. Experimental system for perfusion imaging and time-intensity processing based on ultrasound contrast agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To present a self-developed experimental system for basic studies of blood perfusion imaging and time-intensity evaluating based on ultrasound contrast agent. Methods: The experimental system performed the image reconstruction and time-intensity processing with radio frequency signals. The system was comprised of ultra-high speed hardware data acquisition interface and low computational cost algorithms. The self-made contrast agent ,blood mimic phantom and capillary phantom model were used to validate the experimental system. Results: The images acquired in blood phantoms with linear-array and curve-array transducers were given. The time-intensity curves corresponding to selected region of interested from image sequence were demonstrated. It was also shown the time-intensity based decay curves and a comparison of decay of ultrasound contrast agent under different ultrasound powers. Conclusion: Several experiments resulted from two in vitro phantom models show that the experimental system can be used to basic studies of blood perfusion and further clinical studies of microvasculature perfusion.

  18. Neurosurgical confocal endomicroscopy: A review of contrast agents, confocal systems, and future imaging modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqib H Zehri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical application of fluorescent contrast agents (fluorescein, indocyanine green, and aminolevulinic acid with intraoperative microscopy has led to advances in intraoperative brain tumor imaging. Their properties, mechanism of action, history of use, and safety are analyzed in this report along with a review of current laser scanning confocal endomicroscopy systems. Additional imaging modalities with potential neurosurgical utility are also analyzed. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed utilizing PubMed and key words: In vivo confocal microscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, fluorescence imaging, in vivo diagnostics/neoplasm, in vivo molecular imaging, and optical imaging. Articles were reviewed that discussed clinically available fluorophores in neurosurgery, confocal endomicroscopy instrumentation, confocal microscopy systems, and intraoperative cancer diagnostics. Results: Current clinically available fluorescent contrast agents have specific properties that provide microscopic delineation of tumors when imaged with laser scanning confocal endomicroscopes. Other imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy, confocal reflectance microscopy, fluorescent lifetime imaging (FLIM, two-photon microscopy, and second harmonic generation may also have potential in neurosurgical applications. Conclusion: In addition to guiding tumor resection, intraoperative fluorescence and microscopy have the potential to facilitate tumor identification and complement frozen section analysis during surgery by providing real-time histological assessment. Further research, including clinical trials, is necessary to test the efficacy of fluorescent contrast agents and optical imaging instrumentation in order to establish their role in neurosurgery.

  19. Chitosan oligosaccharide based Gd-DTPA complex as a potential bimodal magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Cao, Juan; Zhang, Qi; Lu, Zheng-rong; Hua, Ming-qing; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Gao, Hu

    2016-01-01

    A new gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) complex (Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11) as a potential bimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with fluorescence was synthesized. It was synthesized by the incorporation of 4-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde (DMABA) and chitosan oligosaccharide (CSn; n=11) with low polydispersity index to DTPA anhydride and then chelated with gadolinium chloride. The structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), (1)H NMR, elemental analysis and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). MRI measurements in vitro were evaluated. The results indicated that Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 provided higher molar longitudinal relaxivity (r1) (12.95mM(-1)·s(-1)) than that of commercial Gd-DTPA (3.63mM(-1)·s(-1)) at 0.5T. Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 also emitted fluorescence, and the intensity was much stronger than that of Gd-DTPA. Therefore, it can be meanwhile used in fluorescent imaging for improving the sensitivity in clinic diagnosis. Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 as a potential contrast agent is preliminarily stable in vitro. The results of thermodynamic action between Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) illustrated that the binding process was exothermic and spontaneous, and the main force was van der Waals' interaction and hydrogen bond. The preliminary study suggested that Gd-DTPA-DMABA-CS11 could be used in both magnetic resonance and fluorescent imaging as a promising bimodal contrast agent.

  20. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf; Rhee, Ilsu; Hong, Sungwook; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun; Sohn, Derac

    2015-05-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T1 and T2 relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM-1 s-1, respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T1-weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T2-weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T1 and T2 contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T1 and T2 contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles.

  1. Protein MRI contrast agent with unprecedented metal selectivity and sensitivity for liver cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shenghui; Yang, Hua; Qiao, Jingjuan; Pu, Fan; Jiang, Jie; Hubbard, Kendra; Hekmatyar, Khan; Langley, Jason; Salarian, Mani; Long, Robert C; Bryant, Robert G; Hu, Xiaoping Philip; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Liu, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Jenny J

    2015-05-26

    With available MRI techniques, primary and metastatic liver cancers that are associated with high mortality rates and poor treatment responses are only diagnosed at late stages, due to the lack of highly sensitive contrast agents without Gd(3+) toxicity. We have developed a protein contrast agent (ProCA32) that exhibits high stability for Gd(3+) and a 10(11)-fold greater selectivity for Gd(3+) over Zn(2+) compared with existing contrast agents. ProCA32, modified from parvalbumin, possesses high relaxivities (r1/r2: 66.8 mmol(-1)⋅s(-1)/89.2 mmol(-1)⋅s(-1) per particle). Using T1- and T2-weighted, as well as T2/T1 ratio imaging, we have achieved, for the first time (to our knowledge), robust MRI detection of early liver metastases as small as ∼0.24 mm in diameter, much smaller than the current detection limit of 10-20 mm. Furthermore, ProCA32 exhibits appropriate in vivo preference for liver sinusoidal spaces and pharmacokinetics for high-quality imaging. ProCA32 will be invaluable for noninvasive early detection of primary and metastatic liver cancers as well as for monitoring treatment and guiding therapeutic interventions, including drug delivery.

  2. ESGAR consensus statement on liver MR imaging and clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, E.; Boraschi, P.; Bartolozzi, C. [University of Pisa, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Bali, M.A.; Matos, C. [Hopital Erasme, MRI Clinics, Department of Radiology, Bruxelles (Belgium); Ba-Ssalamah, A. [The General Hospital of the Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Brancatelli, G. [University of Palermo, Department of Radiology, Palermo (Italy); Alves, F.C. [University Hospital of Coimbra, Medical Imaging Department and Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Grazioli, L. [Spedali Civili di Brescia, Department of Radiology, Brescia (Italy); Helmberger, T. [Academic Teaching Hospital of the Technical University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Lee, J.M. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Manfredi, R. [University of Verona, Department of Radiology, Verona (Italy); Marti-Bonmati, L. [Hospital Universitario y Politecnico La Fe, Area Clinica de Imagen Medica, Valencia (Spain); Merkle, E.M. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Op De Beeck, B. [Antwerp University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Schima, W. [KH Goettlicher Heiland, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern and Sankt Josef-Krankenhaus, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Skehan, S. [St Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Vilgrain, V. [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, APHP, Hopital Beaujon, Radiology Department, Clichy, Paris (France); Zech, C. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilungsleiter Interventionelle Radiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    To develop a consensus and provide updated recommendations on liver MR imaging and the clinical use of liver-specific contrast agents. The European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) formed a multinational European panel of experts, selected on the basis of a literature review and their leadership in the field of liver MR imaging. A modified Delphi process was adopted to draft a list of statements. Descriptive and Cronbach's statistics were used to rate levels of agreement and internal reliability of the consensus. Three Delphi rounds were conducted and 76 statements composed on MR technique (n = 17), clinical application of liver-specific contrast agents in benign, focal liver lesions (n = 7), malignant liver lesions in non-cirrhotic (n = 9) and in cirrhotic patients (n = 18), diffuse and vascular liver diseases (n = 12), and bile ducts (n = 13). The overall mean score of agreement was 4.84 (SD ±0.17). Full consensus was reached in 22 % of all statements in all working groups, with no full consensus reached on diffuse and vascular diseases. The consensus provided updated recommendations on the methodology, and clinical indications, of MRI with liver specific contrast agents in the study of liver diseases. (orig.)

  3. Open-Source Automated Parahydrogen Hyperpolarizer for Molecular Imaging Using (13)C Metabolic Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Aaron M; Shchepin, Roman V; Truong, Milton L; Wilkens, Ken; Pham, Wellington; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-08-16

    An open-source hyperpolarizer producing (13)C hyperpolarized contrast agents using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) for biomedical and other applications is presented. This PHIP hyperpolarizer utilizes an Arduino microcontroller in conjunction with a readily modified graphical user interface written in the open-source processing software environment to completely control the PHIP hyperpolarization process including remotely triggering an NMR spectrometer for efficient production of payloads of hyperpolarized contrast agent and in situ quality assurance of the produced hyperpolarization. Key advantages of this hyperpolarizer include: (i) use of open-source software and hardware seamlessly allowing for replication and further improvement as well as readily customizable integration with other NMR spectrometers or MRI scanners (i.e., this is a multiplatform design), (ii) relatively low cost and robustness, and (iii) in situ detection capability and complete automation. The device performance is demonstrated by production of a dose (∼2-3 mL) of hyperpolarized (13)C-succinate with %P13C ∼ 28% and 30 mM concentration and (13)C-phospholactate at %P13C ∼ 15% and 25 mM concentration in aqueous medium. These contrast agents are used for ultrafast molecular imaging and spectroscopy at 4.7 and 0.0475 T. In particular, the conversion of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate to (13)C-lactate in vivo is used here to demonstrate the feasibility of ultrafast multislice (13)C MRI after tail vein injection of hyperpolarized (13)C-phospholactate in mice.

  4. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, Farshad, E-mail: fyazdani@ccerci.ac.ir; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–SiO{sub 2}-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by simple and economical method. • Preperation of functional MNPs as a MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. • Gaining a good r{sub 2} relaxivity of the coated functional nanoparticles.

  5. Hyperintense acute reperfusion marker is associated with higher contrast agent dosage in acute ischaemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Schaefer, Tabea; Villringer, Kersten; Fiebach, Jochen B. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Academic Neuroradiology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Berlin (Germany); Rozanski, Michal; Ebinger, Martin [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Academic Neuroradiology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin (CSB), Berlin (Germany); Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Jungehuelsing, Gerhard J. [Stiftung des Buergerlichen Rechts, Juedisches Krankenhaus Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability changes. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of contrast agent dosage on HARM incidence in acute ischaemic stroke patients. We prospectively included 529 acute ischaemic stroke patients (204 females, median age 71 years). Patients underwent a first stroke-MRI within 24 hours from symptom onset and had a follow-up on day 2. The contrast agent Gadobutrol was administered to the patients for perfusion imaging or MR angiography. The total dosage was calculated as ml/kg body weight and ranged between 0.04 and 0.31 mmol/kg on the first examination. The incidence of HARM was evaluated on day 2 FLAIR images. HARM was detected in 97 patients (18.3 %). HARM incidence increased significantly with increasing dosages of Gadobutrol. Also, HARM positive patients were significantly older. HARM was not an independent predictor of worse clinical outcome, and we did not find an association with increase risk of haemorrhagic transformation. A higher dosage of Gadobutrol in acute stroke patients on initial MRI is associated with increased HARM incidence on follow-up. MRI studies on BBB should therefore standardize contrast agent dosages. (orig.)

  6. Design of water-based ferrofluids as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casula, Maria F; Corrias, Anna; Arosio, Paolo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Sen, Tapas; Floris, Patrizia; Bruce, Ian J

    2011-05-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization and relaxometric study of ferrofluids based on iron oxide, with potential for use as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (CAs). The effect of different cost-effective, water-based surface modification approaches which can be easily scaled-up for the large scale synthesis of the ferrofluids has been investigated. Surface modification was achieved by silanization, and/or coating with non-toxic commercial dispersants (a lauric polysorbate and a block copolymer with pigment affinic groups, namely Tween 20 and Disperbyk 190) which were added after or during iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis. It was observed that all the materials synthesized functioned as negative contrast agents at physiological temperature and at frequencies covered by clinical imagers. The relaxometric properties of the magnetic nanoparticles were significantly improved after surface coating with stabilizers compared to the original iron oxide nanoparticles, with particular reference to the silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles. The results indicate that the optimization of the preparation of colloidal magnetic ferrofluids by surface modification is effective in the design of novel contrast agents for MRI by enabling better or more effective interaction between the coated iron oxide nanoparticles and protons present in their aqueous environment.

  7. A human cell model for dynamic testing of MR contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulanier, Anne-Lise; Doiron, Amber L; Shepherd, Robert D; Rinker, Kristina D; Frayne, Richard; Andersen, Linda B

    2011-02-01

    To determine the initial feasibility of using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to detect early atherosclerosis, we investigated inflammatory cells labeled with a positive contrast agent in an endothelial cell-based testing system. The human monocytic cell line THP-1 was labeled by overnight incubation with a gadolinium colloid (Gado CELLTrack) prior to determination of the in vitro release profile from T1-weighted MR images. Next, MR signals arising from both a synthetic model of THP-1/human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) accumulation and the dynamic adhesion of THP-1 cells to activated HUVECs under flow were obtained. THP-1 cells were found to be successfully--but not optimally--labeled with gadolinium colloid, and MR images demonstrated increased signal from labeled cells in both the synthetic and dynamic THP-1/HUVEC models. The observed THP-1 contrast release profile was rapid, suggesting the need for an agent that is optimized for retention in the target cells for use in further studies. Detection of labeled THP-1 cells was accomplished with no signal enhancement from unlabeled cells. These achievements demonstrate the feasibility of targeting early atherosclerosis with MR imaging, and suggest that using an in vitro system like the one described provides a rapid, efficient, and cost-effective way to support the development and evaluation of novel MR contrast agents.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as calcium-responsive MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengfei; Shen, Zhiwei; Zhang, Baolin; Wang, Jun; Wu, Renhua

    2016-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as T2 contrast agents have great potential to sense calcium ion (Ca2+) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we prepared calcium-responsive SPIONs for MRI, formed by combining poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI) coated iron oxide nanoparticle (PEI/PEG-SPIONs) contrast agents with the straightforward calcium-sensing compound EGTA (ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid). EGTA was conjugated onto PEI/PEG-SPIONs using EDC/sulfo-NHS method. EGTA-SPIONs were characterized using TEM, XPS, DSL, TGA and SQUIID. DSL results show that the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca2+. MRI analyses indicate that the water proton T2 relaxation rates in HEPES suspensions of the EGTA-SPIONs significantly increase with the calcium concentration because the SPIONs aggregate in the presence of Ca2+. The T2 values decreased 25% when Ca2+ concentration decreased from 1.2 to 0.8 mM. The aggregation of EGTA-SPIONs could be reversed by EDTA. EGTA-SPIONs have potential as smart contrast agents for Ca2+-sensitive MRI.

  9. Intravenous, contrast-enhanced MR colonography using air as endoluminal contrast agent: Impact on colorectal polyp detection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To compare diagnostic accuracy and patient tolerance of MR colonography with intravenous contrast and luminal air (MRC) to conventional colonoscopy (CC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: IRB approval and written informed consent were obtained. Forty-six patients, both screening and symptomatic, underwent MRC followed by CC. The MRC technique employed 3D T1W spoiled gradient echo sequences performed after the administration of gadopenetate dimeglumine, with parallel imaging. The diagnostic accuracy and tolerance of patients for MRC was compared to CC. RESULTS: Twenty-four polyps were detected in eighteen patients with CC (5 polyps >\\/=10mm, 4 polyps 6-9mm, 15 polyps <\\/=5mm). MRC was 66.7% (12\\/18) sensitive and 96.4% (27\\/28) specific for polyp detection on a per-patient basis. When analyzed by polyp size, sensitivity and specificity of MRC was 100% (5\\/5) and 100% (19\\/19), respectively, for lesions greater than 10mm, 100% (4\\/4) and 100% (20\\/20) for lesions 6-9mm, and sensitivity of 20% (3\\/15) lesions less than 5mm. The sensitivity and specificity of MRC for detecting significant lesions (>6mm) was 100% (9\\/9) and 100% (15\\/15), respectively. Regarding tolerance of the exams, there were no significant differences between MRC and CC. Thirty-five percent (n=16) of patients preferred MRC as a future screening test compared to 33% (n=15) for CC. CONCLUSION: MRC using air as an intraluminal contrast agent is a feasible and well-tolerated technique for detecting colonic polyps >\\/=6mm in size. Further studies are warranted.

  10. Intravenous, contrast-enhanced MR colonography using air as endoluminal contrast agent: Impact on colorectal polyp detection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2010-12-03

    PURPOSE: To compare diagnostic accuracy and patient tolerance of MR colonography with intravenous contrast and luminal air (MRC) to conventional colonoscopy (CC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: IRB approval and written informed consent were obtained. Forty-six patients, both screening and symptomatic, underwent MRC followed by CC. The MRC technique employed 3D T1W spoiled gradient echo sequences performed after the administration of gadopenetate dimeglumine, with parallel imaging. The diagnostic accuracy and tolerance of patients for MRC was compared to CC. RESULTS: Twenty-four polyps were detected in eighteen patients with CC (5 polyps ≥10mm, 4 polyps 6-9mm, 15 polyps ≤5mm). MRC was 66.7% (12\\/18) sensitive and 96.4% (27\\/28) specific for polyp detection on a per-patient basis. When analyzed by polyp size, sensitivity and specificity of MRC was 100% (5\\/5) and 100% (19\\/19), respectively, for lesions greater than 10mm, 100% (4\\/4) and 100% (20\\/20) for lesions 6-9mm, and sensitivity of 20% (3\\/15) lesions less than 5mm. The sensitivity and specificity of MRC for detecting significant lesions (>6mm) was 100% (9\\/9) and 100% (15\\/15), respectively. Regarding tolerance of the exams, there were no significant differences between MRC and CC. Thirty-five percent (n=16) of patients preferred MRC as a future screening test compared to 33% (n=15) for CC. CONCLUSION: MRC using air as an intraluminal contrast agent is a feasible and well-tolerated technique for detecting colonic polyps ≥6mm in size. Further studies are warranted.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of osteosarcoma using a bis(alendronate)-based bone-targeted contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Pingju; Sheng, Fugeng; Jin, Yiguang; Tong, Li; Du, Lina; Zhang, Lei; Tian, Ning; Li, Gongjie

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is currently used for diagnosis of osteosarcoma but not well even though contrast agents are administered. Here, we report a novel bone-targeted MR imaging contrast agent, Gd2-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate-bis(alendronate) (Gd2-DTPA-BA) for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. It is the conjugate of a bone cell-seeking molecule (i.e., alendronate) and an MR imaging contrast agent (i.e., Gd-DTPA). Its physicochemical parameters were measured, including pKa, complex constant, and T1 relaxivity. Its bone cell-seeking ability was evaluated by measuring its adsorption on hydroxyapatite. Hemolysis was investigated. MR imaging and biodistribution of Gd2-DTPA-BA and Gd-DTPA were studied on healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing nude mice. Gd2-DTPA-BA showed high adsorption on hydroxyapatite, the high MR relaxivity (r1) of 7.613mM(-1)s(-1) (2.6 folds of Gd-DTPA), and no hemolysis. The MR contrast effect of Gd2-DTPA-BA was much higher than that of Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection to the mice. More importantly, the MR imaging of osteosarcoma was significantly improved by Gd2-DTPA-BA. The signal intensity of Gd2-DTPA-BA reached 120.3% at 50min, equal to three folds of Gd-DTPA. The bone targeting index (bone/blood) of Gd2-DTPA-BA in the osteosarcoma-bearing mice was very high to 130 at 180min. Furthermore, the contrast enhancement could also be found in the lung due to metastasis of osteosarcoma. Gd2-DTPA-BA plays a promising role in the diagnoses of osteosacomas, including the primary bone tumors and metastases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Dextran coated bismuth-iron oxide nanohybrid contrast agents for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naha, Pratap C; Zaki, Ajlan Al; Hecht, Elizabeth; Chorny, Michael; Chhour, Peter; Blankemeyer, Eric; Yates, Douglas M; Witschey, Walter R T; Litt, Harold I; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cormode, David P

    2014-12-14

    Bismuth nanoparticles have been proposed as a novel CT contrast agent, however few syntheses of biocompatible bismuth nanoparticles have been achieved. We herein report the synthesis of composite bismuth-iron oxide nanoparticles (BION) that are based on a clinically approved, dextran-coated iron oxide formulation; the particles have the advantage of acting as contrast agents for both CT and MRI. BION were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. BION CT phantom images revealed that the X-ray attenuation of the different formulations was dependent upon the amount of bismuth present in the nanoparticle, while T2-weighted MRI contrast decreased with increasing bismuth content. No cytotoxicity was observed in Hep G2 and BJ5ta cells after 24 hours incubation with BION. The above properties, as well as the yield of synthesis and bismuth inclusion efficiency, led us to select the Bi-30 formulation for in vivo experiments, performed in mice using a micro-CT and a 9.4 T MRI system. X-ray contrast was observed in the heart and blood vessels over a 2 hour period, indicating that Bi-30 has a prolonged circulation half-life. Considerable signal loss in T2-weighted MR images was observed in the liver compared to pre-injection scans. Evaluation of the biodistribution of Bi-30 revealed that bismuth is excreted via the urine, with significant concentrations found in the kidneys and urine. In vitro experiments confirmed the degradability of Bi-30. In summary, dextran coated BION are biocompatible, biodegradable, possess strong X-ray attenuation properties and also can be used as T2-weighted MR contrast agents.

  13. An in vitro study of a microbubble contrast agent using a clinical ultrasound imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sboros, V.; Moran, C. M.; Pye, S. D.; McDicken, W. N.

    2004-01-01

    Optimal insonation settings for contrast imaging are yet to be specified, mainly due to the lack of good understanding of the behaviour of the microbubbles. A satisfactory model that explains the behaviour of individual contrast agent scatterers has not yet been reported in the literature. An in vitro system based on a commercial scanner (ATL HDI3000) has been developed to investigate the backscatter of such agents. Suspensions of Definity® were introduced in an anechoic tank. The frequency of transmitted ultrasound varied from 1 to 5 MHz, pulse period from 2 to 10 periods and peak negative acoustic pressure from 0.08 to 1.7 MPa. The backscatter at the fundamental and second harmonic frequency windows from the agent was normalized in terms of the corresponding components of backscatter from a blood mimicking fluid suspension. The agent provided a dominant resonance effect at 1.6 MHz transmit frequency. Second harmonic normalized backscatter averaged around 9 dB higher than the fundamental. The normalized fundamental backscatter intensity was linear with peak negative pressure. The second harmonic at resonance peaked at 0.5 MPa suggestive of bubble disruption above such pressure. The system proved capable of illustrating the ultrasonic behaviour of Definity® in vitro, and the investigation suggested particular insonation conditions for optimal image enhancement using Definity®.

  14. Fluorescent and scattering contrast agents in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Amy M.; Rice, Photini F. S.; Troutman, Timothy S.; Backer, Marina V.; Backer, Joseph M.; Drezek, Rebekah A.; Romanowski, Marek; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2008-02-01

    In previous work we have demonstrated the utility of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to identify adenoma in mouse models of colorectal cancer with high sensitivity and specificity. However, improved sensitivity to early disease, as well as the ability to distinguish confounders (e.g. fecal contamination, natural variations in mucosal thickness), is desired. In this study, we investigated the signal enhancement of fluorescent and scattering contrast agents in the colons of AOM-treated mice. The fluorescent tracer scVEGF/Cy, targeted to receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor, was visualized on a dual modality OCT/LIF endoscopic system with 1300-nm center wavelength OCT source and 635-nm LIF excitation. Scattering agents were tested with an 890-nm center wavelength endoscopic OCT system. Agents included nanoshells, 120-nm in diameter, and nanorods, 20-nm in diameter by 80-nm in length. Following imaging, colons were excised. Tissue treated with fluorophore was imaged on an epifluorescence microscope. Histological sections were obtained and stained with H&E and silver enhancer to verify disease and identify regions of gold uptake, respectively. Non-specific signal enhancement was observed with the scattering contrast agents. Specificity for adenoma was seen with the scVEGF/Cy dye.

  15. Gadolinium magnetic resonance contrast agents produce analytic interference in multiple serum assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Kerry A S; Rao, Lokinendi V; Roberts, William L

    2004-02-01

    Gadolinium magnetic resonance contrast agents are known to interfere with some clinical chemistry tests, particularly colorimetric assays for serum calcium. We studied the effects of 4 agents, gadodiamide, gadoversetamide, gadopentetate dimeglumine, and gadoteridol, for interference with multiple serum assays. Gadodiamide and gadoversetamide produced clinically significant negative interference with colorimetric assays for serum angiotensin-converting enzyme, calcium, and zinc. These agents produced clinically significant positive interference in magnesium and total iron binding capacity assays and both positive and negative interference in iron assays. Gadopentetate dimeglumine produced a negative interference with iron assays, and gadopentetate dimeglumine and gadoteridol produced negative interference with a colorimetric zinc assay. Caution should be exercised when using colorimetric assays for angiotensin-converting enzyme, calcium, iron, magnesium, total iron binding capacity, and zinc in serum samples from patients who have recently received magnetic resonance contrast agents. In general, gadodiamide and gadoversetamide are more likely to produce a clinically significant interference than gadopentetate dimeglumine and gadoteridol. Likewise, certain analytic methods are more prone to interference, while others not affected.

  16. Polypyrrole coated phase-change contrast agents for sono-photoacoustic imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David S.; Yoon, Soon Joon; Matula, Thomas J.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Pozzo, Lilo D.

    2017-03-01

    A new light and sound sensitive nanoemulsion contrast agent is presented. The agents feature a low boiling point liquid perfluorocarbon core and a broad light spectrum absorbing polypyrrole (PPy) polymer shell. The PPy coated nanoemulsions can reversibly convert from liquid to gas phase upon cavitation of the liquid perfluorocarbon core. Cavitation can be initiated using a sufficiently high intensity acoustic pulse or from heat generation due to light absorption from a laser pulse. The emulsions can be made between 150 and 350 nm in diameter and PPy has a broad optical absorption covering both the visible spectrum and extending into the near-infrared spectrum (peak absorption 1053 nm). The size, structure, and optical absorption properties of the PPy coated nanoemulsions were characterized and compared to PPy nanoparticles (no liquid core) using dynamic light scattering, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and small angle X-ray scattering. The cavitation threshold and signal intensity were measured as a function of both acoustic pressure and laser fluence. Overlapping simultaneous transmission of an acoustic and laser pulse can significantly reduce the activation energy of the contrast agents to levels lower than optical or acoustic activation alone. We also demonstrate that simultaneous light and sound cavitation of the agents can be used in a new sono-photoacoustic imaging method, which enables greater sensitivity than traditional photoacoustic imaging.

  17. Multispectral photoacoustic decomposition with localized regularization for detecting targeted contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Chen, Ying; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Pomper, Martin; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Targeted contrast agents can improve the sensitivity of imaging systems for cancer detection and monitoring the treatment. In order to accurately detect contrast agent concentration from photoacoustic images, we developed a decomposition algorithm to separate photoacoustic absorption spectrum into components from individual absorbers. In this study, we evaluated novel prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) targeted agents for imaging prostate cancer. Three agents were synthesized through conjugating PSMA-targeting urea with optical dyes ICG, IRDye800CW and ATTO740 respectively. In our preliminary PA study, dyes were injected in a thin wall plastic tube embedded in water tank. The tube was illuminated with pulsed laser light using a tunable Q-switch ND-YAG laser. PA signal along with the B-mode ultrasound images were detected with a diagnostic ultrasound probe in orthogonal mode. PA spectrums of each dye at 0.5 to 20 μM concentrations were estimated using the maximum PA signal extracted from images which are obtained at illumination wavelengths of 700nm-850nm. Subsequently, we developed nonnegative linear least square optimization method along with localized regularization to solve the spectral unmixing. The algorithm was tested by imaging mixture of those dyes. The concentration of each dye was estimated with about 20% error on average from almost all mixtures albeit the small separation between dyes spectrums.

  18. How to Use MR-Contrast Agent in Tumor Induced Epilepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Ameri

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available By year of 1990, second MRI revolution has hap-pened in the diagnosis of infection and tumor assessment "first revolution was made by clinical MRI invention in the early 1980's"."nTumor-associated epilepsis is an important contributor to morbidity in patients with brain tumors. Perilesional tissue changes play a vital role in the generation of tumor-associated seizures.Tumor-associated seizure is usually focal with secondary generalization and often resistant to antiepileptic drugs."nFor studying the tumor well and diagnosis, contrast injection is a necessity and T1 pulse is used for demonstration. It needs pre-contrast T1 to compare with post contrast T1. "nContrast agent "Gadolinium" changes the relaxation time of tissue in T1 pulse "shortening the time". Contrast circulation in the body is in a close circuit from vein or artery to the capillary system, interstitial tissue and contrast does not go inside the normal cells except in hepatocytes, pituicytes and damaged cells "broken blood brain barrier"."nFor tumor diagnosis, MRI with and without Gadolinium is used more than x-ray CT techniques."nOther diagnostic techniques for tumor D.D.X and epilepsis are PET, SPECT, EEG, MEG "MSI" and ultrasound. "nTested Double Dose contrasted images "2 x 1mmol/kg" of Gadolinium by 1.5 Tesla machine increased the enhancement rate about 5-10% but needs double money for contrast. Using 3 Tesla machine also increases signal demonstration but today all imaging "95%" is sufficient by 1.5 Tesla and imaging by 3-Tesla is difficult and expensive. "nConclusion: 1/ Please request MRI with and without GD for tumor diagnosis "pre-contrast T1and post contrast T1 is necessary to diagnosis and D.D.X of any hemorrhage inside the tumor versus enhancement". 2/ Please do not request double dose contrast for imaging "it is more expensive and less effective". 3/ Please request your patients imaging by 1.5 Tesla "3 Tesla imaging is difficult and more expensive". 4/Requesting

  19. Gadolinium contrast agent-induced CD163+ ferroportin+ osteogenic cells in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Sundararaman; Bose, Chhanda; Shah, Sudhir V; Hall, Kimberly A; Hiatt, Kim M

    2013-09-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are linked to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with renal insufficiency. The pathology of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is characterized by abnormal tissue repair: fibrosis and ectopic ossification. The mechanisms by which gadolinium could induce fibrosis and ossification are not known. We examined in vitro the effect of a gadolinium-based contrast agent on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for phenotype and function relevant to the pathology of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis using immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, real-time PCR, and osteogenic assays. We also examined tissues from patients with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, using IHC to identify the presence of cells with phenotype induced by gadolinium. Gadolinium contrast induced differentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into a unique cellular phenotype--CD163(+) cells expressing proteins involved in fibrosis and bone formation. These cells express fibroblast growth factor (FGF)23, osteoblast transcription factors Runt-related transcription factor 2, and osterix, and show an osteogenic phenotype in in vitro assays. We show in vivo the presence of CD163(+)/procollagen-1(+)/osteocalcin(+) cells in the fibrotic and calcified tissues of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis patients. Gadolinium contrast-induced CD163(+)/ferroportin(+)/FGF23(+) cells with osteogenic potential may play a role in systemic fibrosis and ectopic ossification in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

  20. Design of a modular protein-based MRI contrast agent for targeted application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Grum

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI offers a non-radioactive alternative for the non-invasive detection of tumours. Low molecular weight MRI contrast agents currently in clinical use suffer either from a lack of specificity for tumour tissue or from low relaxivity and thus low contrast amplification. In this study, we present the newly designed two domain fusion protein Zarvin, which is able to bind to therapeutic IgG antibodies suitable for targeting, while facilitating contrast enhancement through high affinity binding sites for Gd(3+. We show that the Zarvin fold is stable under serum conditions, specifically targets a cancer cell-line when bound to the Cetuximab IgG, and allows for imaging with high relaxivity, a property that would be advantageous for the detection of small tumours and metastases at 1.5 or 3 T.

  1. Highly magnetic iron carbide nanoparticles as effective T(2) contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoming; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Zijian; Chi, Xiaoqin; Gao, Jinhao

    2014-01-21

    This paper reports that iron carbide nanoparticles with high air-stability and strong saturation magnetization can serve as effective T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Fe5C2 nanoparticles (~20 nm in diameter) exhibit strong contrast enhancement with an r2 value of 283.2 mM(-1) S(-1), which is about twice as high as that of spherical Fe3O4 nanoparticles (~140.9 mM(-1) S(-1)). In vivo experiments demonstrate that Fe5C2 nanoparticles are able to produce much more significant MRI contrast enhancement than conventional Fe3O4 nanoparticles in living subjects, which holds great promise in biomedical applications.

  2. Iodinated contrast agents in patients with myasthenia gravis: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Jakob; Mauritz, Matthias; Zulehner, Gudrun; Hilger, Eva; Cetin, Hakan; Kasprian, Gregor; Auff, Eduard; Zimprich, Fritz

    2017-06-01

    Currently, it has not been satisfactorily established, whether modern low-osmolality iodinated contrast agents (ICAs) used in computed tomography (CT) studies are a risk factor for exacerbation of myasthenic symptoms. The rate of acute adverse events as well as delayed clinical worsening up to 30 days were analyzed in 73 patients with confirmed myasthenia gravis (MG) who underwent contrast-enhanced CT studies and compared to 52 patients who underwent unenhanced CT studies. One acute adverse event was documented. 12.3% of MG patients experienced a delayed exacerbation of symptoms after ICA administration. The rate of delayed severe exacerbation was higher in the contrast-enhanced group. Alternative causes for the exacerbation of MG-related symptoms were more likely than ICA administration in all cases. ICA administration for CT studies in MG patients should not be withheld if indicated, but patients particularly those with concomitant acute diseases should be carefully monitored for exacerbation of symptoms.

  3. Differential structured illumination microendoscopy for in vivo imaging of molecular contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keahey, Pelham; Ramalingam, Preetha; Schmeler, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic microendoscopy has shown promise for visualization of molecular contrast agents used to study disease in vivo. However, fiber optic microendoscopes have limited optical sectioning capability, and image contrast is limited by out-of-focus light generated in highly scattering tissue. Optical sectioning techniques have been used in microendoscopes to remove out-of-focus light but reduce imaging speed or rely on bulky optical elements that prevent in vivo imaging. Here, we present differential structured illumination microendoscopy (DSIMe), a fiber optic system that can perform structured illumination in real time for optical sectioning without any opto-mechanical components attached to the distal tip of the fiber bundle. We demonstrate the use of DSIMe during in vivo fluorescence imaging in patients undergoing surgery for cervical adenocarcinoma in situ. Images acquired using DSIMe show greater contrast than standard microendoscopy, improving the ability to detect cellular atypia associated with neoplasia. PMID:27621464

  4. Generation of a droplet inside a microbubble with the aid of an ultrasound contrast agent: First result

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Postema (Michiel); F.J. ten Cate (Folkert); G. Schmitz (Gerd); N. de Jong (Nico); A. van Wamel (Annemieke)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractNew ultrasound contrast agents that incorporate a therapeutic compound have become of interest. Such an ultrasound contrast agent particle might act as the vehicle to carry a drug or gene load to a perfused region of interest. The load could be released with the assistance of ultrasound.

  5. Peptide-based MRI contrast agent and near-infrared fluorescent probe for intratumoral legumain detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Wu, Shou-Cheng; Chen, Chung-Yung; Tzou, Shey-Cherng; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Huang, Ying-Fang; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou; Wang, Yun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that intratumoral legumain promotes tumorigenesis. To monitor legumain activity in tumors, we developed a new MRI contrast agent ([Gd-NBCB-TTDA-Leg(L)]) and a NIR fluorescence probe (CyTE777-Leg(L)-CyTE807). The MRI contrast agent was prepared by introduction of cyclobutyl and benzyl group residues to TTDA (3,6,10-tri(carboxymethyl)-3,6,10-triaza-dodecanedioic acid), followed by the attachment of a legumain-specific substrate peptide (Leg(L)). The NIR fluorescence probe was designed by conjugating two NIR fluorochromes (CyTE777 and CyTE807) with Leg(L). Peptide cleavage of the MRI contrast agent by legumain can increase its hydrophobicity and promote rotational correlation time (τ(R)). Peptide cleavage of the NIR probes by the legumain relieves the self quench of the probe. Peptide cleavage of the MRI contrast agent and the NIR fluorescence probe by legumain were confirmed by T1 relaxometric studies and by fluorescence studies, respectively. In vivo MR images showed that [Gd-NBCB-TTDA-Leg(L)] attained 55.3 fold (254.2% versus 4.6%, at 2.0 h post-injection) higher imaging enhancement, as compared with control contrast agent bearing a noncleaveable peptide ([Gd-NBCB-TTDA-Leg(D)], in the CT-26 (legumain(+)) tumors. Similarly, optical imaging probe CyTE777-Leg(L)-CyTE807 attained 15.2 fold (3.34 × 10(9) photons/min versus 0.22 × 10(9) photons/min, at 24.0 h post-injection) higher imaging enhancement in the CT-26 (legumain(+)) tumors, compared to a NIR control probe (CyTE777-Leg(D)-CyTE807). These data indicate that the [Gd-NBCB-TTDA-Leg(L)] and the CyTE777-Leg(L)-CyTE807 probes may be promising tools to image the legumain-expressing cancers for diagnoses and targeted treatments.

  6. Highly monodisperse low-magnetization magnetite nanocubes as simultaneous T1-T2 MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V. K.; Alipour, A.; Soran-Erdem, Z.; Aykut, Z. G.; Demir, H. V.

    2015-06-01

    We report the first study of highly monodisperse and crystalline iron oxide nanocubes with sub-nm controlled size distribution (9.7 +/- 0.5 nm in size) that achieve simultaneous contrast enhancement in both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we confirmed the magnetite structure of iron oxide nanocubes by X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, optical absorption and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectra. These magnetite nanocubes exhibit superparamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior simultaneously by virtue of their finely controlled shape and size. The magnetic measurements reveal that the magnetic moment values are favorably much lower because of the small size and cubic shape of the nanoparticles, which results in an enhanced spin canting effect. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we showed their potential as dual contrast agents for both T1- and T2-weighted MRI via phantom studies, in vivo imaging and relaxivity measurements. Therefore, these low-magnetization magnetite nanocubes, while being non-toxic and bio-compatible, hold great promise as excellent dual-mode T1 and T2 contrast agents for MRI.We report the first study of highly monodisperse and crystalline iron oxide nanocubes with sub-nm controlled size distribution (9.7 +/- 0.5 nm in size) that achieve simultaneous contrast enhancement in both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we confirmed the magnetite structure of iron oxide nanocubes by X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, optical absorption and Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectra. These magnetite nanocubes exhibit superparamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior simultaneously by virtue of their finely controlled shape and size. The magnetic measurements reveal that the magnetic moment values are favorably much lower because of the small size and cubic shape of the nanoparticles, which results in an enhanced spin

  7. Dendritic iodinated contrast agents with PEG-cores for CT imaging: synthesis and preliminary characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanjun; Nitecki, Danute E; Maltby, David; Simon, Gerhard H; Berejnoi, Kirill; Raatschen, Hans-Juergen; Yeh, Benjamin M; Shames, David M; Brasch, Robert C

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design, synthesize, and initially characterize a representative set of novel constructs for large-molecular radiographic/computed tomography (CT) contrast agents, intended for a primarily intravascular distribution. A new assembly of well-known and biocompatible components consists of paired, symmetrical dendritic polylysines initiated from both ends of a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) core, yielding an array of multiple free amino groups to which were conjugated highly soluble and stable triiodophthalamide ("triiodo") moieties. An array of six dendritic contrast agents was synthesized originally, using three different PEG cores (3, 6, 12 kDa) with t-Boc lysine-generated dendrimer "amplifiers" (from three to five generations) containing 16 to 64 amino groups for conjugation with reactive triiodo moieties. A clinically used, nonionic, small molecular CT contrast agent, iobitridol, was derivatized via a hydroxyl protection/deprotection strategy, introducing a new carboxyl group available for conjugation to the lysine amino groups of dendrimers. Final products were purified by size exclusion chromatography and characterized by NMR, UV, HPLC, and elemental analysis. Preliminary evaluations were conducted for physicochemical characterization and in vivo CT contrast enhancement in a rat model. All six iodinated PEG-core dendrimer conjugates were synthesized in good yields, with a high degree of size monodispersity, large apparent molecular weight, favored physicochemical properties. A representative compound, PEG12000-carbamate-Gen4-IOB conjugate, 27% (w%) rich in iodine, demonstrated a desirable strong and persistent intravascular enhancement with a monoexponential blood half-life of approximately 35 min assayed by dynamic CT imaging and also showed high water solubility (>550 mg/mL at 25 degrees C), large apparent molecular size (comparable to a 143-kDa protein), high hydrophilicity (butanol-water partition coefficient 0.015), and

  8. Magnetic red blood cells as new contrast agents for MRI applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Antonella; Sfara, Carla; Manuali, Elisabetta; Salamida, Sonia; Louin, Gaëlle; Magnani, Mauro

    2013-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have been produced and used successfully as potent contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). However, a significant challenge associated with the biological application of SPIO-tracer agents is their behavior in vivo since their efficacy is often compromised due to a rapid recognition and clearance by the reticuloendothelial system (RES) which limits the applicability of such compounds in MRI. The advances in nanotechnology and molecular cell biology had lead to improve stability and biocompatibility of these nanoparticles, but despite a number of efforts, the SPIO half-life in blood circulation is very short. In this contest, the potential of red blood cells (RBCs) loaded with SPIO nanoparticles as a tracer material for MRI has been investigated in order to realize a blood pool tracer with longer blood retention time. Previously, we have proposed the encapsulation into RBCs of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles carboxydextran coated, such as Resovist contrast agent. This approach led to a nanoparticle reduction in uptake by the RES, increasing the blood circulation half-life of nanoparticles. Recently, the loading procedure was applied to a new contrast agent, the P904 ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles coated by hydrophilic derivatives of glucose, recently developed by Guerbet Laboratories. The results evidenced that this nanomaterial can be efficiently loaded into human and murine RBCs at concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 12 mM Fe. In vivo experiments performed in mice have showed an increased survival in the mouse vascular system of P904 encapsulated into RBCs respect to free P904 sample intravenously injected at the equivalent amounts.

  9. Biodegradable Polysilsesquioxane Nanoparticles as Efficient Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivero-Escoto, Juan L.; Rieter, William J.; Lau, Honam; Huxford-Phillips, Rachel C.

    2013-01-01

    Polysilsesquioxane (PSQ) nanoparticles are crosslinked homopolymers formed by condensation of functionalized trialkoxysilanes, and provide an interesting platform for developing biologically and biomedically relevant nanomaterials. In this work, the design and synthesis of biodegradable PSQ particles with extremely high payloads of paramagnetic Gd(III) centers is explored, for use as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two new bis(trialkoxysilyl) derivatives of Gd(III) diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) containing disulfide linkages are synthesized and used to form biodegradable Gd-PSQ particles by base-catalyzed condensation reactions in reverse microemulsions. The Gd-PSQ particles, PSQ-1 and PSQ-2, carry 53.8 wt% and 49.3 wt% of Gd-DTPA derivatives, respectively. In addition, the surface carboxy groups on the PSQ-2 particles can be modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and the anisamide (AA) ligand to enhance biocompatibility and cell uptake, respectively. The Gd-PSQ particles are readily degradable to release the constituent Gd(III) chelates in the presence of endogenous reducing agents such as cysteine and glutathione. The MR relaxivities of the Gd-PSQ particles are determined using a 3T MR scanner, with r1 values ranging from 5.9 to 17.8 mMs−1 on a per-Gd basis. Finally, the high sensitivity of the Gd-PSQ particles as T1-weighted MR contrast agents is demonstrated with in vitro MR imaging of human lung and pancreatic cancer cells. The enhanced efficiency of the anisamide-functionalized PSQ-2 particles as a contrast agent is corroborated by both confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging and ICP-MS analysis of Gd content in vitro. PMID:23613450

  10. Enhanced conjugation stability and blood circulation time of macromolecular gadolinium-DTPA contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenjob, Ratchapol [Department of New Drug Development, School of Medicine, Inha University, 2F A-dong, Jeongseok Bldg., Sinheung-dong 3-ga, Jung-gu, Incheon 400-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kun, Na [Department of Biotechnology, The Catholic University of Korea, 43 Jibong-ro, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si, Gyeonggi-do 420-743 (Korea, Republic of); Ghee, Jung Yeon [Utah-Inha DDS and Advanced Therapeutics, B-403 Meet-You-All Tower, SongdoTechnopark, 7–50, Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Xiaoxia [Division of Functional Materials and Nano-Devices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology & Engineering (NIMTE), Chinese Academy of Sciences, 519 Zhuangshi Street, Zhenhai District, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315201 (China); Cho, Steve K., E-mail: scho@gist.ac.kr [Division of Liberal Arts and Science, GIST College, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Don Haeng [Utah-Inha DDS and Advanced Therapeutics, B-403 Meet-You-All Tower, SongdoTechnopark, 7–50, Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Incheon 420-751 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Su-Geun, E-mail: Sugeun.Yang@Inha.ac.kr [Department of New Drug Development, School of Medicine, Inha University, 2F A-dong, Jeongseok Bldg., Sinheung-dong 3-ga, Jung-gu, Incheon 400-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we prepared macromolecular MR T1 contrast agent: pullulan-conjugated Gd diethylene triamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA-Pullulan) and estimated residual free Gd{sup 3+}, chelation stability in competition with metal ions, plasma and tissue pharmacokinetics, and abdominal MR contrast on rats. Residual free Gd{sup 3+} in Gd-DTPA-Pullulan was measured using colorimetric spectroscopy. The transmetalation of Gd{sup 3+} incubated with Ca{sup 2+} was performed by using a dialysis membrane (MWCO 100–500 Da) and investigated by ICP-OES. The plasma concentration profiles of Gd-DTPA-Pullulan were estimated after intravenous injection at a dose 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd. The coronal-plane abdominal images of normal rats were observed by MR imaging. The content of free Gd{sup 3+}, the toxic residual form, was less than 0.01%. Chelation stability of Gd-DTPA-Pullulan was estimated, and only 0.2% and 0.00045% of Gd{sup 3+} were released from Gd-DTPA-Pullulan after 2 h incubation with Ca{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}, respectively. Gd-DTPA-Pullulan displayed the extended plasma half-life (t{sub 1/2,α} = 0.43 h, t{sub 1/2,β} = 2.32 h), much longer than 0.11 h and 0.79 h of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Abdominal MR imaging showed Gd-DTPA-Pullulan maintained initial MR contrast for 30 min. The extended plasma half-life of Gd-DTPA-Pullulan probably allows the prolonged MR acquisition time in clinic with enhanced MR contrast. - Highlights: • Macromolecule (pullulan) conjugated Gd contrast agent (Gd-DTPA-Pullulan) showed the extended plasma half-life (t{sub 1/2,α} = 0.43 h, t{sub 1/2,β} = 2.32 h) in comparison with Gd-EOB-DTPA • Gd-DTPA-pullulan T1 contrast agent exhibited strong chelation stability against Gd. • The extended blood circulation attributed the enhanced and prolonged MR contrast on abdominal region of rats. • The extended blood circulation may provide prolonged MR acquisition time window in clinics.

  11. Comparison of the effect of positive and negative oral contrast agents on delineation and 18F-FDG uptake of gastrointestinal tract%口服不同对比剂对PET/CT胃肠道充盈及FDG摄取影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟德刚; 孙晓光; 黄钢; 刘建军; 宋少莉; 万良荣

    2010-01-01

    目的 比较PET/CT显像前口服泛影葡胺、甘露醇和清水对胃肠道显示和脱氧葡萄糖(FDG)摄取的差异.方法 将61例无胃肠道疾病行PET/CT显像的患者按随机数字法分成3组,组1(25例)显像前口服质量分数1%泛影葡胺1 L;组2(20例)显像前口服质量分数2.5%甘露醇1 L;组3(16例)显像前口服清水1 L.患者注射18F-FDG(按体质量5.55 MBq/kg)后50 min应用二维(2D)模式进行PET/CT显像.由3位核医学科医师分别应用目测分析法将胃肠道充盈状态和FDG摄取情况分为4类:无、轻度、中度和重度.应用秩和检验、配对t检验对相关数据进行统计学分析.结果 组2患者口服甘露醇前后血糖和血胰岛素水平差异无统计学意义.组2患者胃肠道充盈好于组1;除直肠外,其余部位充盈状态好于组3.组1患者胃、空肠、升结肠和横结肠充盈状态好于组3患者.组3患者胃、空肠和回肠FDG摄取程度高于组2患者(z=-3.192,-3.290,-3.290,P<0.05);空肠FDG摄取高于组1(z=-3.603,P<0.05),升结肠FDG摄取低于组1(z=-2.706,P<0.05),横结肠和降结肠FDG摄取均明显低于其他2组(z=-3.503,-2.403,-4.223,-4.027,P<0.05),直肠FDG摄取明显低于组2(z=-4.128,P<0.01).组1患者胃、空肠、回肠和升结肠最大CT值分别为(132±23),(191±31),(313±47)和(374±53)HU,差异有统计学意义(t=-7.088~-1.781,P<0.01).结论 口服甘露醇作为增强剂胃肠道充盈好,FDG生理性摄取相对较低.%Objective To compare the different effects of 1% diatrizoate meglumine,2.5% mannitol and water as oral contrasts in PET/CT scan in gastrointestinal tract delineation and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. Methods Sixty-one patients referred for PET/CT scan without gastrointestinal diseases were divided into three groups randomly ( random number method). One liter of 1% diatrizoate meglumine,2.5% mannitol,or water was orally taken by groups 1 (25 cases),2 (20 cases) and 3 ( 16 cases

  12. Adherence, compliance and persistence to oral antineoplastic therapy: a review focused on chemotherapeutic and biologic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebbia, Vittorio; Bellavia, Giuseppe; Ferraù, Francesco; Valerio, Maria Rosaria

    2012-05-01

    To date, orally administered chemotherapy and biologic agents represent a significant percentage of all antineoplastic treatments in several types of cancer, which are most likely to increase in the near future. In this scenario, the issue of adherence and persistence to oral therapy is a key issue since poor compliance to oral antineoplastic treatments may negatively influence patients' clinical outcomes and, in turn, cause an increase in costs, number of hospitalizations and time spent in the hospital. The issue of adherence to new oral chemotherapeutic and/or biologic agents has not been deeply evaluated and data published in medical literature are quite scarce. Adherence is a multidimensional phenomenon, which may be influenced by patient- and health-care provider-related factors, anticancer therapy itself, education and socioeconomic aspects. Patients' selection plays, therefore, a key role in maximizing adherence and persistence to oral therapies. Treating health-care practitioners should first evaluate patient reliability to avoid prescribing oral treatments to patients with socioeconomic and medical conditions, which may predict poor adherence. Adherence and persistence to new oral biologic agents, which are linked to several side effects and whose use is constantly widening, should represent a main endpoint of clinical research in the nearest future.

  13. Facile Synthesis of Gd-Functionalized Gold Nanoclusters as Potential MRI/CT Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Le

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modal imaging plays a key role in the earlier detection of disease. In this work, a facile bioinspired method was developed to synthesize Gd-functionalized gold nanoclusters (Gd-Au NCs. The Gd-Au NCs exhibit a uniform size, with an average size of 5.6 nm in dynamic light scattering (DLS, which is a bit bigger than gold clusters (3.74 nm, DLS, while the fluorescent properties of Gd-Au NCs are almost the same as that of Au NCs. Moreover, the Gd-Au NCs exhibit a high longitudinal relaxivity value (r1 of 22.111 s−1 per mM of Gd in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, which is six times higher than that of commercial Magnevist (A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid, Gd-DTPA, r1 = 3.56 mM−1·s−1. Besides, as evaluated by nano single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and computed tomography (CT the Gd-Au NCs have a potential application as CT contrast agents because of the Au element. Finally, the Gd-Au NCs show little cytotoxicity, even when the Au concentration is up to 250 μM. Thus, the Gd-Au NCs can act as multi-modal imaging contrast agents.

  14. Palladium nanosheets as highly stable and effective contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Liming; Chen, Mei; Sun, Xiaolian; Rong, Pengfei; Zheng, Nanfeng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A stable and efficient contrast agent is highly desirable for photoacoustic (PA) imaging applications. Recently gold nanostructures have been widely reported and studied for PA imaging and photothermal therapy. However, the structures of the nonspherical gold nanoparticles are easily destroyed after laser irradiation and thus may fail to complete the intended tasks. In this study, we propose to apply palladium nanosheets (PNSs), with strong optical absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region, as a new class of exogenous PA contrast agents. PA and ultrasound (US) images were acquired sequentially by a portable and fast photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with a hand-held transducer. Significant and long-lasting imaging enhancement in SCC7 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma was successfully observed in mice by PAT over time after tail vein administration of PNSs. The morphology and functional perfusion of the tumors were delineated in PA images due to the nanoparticle accumulation. PAT of the main organs was also conducted ex vivo to trace the fate of PNSs, which was further validated by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). No obvious toxic effect was observed by in vitro MTT assay and ex vivo histological examination 7 days after PNS administration. With the combination of a portable imaging instrument and signal specificity, PNSs might be applied as stable and effective agents for photoacoustic cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment guidance.

  15. Quantitative MRI for Analysis of Active Multiple Sclerosis Lesions without Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blystad, I; Håkansson, I; Tisell, A; Ernerudh, J; Smedby, Ö; Lundberg, P; Larsson, E-M

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-enhancing MS lesions are important markers of active inflammation in the diagnostic work-up of MS and in disease monitoring with MR imaging. Because intravenous contrast agents involve an expense and a potential risk of adverse events, it would be desirable to identify active lesions without using a contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether pre-contrast injection tissue-relaxation rates and proton density of MS lesions, by using a new quantitative MR imaging sequence, can identify active lesions. Forty-four patients with a clinical suspicion of MS were studied. MR imaging with a standard clinical MS protocol and a quantitative MR imaging sequence was performed at inclusion (baseline) and after 1 year. ROIs were placed in MS lesions, classified as nonenhancing or enhancing. Longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates, as well as proton density were obtained from the quantitative MR imaging sequence. Statistical analyses of ROI values were performed by using a mixed linear model, logistic regression, and receiver operating characteristic analysis. Enhancing lesions had a significantly (P relaxation rate (1.22 ± 0.36 versus 0.89 ± 0.24), a higher mean transverse relaxation rate (9.8 ± 2.6 versus 7.4 ± 1.9), and a lower mean proton density (77 ± 11.2 versus 90 ± 8.4) than nonenhancing lesions. An area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.832 was obtained. Contrast-enhancing MS lesions often have proton density and relaxation times that differ from those in nonenhancing lesions, with lower proton density and shorter relaxation times in enhancing lesions compared with nonenhancing lesions. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. [Temozolomide, an oral chemotherapeutic agent with potential severe toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetekouw, P.M.M.B.; Gijtenbeek, J.M.M.; Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Kappelle, A.C.; Herpen, C.M.L. van

    2007-01-01

    Two patients, a 58-year-old man and a 55-year-old woman, both under treatment for glioblastoma multiforme, were admitted with fever and neutropenia a few weeks after starting to take the oncolytic agent temozolomide. The man died of a cerebral haemorrhage against a background of severe thrombocytope

  17. Optically tunable nanoparticle contrast agents for early cancer detection: model-based analysis of gold nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Alex W H; Lewinski, Nastassja A; West, Jennifer L; Halas, Naomi J; Drezek, Rebekah A

    2005-01-01

    Many optical diagnostic approaches rely on changes in scattering and absorption properties to generate optical contrast between normal and diseased tissue. Recently, there has been increasing interest in using exogenous agents to enhance this intrinsic contrast with particular emphasis on the development for targeting specific molecular features of disease. Gold nanoshells are a class of core-shell nanoparticles with an extremely tunable peak optical resonance ranging from the near-UV to the mid-IR wavelengths. Using current chemistries, nanoshells of a wide variety of core and shell sizes can easily be fabricated to scatter and/or absorb light with optical cross sections often several times larger than the geometric cross section. Using gold nanoshells of different size and optical parameters, we employ Monte Carlo models to predict the effect of varying concentrations of nanoshells on tissue reflectance. The models demonstrate the importance of absorption from the nanoshells on remitted signals even when the optical extinction is dominated by scattering. Furthermore, because of the strong optical response of nanoshells, a considerable change in reflectance is observed with only a very small concentration of nanoshells. Characterizing the optical behavior of gold nanoshells in tissue will aid in developing nanoshells as contrast agents for optical diagnostics.

  18. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38–40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging.

  19. Copper oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S.; Azhari, Haim

    2015-08-01

    Multimodal medical imaging is gaining increased popularity in the clinic. This stems from the fact that data acquired from different physical phenomena may provide complementary information resulting in a more comprehensive picture of the pathological state. In this context, nano-sized contrast agents may augment the potential sensitivity of each imaging modality and allow targeted visualization of physiological points of interest (e.g. tumours). In this study, 7 nm copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized and characterized. Then, in vitro and phantom specimens containing CuO NPs ranging from 2.4 to 320 μg · mL-1 were scanned, using both 9.4 T MRI and through-transmission ultrasonic imaging. The results show that the CuO NPs induce shortening of the magnetic T1 relaxation time on the one hand, and increase the speed of sound and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient on the other. Moreover, these visible changes are NP concentration-dependent. The change in the physical properties resulted in a substantial increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (3.4-6.8 in ultrasound and 1.2-19.3 in MRI). In conclusion, CuO NPs are excellent candidates for MRI-ultrasound dual imaging contrast agents. They offer radiation-free high spatial resolution scans by MRI, and cost-effective high temporal resolution scans by ultrasound.

  20. Saline as the Sole Contrast Agent for Successful MRI-guided Epidural Injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deli, Martin, E-mail: martin.deli@web.de [University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy (GIMT) (Germany); Fritz, Jan, E-mail: jfritz9@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Mateiescu, Serban, E-mail: mateiescu@microtherapy.de; Busch, Martin, E-mail: busch@microtherapy.de [University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy (GIMT) (Germany); Carrino, John A., E-mail: jcarrin2@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Becker, Jan, E-mail: j.becker@microtherapy.de; Garmer, Marietta, E-mail: garmer@microtherapy.de; Groenemeyer, Dietrich, E-mail: dg@microtherapy.de [University of Witten/Herdecke, Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, Groenemeyer Institute for Microtherapy (GIMT) (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the performance of sterile saline solution as the sole contrast agent for percutaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided epidural injections at 1.5 T. Methods. A retrospective analysis of two different techniques of MRI-guided epidural injections was performed with either gadolinium-enhanced saline solution or sterile saline solution for documentation of the epidural location of the needle tip. T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FLASH) images or T2-weighted single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images visualized the test injectants. Methods were compared by technical success rate, image quality, table time, and rate of complications. Results. 105 MRI-guided epidural injections (12 of 105 with gadolinium-enhanced saline solution and 93 of 105 with sterile saline solution) were performed successfully and without complications. Visualization of sterile saline solution and gadolinium-enhanced saline solution was sufficient, good, or excellent in all 105 interventions. For either test injectant, quantitative image analysis demonstrated comparable high contrast-to-noise ratios of test injectants to adjacent body substances with reliable statistical significance levels (p < 0.001). The mean table time was 22 {+-} 9 min in the gadolinium-enhanced saline solution group and 22 {+-} 8 min in the saline solution group (p = 0.75). Conclusion. Sterile saline is suitable as the sole contrast agent for successful and safe percutaneous MRI-guided epidural drug delivery at 1.5 T.

  1. Copper oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for MRI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S; Azhari, Haim

    2015-08-07

    Multimodal medical imaging is gaining increased popularity in the clinic. This stems from the fact that data acquired from different physical phenomena may provide complementary information resulting in a more comprehensive picture of the pathological state. In this context, nano-sized contrast agents may augment the potential sensitivity of each imaging modality and allow targeted visualization of physiological points of interest (e.g. tumours). In this study, 7 nm copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) were synthesized and characterized. Then, in vitro and phantom specimens containing CuO NPs ranging from 2.4 to 320 μg · mL(-1) were scanned, using both 9.4 T MRI and through-transmission ultrasonic imaging. The results show that the CuO NPs induce shortening of the magnetic T1 relaxation time on the one hand, and increase the speed of sound and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient on the other. Moreover, these visible changes are NP concentration-dependent. The change in the physical properties resulted in a substantial increase in the contrast-to-noise ratio (3.4-6.8 in ultrasound and 1.2-19.3 in MRI). In conclusion, CuO NPs are excellent candidates for MRI-ultrasound dual imaging contrast agents. They offer radiation-free high spatial resolution scans by MRI, and cost-effective high temporal resolution scans by ultrasound.

  2. Development of New Contrast Agents for Imaging Function and Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Carvalho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are interesting nanosystems with a wide range of medical application. One particular application is their ability to enhance contrast in magnetic resonance images; when properly loaded with magnetic/superparamagnetic nanoparticles, this means to act as contrast agents. The design of liposomes loaded with magnetic particles, magnetoliposomes, presents a large number of possibilities depending on the application from image function to metabolism. More interesting is its double function application as theranostics (diagnostics and therapy. The synthesis, characterization, and possible medical applications of two types of magnetoliposomes are reviewed. Their performance will be compared, in particular, their efficiency as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, measured by their relaxivities r 1 and r 2 relating to their particular composition. One of the magnetoliposomes had 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (soy as the main phospholipid component, with and without cholesterol, varying its phospholipid to cholesterol molar ratios. The other formulation is a long-circulating liposome composed of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (egg, cholesterol, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoethanolamine- N -[methoxy(polyethylene glycol-2000]. Both nanosystems were loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different sizes and coatings.

  3. Silicon nanoparticles as contrast agents in the methods of optical biomedical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabotnov, S. V.; Kashaev, F. V.; Shuleiko, D. V.; Gongalsky, M. B.; Golovan, L. A.; Kashkarov, P. K.; Loginova, D. A.; Agrba, P. D.; Sergeeva, E. A.; Kirillin, M. Yu

    2017-07-01

    The efficiency of light scattering by nanoparticles formed using the method of picosecond laser ablation of silicon in water and by nanoparticles of mechanically grinded mesoporous silicon is compared. The ensembles of particles of both types possess the scattering coefficients sufficient to use them as contrast agents in optical coherence tomography (OCT), particularly in the range of wavelengths 700-1000 nm, where the absorption of both silicon and most biological and mimicking tissues is small. According to the Mie theory the main contribution to the scattering in this case is made by the particles having a relatively large size (150-300 nm). In the experiments on visualising the agar phantom surface by means of OCT, the contrast of the medium boundary, provided by nanoparticles amounted to 14 dB and 30 dB for the ablated particles and the porous silicon powder, respectively. The numerical simulation of OCT images of skin in the presence of nanoparticles, confirmed the efficiency of using them as a contrast agent.

  4. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38–40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging. PMID:27775014

  5. Ultrasound contrast agent fabricated from microbubbles containing instant adhesives, and its ultrasound imaging ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuta, T.; Tamakawa, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Non-invasive surgery techniques and drug delivery system with acoustic characteristics of ultrasound contrast agent have been studied intensively in recent years. Ultrasound contrast agent collapses easily under the blood circulating and the ultrasound irradiating because it is just a stabilized bubble without solid-shell by surface adsorption of surfactant or lipid. For improving the imaging stability, we proposed the fabrication method of the hollow microcapsule with polymer shell, which can be fabricated just blowing vapor of commonly-used instant adhesive (Cyanoacrylate monomer) into water as microbubbles. Therefore, the cyanoacrylate vapor contained inside microbubble initiates polymerization on the gasliquid interface soon after microbubbles are generated in water. Consequently, hollow microspheres coated by cyanoacrylate thin film are generated. In this report, we revealed that diameter distributions of microbubbles and microcapsules were approximately same and most of them were less than 10 μm, that is, smaller than blood capillary. In addition, we also revealed that hollow microcapsules enhanced the acoustic signal especially in the harmonic contrast imaging and were broken or agglomerated under the ultrasound field. As for the yield of hollow microcapsules, we revealed that sodium dodecyl sulfate addition to water phase instead of deoxycolic acid made the fabrication yield increased.

  6. CONTRAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Krogsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon.......Dette er en afrapportering fra den årlige CONTRAST workshop, der i 2007 blev afholdt i Yaoundé, Cameroon....

  7. L-DOPA-Coated Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles as Dual MRI Contrast Agents and Drug-Delivery Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Birgitte Hjelmeland; Singh, Gurvinder; Hak, Sjoerd; Bandyopadhyay, Sulalit; Augestad, Ingrid Lovise; Peddis, Davide; Sandvig, Ioanna; Sandvig, Axel; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert

    2016-01-20

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are capable of time-dependent magnetic resonance imaging contrast switching as well as releasing a surface-bound drug. MONPs give T2/T2* contrast, but dissolve and release T1-active Mn(2+) and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. Complementary images are acquired with a single contrast agent, and applications toward Parkinson's disease are suggested.

  8. T₁ and T₂ dual-mode MRI contrast agent for enhancing accuracy by engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Jin-sil; Yun, Seokhwan; Kim, Il-Sun; Song, Ho-Taek; Kim, Youngmee; Park, Kook In; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2014-04-22

    One of the holy grails in biomedical imaging technology is to achieve accurate imaging of biological targets. The development of sophisticated instrumentation and the use of contrast agents have improved the accuracy of biomedical imaging. However, the issue of false imaging remains a problem. Here, we developed a dual-mode artifact filtering nanoparticle imaging agent (AFIA) that comprises a combination of paramagnetic and superparamagnetic nanomaterials. This AFIA has the ability to perform "AND logic gate" algorithm to eliminate false errors (artifacts) from the raw images to enhance accuracy of the MRI. We confirm the artifact filtering capability of AFIA in MRI phantoms and further demonstrate that artifact-free imaging of stem cell migration is possible in vivo.

  9. Comparison of oral ketamine and oral midazolam as sedative agents in pediatric dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damle S

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The safe and effective treatment of uncooperative or combative preschool children with extensive dental needs is one of pediatric dentist′s ongoing challenges. The traditional methods of behavior management are no longer acceptable to parents as they are not ready to spare more time for dental treatment of their children. Keeping this in mind, the present study was designed and carried out to evaluate the sedative effects of oral ketamine and oral midazolam prior to general anesthesia. Twenty uncooperative children in the age-group of 2-6 years were selected after thorough medical examination and investigations. Informed consent was obtained from the parent. This was a randomized double-blind study. An anesthesiologist administered either 0.5 mg/kg midazolam or 5 mg/kg ketamine orally. The heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation were recorded at regular intervals. The sedation and anxiolysis scores were also recorded. The parents were asked to answer a questionnaire at the follow-up session the next day on the surgical experience of the parent and the child and side effects experienced, if any. When the data was subjected to statistical analysis, it was observed that both drugs resulted in adequate sedation at the end of 30 min, with oral midazolam providing significantly better anxiolysis. The heart rate and respiratory rate were marginally higher with oral ketamine. The questionnaire revealed a better response with oral midazolam; side effects were more prominent with oral ketamine.

  10. Tobacco mosaic virus rods and spheres as supramolecular high-relaxivity MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckman, Michael A.; Hern, Stephen; Jiang, Kai; Flask, Chris A.; Yu, Xin; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2013-01-01

    To compensate for the low sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nanoparticles have been developed to deliver high payloads of contrast agents to sites of disease. Here, we report the development of supramolecular MRI contrast agents using the plant viral nanoparticle tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Rod-shaped TMV nanoparticles measuring 300×18 nm were loaded with up to 3,500 or 2,000 chelated paramagnetic gadolinium (III) ions selectively at the interior (iGd-TMV) or exterior (eGd-TMV) surface, respectively. Spatial control is achieved through targeting either tyrosine or carboxylic acid side chains on the solvent exposed exterior or interior TMV surface. The ionic T1 relaxivity per Gd ion (at 60 MHz) increases from 4.9 mM−1s−1 for free Gd(DOTA) to 18.4 mM−1s−1 for eGd-TMV and 10.7 mM−1s−1 for iGd-TMV. This equates to T1 values of ~ 30,000 mM−1s−1 and ~ 35,000 mM−1s−1 per eGd-TMV and iGd-TMV nanoparticle. Further, we show that interior-labeled TMV rods can undergo thermal transition to form 170 nm-sized spherical nanoparticles containing ~ 25,000 Gd chelates and a per particle relaxivity of almost 400,000 mM−1s−1 (15.2 mM−1s−1 per Gd). This work lays the foundation for the use of TMV as a contrast agent for MRI. PMID:23589767

  11. Management of oral Graft versus Host Disease with topical agents: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque, Rui; Khan, Zahid; Poveda, Ana; Higham, Jonathan; Richards, Andrea; Monteiro,Luís Silva; Jane Salas, Enric; López López, José, 1958-; Warnakulasuriya, Saman

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral Graft-versus-Host Disease (oGvHD) is a common complication of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Choosing the right topical application to be used intra orally can be a challenge. Consequently, the aim of this work is to review the effectiveness and safety of topical agents currently used in the management of the inflammatory mucosal lesions encountered in oGVHD. Material and Methods We carried out electronic searches of publications up to May 2015 of the databases Pubm...

  12. Highly biocompatible TiO2:Gd3+ nano-contrast agent with enhanced longitudinal relaxivity for targeted cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Sasidharan, Abhilash; Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-10-01

    We report the development of a novel magnetic nano-contrast agent (nano-CA) based on Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 of size ~25 nm, exhibiting enhanced longitudinal relaxivity (r1) and magnetic resonance (MR) contrasting together with excellent biocompatibility. Quantitative T1 mapping of phantom samples using a 1.5 T clinical MR imaging system revealed that the amorphous phase of doped titania has the highest r1 relaxivity which is ~2.5 fold higher than the commercially used CA Magnevist™. The crystalline (anatase) samples formed by air annealing at 250 °C and 500 °C showed significant reduction in r1 values and MR contrast, which is attributed to the loss of proton-exchange contribution from the adsorbed water and atomic re-arrangement of Gd3+ ions in the crystalline host lattice. Nanotoxicity studies including cell viability, plasma membrane integrity, reactive oxygen stress and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, performed on human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC), human blood derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and nasopharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma (KB) cell line showed excellent biocompatibility up to relatively higher doses of 200 μg ml-1. The potential of this nano-CA to cause hemolysis, platelet aggregation and plasma coagulation were studied using human peripheral blood samples and found no adverse effects, illustrating the possibility of the safe intravenous administration of these agents for human applications. Furthermore, the ability of these agents to specifically detect cancer cells by targeting molecular receptors on the cell membrane was demonstrated on folate receptor (FR) positive oral carcinoma (KB) cells, where the folic acid conjugated nano-CA showed receptor specific accumulation on cell membrane while leaving the normal fibroblast cells (L929) unstained. This study reveals that the Gd3+ doped amorphous TiO2 nanoparticles having enhanced magnetic resonance contrast and high biocompatibility is a promising candidate for

  13. Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Tanveer [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan (Pakistan); Bae, Hongsub; Iqbal, Yousaf [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Ilsu, E-mail: ilrhee@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungwook [Division of Science Education, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Jaejun [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Kyungpook National University and Hospital, Daegu 700-721 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Derac [Department of Physics, Hannam University, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    We report evidence for the possible application of chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coating of nickel-ferrite nanoparticles with chitosan was performed simultaneously with the synthesis of the nickel-ferrite nanoparticles by a chemical co-precipitation method. The coated nanoparticles were cylindrical in shape with an average length of 17 nm and an average width of 4.4 nm. The bonding of chitosan onto the ferrite nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxivities were 0.858±0.04 and 1.71±0.03 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1}, respectively. In animal experimentation, both a 25% signal enhancement in the T{sub 1}-weighted mage and a 71% signal loss in the T{sub 2}-weighted image were observed. This demonstrated that chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite nanoparticles are suitable as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents in MRI. We note that the applicability of our nanoparticles as both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents is due to their cylindrical shape, which gives rise to both inner and outer sphere processes of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Chitosan-coated nickel-ferrite (Ni-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous system by chemical co-precipitation. • The characterization of bare and chitosan-coated nanoparticles were performed using various analytical tools, such as TEM, FTIR, XRD, and VMS. • We evaluated the coated particles as potential T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} contrast agents for MRI by measuring T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation times as a function of iron concentration. • Both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} effects were also observed in animal experimentation.

  14. Gd-Si Oxide Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Cabrera-García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the synthesis, characterization and application as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging of a novel type of magnetic nanoparticle based on Gd-Si oxide, which presents high Gd3+ atom density. For this purpose, we have used a Prussian Blue analogue as the sacrificial template by reacting with soluble silicate, obtaining particles with nanorod morphology and of small size (75 nm. These nanoparticles present good biocompatibility and higher longitudinal and transversal relaxivity values than commercial Gd3+ solutions, which significantly improves the sensitivity of in vivo magnetic resonance images.

  15. Hydrogels incorporating GdDOTA: towards highly efficient dual T1/T2 MRI contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, Thomas; Roullin, Valérie Gaëlle; Cadiou, Cyril; Callewaert, Maïté; Andry, Marie Christine; Portefaix, Christophe; Hoeffel, Christine; de Goltstein, Marie Christine; Port, Marc; Laurent, Sophie; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert; Molinari, Michaël; Chuburu, Françoise

    2012-09-03

    Do not tumble dry: Gadolinium-DOTA encapsulated into polysaccharide nanoparticles (GdDOTA NPs) exhibited high relaxivity (r(1) =101.7 s(-1) mM(-1) per Gd(3+) ion at 37 °C and 20 MHz). This high relaxation rate is due to efficient Gd loading, reduced tumbling of the Gd complex, and the hydrogel nature of the nanoparticles. The efficacy of the nanoparticles as a T(1)/T(2) dual-mode contrast agent was studied in C6 cells.

  16. Development and optimization of near-IR contrast agents for immune cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Pratixa P.; Yoon, Soon Joon; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav; Sokolov, Konstantin V.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanorods (NRs) are attractive for in vivo imaging due to their high optical cross-sections and tunable absorbance. However, the feasibility of using NRs for cell tracking has not been fully explored. Here, we synthesized dye doped silica-coated NRs as multimodal contrast agents for imaging of macrophages – immune cells which play an important role in cancer and cardiovascular diseases. We showed the importance of silica coating in imaging of NR-labeled cells. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging of NRs labeled macrophages showed high sensitivity. Therefore, these results provide foundation for applications of silica-coated NRs and PA imaging in tracking of immune cells. PMID:24298419

  17. Gaucher disease in the liver on hepatocyte specific contrast agent enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayyala, Rama S. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Teot, Lisa A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Perez Rossello, Jeanette M. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Gaucher disease is a hereditary lipid storage disorder that affects the enzyme beta glucocerebrosidase, causing accumulation of glucocerebroside in macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Accumulation can occur in the liver and spleen, manifesting as hepatosplenomegaly, as well as within the bone marrow. Hepatic involvement is usually diffuse but can occasionally manifest as focal liver lesions. We present a case of a 2-year-old boy with Gaucher disease and an infiltrating liver lesion detected on imaging, which was pathologically shown to be focal changes related to the disease. Imaging characteristics of this lesion using hepatocyte specific contrast agent enhanced MRI, which have not been previously discussed in the literature, are described. (orig.)

  18. Tissue sensitive imaging and tomography without contrast agents for small animals with Timepix based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanova, E.; Schyns, L. E. J. R.; Ludwig, D.; Jakubek, J.; Le Pape, A.; Sefc, L.; Lotte, S.; Sykora, V.; Turecek, D.; Uher, J.; Verhaegen, F.

    2017-01-01

    The tissue type resolving X-ray radiography and tomography can be performed even without contrast agents. The differences between soft tissue types such as kidney, muscles, fat, liver, brain and spleen were measured based on their spectral response. The Timepix based X-ray imaging detector WidePIX2×5 with 300 μm thick silicon sensors was used for most of the measurements presented in this work. These promising results are used for further optimizations of the detector technology and radiographic methods.

  19. Synthetic Approaches to Heterocyclic Ligands for Gd-Based MRI Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Ballesteros

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI methods are currently used in the clinic for the non invasive detection and characterization of a wide variety of pathologies. Increases in the diagnostic efficiency of MRI have been helped by both the design of dedicated MR sequences revealing specific aspects of the pathology and by the development of more sensitive and selective Contrast Agents (CAs, capable of more precisely delineating the borderline regions. In the present review we focus on the synthetic strategies used to obtain MRI CAs containing heterocyclic rings.

  20. Variability in contrast agent uptake by different but similar stem cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketkar-Atre A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ashwini Ketkar-Atre,1 Tom Struys,1,2 Stefaan J Soenen,3 Ivo Lambrichts,2 Catherine M Verfaillie,4 Marcel De Cuyper,5 Uwe Himmelreich1 1Biomedical MRI/MoSAIC, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Biomedical Sciences Group, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 2Lab of Histology, Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt University, Campus Diepenbeek, Agoralaan, Diepenbeek, Belgium; 3Lab for General Biochemistry and Physical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; 4Interdepartmental Stem Cell Institute, O&N IV, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 5Laboratory of BioNanoColloids, Interdisciplinary Research Centre, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kortrijk, Belgium Abstract: The need to track and evaluate the fate of transplanted cells is an important issue in regenerative medicine. In order to accomplish this, pre-labelling cells with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents is a well-established method. Uptake of MRI contrast agents by non-phagocytic stem cells, and factors such as cell homeostasis or the adverse effects of contrast agents on cell biology have been extensively studied, but in the context of nanoparticle (NP-specific parameters. Here, we have studied three different types of NPs (Endorem®, magnetoliposomes [MLs], and citrate coated C-200 to label relatively larger, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and, much smaller yet faster proliferating, multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs. Both cell types are similar, as they are isolated from bone marrow and have substantial regenerative potential, which make them interesting candidates for comparative experiments. Using NPs with different surface coatings and sizes, we found that differences in the proliferative and morphological characteristics of the cells used in the study are mainly responsible for the fate of endocytosed iron, intracellular iron concentration, and cytotoxic responses. The quantitative analysis, using high

  1. Ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agent binding to both E- and P-selectin in different species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinger, Thierry; Bussat, Philippe; Tardy, Isabelle; Pochon, Sibylle; Hyvelin, Jean-Marc; Emmel, Patricia; Henrioud, Sylvie; Biolluz, Nathalie; Willmann, Jürgen K; Schneider, Michel; Tranquart, François

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging is increasingly used in preclinical studies to measure the expression of vascular markers during inflammation process. In this context, a new ultrasound contrast agent functionalized with a recombinant P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 analogue (rPSGL-Ig) was developed (MBrPSGL-Ig). This agent was assayed in vitro and in vivo to evaluate its binding performance and potential to image expression of inflammatory markers E- and P-selectin. Performance of this newly developed agent was compared with that of antibody (MBAb) or sialyl Lewis X (MBsLe) containing microbubbles and with control microbubbles (MBC). The targeted ultrasound contrast agents were prepared by coupling biotin-conjugated ligands onto streptavidin-functionalized microbubbles. First, in vitro experiments were performed to measure the adhesion efficiency of these microbubble constructs under static or flow conditions (114 sec), on cell monolayer (human umbilical vein endothelial cells and bEnd.5), or coatings of E- or P-selectin of various animal species, respectively. Second, molecular imaging studies were performed in a rat inflammatory model 24 hours after intramuscular injection of lipopolysaccharide in the hind limb. Finally, immunohistochemistry staining of rat inflamed muscle tissue was performed to assess expression of E- and P-selectin. Microbubbles functionalized with rPSGL-Ig (MBrPSGL-Ig) displayed firm in vitro binding on the coating of both recombinant E- or P-selectin, with an efficiency similar to microbubbles comprising antibody specific for E-selectin (MBE) or P-selectin (MBP). In contrast, lower binding capacity was measured with MBsLe. At the surface of inflamed endothelial cells, MBrPSGL-Ig were able to interact specifically with E- and P-selectin. Binding specificity was demonstrated by performing blocking experiments with target-specific antibodies, resulting in an 80% to 95% decrease in binding. Ten minutes after microbubble injection, echo signal

  2. Contrast Agent Ultrasonography before and after HIFU Treatment of Parathyroid Glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovatcheva, Roussanka; Arnaud, Françoise; Lacoste, François

    2010-03-01

    OBJECTIVES: To observe changes in the parathyroid tissue treated by extracorporeal HIFU. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 5 patients were treated for primary hyperparathyroidism by thermally ablating enlarged parathyroid glands using an external HIFU applicator. The treated glands were visualized with B-Mode and contrast enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) before, 1 week and 4 weeks post HIFU. Serum iPTH, calcium, and phosphorus levels were monitored before and after the treatment. RESULTS: The initial results showed a correlation between contrast agent uptake of treated parathyroid tissue, the reduction of volume of the gland and the decrease of iPTH levels. CONCLUSIONS These results show it is possible to use CEUS to monitor the thermal ablation of parathyroid glands.

  3. Porous silicon nanoparticles as biocompatible contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongalsky, M. B.; Kargina, Yu. V.; Osminkina, L. A.; Perepukhov, A. M.; Gulyaev, M. V.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Pirogov, Yu. A.; Maximychev, A. V.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    We propose porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) with natural oxide coating as biocompatible and bioresorbable contrast agents for magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). A strong shortening of the transversal proton relaxation time (T2) was observed for aqueous suspensions of PSi NPs, whereas the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) changed moderately. The longitudinal and transversal relaxivities are estimated to be 0.03 and 0.4 l/(g.s), respectively, which are promising for biomedical studies. The proton relaxation is suggested to undergo via the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction with Si dangling bonds on surfaces of PSi NPs. MRI experiments with phantoms have revealed the remarkable contrasting properties of PSi NPs for medical diagnostics.

  4. Porous silicon nanoparticles as biocompatible contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongalsky, M. B., E-mail: mgongalsky@gmail.com; Kargina, Yu. V.; Osminkina, L. A. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Perepukhov, A. M.; Maximychev, A. V. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, 141700 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gulyaev, M. V. [Research Center for MRI and MRS, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, A. N. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pirogov, Yu. A. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Research Center for MRI and MRS, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    We propose porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) with natural oxide coating as biocompatible and bioresorbable contrast agents for magnetic resonant imaging (MRI). A strong shortening of the transversal proton relaxation time (T{sub 2}) was observed for aqueous suspensions of PSi NPs, whereas the longitudinal relaxation time (T{sub 1}) changed moderately. The longitudinal and transversal relaxivities are estimated to be 0.03 and 0.4 l/(g·s), respectively, which are promising for biomedical studies. The proton relaxation is suggested to undergo via the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction with Si dangling bonds on surfaces of PSi NPs. MRI experiments with phantoms have revealed the remarkable contrasting properties of PSi NPs for medical diagnostics.

  5. The role of diet on the clinical pharmacology of oral antineoplastic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Antonio; Cefalo, Maria G; Coccia, Paola; Mastrangelo, Stefano; Maurizi, Palma; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2012-02-01

    The number of oral anticancer agents has greatly increased in recent years. It is a well-known fact that food intake can induce significant variations in the bioavailability of these drugs. The aim of this review is to describe the interactions between diet and oral anticancer drugs in terms of the possible effects of such interactions on reducing the antineoplastic activity of the drug or increasing its side effects. This was an analytical study of the numerous mechanisms leading to changes in the bioavailability of oral antineoplastic agents due to diet. Food-drug interactions can induce a delay, decrease or increase in the absorption of the oral chemotherapeutic agent. The concomitant intake of food and antineoplastic drugs influence the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug processes depending on the composition of the food consumed and the specific interactions of the food with transport mechanisms (p-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance proteins) and intestinal enzymatic systems (cytochrome P450). In prescribing an oral anticancer agent, clinicians must consider the possibility that the consumption of specific food items has the potential to interfere with the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the prescribed drug.

  6. A pilot study to investigate the effect of a hydration regime upon immediate and 24 h delayed MRI contrast agent reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, William [Medical Imaging, Leighton Hospital, Mid Cheshire Hospital Trust, Middlewich Road, Crewe, Cheshire CW1 4QJ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: william.bailey@mcht.nhs.uk; Marshall, Gill [Chair of Faculty Academic Standards International Projects Leader, Faculty of Health and Social Care, St. Martin' s College, Lancaster LA1 3JD (United Kingdom); Coals, Jacqui [Medical Imaging, Leighton Hospital, Mid Cheshire Hospital Trust, Middlewich Road, Crewe, Cheshire CW1 4QJ (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-15

    Purpose: Adverse reaction rates to gadolinium based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents which occur immediately post-injection are well documented. However little research has investigated delayed reaction rates (i.e. 30 min-24 h). This study evaluated the rate of immediate and delayed adverse reaction rates to a gadolinium based MRI contrast agent (Dotarem) and investigated the effect of a hydration regime on the rate of adverse events. Method: Fifty-eight patients received no preparation, prior to administration of the contrast agent, whilst another 58 underwent a hydration protocol. The patients had their answers to a questionnaire recorded immediately after the scanning procedure and also via a follow-up telephone call 24 h later. Results: In the unprepared group 9 patients (15.5%) experienced immediate adverse events, i.e. within 0-30 min, whereas 24 (41.4%) experienced delayed reactions (30 min-24 h) after administration of the contrast agent. In the hydrated patient group 6 (10.3%) experienced an immediate adverse event, whilst 8 (13.7%) experienced delayed events post-injection. The difference in the total reaction rates for the unprepared and hydrated groups was statistically significant for immediate and delayed reactions. The difference in the rates of delayed headache, nausea, dizziness and problems with the injection site, for the unprepared and hydrated groups was statistically significant. Conclusion: An oral hydration regime administered to patients, both before and after MRI contrast agent administration significantly reduced the total number of immediate and delayed reactions. It also significantly reduced delayed headache, nausea, dizziness and problems at the injection site. Whilst this pilot study had methodological shortcomings, the strength of the relationship demonstrated are worthy of further investigation.

  7. Development and evaluation of a novel VEGFR2-targeted nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Houqiang; Li, Chunfang; He, Xiaoling; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-04-01

    Recent literatures have reported that the targeted nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents are becoming more and more important in medical application, like ultrasound imaging, detection of perfusion, drug delivery and molecular imaging and so on. In this study, we fabricated an uniform nanoscale bubbles (257 nm with the polydispersity index of 0.458) by incorporation of antibody targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) into the nanobubbles membrane by using avidin-biotin interaction. Some fundamental characterizations such as nanobubble suspension, surface morphology, particle size distribution and zeta potential were investigated. The concentration and time-intensity curves (TICs) were obtained with a self-made ultrasound experimental setup in vitro evaluation. In addition, in order to evaluate the contrast enhancement ability and the potential tumor-targeted ability in vivo, normal Wistar rats and nude female BALB/c mice were intravascular administration of the nanobubbles via tail vein injection, respectively. Significant contrast enhancement of ultrasound imaging within liver and tumor were visualized. These experiments demonstrated that the targeted nanobubbles is efficient in ultrasound molecular imaging by enhancement of the contrast effect and have potential capacity for targeted tumor diagnosis and therapy in the future.

  8. FEASIBILITY STUDY OF AN ULTRASOUND CONTRAST AGENT (LEVOVIST) IN COLOR DOPPLER IMAGING OF LIVER NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of using an ultrasound contrast agent(levovist)to enhance the color Doppler imaging of liver neoplasms.Thirty patients with hepatic tumors were enrolled in this study.After intravenous administration of levovist,the color Doppler signals of normal hepatic vessels were enhanced.In various hepatic tumors,the different patterns of tumor vascularity were observed,which had not been demonstrated in conventional non-contrast color Doppler imaging.In 11 of 16 patients with hepatocarcinoma,additoal color Doppler signals were observed in the central part of the tumors.On the contrary,3 patients with metastatic liver lesions the enhanced color Doppler signal appear only at the peripheral of tumors.A typical rim-like color enhancement was seen in 2 of the 3 cases.In six patients with hpatic hemangiomas contrast-enhanced color Doppler imaging demonstrated the blood vessels at the margin of the neoplasms.Contrast-enhanced color Doppler imaging improves the visualization of the hepatic neoplasm vascularity.This technique holds great promise for detecting small liver tumors and differentiating hepatic neoplasms.

  9. Systematic review of natural agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarom, Noam; Ariyawardana, Anura; Hovan, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society for Oral Oncology. The body of evidence for each intervention, in each cancer treatment setting, was assigned an evidence level. Based on the evidence level, one of the following three guideline determinations was possible: recommendation......, suggestion, and no guideline possible. RESULTS: A total of 49 papers across 15 interventions were examined. A new suggestion was developed in favor of systemic zinc supplements administered orally in the prevention of oral mucositis in oral cancer patients receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation (Level......Abstract PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to review the available literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of natural agents for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study Group of the Multinational...

  10. Metal-based nanorods as molecule-specific contrast agents for reflectance imaging in 3D tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Javier, David J.; Nitin, Nitin; Roblyer, Darren M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    Anisotropic metal-based nanomaterials have been proposed as potential contrast agents due to their strong surface plasmon resonance. We evaluated the contrast properties of gold, silver, and gold-silver hybrid nanorods for molecular imaging applications in three-dimensional biological samples. We used diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to predict the contrast properties of different types of nanorods embedded in biological model systems of increasing complexity. The predicted contrast propertie...

  11. Material characterization of poly-lactic acid shelled ultrasound contrast agent and their dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shirshendu; Russakow, Daniel; Rodgers, Tyler; Sarkar, Kausik; Cochran, Michael; Wheatley, Margaret

    2011-11-01

    Micron-size gas bubbles encapsulated with lipids and proteins are used as contrast enhancing agents for ultrasound imaging. Biodegradable polymer poly-lactic acid (PLA) has recently been suggested as a possible means of encapsulation. Here, we report in vitro measurement of attenuation and scattering of ultrasound through an emulsion of PLA agent as well as theoretical modeling of the encapsulated bubble dynamics. The attenuation measured with three different transducers of central frequencies 2.25, 3.5 and 5 MHz, shows a peak around 2-3 MHz. These bubbles also show themselves to possess excellent scattering characteristics including strong non-linear response that can be used for harmonic and sub-harmonic contrast imaging. Our recently developed interfacial rheological models are applied to describe the dynamics of these bubbles; rheological model properties are estimated using measured attenuation data. The model is then applied to predict nonlinear scattered response, and the prediction is compared against experimental observation. Partially supported by NSF and NIH.

  12. Phase change events of volatile liquid perfluorocarbon contrast agents produce unique acoustic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Matsunaga, Terry O.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) provide a dynamic platform to approach problems in medical ultrasound (US). Upon US-mediated activation, the liquid core vaporizes and expands to produce a gas bubble ideal for US imaging and therapy. In this study, we demonstrate through high-speed video microscopy and US interrogation that PCCAs composed of highly volatile perfluorocarbons (PFCs) exhibit unique acoustic behavior that can be detected and differentiated from standard microbubble contrast agents. Experimental results show that when activated with short pulses PCCAs will over-expand and undergo unforced radial oscillation while settling to a final bubble diameter. The size-dependent oscillation phenomenon generates a unique acoustic signal that can be passively detected in both time and frequency domain using confocal piston transducers with an ‘activate high’ (8 MHz, 2 cycles), ‘listen low’ (1 MHz) scheme. Results show that the magnitude of the acoustic ‘signature’ increases as PFC boiling point decreases. By using a band-limited spectral processing technique, the droplet signals can be isolated from controls and used to build experimental relationships between concentration and vaporization pressure. The techniques shown here may be useful for physical studies as well as development of droplet-specific imaging techniques.

  13. Gadolinium-containing magnetic resonance image contrast agent promotes fibrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Varsha; Sung, Joanna J; Piecychna, Marta; Crawford, Jeffrey R; Kuo, Phillip; Abu-Alfa, Ali K; Cowper, Shawn E; Bucala, Richard; Gomer, Richard H

    2009-12-01

    Gadolinium-containing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents such as Omniscan are associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). To determine if Omniscan can affect the differentiation of monocytes into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes that are found in the fibrotic lesions of NSF, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from NSF patients, hemodialysis patients without NSF, and healthy, renally sufficient controls were exposed to Omniscan in a standardized in vitro fibrocyte differentiation protocol. When added to PBMCs, the gadolinium-containing MRI contrast agent Omniscan generally had little effect on fibrocyte differentiation. However, 10(-8) to 10(-3) mg/mL Omniscan reduced the ability of the fibrocyte differentiation inhibitor serum amyloid P (SAP) to decrease fibrocyte differentiation in PBMCs from 15 of 17 healthy controls and one of three NSF patients. Omniscan reduced the ability of SAP to decrease fibrocyte differentiation from purified monocytes, indicating that the Omniscan effect does not require the presence of other cells (such as T cells) in the PBMCs. Omniscan also reduced the ability of a different fibrocyte differentiation inhibitor, interleukin-12, to decrease fibrocyte differentiation. These data suggest that Omniscan interferes with the regulatory action of signals that inhibit the differentiation of monocytes to fibrocytes. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2009;30:1284-1288. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. A new contrast agent for radiological and dissection studies of the arterial network of anatomic specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, A; Casoli, C; Farace, F; Mazzarello, V; De Luca, L; Rubino, C; Montella, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to propose a new contrast agent that can be easily applied both to CT and dissection studies to replace lead oxide based formulas for comparative anatomical analyses of the vascularisation of cadaveric specimens. The infusion material was an epoxy resin, especially modified by the addition of barium sulphate to enhance its radiopacity. The final copolymer was toxicologically safe. To test the properties of the new material, several cadaveric limb injections were performed. The injected specimens were both CT scanned to perform 3D vascular reconstructions and dissected by anatomical planes. There was a perfect correspondence between the image studies and the dissections: even the smallest arteries on CT scan can be identified on the specimen and vice versa. The properties of the epoxy allowed an easy dissection of the vessels. The new imaging techniques available today, such as CT scan, can evaluate the vascular anatomy in high detail and 3D. This new contrast agent may help realising detailed vascular studies comparing CT scan results with anatomical dissections. Moreover, it may be useful for teaching surgical skills in the field of plastic surgery.

  15. Fe3O4-based PLGA nanoparticles as MR contrast agents for the detection of thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Xu, Jie; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Dajing; Wang, Zhigang

    2017-01-01

    Thrombotic disease is a great threat to human health, and early detection is particularly important. Magnetic resonance (MR) molecular imaging provides noninvasive imaging with the potential for early disease diagnosis. In this study, we developed Fe3O4-based poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) surface-modified with a cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (cRGD) peptide as an MR contrast agent for the detection of thrombosis. The physical and chemical characteristics, biological toxicity, ability to target thrombi, and biodistribution of the NPs were studied. The Fe3O4-PLGA-cRGD NPs were constructed successfully, and hematologic and pathologic assays indicated no in vivo toxicity of the NPs. In a rat model of FeCl3-induced abdominal aorta thrombosis, the NPs readily and selectively accumulated on the surface of the thrombosis and under vascular endothelial cells ex vivo and in vivo. In the in vivo experiment, the biodistribution of the NPs suggested that the NPs might be internalized by the macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system in the liver and the spleen. The T2 signal decreased at the mural thrombus 10 min after injection and then gradually increased until 50 min. These results suggest that the NPs are suitable for in vivo molecular imaging of thrombosis under high shear stress conditions and represent a very promising MR contrast agent for sensitive and specific detection of thrombosis. PMID:28223802

  16. Porphyrin Nanodroplets: Sub-micrometer Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Contrast Imaging Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J; Forbrich, Alexander; Huynh, Elizabeth; Chen, Juan; Lewis, John D; Zheng, Gang; Zemp, Roger J

    2016-01-20

    A novel class of all-organic nanoscale porphyrin nanodroplet agents is presented which is suitable for multimodality ultrasound and photoacoustic molecular imaging. Previous multimodality photoacoustic-ultrasound agents are either not organic, or not yet demonstrated to exhibit enhanced accumulation in leaky tumor vasculature, perhaps because of large diameters. In the current study, porphyrin nanodroplets are created with a mean diameter of 185 nm which is small enough to exhibit the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Porphyrin within the nanodroplet shell has strong optical absorption at 705 nm with an estimated molar extinction coefficient >5 × 10(9) m(-1) cm(-1) , allowing both ultrasound and photoacoustic contrast in the same nanoparticle using all organic materials. The potential of nanodroplets is that they may be phase-changed into microbubbles using high pressure ultrasound, providing ultrasound contrast with single-bubble sensitivity. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging allows visualization of nanodroplets when injected intratumorally in an HT1080 tumor in the chorioallantoic membrane of a chicken embryo. Intravital microscopy imaging of Hep3-GFP and HT1080-GFP tumors in chicken embryos determines that nanodroplets accumulated throughout or at the periphery of tumors, suggesting that porphyrin nanodroplets may be useful for enhancing the visualization of tumors with ultrasound and/or photoacoustic imaging.

  17. BR1: A new ultrasonographic contrast agent based on sulfur hexafluoride-filled microbubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheider, M.; Arditi, M.; Barrau, M.B.

    1995-08-01

    Rationale and objectives. The basic characteristics of BR1, a novel echo contrast agent based on stabilized sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) microbubbles have been evaluated. Methods. The authors determined the physicochemical properties (bubble concentration, bubble size distribution, resistance to pressure, and stability) and the acoustic properties (backscatter and attenuation coefficients) of BR1. The diagnostic value of BR1 was evaluated further in minipigs. Left heart images were recorded before and after injection of different doses of BR1. Results. BR1 is formulated as a lyophilized products, which after addition of saline, provides a suspension containing 2 X 10{sup 8} SF{sub 6} microbubbles/mL with a number mean diameter of 2.5 {mu}m. More than 90% of the bubbles are below 8 {mu}m. The use of SF{sub 6} rather than air provides an improved resistance to pressure increases such as the ones occuring in the left heart during systole. After reconstitution, the echogenicity and the bubble characteristics are unchanged for more than 8 hours. The high echogenicity remains almost constant over the entire medical frequency range (1-10 MH{sub Z}). BR1 injections in animals resulted in a homogenous, dose-dependent opacification of the left heart. Conclusions. Considering its high echogenicity, outstanding stability, and resistance to pressure changes, BR1 is a very promising ultrasound contrast agent. 14 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. A new biodegradable and biocompatible gadolinium (III) -polymer for liver magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Xue, Rong; You, Tianyan; Li, Xiaojing; Pei, Fengkui

    2015-07-01

    A new biodegradable and biocompatible gadolinium (III) -copolymer (ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd) has been developed as a potential liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd consisted of a poly (aspartic acid-co-leucine) unit bound with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecan-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-gadolinium (Gd-DOTA) via the linkage of ethylenediamine. In vitro, the biodegradable experiment and cytotoxicity assay showed the biodegradability and biocompatibility of this gadolinium-polymer. ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd presented an increase in relaxivity of 2.4 times than the clinical Gd-DOTA. In vivo, gadolinium (III)-copolymer was mainly accumulated in the liver, and it could be excreted via the renal and hepatobiliary mechanism. The average enhancement of ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd (60.71±5.93%, 50-80 min) in liver was 2.62-fold greater than that of Gd-DOTA (23.16±3.55%, 10-30 min). ACL-A2-DOTA-Gd could be as a potential liver MRI contrast agent with a long time-window.

  19. Effect on renal function of an iso-osmolar contrast agent in patients with monoclonal gammopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preda, Lorenzo [Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); Agazzi, Alberto; Martinelli, Giovanni [Division of Haematology, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); Raimondi, Sara [Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Occupational Medicin ' ' Clinica del Lavoro Luigi Devoto' ' Section of Medical Statistics and Biometry ' ' GA Maccacaro' ' , Milan (Italy); Lanfranchi, Carla Federica [University of Milan, IRCCS, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); Passerini, Rita [Unit of Laboratory Medicine, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); Calvetta, Albania [Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, Istituto Clinico Humanitas, IRCCS, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [Division of Radiology, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, IRCCS, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    To assess the safety of the non-ionic iso-osmolar contrast agent iodixanol on renal function in patients with monoclonal gammopathies undergoing CT. We explored the effect of iodixanol on renal function in 30 patients with monoclonal gammopathies and 20 oncological patients with a normal electrophoretic profile (control group). The parameters used to estimate renal function were: serum creatinine, eGFR (determined 24 h before and 48 h after the administration of iodixanol), and urinary excretion of Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) determined 2 h and 24 h after. Serum creatinine was also determined 1 month after the administration of iodixanol. No significant increase in serum creatinine values were observed in the monoclonal gammopathies group and in 19/20 patients in the control group. Only 1 patient in the control group developed a transient contrast agent-induced nephropathy. We found no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding the percentage variation from baseline values of serum creatinine, creatinine clearance, NGAL 2 h after, and eGFR. Whereas NGAL at 24 h showed a statistically significant increase in patients with Monoclonal gammopathies. The use of iodixanol appears to be safe in patients with monoclonal gammopathies and an eGFR {>=} 60 ml/min/1.73 mq. (orig.)

  20. Carboxylated magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents: Relaxation measurements at different field strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedlovszky-Hajdu, Angela, E-mail: angela.hajdu@net.sote.hu [Laboratory of Nanochemistry, Department of Biophysics and Radiation Biology, Semmelweis University, Nagyvarad Sq 4, H-1089 Budapest (Hungary); Tombacz, Etelka, E-mail: tombacz@chem.u-szeged.hu [Department of Physical Chemistry and Material Science, University of Szeged, Aradi Vt. Sq 1, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Banyai, Istvan, E-mail: banyai.istvan@science.unideb.hu [Department of Colloid and Environmental Chemistry, University of Debrecen (Hungary); Babos, Magor, E-mail: babosmagor@yahoo.com [Euromedic Diagnostics Szeged Ltd., Semmelweis St 6, Szeged 6720 (Hungary); Palko, Andras, E-mail: palko@radio.szote.u-szeged.hu [Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Szeged (Hungary)

    2012-09-15

    At the moment the biomedical applications of magnetic fluids are the subject of intensive scientific interest. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized and stabilized in aqueous medium with different carboxylic compounds (citric acid (CA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), and sodium oleate (NaOA)), in order to prepare well stabilized magnetic fluids (MFs). The magnetic nanoparticles can be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as contrast agents. Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements of the above MFs were performed at different field strengths (i.e., 0.47, 1.5 and 9.4 T) to reveal the field strength dependence of their magnetic responses, and to compare them with that of ferucarbotran, a well-known superparamagnetic contrast agent. The measurements showed characteristic differences between the tested magnetic fluids stabilized by carboxylic compounds and ferucarbotran. It is worthy of note that our magnetic fluids have the highest r2 relaxivities at the field strength of 1.5 T, where the most of the MRI works in worldwide. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements were done at different field strengths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results show characteristic differences between the tested carboxylated MFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer r1 and r2 relaxivities depend on the thickness of the protecting layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MFs have high r2/r1 ratios at each magnetic field.

  1. Removal of gadolinium-based contrast agents: adsorption on activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde-González, María P; García-Díaz, Esmeralda; González-Perea, Mario; Mattusch, Jürgen

    2017-01-31

    Three carbon samples were employed in this work, including commercial (1690 m(2) g(-1)), activated carbon prepared from guava seeds (637 m(2) g(-1)), and activated carbon prepared from avocado kernel (1068 m(2) g(-1)), to study the adsorption of the following gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs): gadoterate meglumine Dotarem®, gadopentetate dimeglumine Magnevist®, and gadoxetate disodium Primovist®. The activation conditions with H3PO4 were optimized using a Taguchi methodology to obtain mesoporous materials. The best removal efficiency by square meter in a batch system in aqueous solution and model urine was achieved by avocado kernel carbon, in which mesoporosity prevails over microporosity. The kinetic adsorption curves were described by a pseudo-second-order equation, and the adsorption isotherms in the concentration range 0.5-6 mM fit the Freundlich equation. The chemical characterization of the surfaces shows that materials with a greater amount of phenolic functional groups adsorb the GBCA better. Adsorption strongly depends on the pH due to the combination of the following factors: contrast agent protonated forms and carbon surface charge. The tested carbon samples were able to adsorb 70-90% of GBCA in aqueous solution and less in model urine. This research proposes a method for the elimination of GBCA from patient urine before its discharge into wastewater.

  2. High Relaxivity Gadolinium Hydroxypyridonate-Viral Capsid Conjugates: Nano-sized MRI Contrast Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meux, Susan C.; Datta, Ankona; Hooker, Jacob M.; Botta, Mauro; Francis, Matthew B.; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-08-29

    High relaxivity macromolecular contrast agents based on the conjugation of gadolinium chelates to the interior and exterior surfaces of MS2 viral capsids are assessed. The proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of the conjugates show up to a five-fold increase in relaxivity, leading to a peak relaxivity (per Gd{sup 3+} ion) of 41.6 mM{sup -1}s{sup -1} at 30 MHz for the internally modified capsids. Modification of the exterior was achieved through conjugation to flexible lysines, while internal modification was accomplished by conjugation to relatively rigid tyrosines. Higher relaxivities were obtained for the internally modified capsids, showing that (1) there is facile diffusion of water to the interior of capsids and (2) the rigidity of the linker attaching the complex to the macromolecule is important for obtaining high relaxivity enhancements. The viral capsid conjugated gadolinium hydroxypyridonate complexes appear to possess two inner-sphere water molecules (q = 2) and the NMRD fittings highlight the differences in the local motion for the internal ({tau}{sub RI} = 440 ps) and external ({tau}{sub RI} = 310 ps) conjugates. These results indicate that there are significant advantages of using the internal surface of the capsids for contrast agent attachment, leaving the exterior surface available for the installation of tissue targeting groups.

  3. Oral (Systemic) Botanical Agents for the Treatment of Psoriasis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahnik, Benjamin; Sharma, Divya; Alban, Joseph; Sivamani, Raja

    2017-06-01

    Patients with psoriasis often use botanical therapies as part of their treatment. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the current evidence regarding these agents as they treat patients. A systematic literature search was conducted using the PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE database for randomized clinical trials assessing the use of botanical therapeutics for psoriasis. The search included the following keywords: "psoriasis" and "plant" or "herbal" or "botanical." Citations within articles were also reviewed to identify relevant sources. The results were then further refined by route of administration, and the oral (systemic) botanical agents are reviewed herein. A total of 12 controlled and uncontrolled clinical trials addressing the use of oral, systemic botanical agents for psoriasis were assessed in this review. While overall evidence is limited in quantity and quality, HESA-A, curcumin, neem extract, and, to a lesser degree, Traditional Chinese Medicine seem to be the most efficacious agents. The literature addresses a large amount of studies in regards to botanicals for the treatment of psoriasis. While most agents appear to be safe, further research is necessary for evidence-based recommendation of oral botanical agents to psoriasis patients.

  4. Parallel Comparative Studies on Mouse Toxicity of Oxide Nanoparticle- and Gadolinium-Based T1 MRI Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Ling, Daishun; Zhao, Lin; Wang, Shuaifei; Liu, Ying; Bai, Ru; Baik, Seungmin; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Chunying; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2015-12-22

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with high relaxivity are highly desirable because they can significantly increase the accuracy of diagnosis. However, they can be potentially toxic to the patients. In this study, using a mouse model, we investigate the toxic effects and subsequent tissue damage induced by three T1 MRI contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine injection (GDI), a clinically used gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent (GBCAs), and oxide nanoparticle (NP)-based contrast agents, extremely small-sized iron oxide NPs (ESIONs) and manganese oxide (MnO) NPs. Biodistribution, hematological and histopathological changes, inflammation, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses are evaluated for 24 h after intravenous injection. These thorough assessments of the toxic and stress responses of these agents provide a panoramic description of safety concerns and underlying mechanisms of the toxicity of contrast agents in the body. We demonstrate that ESIONs exhibit fewer adverse effects than the MnO NPs and the clinically used GDI GBCAs, providing useful information on future applications of ESIONs as potentially safe MRI contrast agents.

  5. Gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast agents at 7 Tesla: in vitro T1 relaxivities in human blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris M; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Juras, Vladimír; Kraff, Oliver; Ladd, Mark E; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-09-01

    PURPOSE/INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the T1 relaxivities (r1) of 8 gadolinium (Gd)-based MR contrast agents in human blood plasma at 7 Tesla, compared with 3 Tesla. Eight commercially available Gd-based MR contrast agents were diluted in human blood plasma to concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mmol/L. In vitro measurements were performed at 37 degrees C, on a 7 Tesla and on a 3 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging scanner. For the determination of T1 relaxation times, Inversion Recovery Sequences with inversion times from 0 to 3500 ms were used. The relaxivities were calculated. The r1 relaxivities of all agents, diluted in human blood plasma at body temperature, were lower at 7 Tesla than at 3 Tesla. The values at 3 Tesla were comparable to those published earlier. Notably, in some agents, a minor negative correlation of r1 with a concentration of up to 2 mmol/L could be observed. This was most pronounced in the agents with the highest protein-binding capacity. At 7 Tesla, the in vitro r1 relaxivities of Gd-based contrast agents in human blood plasma are lower than those at 3 Tesla. This work may serve as a basis for the application of Gd-based MR contrast agents at 7 Tesla. Further studies are required to optimize the contrast agent dose in vivo.

  6. Evaluation of microbubbles as contrast agents for ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbubbles (MBs can serve as an ultrasound contrast agent, and has the potential for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Due to the relatively low effect of MBs on MRI, it is necessary to develop new MBs that are more suitable for MRI. In this study, we evaluate the properties of SonoVue® and custom-made Fe(3O(4-nanoparticle-embedded microbubbles (Fe(3O(4-MBs in terms of contrast agents for ultrsonography (US and MRI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 20 HepG2 subcutaneous-tumor-bearing nude mice were randomly assigned to 2 groups (i.e., n = 10 mice each group, one for US test and the other for MRI test. Within each group, two tests were performed for each mouse. The contrast agent for the first test is SonoVue®, and the second is Fe(3O(4-MBs. US was performed using a Technos(MPX US system (Esaote, Italy with a contrast-tuned imaging (CnTI™ mode. MRI was performed using a 7.0T Micro-MRI (PharmaScan, Bruker Biospin GmbH, Germany with an EPI-T(2* sequence. The data of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR from the region-of-interest of each US and MR image was calculated by ImageJ (National Institute of Health, USA. In group 1, enhancement of SonoVue® was significantly higher than Fe(3O(4-MBs on US (P0.05. The SNR analysis of the enhancement process reveals a strong negative correlation in both cases (i.e., SonoVue® r = -0.733, Fe(3O(4-MBs r = -0.903, with P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: It might be important to change the Fe(3O(4-MBs' shell structure and/or the imagining strategy of US to improve the imaging quality of Fe(3O(4-MBs on US. As an intriguing prospect that can be detected by US and MRI, MBs are worthy of further study.

  7. Impact of Filling Gas on Subharmonic Emissions of Phospholipid Ultrasound Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbar, Emma; Fouan, Damien; Sennoga, Charles A; Doinikov, Alexander A; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2017-02-14

    Subharmonic signals backscattered from gas-filled lipid-shelled microbubbles have generated significant research interest because they can improve the detection and sensitivity of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. However, the emission of subharmonic signals is strongly characterized by a temporal dependence, the origins of which have not been sufficiently elucidated. The features that influence subharmonic emissions need to be identified not only to better develop next-generation microbubble contrast agents, but also to develop more efficient subharmonic imaging (SHI) modes and therapeutic strategies. We examined the effect of microbubble filling gas on subharmonic emissions. Phospholipid shelled-microbubbles with different gaseous compositions such as sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), octafluoropropane (C3F8) or decafluorobutane (C4F10), nitrogen (N2)/C4F10 or air were insonated using a driving frequency of 10 MHz and peak negative pressure of 450 kPa, and their acoustic responses were tracked by monitoring both second harmonic and subharmonic emissions. Microbubbles were first acoustically characterized with their original gas and then re-characterized after substitution of the original gas with air, SF6 or C4F10. A measureable change in intensity of the subharmonic emissions with a 20- to 40-min delayed onset and increasing subharmonic emissions of the order 12-18 dB was recorded for microbubbles filled with C4F10. Substitution of C4F10 with air eliminated the earlier observed delay in subharmonic emissions. Significantly, substitution of SF6 for C4F10 successfully triggered a delay in the subharmonic emissions of the resultant agents, whereas substitution of C4F10 for SF6 eliminated the earlier observed suppression of subharmonic emissions, clearly suggesting that the type of filling gas contained in the microbubble agent influences subharmonic emissions in a time-dependent manner. Because our agents were dispersed in air-stabilized phosphate-buffered saline

  8. 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography with microbubble contrast agent improves characterization of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kouji Yamamoto; Katsuya Shiraki; Shigeo Nakanishi; Hiroyuki Fuke; Takeshi Nakano; Akira Hashimoto; Atsuya Shimizu; Toshinobu Hamataki

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the usefulness of 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography with the use of the contrast agent Levovist for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and for the evaluation of therapeutic response.METHODS: Phantom experiments were performed to compare the contrast effects of 2nd harmonic imaging and 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography. 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography was employed to examine 36 patients with HCC (42 nodules) before and after the treatment and to compare against the findings obtained using other diagnostic imaging modalities. RESULTS: In 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography, the tumor vessels of HCCs were clearly identified during the early phase, and late-phase images clearly demonstrated the differences in contrast enhancement between the tumor and surrounding hepatic parenchyma. Blood flow within the tumor was detected in 36 nodules (85.7%)during the early phase and in all 42 nodules (100%) during the late phase using 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography,in 38 nodules (90.5%) using contrast-enhanced CT, in 34nodules (81.0%) using digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and in 42 nodules (100%) using US CO2angiography.Following transcatheter arterial embolization, 1.5Harmonic Imaging Sonography detected blood flow and contrast enhancement within the tumors that were judged to contain viable tissue in 20 of 42 nodules (47.6%).However, 6 of these 20 cases were not judged in contrastenhanced CT. 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography was compared with the US CO2 angiography findings as the gold standard, and the sensitivity and specificity of these images for discerning viable and nonviable HCC after transcatheter arterial embolization were 100% and 100%,respectively.CONCLUSION: 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography permits the vascular structures of HCCs to be identified and blood flow within the tumor to be clearly demonstrated.Furthermore, 1.5 Harmonic Imaging Sonography is potentially useful for evaluating the therapeutic effects of transcatheter arterial

  9. Development of nanostars as a biocompatible tumor contrast agent: toward in vivo SERS imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Hollander A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Antoine D’Hollander,1–3 Evelien Mathieu,1,4 Hilde Jans,1 Greetje Vande Velde,2,3 Tim Stakenborg,1 Pol Van Dorpe,1,4 Uwe Himmelreich,2,3 Liesbet Lagae1,4 1Department of Life Science Technology, Imec, 2Department of Imaging and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Biomedical MRI Unit, 3Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center (MoSAIC, 4Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Laboratory of Solid State Physics and Magnetism, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Abstract: The need for sensitive imaging techniques to detect tumor cells is an important issue in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS, realized by chemisorption of compounds suitable for Raman spectroscopy onto gold nanoparticles, is a new method for detecting a tumor. As a proof of concept, we studied the use of biocompatible gold nanostars as sensitive SERS contrast agents targeting an ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV3. Due to a high intracellular uptake of gold nanostars after 6 hours of exposure, they could be detected and located with SERS. Using these nanostars for passive targeting after systemic injection in a xenograft mouse model, a detectable signal was measured in the tumor and liver in vivo. These signals were confirmed by ex vivo SERS measurements and darkfield microscopy. In this study, we established SERS nanostars as a highly sensitive contrast agent for tumor detection, which opens the potential for their use as a theranostic agent against cancer. Keywords: SERS, gold nanostars, cancer imaging, Raman active

  10. Chemistry of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Mayoral, Elena [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Quimica Tecnica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Negri, Viviana; Soler-Padros, Jordi [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Cerdan, Sebastian [Laboratorio de Imagen Espectroscopica por Resonancia Magnetica (LIERM), Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas ' Alberto Sols' , CSIC/UAM, c/Arturo Duperier 4, E-28029 Madrid (Spain); Ballesteros, Paloma [Laboratorio de Sintesis Organica e Imagen Molecular por Resonancia Magnetica, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Paseo Senda del Rey 9, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: pballesteros@ccia.uned.es

    2008-09-15

    We provide a brief overview of the chemistry and most relevant properties of paramagnetic and diamagnetic contrast agents (CAs) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging. Paramagnetic CAs for MRI consist mainly of Gd(III) complexes from linear or macrocyclic polyaminopolycarboxylates. These agents reduce, the relaxation times T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} of the water protons in a concentration dependent manner, increasing selectively MRI contrast in those regions in which they accumulate. In most instances they provide anatomical information on the localization of lesions and in some specific cases they may allow to estimate some physiological properties of tissues including mainly vascular performance. Because of its ability to discriminate easily between normal and diseased tissue, extracellular pH (pH{sub e}) has been added recently, to the battery of variables amenable to MRI investigation. A variety of Gd(III) containing macrocycles sensitive to pH, endogenous or exogenous polypeptides or even liposomes have been investigated for this purpose, using the pH dependence of their relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constant (chemical exchange saturation transfer, CEST). Many environmental circumstances in addition to pH affect, however, relaxivity or magnetization transfer rate constants of these agents, making the results of pH measurements by MRI difficult to interpret. To overcome these limitations, our laboratory synthesized and developed a novel series of diamagnetic CAs for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging, a new family of monomeric and dimeric imidazolic derivatives able to provide unambiguous measurements of pH{sub e}, independent of water relaxivity, diffusion or exchange.

  11. Update on the safety and efficacy of commercial ultrasound contrast agents in cardiac applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appis, Andrew W; Tracy, Melissa J; Feinstein, Steven B

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are currently used throughout the world in both clinical and research settings. The concept of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging originated in the late 1960s, and the first commercially available agents were initially developed in the 1980s. Today's microbubbles are designed for greater utility and are used for both approved and off-label indications. In October 2007, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) imposed additional product label warnings that included serious cardiopulmonary reactions, several new disease-state contraindications, and a mandated 30 min post-procedure monitoring period for the agents Optison and Definity. These additional warnings were prompted by reports of cardiopulmonary reactions that were temporally related but were not clearly attributable to these UCAs. Subsequent published reports over the following months established not only the safety but also the improved efficacy of clinical ultrasound applications with UCAs. The FDA consequently updated the product labeling in June 2008 and reduced contraindications, although it continued to monitor select patients. In addition, a post-marketing program was proposed to the sponsors for a series of safety studies to further assess the risk of UCAs. Then in October 2011, the FDA leadership further downgraded the warnings after hearing the results of the post-marketing data, which revealed continued safety and improved efficacy. The present review focuses on the use of UCAs in today's clinical practice, including the approved indications, a variety of off-label uses, and the most recent data, which affirms the safety and efficacy of UCAs.

  12. Evaluation of Gd-DTPA-monophytanyl and phytantriol nanoassemblies as potential MRI contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhishek; de Campo, Liliana; Rehmanjan, Beenish; Willis, Scott A; Waddington, Lynne J; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Kirby, Nigel; Price, William S; Moghaddam, Minoo J

    2015-02-03

    Supramolecular self-assembling amphiphiles have been widely used in drug delivery and diagnostic imaging. In this report, we present the self-assembly of Gd (III) chelated DTPA-monophytanyl (Gd-DTPA-MP) amphiphiles incorporated within phytantriol (PT), an inverse bicontinuous cubic phase forming matrix at various compositions. The dispersed colloidal nanoassemblies were evaluated as potential MRI contrast agents at various magnetic field strengths. The homogeneous incorporation of Gd-DTPA-MP in PT was confirmed by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of the bulk phases of the mixtures. The liquid crystalline nanostructures, morphology, and the size distribution of the nanoassemblies were studied by SAXS, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The dispersions with up to 2 mol % of Gd-DTPA-MP in PT retained inverse cubosomal nanoassemblies, whereas the rest of the dispersions transformed to liposomal nanoassemblies. In vitro relaxivity studies were performed on all the dispersions at 0.54, 9.40, and 11.74 T and compared to Magnevist, a commercially available contrast agent. All the dispersions showed much higher relaxivities compared to Magnevist at both low and high magnetic field strengths. Image contrast of the nanoassemblies was also found to be much better than Magnevist at the same Gd concentration at 11.74 T. Moreover, the Gd-DTPA-MP/PT dispersions showed improved relaxivities over the pure Gd-DTPA-MP dispersion at high magnetic fields. These stable colloidal nanoassemblies have high potential to be used as combined delivery matrices for diagnostics and therapeutics.

  13. Hyaluronic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting MRI contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou L

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lin Hou,* Huijuan Zhang,* Yating Wang, Lili Wang, Xiaomin Yang, Zhenzhong ZhangSchool of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: A tumor-targeting carrier, hyaluronic acid (HA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, was explored to deliver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents (CAs targeting to the tumor cells specifically. In this system, HA surface modification for SWCNTs was simply accomplished by amidation process and could make this nanomaterial highly hydrophilic. Cellular uptake was performed to evaluate the intracellular transport capabilities of HA-SWCNTs for tumor cells and the uptake rank was HA-SWCNTs> SWCNTs owing to the presence of HA, which was also evidenced by flow cytometry. The safety evaluation of this MRI CAs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. It revealed that HA-SWCNTs could stand as a biocompatible nanocarrier and gadolinium (Gd/HA-SWCNTs demonstrated almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Moreover, GdCl3 bearing HA-SWCNTs could significantly increase the circulation time for MRI. Finally, to investigate the MRI contrast enhancing capabilities of Gd/HA-SWCNTs, T1-weighted MR images of tumor-bearing mice were acquired. The results suggested Gd/HA-SWCNTs had the highest tumor-targeting efficiency and T1-relaxivity enhancement, indicating HA-SWCNTs could be developed as a tumor-targeting carrier to deliver the CAs, GdCl3, for the identifiable diagnosis of tumor.Keywords: gadolinium, magnetic resonance, SWCNTs, hyaluronic acid, contrast agent

  14. Stimulus-responsive ultrasound contrast agents for clinical imaging: motivations, demonstrations, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Andrew P; Nakatsuka, Matthew A; Mattrey, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents allow imaging of the vasculature with excellent resolution and signal-to-noise ratios. Contrast in microbubbles derives from their interaction with an ultrasound wave to generate signal at harmonic frequencies of the stimulating pulse; subtracting the elastic echo caused by the surrounding tissue can enhance the specificity of these harmonic signals significantly. The nonlinear acoustic emission is caused by pressure-driven microbubble size fluctuations, which in both theoretical descriptions and empirical measurements was found to depend on the mechanical properties of the shell that encapsulates the microbubble as well as stabilizes it against the surrounding aqueous environment. Thus biochemically induced switching between a rigid 'off' state and a flexible 'on' state provides a mechanism for sensing chemical markers for disease. In our research, we coupled DNA oligonucleotides to a stabilizing lipid monolayer to modulate stiffness of the shell and thereby induce stimulus-responsive behavior. In initial proof-of-principle studies, it was found that signal modulation came primarily from DNA crosslinks preventing the microbubble size oscillations rather than merely damping the signal. Next, these microbubbles were redesigned to include an aptamer sequence in the crosslinking strand, which not only allowed the sensing of the clotting enzyme thrombin but also provided a general strategy for sensing other soluble biomarkers in the bloodstream. Finally, the thrombin-sensitive microbubbles were validated in a rabbit model, presenting the first example of an ultrasound contrast agent that could differentiate between active and inactive clots for the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvana Lopes Pinheiro da Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods: Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results: As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion: Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography.

  16. Correction: Polyol synthesis, functionalisation, and biocompatibility studies of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachani, Roxanne; Lowdell, Mark; Birchall, Martin; Hervault, Aziliz; Mertz, Damien; Begin-Colin, Sylvie; Thanh, Nguy&Ecirtil; N. Thi&Cmb. B. Dot; Kim

    2016-02-01

    Correction for `Polyol synthesis, functionalisation, and biocompatibility studies of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential MRI contrast agents' by Roxanne Hachani et al., Nanoscale, 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03867g.

  17. Tumor Delivery of Ultrasound Contrast Agents Using Shiga Toxin B Subunit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Couture

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates the targeting of ultrasound contrast agents to human xenograft tumors by exploiting the overexpression of the glycolipid Gb3 in neovasculature. To this end, microbubbles were functionalized with a natural Gb3 ligand, the B subunit of the Shiga toxin (STxB. The targeting of Gb3-expressing tumor cells by STxB microbubbles was first shown by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. A significantly higher proportion of STxB microbubbles were associated with Gb3-expressing tumor cells compared to cells in which Gb3 expression was inhibited. Moreover, ultrasonic imaging of culture plates showed a 12 dB contrast enhancement in average backscattered acoustic intensity on the surface of Gb3-expressing cells compared to Gb3-negative cells. Also, a 18 dB contrast enhancement was found in favor of STxB microbubbles compared to unspecific microbubbles. Microbubble signal intensity in subcutaneous tumors in mice was more than twice as high after the injection of STxB-functionalized microbubbles compared to the injection of unspecific microbubbles. These in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that STxB-functionalized microbubbles bind specifically to cells expressing the Gb3 glycolipid. The cell-binding moieties of toxins thus appear as a new group of ligands for angiogenesis imaging with ultrasound.

  18. TREG coated iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agent for MRI in-vivo use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Garcia, Eric; Hidalgo-Tobon, Silvia; Lopez, Ciro; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Roberto; Coffer, Jeffery; De Celis Alonso, Benito; Dies Suarez, Pilar; Obregon, Manuel; Perez-Pena, Mario; Platas-Neri, Diana; Mendez-Rojas, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are of interest due to their great potential applications in diverse fields such as biomedicine. In this work we have prepared SPION nanoparticles using the polyol technique and characterized the magnetic properties of them for MRI in-vivo use. Nanoparticle preparation: All reagents were purchased from commercial sources (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, USA) Iron (III) acetylacetonate, [Fe(acac)3], was used as the iron oxide precursor and thermally decomposed at high temperatures in triethyleneglycol (TREG). Nano-sized magnetite particles were prepared by an adaptation of the method proposed by Wei Cai et al[1-3]. A healthy rabbit was scanned on a clinical 1.5 T Philips MR scanner. Images were taken in 2D mode with a mFFE sequence. Relaxation time T2 was obtained from the MR images using a Matlab algorithm where the signal intensity decay was calculated at each image and then adjusted to a mono-exponential curve. Images were obtained before contrast injection, 24 hours and 36 hours following SPIONs administration. Signal decay at different Echo times for the prepared magnetic SPIONs, before and after contrast injection was measured. It was visualized a concentration of the agent contrast in brain and liver and the results were compared with images obtained from histopathology.

  19. Interactions between oral antineoplastic agents and concomitant medication: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcelero, Esther; Anglada, Helena; Tuset, Montse; Creus, Natalia

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, the number of oral antitumoral agents has considerably increased. Oral administration increases the risk of interactions, because most oral anticancer drugs are taken on a daily basis. Interactions can increase exposure to antitumoral agents or cause treatment failure. Many antitumoral drugs undergo enzymatic metabolism by cytochrome P450. As some act as inducers or inhibitors of one or more isoenzymes, they can lead to decreases or increases in plasma concentrations of concomitant drugs. Hence, cytostatic drugs can act not only as victims but also as perpetrators. P-glycoprotein, an efflux transporter, can also be involved in pharmacokinetic interactions. A Medline search was performed to summarize the available evidence of the most clinically relevant interactions between oral chemotherapy agents and other drugs. The search covered the period from 1966 until August 2012 for each antitumoral drug using the medical subject headings 'Drug Interactions' OR 'Pharmacokinetics'. While the present review is not exhaustive, it aims to increase clinicians' awareness of potential drug-drug interactions. As cancer patients are often polymedicated and treated by different physicians, the risk of drug interactions between antitumoral agents and other medications is high. More clinical interaction studies are encouraged to ensure appropriate antineoplastic pharmacokinetics in clinical practice.

  20. Systematic review of anti-inflammatory agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Sarri, Triantafyllia; Bowen, Joanne; Di Palma, Mario; Kouloulias, Vassilios E.; Niscola, Pasquale; Riesenbeck, Dorothea; Stokman, Monique; Tissing, Wim; Yeoh, Eric; Elad, Sharon; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this project was to review the available literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of anti-inflammatory agents for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients. Materials and methods A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study

  1. Topical Hemostatic Agents: What the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezeau, Patrick J

    2016-11-01

    Hemostasis is a key step in safe and predictable surgery. Knowledge of normal blood clotting mechanisms and abnormal diathesis is necessary to anticipate potential problems during and after surgery. As an adjunct to bleeding control, topical hemostatic agents have long been used in all surgical disciplines. This article provides a brief review of hemostasis and a topical summary of different classes of topical hemostatic agents useful to oral and maxillofacial surgery, including indications and potential complications/side effects. This rapidly evolving field promises to yield future agents with increased efficacy, cost efficiency, and decreased complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of paramagnetic chelated metal derivatives of polysaccharides and spin-labeled polysaccharides as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bligh, S.W.; Harding, C.T.; Sadler, P.J.; Bulman, R.A.; Bydder, G.M.; Pennock, J.M.; Kelly, J.D.; Latham, I.A.; Marriott, J.A. (Department of Chemistry, Birkbeck College, London (England))

    1991-02-01

    Soluble and insoluble polysaccharides were derivatized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and/or spin-labeled with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO). Polysaccharides derivatized with DTPA were prepared via cyanogen bromide activation, coupling to a diamine linker, and to DTPA anhydride. Spin-labeled polysaccharides were also prepared via cyanogen bromide activation. The extent of derivatization for dextran (18 kDa) was about 120 glucose units per DTPA, and for cellulose and starch about 15-30 units per DTPA. For spin-labeled polysaccharides, the average loading ranged from 1 nitroxide per 16 glucose units for starch to 181 for dextran (82 kDa). These derivatized paramagnetic polysaccharides were shown to be more effective relaxants than the small paramagnetic molecules alone. Both soluble and insoluble polysaccharide-linker-DTPA-Gd(3) complexes were effectively cleared from the body (rats) after oral administration. After intravenous administration, the biodistribution of dextran-linker-DTPA-Gd(3) complexes differed significantly from that of GdDTPA. Reduction of the nitroxide by ascorbic acid was retarded in the polysaccharide derivatives, particularly in starch derivatized with both nitroxide and linker-DTPA-Cu(2). These agents showed contrast enhancement in the gastrointestinal tract of rabbits.

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a macromolecular MR contrast agent (P792): Evaluation of antivascular drug effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Sun [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Woo, Sung Min; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Il [Dept. of Radiology, Sheikh Khalifa Specialty Hospital, Ras Al Khaimah (United Arab Emirates); Choi, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent.

  4. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J. [MSD lab, Department of Information Engineering, Univ of Florence, Via S.Marta, 3, 50139 Firenze (Italy); Erasmus MC, ’s-Gravendijkwal 230, Faculty Building, Ee 2302, 3015 CE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Tortoli, P. [MSD lab, Department of Information Engineering, Univ of Florence, Via S.Marta, 3, 50139 Firenze (Italy); Verweij, M. D. [Acoustical Wavefield Imaging, ImPhys, Delft Univ Technology, van der Waalsweg 8, 2628 CH Delft (Netherlands); Jong, N. de; Vos, H. J., E-mail: h.vos@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus MC, ’s-Gravendijkwal 230, Faculty Building, Ee 2302, 3015 CE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Acoustical Wavefield Imaging, ImPhys, Delft Univ Technology, van der Waalsweg 8, 2628 CH Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-10-28

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. “superharmonic” imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which ‘signal’ denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  5. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; de Jong, N.; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. "superharmonic" imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which `signal' denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  6. Characteristics and Echogenicity of Clinical Ultrasound Contrast Agents: An In Vitro and In Vivo Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvelin, Jean-Marc; Gaud, Emmanuel; Costa, Maria; Helbert, Alexandre; Bussat, Philippe; Bettinger, Thierry; Frinking, Peter

    2017-05-01

    To compare physicochemical characteristics and in vitro and in vivo contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging performance of 3 commercially available ultrasound contrast agents: SonoVue (Bracco Imaging SpA, Colleretto Giacosa, Italy; also marketed as Lumason in the USA), Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, North Billerica, MA) and Optison (GE Healthcare AS, Oslo, Norway). Physicochemical characteristics were measured with a Multisizer Coulter Counter (Beckman Coulter, Fullerton, CA). Two ultrasound systems (Aplio 500; Toshiba Medical Systems Corp, Tochigi-ken, Japan; and Logiq E9; GE Healthcare, Little Chalfont, England) were used with different transducers. Contrast enhancement was measured in vitro by dose-ranging measurements using a custom-built beaker setup; in vivo imaging performances were compared in pigs (heart and liver) and rabbits (liver). Quantitative analyses were performed with VueBox quantification software (Bracco Suisse SA, Plan-les-Ouates, Switzerland). Measured physicochemical characteristics were in agreement with those provided by the manufacturers. In vitro data demonstrated that the performance of SonoVue was similar to or better than that of Definity but superior to Optison (normalized scattered power 2- to 10-fold higher with SonoVue). Similar results were obtained in vivo, although the duration of enhancement in the pig heart was longer for SonoVue compared to Definity, and quantitative analysis revealed higher enhancement for SonoVue (1.5-fold increase). For liver imaging, SonoVue and Definity showed similar contrast enhancement and duration of enhancement, but compared to Optison, both peak enhancement and duration of enhancement were superior for SonoVue (up to 2-fold increase). Imaging performance of SonoVue was similar to or slightly better than that of Definity, but it was superior to Optison for the conditions used in this study. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  7. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts.

  8. High-resolution wide-field imaging of perfused capillaries without the use of contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson DA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Darin A Nelson1, Zvia Burgansky-Eliash1,2, Hila Barash1, Anat Loewenstein3, Adiel Barak4, Elisha Bartov2, Tali Rock2, Amiram Grinvald51Optical Imaging Ltd, Rehovot, Israel; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Tel Aviv Medical Center & Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel; 4Department of Ophthalmology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel; 5Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, IsraelPurpose: Assessment of capillary abnormalities facilitates early diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of common retinal pathologies. Injected contrast agents like fluorescein are widely used to image retinal capillaries, but this highly effective procedure has a few disadvantages, such as untoward side effects, inconvenience of injection, and brevity of the time window for clear visualization. The retinal function imager (RFI is a tool for monitoring retinal functions, such as blood velocity and oximetry, based on intrinsic signals. Here we describe the clinical use of hemoglobin in red blood cells (RBCs as an intrinsic motion-contrast agent in the generation of detailed noninvasive capillary-perfusion maps (nCPMs.Patients and methods: Multiple series of nCPM images were acquired from 130 patients with diabetic retinopathy, vein occlusion, central serous retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, or metabolic syndrome, as well as from 37 healthy subjects. After registration, pixel value distribution parameters were analyzed to locate RBC motion.Results: The RFI yielded nCPMs demonstrating microvascular morphology including capillaries in exquisite detail. Maps from the same subject were highly reproducible in repeated measurements, in as much detail and often better than that revealed by the very best fluorescein angiography. In patients, neovascularization and capillary nonperfusion areas were clearly observed. Foveal avascular

  9. Iron oxide nanorods as high-performance magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Jeotikanta; Mitra, Arijit; Tyagi, Himanshu; Bahadur, D.; Aslam, M.

    2015-05-01

    An efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with a high R2 relaxivity value is achieved by controlling the shape of iron oxide to rod like morphology with a length of 30-70 nm and diameter of 4-12 nm. Fe3O4 nanorods of 70 nm length, encapsulated with polyethyleneimine show a very high R2 relaxivity value of 608 mM-1 s-1. The enhanced MRI contrast of nanorods is attributed to their higher surface area and anisotropic morphology. The higher surface area induces a stronger magnetic field perturbation over a larger volume more effectively for the outer sphere protons. The shape anisotropy contribution is understood by calculating the local magnetic field of nanorods and spherical nanoparticles under an applied magnetic field (3 Tesla). As compared to spherical geometry, the induced magnetic field of a rod is stronger and hence the stronger magnetic field over a large volume leads to a higher R2 relaxivity of nanorods.An efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent with a high R2 relaxivity value is achieved by controlling the shape of iron oxide to rod like morphology with a length of 30-70 nm and diameter of 4-12 nm. Fe3O4 nanorods of 70 nm length, encapsulated with polyethyleneimine show a very high R2 relaxivity value of 608 mM-1 s-1. The enhanced MRI contrast of nanorods is attributed to their higher surface area and anisotropic morphology. The higher surface area induces a stronger magnetic field perturbation over a larger volume more effectively for the outer sphere protons. The shape anisotropy contribution is understood by calculating the local magnetic field of nanorods and spherical nanoparticles under an applied magnetic field (3 Tesla). As compared to spherical geometry, the induced magnetic field of a rod is stronger and hence the stronger magnetic field over a large volume leads to a higher R2 relaxivity of nanorods. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00055f

  10. Effects of oral contraceptive agents and sex steroids on carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkhoff, R K

    1972-01-01

    The article offers a general interpretation of the influence of oral contraceptive agents on glucose tolerance, emphasizing comparisons of synthetic sex hormones. Although there are conflicting reports on steroid-induced diabetes in normal women, their glucose curves are often higher when under oral contraceptive treatment, suggesting that oral contraceptives may induce a form of subclinical diabetes melitus that is reversible. Evidence from diabetic women suggests definite deliterious effects from contraceptive administration. Estradiol, estriol, and estrone may improve glucose tolerance in nondiabetic women and reduce insulin requirements in diabetics. Progesterone has little effect on carbohydrate tolerance, as did synthetic progestin. Conjugated equine estrogens (equilenine or Premarin) may provoke mild to moderate deterioration of carbohydrate tolerance. Parenterally administered natural estrogens and orally administered synthetic derivatives appear to differ sharply in their effects. Sex hormones' effects on carbohydrate metabolism likely involve interactions with insulin and endogenous glucocorticoids.

  11. Detection of brain tumors using fluorescence diffuse optical tomography and nanoparticles as contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Genevois, Coralie; Koenig, Anne; Heinrich, Emilie; Texier, Isabelle; Couillaud, Franck

    2012-12-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence-enhanced diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) is used to localize tumors in mice using fluorescent nanoparticles as a blood pool contrast agent. The infrared dye DiR is loaded in the lipid core of nontargeted nanoparticles (DiR-lipidots) and injected systemically via the tail vein in mice bearing U87 tumors. Distribution and time-course of DiR-lipidots are followed using in vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging and reveal enhanced fluorescent signal within the subcutaneous tumors up to seven days due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Tumor growth into the brain is followed using bioluminescent imaging, and tumor localization is further determined by magnetic resonance imaging. The fDOT provides three-dimensional fluorescent maps that allow for consistent localization for both subcutaneous and brain tumors.

  12. Non-invasive estimation of blood pressure using ultrasound contrast agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    Local blood pressure measurements provide important information on the state of health of organs in the body and can be used to diagnose diseases in the heart, lungs, and kidneys. This paper presents an experimental setup for investigating the ambient pressure sensitivity of a contrast agent using...... measurement series at 485 kPa showed a sensitivity of 0.41 dB/kPa with a correlation coefficient of 0.89. Based on the measurements at 500 kPa, this acoustic driving pressure was concluded to be too high causing the bubbles to be destroyed. The pressure sensitivity for these two measurement series were 0...... diagnostic ultrasound. The setup resembles a realistic clinical setup utilizing a single array transducer for transmit and receive. The ambient pressure sensitivity of SonoVue (Bracco, Milano, Italy) was measured twice using two different acoustic driving pressures, which were selected based on a preliminary...

  13. Impact of acoustic pressure on ambient pressure estimation using ultrasound contrast agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Scheldrup; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Local blood pressure measurements provide important information on the state of health of organs in the body and can be used to diagnose diseases in the heart, lungs, and kidneys. This paper presents an approach for investigating the ambient pressure sensitivity of a contrast agent using diagnostic.......94. The second measurement series at 485 kPa showed a sensitivity of 0.41 dB/kPa with a correlation coefficient of 0.89. Based on the measurements at 500 kPa, this acoustic driving pressure was concluded to be too high causing the bubbles to be destroyed. The pressure sensitivity for these two measurement series...... ultrasound. The experimental setup resembles a realistic clinical setup utilizing a single array transducer for transmit and receive. The ambient pressure sensitivity of SonoVue (Bracco, Milano, Italy) was measured twice using two different acoustic driving pressures, which were selected based...

  14. Luminescence study of Eu(III) analogues of esterase-activated magnetic resonance contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardiello, Marco; Lowe, Mark P

    2009-09-07

    A model for an accumulation and enzyme-activation strategy of a magnetic resonance contrast agent was investigated via the luminescence of Eu(III) analogues. Neutral q = 2 Eu(III) ethyl and acetoxymethyl ester LnaDO3A-based complexes showed increased emission intensity in the presence of serum concentrations of carbonate because of inner-sphere water molecule displacement by the anion. The affinity for carbonate is suppressed by the introduction of negative charge to the complex following enzymatic hydrolysis of the ester groups, resulting in quenching of Eu(III) luminescence and changes in spectral form. The conversion of neutral, carboxylic ester-containing complexes into free acid forms by enzymatic hydrolysis using pig liver esterase was demonstrated by luminescence (Eu) and (1)H NMR spectroscopic investigations (Y). These studies demonstrated that the concept of inhibition of anion binding as a result of enzyme activation is feasible.

  15. Experimental validation of proton transverse relaxivity models for superparamagnetic nanoparticle MRI contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Matthew R J; Woodward, Robert C; House, Michael J; St Pierre, Timothy G [Centre for Strategic Nanofabrication, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Teoh, Wey Yang; Amal, Rose [ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials, School of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Hanley, Tracey L, E-mail: stpierre@physics.uwa.edu.au [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, New Illawarra Road, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2010-01-22

    Analytical models of proton transverse relaxation rate enhancement by magnetic nanoparticles were tested by making measurements on model experimental systems in a field of 1.4 T. Proton relaxivities were measured for five aqueous suspensions of iron oxide (maghemite) nanoparticles with nominal mean particle sizes of 6, 8, 10, 11, and 13 nm. Proton relaxivity increased with mean particle size ranging from 13 s{sup -1} mM Fe{sup -1} for the 6 nm sample, up to 254 s{sup -1} mM Fe{sup -1} for the 13 nm sample. A strong correlation between the measured and predicted values of the relaxivity was observed, with the predicted values being consistently higher than the measured values. The results indicate that the models give a reasonable agreement with experimental results and hence can be used as the basis for the design of new magnetic resonance imaging contrast and labelling agents.

  16. Aptamer-Modified Temperature-Sensitive Liposomal Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kunchi; Liu, Min; Tong, Xiaoyan; Sun, Na; Zhou, Lu; Cao, Yi; Wang, Jine; Zhang, Hailu; Pei, Renjun

    2015-09-14

    A novel aptamer modified thermosensitive liposome was designed as an efficient magnetic resonance imaging probe. In this paper, Gd-DTPA was encapsulated into an optimized thermosensitive liposome (TSL) formulation, followed by conjugation with AS1411 for specific targeting against tumor cells that overexpress nucleolin receptors. The resulting liposomes were extensively characterized in vitro as a contrast agent. As-prepared TSLs-AS1411 had a diameter about 136.1 nm. No obvious cytotoxicity was observed from MTT assay, which illustrated that the liposomes exhibited excellent biocompatibility. Compared to the control incubation at 37 °C, the liposomes modified with AS1411 exhibited much higher T1 relaxivity in MCF-7 cells incubated at 42 °C. These data indicate that the Gd-encapsulated TSLs-AS1411 may be a promising tool in early cancer diagnosis.

  17. USPIO: New MR Contrast Agent for Evaluation of Metastatic Lymph Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrooz Malek

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available accurate detection and characterization of lymph node metastases is crucial for planning therapy and determining prognosis in patients with various un-derlying primary tumors such as the breast, prostate, head and neck, urogenital, melanoma and other cancers. CT and MR imaging are of limited value because they primarily rely on the tumor size for differentiating benign from malignant lymph nodes. Ultrasmall super paramagnetic iron oxide (USPIO (Combidex or Ferumoxtran-10; Advanced Magnetics, Sinerem; Guerbet is an MR contrast agent that has shown improved accuracy in the staging of lymph nodes in cancer patients. Animal and recent human studies have shown that USPIO particles allow MR differentiation of benign from malignant lymph nodes based on enhancement patterns."nThis lecture is a review about new imaging methods in oncological imaging, especially for the lymphatic system.

  18. Erythrocytes and microbubble contrast agents, improve the therapeutic efficiency of high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegami, Kenji; Kaneko, Yukio; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Maruyama, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Nagawa, Hirokazu

    2005-03-01

    Erythrocytes, an well as Levovist microbubble contrast agent, enhance the heating effect of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and increase the coagulation volume produced by HIFU irradiation. In vitro experiments used human plasma with various concentrations of human erythrocytes in combination with or without Levovist. In vivo experiments used eight Japan white rabbits with three levels of anaemia. Using a 2.17 MHz transducer, HIFU was applied for 60 seconds, and the temperature rise and the volume of coagulation necrosis was evaluated. There was a significant correlation between the HIFU-induced temperature rise and hematocrit, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 (p=0.0001). Although the temperature rise was smaller at low hematocrit, it was significantly increased by adding Levovist to the suspension (panaemia group was significantly increased by using Levovist (p<0.01).

  19. Nonlinear response of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles: From fundamentals to applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Xu-Dong; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2016-12-01

    Modelling and biomedical applications of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) microbubbles have attracted a great deal of attention. In this review, we summarize a series of researches done in our group, including (i) the development of an all-in-one solution of characterizing coated bubble parameters based on the light scattering technique and flow cytometry; (ii) a novel bubble dynamic model that takes into consideration both nonlinear shell elasticity and viscosity to eliminate the dependences of bubble shell parameters on bubble size; (iii) the evaluation of UCA inertial cavitation threshold and its relationship with shell parameters; and (iv) the investigations of transfection efficiency and the reduction of cytotoxicity in gene delivery facilitated by UCAs excited by ultrasound exposures. Projects supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 81127901, 81227004, 11374155, 11274170, 11274176, 11474001, 11474161, 11474166, and 11674173), the National High-Technology Research and Development Program, China (Grant No. 2012AA022702), and Qing Lan Project of Jiangsu Province, China.

  20. Effects of dissolved gases and an echo contrast agent on ultrasound mediated in vitro gene transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Ryohei; Kondo, Takashi; Honda, Hidemi; Zhao, Qing Li; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Riesz, Peter

    2002-09-01

    The effects of acoustic cavitation on in vitro transfection by ultrasound were investigated. HeLa cells were exposed to 1.0 MHz continuous ultrasound in culture media containing the luciferase gene. Transfection efficiency was elevated when an echo contrast agent, Levovist was added or air was dissolved in the medium. When cells were sonicated in medium saturated with Ar, N2 or N2O which have different gamma values (Cp/Cv), or were saturated with He, Ar or Ne with different thermal conductivities, the effectiveness for the dissolved gases in the ultrasound mediated transfection was Ar > N2 > N2O or Ar > Ne > He, respectively. When free radical formation in water by ultrasound was monitored as a measure of inertial cavitation, it was similarly affected by dissolved gases. These results indicate that the efficiency of ultrasound mediated transfection was significantly affected either by occurrence of or by modification of inertial cavitation due to various gases.

  1. Fe3O4-based PLGA nanoparticles as MR contrast agents for the detection of thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jia Liu,1 Jie Xu,1 Jun Zhou,1 Yu Zhang,1 Dajing Guo,1 Zhigang Wang2 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Ultrasound, Institute of Ultrasound Imaging, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Yuzhong, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Thrombotic disease is a great threat to human health, and early detection is particularly important. Magnetic resonance (MR molecular imaging provides noninvasive imaging with the potential for early disease diagnosis. In this study, we developed Fe3O4-based poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (NPs surface-modified with a cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (cRGD peptide as an MR contrast agent for the detection of thrombosis. The physical and chemical characteristics, biological toxicity, ability to target thrombi, and biodistribution of the NPs were studied. The Fe3O4-PLGA-cRGD NPs were constructed successfully, and hematologic and pathologic assays indicated no in vivo toxicity of the NPs. In a rat model of FeCl3-induced abdominal aorta thrombosis, the NPs readily and selectively accumulated on the surface of the thrombosis and under vascular endothelial cells ex vivo and in vivo. In the in vivo experiment, the biodistribution of the NPs suggested that the NPs might be internalized by the macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system in the liver and the spleen. The T2 signal decreased at the mural thrombus 10 min after injection and then gradually increased until 50 min. These results suggest that the NPs are suitable for in vivo molecular imaging of thrombosis under high shear stress conditions and represent a very promising MR contrast agent for sensitive and specific detection of thrombosis. Keywords: iron oxide, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, thrombosis, magnetic resonance imaging, cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp peptide

  2. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a potential contrast agent for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Goñi, T; Martín-Sitjar, J; Simões, R V; Acosta, M; Lope-Piedrafita, S; Arús, C

    2013-02-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is commonly used in preclinical studies of animal models of high-grade glioma as a solvent for chemotherapeutic agents. A strong DMSO signal was detected by single-voxel MRS in the brain of three C57BL/6 control mice during a pilot study of DMSO tolerance after intragastric administration. This led us to investigate the accumulation and wash-out kinetics of DMSO in both normal brain parenchyma (n=3 control mice) by single-voxel MRS, and in 12 GL261 glioblastomas (GBMs) by single-voxel MRS (n=3) and MRSI (n=9). DMSO accumulated differently in each tissue type, reaching its highest concentration in tumors: 6.18 ± 0.85 µmol/g water, 1.5-fold higher than in control mouse brain (pDMSO changes revealed clear hotspots of differential spatial accumulation in GL261 tumors. Additional MRSI studies with four mice bearing oligodendrogliomas (ODs) revealed similar results as in GBM tumors. The lack of T(1) contrast enhancement post-gadolinium (gadopentetate dimeglumine, Gd-DTPA) in control mouse brain and mice with ODs suggested that DMSO was fully able to cross the intact blood-brain barrier in both normal brain parenchyma and in low-grade tumors. Our results indicate a potential role for DMSO as a contrast agent for brain tumor detection, even in those tumors 'invisible' to standard gadolinium-enhanced MRI, and possibly for monitoring heterogeneities associated with progression or with therapeutic response. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Immunological evaluation of the new stable ultrasound contrast agent LK565: a phase one clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wild P

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs allow the enhancement of vascular definition, thereby providing more diagnostic information. LK565 is a new second-generation UCA based on synthetic polymers of aspartic acid which is eliminated from the blood stream via phagocytosis. LK565 forms very stable air-filled microspheres and is capable of repeated passage through the pulmonary capillary bed after peripheral intravenous injection. This characteristic allows examination of the cardiac function or extracardiac vessel abnormalities up to 15 minutes. Methods A phase one clinical study was conducted on 15 healthy volunteers to identify the development of an undesirable immune response. Phagocytosis capacity, TNF-α secretion, and MHC class II upregulation of monocytes was monitored, as well as microsphere specific antibody development (IgM, IgG. Furthermore, the kinetics of the activation surface markers CD69, CD25, CD71, and CD11b on leukocytes were analyzed. Results Due to LK565-metabolism the administration of the UCA led to saturation of phagocytes which was reversible after 24 hrs. Compared to positive controls neither significant TNF-α elevation, neither MHC class II and activation surface markers upregulation, nor specific antibody development was detectable. Conclusion The administration of LK565 provides a comfortable duration of signal enhancement, esp. in echocardiography, without causing a major activation cascade or triggering an adaptive immune response. To minimize the risk of undesirable adverse events such as anaphylactoid reactions, immunological studies should be included in clinical trials for new UCAs. The use of LK565 as another new ultrasound contrast agent should be encouraged as a safe means to provide additional diagnostic information.

  4. Subharmonic analysis using singular-value decomposition of ultrasound contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Ketterling, Jeffrey A

    2009-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are designed to be used below 10 MHz, but interest is growing in studying the response of agents to high-frequency ultrasound. In this study, the subharmonic response of polymer-shelled UCAs with a mean diameter of 1.1 mum excited with 40-MHz tone-bursts of 1-20 cycles was analyzed. UCAs were diluted in water and streamed through a flow phantom that permitted single-bubble backscatter events to be acquired at peak-negative pressures from 0.75 to 5.0 MPa. At each exposure condition, 1000 single-bubble-backscatter events were digitized. Subharmonic content at 20 MHz was screened using a conventional and a singular-value-decomposition (SVD) method. The conventional method evaluated each event spectrum individually while the SVD method treated the 1000-event data set at one time. A subharmonic score (SHS) indicative of how much subharmonic content a 1000-event data set contained was computed for both methods. Empirical-simulation results indicated that SHSs obtained from the two methods were linearly related. Also, experimental data with both methods indicated that subharmonic likelihood increased with pulse duration and peaked near 2 MPa. The SVD method also yielded quantitative information about subharmonic events not available with the conventional method.

  5. New calcium-selective smart contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kirti Dhingra; Forgács, Attila; Uh, Hyounsoo; Beyerlein, Michael; Maier, Martin E; Petoud, Stéphane; Botta, Mauro; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2013-12-23

    Calcium plays a vital role in the human body and especially in the central nervous system. Precise maintenance of Ca(2+) levels is very crucial for normal cell physiology and health. The deregulation of calcium homeostasis can lead to neuronal cell death and brain damage. To study this functional role played by Ca(2+) in the brain noninvasively by using magnetic resonance imaging, we have synthesized a new set of Ca(2+) -sensitive smart contrast agents (CAs). The agents were found to be highly selective to Ca(2+) in the presence of other competitive anions and cations in buffer and in physiological fluids. The structure of CAs comprises Gd(3+)-DO3A (DO3A=1,4,7-tris(carboxymethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane) coupled to a Ca(2+) chelator o-amino phenol-N,N,O-triacetate (APTRA). The agents are designed to sense Ca(2+) present in extracellular fluid of the brain where its concentration is relatively high, that is, 1.2-0.8 mM. The determined dissociation constant of the CAs to Ca(2+) falls in the range required to sense and report changes in extracellular Ca(2+) levels followed by an increase in neural activity. In buffer, with the addition of Ca(2+) the increase in relaxivity ranged from 100-157%, the highest ever known for any T1-based Ca(2+)-sensitive smart CA. The CAs were analyzed extensively by the measurement of luminescence lifetime measurement on Tb(3+) analogues, nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD), and (17)O NMR transverse relaxation and shift experiments. The results obtained confirmed that the large relaxivity enhancement observed upon Ca(2+) addition is due to the increase of the hydration state of the complexes together with the slowing down of the molecular rotation and the retention of a significant contribution of the water molecules of the second sphere of hydration.

  6. Insulin versus oral agents in the management of Cystic Fibrosis Related Diabetes: a case based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langdon Leora J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin is the recommend therapeutic agent of choice for the management of Cystic Fibrosis Related Diabetes (CFRD, despite only sub-optimal reductions in glycemic control and increased morbidity and mortality reported by centers using this agent. The newer insulin sensitizing agents demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory mechanisms may provide an alternative management option for CFRD. Methods A prospective case based therapeutic comparison between insulin, sulfonylurea, metformin and thiazolidinedione was observed over one decade with 20 CFRD patients diagnosed using American Diabetes Association guideline standards. Patients entering the study elected treatment based on risk and benefit information provided for treatment options. Patients receiving organ transplant or requiring combination diabetic medications were excluded from the study. Results No statistical advantage was achieved regarding overall glycemic control for oral agents over insulin. Additional outcome measures including changes in weight, liver function testing and FEV1 were not statistically significant. Conclusion Insulin alone may not be the only therapeutic option in managing CFRD. Oral hypoglycemic agents were equally effective in treating CFRD and may provide an alternative class of agents for patients reluctant in using insulin.

  7. Regional contrast agent quantification in a mouse model of myocardial infarction using 3D cardiac T1 mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolay Klaas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative relaxation time measurements by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR are of paramount importance in contrast-enhanced studies of experimental myocardial infarction. First, compared to qualitative measurements based on signal intensity changes, they are less sensitive to specific parameter choices, thereby allowing for better comparison between different studies or during longitudinal studies. Secondly, T1 measurements may allow for quantification of local contrast agent concentrations. In this study, a recently developed 3D T1 mapping technique was applied in a mouse model of myocardial infarction to measure differences in myocardial T1 before and after injection of a liposomal contrast agent. This was then used to assess the concentration of accumulated contrast agent. Materials and methods Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was induced in 8 mice by transient ligation of the LAD coronary artery. Baseline quantitative T1 maps were made at day 1 after surgery, followed by injection of a Gd-based liposomal contrast agent. Five mice served as control group, which followed the same protocol without initial surgery. Twenty-four hours post-injection, a second T1 measurement was performed. Local ΔR1 values were compared with regional wall thickening determined by functional cine CMR and correlated to ex vivo Gd concentrations determined by ICP-MS. Results Compared to control values, pre-contrast T1 of infarcted myocardium was slightly elevated, whereas T1 of remote myocardium did not significantly differ. Twenty-four hours post-contrast injection, high ΔR1 values were found in regions with low wall thickening values. However, compared to remote tissue (wall thickening > 45%, ΔR1 was only significantly higher in severe infarcted tissue (wall thickening r = 0.81 was found between CMR-based ΔR1 values and Gd concentrations from ex vivo ICP-MS measurements. Furthermore, regression analysis revealed that the

  8. Preliminary Results on Different Impedance Contrast Agents for Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging with Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Kosobrodov, R.; Barry, M. A.; Chik, W.; Pouliopoulos, J.; Oh, T. I.; Thiagalingam, A.; McEwan, A.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies in animal models suggest that the use of small volume boluses of NaCl as an impedance contrast agent can significantly improve pulmonary perfusion imaging by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). However, these studies used highly concentrated NaCl solution (20%) which may have adverse effects on the patients. In a pilot experiment, we address this problem by comparing a number of different Impedance Contrast Boluses (ICBs). Conductivity changes in the lungs of a sheep after the injection of four different ICBs were compared, including three NaCl-based ICBs and one glucose-based ICB. The following procedure was followed for each ICB. Firstly, ventilation was turned off to provide an apneic window of approximately 40s to image the conductivity changes due to the ICB. Each ICB was then injected through a pig-tail catheter directly into the right atrium. EIT images were acquired throughout the apnea to capture the conductivity change. For each ICB, the experiment was repeated three times. The three NaCl-based ICB exhibited similar behaviour in which following the injection of each of these ICBs, the conductivity of each lung predictably increased. The effect of the ICB of 5% glucose solution was inconclusive. A small decrease in conductivity in the left lung was observed in two out of three cases and none was discernible in the right lung.

  9. A Novel Polyacrylamide Magnetic Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Molecular Imaging using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford A. Moffat

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel Polyacrylamide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle platform is described which has been synthetically prepared such that multiple crystals of iron oxide are encapsulated within a single Polyacrylamide matrix (PolyAcrylamide Magnetic [PAM] nanoparticles. This formulation provides for an extremely large T2 and T2* relaxivity of between 620 and 1140 sec−1 mM−1. Administration of PAM nanoparticles into rats bearing orthotopic 9L gliomas allowed quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis of the uptake of nanoparticles in the vasculature, brain, and glioma. Addition of polyethylene glycol of varying sizes (0.6, 2, and 10 kDa to the surface of the PAM nanoparticles resulted in an increase in plasma half-life and affected tumor uptake and retention of the nanoparticles as quantified by changes in tissue contrast using MRI. The flexible formulation of these nanoparticles suggests that future modifications could be accomplished allowing for their use as a targeted molecular imaging contrast agent and/or therapeutic platform for multiple indications.

  10. Zero echo time magnetic resonance imaging of contrast-agent-enhanced calcium phosphate bone defect fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Ventura, Manuela; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Jansen, John A; Walboomers, X Frank; Heerschap, Arend

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are widely used bone substitutes. However, CPCs have similar radiopacity as natural bone, rendering them difficult to be differentiated in classical X-ray and computed tomography imaging. As conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of bone is cumbersome, due to low water content and very short T(2) relaxation time, ultra-short echo time (UTE) and zero echo time (ZTE) MRI have been explored for bone visualization. This study examined the possibility to differentiate bone and CPC by MRI. T(1) and T(2)* values determined with UTE MRI showed little difference between bone and CPC; hence, these materials were difficult to separate based on T(1) or T(2) alone. Incorporation of ultra-small particles of iron oxide and gadopentetatedimeglumine (Gd-DTPA; 1 weight percentage [wt%] and 5 wt% respectively) into CPC resulted in visualization of CPC with decreased intensity on ZTE images in in vitro and ex vivo experiments. However, these additions had unfavorable effects on the solidification time and/or mechanical properties of the CPC, with the exception of 1% Gd-DTPA alone. Therefore, we tested this material in an in vivo experiment. The contrast of CPC was enhanced at an early stage postimplantation, and was significantly reduced in the 8 weeks thereafter. This indicates that ZTE imaging with Gd-DTPA as a contrast agent could be a valid radiation-free method to visualize CPC degradation and bone regeneration in preclinical experiments.

  11. Estimation of contrast agent bolus arrival delays for improved reproducibility of liver DCE MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Manil D.; Bainbridge, Alan; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Taylor, Stuart A.

    2016-10-01

    Delays between contrast agent (CA) arrival at the site of vascular input function (VIF) sampling and the tissue of interest affect dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI pharmacokinetic modelling. We investigate effects of altering VIF CA bolus arrival delays on liver DCE MRI perfusion parameters, propose an alternative approach to estimating delays and evaluate reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers (28.7  ±  1.9 years, seven males) underwent liver DCE MRI using dual-input single compartment modelling, with reproducibility (n  =  9) measured at 7 days. Effects of VIF CA bolus arrival delays were assessed for arterial and portal venous input functions. Delays were pre-estimated using linear regression, with restricted free modelling around the pre-estimated delay. Perfusion parameters and 7 days reproducibility were compared using this method, freely modelled delays and no delays using one-way ANOVA. Reproducibility was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis of agreement. Maximum percent change relative to parameters obtained using zero delays, were  -31% for portal venous (PV) perfusion, +43% for total liver blood flow (TLBF), +3247% for hepatic arterial (HA) fraction, +150% for mean transit time and  -10% for distribution volume. Differences were demonstrated between the 3 methods for PV perfusion (p  =  0.0085) and HA fraction (p  liver DCE MRI quantification. Pre-estimation of delays with constrained free modelling improved 7 days reproducibility of perfusion parameters in volunteers.

  12. In situ gold nanoparticles formation: contrast agent for dental optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Ana K. S.; Araujo, Renato E. de; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Shukla, Shoba; Bergey, Earl J.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Prasad, Paras N.

    2012-06-01

    In this work we demonstrate the potential use of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique in dentistry. Here, a new in situ photothermal reduction procedure was developed, producing spherical gold nanoparticles inside dentinal layers and tubules. Gold ions were dispersed in the primer of commercially available dental bonding systems. After the application and permeation in dentin by the modified adhesive systems, the dental bonding materials were photopolymerized concurrently with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images show the presence of gold nanospheres in the hybrid layer and dentinal tubules. The diameter of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 40 to 120 nm. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained in two- and three-dimensions. The distribution of nanoparticles was analyzed and the extended depth of nanosphere production was determined. The results show that the OCT technique, using in situ formed gold nanoparticles as contrast enhancers, can be used to visualize dentin structures in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  13. Contrasting Nephropathic Responses to Oral Administration of Extract of Cultured Penicillium polonicum in Rat and Primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantle, Peter G.; McHugh, Katharine M.; Fincham, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid- or solid substrate-cultured Penicillium polonicum administered in feed to rats over several days evokes a histopathological response in kidney involving apoptosis and abnormal mitosis in proximal tubules. The amphoteric toxin is yet only partly characterized, but can be isolated from cultured sporulating biomass in a fraction that is soluble in water and ethanol, and exchangeable on either anion- or cation-exchange resins. After several weeks of treatment renal proximal tubule distortion became striking on account of karyocytomegaly, but even treatment for nearly two years remained asymptomatic. Extract from a batch of solid substrate fermentation of P. polonicum on shredded wheat was incorporated into feed for rats during four consecutive days, and also given as an aqueous solution by oral gavage to a vervet monkey daily for 10 days. Treatment was asymptomatic for both types of animal. Rat response was evident as the typical renal apoptosis and karyomegaly. In contrast there was no such response in the primate; and neither creatinine clearance nor any haematological characteristic or serum component concentration deviated from a control or from historical data for this primate. The contrast is discussed concerning other negative findings for P. polonicum in pigs and hamsters. Renal karyomegaly, as a common rat response to persistent exposure to ochratoxin A, is not known in humans suspected as being exposed to more than the usual trace amounts of dietary ochratoxin A. Therefore the present findings question assumptions that human response to ochratoxin A conforms to that in the rat. PMID:22069673

  14. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Becker, Christoph D.; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Rutschmann, Olivier T. [University Hospital of Geneva, Emergency Center, Geneva (Switzerland); Verdun, Francis R. [University Institute for Radiation Physics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gervaz, Pascal [University Hospital of Geneva, Clinic of Digestive Surgery, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) {>=} 18.5. In slim patients (BMI < 18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI {>=} 18.5. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Becker, Christoph D; Verdun, Francis R; Gervaz, Pascal; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) >or= 18.5. In slim patients (BMIor= 18.5.

  16. Contrasting Nephropathic Responses to Oral Administration of Extract of Cultured Penicillium polonicum in Rat and Primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Fincham

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquid- or solid substrate-cultured Penicillium polonicum administered in feed to rats over several days evokes a histopathological response in kidney involving apoptosis and abnormal mitosis in proximal tubules. The amphoteric toxin is yet only partly characterized, but can be isolated from cultured sporulating biomass in a fraction that is soluble in water and ethanol, and exchangeable on either anion- or cation-exchange resins. After several weeks of treatment renal proximal tubule distortion became striking on account of karyocytomegaly, but even treatment for nearly two years remained asymptomatic. Extract from a batch of solid substrate fermentation of P. polonicum on shredded wheat was incorporated into feed for rats during four consecutive days, and also given as an aqueous solution by oral gavage to a vervet monkey daily for 10 days. Treatment was asymptomatic for both types of animal. Rat response was evident as the typical renal apoptosis and karyomegaly. In contrast there was no such response in the primate; and neither creatinine clearance nor any haematological characteristic or serum component concentration deviated from a control or from historical data for this primate. The contrast is discussed concerning other negative findings for P. polonicum in pigs and hamsters. Renal karyomegaly, as a common rat response to persistent exposure to ochratoxin A, is not known in humans suspected as being exposed to more than the usual trace amounts of dietary ochratoxin A. Therefore the present findings question assumptions that human response to ochratoxin A conforms to that in the rat.

  17. A functional form for injected MRI Gd-chelate contrast agent concentration incorporating recirculation, extravasation and excretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsfield, Mark A [Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester Royal Infirmary, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 5WW (United Kingdom); Thornton, John S; Jager, H Rolf [Lysholm Department of Neuroradiology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London WC1N 3BG (United Kingdom); Gill, Andrew; Priest, Andrew N [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Rd, Cambridge CB2 2QQ (United Kingdom); Morgan, Bruno [Department of Cancer Studies, Leicester Royal Infirmary, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 5WW (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mah5@le.ac.uk

    2009-05-07

    A functional form for the vascular concentration of MRI contrast agent after intravenous bolus injection was developed that can be used to model the concentration at any vascular site at which contrast concentration can be measured. The form is based on previous models of blood circulation, and is consistent with previously measured data at long post-injection times, when the contrast agent is fully and evenly dispersed in the blood. It allows the first-pass and recirculation peaks of contrast agent to be modelled, and measurement of the absolute concentration of contrast agent at a single time point allows the whole time course to be rescaled to give absolute contrast agent concentration values. This measure of absolute concentration could be performed at a long post-injection time using either MRI or blood-sampling methods. In order to provide a model that is consistent with measured data, it was necessary to include both rapid and slow extravasation, together with excretion via the kidneys. The model was tested on T{sub 1}-weighted data from the descending aorta and hepatic portal vein, and on T*{sub 2}-weighted data from the cerebral arteries. Fitting of the model was successful for all datasets, but there was a considerable variation in fit parameters between subjects, which suggests that the formation of a meaningful population-averaged vascular concentration function is precluded.

  18. Catechin tuned magnetism of Gd-doped orthovanadate through morphology as T1-T2 MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairapperumal, Tamilmani; Saraswathy, Ariya; Ramapurath, Jayasree S.; Kalarical Janardhanan, Sreeram; Balachandran Unni, Nair

    2016-01-01

    Tetragonal (t)-LaVO4 has turned out to be a potential host for luminescent materials. Synthesis of t-LaVO4 till date has been based on chelating effect of EDTA making it not ideal for bioimaging applications. An alternative was proposed by us through the use of catechin. In recent times there is interest for new MRI contrast agents that can through appropriate doping function both as MRI contrast and optical/upconversion materials. It is generally believed that under appropriate doping, t-LaVO4 would be a better upconversion material than monoclinic (m)-LaVO4. Based on these postulations, this work explores the use of gadolinium doped t-LaVO4 as an MRI contrast agent. From literature, gadolinium oxide is a good T1 contrast agent. Through this work, using catechin as a template for the synthesis of Gd doped t-LaVO4, we demonstrate the possible use as a T1 contrast agent. Interestingly, as the catechin concentration changes, morphology changes from nanorods to square nanoplates and spheres. In this process, a switch from T1 to T2 contrast agent was also observed. Under optimal concentration of catechin, with a rod shaped Gd doped t-LaVO4 an r2/r1 value of 21.30 was observed. Similarly, with a spherical shape had an r2/r1 value of 1.48 was observed. PMID:27752038

  19. Comparative study of non-ionic contrast agents Optiray 350 and Ultravist 370 in myelography in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Lăcătuș

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An essential quality of non-ionic contrast agents is that of containing in their chemical composition, elements with high atomic weight, which determine an increasing absorption of the X-ray beam and this will cause intense radiopacity. The possibilities for radiological exploration with non-ionic contrast agents are very wide. Currently the radiological examination with contrast agent no longer constitutes a risky step in medical diagnosis. Aims: To highlight the importance of using the non-ionic contrast agents Optiray 350 and Ultravist 370 in dog’s myelography and to compare the changes induced in cerebrospinal fluid and blood biochemical constituents by the administration of those non-ionic contrast substances. Materials and Methods: To determine the influence of non-ionic preparations Optiray 350 and Ultravist 370 on cerebrospinal fluid and on some haematological parameters were included in the study a total of 10 dogs. Results: Myelographies with Optiray 350 and Ultravist 370 in dogs with severe spinal condition negatively influence biochemical and haematological blood status, being necessary to take preventive measures. Optiray 350 and Ultravist 370 administration cause a slight sensitization of liver with blood biochemical parameters return to normal within 24-48 hours. Conclusion: Non-ionic contrast agents Optiray 350 and Ultravist 370 offer a very good opacification of the subarachnoidian space, but because it causes liver sensitization, we recommend using them with caution and only after a prior check of liver function.

  20. Liver dysplasia: US molecular imaging with targeted contrast agent enables early assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouls, Christoph; Hatting, Maximillian; Rix, Anne; Pochon, Sibylle; Lederle, Wiltrud; Tardy, Isabelle; Kuhl, Christiane K; Trautwein, Christian; Kiessling, Fabian; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the ability of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2)-targeted ultrasonographic (US) microbubbles for the assessment of liver dysplasia in transgenic mice. Animal experiments were approved by the governmental review committee. Nuclear factor-κB essential modulator knock-out mice with liver dysplasia and wild-type mice underwent liver imaging by using a clinical US system. Two types of contrast agents were investigated: nontargeted, commercially available, second-generation microbubbles (SonoVue) and clinically translatable PEGylated VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles (BR55). Microbubble kinetics was investigated over the course of 4 minutes. Targeted contrast material-enhanced US signal was quantified 5 minutes after injection. Competitive in vivo binding experiments with BR55 were performed in knock-out mice. Immunohistochemical and hematoxylin-eosin staining of liver sections was performed to validate the in vivo US results. Groups were compared by using the Mann-Whitney test. Peak enhancement after injection of SonoVue and BR55 did not differ in healthy and dysplastic livers (SonoVue, P = .46; BR55, P = .43). Accordingly, immunohistochemical findings revealed comparable vessel densities in both groups. The specificity of BR55 to VEGFR2 was proved by in vivo competition (P = .0262). While the SonoVue signal decreased similarly in healthy and dysplastic livers during the 4 minutes, there was an accumulation of BR55 in dysplastic livers compared with healthy ones. Furthermore, targeted contrast-enhanced US signal indicated a significantly higher site-specific binding of BR55 in dysplastic than healthy livers (P = .005). Quantitative immunohistologic findings confirmed significantly higher VEGFR2 levels in dysplastic livers (P = .02). BR55 enables the distinction of early stages of liver dysplasia from normal liver. © RSNA, 2013.

  1. Parametric imaging using subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents in patients with breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Merton, Daniel A; Palazzo, Juan P; Hall, Anne L; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Parametric maps showing perfusion of contrast media can be useful tools for characterizing lesions in breast tissue. In this study we show the feasibility of parametric subharmonic imaging (SHI), which allows imaging of a vascular marker (the ultrasound contrast agent) while providing near complete tissue suppression. Digital SHI clips of 16 breast lesions from 14 women were acquired. Patients were scanned using a modified LOGIQ 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) transmitting/receiving at 4.4/2.2 MHz. Using motion-compensated cumulative maximum intensity (CMI) sequences, parametric maps were generated for each lesion showing the time to peak (TTP), estimated perfusion (EP), and area under the time-intensity curve (AUC). Findings were grouped and compared according to biopsy results as benign lesions (n = 12, including 5 fibroadenomas and 3 cysts) and carcinomas (n = 4). For each lesion CMI, TTP, EP, and AUC parametric images were generated. No significant variations were detected with CMI (P = .80), TTP (P = .35), or AUC (P = .65). A statistically significant variation was detected for the average pixel EP (P = .002). Especially, differences were seen between carcinoma and benign lesions (mean ± SD, 0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.05 ± 0.02 intensity units [IU]/s; P = .0014) and between carcinoma and fibroadenoma (0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.04 ± 0.01 IU/s; P = .0044), whereas differences between carcinomas and cysts were found to be nonsignificant. In conclusion, a parametric imaging method for characterization of breast lesions using the high contrast to tissue signal provided by SHI has been developed. While the preliminary sample size was limited, results show potential for breast lesion characterization based on perfusion flow parameters.

  2. Grey scale enhancement of rabbit liver and kidney by intravenous injection of a new lipid-coated ultrasound contrast agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Liu; Yun-Hua Gao; Kai-Bin Tan; Zheng Liu; Song Zuo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess the grey scale enhancement of a new lipidcoated ultrasound contrast agent in solid abdominal organs as liver and kidney.METHODS: Size distribution and concentration of the lipidcoated contrast microbubbles were analyzed by a Coulter counter. Two-dimensional (2D) second harmonic imaging of the hepatic parenchyma, the inferior vena cava and the right kidney of the rabbits were acquired before and after contrast agent injection. Images were further quantified by histogram in Adobe Photoshop 6.0. Time-intensity curves of hepatic parenchyma, inferior vena cava and renal cortex were generated from the original grey scale.RESULTS: The 2D images of hepatic parenchyma and cortex of the kidney were greatly enhanced after injection and the peak time could last more than 50 min.CONCLUSION: This new lipid ultrasound contrast agent could significantly enhance the grey scale imaging of the hepatic parenchyma and the renal cortex for more than 50 min.

  3. Development and characterization of hollow polymeric microcapsules for use as contrast agents for diagnostic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Padma Jyothi

    1999-09-01

    This thesis concerns the development and characterization of a new type of rigid-shelled ultrasound contrast agent. A novel method was devised for producing hollow, gas- filled, polymer microcapsules, sized to less than 10 μm in diameter for contrast imaging. This method involved the encapsulation of a solid, volatile core material, and its subsequent evacuation by sublimation. The biodegradable polymer, 50/50 poly(D,L-lactide-co- glycolide), was the main focus of this study. Polymer- based contrast agents have many advantages, such as their applicability for concomitant imaging and drug delivery. Three encapsulation techniques were evaluated: solvent evaporation, coacervation, and spray drying. The polymer molecular weight and polydispersity in the solvent evaporation and coacervation techniques strongly affected microcapsule size and morphology. Efficient mechanical agitation and shear were crucial for obtaining high yields in the desired size range (less than 6 μm). In spray drying, a factorial design approach was used to optimize conditions to produce microcapsules. The main factors affecting spray drying were found to be the temperature driving force for drying and initial polymer concentration. The smallest microcapsule mean diameters were produced by spray drying (3-4 μm) and solvent evaporation (5-6 μm). Zeta potential (ζ) studies for all microcapsule types indicated that the encapsulation technique affected their surface properties due to the orientation of the polymer chains within nascent polymer droplets. Microcapsules with the most hydrophilic tendency were produced with solvent evaporation (ζ ~ -50 mV). In vitro acoustic testing revealed that the 20-41 μm size fractions of coacervate microcapsules were the most echogenic. In vivo ultrasound studies with both solvent evaporation and coacervate microcapsules showed visible enhancement of the color Doppler image in the rabbit kidney for the samples less than 10 μm in diameter. A mathematical

  4. Systematic review of miscellaneous agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Jarvis, Virginia; Zadik, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    : A total of 32 papers across 10 interventions were examined. New suggestions were developed against the use of systemic pilocarpine administered orally for prevention of OM during RT in head and neck cancer patients and in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy, with or without total body irradiation......, prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A suggestion was also made against the use of systemic pentoxifylline administered orally for the prevention of OM in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. No guideline was possible for any other agent reviewed due to inadequate and...

  5. Experimental Transmission of the Chronic Wasting Disease Agent to Swine after Oral or Intracranial Inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S Jo; West Greenlee, M Heather; Kondru, Naveen; Manne, Sireesha; Smith, Jodi D; Kunkle, Robert A; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Greenlee, Justin J

    2017-10-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids. The potential for swine to serve as hosts for the agent of CWD is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of swine to the CWD agent following experimental oral or intracranial inoculation. Crossbred piglets were assigned to three groups, intracranially inoculated (n = 20), orally inoculated (n = 19), and noninoculated (n = 9). At approximately the age at which commercial pigs reach market weight, half of the pigs in each group were culled ("market weight" groups). The remaining pigs ("aged" groups) were allowed to incubate for up to 73 months postinoculation (mpi). Tissues collected at necropsy were examined for disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) by Western blotting (WB), antigen capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and in vitro real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC). Brain samples from selected pigs were also bioassayed in mice expressing porcine prion protein. Four intracranially inoculated aged pigs and one orally inoculated aged pig were positive by EIA, IHC, and/or WB. By RT-QuIC, PrP(Sc) was detected in lymphoid and/or brain tissue from one or more pigs in each inoculated group. The bioassay was positive in four out of five pigs assayed. This study demonstrates that pigs can support low-level amplification of CWD prions, although the species barrier to CWD infection is relatively high. However, detection of infectivity in orally inoculated pigs with a mouse bioassay raises the possibility that naturally exposed pigs could act as a reservoir of CWD infectivity.IMPORTANCE We challenged domestic swine with the chronic wasting disease agent by inoculation directly into the brain (intracranially) or by oral gavage (orally). Disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) was detected in brain and lymphoid tissues from intracranially and orally inoculated pigs as early as 8 months of age (6 months

  6. Lumazine Synthase Protein Nanoparticle-Gd(III)-DOTA Conjugate as a T1 contrast agent for high-field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, YoungKyu; Kang, Young Ji; Jung, Hoesu; Kim, Hansol; Kang, Sebyung; Cho, HyungJoon

    2015-10-23

    With the applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at higher magnetic fields increasing, there is demand for MRI contrast agents with improved relaxivity at higher magnetic fields. Macromolecule-based contrast agents, such as protein-based ones, are known to yield significantly higher r1 relaxivity at low fields, but tend to lose this merit when used as T1 contrast agents (r1/r2 = 0.5 ~ 1), with their r1 decreasing and r2 increasing as magnetic field strength increases. Here, we developed and characterized an in vivo applicable magnetic resonance (MR) positive contrast agent by conjugating Gd(III)-chelating agent complexes to lumazine synthase isolated from Aquifex aeolicus (AaLS). The r1 relaxivity of Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C was 16.49 mM(-1)s(-1) and its r1/r2 ratio was 0.52 at the magnetic field strength of 7 T. The results of 3D MR angiography demonstrated the feasibility of vasculature imaging within 2 h of intravenous injection of the agent and a significant reduction in T1 values were observed in the tumor region 7 h post-injection in the SCC-7 flank tumor model. Our findings suggest that Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C could serve as a potential theranostic nanoplatform at high magnetic field strength.

  7. Quasi-cubic magnetite/silica core-shell nanoparticles as enhanced MRI contrast agents for cancer imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos L Campbell

    Full Text Available Development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents that can be readily applied for imaging of biological tissues under clinical settings is a challenging task. This is predominantly due to the expectation of an ideal MR agent being able to be synthesized in large quantities, possessing longer shelf life, reasonable biocompatibility, tolerance against its aggregation in biological fluids, and high relaxivity, resulting in better contrast during biological imaging. Although a repertoire of reports address various aforementioned issues, the previously reported results are far from optimal, which necessitates further efforts in this area. In this study, we demonstrate facile large-scale synthesis of sub-100 nm quasi-cubic magnetite and magnetite/silica core-shell (Mag@SiO2 nanoparticles and their applicability as a biocompatible T2 contrast agent for MRI of biological tissues. Our study suggests that silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles reported in this study can potentially act as improved MR contrast agents by addressing a number of aforementioned issues, including longer shelf life and stability in biological fluids. Additionally, our in vitro and in vivo studies clearly demonstrate the importance of silica coating towards improved applicability of T2 contrast agents for cancer imaging.

  8. MR angiography of collateral arteries in a hind limb ischemia model: comparison between blood pool agent Gadomer and small contrast agent Gd-DTPA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolien Jaspers

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the blood pool agent Gadomer with a small contrast agent for the visualization of ultra-small, collateral arteries (diameter0.10. Inter-observer variation was 24% and 18% for Gadomer and Gd-DTPA, respectively. In conclusion, blood pool agent Gadomer improved vessel conspicuity compared to Gd-DTPA. Steady-state MRA can be considered as an excellent non-invasive alternative to intra-arterial XRA for the visualization of ultra-small collateral arteries.

  9. Oral hypoglycaemic agents, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Lund, Søren S; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    This article is a narrative review of the current evidence of the effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) of oral hypoglycaemic agents that increase insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In overweight T2D patients, metformin has been demonstrated to reduce CVD risk, and this......This article is a narrative review of the current evidence of the effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) of oral hypoglycaemic agents that increase insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In overweight T2D patients, metformin has been demonstrated to reduce CVD risk......, and this beneficial effect may be conserved with the combination of metformin and insulin treatment. However, the effect of glitazones on CVD is uncertain. There is conflicting evidence from large randomized trials to support a protective effect against CVD of lowering blood glucose per se but a systematic review...

  10. Review of atrial fibrillation outcome trials of oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassand, Jean-Pierre

    2012-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is strongly associated with cardioembolic stroke, and thromboprophylaxis is an established means of reducing stroke risk in patients with AF. Oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin have been the mainstay of therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF. However, they are associated with a number of limitations, including excessive bleeding when not adequately controlled. Antiplatelet agents do not match vitamin K antagonists in terms of their preventive efficacy. Dual-antiplatelet therapy (clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid) or combined antiplatelet-vitamin K antagonist therapy in AF has also failed to provide convincing evidence of their additional benefit over vitamin K antagonists alone. Novel oral anticoagulants, including the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and direct Factor Xa inhibitors such as rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have now been approved or are currently in late-stage clinical development in AF. These newer agents may provide a breakthrough in the optimal management of stroke risk.

  11. Development of Microbubble Contrast Agents with Biochemical Recognition and Tunable Acoustic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Matthew Allan Masao

    Microbubbles, consisting of gas-filled cores encapsulated within phospholipid or polymer shells, are the most widely used ultrasound contrast agents in the world. Because of their acoustic impedance mismatch with surrounding tissues and compressible gaseous interiors, they have high echogenicities that allow for efficient backscatter of ultrasound. They can also generate unique harmonic frequencies when insonated near their resonance frequency, depending on physical microbubble properties such as the stiffness and thickness of the encapsulating shell. Microbubbles are used to detect a number of cardiovascular diseases, but current methodologies lack the ability to detect and distinguish small, rapidly growing abnormalities that do not produce visible blockage or slowing of blood flow. This work describes the development, formulation, and validation of microbubbles with various polymer shell architectures designed to modulate their acoustic ability. We demonstrate that the addition of a thick disulfide crosslinked, poly(acrylic acid) encapsulating shell increases a bubble's resistance to cavitation and changes its resonance frequency. Modification of this shell architecture to use hybridized DNA strands to form crosslinks between the polymer chains allows for tuning of the bubble acoustic response. When the DNA crosslinks are in place, shell stiffness is increased so the bubbles do not oscillate and acoustic signal is muted. Subsequently, when these DNA strands are displaced, partial acoustic activity is restored. By using aptamer sequences with a specific affinity towards the biomolecule thrombin as the DNA crosslinking strand, this acoustic "ON/OFF" behavior can be specifically tailored towards the presence of a specific biomarker, and produces a change in acoustic signal at concentrations of thrombin consistent with acute deep venous thrombosis. Incorporation of the emulsifying agent poly(ethylene glycol) into the encapsulating shell improves microbubble yield

  12. New oil-in-water magnetic emulsion as contrast agent for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Naveed; Jaafar-Maalej, Chiraz; Eissa, Mohamed Mahmoud; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, bio-imaging techniques are widely applied for the diagnosis of various diseased/tumoral tissues in the body using different contrast agents. Accordingly, the advancement in bionanotechnology research is enhanced in this regard. Among contrast agents used, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by many researchers and applied for in vive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, a new oil-in-water magnetic emulsion was used as contrast agent in MRI, after being characterized in terms of particle size, iron oxide content, magnetic properties and colloidal stability using dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and zeta potential measurement techniques, respectively. The hydrodynamic size and magnetic content of the magnetic colloidal particles were found to be 250 nm and 75 wt%, respectively. In addition, the used magnetic emulsion possesses superparamagentic properties and high colloidal stability in aqueous medium. Then, the magnetic emulsion was highly diluted and administered intravenously to the Sprague dawley rats to be tested as contrast agent for in vivo MRI. In this preliminary study, MRI images showed significant enhancement in contrast, especially for T2 (relaxation time) contrast enhancement, indicating the distribution of magnetic colloidal nanoparticles within organs, like liver, spleen and kidneys of the Sprague dawley rats. In addition, it was found that 500 microL of the highly diluted magnetic emulsion (0.05 wt%) was found adequate for MRI analysis. This seems to be useful for further investigations especially in theranostic applications of magnetic emulsion.

  13. Polyol synthesis, functionalisation, and biocompatibility studies of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachani, Roxanne; Lowdell, Mark; Birchall, Martin; Hervault, Aziliz; Mertz, Damien; Begin-Colin, Sylvie; Thanh, Nguy&Ecirtil; N. Thi&Cmb. B. Dot; Kim

    2016-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) of low polydispersity were obtained through a simple polyol synthesis in high pressure and high temperature conditions. The control of the size and morphology of the nanoparticles was studied by varying the solvent used, the amount of iron precursor and the reaction time. Compared with conventional synthesis methods such as thermal decomposition or co-precipitation, this process yields nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distribution in a simple, reproducible and cost effective manner without the need for an inert atmosphere. For example, IONPs with a diameter of ca. 8 nm could be made in a reproducible manner and with good crystallinity as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis and high saturation magnetization value (84.5 emu g-1). The surface of the IONPs could be tailored post synthesis with two different ligands which provided functionality and stability in water and phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Their potential as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent was confirmed as they exhibited high r1 and r2 relaxivities of 7.95 mM-1 s-1 and 185.58 mM-1 s-1 respectively at 1.4 T. Biocompatibility and viability of IONPs in primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was studied and confirmed.Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) of low polydispersity were obtained through a simple polyol synthesis in high pressure and high temperature conditions. The control of the size and morphology of the nanoparticles was studied by varying the solvent used, the amount of iron precursor and the reaction time. Compared with conventional synthesis methods such as thermal decomposition or co-precipitation, this process yields nanoparticles with a narrow particle size distribution in a simple, reproducible and cost effective manner without the need for an inert atmosphere. For example, IONPs with a diameter of ca. 8 nm could be made in a reproducible manner and with good crystallinity as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis and high

  14. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dendritic polyglycerols as selective MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmeyer, Daniel; Stumpf, Patrick; Gröger, Dominic; Hofmann, Andreas; Enders, Sven; Riese, Sebastian B.; Dernedde, Jens; Taupitz, Matthias; Rauch, Ursula; Haag, Rainer; Rühl, Eckart; Graf, Christina

    2014-07-01

    Monodisperse small iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) or dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) are prepared. They are highly stable in aqueous solutions as well as physiological media. In particular, oleic acid capped iron oxide particles (core diameter = 11 +/- 1 nm) were modified by a ligand exchange process in a one pot synthesis with dPG and dPGS bearing phosphonate as anchor groups. Dynamic light scattering measurements performed in water and different biological media demonstrate that the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles is only slightly increased by the ligand exchange process resulting in a final diameter of less than 30 nm and that the particles are stable in these media. It is also revealed by magnetic resonance studies that their magnetic relaxivity is reduced by the surface modification but it is still sufficient for high contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Additionally, incubation of dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles with human umbilical vein endothelial cells showed a 50% survival at 85 nM (concentration of nanoparticles). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies demonstrate that the dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles inhibit L-selectin ligand binding whereas the particles containing only dPG do not show this effect. Experiments in a flow chamber with human myelogenous leukemia cells confirmed L-selectin inhibition of the dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and with that the L-selectin mediated leukocyte adhesion. These results indicate that dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles are a promising contrast agent for inflamed tissue probed by MRI.Monodisperse small iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) or dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) are prepared. They are highly stable in aqueous solutions as well as physiological media. In particular, oleic acid capped iron oxide particles (core diameter = 11 +/- 1 nm) were modified by a

  15. [Reflections around the performance of community health agents in oral health strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Holanda, Ana Larissa Fernandes; Barbosa, Aldenísia Alves de Albuquerque; Brito, Ewerton William Gomes

    2009-10-01

    The Community Health Agent (CHA) has traditionally been linked to doctors and nurses, being considered exclusive 'property' of these professionals. Historically, oral health tended to operate isolated, disconnecting the mouth from the rest of the body and the individual from his environment. The Family Health Program (FHP) points to important changes in the organization of services as well as in the work process. One of the differences is the teamwork joining different professionals, including oral health which was previously excluded. The objective of the study is to show the experience of the CHA qualifying course, which allowed the entrance of different professional categories into teaching. The course included three odontologists as lecturers, and CHA recognized other individuals as health team members, as well as expand the view of its role within oral health. The professors also had their practices modified, given that they could understand the often ignored suffering and limitations of the CHAs.

  16. Herbal oral gel induced contact stomatitis along with desquamative gingivitis due to a coloring agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Report of a rare case of contact stomatitis manifesting as irregular erosions partially covered with pseudomembrane along with desquamative gingivitis in a 32-year-old female patient is presented. The patient was otherwise healthy and not taking any medication. She gave the history of using curcumin-based oral gel 2 days back. Allergy test to curcumin oral gel was found to be positive, which on detailed allergy testing proved to be the coloring agent, erythrosine present in the gel. Contrary to the popular belief some folk medicine preparations can lead to unwanted side effects due to the antigenic potential of ingredients present in them. In addition, every clinician, during differential diagnosis of oral lesions must bear in mind unwanted reactions to any local ointment.

  17. Herbal oral gel induced contact stomatitis along with desquamative gingivitis due to a coloring agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baljeet; Sharma, Alka; Garg, Avnika

    2015-01-01

    Report of a rare case of contact stomatitis manifesting as irregular erosions partially covered with pseudomembrane along with desquamative gingivitis in a 32-year-old female patient is presented. The patient was otherwise healthy and not taking any medication. She gave the history of using curcumin-based oral gel 2 days back. Allergy test to curcumin oral gel was found to be positive, which on detailed allergy testing proved to be the coloring agent, erythrosine present in the gel. Contrary to the popular belief some folk medicine preparations can lead to unwanted side effects due to the antigenic potential of ingredients present in them. In addition, every clinician, during differential diagnosis of oral lesions must bear in mind unwanted reactions to any local ointment.

  18. Pharmacogenetics in type 2 diabetes: influence on response to oral hypoglycemic agents

    OpenAIRE

    Dawed AY; Zhou K.; Pearson ER

    2016-01-01

    Adem Yesuf Dawed, Kaixin Zhou, Ewan Robert Pearson  Division of Cardiovascular and Diabetes Medicine, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland, UK Abstract: Type 2 diabetes is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, consuming a significant proportion of public health spending. Oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) are the frontline treatment approaches after lifestyle changes. However, huge interindividual variation in response to OHAs resu...

  19. Biocompatible magnetite/gold nanohybrid contrast agents via green chemistry for MRI and CT bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sreeja; Sathy, Binulal N; Mony, Ullas; Koyakutty, Manzoor; Nair, Shantikumar V; Menon, Deepthy

    2012-01-01

    Magnetite/gold (Fe(3)O(4)/Au) hybrid nanoparticles were synthesized from a single iron precursor (ferric chloride) through a green chemistry route using grape seed proanthocyanidin as the reducing agent. Structural and physicochemical characterization proved the nanohybrid to be crystalline, with spherical morphology and size ~35 nm. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetization studies revealed that the Fe(3)O(4) component of the hybrid provided superparamagnetism, with dark T(2) contrast and high relaxivity (124.2 ± 3.02 mM(-1) s(-1)). Phantom computed tomographic imaging demonstrated good X-ray contrast, which can be attributed to the presence of the nanogold component in the hybrid. Considering the potential application of this bimodal nanoconstruct for stem cell tracking and imaging, we have conducted compatibility studies on human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs), wherein cell viability, apoptosis, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation due to the particle-cell interaction were asessed. It was noted that the material showed good biocompatibility even for high concentrations of 500 μg/mL and up to 48 h incubation, with no apoptotic signals or ROS generation. Cellular uptake of the nanomaterial was visualized using confocal microscopy and prussian blue staining. The presence of the nanohybrids were clearly visualized in the intracytoplasmic region of the cell, which is desirable for efficient imaging of stem cells in addition to the cytocompatible nature of the hybrids. Our work is a good demonstrative example of the use of green aqueous chemistry through the employment of phytochemicals for the room temperature synthesis of complex hybrid nanomaterials with multimodal functionalities.

  20. Magnetic protein microspheres as dynamic contrast agents for magnetomotive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Freddy T.; Dibbern, Elizabeth M.; Chaney, Eric J.; Oldenburg, Amy L.; Suslick, Kenneth S.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2008-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality that has been developed over the last 15 years. More recently, OCT has been used for the intraoperative imaging of tumor margins in breast cancer and axillary lymph nodes providing a real time in-vivo assessment of the tissue morphology. Traditional OCT images are limited by only being able to observe morphological structures. As diagnostic medicine continues to push for earlier detection, one must develop functional imaging modalities that would detect molecular information in-vivo allowing a real-time microscopic analysis of the tissue specimen. A novel modality of OCT called magnetomotive-OCT (MMOCT) has been developed by our group, employing an induced modulated magnetic field with a magnetic contrast agent to create the added contrast to structural OCT images. Modified protein microspheres with a BSA protein shell functionalized with RGD peptide sequences for targeting and an oil core have been designed and synthesized. Magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) and Nile Red dye have been encapsulated into its oil core. These microspheres have previously been demonstrated to target cancer cells by functionalizing them with a layer of RGD peptides and could be functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Preliminary results show that these magnetic microspheres, which are 2.0- 5.0 microns in size, are readily detectable under MM-OCT when embedded in a 5% agarose gel, in a 3-D scaffold of macrophage cells previously incubated with the microspheres, and when injected in-vivo into a tumor from an NMUcarcinogen rat animal model for breast cancer.

  1. Diagnostic utility of an echo-contrast agent in patients with synovitis using power Doppler ultrasound: a preliminary study with comparison to contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magarelli, N.; Tartaro, A.; Bonomo, L. [Istituto di Radiologia, Universita di Chieti (Italy); Guglielmi, G. [Istituto di Radiologia, IRCCS, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy); Di Matteo, L. [Istituto di Reumatologia, Pescara (Italy); Mattei, P.A. [Facolta di Medicina, Universita Chieti (Italy)

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to first evaluate Levovist (Schering, Berlin, Germany), an echo-contrast agent, during power Doppler sonography (PDS) in patients with synovitis using asymptomatic joints as controls. Then we evaluated the accuracy of this technique against contrast-enhanced MRI. Forty patients (19 men and 21 women; mean age 40 years) were enrolled on the basis of clinical signs, laboratory tests, and radiographic findings positive for articular inflammatory disease. They were examined with conventional ultrasonography (US) and PDS techniques before and after intravenous contrast medium injection. Fourteen patients then underwent MRI with and without contrast medium 8-14 days after PDS studies. Three expert readers independently evaluated each examination. After contrast medium, synovium in inflammatory arthritis enhanced on PDS compared with normal joints in the same patient. Power Doppler sonography after contrast medium and MRI were concordant in all cases. Power Doppler sonography with contrast medium showed a qualitative increase in signal from synovial vessels, the first sign of synovial changes in inflammatory diseases. (orig.)

  2. Use of oral anti-diabetic agents in pregnancy: A pragmatic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Kalra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin is the gold standard for treatment of hyperglycemia during pregnancy, when lifestyle measures do not maintain glycemic control during pregnancy. However, recent studies have suggested that certain oral hypoglycemic agents (metformin and glyburide may be safe and be acceptable alternatives. There are no serious safety concerns with metformin, despite it crossing the placenta. Neonatal outcomes are also comparable, with benefit of reductions in neonatal hypoglycemia, maternal hypoglycemia and weight gain, and improved treatment satisfaction. Glibenclamide is more effective in lowering blood glucose in women with gestational diabetes, and with a lower treatment failure rate than metformin. Although generally well-tolerated, some studies have reported higher rates of pre-eclampsia, neonatal jaundice, longer stay in the neonatal care unit, macrosomia, and neonatal hypoglycaemia. There is also paucity of long-term follow-up data on children exposed to oral agents in utero. This review aims to provide an evidence-based approach, concordant with basic and clinical pharmacological knowledge, which will help medical practitioners use oral anti-diabetic agents in a rational and pragmatic manner. Pubmed search was made using Medical Subject Headings (MESH terms "Diabetes" and "Pregnancy" and "Glyburide"; "Diabetes" and "Pregnancy" and "Metformin". Limits were randomized controlled trials (RCTs and meta-analysis. The expert reviews on the topic were also used for discussion. Additional information (studies/review pertaining to discussion under sub-headings like safety during breastfeeding; placental transport; long-term safety data were searched (pubmed/cross-references/expert reviews.

  3. Nonlinear Imaging of Microbubble Contrast Agent Using the Volterra Filter: In Vivo Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S

    2016-12-01

    A nonlinear filtering approach to imaging the dynamics of microbubble ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) in microvessels is presented. The approach is based on the adaptive third-order Volterra filter (TVF), which separates the linear, quadratic, and cubic components from beamformed pulse-echo ultrasound data. The TVF captures polynomial nonlinearities utilizing the full spectral components of the echo data and not from prespecified bands, e.g., second or third harmonics. This allows for imaging using broadband pulse transmission to preserve the axial resolution and the SNR. In this paper, we present the results from imaging the UCA activity in a 200- [Formula: see text] cellulose tube embedded in a tissue-mimicking phantom using a linear array diagnostic probe. The contrast enhancement was quantified by computing the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) for the different imaging components, i.e., B-mode, pulse inversion (PI), and the TVF components. The temporal mean and standard deviation of the CTR values were computed for all frames in a given data set. Quadratic and cubic images, referred to as QB-mode and CB-mode, produced higher mean CTR values than B-mode, which showed improved sensitivity. Compared with PI, they produced similar or higher mean CTR values with greater spatial specificity. We also report in vivo results from imaging UCA activity in an implanted LNCaP tumor with heterogeneous perfusion. The temporal means and standard deviations of the echogenicity were evaluated in small regions with different perfusion levels in the presence and absence of UCA. The in vivo measurements behaved consistently with the corresponding calculations obtained under microflow conditions in vitro. Specifically, the nonlinear VF components produced larger increases in the temporal mean and standard deviation values compared with B-mode in regions with low to relatively high perfusion. These results showed that polynomial filters such as the TVF can provide an important tool

  4. Mn-porphyrins as novel molecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraviev, Vladimir; Venkatraman, Talaignair N; Tovmasyan, Artak; Kimura, Masaki; Tsivian, Matvey; Mouravieva, Vladimira; Polascik, Tom J; Wang, Haichen; Amrhein, Timothy J; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Lascola, Christopher

    2011-11-03

    In this study, we investigated the potential of a new class of therapeutic Mn porphyrins as molecular MRI probes for prostate cancer imaging. Two compounds of different bioavailibility were investigated: Mn(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTE-2-PyP(5 +)) and Mn(III) mesotetrakis(N-n-hexylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTnHex-2-PyP(5 +)). These compounds have previously been shown to have adjunctive antineoplastic activity through their actions as powerful superoxide dismutase mimics, peroxynitrite scavengers, and modulators of cellular redox-based signaling pathways. Strong paramagnetic MRI contrast properties and affinity for cancer cells suggest their potential application as novel diagnostic imaging agents. MRI experiments were performed at 7.0T on a Bruker Biospec horizontal bore scanner. All in-vivo experiments were performed on 12 C57 black mice implanted with RM-9 prostate cancer cells on the hind limb. Two mg/kg of MnTnHex-2-PyP(5 +) (n = 6) and 8 mg/kg MnTE-2-PyP(5 +) (n = 6) were administered intraperitoneally 90 minutes before imaging. All the images were collected using a volume coil and processed using Paravision 4.0. Phantom studies reveal remarkably high T1 relaxivity changes for both metalloporphyrins, which are twofold to threefold higher than commercially available gadolinium chelates. Observable detection limits using conventional T1-weighted MRI are in the low micromolar range for both compounds. In vivo, MR relaxation changes in prostate tumor xenografts were readily observed after a single injection of either MnTE-2-PyP(5 +) or MnTnHex-2-PyP(5 +), with tumor contrast to background ratio greatest after MnTE-2-PyP(5 +) administration. After a single dose of MnTE-2-PyP(5 +), contrast changes in prostate tumors are up to sixfold greater than in surrounding, noncancerous tissues, suggesting the potential use of this metalloporphyrin as a novel diagnostic probe for detecting prostate malignancy using MRI.

  5. Efficient, Non-Iterative Estimator for Imaging Contrast Agents With Spectral X-Ray Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    An estimator to image contrast agents and body materials with x-ray spectral measurements is described. The estimator is usable with the three or more basis functions that are required to represent the attenuation coefficient of high atomic number materials. The estimator variance is equal to the Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) and it is unbiased. Its parameters are computed from measurements of a calibration phantom with the clinical x-ray system and it is non-iterative. The estimator is compared with an iterative maximum likelihood estimator. The estimator first computes a linearized maximum likelihood estimate of the line integrals of the basis set coefficients. Corrections for errors in the initial estimates are computed by interpolation with calibration phantom data. The final estimate is the initial estimate plus the correction. The performance of the estimator is measured using a Monte Carlo simulation. Random photon counting with pulse height analysis data are generated. The mean squared errors of the estimates are compared to the CRLB. The random data are also processed with an iterative maximum likelihood estimator. Previous implementations of iterative estimators required advanced physics instruments not usually available in clinical institutions. The estimator mean squared error is essentially equal to the CRLB. The estimator outputs are close to those of the iterative estimator but the computation time is approximately 180 times shorter. The estimator is efficient and has advantages over alternate approaches such as iterative estimators.

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Ion-Irradiated Nanodiamonds as Photoacoustic Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chia-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    Highly radiation-damaged or irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) are a new type of nanomaterial developed recently as a potential photoacoustic (PA) contrast agent for deep-tissue imaging. This work characterized in detail the photophysical properties of these materials prepared by ion irradiation of natural diamond powders using various spectroscopic methods. For 40-nm NDs irradiated with 40-keV He+ at a dose of 3 x 10(15) ions/cm2, an average molar extinction coefficient of 4.2 M-1 cm-1 per carbon atom was measured at 1064 nm. Compared with gold nanorods of similar dimensions (10 nm x 67 nm), the INDs have a substantially smaller (by > 4 orders of magnitude) molar extinction coefficient per particle. However, the deficit is readily compensated by the much higher thermal stability, stronger hydrophilic interaction with water, and a lower nanobubble formation threshold (~30 mJ/cm2) of the sp3-carbon-based nanomaterial. No sign of photodamage was detected after high-energy (>100 mJ/cm2) illumination of the INDs for hours. Cell viability assays at the IND concentration of up to 100 µg/mL showed that the nanomaterial is non-cytotoxic and potentially useful for long-term PA bioimaging applications.

  7. Physicochemical characterization of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIO) for biomedical application as MRI contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Mariagrazia; Sadun, Claudia; Port, Marc; Guilbert, Irene; Couvreur, Patrick; Dubernet, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles are maghemite or magnetite nanoparticles currently used as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging. The coatings surrounding the USPIO inorganic core play a major role in both the in vitro stability and, over all, USPIO's in vivo fate. Different physicochemical properties such as final size, surface charge and coating density are key factors in this respect. Up to now no precise structure--activity relationship has been described to predict entirely the USPIOs stability, as well as their pharmacokinetics and their safety. This review is focused on both the classical and the latest available techniques allowing a better insight in the magnetic core structure and the organic surface of these particles. Concurrently, this work clearly shows the difficulty to obtain a complete physicochemical characterization of USPIOs particles owing to their small dimensions, reaching the analytical resolution limits of many commercial instruments. An extended characterization is therefore necessary to improve the understanding of the properties of USPIOs when dispersed in an aqueous environment and to set the specifications and limits for their conception.

  8. PREPARATION OF POLYELECTROLYTE MULTILAYER COATED MICROBUBBLES FOR USE AS ULTRASOUND CONTRAST AGENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan-wen Xing; Heng-te Ke; Shao-qin Liu; Zhi-fei Dai; Jin-rui Wang; Ji-bin Liu

    2008-01-01

    Objective To prepare and characterize polyelectrolyte multilayer film coated microbubbles for use as ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) and evaluate its effects in ultrasonic imaging on normal rabbit's fiver parenchyma.Methoda Pcrfluorocarbon (PFC)-containing microbubbles (ST68-PFC) were prepared by sonication based on surfactant ( Span 60 and Tween 80). Subsequently, the resulting ST68-PFC microbnbbles were coated using oppositely charged polyclectrolytes by microbubble-templated layer-by-layer self-assembly technique via electrostatic interaction.The enhancement effects in ultrasonic imaging on normal rabbit's liver parenchyma were assessed.Results The obtained microbubbles exhibited a narrow size distribution. The polyelectrolytes were successfully assembled onto the surface of ST68-PFC microbubbles. In vivo experiment showed that polyelectrolyte multilayer film coated UCA effectively enhanced the imaging of rabbit's liver parenchyma.Conclnsions The novel microbubbles UCA coated with polyelectrolyte multilayer, when enabled more function,has no obvious difference in enhancement effects compared with the pre-modified microbnbbles. The polymers with chemically active groups ( such as amino group and carboxyl group) can be used as the outermost layer for attachment of targeting ligands onto microbubbles, allowing selective targeting of the microbubbles to combine with desired sites.

  9. Yeast Cell Trapping In Ultrasonic Wave Field Using Ultrasonic Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Koitabashi, Yusuke; Nakajima, Naritsugu; Miwa, Takashi

    2006-05-01

    Microobject manipulation using ultrasonic waves is expected to play important roles in constructing future drug or gene delivery systems. The acoustic radiation force, which is applied to microobjects, traps the objects at the desired position. A microjet, which is produced by bubble explosion under high-intensity ultrasonic waves, creates microholes through the cell membrane (sonoporation), which is considered as a sophisticated method of improving the doses of drugs or genes injected into a tissue. Aiming at increasing the trapping force in micro bubble manipulation using ultrasonic waves, we have proposed a novel method based on the self-organization of microbubbles. This method uses seed bubbles in order to trap the target bubbles. In this study, the proposed method is applied to yeast cell trapping using ultrasonic waves. An ultrasonic wave contrast agent (Levovist; Shering A.G., Germany) is used as a seed bubble. It is shown that the number of trapped yeast cells depends on the preparation of the yeast cells. In order to evaluate the result, two additional experiments are carried out by changing the internal gas of the seed bubbles and by using bubbles with a polymer shell.

  10. Rupture threshold characterization of polymer-shelled ultrasound contrast agents subjected to static overpressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Lee, Paul; Mamou, Jonathan; Allen, John S.; Böhmer, Marcel; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2011-04-01

    Polymer-shelled micro-bubbles are employed as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and vesicles for targeted drug delivery. UCA-based delivery of the therapeutic payload relies on ultrasound-induced shell rupture. The fragility of two polymer-shelled UCAs manufactured by Point Biomedical or Philips Research was investigated by characterizing their response to static overpressure. The nominal diameters of Point and Philips UCAs were 3 μm and 2 μm, respectively. The UCAs were subjected to static overpressure in a glycerol-filled test chamber with a microscope-reticule lid. UCAs were reconstituted in 0.1 mL of water and added over the glycerol surface in contact with the reticule. A video-microscope imaged UCAs as glycerol was injected (5 mL/h) to vary the pressure from 2 to 180 kPa over 1 h. Neither UCA population responded to overpressure until the rupture threshold was exceeded, which resulted in abrupt destruction. The rupture data for both UCAs indicated three subclasses that exhibited different rupture behavior, although their mean diameters were not statistically different. The rupture pressures provided a measure of UCA fragility; the Philips UCAs were more resilient than Point UCAs. Results were compared to theoretical models of spherical shells under compression. Observed variations in rupture pressures are attributed to shell imperfections. These results may provide means to optimize polymeric UCAs for drug delivery and elucidate associated mechanisms.

  11. Self-Assembled Polyelectrolyte Nanoparticles as Fluorophore-Free Contrast Agents for Multicolor Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Hye Shin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe the fabrication of self-assembled polyelectrolyte nanoparticles that provide a multicolor optical imaging modality. Poly(γ-glutamic acid(γ-PGA formed self-assembled nanoparticles through electrostatic interactions with two different cationic polymers: poly(L-lysine(PLL and chitosan. The self-assembled γ-PGA/PLL and γ-PGA/chitosan nanoparticles were crosslinked by glutaraldehyde. Crosslinking of the ionic self-assembled nanoparticles with glutaraldehyde not only stabilized the nanoparticles but also generated a strong autofluorescence signal. Fluorescent Schiff base bonds (C=N and double bonds (C=C were generated simultaneously by crosslinking of the amine moiety of the cationic polyelectrolytes with monomeric glutaraldehyde or with polymeric glutaraldehyde. The unique optical properties of the nanoparticles that resulted from the crosslinking by glutaraldehyde were analyzed using UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. We observed that the fluorescence intensity of the nanoparticles could be regulated by adjusting the crosslinker concentration and the reaction time. The nanoparticles also exhibited high performance in the labeling and monitoring of therapeutic immune cells (macrophages and dendritic cells. These self-assembled nanoparticles are expected to be a promising multicolor optical imaging contrast agent for the labeling, detection, and monitoring of cells.

  12. 1,2-hydroxypyridonates as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging: TREN-1,2-HOPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocher, Christoph J; Moore, Evan G; Xu, Jide; Avedano, Stefano; Botta, Mauro; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2007-10-29

    1,2-Hydroxypyridinones (1,2-HOPO) form very stable lanthanide complexes that may be useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray diffraction of single crystals established that the solid-state structures of the Eu(III) and the previously reported [Inorg. Chem. 2004, 43, 5452] Gd(III) complex are identical. The recently discovered sensitizing properties of 1,2-HOPO chelates for Eu(III) luminescence [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 10 067] allow for direct measurement of the number of water molecules coordinated to the metal center. Fluorescence measurements of the Eu(III) complex corroborate that, in solution, two water molecules coordinate the lanthanide (q = 2) as proposed from the analysis of NMRD profiles. In addition, fluorescence measurements have verified the anion binding interactions of lanthanide TREN-1,2-HOPO complexes in solution, studied by relaxivity, revealing only very weak oxalate binding (KA = 82.7 +/- 6.5 M-1). Solution thermodynamic studies of the metal complex and free ligand have been carried out using potentiometry, spectrophotometry, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The metal ion selectivity of TREN-1,2-HOPO supports the feasibility of using 1,2-HOPO ligands for selective lanthanide binding [pGd = 19.3 (2), pZn = 15.2 (2), pCa = 8.8 (3)].

  13. A contrast study on different gasifying agents of underground coal gasification at Huating Coal Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zuo-tang; HUANG Wen-gang; ZHANG Peng; XIN Lin

    2011-01-01

    To optimize the technological parameter of underground coal gasification (UCG), the experimental results of air gasification, air-steam gasification, oxygen-enrichment steam gasification, pure oxygen steam gasification and two-stage gasification were studied contrastively based on field trial at the Huating UCG project. The results indicate that the average low heat value of gas from air experiment is the lowest (4.1 MJ/Nm3) and the water gas from two-stage gasification experiment is the highest (10.72 MJ/Nm3). The gas productivity of air gasification is the highest and the pure oxygen steam gasification is the lowest. The gasification efficiency of air gasification, air-steam gasification, oxygen-enriched steam gasification, pure oxygen steam gasification and two-stage gasification is listed in ascending order, ranging from 69.88% to 84.81%. Described a contract study on results of a field test using steam and various levels of oxygen enrichment of 21%, 32%, 42% and 100%. The results show that, with the increasing of O2 content in gasifying agents, the gas caloricity rises, and the optimal O2 concentration range to increase the gas caloricity is 30%~40%. Meanwhile, the consumption of O2 and steam increase, and the air consumption and steam decomposition efficiency fall.

  14. Comparison of Folate Receptor Targeted Optical Contrast Agents for Intraoperative Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth De Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intraoperative imaging can identify cancer cells in order to improve resection; thus fluorescent contrast agents have emerged. Our objective was to do a preclinical comparison of two fluorescent dyes, EC17 and OTL38, which both target folate receptor but have different fluorochromes. Materials. HeLa and KB cells lines were used for in vitro and in vivo comparisons of EC17 and OTL38 brightness, sensitivity, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution. In vivo experiments were then performed in mice. Results. The peak excitation and emission wavelengths of EC17 and OTL38 were 470/520 nm and 774/794 nm, respectively. In vitro, OTL38 required increased incubation time compared to EC17 for maximum fluorescence; however, peak signal-to-background ratio (SBR was 1.4-fold higher compared to EC17 within 60 minutes (p<0.001. Additionally, the SBR for detecting smaller quantity of cells was improved with OTL38. In vivo, the mean improvement in SBR of tumors visualized using OTL38 compared to EC17 was 3.3 fold (range 1.48–5.43. Neither dye caused noticeable toxicity in animal studies. Conclusions. In preclinical testing, OTL38 appears to have superior sensitivity and brightness compared to EC17. This coincides with the accepted belief that near infrared (NIR dyes tend to have less autofluorescence and scattering issues than visible wavelength fluorochromes.

  15. Use of intravital microscopy to study the microvascular behavior of microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michel; Broillet, Anne; Tardy, Isabelle; Pochon, Sibylle; Bussat, Philippe; Bettinger, Thierry; Helbert, Alexandre; Costa, Maria; Tranquart, François

    2012-04-01

    The study describes the use of intravital microscopy (IVM) to assess the behavior of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), including targeted UCAs, in the microcirculation of rodents. IVM was performed on various exteriorized organs: hamster cheek pouch, rat mesentery, liver, spinotrapezius muscle, and mouse cremaster muscle. A dorsal skin-fold chamber with MatBIII tumor cells was also implanted in rats. Nontargeted UCAs (SonoVue(®) and BR14) and targeted UCAs (BR55 and P-selectin targeted microbubbles) were tested. IVM was used to measure microbubble size, determine their persistence, and observe their behavior in the blood circulation. Intravenous and intra-arterial injections of high doses of UCAs did not modify the local microvascular hemodynamics. No microbubble coalescence and no increased size were observed. Adhesion of some microbubbles to leukocytes was observed in various microcirculation models. Microbubbles are captured by Kupffer cells in the liver. Targeted microbubbles were shown to adhere specifically to endothelial receptors without compromising local blood flow. These results support the safety of both targeted and nontargeted UCAs as no microvascular flow alteration or plugging of microvessels were observed. They confirm that binding observed with targeted microbubbles are due to the binding of these microbubbles to specific endothelial receptors. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. In vivo dentate nucleus MRI relaxometry correlates with previous administration of Gadolinium-based contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, Enrico; Canna, Antonietta; Cocozza, Sirio; Russo, Carmela; Angelini, Valentina; Brunetti, Arturo [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Neuroradiology, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Palma, Giuseppe; Quarantelli, Mario [National Research Council, Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Borrelli, Pasquale; Salvatore, Marco [IRCCS SDN, Naples (Italy); Lanzillo, Roberta; Postiglione, Emanuela; Morra, Vincenzo Brescia [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate changes in T1 and T2* relaxometry of dentate nuclei (DN) with respect to the number of previous administrations of Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA). In 74 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) patients with variable disease duration (9.8±6.8 years) and severity (Expanded Disability Status Scale scores:3.1±0.9), the DN R1 (1/T1) and R2* (1/T2*) relaxation rates were measured using two unenhanced 3D Dual-Echo spoiled Gradient-Echo sequences with different flip angles. Correlations of the number of previous GBCA administrations with DN R1 and R2* relaxation rates were tested, including gender and age effect, in a multivariate regression analysis. The DN R1 (normalized by brainstem) significantly correlated with the number of GBCA administrations (p<0.001), maintaining the same significance even when including MS-related factors. Instead, the DN R2* values correlated only with age (p=0.003), and not with GBCA administrations (p=0.67). In a subgroup of 35 patients for whom the administered GBCA subtype was known, the effect of GBCA on DN R1 appeared mainly related to linear GBCA. In RR-MS patients, the number of previous GBCA administrations correlates with R1 relaxation rates of DN, while R2* values remain unaffected, suggesting that T1-shortening in these patients is related to the amount of Gadolinium given. (orig.)

  17. Angiographic CT with intravenous contrast agent application for monitoring of intracranial flow diverting stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saake, Marc; Struffert, Tobias; Goelitz, Philipp; Ott, Sabine; Doerfler, Arnd [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany); Seifert, Frank [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurology, Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, Oliver [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Intracranial flow diverting devices are increasingly used to treat cerebral aneurysms. A reliable, non-invasive follow-up modality would be desirable. Our aim was to compare intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (ia DSA) to angiographic computed tomography with intravenous contrast agent application (iv ACT) in the visualisation of flow diverting devices and aneurysm lumina. Follow-up monitoring by iv ACT (n = 36) and ia DSA (n = 25) in 14 patients treated with flow diverting devices for intracranial aneurysms was evaluated retrospectively. Images were evaluated by two neuroradiologists in anonymous consensus reading regarding the device deployment, wall apposition, neck coverage of the aneurysm, opacification of the vessel and device lumen, as well as the degree of aneurysm occlusion. Corresponding ia DSA and iv ACT images were scored identically in all patients regarding the stent deployment, wall apposition and neck coverage, as well as the degree of aneurysm occlusion and patency status of the device and parent artery. Opacification of the parent vessel lumen and perfused parts of the aneurysm was considered slightly inferior for iv ACT in comparison with ia DSA (seven of 36 cases), without impact on diagnosis. We demonstrated the feasibility and diagnostic value of iv ACT in follow-up imaging of intracranial flow diverting devices. Due to its high spatial resolution and non-invasive character, this novel technique might become a valuable imaging modality in these patients. (orig.)

  18. Aptamer-conjugated Magnetic Nanoparticles as Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtkar, Mohammad; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Khoshfetrat, Seyyed Mehdi; Mehrgardi, Masoud A.; Aghaei, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of breast cancer is the most effective way to improve the survival rate in women. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers high spatial resolution and good anatomic details, and its lower sensitivity can be improved by using targeted molecular imaging. In this study, AS1411 aptamer was conjugated to Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles for specific targeting of mouse mammary carcinoma (4T1) cells that overexpress nucleolin. In vitro cytotoxicity of aptamer-conjugated nanoparticles was assessed on 4T1 and HFFF-PI6 (control) cells. The ability of the synthesized nanoprobe to target specifically the nucleolin overexpressed cells was assessed with the MRI technique. Results show that the synthesized nanoprobe produced strongly darkened T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images with 4T1 cells, whereas the MR images of HFFF-PI6 cells incubated with the nanoprobe are brighter, showing small changes compared to water. The results demonstrate that in a Fe concentration of 45 μg/mL, the nanoprobe reduced by 90% MR image intensity in 4T1 cells compared with the 27% reduction in HFFF-PI6 cells. Analysis of MR signal intensity showed statistically significant signal intensity difference between 4T1 and HFFF-PI6 cells treated with the nanoprobe. MRI experiments demonstrate the high potential of the synthesized nanoprobe as a specific MRI contrast agent for detection of nucleolin-expressing breast cancer cells. PMID:28028501

  19. Angiographic CT with intravenous contrast agent application for monitoring of intracranial flow diverting stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saake, Marc; Struffert, Tobias; Goelitz, Philipp; Ott, Sabine; Seifert, Frank; Ganslandt, Oliver; Doerfler, Arnd

    2012-07-01

    Intracranial flow diverting devices are increasingly used to treat cerebral aneurysms. A reliable, non-invasive follow-up modality would be desirable. Our aim was to compare intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (ia DSA) to angiographic computed tomography with intravenous contrast agent application (iv ACT) in the visualisation of flow diverting devices and aneurysm lumina. Follow-up monitoring by iv ACT (n = 36) and ia DSA (n = 25) in 14 patients treated with flow diverting devices for intracranial aneurysms was evaluated retrospectively. Images were evaluated by two neuroradiologists in anonymous consensus reading regarding the device deployment, wall apposition, neck coverage of the aneurysm, opacification of the vessel and device lumen, as well as the degree of aneurysm occlusion. Corresponding ia DSA and iv ACT images were scored identically in all patients regarding the stent deployment, wall apposition and neck coverage, as well as the degree of aneurysm occlusion and patency status of the device and parent artery. Opacification of the parent vessel lumen and perfused parts of the aneurysm was considered slightly inferior for iv ACT in comparison with ia DSA (seven of 36 cases), without impact on diagnosis. We demonstrated the feasibility and diagnostic value of iv ACT in follow-up imaging of intracranial flow diverting devices. Due to its high spatial resolution and non-invasive character, this novel technique might become a valuable imaging modality in these patients.

  20. High-frequency subharmonic pulsed-wave Doppler and color flow imaging of microbubble contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, A; Goertz, D E; Karshafian, R; Cherin, E; Brown, A S; Burns, P N; Foster, F S

    2008-07-01

    A recent study has shown the feasibility of subharmonic (SH) flow imaging at a transmit frequency of 20 MHz. This paper builds on these results by examining the performance of SH flow imaging as a function of transmit pressure. Further, we also investigate the feasibility of SH pulsed-wave Doppler (PWD) imaging. In vitro flow experiments were performed with a 1-mm-diameter wall-less vessel cryogel phantom using the ultrasound contrast agent Definity and an imaging frequency of 20 MHz. The phantom results show that there is an identifiable pressure range where accurate flow velocity and power estimates can be made with SH imaging at 10 MHz (SH10), above which velocity estimates are biased by radiation force effects and unstable bubble behavior, and below which velocity and power estimates are degraded by poor SNR. In vivo validation of SH PWD was performed in an arteriole of a rabbit ear, and blood velocity estimates compared well with fundamental (F20) mode PWD. The ability to suppress tissue signals using SH signals may enable the use of higher frame rates and improve sensitivity to microvascular flow or slow velocities near large vessel walls by reducing or eliminating the need for clutter filters.

  1. Streaming flow from ultrasound contrast agents by acoustic waves in a blood vessel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunjin; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2015-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of streaming flow on ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-assisted drug delivery, streaming velocity fields from sonicated UCA microbubbles were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a blood vessel model. At the beginning of ultrasound sonication, the UCA bubbles formed clusters and translated in the direction of the ultrasound field. Bubble cluster formation and translation were faster with 2.25MHz sonication, a frequency close to the resonance frequency of the UCA. Translation of bubble clusters induced streaming jet flow that impinged on the vessel wall, forming symmetric vortices. The maximum streaming velocity was about 60mm/s at 2.25MHz and decreased to 15mm/s at 1.0MHz for the same acoustic pressure amplitude. The effect of the ultrasound frequency on wall shear stress was more noticeable. Maximum wall shear stress decreased from 0.84 to 0.1Pa as the ultrasound frequency decreased from 2.25 to 1.0MHz. The maximum spatial gradient of the wall shear stress also decreased from 1.0 to 0.1Pa/mm. This study showed that streaming flow was induced by bubble cluster formation and translation and was stronger upon sonication by an acoustic wave with a frequency near the UCA resonance frequency. Therefore, the secondary radiant force, which is much stronger at the resonance frequency, should play an important role in UCA-assisted drug delivery.

  2. Quantitative myocardial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging: the impact of pulsatile flow on contrast agent bolus dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graafen, Dirk; Hamer, Julia; Weber, Stefan; Schreiber, Laura M, E-mail: graafen@uni-mainz.de [Section of Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Medical Center, Mainz (Germany)

    2011-08-21

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) can be quantified using T{sub 1}-weighted first-pass magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with a tracer-kinetic model, like MMID4. This procedure requires the knowledge of an arterial input function which is usually estimated from the left ventricle (LV). Dispersion of the contrast agent bolus may occur between the LV and the tissue of interest. The aim of this study was to investigate the dispersion under conditions of physiological pulsatile blood flow, and to simulate its effect on MBF quantification. The dispersion was simulated in coronary arteries using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. Simulations were accomplished on straight vessels with stenosis of different degrees and shapes. The results show that dispersion is more pronounced under resting conditions than during hyperemia. Stenosis leads to a reduction of dispersion. In consequence, dispersion results in a systematic MBF underestimation between -0.4% and -9.3%. The relative MBF error depends not only on the dispersion but also on the actual MBF itself. Since MBF under rest is more underestimated than under stress, myocardial perfusion reserve is overestimated between 0.1% and 4.5%. Considering other sources of errors in myocardial perfusion MRI, systematic errors of MBF by bolus dispersion are relatively small.

  3. An evaluation of the use of oral contrast media in abdominopelvic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttigieg, Erica Lauren; Cortis, Kelvin; Galea Soler, Sandro [Mater Dei Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Msida (Malta); Borg Grima, Karen; Zarb, Francis [Mater Dei Hospital, Faculty of Health Sciences, Msida (Malta)

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of different oral contrast media (OCM) for abdominopelvic CT examinations performed for follow-up general oncological indications. The objectives were to establish anatomical image quality criteria for abdominopelvic CT; use these criteria to evaluate and compare image quality using positive OCM, neutral OCM and no OCM; and evaluate possible benefits for the medical imaging department. Forty-six adult patients attending a follow-up abdominopelvic CT for general oncological indications and who had a previous abdominopelvic CT with positive OCM (n = 46) were recruited and prospectively placed into either the water (n = 25) or no OCM (n = 21) group. Three radiologists performed absolute visual grading analysis (VGA) to assess image quality by grading the fulfilment of 24 anatomical image quality criteria. Visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis of the data showed comparable image quality with regards to reproduction of abdominal structures, bowel discrimination, presence of artefacts, and visualization of the amount of intra-abdominal fat for the three OCM protocols. All three OCM protocols provided similar image quality for follow-up abdominopelvic CT for general oncological indications. (orig.)

  4. Fabrication and evaluation of tumor-targeted positive MRI contrast agent based on ultrasmall MnO nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haitao; Yue, Tao; Xu, Ke; Golzarian, Jafar; Yu, Jiahui; Huang, Jin

    2015-07-01

    Gd(III) chelate is currently used as positive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in clinical diagnosis, but generally induces the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) due to the dissociated Gd(3+) from Gd(III) chelates. To develop a novel positive MRI contrast agent with low toxicity and high sensitivity, ultrasmall MnO nanoparticles were PEGylated via catechol-Mn chelation and conjugated with cRGD as active targeting function to tumor. Particularly, the MnO nanoparticles with a size of ca. 5nm were modified by α,β-poly(aspartic acid)-based graft polymer containing PEG and DOPA moieties and, meanwhile, conjugated with cRGD to produce the contrast agent with a size of ca. 100nm and a longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of 10.2mM(-1)S(-1). Such nanoscaled contrast agent integrated passive- and active-targeting function to tumor, and its efficient accumulation behavior in tumor was verified by in vivo distribution study. At the same time, the PEG moiety played a role of hydrophilic coating to improve the biocompatibility and stability under storing and physiological conditions, and especially might guarantee enough circulation time in blood. Moreover, in vivo MRI revealed a good and long-term effect of enhancing MRI signal for as-fabricated contrast agent while cell viability assay proved its acceptable cytotoxicity for MRI application. On the whole, the as-fabricated PEGylated and cRGD-functionalized contrast agent based on ultrasmall MnO nanoparticles showed a great potential to the T1-weighted MRI diagnosis of tumor.

  5. Highly biocompatible TiO₂:Gd³⁺ nano-contrast agent with enhanced longitudinal relaxivity for targeted cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Sasidharan, Abhilash; Ashokan, Anusha; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-10-05

    We report the development of a novel magnetic nano-contrast agent (nano-CA) based on Gd(3+) doped amorphous TiO(2) of size ∼25 nm, exhibiting enhanced longitudinal relaxivity (r(1)) and magnetic resonance (MR) contrasting together with excellent biocompatibility. Quantitative T1 mapping of phantom samples using a 1.5 T clinical MR imaging system revealed that the amorphous phase of doped titania has the highest r(1) relaxivity which is ∼2.5 fold higher than the commercially used CA Magnevist™. The crystalline (anatase) samples formed by air annealing at 250 °C and 500 °C showed significant reduction in r(1) values and MR contrast, which is attributed to the loss of proton-exchange contribution from the adsorbed water and atomic re-arrangement of Gd(3+) ions in the crystalline host lattice. Nanotoxicity studies including cell viability, plasma membrane integrity, reactive oxygen stress and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, performed on human primary endothelial cells (HUVEC), human blood derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and nasopharyngeal epidermoid carcinoma (KB) cell line showed excellent biocompatibility up to relatively higher doses of 200 μg ml(-1). The potential of this nano-CA to cause hemolysis, platelet aggregation and plasma coagulation were studied using human peripheral blood samples and found no adverse effects, illustrating the possibility of the safe intravenous administration of these agents for human applications. Furthermore, the ability of these agents to specifically detect cancer cells by targeting molecular receptors on the cell membrane was demonstrated on folate receptor (FR) positive oral carcinoma (KB) cells, where the folic acid conjugated nano-CA showed receptor specific accumulation on cell membrane while leaving the normal fibroblast cells (L929) unstained. This study reveals that the Gd(3+) doped amorphous TiO(2) nanoparticles having enhanced magnetic resonance contrast and high biocompatibility is a

  6. Boron nitride nanotubes for boron neutron capture therapy as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menichetti, L., E-mail: luca.menichetti@ifc.cnr.it [CNR-National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Clinical Physiology, via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); De Marchi, D. [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio per la Ricerca Medica e la Sanita Pubblica, CNR-Regione Toscana, via Trieste 41, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Calucci, L. [CNR-National Research Council of Italy, ICCOM-Institute of OrganoMetallic Chemistry, via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ciofani, G.; Menciassi, A. [Italian Institute of Technology c/o Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, viale R. Piaggio 34, 56025 Pontedera (Italy); Forte, C. [CNR-National Research Council of Italy, ICCOM-Institute of OrganoMetallic Chemistry, via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    The applicability of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) containing Fe paramagnetic impurities as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated. The measurement of longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of water protons in homogeneous aqueous dispersions of BNNTs wrapped with poly(L-lysine) at different concentrations allowed longitudinal (r{sub 1}) and transverse (r{sub 2}) relaxivities to be determined at 3 T. The r{sub 2} value was comparable to those of commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, indicating that Fe-containing BNNTs have the potential to be used as T{sub 2} contrast-enhancement agents in MRI at 3 T.

  7. In vivo detection of cucurbit[6]uril, a hyperpolarized xenon contrast agent for a xenon magnetic resonance imaging biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hane, Francis T.; Li, Tao; Smylie, Peter; Pellizzari, Raiili M.; Plata, Jennifer A.; DeBoef, Brenton; Albert, Mitchell S.

    2017-01-01

    The Hyperpolarized gas Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (HyperCEST) Magnetic Resonance (MR) technique has the potential to increase the sensitivity of a hyperpolarized xenon-129 MRI contrast agent. Signal enhancement is accomplished by selectively depolarizing the xenon within a cage molecule which, upon exchange, reduces the signal in the dissolved phase pool. Herein we demonstrate the in vivo detection of the cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) contrast agent within the vasculature of a living rat. Our work may be used as a stepping stone towards using the HyperCEST technique as a molecular imaging modality. PMID:28106110

  8. Difficult to swallow: issues affecting optimal adherence to oral anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Winson Y

    2013-01-01

    The number of anticancer drugs currently available in oral formulation has increased dramatically over the past 15 to 20 years, especially with the recent development of new hormonal and targeted therapies. At present, approximately 25% of all cancer drugs are available in oral formulation, with numbers expected to increase exponentially in the coming years. The convenience associated with the self-administration of oral therapy, the requirement of fewer trips to the physician's office, and the lack of infusion reactions are all benefits for patients, allowing them to potentially maintain their relative independence while undergoing active anticancer treatment. On the other hand, there are growing concerns regarding patients' poor adherence to oral therapy as well as the challenges of monitoring patient compliance when treatment administration does not occur in the presence of health care professional (HCPs). More importantly, poor adherence to proven therapies may detrimentally affect the patients' clinical outcomes, such as survival. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify more effective strategies to measure and monitor adherence to oral anticancer agents in an effort to maximize their therapeutic benefits.

  9. Methylene blue microbubbles as a model dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound and activatable photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mansik; Song, Wentao; Huynh, Elizabeth; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Jeesu; Helfield, Brandon L; Leung, Ben Y C; Goertz, David E; Zheng, Gang; Oh, Jungtaek; Lovell, Jonathan F; Kim, Chulhong

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging are highly complementary modalities since both use ultrasonic detection for operation. Increasingly, photoacoustic and ultrasound have been integrated in terms of hardware instrumentation. To generate a broadly accessible dual-modality contrast agent, we generated microbubbles (a standard ultrasound contrast agent) in a solution of methylene blue (a standard photoacoustic dye). This MB2 solution was formed effectively and was optimized as a dual-modality contrast solution. As microbubble concentration increased (with methylene blue concentration constant), photoacoustic signal was attenuated in the MB2 solution. When methylene blue concentration increased (with microbubble concentration held constant), no ultrasonic interference was observed. Using an MB2 solution that strongly attenuated all photoacoustic signal, high powered ultrasound could be used to burst the microbubbles and dramatically enhance photoacoustic contrast (>800-fold increase), providing a new method for spatiotemporal control of photoacoustic signal generation.

  10. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriac, L. B.; Trandafir, D. L.; Turcu, R. V. F.; Todea, M.; Simon, S.

    2016-11-01

    The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, 29Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T1 and RARE-T2 protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T2-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  11. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: a multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Mukundan, Ananya; Xie, Zhixing; Karamchand, Leshern; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-11-07

    Here, we present a new optical contrast agent based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside of a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside of a polymer cladding so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer-coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting an F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90% following the nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NPs can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities for broadband multimodal imaging that are usable for diagnostic applications and that extend into use as therapeutic agents as well.

  12. Biocompatible Low-Retention Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoclusters as Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Liver Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yushuang; Liao, Rufang; Liu, Haijuan; Li, Huan; Xu, Haibo; Zhou, Qibing

    2015-05-01

    Although superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have been developed as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), acute iron overload due to the persistently high retention of SPIOs in the liver and spleen that are slowly converted to ferroproteins is a serious safety concern. Here, we report that the addition of poly-L-lysine polymers to an SPIO hydroxyethyl starch solution produced tightly controlled, monodispersed nanoparticles in a size-dependent manner as effective contrast agents for the MRI of liver tumors. High MRI contrast was demonstrated with an orthotopic liver tumor model at a low injection dose. Simultaneously, rapid bioclearance of excess iron in the lung and spleen and in blood serum was observed within 24 h post-injection. The full excretion of excess iron was confirmed in urine post-intravenous injection, suggesting that the effective clearance of SPIOs could be achieved with our SPIO nanoclusters as a liver imaging contrast agent to resolve acute iron overload in the clinical usage of SPIOs as a contrast agent.

  13. Highly stable polymer coated nano-clustered silver plates: a multimodal optical contrast agent for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Mukundan, Ananya; Xie, Zhixing; Karamchand, Leshern; Wang, Xueding; Kopelman, Raoul

    2014-11-01

    Here, we present a new optical contrast agent based on silver nanoplate clusters embedded inside of a polymer nano matrix. Unlike nanosphere clusters, which have been well studied, nanoplate clusters have unique properties due to the different possible orientations of interaction between the individual plates, resulting in a significant broadening of the absorption spectra. These nanoclusters were immobilized inside of a polymer cladding so as to maintain their stability and optical properties under in vivo conditions. The polymer-coated silver nanoplate clusters show a lower toxicity compared to the uncoated nanoparticles. At high nanoparticle concentrations, cell death occurs mostly due to apoptosis. These nanoparticles were used for targeted fluorescence imaging in a rat glioma cell line by incorporating a fluorescent dye into the matrix, followed by conjugation of a tumor targeting an F3 peptide. We further used these nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrast agents in vivo to enhance the contrast of the vasculature structures in a rat ear model. We observed a contrast enhancement of over 90% following the nanoparticle injection. It is also shown that these NPs can serve as efficient contrast agents, with specific targeting abilities for broadband multimodal imaging that are usable for diagnostic applications and that extend into use as therapeutic agents as well.

  14. Gadolinium Contrast Agent is of Limited Value for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Synovial Hypertrophy in Hemophiliacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundin, B.; Berntorp, E.; Pettersson, H.; Wirestam, R.; Jonsson, K.; Staahlberg, F.; Ljung, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ Hospital of Lund, Lund (Sweden)

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To examine the influence of different doses of gadolinium contrast agent on synovial enhancement, to compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of synovial hypertrophy and radiographic joint changes in hemophiliacs, and to investigate the value of gadolinium in MRI assessment of synovial hypertrophy in hemophiliacs using dynamic MRI and MRI scoring. Material and Methods: Twenty-one hemophiliacs on prophylactic factor treatment without recent bleeds were subjected to radiography and gadolinium contrast-enhanced dynamic and static MRI of the knee using a standard dose of 0.1 mmol/kg b.w. gadoteridol. In 17 of the patients, the MRI procedure was repeated after a triple dose of gadoteridol. Results: MRI findings of synovial hypertrophy were significantly correlated with Pettersson radiographic scores. In 19 of the 21 MRI investigated joints, administration of contrast agent did not alter the result of the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy. Conclusion: The optimal time interval for volume assessment of synovial hypertrophy after injection of gadolinium contrast agent is dose dependent. Hemophiliacs without recent bleeds have minor to abundant synovial hypertrophy in joints with pronounced radiographic changes. Dynamic MRI is not useful for evaluating hemophilic arthropathy, and gadolinium contrast agent is not routinely indicated for MRI scoring of joints in hemophiliacs.

  15. Is the transport of a gadolinium-based contrast agent decreased in a degenerated or aged disc? A post contrast MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tibiletti

    Full Text Available A post contrast magnetic resonance imaging study has been performed in a wide population of low back pain patients to investigate which radiological and phenotypic characteristics influence the penetration of the contrast agent in lumbar discs in vivo. 37 patients affected by different pathologies (disc herniation, spondylolisthesis, foraminal stenosis, central canal stenosis were enrolled in the study. The selected population included 26 male and 11 female subjects, with a mean age of 42.4 ± 9.3 years (range 18-60. Magnetic resonance images of the lumbar spine were obtained with a 1.5 T scanner (Avanto, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany with a phased-array back coil. A paramagnetic non-ionic contrast agent was injected with a dose of 0.4 ml/kg. T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were subsequently acquired at 5 time points, 5 and 10 minutes, 2, 4 and 6 hours after injection. Endplates presented clear enhancement already 5 minutes after injection, and showed an increase in the next 2 hours followed by a decrease. At 5 and 10 minutes, virtually no contrast medium was present inside the intervertebral disc; afterwards, enhancement significantly increased. Highly degenerated discs showed higher enhancement in comparison with low and medium degenerated discs. Discs classified as Pfirrmann 5 showed a statistically significant higher enhancement than Pfirrmann 1, 2 and 3 at all time points but the first one, possibly due to vascularization. Disc height collapse and Modic changes significantly increased enhancement. Presence of endplate defects did not show any significant influence on post contrast enhancement, but the lack of a clear classification of endplate defects as seen on magnetic resonance scans may be shadowing some effects. In conclusion, disc height, high level of degeneration and presence of Modic changes are factors which increase post contrast enhancement in the intervertebral disc. The effect of age could not be demonstrated.

  16. Brain tumours at 7T MRI compared to 3T - contrast effect after half and full standard contrast agent dose: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie; Weber, M. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Szomolanyi, P.; Juras, V. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Kronnerwetter, C. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, G. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Nemec, S.; Prayer, D. [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ladd, M.E. [University Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Trattnig, S. [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-15

    To compare the contrast agent effect of a full dose and half the dose of gadobenate dimeglumine in brain tumours at 7 Tesla (7T) MR versus 3 Tesla (3T). Ten patients with primary brain tumours or metastases were examined. Signal intensities were assessed in the lesion and normal brain. Tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were calculated. Additionally, two independent readers subjectively graded the image quality and artefacts. The enhanced mean tumour-to-brain contrast and lesion enhancement were significantly higher at 7T than at 3T for both half the dose (91.8 ± 45.8 vs. 43.9 ± 25.3 [p = 0.010], 128.1 ± 53.7 vs. 75.5 ± 32.4 [p = 0.004]) and the full dose (129.2 ± 50.9 vs. 66.6 ± 33.1 [p = 0.002], 165.4 ± 54.2 vs. 102.6 ± 45.4 [p = 0.004]). Differences between dosages at each field strength were also significant. Lesion enhancement was higher with half the dose at 7T than with the full dose at 3T (p =.037), while the tumour-to-brain contrast was not significantly different. Subjectively, contrast enhancement, visibility, and lesion delineation were better at 7T and with the full dose. All parameters were rated as good, at the least. Half the routine contrast agent dose at 7T provided higher lesion enhancement than the full dose at 3T which indicates the possibility of dose reduction at 7T. (orig.)

  17. Adherence and patients' experiences with the use of oral anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Lonneke; Boons, Christel C L M; Kropff, Femke; van de Ven, Peter M; Swart, Eleonora L; Smit, Egbert F; Zweegman, Sonja; Kroep, Judith R; Timmer-Bonte, Johanna N H; Boven, Epie; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G

    2014-02-01

    A rapidly growing number of oral anticancer agents has become available in oncology and hematology. Though these introductions have several benefits, medication adherence is an issue of concern. Little is known about the factors influencing adherence to treatment with oral anticancer agents in daily practice. Material and methods. In this observational, multicenter study including 216 patients, carried out between October 2010 and March 2012, the use of oral anticancer drugs was assessed by means of a telephonic pill count, a questionnaire and a review of the patient's medical file and pharmacy medication records. Parameters collected were patients' demographics, treatment characteristics, beliefs and attitude towards disease and medicines, self-reported adherence, side effects, quality of life and satisfaction about information. Patients off treatment filled out a questionnaire about the reasons for discontinuation. Optimal adherence was defined as ≥ 95%-≤ 105%. Results. The mean adherence rate (AR) (n = 177) was 99.1% with 20.3% of patients having a sub-optimal AR ( 105%) consisting both of under- and over-adherence. Multivariate analyses showed that being on a cyclic dosing regimen (rather than a continuous regimen), not living alone and being highly educated increased the chances of optimal adherence (ORs = 4.88, 4.59 and 2.53, respectively). In addition, optimal adherence was found to be less common in patients reporting treatment control (OR = 0.77). One third of 79 patients off treatment reported their experienced side effects as one of the reasons for discontinuation. Discussion. Although most patients are fully adherent to oral anticancer agents, there is a substantial number tending to non-adherence. Patients living alone and those on a continuous dosing regimen are most likely to adhere sub-optimally. Interventions to improve adherence should specifically address these patients and be tailored to the needs of the individual patient.

  18. Pathological mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of chronic scarred myocardium in contrast agent enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate possible mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of scarred myocardium by investigating the relationship of contrast agent (CA first pass and delayed enhancement patterns with histopathological changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen pigs underwent 4 weeks ligation of 1 or 2 diagonal coronary arteries to induce chronic infarction. The hearts were then removed and perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. The hearts firstly experienced phosphorus 31 MR spectroscopy. The hearts in group I (n = 9 and II (n = 9 then received the bolus injection of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (0.05 mmol/kg and gadolinium-based macromolecular agent (P792, 15 µmol/kg, respectively. First pass T2* MRI was acquired using a gradient echo sequence. Delayed enhanced T1 MRI was acquired with an inversion recovery sequence. Masson's trichrome and anti- von Willebrand Factor (vWF staining were performed for infarct characterization. RESULTS: Wash-in of both kinds of CA caused the sharp and dramatic T2* signal decrease of scarred myocardium similar to that of normal myocardium. Myocardial blood flow and microvessel density were significantly recovered in 4-week-old scar tissue. Steady state distribution volume (ΔR1 relaxation rate of Gd-DTPA was markedly higher in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium, whereas ΔR1 relaxation rate of P792 did not differ significantly between scarred and normal myocardium. The ratio of extracellular volume to the total water volume was significantly greater in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium. Scarred myocardium contained massive residual capillaries and dilated vessels. Histological stains indicated the extensively discrete matrix deposition and lack of cellular structure in scarred myocardium. CONCLUSIONS: Collateral circulation formation and residual vessel effectively delivered CA into scarred myocardium. However, residual vessel without abnormal hyperpermeability allowed Gd

  19. (1)H NMR Relaxation Study of a Magnetic Ionic Liquid as a Potential Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Carla I; Vaca Chávez, Fabián; Portugal, Carla A M; Crespo, João G; Sebastião, Pedro J

    2015-09-03

    A proton nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (1)H NMRD study of the molecular dynamics in mixtures of magnetic ionic liquid [P66614][FeCl4] with [P66614][Cl] ionic liquid and mixtures of [P66614][FeCl4] with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is presented. The proton spin-lattice relaxation rate, R1, was measured in the frequency range of 8 kHz-300 MHz. The viscosity of the binary mixtures was measured as a function of an applied magnetic field, B, in the range of 0-2 T. In the case of DMSO/[P66614][FeCl4] the viscosity was found to be independent from the magnetic field, while in the case of the [P66614][Cl]/[P66614][FeCl4] system viscosity decreased with the increase of the magnetic field strength. The spin-lattice relaxation results were analyzed for all systems taking into account the relaxation mechanisms associated with the molecular motions with correlation times in a range between 10(-11) and 10(-7)s, usually observed by NMRD, and the paramagnetic relaxation contributions associated with the presence of the magnetic ions in the systems. In the case of the DMSO/[P66614][FeCl4] system the R1 dispersion shows the relaxation enhancement due to the presence of the magnetic ions, similar to that reported for contrast agents. For the [P66614][Cl]/[P66614][FeCl4] system, the R1 dispersion presents a much larger paramagnetic relaxation contribution, in comparison with that observed for the DMSO/[P66614][FeCl4] mixtures but different from that reported for other magnetic ionic liquid system. In the [P66614][Cl]/[P66614][FeCl4] system the relaxation enhancement associated with the paramagnetic ions is clearly not proportional to the concentration of magnetic ions, in contrast with what is observed for the DMSO/[P66614][FeCl4] system.

  20. Comparison of quantitative dynamic susceptibility-contrast MRI perfusion estimates obtained using different contrast-agent administration schemes at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirestam, Ronnie, E-mail: Ronnie.Wirestam@med.lu.s [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, University Hospital, SE-22185 Lund (Sweden); Thilmann, Oliver; Knutsson, Linda [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, University Hospital, SE-22185 Lund (Sweden); Bjoerkman-Burtscher, Isabella M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Lund University, University Hospital, SE-22185 Lund (Sweden); Larsson, Elna-Marie [Division of Radiology, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset, SE-75185 Uppsala (Sweden); Stahlberg, Freddy [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, University Hospital, SE-22185 Lund (Sweden); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Lund University, University Hospital, SE-22185 Lund (Sweden)

    2010-07-15

    Absolute cerebral perfusion parameters were obtained by dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) carried out using different contrast-agent administration protocols. Sixteen healthy volunteers underwent three separate DSC-MRI examinations each, receiving single-dose (0.1 mmol/kg b.w.) gadobutrol, double-dose gadobutrol and single-dose gadobenate-dimeglumine on different occasions. DSC-MRI was performed using single-shot gradient-echo echo-planar imaging at 3 T. The arterial input functions (AIFs) were averages (4-9 pixels) of arterial curves from middle cerebral artery branches, automatically identified according to standard criteria. Absolute estimates of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and mean transit time (MTT) were calculated without corrections for non-linear contrast-agent (CA) response in blood or for different T2* relaxivities in tissue and artery. Perfusion estimates obtained using single and double dose of gadobutrol correlated moderately well, while the relationship between estimates obtained using gadobutrol and gadobenate-dimeglumine showed generally lower correlation. The observed degree of CBV and CBF overestimation, compared with literature values, was most likely caused by different T2* relaxivities in blood and tissue in combination with partial-volume effects. The present results showed increased absolute values of CBV and CBF at higher dose, not predicted by the assumption of a quadratic response to contrast-agent concentration in blood. This indicates that the signal components of measured AIFs were not purely of arterial origin and that arterial signal components were more effectively extinguished at higher CA dose. This study also indicates that it may not be completely straightforward to compare absolute perfusion estimates obtained with different CA administration routines.

  1. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-21

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  2. Gold nanorods as a contrast agent for Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate gold nanorods (GNRs as a contrast agent to enhance Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging of the intrascleral aqueous humor outflow. METHODS: A serial dilution of GNRs was scanned with a spectral-domain OCT device (Bioptigen, Durham, NC to visualize Doppler signal. Doppler measurements using GNRs were validated using a controlled flow system. To demonstrate an application of GNR enhanced Doppler, porcine eyes were perfused at constant pressure with mock aqueous alone or 1.0×10(12 GNR/mL mixed with mock aqueous. Twelve Doppler and volumetric SD-OCT scans were obtained from the limbus in a radial fashion incremented by 30°, forming a circular scan pattern. Volumetric flow was computed by integrating flow inside non-connected vessels throughout all 12 scans around the limbus. RESULTS: At the GNR concentration of 0.7×10(12 GNRs/mL, Doppler signal was present through the entire depth of the testing tube without substantial attenuation. A well-defined laminar flow profile was observed for Doppler images of GNRs flowing through the glass capillary tube. The Doppler OCT measured flow profile was not statistically different from the expected flow profile based upon an autoregressive moving average model, with an error of -0.025 to 0.037 mm/s (p = 0.6435. Cross-sectional slices demonstrated the ability to view anterior chamber outflow ex-vivo using GNR-enhanced Doppler OCT. Doppler volumetric flow measurements were comparable to flow recorded by the perfusion system. CONCLUSIONS: GNRs created a measureable Doppler signal within otherwise silent flow fields in OCT Doppler scans. Practical application of this technique was confirmed in a constant pressure ex-vivo aqueous humor outflow model in porcine eyes.

  3. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  4. Influence of Guided Waves in Tibia on Non-linear Scattering of Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Diya; Zhong, Hui; Zhai, Yu; Hu, Hong; Jin, Bowen; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the linear and non-linear responses of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) to frequency-dispersive guided waves from the tibia cortex, particularly two individual modes, S0 (1.23 MHz) and A1 (2.06 MHz). The UCA responses to guided waves were illustrated through the Marmottant model derived from measured guided waves, and then verified by continuous infusion experiments in a vessel-tibia flow phantom. These UCA responses were further evaluated by the enhanced ratio of peak values and the resolutions of UCA backscattered echoes. Because of the individual modes S0 and A1 in the tibia, the peak values of the UCA backscattered echoes were enhanced by 83.57 ± 7.35% (p < 0.05) and 80.77 ± 6.60% (p < 0.01) in the UCA subharmonic frequency and subharmonic imaging, respectively. However, corresponding resolutions were 0.78 ± 0.07 (p < 0.05) and 0.72 ± 0.12 (p < 0.01) times those without guided wave disturbances, respectively. Even though the resolution was partly degenerated, the subharmonic detection sensitivity of UCA was improved by the guided waves. Thus, UCA responses to the double-frequency guided waves should be further explored to benefit the detection of capillary perfusion in tissue layers near the bone cortex, particularly for perfusion imaging in the free flaps and skeletal muscles.

  5. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis associated with gadolinium based contrast agents: A summary of the medical literature reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broome, Dale R. [Department of Radiology, Loma Loma University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, Room 2606, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States)], E-mail: dbroome@ahs.llumc.edu

    2008-05-15

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a systemic fibrosing disorder that principally affects the skin, but can involve virtually any tissue in the human body and result in significant disability and even death. Since 2006 numerous retrospective case reports and case series have reported a very strong association of this disease with exposure to gadolinium-based contrast agents (Gd-CA) for MR imaging in the setting of severe or end-stage renal disease. The purpose of this report is to summarize the medical literature reporting of biopsy-proven NSF cases in which the authors specifically investigated patient exposure to Gd-CA. A Pub Med MEDLINE search was performed using the key words-nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy. All case reports and case series of NSF were reviewed to determine if patients had a preceding exposure to Gd-CA and which specific Gd-CA was involved. If the original reports did not clarify the specific Gd-CA, I reviewed follow-up letters to the editors or contacted the authors to clarify which specific Gd-CA were linked to the NSF cases. If several reports originated from the same institution, clarification was also obtained to avoid redundant reporting. As of February 1, 2008 there have been 190 biopsy-proven cases of NSF published in the peer-reviewed literature with the following associations: 157 gadodiamide (Omniscan, GE Healthcare), 8 gadopentetate (Magnevist, Bayer Healthcare), 3 gadoversetamide (OptiMARK, Covidien), and 18 unspecified Gd-CA, and 4 confounded cases with more than one Gd-CA. Five cases of NSF were unassociated with Gd-CA.

  6. Processing of subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents to determine ambient pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-04-01

    Subharmonic-aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) is a technique that utilizes the subharmonic emissions, occurring at half the insonation frequency, from ultrasound contrast agents to estimate ambient pressures. The purpose of this work was to compare the performance of different processing techniques for the raw radiofrequency (rf) data acquired for SHAPE. A closed loop flow system was implemented circulating reconstituted Sonazoid (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway; 0.2 ml for 750 ml diluent) and the beam-formed unprocessed rf data were obtained from a 4 mm diameter lumen of a Doppler flow phantom (ATS Laboratories, Inc., Bridgeport, CT) using a SonixRP scanner (Ultrasonix, Richmond, BC, Canada). The transmit frequency and incident acoustic pressures were set to 2.5 MHz and 0.22 MPa, respectively, in order to elicit Sonazoid subharmonic emissions that are ambient-pressure sensitive. The time-varying ambient pressures within the flow phantom were recorded by a Millar pressure catheter. Four techniques for extracting the subharmonic amplitude from the rf data were tested along with two noise filtering techniques to process this data. Five filter orders were tested for the noise removing filters. The performance was evaluated based on the least root-mean-square errors reported after linear least-square regression analyses of the subharmonic data and the pressure catheter data and compared using a repeated ANOVA. When the subharmonic amplitudes were extracted as the mean value within a 0.2 MHz bandwidth about 1.25 MHz and when the resulting temporally-varying subharmonic signal was median filtered with an order of 500, the filtered subharmonic signal significantly predicted the ambient pressures (r2 = 0.90; p subharmonic data extracted as the mean value within a 0.2 MHz bandwidth about the theoretical subharmonic frequency turned out to be the best technique to process acoustic data for SHAPE. The implementation of this technique on ultrasound scanners may permit real

  7. Effect of self-demodulation on the subharmonic response of contrast agent microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeichin, V; Faez, T; Renaud, G; Bosch, J G; van der Steen, A F W; de Jong, N

    2012-06-21

    Subharmonic (SH) emission from the ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) is of interest since it is produced only by the UCA and not by tissue, opposite to harmonic imaging modes where both tissue and microbubble show harmonics. In this work, the use of the self-demodulation (S-D) signal as a means of microbubble excitation at the SH frequency to enhance the SH emission of UCA is studied. The S-D wave is a low-frequency signal produced by the weak nonlinear propagation of an ultrasound wave. It is proportional to the second time derivative of the squared envelope of the transmitted signal. A diluted population of BR14 UCA (Bracco Research SA, Geneva, Switzerland) was insonified by a 10 MHz transducer focused at 76 mm firing bursts with different envelopes, durations and peak pressure amplitudes. The center frequency of the S-D signal changes from low frequencies (around 0.5 MHz) toward the transmitted frequency (10 MHz) by modifying the envelope function from gaussian to rectangular. For 6 and 20 transmitted cycles, the SH response is enhanced up to 25 and 22 dB, respectively, when using a rectangular envelope instead of a gaussian one. The experimental results are confirmed by the numerical simulation. The effects of the excitation duration and pressure amplitude are also studied. This study shows that a suitable design of the envelope of the transmit excitation to generate a S-D signal at the SH frequency can enhance the SH emission of UCA, and the SH imaging is feasible at high frequencies with a shorter transmit burst (six-cycle) and low acoustic pressure (∼100 KPa).

  8. Nonspherical dynamics and shape mode stability of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvisi, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are shell encapsulated microbubbles developed originally for ultrasound imaging enhancement. UCAs are more recently being exploited for therapeutic applications, such as for drug delivery, gene therapy, and tissue ablation. Ultrasound transducer pulses can induce spherical (radial) UCA oscillations, translation, and nonspherical shape oscillations, the dynamics of which are highly coupled. If driven sufficiently strongly, the ultrasound can induce breakup of UCAs, which can facilitate drug or gene delivery but should be minimized for imaging purposes to increase residence time and maximize diagnostic effect. Therefore, an understanding of the interplay between the acoustic driving and nonspherical shape mode stability of UCAs is essential for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this work, we use both analytical and numerical methods to analyze shape mode stability for cases of small and large nonspherical oscillations, respectively. To analyze shape mode stability in the limit of small nonspherical perturbations, we couple a radial model of a lipid-coated microbubble with a model for bubble translation and nonspherical shape oscillation. This hybrid model is used to predict shape mode stability for ultrasound driving frequencies and pressure amplitudes of clinical interest. In addition, calculations of the stability of individual shape modes, residence time, maximum radius, and translation are provided with respect to acoustic driving parameters and compared to an unshelled bubble. The effects of shell elasticity, shell viscosity, and initial radius on stability are investigated. Furthermore, the well-established boundary element method (BEM) is used to investigate the dynamics and shape stability of large amplitude nonspherical oscillations of an ultrasonically-forced, polymer-coated microbubble near a rigid boundary. Different instability modes are identified based on the degree of jetting and proximity to the

  9. Investigation on the inertial cavitation threshold and shell properties of commercialized ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiasheng; Li, Qian; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Dong; Tu, Juan

    2013-08-01

    The inertial cavitation (IC) activity of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) plays an important role in the development and improvement of ultrasound diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, various diagnostic and therapeutic applications have different requirements for IC characteristics. Here through IC dose quantifications based on passive cavitation detection, IC thresholds were measured for two commercialized UCAs, albumin-shelled KangRun(®) and lipid-shelled SonoVue(®) microbubbles, at varied UCA volume concentrations (viz., 0.125 and 0.25 vol. %) and acoustic pulse lengths (viz., 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 cycles). Shell elastic and viscous coefficients of UCAs were estimated by fitting measured acoustic attenuation spectra with Sarkar's model. The influences of sonication condition (viz., acoustic pulse length) and UCA shell properties on IC threshold were discussed based on numerical simulations. Both experimental measurements and numerical simulations indicate that IC thresholds of UCAs decrease with increasing UCA volume concentration and acoustic pulse length. The shell interfacial tension and dilatational viscosity estimated for SonoVue (0.7 ± 0.11 N/m, 6.5 ± 1.01 × 10(-8) kg/s) are smaller than those of KangRun (1.05 ± 0.18 N/m, 1.66 ± 0.38 × 10(-7) kg/s); this might result in lower IC threshold for SonoVue. The current results will be helpful for selecting and utilizing commercialized UCAs for specific clinical applications, while minimizing undesired IC-induced bioeffects.

  10. Relationship between cavitation and loss of echogenicity from ultrasound contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Bader, Kenneth B; Haworth, Kevin J; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Raymond, Jason L; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2013-09-21

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have the potential to nucleate cavitation and promote both beneficial and deleterious bioeffects in vivo. Previous studies have elucidated the pulse-duration-dependent pressure amplitude threshold for rapid loss of echogenicity due to UCA fragmentation. Previous studies have demonstrated that UCA fragmentation was concomitant with inertial cavitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between stable and inertial cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs as a function of pulse duration. Determining the relationship between cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs would enable monitoring of cavitation based upon the onscreen echogenicity in clinical applications. Two lipid-shelled UCAs, echogenic liposomes (ELIP) and Definity®, were insonified by a clinical ultrasound scanner in duplex spectral Doppler mode at four pulse durations ('sample volumes') in both a static system and a flow system. Cavitation emissions from the UCAs insonified by Doppler pulses were recorded using a passive cavitation detection system and stable and inertial cavitation thresholds ascertained. Loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity® was assessed within regions of interest on B-mode images. A numerical model based on UCA rupture predicted the functional form of the loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity®. Stable and inertial cavitation thresholds were found to have a weak dependence on pulse duration. Stable cavitation thresholds were lower than inertial cavitation thresholds. The power of cavitation emissions was an exponential function of the loss of echogenicity over the investigated range of acoustic pressures. Both ELIP and Definity® lost more than 80% echogenicity before the onset of stable or inertial cavitation. Once this level of echogenicity loss occurred, both stable and inertial cavitation were detected in the physiologic flow phantom. These results imply that stable and inertial

  11. Impact of low-energy CT imaging on selection of positive oral contrast media concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Manuel; Murcia, Diana J; Iamurri, Andrea Prochowski; Kambadakone, Avinash R; Hahn, Peter F; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2017-05-01

    To determine to what extent low-energy CT imaging affects attenuation of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) opacified with positive oral contrast media (OCM). Second, to establish optimal OCM concentrations for low-energy diagnostic CT exams. One hundred patients (38 men and 62 women; age 62 ± 11 years; BMI 26 ± 5) with positive OCM-enhanced 120-kVp single-energy CT (SECT), and follow-up 100-kVp acquisitions (group A; n = 50), or 40-70-keV reconstructions from rapid kV switching-single-source dual-energy CT (ssDECT) (group B; n = 50) were included. Luminal attenuation from different GIT segments was compared between exams. Standard dose of three OCM and diluted solutions (75%, 50%, and 25% concentrations) were introduced serially in a gastrointestinal phantom and scanned using SECT (120, 100, and 80 kVp) and DECT (80/140 kVp) acquisitions on a ssDECT scanner. Luminal attenuation was obtained on SECT and DECT images (40-70 keV), and compared to 120-kVp scans with standard OCM concentrations. Luminal attenuation was higher on 100-kVp (328 HU) and on 40-60-keV images (410-924 HU) in comparison to 120-kVp scans (298 HU) in groups A and B (p concentration.

  12. Management of Antithrombotic Agents in Oral Surgery Maria Martinez and Dimitrios A. Tsaki