WorldWideScience

Sample records for oral cancer patients

  1. Oral complications in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  2. Oral cancer knowledge among Turkish dental patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Misirlioglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the level of oral cancer awareness and knowledge among patients referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology in Central Anatolia. Settings and Design: The study was conducted with 1,125 patients who applied to the school of dentistry for routine dental examinations. The authors collect information with a 20-item written questionnaire from the participants about oral cancer risk factors, epidemiology, etiology, and signs and symptoms. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics of demographic variables and other data were reported as means and percentages. Statistical analysis was performed by means of SPSS +11.0 statistical package. Results: Overall, only 48.9% of all patients showed awareness of oral cancer, with awareness especially poor among lower socioeconomic groups. Awareness of oral cancer risk factors and signs and symptoms did not vary significantly between men and women (P > 0.5; however, older participants (aged 40-64 years were more familiar with oral cancer signs than younger participants. More than half of all participants (56.8% were unaware of the common clinical presentations of oral cancer. Conclusions: The results of this survey showed knowledge regarding oral cancer to be quite low. Thus, educational programs are needed to increase public awareness about oral cancer, and dentists should request patients undergo examinations for oral cancer to ensure early detection.

  3. Trismus release in oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yao-Chou; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Shieh, Shyh-Jou; Lee, Jing-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Trismus is a common problem among oral cancer patients. This report aimed to study the inciting factors of trismus and to find out the rationale of trismus release. Between 1996 and 2008, 61 oral cancer patients with retrievable records of interincisor distance (IID) were analyzed by retrospective chart review. The IID decreased from 31.4 (12.4) to 24.9 (12.0) mm in 36 patients undergoing cancer ablation only (P = 0.001). Other variables prompting trismus include buccal cancer (P = 0.017), radiotherapy (P = 0.008), and recurrence (P = 0.001). In contrast, the IID improved from 11.7 (7.1) to 22.7 (11.9) mm in 25 patients receiving cancer ablative and trismus releasing surgeries (P = 0.000). The improvement fared better in individuals with IID less than 15 mm than the others (P = 0.037). In conclusion, involvement of buccal region, ablative surgery, radiotherapy, and recurrence are provocative factors of trismus. Patients with IID less than 15 mm will benefit from releasing surgery significantly. Others may better be handled with conservative managements firstly, and enrolled as candidates of surgical release only until the patients entertained a 28-month period of disease-free interval, by which time the risk of recurrence would be markedly reduced.

  4. Oral cryotherapy reduced oral mucositis in patients having cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivakovsky, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CANCERLIT, CINAHL, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment compared to usual care, no treatment or other interventions to prevent mucositis. The primary outcome was incidence of mucositis and its severity.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers carried out study assessment and data extraction independently. Treatment effect for continuous data was calculated using mean values and standard deviations and expressed as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Meta-analysis was performed.ResultsFourteen studies with 1280 participants were included. Subgroup analysis was undertaken according to the main cancer treatment type. Cryotherapy reduced the risk of developing mucositis by 39% (RR = 0.61; 95%CI, 0.52 to 0.72) on patients treated with fluorouracil (5FU). For melphalan-based treatment the risk of developing mucositis was reduced by 41% (RR =0.59; 95%CI, 0.35 to 1.01). Oral cryotherapy was shown to be safe, with very low rates of minor adverse effects, such as headaches, chills, numbness/taste disturbance and tooth pain. This appears to contribute to the high rates of compliance seen in the included studies.ConclusionsThere is confidence that oral cryotherapy leads to a large reduction in oral mucositis in adults treated with 5FU. Although there is less certainty on the size of the reduction on patients treated with melphalan, it is certain there is reduction of severe mucositis.

  5. [Study on the oral hygiene of patients with oral cavity cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratoĭcheva, M St; Kondeva, V K

    2008-01-01

    Many authors consider oral hygiene an important factor in the etiology and pathogenesis of oral cavity cancer. The aim of the present study was to establish the role of poor oral hygiene in the development of malignant lesions in the oral cavity. One hundred and three patients were interviewed. Questions, regarding oral hygiene were included in the interview. Results showed that 53,80% of urban residents brush their teeth twice daily whereas 65,52% of rural residents brush their teeth irregularly - poral hygiene - poral cavity cancer is more frequent in men, rural residents and in the elderly. Oral hygiene is a factor in the development of oral cavity cancer.

  6. Disparities in oral cancer survival among mentally ill patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Shou Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many studies have reported excess cancer mortality in patients with mental illness. However, scant studies evaluated the differences in cancer treatment and its impact on survival rates among mentally ill patients. Oral cancer is one of the ten most common cancers in the world. We investigated differences in treatment type and survival rates between oral cancer patients with mental illness and without mental illness. METHODS: Using the National Health Insurance (NHI database, we compared the type of treatment and survival rates in 16687 oral cancer patients from 2002 to 2006. The utilization rate of surgery for oral cancer was compared between patients with mental illness and without mental illness using logistic regression. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for survival analysis. RESULTS: Oral cancer patients with mental disorder conferred a grave prognosis, compared with patients without mental illness (hazard ratios [HR] = 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.30-1.93; P<0.001. After adjusting for patients' characteristics and hospital characteristics, patients with mental illness were less likely to receive surgery with or without adjuvant therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.34-0.65; P<0.001. In multivariate analysis, oral cancer patients with mental illness carried a 1.58-times risk of death (95% CI = 1.30-1.93; P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Oral cancer patients with mental illness were less likely to undergo surgery with or without adjuvant therapy than those without mental illness. Patients with mental illness have a poor prognosis compared to those without mental illness. To reduce disparities in physical health, public health strategies and welfare policies must continue to focus on this vulnerable group.

  7. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  8. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early ...

  9. Simplified Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient after Oral Cancer Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjčić, Josip; Džakula, Nikola; Vojvodić, Denis

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of patients with oral cancer is complex: a multidisciplinary approach needs to be taken and maxillofacial and oral surgeons, an oncologist, a prosthodontist should be included, and a psychologist is often needed. This case report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient after surgical removal of oral cancer with obturator prosthesis. Resection cavity was located in central part of the hard palate and the condition belonged to Aramany class 3 maxillary defects. The two-step impression technique of denture bearing area was used and the resection of cavity was performed. A primary impression-the impression of denture bearing area was made using irreversible hydrocolloid material, while the second impression - the impression of resection cavity was made using condensation silicone material and obturator prosthesis framework. The obturator prosthesis replaced lost teeth, improved oral function and esthetics at minimal costs.

  10. Oral care of the cancer patient receiving radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzhausen, T. (Medical Univ. of Southern Africa, Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Community Dentistry)

    1982-07-01

    Radiation therapy is frequently being used for the patient with oral cancer. The survival rate is increasing, due to more effective treatment technique. The question of whether any teeth should be extracted, the mode of therapy and the side effects of radiation like Xerostomia, caries, stomatitis, trismus and osteo-radionecrosis and also post radiation care are discussed.

  11. Serum lipid profile in patients with oral cancer and oral precancerous conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajul Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was undertaken to estimate and compare the levels of plasma total cholesterol (TC, low density lipoprotein (LDL, high density lipoprotein (HDL, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL and triglycerides in patients with oral precancerous lesions/conditions, oral cancer and normal subjects. Materials and Methods: The study comprised of 60 patients with oral precancerous lesions/conditions, 60 patients with oral cancer and a control group of 60 healthy individuals. The diagnosis of oral precancerous lesions/conditions and oral cancer was confirmed histopathologically. Under aseptic condition 5 ml venous blood of overnight fasting patient was withdrawn from each individual. Serum was separated by centrifugation and plasma levels of TC, LDL, HDL, VLDL and triglycerides were estimated. Descriptive statistical analysis has been carried out in the present study. Analysis of variance has been used to find the significance of study parameters between three or more groups of patients, Post-hoc test as Tukey has been used to find the pair wise significance. Significance is assessed at 5% level of significance. Results: Statistically significant decrease in levels of plasma TC, LDL, HDL, VLDL and triglycerides was observed in the precancerous and cancerous groups as compared to the control group. On comparison between precancerous and cancerous groups, significant decrease was observed in cancerous group. Conclusion: The change in lipid levels may have an early diagnostic or prognostic role in the oral premalignant lesions/conditions and oral cancer. The presence of decreased plasma lipid profile should increase the suspicion of these lesions to be investigated further.

  12. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that describes the risk factors, ... not collect any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are leaving ...

  13. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... signs of oral cancer. For Patients and the Public Oral Cancer Pamphlet that ... any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are leaving ...

  14. Homemade oral supplements for patients with cancer: descriptive analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Garófolo,Adriana; Alves,Fernanda Rodrigues; Rezende, Maria Aurelia do Carmo

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveThis study aimed to describe the development of eight formulations of homemade oral supplements that propose to increase the energy, protein and micronutrient intakes of patients with cancer, analyze its nutritional value and assess its taste using two different fat sources.MethodsThe supplements were based on four ingredients: milk, eggs, sugars and oils for nutritional recovery. the formulations were calculated by the nutritional support software NUTWIN. the nutritional value of th...

  15. Dental management of patients irradiated for oral cancer. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regezi, J.A.; Courtney, R.M.; Kerr, D.A.

    1976-08-01

    Management of patients irradiated for oral cancer should include consideration of their oral health prior to, and after, radiation therapy. Data from 130 patients, followed for a period of 1 to 10 years, are presented and evaluated. The philosophy of retention and maintenance of as many teeth as possible is supported by this data. Extraction of teeth with severe periodontal disease after irradiation also proves to be a relatively safe operation. Osteoradionecrosis tends to be limited in extent and is generally well tolerated by the patient when treated conservatively. A treatment regimen is presented that significantly reduces the morbidity from therapeutic irradiation of the jaws. A comprehensive dental evaluation and follow-up plan coupled with patient cooperation are instrumental to the success of this program.

  16. Cancer patients with oral mucositis: challenges for nursing care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Nilkece Mesquita Araújo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze nursing care provided to cancer patients with oral mucositis based on the Nursing Process (NP. METHOD: this exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted with 213 patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in two cancer facilities: one philanthropic and one private service. RESULTS: the participants were mainly female, aged 45.8 years old on average, with up to 11 years of schooling and income of up to one times the minimum wage. Severe mucositis was related to chemotherapy associated with radiotherapy. Only 25.3% of the patients reported having received guidance from nurses during their treatment concerning self-care. The perceptions of patients regarding quality of care did not significantly differ between the private and public facilities. The basic human needs mainly affected were comfort, eating, and hygiene. Based on this finding, one NP was established listing the diagnoses, interventions and expected results to establish an ideal, though individualized, standard of nursing care to be provided to these patients. CONCLUSION: to understand oral mucositis is crucial to establish nursing care that includes prevention based on the implementation of an oral care plan.

  17. Controlled study of lactoperoxidase gel on oral flora and saliva in irradiated patients with oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Katalin; Urban, Edit; Fazekas, Olga; Thurzo, Laszlo; Nagy, Elisabeth

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if radiotherapy induces hyposalivation altering oral microbial flora. The purpose of this placebo-controlled, single-blind study was to determine beneficial effects of a saliva substitute and an oral hygiene product on irradiated patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Eighteen patients were assigned to the test group (Biotène Oral Balance gel [Lacléde Incorporated Healthcare Products, Gardena, CA] and toothpaste used daily), and another 18 were put on a conventional daily regimen (carboxymethylcellulose gel and Oral-B toothpaste [Laclede Pharmaceuticals, Gardena, CA]). Cultures for identifying and quantitating microorganisms, whole unstimulated saliva, and visual analog measurements for comfort were obtained before mucositis occurred and after treatment. Daily use of Biotène products enhanced control of microbial flora, improved salivary flow, and increased oral comfort as compared with control subjects. Four weeks after mucositis, some aerobic isolates disappeared in the test group; periodontal-associated bacteria were markedly decreased in the test group; and candidal species were significantly lowered in the test group. Although baseline saliva was lower in the test group (P = 0.001), after 4 weeks, no difference between groups existed; comfort was greater in the test group (P = 0.007). Use of enzyme-engineered Biotène products that assist in control of the oral microbial flora as well as supporting oral comfort through lubrication appear to be useful aids for irradiated patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

  18. Routine endoscopy for esophageal cancer is suggestive for patients with oral, oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Han Hung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study attempted to reveal the incidence and risk of synchronous and metachronous esophageal cancer in subjects with oral, oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer based on a population-wide database in Taiwan. METHODS: We retrieved data for this cross-sectional study from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. The study group included 2,965 subjects who had received their first-time diagnosis of oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer in 2002∼2009. We assigned the date of their first diagnosis of oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer as the index date. We also randomly retrieved 29,650 comparison subjects matched with the study subjects in terms of gender and age group. We assigned their first medical utilization that occurred in the index year as the index date for the comparison group. We further performed a conditional logistic regression to investigate the association between esophageal cancer and oral cancer. RESULTS: Results showed that prevalences of esophageal cancer within 3 months before and after the index date were respectively 2.19% and 0.04% for the study and comparison groups. A conditional logistic regression revealed that the odds ratio (OR of esophageal cancer for subjects with oral/oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 55.33 (95% confidence interval (CI: 29.86∼102.52 compared to comparison subjects. Furthermore, compared to comparison subjects, ORs for esophageal cancer were respectively 18.41 (95% CI: 8.50-39.85, 40.49 (95% CI: 15.11∼108.64, and 240.96 (95% CI: 125.49-462.69 for study subjects with a malignancy of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx. CONCLUSION: We concluded that there were relatively high chances for synchronous and metachronous esophageal cancers being detected through panendoscopy in patients with oral, oropharyngeal, and hypopharyngeal cancers. The routine use of panendoscopy in such patients should be encouraged with a higher priority.

  19. Postoperative Conversion Disorder in Elderly Oral Cancer Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushiji, Takashi; Hayashi, Kamichika; Morikawa, Takamichi; Migita, Masashi; Ogane, Satoru; Muramatsu, Kyotaro; Kamio, Takashi; Shibahara, Takahiko; Takano, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    Conversion disorder is a condition in which psychological stress in response to difficult situations manifests as physical symptoms. Here, we report a case of postoperative coma due to conversion disorder in an elderly oral cancer patient. An 82-year-old woman was referred to Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital with a mass lesion on the tongue. A biopsy revealed a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Surgical treatment was performed for the tongue carcinoma and tracheotomy for management of the airway. On postoperative day 5, the patient exhibited loss of consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale: E1, VT, M1; Japan Coma Scale: III-300). The patient's vital signs were all normal, as were the results of a full blood count, brain-CT, MRI, and MRA. Only the arm dropping test was positive. Therefore, the cause of the coma was diagnosed as conversion disorder. Seven hours later, the patient showed a complete recovery.

  20. Factors that affect cancer patient compliance to oral anti-neoplastic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Marques,Patrícia Andréa Crippa; Pierin, Angela Maria Geraldo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify factors that can affect compliance to treatment with neoplastic oral drugs in a group of cancer patients. METHODS: Interviews were performed on 61 patients diagnosed with cancer and under anti-neoplastic oral therapy in a private hospital. The interviews were carried out using instruments to assess compliance. RESULTS: Most patients (95%) reported the oral treatment was not difficult. The Morisky and Green Test were positive in 28% of the patients. Factors that may aff...

  1. Oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer during postoperative irradiation. An alleviating effect on acute radiation mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsura, Kouji; Masuko, Noriko; Hayashi, Takafumi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Tsuchida, Emiko; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sasamoto, Ryuta

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer on alleviating acute radiation mucositis. Eighteen patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for tongue and oral floor cancer were evaluated. Radiotherapy was given in 2 Gy per fraction, 5 times a week for a total dose of 50 Gy in most patients. Radiation field included the tongue and oral floor. During radiotherapy, 8 patients were treated by dento-maxillofacial radiologists with special concern on oral hygiene (oral hygiene group) and the remaining 10 patients were treated with routine dental care (standard medication group). Mucositis were evaluated using JCOG grade and EORTC/RTOG score by radiotherapists or dento-maxillofacial radiologists at 10 Gy intervals. Oral hygiene plans comprised motivation to maintain oral hygiene and establishing the habits of oral self care 4 times per day. Once a week, oral hygiene and oral cleaning of patients were checked by dento-maxillofacial radiologists. Oral self care included mechanical tooth brushing and a chemical mouthwash. No patients with grade 3 and score 4 mucositis were noted in the oral hygiene group. Severe mucositis occurred less frequently in the oral hygiene group than in the standard medication group. Interruption of radiotherapy due to severe mucositis did not occur in the oral hygiene group. On the other hand, interruption of radiotherapy occurred in four patients in the standard medication group, and in three it was due to severe oral pain. Our results suggested that our method of oral hygiene was more effective for alleviating acute radiation mucositis than other methods so far reported. In addition, our method is considered to be useful in preventing rampant dental caries and severe periodontitis due to the xerostomia induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  2. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.F. van Leeuwen (Roelof); D.H.S. Brundel (D. H S); C. Neef (Cees); T. van Gelder (Teun); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); D.M. Burger (David); F.G.A. Jansman (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment.

  3. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Brundel, D. H. S.; Neef, C.; van Gelder, T.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; Burger, D. M.; Jansman, F. G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment. Methods: A

  4. Associations between voice quality and swallowing function in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Marieke J.; Rinkel, Rico N. P. M.; Cnossen, Ingrid C.; Witte, Birgit I.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Ren; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between voice quality and swallowing function in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Recordings of speech and videofluoroscopy of 51 patients after treatment for oral or oropharyngeal cancer were analysed. Acoustic voice parame

  5. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  6. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  7. Airway Management of Patients Undergoing Oral Cancer Surgery: A Retrospective Analysis of 156 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikhar, Sapna Annaji; Sharma, Ashima; Ramdaspally, Mahesh; Gopinath, Ramachandran

    2017-04-01

    Oral cancer patients have a potentially difficult airway, but if managed properly during the perioperative period, morbidity and mortality can be reduced or avoided. The medical records of 156 patients who were operated for oral cancers were reviewed for airway management during the perioperative period. The surgical procedures ranged from excisions, wide local excisions with split skin graftings, hemiglossectomies and radical neck nodes dissections to pectoralis major myocutaneous or free fibular flaps. Intubation was assessed as difficult in 14.7% of patients because of tumour- or radiation fibrosis-related trismus, restricted neck mobility and prior similar surgeries. Twenty patients had undergone surgery for oral cancer previously and were scheduled for flap reconstruction. Nasotracheal intubation was a preferred route, and 62.8% of patients could be intubated nasotracheally after neuromuscular blockade. Tracheostomy (elective or existing) was utilised for airway control in 19.2% cases. Patients who had undergone prior radiotherapy were more likely to be tracheostomised. McCoy laryngoscopes (13.4%), gum elastic bougies (23.6%), Airtraq devices (0.006%) and fibreoptic bronchoscopes (FOBs) (0.03%) were the additional airway techniques employed. In total, 64 patients (50.7%) could be extubated immediately after surgery. Proper preoperative evaluation and planning help manage difficult airways effectively with minimal need of advanced airway gadgets. Gum elastic bougies and Magill forceps are very useful in airway management and decrease the need of elective tracheostomy in oral cancer patients.

  8. Oral histoplasmosis masquerading as oral cancer in HIV-infected patient: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Shafiulla; Sinha, Mahua; Chavan, Purushottam; Premalata, CS; Shivaprakash,; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Jayshree, Rudrapatna S

    2012-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is an endemic mycoses caused by Histoplasma capsulatum with endemicity around midwestern United States and central America. The endemicity of histoplasmosis in India is not clearly known. Histoplasmosis, especially oral histoplasmosis, is now increasingly being reported from India. We report here a culture-confirmed and sequence confirmed, oral histoplasmosis in a HIV seropositive individual who was referred to our regional cancer centre with a suspicion of oral cancer.

  9. Oral hygiene in patients with oral cancer undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation: protocol proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAPONE, B.; NARDI, G.M.; DI VENERE, D.; PETTINI, F.; GRASSI, F.R.; CORSALINI, M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose This study was aimed at assessing the effectiveness and the importance of an oral hygiene (OH) protocol in patients undergoing radiation therapy and chemotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation, in order to reduce or minimize oral complications. Materials and methods This study was carried out at the Department of Dental Science, at the University of Bari-Italy from December 2012 to December 2015 on 34 selected patients with primary oral cancer undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy after prosthesis rehabilitation. They were divided into 2 groups according to their age, sex and cancer therapy. Seventeen patients were assigned to the control group and seventeen in the experimental one. In the experimental group (Table 1), patients underwent an oral hygiene protocol whereas in the control group (Table 2) patients received the usual care provided within the clinical setting. All the patients gave written informed consent. It has been asked and obtained the authorisation from the Ethics Committee of the Dental Science and Surgery Department. Results Results show that in patients undergoing the oral hygiene protocol, the complications and the risks of infection and permanent dental problems have been minimized. Indeed, of the seventeen patients undergoing the OH protocol, 70% obtained positive results and were satisfied with the program outcome. Conclusions The role of the health care providers is essential to educate patients to adhere to the prescribed treatments and reinforce their motivation in oral hygiene. The oral hygiene procedures prevent and ameliorate oral complications due to the radiation therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:28280537

  10. Oral microbiota and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka H. Meurman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion.

  11. Cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer Cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Kędra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of malignant gastrointestinal cancers in Poland has been constantly growing, which has
    led to an intensification of the search for new markers of the early clinical stage of this disease. The oral cavity,
    as the first part of the gastrointestinal tract, has a very important role. The oral cavity presents symptoms of both
    typically stomatological and systemic diseases. Oral cancers, benign or malignant, may originate and grow in any
    of the tissues of the mouth, and within this small area they may be of varied clinical, histological and biological
    features. These can be lesions typically observed in the oral cavity, but also characteristic of cases where the
    symptoms occur both in the mouth and in other body parts. The aim of this study was to present a cytological
    picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer and to compare the cytological picture with
    that obtained from a group of patients with no cancer, using the Papanicolaou classification and the Bethesda
    system. The study was conducted in 126 patients treated surgically in the II General and Gastroenterological
    Surgery Clinic between 2006 and 2008. All patients were divided into two groups based on the type of lesions. In
    both of the studied groups, more than half of the patients did not present any abnormalities in the mucosa of the
    mouth, lips and cheeks in the physical examination. None of the patients had erosion, ulceration or lesions
    typical of leukoplakia or lichen planus. No malignant cells were detected in either of the studied groups, and
    there were no well-defined lesions found in the oral cavity that would distinguish the patients with gastrointestinal
    cancer. (The incidence of malignant gastrointestinal cancers in Poland has been constantly growing, which has
    led to an intensification of the search for new markers of the early clinical stage of this disease. The

  12. Patient Related Factors Associated with Delayed Reporting in Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akram

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study provide guidance towards interventions to reduce patient delay. Interventions should target the rural, older age group and lower socioeconomic population for educating them and to change their psychosocial behavior for oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

  13. Evaluation of potential salivary acetaldehyde production from ethanol in oral cancer patients and healthy subjects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kocaelli, H; Apaydin, A; Aydil, B; Ayhan, M; Karadeniz, A; Ozel, S; Yılmaz, E; Akgün, B; Eren, B

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, saliva samples from oral cancer patients and healthy individuals were incubated in vitro with ethanol in order to investigate factors which can influence salivary acetaldehyde production...

  14. Induction chemotherapy for oral cavity cancer patients: Current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marta, Gustavo Nader; William, William N; Feher, Olavo; Carvalho, André Lopes; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo

    2015-12-01

    There is a lack of data from phase III randomized studies to support an ideal approach for locally advanced oral cavity cancer patients. In general, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are valid treatment options, and combined approach is usually indicated given poor clinical outcomes with single modality therapy. The aim of this study is to review the current status and future perspectives of induction chemotherapy for locally advanced oral cavity cancer patients.

  15. Preventive Effect of Rebamipide Gargle on Chemoradiotherpy-Induced Oral Mucositis in Patients with Oral Cancer: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yasuda

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the efficacy and safety of rebamipide in preventing chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with oral cancer.Material and Methods: Patients with oral cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy (daily radiotherapy plus docetaxel hydrate once a week were enrolled for this study. They were assigned in a double-blind fashion to receive either rebamipide gargle or placebo on the days of chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using the WHO grading system. The primary endpoint of this study was the incidence of grade 3 - 4 mucositis after exposure to 40 Gy radiation (4 weeks. The secondary endpoint was the effect of rebamipide gargle on tumour response to chemoradiotherapy.Results: Twenty-four patients were randomly assigned to receive rebamipide gargle (n = 12 or placebo-gargle (n = 12 during chemoradiotherapy. The number of patients with severe mucositis (WHO ≥ 3 was higher in the placebo group than in the rebamipide group (83.3% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.036. In addition, no effect of rebamipide gargle on tumour response to chemoradiotherapy was recognized compared with the placebo group.Conclusions: For patients with oral cancer undergoing chemoradiotherapy, rebamipide gargle may contribute to decrease the severity of oral mucositis.

  16. Preventive effect of rebamipide gargle on chemoradiotherpy-induced oral mucositis in patients with oral cancer: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Takashi; Chiba, Hiroshige; Satomi, Takafumi; Matsuo, Akira; Kaneko, Tadayoshi; Chikazu, Daichi; Miyamatsu, Hironobu

    2012-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of rebamipide in preventing chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with oral cancer. Patients with oral cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy (daily radiotherapy plus docetaxel hydrate once a week) were enrolled for this study. They were assigned in a double-blind fashion to receive either rebamipide gargle or placebo on the days of chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis was assessed using the WHO grading system. The primary endpoint of this study was the incidence of grade 3 - 4 mucositis after exposure to 40 Gy radiation (4 weeks). The secondary endpoint was the effect of rebamipide gargle on tumour response to chemoradiotherapy. Twenty-four patients were randomly assigned to receive rebamipide gargle (n = 12) or placebo-gargle (n = 12) during chemoradiotherapy. The number of patients with severe mucositis (WHO ≥ 3) was higher in the placebo group than in the rebamipide group (83.3% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.036). In addition, no effect of rebamipide gargle on tumour response to chemoradiotherapy was recognized compared with the placebo group. For patients with oral cancer undergoing chemoradiotherapy, rebamipide gargle may contribute to decrease the severity of oral mucositis.

  17. [Circulating biomarkers association in the follow-up of patients with oral cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, G; Cozzolino, A; Santagata, M; Vicidomini, A; Itro, A

    2001-05-01

    The goal of this study is to analyze the importance of circulating biomarkers association in the management of patients affected by oral cancer. In this study a survey is made of the international experience from 1980 to 1990 based on the presence of CEA, LASA, SCC Ag, TPA, ferritina, CA-50 and others in patients affected by oral cancer and the sensitivity and specificity of these circulating biomarkers association are assessed. In patients with active disease, the results obtained at the time of diagnosis of oral cancer are not satisfactory due to poor specificity of these circulating biomarkers association. The conclusions is drawn that the circulating biomarkers association (especially CEA, SCC Ag, LASA, ferritin, TPA and CA-50) appears to be useful in the prognosis and staging of oral cancer, while their presence is not significative for the diagnosis.

  18. Management of oral mucositis in patients with cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, R.; Fliedner, M.C.; Smiet, A.C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a distressing toxic effect of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It can increase the need for total parenteral nutrition and opioid analgesics, prolong hospital stays, increase the risk of infection, and greatly diminish a patient's quality of life. Nurses play a critical role in

  19. ON ORAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Svetitsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes a rise in the incidence of oral cancer in the Rostov Region since the 1990s. The study has indicated that this rise is associated with regional population growth due to the forced migrants after the collapse of the USSR. Financial problems, unbalanced nutrition, poor oral hygiene, and depression in this group of patients have contributed to the higher incidence of precancers and cancers.

  20. Maxillofacial prosthetic rehabilitation of the oral cancer patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfaardt, J.F.; Monteith, B.D. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Prosthetic Dentistry)

    1982-08-01

    The victim of orofacial cancer is frequently subjected to severe morphological and functional disturbance: a condition which the maxillofacial prosthetist can do much to alleviate through the use of various prosthetic devices. The successful rehabilitation of these patients, however, is often compromised by the presence of psychosocial and other problems, the solution of which extends beyond the limits of a single clinical discipline. The modern approach to orofacial cancer, therefore, is organised within the context of interdisciplinary co-operation: each phase of patient management being planed and executed according to the co-ordinated efforts of the various members of a head and neck cancer team.

  1. Long-Term Surgical Complications in the Oral Cancer Patient: a Comprehensive Review. Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Kolokythas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Oral and oropharyngeal cancer remains among the top ten most common malignancies in the United States and worldwide. Over the last several decades the approach to treatment of oral cancer has changed very little with regards to primary tumour extirpation while the approach to the “at risk” lymph nodes has evolved significantly. Perhaps the most significant change in the surgical treatment of cancer is the introduction of free flap for reconstruction post resection. Despite these surgical advances, oral cancer ablation, still results in the sacrifice of several functional and aesthetic organs. The aim of this article was to provide a comprehensive review of the potential long-term complications associated with surgical treatment of oral cancer and their management.Material and Methods: The available English language literature relevant to long-term surgical complications associated with surgical treatment of oral cancer was reviewed. The potential common as well as rarer complications that may be encountered and their treatment are summarized.Results: In total 50 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The topics covered in the first part of this review series include ablative surgery complications, issues with speech, swallowing and chewing and neurologic dysfunction.Conclusions: The early complications associated with oncologic surgery for oral cancer are similar to other surgical procedures. The potential long-term complications however are quite challenging for the oncologic team and the patient who survives oral cancer, primarily due to the highly specialized regional tissues involved in the surgical field.

  2. A systematic review of oral fungal infections in patients receiving cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalla, Rajesh V.; Latortue, Marie C.; Hong, Catherine H.; Ariyawardana, Anura; D'Amato-Palumbo, Sandra; Fischer, Dena J.; Martof, Andrew; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Patton, Lauren L.; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    The aims of this systematic review were to determine, in patients receiving cancer therapy, the prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection and fungal colonization, to determine the impact on quality of life and cost of care, and to review current management strategies for oral fungal infections.

  3. A systematic review of oral fungal infections in patients receiving cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalla, Rajesh V.; Latortue, Marie C.; Hong, Catherine H.; Ariyawardana, Anura; D'Amato-Palumbo, Sandra; Fischer, Dena J.; Martof, Andrew; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Patton, Lauren L.; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this systematic review were to determine, in patients receiving cancer therapy, the prevalence of clinical oral fungal infection and fungal colonization, to determine the impact on quality of life and cost of care, and to review current management strategies for oral fungal infections. T

  4. Association between general and oral health-related quality of life in patients treated for oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakos, Georgios; Gil-Montoya, José-Antonio; Montero, Javier; Bravo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Less is known about the association between general health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and oral HRQoL (OHRQoL) among patients with specific diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the association between patient-centered outcome measurements (HRQoL and OHRQoL) of oral cancer patients at least 6 months after treatment. Material and Methods HRQoL was measured with the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12); OHRQoL was evaluated using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and the Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP). Results Higher OHRQoL scores were associated with lower SF-12 domains scores. The OHIP-14 explained 16.5 % of the total variance of SF-12 Physical Component Summary (PCS) and the OIDP explained 16.1 %. In the SF-12 Mental Component Summary (MCS), the total variance explained was 23.9 % by the OHIP-14 and 21.8 % by the OIDP. Conclusions There was a significant association between long-term OHRQoL and HRQoL in oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients. These results may help to carry out new interventions aiming to improve patient´s life overall. Key words:Mouth neoplasms, quality of life, health status, oral health. PMID:26449436

  5. Nurses′ knowledge and education about oral care of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika R Pai

    2015-01-01

    Setting and design: A cross sectional descriptive survey was conducted among 158 staff nurses working in oncology related areas from 4 different hospitals of Dakshina Kannada district and Udupi district of Karnataka state, India. Statistical Analysis: descriptive and inferential statistics was used by using SPSS 16 version. Results: Majority 81 (51.3% of the staff nurses had poor knowledge of oral care in cancer patients whereas 87 (55.1% reported that knowledge acquired through basic education in oral care is not sufficient. Most of the staff nurses 115 (72.8% did not receive basic education in oral care of cancer patients. There was significant association between knowledge and variables such as designation (.005, years of work experience (.040 and years of experience in cancer wards (.000 at 0.05 levels. Conclusion: Lack of knowledge suggest the need to develop and implement continuing nursing education programs on oral care specifically for patients receiving cancer treatments, for improving knowledge of staff nurses′ in order to render comprehensive care to the patients. This study also recommends the importance of inclusion of cancer patient specific oral care in the curriculum which can enhance competency of the qualified nurses in cancer wards.

  6. Systematic review of natural agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarom, Noam; Ariyawardana, Anura; Hovan, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society for Oral Oncology. The body of evidence for each intervention, in each cancer treatment setting, was assigned an evidence level. Based on the evidence level, one of the following three guideline determinations was possible: recommendation......, suggestion, and no guideline possible. RESULTS: A total of 49 papers across 15 interventions were examined. A new suggestion was developed in favor of systemic zinc supplements administered orally in the prevention of oral mucositis in oral cancer patients receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation (Level......Abstract PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to review the available literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of natural agents for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study Group of the Multinational...

  7. MALNUTRITION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS TREATED FOR ORAL OR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; van Oort, Rob P.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    Background. This study assessed whether malnourished patients score lower on quality of life after treatment for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Methods. Malnutrition (weight loss >= 10% in 6 months/>= 5% in 1 month) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality

  8. MALNUTRITION AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS TREATED FOR ORAL OR OROPHARYNGEAL CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; van Oort, Rob P.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Background. This study assessed whether malnourished patients score lower on quality of life after treatment for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Methods. Malnutrition (weight loss >= 10% in 6 months/>= 5% in 1 month) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality

  9. Serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc in patients with oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharvand, Maryam; Manifar, Soheila; Akkafan, Reihaneh; Mortazavi, Hamed; Sabour, Siamak

    2014-01-01

    Apart from the crucial role of micronutrients like copper, iron, and zinc in the functions of body enzymes, it seems that changes in the serum levels of these biomarkers may play a role in the pathogenesis of oral cancer. The aim of this study was to measure the serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc in patients with oral malignancies. Sixty consecutive patients with oral cancer, together with 66 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. The serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc were measured in both patients and healthy individuals. Data were statistically analyzed by Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. In patients with oral cancer, the serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc were 267.41 ± 249.45, 209.85 ± 160.28, and 113.51 ± 52.30 mg/dl, respectively. In the control group, the serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc were reported to be 106.13 ± 72.96, 114.20 ± 38.69, and 64.57 ± 31.54 mg/dl, respectively. The mean serum values of ferritin, copper, and zinc in cancerous patients were significantly higher than in controls (p serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc in oral cancer patients were significantly higher than in control group subjects.

  10. Serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc in patients with oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Baharvand

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Apart from the crucial role of micronutrients like copper, iron, and zinc in the functions of body enzymes, it seems that changes in the serum levels of these biomarkers may play a role in the pathogenesis of oral cancer. The aim of this study was to measure the serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc in patients with oral malignancies. Methods: Sixty consecutive patients with oral cancer, together with 66 age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. The serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc were measured in both patients and healthy individuals. Data were statistically analyzed by Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: In patients with oral cancer, the serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc were 267.41 ± 249.45, 209.85 ± 160.28, and 113.51 ± 52.30 mg/dl, respectively. In the control group, the serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc were reported to be 106.13 ± 72.96, 114.20 ± 38.69, and 64.57 ± 31.54 mg/dl, respectively. The mean serum values of ferritin, copper, and zinc in cancerous patients were significantly higher than in controls (p < 0.001. Conclusions: The serum levels of ferritin, copper, and zinc in oral cancer patients were significantly higher than in control group subjects.

  11. Patients with Advanced Ovarian Cancer Administered Oral Etoposide following Taxane as Maintenance Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Nagano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The concept of maintenance therapy is one of the highly relevant approaches in the management of advanced ovarian cancer. The fundamental goal of maintenance therapy is to improve survival outcomes. We attempted to reinforce maintenance chemotherapy by adding oral etoposide following taxane administration. Cases: We retrospectively evaluated 14 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who had achieved clinically defined complete response to a primary platinum/taxane chemotherapy regimen and who were administered oral etoposide (50 mg/day × 21 days per cycle monthly for 3-5 cycles following paclitaxel or docetaxel administration as maintenance chemotherapy. With regard to oral etoposide toxicity, grade 2 oral mucositis and grade 3 anemia were observed in 1 patient each. Three to five cycles of etoposide were administered to all patients, though daily dosage was reduced to 25 mg in 2 patients due to toxicity. The median progression-free survival was 43.5 months, the median overall survival was 86 months, and 5-year overall survival was 77.1%. Conclusion: The results from this ovarian cancer treatment evaluation suggest that oral etoposide may be administered safely following paclitaxel or docetaxel as maintenance chemotherapy. We expect this regimen to contribute to the improvement in the survival outcomes of patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

  12. Oral cancer presentation among Malay patients in hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Asmani Abdul; Saddki, Norkhafizah; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Abdullah, Nizam

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of oral cancer among Malay patients in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM), Kelantan. A retrospective record review was conducted from August to December 2006 in HUSM. Of 133 patients with oral cancer diagnosed from 1986 to 2005, 118 were Malay. Data on socio-demographic background, high-risk habits practiced, clinical and histological characteristics, and treatment profile of the patients were obtained. Malay patients with oral cancer were predominantly elderly, aged 60 years old and above (51.7%) at the time of diagnosis, with a mean age of 58.1 years (SD 16.81). Most patients were males (64.4%) and the majority of them were married (83.9%). More than half (58.5%) had been smokers, and of those who smoked, 89.9% were males. Some had a betel quid chewing habit (22.9%) but none ever consumed alcohol. The majority of the patients (77.1%) were diagnosed at stage IV. The tongue was the most usual site involved (37.3%) and squamous cell carcinoma was the most common histological type seen (75.4%). The prevalence of oral cancer among Malay patients in HUSM is high (88.7%). It is predominantly found in elderly males and the majority of cases present at advanced stage.

  13. Imaging in oral cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreeta Arya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist.

  14. Cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kędra, Bożena; Chomczyk, Monika; Złotkowski, Marcin; Stokowska, Wanda; Borsuk, Agnieszka; Bicz, Mieczysław; Pietruska, Małgorzata; Tokajuk, Grażyna; Charkiewicz, Radosław; Czajka, Piotr; Chyczewski, Lech; Zimnoch, Lech; Kędra, Bogusław

    2012-10-08

    The incidence of malignant gastrointestinal cancers in Poland has been constantly growing, which has led to an intensification of the search for new markers of the early clinical stage of this disease. The oral cavity,as the first part of the gastrointestinal tract, has a very important role. The oral cavity presents symptoms of both typically stomatological and systemic diseases. Oral cancers, benign or malignant, may originate and grow in any of the tissues of the mouth, and within this small area they may be of varied clinical, histological and biological features. These can be lesions typically observed in the oral cavity, but also characteristic of cases where the symptoms occur both in the mouth and in other body parts. The aim of this study was to present a cytological picture of the oral mucosa in patients with gastric and colon cancer and to compare the cytological picture with that obtained from a group of patients with no cancer, using the Papanicolaou classification and the Bethesda system. The study was conducted in 126 patients treated surgically in the II General and Gastroenterological Surgery Clinic between 2006 and 2008. All patients were divided into two groups based on the type of lesions. In both of the studied groups, more than half of the patients did not present any abnormalities in the mucosa of the mouth, lips and cheeks in the physical examination. None of the patients had erosion, ulceration or lesions typical of leukoplakia or lichen planus. No malignant cells were detected in either of the studied groups, and there were no well-defined lesions found in the oral cavity that would distinguish the patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

  15. SURVIVAL RATES IN ORAL CANCER PATIENTS – A 10-YEAR RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Tonchev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is the eighth most common cancer worldwide and presents a serious health problem in countries with higher alcohol consumption and smoking. The aim of the present study was to analyze the survival rates of patients with oral cancer diagnosed at a single center in Bulgaria. The clinical records of patients with oral cancer admitted to the Clinic of Maxillofacial surgery, University Hospital “St. George”, Plovdiv, Bulgaria, from 2004 till 2013 were reviewed. Additional information about follow-up was obtained from the Regional Complex Oncological Centre (RCOC. Data about patient and tumor characteristics – age, sex, site of cancer, stage, degree of differentiation and survival rates were analyzed. The overall 5-year survival rate was 36% while the disease-specific survival rate was 45%. The highest chance for survival was for upper lip (66% while the lowest was for retromolar trigone (0%. Overall survival rate depended also on the stage and grade of differentiation of the tumor. The study confirmed that oral cancer remains serious problem in terms of risk factors, delayed diagnosis, and overall survival rates.

  16. Preferences for oral versus intravenous adjuvant chemotherapy among early breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishitobi M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Makoto Ishitobi,1 Kazuyo Shibuya,2 Yoshifumi Komoike,1 Hiroki Koyama,1 Hideo Inaji1 1Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, 2Department of Nursing, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka, Japan Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate preferences for oral versus intravenous adjuvant chemotherapy among early breast cancer patients (UMIN-CTR number UMIN000004696. Patients and methods: Eighty-two postmenopausal women with estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer who had completed adjuvant chemotherapy were asked about their preferred route of administration of chemotherapy and the reason. Women also answered questions about their physical and psychological status and quality of life during chemotherapy. Results: Patients who had received oral chemotherapy preferred it more frequently than those who had received intravenous chemotherapy (100% versus 37%, respectively, chi-square =15.5; P<0.001. Patients who preferred the same route of administration of chemotherapy as they had previously received showed a significantly better psychological status during chemotherapy compared with those who preferred a different route. Conclusion: Our study showed that preferences for oral and intravenous chemotherapy strongly depended on the actual prior administration of chemotherapy and patients' own experiences during chemotherapy. Keywords: breast cancer, adjuvant, chemotherapy, patient preference, oral, intravenous

  17. Oral cancer survival among Malay patients in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Asmani Abdul; Saddki, Norkhafizah; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Abdullah, Nizam

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to determine oral cancer survival among Malay patients in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM), Kelantan. The medical records of 118 Malay patients with oral cancer admitted in HUSM from 1st January 1986 to 31st December 2005 were reviewed. Data collected include socio-demographic background, high-risk habits practiced, clinical and histological characteristics, and treatment profile of the patients. Survival status and duration were determined by active validation until 31st December 2006. Data entry and analysis were accomplished using SPSS version 12.0. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to perform survival estimates while the log-rank test and the Cox proportional hazards regression model were employed to perform univariate analysis and multivariable analysis of the variables, respectively. The overall five-year survival rate of Malay patients with oral cancer was 18.0%, with a median survival time of 9 months. Significant factors that influenced survival of the patients were age, sex, tumour site, TNM stage, histological type, and treatment received. Survival of oral cancer patients in HUSM was very low. Being elderly, male, presenting with an advanced stage at diagnosis, and not having treatment all contributed to poor survival.

  18. Factors Influencing Adherence in Cancer Patients Taking Oral Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Mathieu; Duprez, Veerle; Beeckman, Dimitri; Grypdonck, Mieke; Quaghebeur, Marijke; Verschueren, Caroline; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Hecke, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Nonadherence in cancer patients taking oral anticancer drugs is common. Reasons for nonadherence are still not really understood as influencing factors are often complex, dynamic, and interrelated. A qualitative study was conducted to gain insight into (non-)adherence behavior in patients taking oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors by exploring (1) processes and factors influencing (non-)adherence and (2) their interrelatedness. Semistructured interviews were held with 30 patients of different ages and with different types of cancer. A grounded theory approach was used. Three foci were found when dealing with oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors: (1) a focus on survival, (2) a focus on quality of life, and (3) a balance between survival and quality of life. The process of adherence was determined by a set of complex and interrelated influencing factors: treatment-related side effects, hope, anxiety, trust, and feedback mechanisms. This qualitative study gives insight into processes and factors influencing (non-)adherence behavior in patients taking oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The results of this study can help healthcare professionals understand why patients taking oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors do not always adhere to their therapy. Conditions should be created by which patients get maximum opportunity to establish a balance between survival and quality of life. An open climate and a trust-based relationship should be established in which patients feel comfortable to openly discuss their therapy and the difficulties they experience.

  19. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ... detection and treatment of oral cancers. Note: For materials specific to African American men, please see: Oral ...

  20. Comparison of orofacial pain of patients with different stages of precancer and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanjie; Zhang, Peipei; Li, Wenlu

    2017-03-16

    Orofacial pain impairs a patient's speech, swallowing, eating and interpersonal relations. Thirty-seven patients with a premalignant oral lesion, 124 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSSC), and 21 patients with a recurrence of OSSC were evaluated for their orofacial pain. The University of California San Francisco Oral Cancer Pain Questionnaire was administered to these patients at their initial visit, before they were prescribed analgesics for pain and before any treatment. Significant differences with respect to orofacial pain between the groups could be evaluatedwere observed. Patients with recurrence had the highest facial pain and patients with precancer had the lowest. Patients with OSSC and recurrence of OSSC reported significant levels of orofacial pain and functional restriction because of pain. Moreover, patients with recurrence of OSSC experienced significantly higher function-related pain, rather than pain qualities. These findings suggest that an important predictor for recurrence of OSSC may be the onset of orofacial pain that is exacerbated during function. The present study examined orofacial pain depending on the disease severity of precancer and oral cancer patients. Earlier recognition of symptoms of OSSC may improve early detection of its recurrence.

  1. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected ...

  2. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the exam can detect oral cancer early—when it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health ... and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. The Oral Cancer Exam Step-by- ...

  3. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected ...

  4. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings ... of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected medical terms and resource information. Oral Cancer A fact ...

  5. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the exam can detect oral cancer early—when it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health ... and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. The Oral Cancer Exam Step-by- ...

  6. Systematic review of anti-inflammatory agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Sarri, Triantafyllia; Bowen, Joanne; Di Palma, Mario; Kouloulias, Vassilios E.; Niscola, Pasquale; Riesenbeck, Dorothea; Stokman, Monique; Tissing, Wim; Yeoh, Eric; Elad, Sharon; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this project was to review the available literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of anti-inflammatory agents for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients. Materials and methods A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study

  7. Systematic review of amifostine for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Sarri, Triantafyllia; Bowen, Joanne; Di Palma, Mario; Kouloulias, Vassilios E.; Niscola, Pasquale; Riesenbeck, Dorothea; Stokman, Monique; Tissing, Wim; Yeoh, Eric; Elad, Sharon; Lalla, Rajesh V.

    The aim of this study was to review the available literature from 1966 until December 31, 2010 and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of amifostine for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients. A systematic review was conducted by the Mucositis Study Group of

  8. Oral ftorafur versus intravenous 5-fluorouracil. A comparative study in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, E; Pedersen, H

    1987-01-01

    The toxicities of oral Ftorafur (1 g/m2/day 1-21) and intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (500 mg/m2/day 1-5) were compared in a prospective randomized study in patients with colorectal cancer. The treatment courses were repeated every 6th week. Leucopenia was more common after 5-FU. Leucocyte nadir...

  9. Morphine mouthwash for the management of oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sarvizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Topical morphine is more effective and more satisfactory to patients than the magic mouthwash in reducing severity of cancer treatment-induced oral mucositis. More studies with larger sample size and longer follow-up are required in this regard.

  10. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Chi Young [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  11. Systematic review of miscellaneous agents for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Jarvis, Virginia; Zadik, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    : A total of 32 papers across 10 interventions were examined. New suggestions were developed against the use of systemic pilocarpine administered orally for prevention of OM during RT in head and neck cancer patients and in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy, with or without total body irradiation......, prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A suggestion was also made against the use of systemic pentoxifylline administered orally for the prevention of OM in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. No guideline was possible for any other agent reviewed due to inadequate and...

  12. A national survey of oral and maxillofacial surgeons' attitudes towards the treatment and dental rehabilitation of oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, A; Owens, J; Dewan, K; Summerwill, A

    2009-12-12

    To investigate the attitudes of maxillofacial surgeons in the treatment and dental rehabilitation of oral cancer patients in the UK. The survey was conducted by postal questionnaires with 17 close-ended questions. A total of 229 questionnaires were sent to members of the British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons over a one week period. A follow-up was sent if a reply was not received within 12 weeks. These results were compared to a similar study that was carried out approximately 15 years ago. The response rate was 65.5% (150/229). Overall 62% of respondents (92/150) carried out maxillary resections, which represents a decline of 23% on the previous study. There has been an increase in surgeons reconstructing the maxillary defect from 38% in the 1995 study to 91% in the present study. Ninety-eight percent of respondents had their patients seen in a multidisciplinary team (MDT) clinic, but in only 30% of the cases was a restorative dentist present on these clinics. There has been an improvement in the accessibility of a restorative dentist for this patient cohort, from 65% to 90%. The use of implants for dental rehabilitation post-cancer surgery has increased from 43% to 93%. This study highlights the changes in the dental and oral rehabilitation of patients undergoing resective surgery for oral cancer and especially those undergoing a maxillectomy procedure. It illustrates the increased use of implants for post-surgery rehabilitation and shows the different trends in which these implants are placed. An important aspect of this study is the input of the dental team. Current national guidelines state that a consultant restorative dentist needs to be a member of the MDT; this survey shows that this was the case in only 30% of responses.

  13. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... papillomavirus (HPV) infection (same virus that causes genital warts ) Taking medicines that weaken the immune system (immunosuppressants) ... dry mouth Support Groups You can ease the stress of illness by joining a cancer support group . ...

  14. Patients with oral cancer developing from pre-existing oral leukoplakia: do they do better than those with de novo oral cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, M.; ten Hove, I.; Allard, R.H.B.; Bezemer, D.P.D.; van der Waal, I.

    2008-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that patients with squamous cell carcinomas derived from oral leukoplakia have a better prognosis than patients with carcinomas that are not associated with oral leukoplakia. Aim: To study the mortality rate of 19 patients with a squamous cell carcinoma derived from

  15. Patients with oral cancer developing from pre-existing oral leukoplakia: do they do better than those with de novo oral cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, M.; ten Hove, I.; Allard, R.H.B.; Bezemer, D.P.D.; van der Waal, I.

    2008-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that patients with squamous cell carcinomas derived from oral leukoplakia have a better prognosis than patients with carcinomas that are not associated with oral leukoplakia. Aim: To study the mortality rate of 19 patients with a squamous cell carcinoma derived from

  16. Dental Students\\' knowledge of preventing, early detecting and referring patients suffering from oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mohsen Hosseini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Nowadays, oral cancer is considered one of the most important diseases related to oral health. The objective of the present study was to determine the dental students’ knowledge in Isfahan about oral cancer and the comparison of the level of students' knowledge in different years of education. Materials and Methods: The present study was a cross-sectional-analytical one conducted in 2013. The population of study included the dental students of private and state University of Isfahan which 255 students were randomly selected. The data were collected using questionnaire and were then analyzed using SPSS software program and Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney. Results: From private and public dental schools in Isfahan, 56% and 44% of dental students were involved. Regarding performing routine clinical oral examination, 81% of the participants answered positively, which showed no significant difference among the years of education of the participants (P=0.116. Regarding the examination of patients with oral lesions, 46% of them answered positively, which the difference between the years of education was highly significant (P≤0.001. Conclusion: The findings of the research indicated that the level of knowledge of dental students of Isfahan city regarding the detection of oral lesions was not sufficient. Although, the students did not perform common examinations for exploring oral cancer, they did not have sufficient knowledge regarding some of the risk factors and oral lesions related to cancer. Therefore, it is necessary that a comprehensive curriculum be developed in this regard for their education.

  17. Analysis of various risk factors affecting potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer patients of Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Kadashetti

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Chewing tobacco/betel quid is a strong risk factor in the development of PMD and oral cancer. Also age, gender, SES, education, and occupation influence the development of PMD and oral cancer.

  18. A Study Of The Effects Of Illness Experienced By Families Of Oral And Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyalaxmi A

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question : What are the various areas and burden a family experiences due to presence of oral and oropharyngeal cancer patient. Objectives: 1. To identify the family burden like financial burden, disruption of routine activities and family leisure etc. 2. To study the severity of family burden experienced by the families of oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients. Study design: Case- control. Setting: Gujarat Cancer and Research Institute (G.C.R.I, Ahmedabad. Participants: 100 cases belonging to the diagnostic categories no. 140-46 of ICD â€"9 and 100 controls belonging to the diagnostic categories other than no. 140-46 of ICD-9 Statistical analysis: Proportions, Chi-square test and Z test. Results: Financial burden was observed in 36% of cases and 43% of controls had burden on the family. Out of 43% respondents reporting any burden, 36(83.72% were identified with severe burden.

  19. Orally administered S-1 suppresses circulating endothelial cell counts in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    [Background]S-1 is an oral cytotoxic preparation that contains tegafur. Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) is a metabolite of tegafur that is known to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated angiogenic activity. The aim of this study was to determine the change in circulating endothelial cell (CEC) counts, GBL levels, and angiogenesis-related factors during S-1 administration in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. [Methods]Patients with HER2-negative MBC were eligible. S-1 was...

  20. Improving adherence with oral antiemetic agents in patients with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Carolyn B

    2015-05-01

    In this small breast cancer-dedicated solo practice, a retrospective medical record review disclosed the following: significant rate of chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting and discordance between patient-reported compliance with prescribed antiemetics and medical record documentation of compliance. As part of the curriculum for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Quality Training Program, a quality improvement project was developed to improve adherence to oral antiemetics in our patients with breast cancer receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. The following steps were undertaken in plan-do-study-act cycles to improve adherence: enhanced patient education at time of chemotherapy consent, implementation of standardized in-person or e-mail contact with our patients receiving chemotherapy, and improvement of our electronic health record documentation of adherence to oral antiemetics. A run chart was generated to analyze our data. After our interventions, the percentage of patients who took their antiemetics as prescribed rose from a baseline of 49% to 79%. Significant improvement in adherence to oral antiemetics among patients with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy was achieved and sustained in this small-practice setting using the framework provided by participation in the ASCO Quality Training Program. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Prevalence based epigrammatic study of oral cancer and other mucosal disorders in elderly patients visiting dental institution of Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj T Bhagawati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This report provides the descriptive information about the oral health among the elderly population. The objective is to assess the association of age, medical status, recent use of dental services, habits and dentures with that of oral cancer, and other mucosal disorders. Materials and Methods: Data from the interviews and clinical examination of 285 persons aged above 60 years were obtained. Patients were divided into three groups of 75 patients each with age group of 60-65 years, 66-70 years, and 71 years above, respectively. Patients were examined and questioned regarding the oral health complaints and the presence of cancer and other mucosal disorders. Results: There are no statistically significant differentiates between the three groups in terms of oral health complaint, medical status. The patients in all the three groups gave the history of consumption of betel quid/alcohol/smoking. About 22.1% patients in Group A, 18.9% in Group B, and 37.9% in Group C had associated mucosal lesion like oral cancer, growth, pigmentation, red lesion, ulcer, and white lesions. Association between deleterious habits and oral mucosal lesions was seen in 12, 15, and 16 patients in Groups A, B, and C, respectively. Conclusion: The oral cancer and oral mucosal lesions were associated with oral habits and the use of faulty dentures. Age had minimal influence but coexistence of multiple conditions might further complicate the oral health.

  2. Long-Term Surgical Complications in the Oral Cancer Patient: a Comprehensive Review. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Kolokythas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Surgery remains the preferred treatment for the majority of oral cancers. The aim of the present article was to provide a comprehensive review of complications associated with surgical treatment of oral cancer including hardware failure; complications associated with choice of reconstruction, donor site morbidity as well as functional and aesthetic issues that impact on the quality of life.Material and Methods: The available English language literature relevant to complications associated with surgical treatment of oral cancer was reviewed. Complications associated with potential for disfigurement, choice of reconstruction, donor site morbidity as well as functional and aesthetic issues that impact on the quality of life are summarized.Results: In total 35 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. The topics covered in the second part of this review series include hardware failure, scars and fistula formation; complications associated with choice of reconstruction, donor site morbidity as well as functional and aesthetic issues.Conclusions: Cancer resection should be planned around two very important concepts. First and foremost is the eradication of disease. This should be the ultimate goal of the ablative team and all potential complications that may be the result of appropriately executed oncologic resection should be discussed in details with the patient. Adequate reconstruction of the defects with restoration of form and function is the second, but not of less importance, goal for the successful care of the head and neck cancer patient.

  3. Impact of dental considerations on the quality of life of oral cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaishree Thanvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the significance of pre-treatment dental care in oral cancer patients and to assess its impact on the quality of life of these patients. Materials and Methods: The sample size included 50 oral cancer patients who were visiting to a palliative care unit at Jaipur. Assessment was based on thorough case history, complete dental examination. Quality of life was estimated by W.H.O quality of life questionnaire. Result: On analysis, patients of age group 50-59 avoided to prophylactic dental treatment before cancer treatment and therapy. Seventy-eight percent patients experienced worst quality of life after the treatment as a result of dental complications. Out of those 78%, only 2% of patients took preventive dental treatments before the cancer therapy. Conclusion: Dental negligence is still a major cause of worsening of post treatment quality of life of an individual. Therefore, the treating oncologist should always take these considerations seriously to provide quality treatment to the patient.

  4. [Nutritional status of patients with cancer of oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Camargo, Dana Aline; De Nicola Delfín, Luigina; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A; Copca Mendoza, Erika Thalia; Hernández Méndez, Margarita; Herrera Gómez, Ángel; Meneses García, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: El cáncer de cavidad oral ocupa el doceavo lugar a nivel mundial. El tratamiento del cáncer de cavidad oral es habitualmente cirugía seguida de radioterapia, la cual puede estar indicada sola o con quimioterapia; este tipo de terapias tienen importantes efectos secundarios funcionales sobre el estado nutricio del paciente. Objetivo: El objetivo de este trabajo es conocer el impacto de los diferentes tratamientos sobre el estado nutricional de los pacientes con cáncer de cavidad oral atendidos en el Instituto Nacional de Cancerología durante el período comprendido del 2009 al 2011. Material y métodos: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, y retrospectivo. Se incluyeron 99 pacientes con cáncer de cavidad oral. Se registraron las siguientes variables; género, edad, tipo de tratamiento (cirugía, quimioterapia, radioterapia), complicaciones más importantes secundarias a tratamiento, pérdida de peso, índice de masa corporal (IMC) y albumina. Resultados y discusión: La prevalencia de cáncer de cavidad oral fue mayor en mujeres (58,6%); la edad promedio fue de 61,22 años. Las complicaciones secundarias al tratamiento fueron xerostomía (20%) seguida de odinofagia y mucositis (19%), la relación de pérdida de peso y sintomatología se observó en el (54%) de los pacientes, debido al tipo de alimentación previo, durante y después del tratamiento en los cuales tuvo mayor predominio el uso de papillas. Conclusión: Se observó una pérdida de peso debido a las complicaciones del tratamiento médico que afectaron el estado nutricio, por ello es importante tener un monitoreo continuo que apoye el éxito del tratamiento multidisciplinario.

  5. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order Publications ...

  6. THE PROBLEM OF THE USE OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN CANCER PATIENTS RECEIVING CHEMOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Rumyantsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite large number of known risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE in cancer patients existing prediction models do not allow definite identification of cancer patients that have indications for anticoagulant prevention. Besides, heparin and warfarin use for VTE prevention in cancer is accompanied by some problems. New oral anticoagulants (NOAC are promising drugs for use in oncology practice; however their use is complicated by the lack of data on efficacy and safety in these patients, potential drug interactions and the possibility of unpredictable changes in effect during chemotherapy. Widespread use of NOAC for the prevention and treatment of tumor-associated VTE prior to phase III trials is not recommended. However, the criteria for selection of patients for whom the study of the efficacy and safety of NOAC is a priority can now be developed.

  7. Adherence to oral chemotherapy medications among gastroenterological cancer patients visiting an outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Chieko; Mikoshiba, Naoko; Shibuta, Tomomi; Yamahana, Reiko; Kawakami, Aki; Tateishi, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Koike, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate medication adherence to oral chemotherapy medications and determinants of medication non-adherence to them among gastroenterological cancer patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 117 consecutive, consenting, eligible patients visiting an outpatient clinic of university hospital in Japan. Good medication adherence was defined as taking 100% of the prescribed dose. Medication adherence was measured via self-report. We hypothesized that there was a significant relationship between medication non-adherence and the five factors defined by the World Health Organization: patient-related, socioeconomic-related, condition-related, treatment-related, and healthcare-system/provider-related factors. Multiple logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with oral chemotherapy medication non-adherence. The proportion of patients showing good medication adherence was 56.4%. The multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the determinants of medication non-adherence to oral chemotherapy medications included having a history of patient-caused treatment interruptions due to worsening of symptoms (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 9.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.38-66.47), having diarrhea (AOR = 3.25, 95% CI = 1.13-9.34), experiencing pain (AOR = 0.17, 95% CI = 0.05-0.55), taking oral chemotherapy medication every 8 h (AOR = 5.52, 95% CI = 1.71-17.81), and diminished sense of priority for medication (AOR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.21-1.63). This study suggests that many patients with gastroenterological cancer were non-adherent to oral chemotherapy medications. It might be necessary to conduct periodic screening and connect patients at a high risk of medication non-adherence to appropriate support.

  8. TC2 C776G polymorphism studies in patients with oral cancer in the Polish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Malinowska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The first signs of oral cancer may resemble developing infections in the mucous membranes, with throat cancer symptoms being similar to those of upper respiratory tract infections. This greatly hinders rapid diagnosis and treatment. Better knowledge of the changes occurring in the metabolism of folic acid can help in understanding the carcinogenesis affecting DNA methylation and genome stability. Polymorphisms in genes encoding enzymes involved in this pathway may influence enzyme activity and thereby interfere with the concentrations of homocysteine and S-adenosylmethionine, which are important for DNA synthesis and cellular methylation reactions. The aim of the study was to determine the risk of oral cancer associated with the TC2 C776G polymorphism, as determined in 119 patients. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. The test genotype was found to correspond to the Hardy-Weinberg (HW equilibrium (p > 0.05. In our population G/G homozygosity of C776G TC2 gene polymorphism increases the risk of oral cancer; OR (odds ratio: 4.3875; 95% CI (confidence interval: 2.0518-9.319; p = 0.001. Regarding C/G genotype of the C776G TC2 gene, polymorphism also increases the risk of developing this cancer; OR 2.4146 95% CI: 1.2803-4.5541; p = 0.01.

  9. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Deadlines Grant Application Forms Application Receipt Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write ... detection and treatment of oral cancers. Note: For materials specific to African American men, please see: Oral ...

  10. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order ... Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents an overview of physical, mental, ...

  11. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected medical terms and resource information. Oral ... of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD 20892-2190 301-496-4261 NIH… ...

  12. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Tanaka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances for detecting high-risk patients, monitoring preventive interventions, and assessing cancer risk and pharmacogenomics. In addition, novel chemopreventive agents based on molecular mechanisms and targets against oral cancers will be derived from studies using appropriate animal carcinogenesis models. New approaches, such as molecular-targeted agents and agent combinations in high-risk oral individuals, are undoubtedly needed to reduce the devastating worldwide consequences of oral malignancy.

  13. Oral physiology and quality of life in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Luciano J; Braga Caputo, Júnior; Midori Castelo, Paula; Francelino Andrade, Eric; Silva Marques, Leandro; Martins de Paiva, Saul; Márcia Pereira, Stela; Vicente Pereira, Cássio

    2015-05-01

    Introdución: El tratamiento del cáncer puede afectar la salud de los dientes y estructuras de apoyo, que son esenciales para el proceso de masticación, que pueden cambiar el estado nutricional del paciente. Objetivo: El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el impacto de los cambios fisiológicos orales sobre la calidad de vida (QoL) de los pacientes sometidos a tratamiento contra el cáncer. Metodos: Inicialmente 84 pacientes con cáncer fueron examinados y sólo los que presentan al menos 15 dientes naturales fueron seleccionados para la fisiología oral y la calidad de las pruebas de la vida. La muestra final quedó conformado por 30 pacientes. Veinte sujetos fueron seleccionados como controles emparejados por edad y sexo. Dental estado de la caries, el flujo salival, rendimiento masticatorio (MP), la ubicación del tumor, la duración de la quimioterapia y la radioterapia y lo cuestionario de La Organización Mundial de la Salud Calidad de Vida (WHOQOL-BREF) cuestionario fueron evaluados. Se utilizaron modelos de regresión lineal para probar la relación entre los dominios del WHOQOL-BREF (psicológicos relación física,, social, ambiental y de calidad de vida en general) y variables independientes bajo estudio. Resultados y Discusión: Número de dientes, MP y el flujo salival fueron menores en los pacientes de cáncer, así como para las puntuaciones obtenidas en la relación social, medio ambiente y dominios de calidad de vida general (p.

  14. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  15. Speech outcome after surgical treatment for oral and oropharyngeal cancer : A longitudinal assessment of patients reconstructed by a microvascular flap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borggreven, PA; Verdonck-de Leeuw, [No Value; Langendijk, JA; Doornaert, P; Koster, MN; de Bree, R; Leemans, R

    Background. The aim of the study was to analyze speech outcome for patients with advanced oral/oropharyngeal cancer treated with reconstructive surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods. Speech tests (communicative suitability, intelligibility, articulation, nasality, and consonant errors) were

  16. Adherence to oral antineoplastic agents by cancer patients: definition and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassan, F; Peter, F; Houbre, B; Brennstuhl, M J; Costantini, M; Speyer, E; Tarquinio, C

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s, oral chemotherapy has been gaining ground as cancer treatment. This therapy seems to have few toxic effects and offers patients good quality of life. However, in addition to the fears the therapy might generate in patients, oral treatment raises a new issue, which, until now, has been marginal in this field: therapeutic observance or adherence. We investigated the research into adherence to oral chemotherapy among cancer patients published between 1990 and July 2013. Studies showed considerable diversity in terms of both the definition and measurement of adherence. As well, adherence to antineoplastic therapy is affected by the patient's understanding of the treatment and ability to remember information provided by the physician, treatment length and psychological distress. Our review of the few studies on adherence to anticancer drug treatment raises some questions that could be pursued in future research. In light of our findings, patients should receive 'therapy education' to help them and their support groups better understand the disease and its treatment and to achieve optimal health management and improved treatment effectiveness. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Sentinel Node in Oral Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tartaglione, Girolamo; Stoeckli, Sandro J; de Bree, Remco;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nuclear imaging plays a crucial role in lymphatic mapping of oral cancer. This evaluation represents a subanalysis of the original multicenter SENT trial data set, involving 434 patients with T1-T2, N0, and M0 oral squamous cell carcinoma. The impact of acquisition techniques, tracer...

  18. Oral complications of cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreizen, S.; Daly, T.E.; Drane, J.B.; Brown, L.R.

    1977-02-01

    Injury to surrounding tissues during radiotherapy for oral cancer can have devastating physical and psychologic consequences for the patient. Oral complications include xerostomia, dental decay, mucositis, taste loss, osteoradionecrosis, infection, and trismus. In many instances, these problems can be eradicated or controlled with appropriate treatment.

  19. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order Publications English and Spanish brochures available free ...

  20. The Efficacy of Oral Nutritional Intervention in Malnourished Cancer Patients: a Systemic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Min; Sung, Mi-Kyung

    2016-10-01

    Cancer is currently a leading cause of deaths worldwide and the number of new cases is growing rapidly in both, developed and developing countries. Nutritional management during and after cancer treatment affects treatment efficacy and patient quality of life (QOL). This review systemically examined the effect of oral nutritional interventions on nutritional and clinical outcomes in cancer patients. We especially focused on outcomes such as nutritional status indices, immune-associated biochemical markers, and QOL assessments to provide insights on the applicability of different outcomes. A total of 28 papers were selected for systematic review. The nutritional composition of oral nutritional supplements (ONS), outcome measures, and efficacy of the oral nutritional interventions were summarized and discussed. Most ONS contain 1 or more functional components in addition to basic nutrients. Each study used various outcome measures and significant efficacy was observed for a limited number of measures. Nutritional status indices, QOL measures, and the duration of hospital stay improved in about 40% of the studies. One or more markers of immune function and inflammatory responses were improved by ONS in 65% of the selected studies. These results suggest that appropriate use of ONS may be an ideal way to improve treatment efficacy; however, additional intervention trials are required to confirm these findings.

  1. The Efficacy of Oral Nutritional Intervention in Malnourished Cancer Patients: a Systemic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is currently a leading cause of deaths worldwide and the number of new cases is growing rapidly in both, developed and developing countries. Nutritional management during and after cancer treatment affects treatment efficacy and patient quality of life (QOL). This review systemically examined the effect of oral nutritional interventions on nutritional and clinical outcomes in cancer patients. We especially focused on outcomes such as nutritional status indices, immune-associated biochemical markers, and QOL assessments to provide insights on the applicability of different outcomes. A total of 28 papers were selected for systematic review. The nutritional composition of oral nutritional supplements (ONS), outcome measures, and efficacy of the oral nutritional interventions were summarized and discussed. Most ONS contain 1 or more functional components in addition to basic nutrients. Each study used various outcome measures and significant efficacy was observed for a limited number of measures. Nutritional status indices, QOL measures, and the duration of hospital stay improved in about 40% of the studies. One or more markers of immune function and inflammatory responses were improved by ONS in 65% of the selected studies. These results suggest that appropriate use of ONS may be an ideal way to improve treatment efficacy; however, additional intervention trials are required to confirm these findings. PMID:27812512

  2. Malnutrition in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer-prevalence and relationship with oral symptoms : an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess prevalence of malnutrition after treatment for oral/oropharyngeal cancer and to explore how oral symptoms relate to malnutrition after treatment. In this cross-sectional study, malnutrition (weight loss a parts per thousand yenaEuro parts per thousand 10% in 6 months or a

  3. Malnutrition in patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer-prevalence and relationship with oral symptoms : an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess prevalence of malnutrition after treatment for oral/oropharyngeal cancer and to explore how oral symptoms relate to malnutrition after treatment. In this cross-sectional study, malnutrition (weight loss a parts per thousand yenaEuro parts per thousand 10% in 6 months or a

  4. Adherence and discontinuation of oral hormonal therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Lorena Rocha; Baldoni, André de Oliveira; Borges, Anna Paula de Sá; Pereira, Leonardo Régis Leira

    2014-02-01

    Oral treatment in women with breast cancer has been increasingly used. However, a potentially negative side of oral medication is poor patient adherence and/or discontinuation, which reduces the treatment effectiveness, accelerating progression of the disease and reducing the patient survival rate. To compare the rates of adherence and/or discontinuation and the methodologies used to assess these outcomes. It was conducted an integrative review of original articles published from 2000 to 2012, in which their primary outcome was to quantify medication adherence and/or discontinuation of oral hormonal therapy in patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Original studies were searched in the PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase and SciELO databases. The Medical Subject Heading was used to define descriptors. The descriptor "breast neoplasms" was used in all combinations. Each of the descriptors "medication adherence" and "patient compliance" were combined with each of the following descriptors "tamoxifen", "aromatase inhibitors", "selective estrogen receptor modulators", or the terms "letrozole", "anastrozole", and "exemestane". Twenty-four original articles were included. Our study showed a wide range of adherence and discontinuation rates, ranging from 45-95.7 and 12-73 %, respectively. Regarding the methodological development of the selected articles, a high prevalence (87.5 %) of prospective and/or retrospective longitudinal studies was found. In addition, there was a high prevalence of studies using a database (70.8 %). Among some of the studies, it was shown that patient adherence to hormonal therapy gradually reduces, while discontinuation increases during the treatment. It was observed a great diversity among rates of adherence and/or discontinuation of hormonal therapy for breast cancer, which may be due to a lack of methodology standardization. Therefore, adequate and validated methods to ensure reliability of the results and allow comparison in the

  5. Measuring oral mucositis of pediatric patients with cancer: A psychometric evaluation of chinese version of the oral mucositis daily questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karis Kin Fong Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oral mucositis is a frequent clinical condition that has been shown to affect pediatric cancer patients. Oral Mucositis Daily Questionnaire (OMDQ is one of the few available patient-reported outcome measures to assess the extent and impact of oral mucositis. The objectives of the study were to translate the Mouth and Throat Soreness-Related Questions of the OMDQ into Chinese (OMDQ MTS-Ch for children and adolescents aged 6–18 years receiving chemotherapy and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: This was part of a multicenter, prospective cohort study involving two phases. Phase I involved forward-backward translation to fit the cognitive and linguistic age level of the children and adolescents, followed by face and content validation, together with pretesting. In Phase II, which evaluated the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and discriminant validity, a total of 140 patients completed the OMDQ MTS-Ch for 14 days. Results: The OMDQ MTS-Ch had satisfactory face and content validities. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the OMDQ MTS-Ch was 0.984. All of the corrected item-total correlations were higher than 0.90. The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient between consecutive days for the OMDQ MTS-Ch items ranged from 0.576 to 0.983; the only value that was not over 0.70 was that for the paired study days 7 and 8 for the item of talking. The mean area-under-the-curve OMDQ MTS-Ch item scores were significantly different among patients with different degrees of mucositis severity (P < 0.001, supporting the discriminant validity. Conclusions: It has been shown that the OMDQ MTS-Ch has a good level of reliability and discriminant validity and can be completed by children aged ≥6 years and adolescents on a daily basis to measure mucositis and its related functional limitations.

  6. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See ... this brochure includes information on symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer, along with definitions of selected medical terms and ...

  7. Feeding in Oral Cancer Patients After Massive Ablative Surgery: Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy or Nasogastric Tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Reza; Hosseinpour, Sepanta; Taghizadeh, Fateme

    2016-06-01

    Feeding after ablative oral cancer surgery is a major concern in postoperative care phase. The aim of this study was to compare postoperative phase of healing in patients undergoing nasogastric tube insertion and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. In this single randomized clinical trial, 40 patients were randomly allocated to 2 groups according to a randomized list: group one (20 patients) had nasogastric tube for 4 weeks and group two (20 patients) underwent percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for 4 weeks or more after the surgery. Occurrence of infection and wound dehiscence was assessed. Weight loss was defined as reduction in patients' weight at 4 weeks after the surgery compared with preoperation. Weight loss was 7.9 ± 1.91 kg in group one and 5.3 ± 1.38 kg in group two; the difference in this regard between the 2 groups was statistically significant (P = 0.001). In group one, 10 subjects had dehiscence versus 3 subjects in group two; this difference was significant (P = 0.04). Analysis of the data demonstrated a significant difference in postsurgical infection between the 2 groups (P = 0.044). It seems that gastrostomy may be an appropriate method for feeding in patients with extensive oral cancer.

  8. Correlation of Arsenic Levels in Smokeless Tobacco Products and Biological Samples of Oral Cancer Patients and Control Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Talpur, Farah N; Kazi, Atif G; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Panhwar, Abdul H; Kamboh, Muhammad A

    2015-12-01

    It has been extensively reported that chewing of smokeless tobacco (SLT) can lead to cancers of oral cavity. In present study, the relationship between arsenic (As) exposure via chewing/inhaling different SLT products in oral cancer patients have or/not consumed SLT products was studied. The As in different types of SLT products (gutkha, mainpuri, and snuff) and biological (scalp hair and blood) samples of different types of oral cancer patients and controls were analyzed. Both controls and oral cancer patients have same age group (ranged 30-60 years), socio-economic status, localities, and dietary habits. The concentrations of As in SLT products and biological samples were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked by certified reference materials. The resulted data of present study indicates that the concentration of As was significantly higher in scalp hair and blood samples of oral cancer patients than those of controls (p0.01). The intake of As via consuming different SLT may have synergistic effects, in addition to other risk factors associated with oral cancer.

  9. Oral environment and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yasusei; Tada, Hidesuke; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Tada, Yoshiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Japan. A rapid increase in cancer mortality is expected as Japan is facing a super-aged society. Many causes of cancer are known to be closely linked to life style factors, such as smoking, drinking, and diet. The oral environment is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and development of various diseases such as bronchitis, pneumonia, diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Because the oral cavity acts as the bodily entrance for air and food, it is constantly exposed to foreign substances, including bacteria and viruses. A large number of bacteria are endemic to the oral cavity, and indigenous oral flora act to prevent the settlement of foreign bacteria. The oral environment is influenced by local factors, including dental plaque, tartar, teeth alignment, occlusion, an incompatible prosthesis, and bad lifestyle habits, and systemic factors, including smoking, consumption of alcohol, irregular lifestyle and eating habits, obesity, stress, hormones, and heredity. It has recently been revealed that the oral environment is associated with cancer. In particular, commensal bacteria in the oral cavity are involved in the development of cancer. Moreover, Candida, human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus as well as commensal bacteria have been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of cancer. In this review, we introduce recent findings of the correlation between the oral environment and cancer.

  10. Maximum mouth opening and trismus in 143 patients treated for oral cancer: a 1-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzels, Jan-Willem G H; Merkx, Matthias A W; de Haan, Anton F J; Koole, Ron; Speksnijder, Caroline M

    2014-12-01

    Patients with oral cancer can develop restricted mouth opening (trismus) because of the oncologic treatment. Maximum mouth opening (MMO) was measured in 143 patients shortly before treatment and 0, 6, and 12 months posttreatment, and the results were analyzed using a linear mixed-effects model. In every patient, MMO decreased after treatment. The patients who underwent surgery, recovered partially by 6 and 12 months after treatment, whereas the patients who received both surgery and radiotherapy or primary radiotherapy did not recover. Tumor location, tumor size, and alcohol consumption had independent effects on MMO. Having trismus (MMO trismus after oral cancer treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effect of early nutrition support on postoperative rehabilitation in patients with oral cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-An Zhang; Xiao-Yao Tan; Lan-Fang Zhang; Hua-Dong Wang; Xin-Sheng Han; Hua-Wei Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of early nutrition support on the postoperative nutrition metabolism and rehabilitation in patients with oral cancer.Methods:A total of 80 patients with oral cancer who were admitted in our hospital from January, 2013 to January, 2015 were included in the study, and divided into the observation group (early nutrition support) and control group (routine treatments) with 40 cases in each group. The postoperative basic nutrition requirement amount in the observation group was calculated according to Harris-Nenedict formula. The appropriate pharmaceutics and nutritional pathway were selected. The patients in the control group were given routine diets after operation. The levels of ALB, PAB, TRF, TCL, IgM, IgG, and IgA before and after operation in the two groups were compared. The body mass and wound healing in the two groups were recorded and compared.Results:The body mass and serum TRF level after operation in the observation group were slightly reduced, but were not significantly different from those before operation (P>0.05). The serum ALB, PAB, and TLC levels after operation in the observation group were significantly reduced when compared with before operation (P0.05), but the above indicators were significantly elevated after operation (P<0.05). The peripheral blood IgM, IgG, and IgA levels 1 week after operation in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). The stage I healing rate of the surgical wound in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions: The early nutrition support can effectively enhance the postoperative nutrition status and immunological function in patients with oral cancer, and is beneficial for the postoperative rehabilitation.

  12. Practice variation in defining sentinel lymph nodes on lymphoscintigrams in oral cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, Geke B.; Bree, Remco de [VU University Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schie, Annelies van; Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Witte, Birgit I. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olmos, Renato A.V. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Klop, W.M.C. [Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Lymphoscintigraphic imaging and adequate interpretation of the lymphatic drainage pattern is an essential step in the sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) procedure. In oral cancer, identification of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) can be challenging. In this study, interobserver variability in defining SLNs on lymphoscintigrams was evaluated in patients with T1-T2 stage N0 oral cancer. Sixteen observers (head and neck surgeons, nuclear medicine physicians or teams of both) from various institutes were asked which criteria they use to consider a hot focus on the lymphoscintigram as SLN. Lymphoscintigrams of 9 patients with 47 hot foci (3-9 per patient) were assessed, using a scale of 'yes/equivocal/no'. Bilateral drainage was seen in four of nine cases. In three cases additional late single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT scanning was performed. Interobserver variability was evaluated by kappa (κ) analysis, using linear weighted pairwise comparison of the observers. Conservative (equivocal analysed as no) and sensitive (equivocal analysed as yes) assessment strategies were investigated using pairwise kappa analysis. Various definitions of SLN on lymphoscintigrams were given. Interobserver variability of all cases using a 3-point scale showed fair agreement (71 %, κ{sub w} = 0.29). The conservative and sensitive analyses both showed moderate agreement: conservative approach κ = 0.44 (in 80 % of the hot foci the observers agreed) and sensitive approach κ = 0.42 (81 %) respectively. Multidisciplinary involvement in image interpretation and higher levels of observer experience appeared to increase agreement. Among 16 observers, there is practice variation in defining SLNs on lymphoscintigrams in oral cancer patients. Interobserver variability of lymphoscintigraphic interpretation shows moderate agreement. In order to achieve better agreement in defining SLNs on lymphoscintigrams specific guidelines are warranted. (orig.)

  13. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Resected Oral Cavity Cancer and Simultaneous Second Primary Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ta Liao

    Full Text Available Simultaneous second primary tumors (SSPT are not uncommon in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC living in areas where the habit of betel quid chewing is widespread. We sought to identify the main prognostic factors in OSCC patients with SSPT and incorporate them into a risk stratification scheme.A total of 1822 consecutive patients with primary OSCC treated between January 1996 and February 2014 were analyzed for the presence of SSPT. The 18-month and 5-year overall survival (OS rates served as the main outcome measures.Of the 1822 patients, 77 (4% were found to have SSPT (i.e, two malignancies identified within one month of each other. The 18-month and 5-year OS rates in patients without SSPT and with SSPT were 82% and 69%, and 72% and 53%, respectively (p = 0.0063. Patients with SSPT were further divided into patients with either esophageal cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (eso-HCC subgroup, n = 8 and other tumors (NO eso-HCC subgroup, n = 69. After multivariate analysis, neck nodal extracapsular spread (ECS, n = 18 and the presence of eso-HCC were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. The 18-month OS rates of SSPT patients with both eso-HCC and ECS (n = 5 vs. the remaining patients (n = 72 were 0% and 78%, respectively (p < 0.0001.OSCC patients with neck nodal ECS and esophageal cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma as SSPT have a dismal short-term prognosis.

  14. Information about oral cancer on the Internet: our patients cannot understand it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Centelles, P; Ledesma-Ludi, Y; Seoane-Romero, J M; Seoane, J

    2015-04-01

    Although information about cancer on the Internet can be beneficial to patients and physicians, to our knowledge, comprehension by patients has not been investigated. We used 3 search engines to select websites on oral cancer then assessed their readability using the Flesch-Kinkaid Reading Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease Score, Gunning Fog Index, Coleman-Liau Index, Automated Readability Index, and the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook Index (SMOG). The mean scores for readability were within the range of "difficult to read" (FRES=36.04 (14.87)) with high educational requirements (FKRGL=11.44 (3.27)). This could hamper comprehension and is particularly worrying given the high percentage of people who have poor levels of literacy.

  15. Bioequivalence study with lapatinib powder for oral suspension and the original tablet formulation in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kevin M; Ferron-Brady, Geraldine; Lemmon, Colleen; Cartee, Leanne; Hollyfield, Hedy; D'Amelio, Anthony M; Piepszak, Alexandra; Swaby, Ramona F; Curran, David; Arya, Niki

    2015-01-01

    Lapatinib is approved for use in various therapeutic combinations for treating metastatic breast cancers that over-express HER2. To deliver the approved doses, up to six large tablets need to be ingested with the current 250-mg tablets. For ease of ingestion, a powder for oral suspension was developed. This study was an open-label, randomized, adaptive design, two-period crossover bioequivalence study of the powder for suspension relative to the commercial tablet at steady state following once daily dosing for 7 days in patients with advanced cancer. To minimize the number of cancer patients required for a pivotal bioequivalence study (144 in this case), a four-stage adaptive group sequential design with interim analyses after every 36 subjects was implemented to allow for early termination. Bioequivalence for the oral suspension relative to the commercial tablet was demonstrated in both the first (and only) interim analysis and the final analysis, as the 90% confidence intervals for the treatment comparison ratios for both AUC0-24 and Cmax were contained within the acceptance criteria (0.80, 1.25). Additionally, there was no statistical difference in tlag or tmax , suggesting no difference in the absorption rate between treatments. There were no unexpected safety findings during this study.

  16. Staging N0 oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Grupe, Peter

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1......%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel...

  17. Response of brain metastasis from lung cancer patients to an oral nutraceutical product containing silibinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Sais, Elia; Cañete, Noemí; Marruecos, Jordi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Izquierdo, Angel; Porta, Rut; Haro, Manel; Brunet, Joan; Pedraza, Salvador; Menendez, Javier A

    2016-05-31

    Despite multimodal treatment approaches, the prognosis of brain metastases (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains poor. Untreated patients with BM have a median survival of about 1 month, with almost all patients dying from neurological causes. We herein present the first report describing the response of BM from NSCLC patients to an oral nutraceutical product containing silibinin, a flavonoid extracted from the seeds of the milk thistle. We present evidence of how the use of the silibinin-based nutraceutical Legasil® resulted in significant clinical and radiological improvement of BM from NSCLC patients with poor performance status that progressed after whole brain radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The suppressive effects of silibinin on progressive BM, which involved a marked reduction of the peritumoral brain edema, occurred without affecting the primary lung tumor outgrowth in NSCLC patients. Because BM patients have an impaired survival prognosis and are in need for an immediate tumor control, the combination of brain radiotherapy with silibinin-based nutraceuticals might not only alleviate BM edema but also prove local control and time for either classical chemotherapeutics with immunostimulatory effects or new immunotherapeutic agents such as checkpoint blockers to reveal their full therapeutic potential in NSCLC BM patients. New studies aimed to illuminate the mechanistic aspects underlying the regulatory effects of silibinin on the cellular and molecular pathobiology of BM might expedite the entry of new formulations of silibinin into clinical testing for progressive BM from lung cancer patients.

  18. AETIOLOGY AND CLINICAL PROFILE OF ORAL CANCERS IN PATIENTS ATTENDING A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN RURAL KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulaseedharan Sreedharan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world. Oral cancer represents 14% of all cancer cases in Kerala. The aim of this study is to find out the aetiological factors, symptomatology, morphologic types and the distribution in the sub-sites of oral cavity. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of ENT, Government Medical College, Thrissur, Kerala from May 2009 to October 2013; 136 patients (88 males and 48 females with histopathologically confirmed oral cancers were studied. Variables such as age, sex, residing area, occupation, educational level, socio-economic status, substance abuse, oral hygiene, family history and premalignant conditions were assessed. The presenting complaints, the site, morphology and histopathology of the lesions were noted. RESULTS Mean age in this study was 57.83 with male-to-female ratio of 1.83:1. Majority of cases were from socially and economically weaker section, 62% patients were smokers, 45% patients were alcoholic, 41% patients were pan chewers and 90% had more than one bad habit; 72.05% patients had poor orodental hygiene. Most common symptom in our patients was growth in the mouth. Tongue and buccal mucosa were the most affected sites. Majority presented with ulcerative type and most of the cases were squamous cell carcinoma. CONCLUSION Oral cancers are mainly seen in males of 55 – 64 years’ age group. Important aetiological factors identified in this study are substance abuse, poor oral hygiene and poor socio-economic status. Tobacco consumption is the most dominant risk factor. Most common symptom in our patients is growth in the mouth. Tongue and buccal mucosa are the most affected sites. Most of the cases were squamous cell carcinoma. The study of aetiology and common clinical presentations may help in prevention, early detection and management.

  19. RESECTION AND PLASTIC TREATMENT PATIENTS WITH TONGUE AND ORAL CAVITY CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Svetitsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of operation at locally-advanced tongue cancer and cancer of oral cavity is presented. Cutaneous tongue-formed incision is performed in submaxillary area. Cellulocutaneous flap is formed in size corresponding to the size of intraoral tumour. Lymphadissection is performed. The primary process is removed by intraoral way. The formed cellulocutaneous flap isexteriorized into oral cavity without tension by means of submaxillary approach through the incision in diaphragm of floor of mouth cavity, put onto wound surface and fixed to edges of normal tissues. The flap basement and its fragment passing in the wound canal are de-epidermized. Such operation has been performed in 22 patients. The method allows to preserve tongue function without its deformation and falling back, improves life quality, restores natural breathing, swallowing and speech. By the end of 24 months survival in free period was observed in 43.8 ± 11.0 % patients, total survival – 56.3 ± 10.0 % patients.

  20. Morphine metabolism in cancer patients on increasing oral doses--no evidence for autoinduction or dose-dependence.

    OpenAIRE

    Säwe, J; Svensson, J O; Rane, A.

    1983-01-01

    Four cancer patients with severe chronic pain were treated with oral morphine with increasing doses during 5-8 months. During this period the oral dose was increased 16-23-fold in each of the patients. Morphine, morphine-3- and morphine-6-glucuronide were determined with high performance liquid chromatography in plasma and urine during steady-state, at five or more occasions on different daily doses of morphine. The trough concentrations of morphine and its metabolites were linearly related t...

  1. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by-step, illustrated guide ...

  2. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & ... successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by- ...

  3. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by-step, illustrated guide ...

  4. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/AIDS See All Order Publications English and Spanish brochures available free of charge. ... early—when it can be treated more successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide ...

  5. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & ... successfully. Publications​ For Health Professionals Detecting Oral Cancer: A Guide for Health Care Professionals A step-by- ...

  6. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College ... signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. ...

  7. Oral Cancer Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College ... signs and symptoms of oral cancer, and the importance of detecting the disease in its early stages. ...

  8. Is social inequality related to different patient concerns in routine oral cancer follow-up clinics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sarah; Lowe, Derek; Harris, Rebecca V; Brown, Steve; Rogers, Simon N

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancer has a higher incidence in the lower social strata, and these patients are less likely to engage in supportive interventions and report a poorer quality of life (QoL). The aim of this paper is to compare the Patient Concerns Inventory (PCI) responses across social groups attending routine oral cancer follow-up clinics with particular focus on the deprivation lower quartile. The PCI package is completed by patients as part of their routine review consultation with SNR. Patients were those diagnosed between 2008 and 2012. Deprivation was stratified using the IMD 2010 from postcode. Of the 106 eligible patients, 85 % used the PCI. Just over half (54 %) were living in the most deprived quartile, with two-thirds (68 %) of males in the most deprived quartile, compared with 35 % of females (p = 0.004). In regard to number and type of PCI items selected by patients at their first PCI clinic, there were no notable differences in respect of IMD classification. The two commonest concerns were fear of recurrence (43 %) and sore mouth (43 %). The most deprived quartile reported significant problems in regard to mood (p = 0.004) and recreation (p = 0.02), and a non-significant trend (36 vs 18 %, p = 0.09) in stating their overall QoL as being less than good. It is possible to identify the concerns of patients from lower socioeconomic strata as part of routine follow-up clinics. This allows for targeted multi-professional intervention and supports to improve the outcome in this hard to reach group.

  9. Adherence to Oral Administration of Endocrine Treatment in Patients With Breast Cancer: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacorossi, Laura; Gambalunga, Francesca; Fabi, Alessandra; Giannarelli, Diana; Marchetti, Anna; Piredda, Michela; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2016-12-05

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the world, and it is also the leading cause of cancer deaths among women. Nevertheless, breast cancer survival has increased as a result of improvements in early diagnosis and therapy, for example, oral endocrine therapy. Despite the importance of adherence to endocrine therapy, its trend appears complex and multidimensional and therefore has many loopholes and missing information. The study aims to explore the experiences of adherence to endocrine therapy in women with breast cancer and their perceptions of the challenges they face in adhering to their medication prescribed. The study used a qualitative exploratory design, with face-to-face semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed using framework analysis in accordance with Ritchie and Spencer's approach. The sample included 27 women. Seven themes were identified: the different faces of adherence, fear of the drug, adherence stimulates the balance of the experience of illness, adherence influences the future of disease, adherence requires attention to the person, knowledge seeking, and "forgetfulness" activates the search for functional strategies. This study shows that adherence assumes different connotations that are mainly influenced by the type of relationship established with health professionals the attention paid to the person, the information received, and the influence that the drug has on the disease. It appears that fear has a strong influence on the behaviors involved in taking the therapy. The only way to overcome irrational fear is to improve the patient's knowledge.

  10. Use of archived biopsy specimens to study gene expression in oral mucosa from chemotherapy-treated cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougeot, Jean-Luc C; Mougeot, Farah K B; Peterson, Douglas E; Padilla, Ricardo J; Brennan, Michael T; Lockhart, Peter B

    2013-05-01

    Oral mucositis caused by cancer chemotherapy can result in significant clinical complications. There is a strategic need to accelerate the delineation of the pathobiology. This proof-of-principle study was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of studying archived oral mucosal specimens to further delineate oral mucositis pathobiology. Twenty-nine formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of 25-year-old oral mucosa autopsy specimens from cancer chemotherapy patients were studied. Standardized technology was utilized, including RNA isolation and amplification, array hybridization, and gene expression analysis. A predominance of DNA damage in buccal mucosal basal keratinocytes was observed. Data comparing basal cells from buccal vs. gingival mucosa identified differential gene expression of host responses in relation to pathways relevant to oral mucositis pathogenesis, including responses to cancer-associated inflammation. This proof-of-principle study demonstrated that archived oral mucosal specimens may be a potentially valuable resource for the study of oral mucositis in cancer patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Exfoliative cytology for diagnosing oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sayánsm, M; Somoza-Martín, J M; Barros-Angueira, F; Reboiras-López, M D; Gándara-Vila, P; Gándara Rey, J M; García-García, A

    2010-04-28

    Exfoliative cytology is a minimally invasive technique for obtaining oral cell specimens from patients for diagnostic purposes. Classical applications of oral cytology studies, such as oral candidiasis, have been extended to include oral precancerous and cancerous lesions. A number of analytical methods are available for studying cytology specimens. The development of molecular analysis techniques, the oral cancer etiopathogenic process, and improvements in liquid-based exfoliative cytology are leading to renewed interest in exfoliative cytology. Results sometimes are disputed, so the aim of our review was to clarify the applicability of exfoliative cytology to the diagnosis of oral precancerous and cancerous lesions.

  12. Adverse event management of oral mucositis in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Sabine; Kosse, Jens; Loibl, Sibylle; Jackisch, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a clinically important and frequent adverse event (AE) associated with cancer treatment with conventional chemotherapy as well as new targeted agents. Incidence and severity of OM vary from treatment to treatment and from patient to patient. The pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced OM can be divided into 5 phases. OM induced by targeted therapies differs among other things in appearance, course, concomitant AEs and toxicity, and thus could be perceived as an entity distinct from chemotherapy-induced OM with an innate pathogenic mechanism. OM has a severe impact on a patient's quality of life (QoL) by causing complications such as pain and discomfort. Even more important are associated restrictions in nutrition and hydration. Thus, the efficacy of cancer therapy might be impaired due to the necessity of dose delays and dose reductions. Numerous preventive and therapeutic approaches have been evaluated, but currently no single agent has changed the standard of care in preventing and treating OM. Thus, the current management has evolved from clinical experience rather than clinical evidence. This article will review the AE 'OM' induced by breast cancer treatment with chemotherapy and targeted agents in order to provide practical guidance for management and prevention.

  13. Oral cancer development in patients with leukoplakia--clinicopathological factors affecting outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oral leukoplakia (OL is the best-known potentially malignant disorder. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the clinicopathological factors predictive of outcome in a large cohort of patients with OL, and report our experience in the early detection of malignant events. METHODS: A total of 320 patients with biopsy-proven OL were retrospectively reviewed from the study institution who had a mean follow-up of 5.1 years. Data on patient and lesion at initial diagnosis and patient underwent sequential biopsies were reviewed. Multiple biopsies indicates > = 3 times sequential biopsies. Oral cancer-free survival rate (OCFS was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method and significant factors were identified by Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: The 3-year and 5-year OCFS was 86.6% and 82.0%, respectively. A new binary system of grading oral dysplasia was performed and Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that high-grade dysplasia had significantly higher malignant incidence than low-grade dysplasia (5-year OCFS, 90.5% vs 59.0%; P60 years, lesion located at lateral/ventral tongue, non-homogenous lesion, high-grade dysplasia were independent significant indicators for OL malignant transformation. In addition, significant positive correlation between the multiple biopsies and these 4 factors and malignant outcome was established. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly patients with OL located at lateral/ventral tongue and who had non-homogenous lesion with high-grade dysplasia correlated much higher risk of transformation. This high-risk subpopulation was suggested to undergo sequential biopsies and histologic examination contributing to early detection of malignant event.

  14. Profiling cancer risk in oral potentially malignant disorders-A patient cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, P J; Goodson, M L; Smith, D R

    2017-08-20

    Oral potentially malignant disorders harbour variable and unpredictable risk for squamous carcinoma development. Whilst current management strategies utilise histopathological diagnoses, dysplasia grading and targeted intervention for "high-risk" lesions, clinicians are unable to predict malignant potential. Detailed, retrospective clinico-pathological analysis of potentially malignant lesions undergoing malignant transformation, from a 590 patient cohort treated by interventional laser surgery and followed for a mean of 7.3 years, was undertaken. Clinical outcome was documented at study census date (31 December 2014). A total of 99 patients (16.8%) developed cancer: 71 (12%) seen "unexpectedly" upon excision and 28 (4.8%) progressing to malignancy at a median of 87.3 months post-surgery. Thirty "unexpected" excisions were micro-invasive (42.3%) arising primarily in severely dysplastic precursors (75%) at ventro-lateral tongue and floor of mouth sites (54.5%); 1 patient (1.4%) had a cancer-related death, whilst 58 (81.7%) were disease free. A total of 19 of 28 "progressive" cancers (67.9%) arose at new sites, with erythroleukoplakia a significant predictor of malignancy (P = .0019). Nine (32.1%) developed at the same precursor site, with 6 (77.7%) on the ventro-lateral tongue and floor of mouth. Three (10.7%) were micro-invasive, 9 patients (32.1%) died from metastatic disease and 12 (42.9%) were disease free (P risk from same-site transformation, new-site cancer is a significant long-term risk for patients with potentially malignant disorder. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Maximum mouth opening and trismus in 143 patients treated for oral cancer: A 1-year prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, J.G.H.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Haan, A.F.J. de; Koole, R.; Speksnijder, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with oral cancer can develop restricted mouth opening (trismus) because of the oncologic treatment. METHODS: Maximum mouth opening (MMO) was measured in 143 patients shortly before treatment and 0, 6, and 12 months posttreatment, and the results were analyzed using a linear

  16. Risk of Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Treated with Oral Immunosuppressive Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garritsen, Floor M.; Van der Schaft, Jorien; Van den Reek, Juul M.; Politiek, Klaziena; Van Osmedendorp, Harmieke; Van Dijk, Marijke; Hijnen, Dirk J.; De Graaf, Marlies; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A.; De Jong, Elke M.; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A.; De Bruin-Weller, Marjolein S.

    There is uncertainty about the risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated with oral immunosuppressive drugs. A total of 557 patients with AD treated with these drugs in the

  17. Oral environment and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kudo, Yasusei; Tada, Hidesuke; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Tada, Yoshiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Japan. A rapid increase in cancer mortality is expected as Japan is facing a super-aged society. Many causes of cancer are known to be closely linked to life style factors, such as smoking, drinking, and diet. The oral environment is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and development of various diseases such as bronchitis, pneumonia, diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Because the oral cavity acts as the bodily entrance for air and food, it...

  18. Effects of aprepitant on the pharmacokinetics of controlled-release oral oxycodone in cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Fujiwara

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Oxycodone is a µ-opioid receptor agonist widely used in the treatment of cancer pain. The predominant metabolic pathway of oxycodone is CYP3A4-mediated N-demethylation to noroxycodone, while a minor proportion undergoes 3-O-demethylation to oxymorphone by CYP2D6. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the mild CYP3A4 inhibitor aprepitant on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered controlled-release (CR oxycodone. METHOD: This study design was an open-label, single-sequence with two phases in cancer patients with pain who continued to be administered orally with multiple doses of CR oxycodone every 8 or 12 hours. Plasma concentration of oxycodone and its metabolites were measured up to 8 hours after administration as follows: on day 1, CR oxycodone was administered alone; on day 2, CR oxycodone was administered with aprepitant (125 mg, at the same time of oxycodone dosing in the morning. The steady-state trough concentrations (Css were measured from day 1 to day 3. RESULTS: Aprepitant increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-8 of oxycodone by 25% (p<0.001 and of oxymorphone by 34% (p<0.001, as well as decreased the AUC0-8 of noroxycodone by 14% (p<0.001. Moreover, aprepitant increased Css of oxycodone by 57% (p = 0.001 and of oxymorphone by 36% (p<0.001 and decreased Css of noroxycodone by 24% (p = 0.02 at day 3 compared to day 1. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical use of aprepitant in patients receiving multiple doses of CR oxycodone for cancer pain significantly altered plasma concentration levels, but would not appear to need modification of the CR oxycodone dose. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN.ac.jp UMIN000003580.

  19. Alterations in 18F-FDG accumulation into neck-related muscles after neck dissection for patients with oral cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kito, Shinji; Koga, Hirofumi; Kodama, Masaaki; Habu, Manabu; Kokuryo, Shinya; Oda, Masafumi; Matsuo, Kou; Nishino, Takanobu; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Uehara, Masataka; Yoshiga, Daigo; Tanaka, Tatsurou; Nishimura, Shun; Miyamoto, Ikuya; Sasaguri, Masaaki; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Yoshioka, Izumi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) accumulations are commonly seen in the neck-related muscles of the surgical and non-surgical sides after surgery with neck dissection (ND) for oral cancers, which leads to radiologists having difficulty in diagnosing the lesions. To examine the alterations in 18F-FDG accumulation in neck-related muscles of patients after ND for oral cancer. Material and Methods 18F-FDG accumulations on positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) in neck-related muscles were retrospectively analyzed after surgical dissection of cervical lymph nodes in oral cancers. Results According to the extent of ND of cervical lymph nodes, the rate of patients with 18F-FDG-PET-positive areas increased in the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and posterior neck muscles of the surgical and/or non-surgical sides. In addition, SUVmax of 18F-FDG-PET-positive areas in the trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles were increased according to the extent of the ND. Conclusions In evaluating 18F-FDG accumulations after ND for oral cancers, we should pay attention to the 18F-FDG distributions in neck-related muscles including the non-surgical side as false-positive findings. Key words:18F-FDG, PET-CT, oral cancers, muscles. PMID:27031062

  20. Low level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients: systematic review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sabbagh, Rula Fawzi; Selting, Wayne J.

    2016-03-01

    Oral mucositis is a debilitating and dose limiting side effect of oncotherapy in cancer patients. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is a promising new intervention for the treatment of oral mucositis. Aims and objectives: 1. Perform a systematic review of available literature on the therapeutic effect of LLLT on established oral mucositis. 2. Formulate recommendations for future studies based on results of review. Methods: Electronic search oflow level laser therapy in the treatment of oral mucositis was conducted and eligible studies reviewed. Results: Four studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. A total of 109 patients were included, 59 of which received LLLT as a therapeutic measure. An overall success rate of 81.4% success rate was reported in regard to OM. Conclusion: The review demonstrated the positive therapeutic effect of LLLT on oral mucositis. However, the need for future studies with standardized reporting of parameters and methods is needed to increase the level of evidence of this intervention.

  1. The effect of structured education to patients receiving oral agents for cancer treatment on medication adherence and self-efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Tokdemir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to examine the effect of structured education on medication adherence and self-efficacy through the use of the MASCC Oral Agent Teaching Tool (MOATT for patients receiving oral agents for cancer treatment. Methods: This quasi-experimental study has been conducted at two hospitals; 41 patients were included in the study. Data were obtained using a questionnaire, medication adherence self-efficacy scale (MASES, memorial symptom assessment scale, and a follow-up form (diary. Patients were educated through the use of the MOATT at a scheduled time; drug-specific information was provided along with a treatment scheme and follow-up diary. Phone interviews were completed 1 and 2 weeks after the educational session. At the next treatment cycle, the patients completed the same questionnaires. Results: Majority of the patients were receiving capecitabine (90.2%; n = 37 as an oral agent for breast (51.2%; n = 21 and stomach cancer (24.6%; n = 10 treatment. About 90.2% of patients (n = 37 stated that they did not forget to take their medication and experienced medication-related side effects (78%; n = 32. The total score of MASES was increased after the education (66.39 vs. 71.04, P < 0.05. Conclusions: It was shown that individual education with the MOATT and follow-up for patients receiving oral agents for cancer treatment increased patient medication adherence self-efficacy.

  2. Conservative neck dissection in oral cancer patients: a 5 year retrospective study in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasundram, Sathesh; Mustafa, Wan Mahadzir Wan; Ip, Jolene; Adnan, Tassha Hilda; Supramaniam, Premaa

    2012-01-01

    The impact of ablative oral cancer surgery was studied, with particular reference to recurrence and nodal metastasis, to assess survival probability and prognostic indicators and to elucidate if ethnicity influences the survival of patients. Patients who underwent major ablative surgery of the head and neck region with neck dissection were identified and clinical records were assessed. Inclusion criteria were stage I-IV oral and oropharyngeal malignancies necessitating resection with or without radiotherapy from 2004 to 2009. All individuals had a pre-operative assessment prior to the surgery. The post operative assessment period ranged from 1 year to 5 years. Survival distributions were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves. 87 patients (males:38%; females:62%) were included in this study, with an age range of 21-85 years. Some 78% underwent neck dissections while 63% had surgery and radiotherapy. Nodal recurrence was detected in 5.7% while 20.5% had primary site recurrence within the study period. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that the median survival time was 57 months. One year overall survival (OS) rate was 72.7% and three year overall survival rate dropped to 61.5%. On OS analysis, the log-rank test showed a significant difference of survival between Malay and Chinese patients (Bonferroni correction p=0.033). Recurrence-free survival (RFS) analysis revealed that 25% of the patients have reached the event of recurrence at 46 months. One year RFS rate was 85.2% and the three year survival rate was 76.1%. In the RFS analysis, the log-rank test showed a significant difference in the event of recurrence and nodal metastasis (p<0.001). Conservative neck is effective, in conjunction with postoperative radiotherapy, for control of neck metastases. Ethnicity appears to influence the survival of the patients, but a prospective trial is required to validate this.

  3. Saliva collection methods for DNA biomarker analysis in oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, April M; Kaur, Harpal; Dodd, Michael; D'Souza, Jacob; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Shaw, Richard J; Risk, Janet M

    2013-07-01

    Patients with head and neck cancers are predisposed to local recurrence and second primaries because of the phenomenon of field cancerisation, and clinical detection of recurrence remains challenging. DNA biomarkers in saliva may prove to be an adjunct to current diagnostic methods, but irradiation of the primary site often leads to xerostomia. We assessed 3 methods of collecting saliva for their ability to generate DNA of sufficient quantity and quality to use in biomarker assays. Paired saliva samples were collected from 2 groups of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In the first group saliva was collected in Oragene(®) vials and as saline mouthwash from non-irradiated patients (n=21) (4 had had radiotherapy before collection); in the second group it was collected using Oragene(®) sponge kits and as mouthwash from irradiated patients (n=24). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) showed that Oragene(®) vials contained DNA in significantly greater amounts (median 122 μg, range 4-379) than mouthwash (median 17 μg, range 2-194) (p=0.0001) in the non-irradiated patients, while Oragene(®) sponge kits (median 4 μg, range 0.1-61) and mouthwash (median 5.5 μg, range 0.1-75) generated comparable concentrations of DNA from the irradiated group. All 90 samples contained DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for p16 promoter quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP). While Oragene(®) vials contained the most DNA, all 3 methods yielded enough to detect DNA biomarkers using qMSP. The method of collection should depend on the compliance of the patient and oral competency.

  4. Conservative neck dissection in oral cancer patients: A 5 years retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Mahadzir Wan Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of ablative oral cancer surgery was studied, with reference to recurrence and nodal metastasis,  survival probability and prognostic indicators and to determine if ethnicity influences the survival of patients. Patients who underwent major ablative surgery of the head and neck region with neck dissection were identified and assessed. Those with stage I-IV oral and oropharyngeal malignancies necessitating resection with or without radiotherapy from 2004 to 2009 were included in this study. All individuals had a pre-operative assessment and post operative assessment. Survival distributions were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves. Eighty seven patients (males: 38%; females: 62% were included in this study, with an age range of 21-85 years. Some 78% underwent neck dissections while 63% had surgery and radiotherapy. Nodal and primary site recurrence was 5.7% and 20.5%. The median survival time was 57 months. One year Overall Survival (OS rate was 72.7% and three year overall survival rate 61.5%. The log-rank test showed a significant difference of survival between Malay and Chinese patients (Bonferroni correction p=0.033. Recurrence-Free Survival (RFS analysis revealed that 25% of the patients have reached the event of recurrence at 46 months. The three year survival rate was 76.1%. In the RFS analysis, the log-rank test showed a significant difference in the event of recurrence and nodal metastasis (p<0.001. Conservative neck effectively controls neck metastases. Ethnicity influence  survival.

  5. Oral mucosal lesions, microbial changes, and taste disturbances induced by adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Mouridsen, Henning T.; Bergmann, Olav Jonas

    2008-01-01

    (n = 7, 16%). Five patients (11%) were diagnosed with oral candidosis. Scores of dental bacterial plaque and gingival inflammation increased during CT and the oral microbial composition changed towards a more acidophilic flora. Taste disturbances were experienced by 84% (n = 38) of the patients...

  6. The impact of oral rehabilitation on oral health-related quality of life in patients receiving radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweyen, Ramona; Kuhnt, Thomas; Wienke, Andreas; Eckert, Alexander; Hey, Jeremias

    2017-05-01

    To analyze the influence of dental treatment on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in head and neck cancer patients. This study included the data of 116 patients who underwent radiotherapy (RT) because of head and neck cancer. For each patient, the variables age, sex, tumor site, irradiation technique, dose on the spared parotid gland, concomitant chemotherapy, and denture status were documented. OHRQoL was determined using the OHIP-G14 questionnaire. Patients were divided into subgroups according to denture status: none or fixed partial dentures (none/FPD), removable partial dentures (RPD), and full dentures (CD). OHIP summary scores were determined and tested for clinical relevant differences with respect to the different variables. The association between OHRQol and the variables was assessed using linear regression. No clinically relevant influence on OHRQoL was found for gender, irradiation technique, and chemotherapy. Patients with tumors located in the oral cavity had a significantly higher OHIP score than patients with other tumor sites (p denture seem to have a limited effect on OHRQoL in head and neck cancer patients. Prosthetic treatment in head and neck cancer patients do not lead to the same improvement in OHRQoL as found in the normal population. This might be taken into account especially if extensive dental treatment is intended.

  7. Freeze-Dried Black Raspberries in Preventing Oral Cancer Recurrence in High-Risk Appalachian Patients Previously Treated With Surgery For Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-04

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  8. Estimation of Nickel in Different Smokeless Tobacco Products and Their Impact on Human Health of Oral Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Afridi, Hassan I; Talpur, Farah N; Kazi, Atif G; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Arain, Mariam S; Sahito, Oan M

    2015-01-01

    It has been extensively investigated that the chewing of smokeless tobacco (SLT) products may enhance the inflammation of the oral cavity. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the relationship between nickel (Ni) exposure via different SLT products with oral cancer (different sites) incidence in the population of Sindh, Pakistan. The different brands of SLT products (mainpuri, gutkha, and moist snuff) commonly consumed by the studied population were analyzed for Ni contents. The biological samples of oral cancer patients and noncancerous control subjects of both genders, who have or have not consumed SLT products, were collected. The concentration of Ni in biological samples and SLT products were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked by using certified reference materials. The results of this study showed that the Ni level was significantly higher in scalp hair and blood samples of oral cancer patients compared to controls (P < 0.01). The study suggested that exposure of Ni as a result of chewing different SLT products may be synergistic with risk factors associated with oral cancer.

  9. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, D.P.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Allemano, J.; Bossi, P.; Wetering, M.D. van de; Rao, N.G.; Potting, C.M.J.; Cheng, K.K.; Freidank, A.; Brennan, M.T.; Bowen, J.; Dennis, K.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. METHODS: A systematic review of the available literature was

  10. Systematic review of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, D.P.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Allemano, J.; Bossi, P.; Wetering, M.D. van de; Rao, N.G.; Potting, C.M.J.; Cheng, K.K.; Freidank, A.; Brennan, M.T.; Bowen, J.; Dennis, K.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this project was to develop clinical practice guidelines on the use of antimicrobials, mucosal coating agents, anesthetics, and analgesics for the prevention and management of oral mucositis (OM) in cancer patients. METHODS: A systematic review of the available literature was con

  11. Putting into Evidence: The Effect of Oral Glutamine on Radiation-induced Esophagitis among Patients with Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Waleed Bader

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral glutamine supplementation is highly effective in preventing and delaying radiation-induced esophagitis, one of the most common discomforting side effects of radiation to the thoracic area among lung cancer patients. According to the literature, lung cancer is the leading cause of death among all cancers with the highest incidence worldwide. This paper aims to emphasize the importance of oral glutamine supplementation in preventing radiation-induced esophagitis among lung cancer patients. Several databases have been searched and seven studies included in this review (five randomized control studies, one quasi-experimental study and one systematic review with a total of 453 patients. The patients in these studies were diagnosed with lung cancer regardless of type or stage. The patients were either assigned to an intervention group (glutamine supplementation or a control group. These studies were conducted in the US, Turkey, Spain, and Greece from 2003 until 2012. The results showed that 10 mg of oral glutamine three times per day on a daily basis (from one month before starting radiation until one month after completion of radiationwas effective in preventing and delaying radiation-induced esophagitis.

  12. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of novel oral fluorouracil antitumor drug S-1 in Chinese cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-xiang ZHUANG; Hong ZHU; Ji WANG; Min-gao ZHU; Hui WANG; Wang-yang PU; Hua-hui BIAN

    2013-01-01

    Aim:S-1 is an oral anticancer fluoropyrimidine formulation consisting of tegafur,5-chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine and potassium oxonate.The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of a newly developed generic formulation of S-1 in Chinese cancer patients in comparison with the branded reference formulation of S-1.Methods:A single-dose,randomized-sequence,open-label,two-way self-crossover study was conducted in 30 Chinese cancer patients.The subjects alternatively received the two formulations (40 mg/m2,po) with a 7-d interval.Plasma concentrations of FT,CDHP,Oxo,and 5-Fu were determined using LC-MS/MS.Pharmacokinetic parameters,including C Tmax,t1/2,AUC0-t,and AUC0-∞ were determined using non-compartmental models with DAS2.0 software.Bioequivalence of the two formulations were to be evaluated according to 90% Cls for the log-transformed ratios of AUC and Cmax of S-1.Adverse events were evaluated through monitoring the symptom,physical and laboratory examinations,ECGs and subject interviews.Results:The mean values of Cmax,AUC0-t,and AUC0-∞ of FT,5-Fu,CDHP,and Oxo for the two formulations had no significant differences.The 90% Cls for natural log-transformed ratios of C AUC0-t,and AUC0-∞ were within the predetermined bioequivalence acceptance limits.A total of 11 mild adverse events,including fatigue,nausea and vomiting,anorexia,diarrhea and myelosuppression,were observed,and no serious and special adverse events were found.Conclusion:The newly developed generic formulation and reference formulation of S-1 have similar pharmacokinetics with one dose (40 mg/m2) in Chinese cancer patients.Both the formulations of S-1 are well tolerated.

  13. Changes in abundance of oral microbiota associated with oral cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Schmidt

    Full Text Available Individual bacteria and shifts in the composition of the microbiome have been associated with human diseases including cancer. To investigate changes in the microbiome associated with oral cancers, we profiled cancers and anatomically matched contralateral normal tissue from the same patient by sequencing 16S rDNA hypervariable region amplicons. In cancer samples from both a discovery and a subsequent confirmation cohort, abundance of Firmicutes (especially Streptococcus and Actinobacteria (especially Rothia was significantly decreased relative to contralateral normal samples from the same patient. Significant decreases in abundance of these phyla were observed for pre-cancers, but not when comparing samples from contralateral sites (tongue and floor of mouth from healthy individuals. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinates analysis based on 12 taxa separated most cancers from other samples with greatest separation of node positive cases. These studies begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence.

  14. Prevalence and determinants of adherence to oral adjuvant endocrine therapy among breast cancer patients in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskinder Eshetu Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The success of oral adjuvant endocrine therapy (OAET is greatly influenced by patients' level of adherence to treatment. The objective of this study is to measure the prevalence and determinants of adherence to OAET among breast cancer patients in Singapore. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of patients supplemented by analysis of their prescription records was used to collect data. Adherence to OAET was assessed using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 items and evaluation of refill gaps. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done to evaluate the association between patients' characteristics and adherence to OAET. Results: A total of 157 women who have started OAET at least 6 months before the time of interview participated in the study, of which less than half (64 patients, 40.8% of the patients had high adherence. Univariate analysis identified patients who were 57 years or older (P = 0.027, unemployed (P = 0.027, on aromatase inhibitors (P = 0.023, on three or more concurrent medications (P = 0.001, and had one or more comorbidities (P = 0.000 to be significantly more adherent. However, only the number of comorbidities was found to be an independent predictor of adherence in a multiple logistic regression analysis (adjusted odds ratio = 2.60; 95% confidence interval = 1.208–5.593; P = 0.015. Forgetfulness was the main reason for nonadherence mentioned by 63 (67.7% of the 93 nonadherent patients. Conclusions: Low level of OAET adherence was found in this study, and forgetfulness was cited as the main reason for nonadherence. Patients were generally receptive to the implementation of various strategies to assist them with their medication-taking behavior

  15. Clinical effectiveness, toxicity, and failure patterns of helical tomotherapy for postoperative oral cavity cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh CH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Hsi Hsieh,1–3 Pei-Wei Shueng,1,4 Li-Ying Wang,5 Li-Jen Liao,6 Yu-Chin Lin,7 Ying-Shiung Kuo,8 Wu-Chia Lo,6 Chien-Fu Tseng,8 Hui-Ju Tien,1 Hsiu-Ling Chou,9,10 Yen-Ping Hsieh,11 Le-Jung Wu,1 Yu-Jen Chen3,12–14 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, 2Department of Medicine, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, National Defense Medical Center, 5School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, 6Department of Otolaryngology, 7Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, 8Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, 9Department of Nursing, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, 10Department of Nursing, Oriental Institute of Technology, Taipei, 11Department of Senior Citizen Service Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung, 12Department of Radiation Oncology, 13Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 14Graduate Institute of Sport Coaching Science, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan Background: The outcome of postoperative high- and intermediate-risk oral cavity cancer (OCC patients receiving helical tomotherapy (HT remains limited. Materials and methods: Between November 2006 and November 2012, 53 postoperative high- and intermediate-risk OCC patients treated with HT were enrolled. Results: The 4-year locoregional, local, and regional control rates were 66%, 76.4%, and 94.3%, respectively. The 4-year locoregional control rates of oral tongue and buccal mucosa cancer were 88.3% and 37.1%, respectively (P=0.012. Eleven (20.8% patients experienced locoregional failure. In-field failure occurred in six of 53 (11.3% in the primary area and three of 53 (5.7% in the regional lymph-node area. No marginal failure was noted. Two of 53 (3.8% experienced out-of-field failure. The rates of grade 3 dermatitis

  16. Perioperative stroke in a patient undergoing surgery for oral cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukegawa, Shintaro; Kanno, Takahiro; Kanai, Kengo; Mandai, Toshiko; Shibata, Akane; Takahashi, Yuka; Hirata, Yuji; Furuki, Yoshihiko

    2016-10-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is a significant risk factor for stroke. In elderly patients with carotid atherosclerosis and stenosis, it is not unusual for oral, head and neck cancer surgery to be performed. The present study describes a case of stroke that occurred during a neck dissection for the treatment of cervical lymph node metastasis of a left maxillary gingival carcinoma. The patient was an 84-year-old female who was considered to be at high risk of a stroke based on pre-operative head and neck computed tomography scans, which detected severe carotid atherosclerosis and stenosis. There was no possible stroke prophylaxis available during the performance of the neck dissection in the present case. However, if patients are evaluated to be high-risk pre-operatively, statin agents should be administered, the surgery should be carefully performed, adequate sedation should be maintained post-operatively and the patient should be followed up, aiming to achieve the early detection of a possible stroke.

  17. Oral contraceptives and survival in breast cancer patients aged 20 to 54 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivers, Katrina F; Gammon, Marilie D; Abrahamson, Page E; Lund, Mary Jo; Flagg, Elaine W; Moorman, Patricia G; Kaufman, Jay S; Cai, Jianwen; Porter, Peggy L; Brinton, Louise A; Eley, J William; Coates, Ralph J

    2007-09-01

    Recent oral contraceptive (OC) use is associated with modestly higher breast cancer incidence among younger women, but its impact on survival is unclear. This study examined the relationship between OC use before breast cancer diagnosis and survival. A population-based sample of 1,264 women aged 20 to 54 years with a first primary invasive breast cancer during 1990 to 1992 were followed up for 8 to 10 years. OC and covariate data were obtained by interviews conducted shortly after diagnosis and from medial records. All-cause mortality was ascertained through the National Death Index (n = 292 deaths). Age- and income-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by Cox regression methods. All-cause mortality was not associated with ever use of OCs or duration of use. Compared with nonusers, mortality estimates were elevated among women who were using OCs at diagnosis or stopped use in the previous year (HR, 1.57; 95% CI, 0.95-2.61). The HR for use of high-dose estrogen pills within 5 years before diagnosis was double that of nonusers (HR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.29-4.41) or, if the most recent pill included the progestin levonorgestrel, compared with nonusers (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.03-3.91). Because subgroup estimates were based on small numbers of OC users, these results should be cautiously interpreted. Overall, most aspects of OC use did not seem to influence survival, although there is limited evidence that OC use just before diagnosis, particularly use of some pill types, may negatively impact survival in breast cancer patients aged 20 to 54 years.

  18. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Huisman, Paulien M.; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Methods Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or orophar

  19. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Huisman, Paulien M.; van Oort, Rob P.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    Purpose This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Methods Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or

  20. Factors influencing oral health in patients during cancer treatment; with emphasis on the relationship between the oral microbiome and oral mucositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of cancer therapy for oral health were studied. The effects of irradiation to the head and neck area for the protein composition of parotid saliva were mapped. It was found that irradiation to the head and neck area likely altered the gland tissues resulting in a change in the prote

  1. Factors influencing oral health in patients during cancer treatment; with emphasis on the relationship between the oral microbiome and oral mucositis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of cancer therapy for oral health were studied. The effects of irradiation to the head and neck area for the protein composition of parotid saliva were mapped. It was found that irradiation to the head and neck area likely altered the gland tissues resulting in a change in the

  2. Chemoprevention of oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Chhaparwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one among the ten most common cancers in the world and shows a marked geographic variation in occurrence. It causes considerable morbidity and is associated with a 5-year survival rate of less than 50%. Current treatment primarily consists of surgery and radiotherapy and improvement in long-term cure rates with these modalities has reached a plateau. As, curative therapy available for oral cancer often results in debilitating changes in appearance, speech, swallowing and breathing, preventive strategies are desirable. Cancer chemoprevention is the use of natural, synthetic or biologic chemical agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent carcinogenic progression. Chemoprevention has been an extensively-studied strategy and continues to hold promise in the management of oral cancer. Many agents have been evaluated as possible chemopreventive agents including vitamin A and retinoids, betacarotene, vitamin E and dietary agents. Recently, molecularly targeted approach has generated interest among researchers worldwide which includes cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors, EGFR inhibitors and adenovirus vectors. This article reviews the various aspects of chemoprevention and describes important chemopreventive agents and design of chemopreventive trials.

  3. Bisphosphonate treatment in primary breast cancer: results from a randomised comparison of oral pamidronate versus no pamidronate in patients with primary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B.; Ejlertsen, B.; Mouridsen, H.T.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE AND PATIENTS: During the period from January 1990 to January 1996 a total of 953 patients with lymph node negative primary breast cancer were randomised to oral pamidronate (n=460) 150 mg twice daily for 4 years or no adjuvant pamidronate (n=493) in order to investigate whether oral pamid...... the trial do not support a beneficial effect of oral pamidronate on the occurrence of bone metastases or fractures in patients with primary breast cancer receiving adjuvant chemotherapy Udgivelsesdato: 2008......PURPOSE AND PATIENTS: During the period from January 1990 to January 1996 a total of 953 patients with lymph node negative primary breast cancer were randomised to oral pamidronate (n=460) 150 mg twice daily for 4 years or no adjuvant pamidronate (n=493) in order to investigate whether oral...... pamidronate can prevent the occurrence of bone metastases and fractures. The patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, loco-regional radiation therapy, but no endocrine treatment. RESULTS: During the follow-up period the number of patients with pure bone metastases was 35 in the control group and 31...

  4. Feasibility of Real-Time Near-Infrared Fluorescence Tracer Imaging in Sentinel Node Biopsy for Oral Cavity Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders; Juhl, Karina; Charabi, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    be identified in vivo using NIRF imaging, and the majority of those were located in level 1 close to the primary tumor. CONCLUSIONS: A combined fluorescent and radioactive tracer for SNB is feasible, and the additional use of NIRF imaging may improve the accuracy of SN identification in oral cancer patients......BACKGROUND: Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) is an established method in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) for staging the cN0 neck and to select patients who will benefit from a neck dissection. Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging has the potential to improve the SNB procedure by facilitating...

  5. Early and late physical and psychosocial effects of primary surgery in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Annelise; Jarden, Mary

    2016-01-01

    in this review was 3386; of these, 1996 were treated by surgery alone and 1390 with combined surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. The studies showed that because of the nature of their disease, patients are negatively affected by the different types of surgical treatment for oral......The purpose of this systematic review is to explore early and late physical and psychosocial effects of primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancers and to investigate the factors that influence these effects. PubMed, Cinahl, and PsycInfo were searched for studies concerning patients...

  6. [Oral cavity cancer: epidemiology and early diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghantous, Y; Yaffi, V; Abu-Elnaaj, I

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity (Oral cancer) is the 11th most common malignancy in the world, despite the general global trend of a slight decrease in the incidence of oral cancer, tongue cancer incidence is increasing. About 90% of tumors are subtyped to oral Squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The incidence and mortality of this tumor shows variability according to the geographic location in which it is diagnosed, however in the last decade an increase was seen in the percentage of young patients, especially patients with tongue cancer. The overall prognosis of this cancer is roughly 55-65%, this is probably due to late diagnosis. Early diagnosis of oral cancer is the most important factor affecting the overall survival and prognosis, thus several diagnosis methods have been developed in the past few years. Still, the prognosis did not improve as expected. Oral cancer biomarkers in saliva is as easy body fluid, for noninvasive detection. Several researches identified several possible biomarkers, but none was specific. In our review, the incidence and mortality of oral tumors pose a main health problem in many aspects all around the world, as well as differences in behavior of these tumors. We witnessed more cases of anterior tongue cancers affecting mainly the young age patient group, a two decades younger than the normal risk group of oral cancer. Several countries in Europe showed a significant increase of oral cancer prevalence, such as Germany, especially in men. Similar behavior was also reported in the United States, which showed a change in the risk groups. Studies have reported an alarming lack of awareness about oral cancer, its symptoms and early diagnosis. These gaps in knowledge need to be addressed by further public education, possibly targeted at high-risk groups. With the knowledge of possible, specific, early biomarkers, primary detection could improve the prognosis tremendously. Research on the salivary biomarkers of the disease would help to develop

  7. Clinical outcome and health-related quality-of-life following microsurgical reconstruction in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Hayder, Shems; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Charabi, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Radial forearm free flap (RFFF) and fibula free flap (FFF) provide high safety and reliability with low incidence of free flap failure and an acceptable level of complications and health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL). OBJECTIVES: To determine the clinical outcomes and long-term HRQoL.......8%) required re-surgery. Nine patients (47.4%) developed late complications, including mandibular osteoradionecrosis in six cases (31.6%). Most patients obtained acceptable values of global quality-of-life and relatively high scores on the functional scales....... in patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer following free flap reconstruction. METHODS: A retrospective review of medical records and self-administered HRQoL questionnaires, EORTC QLQ-C30, and -H&N35. All patients who underwent surgery for oral or oropharyngeal cancer followed by primary reconstruction...

  8. The effect of oral consumption of shark cartilage on the cellular immune responses of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    somaye Shahrokhi

    2006-11-01

    Conclusion: It seems that shark cartilage could help strengthen cellular immunity which is important in tumor regression in breast cancer patients. So we suppose that it could be a good candidate for cancer treatment along with conventional medicine.

  9. Oral-health-related quality of life in patients with cancer: cultural adaptation and the psychometric testing of the Persian version of EORTC QLQ-OH17

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yekaninejad, M.S.; Pakpour, A.H.; Tadakamadla, J.; Kumar, S.; Mosavi, S.H.; Fridlund, B.; Bottomley, A.; Aaronson, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the validity, reliability, responsiveness to treatment, and gender invariance of the Persian version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Oral Health Questionnaire (QLQ-OH17) among Iranian cancer patients. Methods: Cancer patients (n = 729) from thre

  10. Suppression of Proinflammatory and Prosurvival Biomarkers in Oral Cancer Patients Consuming a Black Raspberry Phytochemical-Rich Troche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Thomas J; Uhrig, Lana K; Pearl, Dennis K; Casto, Bruce C; Warner, Blake M; Clinton, Steven K; Sardo-Molmenti, Christine L; Ferguson, Jeanette M; Daly, Brett T; Riedl, Kenneth; Schwartz, Steven J; Vodovotz, Yael; Buchta, Anthony J; Schuller, David E; Ozer, Enver; Agrawal, Amit; Weghorst, Christopher M

    2016-02-01

    Black raspberries (BRB) demonstrate potent inhibition of aerodigestive tract carcinogenesis in animal models. However, translational clinical trials evaluating the ability of BRB phytochemicals to impact molecular biomarkers in the oral mucosa remain limited. The present phase 0 study addresses a fundamental question for oral cancer food-based prevention: Do BRB phytochemicals successfully reach the targeted oral tissues and reduce proinflammatory and antiapoptotic gene expression profiles? Patients with biopsy-confirmed oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) administered oral troches containing freeze-dried BRB powder from the time of enrollment to the date of curative intent surgery (13.9 ± 1.27 days). Transcriptional biomarkers were evaluated in patient-matched OSCCs and noninvolved high at-risk mucosa (HARM) for BRB-associated changes. Significant expression differences between baseline OSCC and HARM tissues were confirmed using a panel of genes commonly deregulated during oral carcinogenesis. Following BRB troche administration, the expression of prosurvival genes (AURKA, BIRC5, EGFR) and proinflammatory genes (NFKB1, PTGS2) were significantly reduced. There were no BRB-associated grade 3-4 toxicities or adverse events, and 79.2% (N = 30) of patients successfully completed the study with high levels of compliance (97.2%). The BRB phytochemicals cyanidin-3-rutinoside and cyanidin-3-xylosylrutinoside were detected in all OSCC tissues analyzed, demonstrating that bioactive components were successfully reaching targeted OSCC tissues. We confirmed that hallmark antiapoptotic and proinflammatory molecular biomarkers were overexpressed in OSCCs and that their gene expression was significantly reduced following BRB troche administration. As these molecular biomarkers are fundamental to oral carcinogenesis and are modifiable, they may represent emerging biomarkers of molecular efficacy for BRB-mediated oral cancer chemoprevention.

  11. Systematic review of cytokines and growth factors for the management of oral mucositis in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; von Bültzingslöwen, I.; Logan, R.M.; Bowen, J.; Al-Azri, A.R.; Everaus, H.; Gerber, E.; Gomez, J.G.; Pettersson, B.G.; Soga, Y.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Tissing, W.J.E.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Lalla, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this project was to review the literature and define clinical practice guidelines for the use of cytokines and growth factor agents for the prevention or treatment of oral mucositis induced by cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Methods A systematic review was conducted by the Mu

  12. Validity and reliability of the Korean version of the Speech Handicap Index in patients with oral cavity cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S S; Choi, S H; Hong, J A; Hong, Y H; Jeong, N G; Lee, S Y; Sung, M-W; Hah, J H

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the cross-cultural adaptation of the Speech Handicap Index (SHI) for Korean subjects and to determine its reliability and utility in patients with oral cavity cancer. The Korean version of the SHI was administered to 50 healthy subjects and 56 patients with speech problems resulting from treatment for oral cavity cancers. The content and construct validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability were examined. Healthy subject and patient group scores were compared, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to determine discriminatory ability. The Korean version of the SHI had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.99) and test-retest reliability for the total and subscales: total (T) 0.98, speech (S) 0.99, and psychosocial (P) 0.97. Mean scores in the healthy group were 0.5 (T), 0.2 (S), and 0.2 (P), whereas those in the patient group were 34.3 (T), 16.6 (S), and 15.5 (P). The scores differed significantly between the groups (P<0.05). The Korean version of the SHI can be a useful tool to evaluate a patient's self-perception of their speech dysfunction in daily life and to better understand postoperative speech disorders in patients with oral cavity cancer.

  13. Impact of a pharmacist-led oral chemotherapy-monitoring program in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jay M; Holle, Lisa M; Clement, Jessica M; Bunz, Thomas; Niemann, Christopher; Chamberlin, Kevin W

    2016-12-01

    With the introduction of oral chemotherapy, the paradigm for cancer treatment is shifting. Use of oral chemotherapy agents offers a non-invasive option for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. However, these medications are not without challenges including strict adherence for optimal effects, novel toxicity profiles, frequent lab parameter monitoring, high cost, and proper handling and disposal methods. Pharmacists are positioned to play a key role in providing patients with the education required to assure an optimal treatment course is carried out. Two cohorts of patients receiving abiraterone, bicalutamide, or enzalutamide for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer seen in our outpatient cancer center 21 months before and 24 months after the implementation of a pharmacist-led oral chemotherapy-monitoring program in December of 2012 were retrospectively compared. Patients were evaluated for number of interventions, adherence to lab parameter monitoring, and overall time on each therapy. Of the 64 patients identified, 31 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. A significant increase in the average number of interventions per patient (6.9 vs. 2.6; P = 0.004) and adherence to lab parameter monitoring (10 vs. 3; P = 0.04) in the post-program implementation cohort was found. However, no significant difference in overall time on therapy (10.3 vs. 8.1; P = 0.341) between the two groups was observed. These results suggest a potential opportunity exists to maximize oral chemotherapy treatment outcomes with the addition of a formalized monitoring program directed by an oncology pharmacist. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Managing Intraoral Lesions in Oral Cancer Patients in a General Dental Practice: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Reuben Han-Kyu; Yang, Paul; Sung, Eric C

    2016-02-01

    As medical technology advances in the area of cancer therapeutics, dental practitioners will encounter patients with active cancer or a history of cancer. Typically, these patients may have had or are undergoing therapies such as surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or a combination of therapies. These patients may present with multiple side effects that dental practitioners can manage or prevent. We discuss some of these concerns and provide management strategies.

  15. Oral cancer: molecular technologies for risk assessment and diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Tao Chen

    2008-01-01

    @@ Purpose: The effective biomarkers related to diagnosis, metastasis, drug resistance and irradiation sensitivity of oral cancers will help the pathologist and oncologist to determine the molecular taxonomy diagnosis and design the individualization treatment for the patients with oral cancers.

  16. Treatment Options for Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and ... clinical trials before, during, or after starting their cancer treatment. Some clinical trials only include patients who have ...

  17. A non-invasive study to estimate and compare salivary sialic acid level as tumor marker in patients with pre-cancer and oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharun Varghese Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Discussion and Conclusion: The result suggests the correlation of elevated salivary TSA levels with the progression of OSCC. In conclusion, the study indicates that the glycoprotein metabolism is significantly altered in the saliva of patients, with both oral pre-cancer and OSCC.

  18. The effects of swallowing disorders, dysgeusia, oral mucositis and xerostomia on nutritional status, oral intake and weight loss in head and neck cancer patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Valentina; Stevanin, Simone; Bianchi, Monica; Aleo, Giuseppe; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Sasso, Loredana

    2016-04-01

    Combined-modality treatment of head and neck cancer is becoming more common, driven by the idea that organ(s) preservation should maintain patient appearance and the function of organ(s) involved. Even if treatments have improved, they can still be associated with acute and late adverse effects. The aim of this systematic review was to retrieve current data on how swallowing disorders, dysgeusia, oral mucositis, and xerostomia affect nutritional status, oral intake and weight loss in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. A systematic literature search covered four relevant electronic databases from January 2005 to May 2015. Retrieved papers were categorised and evaluated considering their methodological quality. Two independent reviewers reviewed manuscripts and abstracted data using a standardised form. Quality assessment of the included studies was performed using the Edwards Method Score. Of the 1459 abstracts reviewed, a total of 25 studies were included. The most studied symptom was dysphagia, even if symptoms were interconnected and affected one other. In most of the selected studies the level of evidence was between 2 and 3, and their quality level was from medium to low. There are limited data about dysgeusia, oral mucositis and xerostomia outcomes available for HNC patients. There is a lack of well-designed clinical trials and multicenter-prospective cohort studies, therefore further research is needed to ascertain which aspects of these symptoms should be measured. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Epidemiologic characteristics of oral cancer:single-center analysis of 4097 patients from the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Zhang; Ming Song; Fan Gao; AnKui Yang; WenKuan Chen; ShuWei Chen; Huan Li; Xing Zhang; ZhongYuan Yang; XinLin Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral cancer is a common type of head and neck cancers. Knowing its epidemiologic characteristics is crucial to preventing, diagnosing, and treating this cancer. This study aimed to explore the epidemiologic characteris‑tics of oral cancer in South China. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 4097 oral cancer patients treated at the Sun Yat‑sen University Cancer Center between 1960 and 2013. We compared the age of onset, sex ratio, pathologic type, and primary tumor location among three subcultural areas (Guangfu, Hakka, and Chaoshan) and between an economically developed region and a less‑developed one in Guangdong. Results: Overall, oral cancer had a male‑to‑female ratio of approximately 2:1, and this ratio decreased over time. Oral cancer occurred mostly in patients of 45–64 years old (54.5%), and the percentage of older patients gradually increased over time. The most common tumor location was the tongue. Squamous cell carcinoma was the predomi‑nant pathologic type. The percentage of blood type O in oral cancer patients was lower than that in the healthy pop‑ulation. The male‑to‑female ratio in the Chaoshan area was higher than that in the Guangfu and Hakka areas, whereas the age of disease onset in Guangfu was higher than that in Hakka and Chaoshan. The male‑to‑female ratio was lower and the age of disease onset was higher in the economically developed region than in the less‑developed region. Conclusion: The incidence of oral cancer in South China presents typical characteristics to which doctors should pay attention when diagnosing and treating oral cancer patients.

  20. The dynamics of gene expression changes in a mouse model of oral tumorigenesis may help refine prevention and treatment strategies in patients with oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Jean-Philippe; Tortereau, Antonin; Caulin, Carlos; Le Texier, Vincent; Lavergne, Emilie; Thomas, Emilie; Chabaud, Sylvie; Perol, David; Lachuer, Joël; Lang, Wenhua; Hong, Waun Ki; Goudot, Patrick; Lippman, Scott M; Bertolus, Chloé; Saintigny, Pierre

    2016-06-14

    A better understanding of the dynamics of molecular changes occurring during the early stages of oral tumorigenesis may help refine prevention and treatment strategies. We generated genome-wide expression profiles of microdissected normal mucosa, hyperplasia, dysplasia and tumors derived from the 4-NQO mouse model of oral tumorigenesis. Genes differentially expressed between tumor and normal mucosa defined the "tumor gene set" (TGS), including 4 non-overlapping gene subsets that characterize the dynamics of gene expression changes through different stages of disease progression. The majority of gene expression changes occurred early or progressively. The relevance of these mouse gene sets to human disease was tested in multiple datasets including the TCGA and the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer project. The TGS was able to discriminate oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) from normal oral mucosa in 3 independent datasets. The OSCC samples enriched in the mouse TGS displayed high frequency of CASP8 mutations, 11q13.3 amplifications and low frequency of PIK3CA mutations. Early changes observed in the 4-NQO model were associated with a trend toward a shorter oral cancer-free survival in patients with oral preneoplasia that was not seen in multivariate analysis. Progressive changes observed in the 4-NQO model were associated with an increased sensitivity to 4 different MEK inhibitors in a panel of 51 squamous cell carcinoma cell lines of the areodigestive tract. In conclusion, the dynamics of molecular changes in the 4-NQO model reveal that MEK inhibition may be relevant to prevention and treatment of a specific molecularly-defined subgroup of OSCC.

  1. [Incidence of oral cancer in AIDS patients at the "20 de Noviembre" Regional Hospital, ISSSTE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís Morán, C E; Molina Moguel, J L

    1990-09-01

    Ever since its initial outbursts in high-risk groups, AIDS has had an appalling impact within the oncological sphere, since it combines opportunistic pathologies with the occurrence of malignancies caused by loss of defensive cells, thus allowing abnormal or cancerous cells to multiply. This paper conveys some recent concepts on AIDS, as well as a study undertaken at the "20 de Noviembre" Hospital, aimed at identifying the most common opportunistic diseases which often occur in the oral cavity upon contracting AIDS.

  2. [Change in the incidence of diabetes mellitus in oral cancer patients based on a long-term comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Végh, Dániel; Bányai, Dorottya; Ujpál, Márta

    2015-03-01

    Our research is focused on the incidence of diabetes mellitus and glucose metabolic disorders among oral cancer patients and the frequency of different oral localizations of cancer. Diabetes mellitus affects 7% of the Hungarian population. This study uses data spanning 14 years, with 2 datasets of 1998-1999 and 2012-2013, collected first hand by the authors. These datasets have led us to examine the blood glucose level in 267 patients with histologically confirmed malignant tumours in the oral cavity. Diabetes mellitus was found in 59 of them (22.1%), The blood glucose was elevated in 32 cases (12%). The most frequent tumor locations among the diabetic patients: labial, lingual and gingival tumors gingivae. Comparative epidemiological study demonstrates that in 2012-2013 dataset there was an increased observed percentage of people with diabetes mellitus [17.6% to 22.1%]. The percentage of patients with IFG (impaired fasting glucose) also increased from 9.8% to 12%. Overall the number of patients with glucose metabolic disorders climbed from 27.4% to 34.1%, (p > 0.05). Our intention of this introductory analysis is to emphasize the close connection of these two very important disease groups, and the wider spread of diabetes mellitus.

  3. Reducing Trismus After Surgery and Radiotherapy in Oral Cancer Patients: Results of Alternative Operation Versus Traditional Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chiang-Chin; Wu, Shang-Liang; Lin, Shang-Lun; Ko, Shun-Yao; Chiang, Wei-Fan; Yang, Jung-Wu

    2016-05-01

    In patients with oral cancer, trismus (maximum interincisal opening [MIO] trismus. In our retrospective cohort study of oral cancer patients who underwent operations during 2010 to 2014, the predictor variable was the type of operation (alternative operation or traditional operation) and the outcome variable was MIO. All of the cases were allocated by 2 periods: the traditional operations were performed from 2010 to 2011, and the alternative operations were performed from 2011 to 2014. All patients received marginal mandibulectomy, anterolateral thigh free flap, and adjuvant radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy. In addition to traditional marginal mandibulectomy, the alternative operation included ipsilateral coronoidectomy and myotomy of the temporalis muscle insertion, masseter muscle, and medial pterygoid muscle. MIO was measured at 10 time points. The adjusted variables included demographic data, diagnostic parameters, treatment, and response. Of the 36 male patients with oral cancer, 16 were placed in the alternative operation group (AOG; mean age, 53.5 ± 11.9 years) and 20 were placed in the traditional operation group (TOG; mean age, 50.7 ± 7.1 years). Regarding the outcome indicator of patient MIO, the preoperative MIO in the AOG was on average 7.5 mm shorter than that in the TOG (P trismus. The alternative operation exhibited superior postoperative MIO values and similar postoperative complication rates. For the prevention of trismus, it is practical to perform the combined operation simultaneously, cutting all ipsilateral jaw closing muscles and the coronoid process and eradicating the tumor. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors Associated with Adherence Rates for Oral and Intravenous Anticancer Therapy in Commercially Insured Patients with Metastatic Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Brian S; Anderson, Sibyl; Shermock, Kenneth M

    2016-03-01

    Over the past decade, oncology therapies have trended toward orally administered regimens, and there has been growing attention on evaluation of factors that affect adherence. There has not been a rigorous investigation of factors associated with adherence to intravenous (i.v.) and oral anticancer drugs in the setting of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). To (a) assess potential patient-specific factors related to adherence to mCRC chemotherapy regimens and (b) compare adherence with IV versus oral dosage forms. A retrospective analysis was performed using the Optum Oncology Management claims database. Patients aged 18 years and older diagnosed with mCRC between July 1, 2004, and December 31, 2010, who were insured by a commercial health plan were included in the study. Adherence to i.v. and oral chemotherapy regimens was assessed using the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines as the standard for expected cycle/regimen duration. The most commonly prescribed chemotherapy regimens were assessed. Adherence was evaluated using the medication possession ratio (MPR), calculated as the number of days a patient was covered by their chemotherapy regimen, according to NCCN guidelines, divided by the number of days elapsed from the first to the last infusion of that regimen. For most analyses, the MPR was considered a continuous variable that could take on values between 0 and 1. In other analyses, a dichotomous categorical variable designated if the MPR was at least 0.8 versus less than 0.8. The Wilcoxon rank sum, Kruskal-Wallis, and Student's t-test were used to detect differences in continuous measures between patients receiving oral capecitabine therapy versus i.v. chemotherapy. The chi square test (X(2) test) or Fisher's exact test was used to assess differences in the dichotomous MPR variable. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used for regimen-level analyses to account for correlated responses within individuals. A total of 6

  5. Oral pristinamycin for the treatment of resistant Gram-positive infections in patients with cancer: Evaluation of clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J C; Lingaratnam, S M; Trubiano, J A; Thursky, K A; Slavin, M A; Worth, L J

    2016-05-01

    Pristinamycin has been used to treat a range of Gram-positive infections, but reported experience in patients with malignancy is limited. This study aimed to evaluate the use of pristinamycin in patients with cancer at an Australian centre. All patients commenced on oral pristinamycin therapy at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre between January 2005 and December 2014 were identified using the hospital pharmacy dispensing system. Information on demographics, co-morbidities, cancer diagnosis, infection characteristics, pristinamycin regimen, pristinamycin tolerability and outcomes was collected. The median duration of follow-up was 398 days. In total, 26 patients received pristinamycin, with median age of 61 years and a male predominance (65%). Underlying diagnoses were haematological malignancies (50%) and solid tumours (50%). Pathogens included 13 meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 6 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, 4 meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis, 2 meticillin-susceptible S. aureus and 1 vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium. Infection sites were osteomyelitis (6), skin and soft-tissue (4), intra-abdominal/pelvic abscess (4), bloodstream (3), empyema (3), endocarditis/endovascular (3), prosthesis-related infection (2) and epididymo-orchitis (1). One patient ceased pristinamycin due to nausea. Regarding outcome, 13 patients (50%) were cured of infection, 8 (31%) had suppression and 5 (19%) had relapse. Relapses included 1 endovascular infection, 2 episodes of osteomyelitis, 1 pelvic abscess and 1 skin and soft-tissue infection. Overall, 81% of patients achieved cure or suppression of antibiotic-resistant or complex Gram-positive infections, consistent with published experience in non-cancer populations. A favourable tolerability profile makes oral pristinamycin a viable treatment option, particularly in settings where outpatient management of cancer is the objective.

  6. Gene expression profiling predicts the development of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saintigny, Pierre; Zhang, Li; Fan, You-Hong; El-Naggar, Adel K; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A; Feng, Lei; Lee, J Jack; Kim, Edward S; Ki Hong, Waun; Mao, Li

    2011-02-01

    Patients with oral premalignant lesion (OPL) have a high risk of developing oral cancer. Although certain risk factors, such as smoking status and histology, are known, our ability to predict oral cancer risk remains poor. The study objective was to determine the value of gene expression profiling in predicting oral cancer development. Gene expression profile was measured in 86 of 162 OPL patients who were enrolled in a clinical chemoprevention trial that used the incidence of oral cancer development as a prespecified endpoint. The median follow-up time was 6.08 years and 35 of the 86 patients developed oral cancer over the course. Gene expression profiles were associated with oral cancer-free survival and used to develop multivariate predictive models for oral cancer prediction. We developed a 29-transcript predictive model which showed marked improvement in terms of prediction accuracy (with 8% predicting error rate) over the models using previously known clinicopathologic risk factors. On the basis of the gene expression profile data, we also identified 2,182 transcripts significantly associated with oral cancer risk-associated genes (P value oral cancer risk. In multiple independent data sets, the expression profiles of the genes can differentiate head and neck cancer from normal mucosa. Our results show that gene expression profiles may improve the prediction of oral cancer risk in OPL patients and the significant genes identified may serve as potential targets for oral cancer chemoprevention. ©2011 AACR.

  7. Factors that affect cancer patient compliance to oral anti-neoplastic therapy Factores que influyen en la adhesión de pacientes con cáncer a la terapia antineoplásica oral Fatores que influenciam a adesão de pacientes com câncer à terapia antineoplásica oral

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Andréa Crippa Marques; Angela Maria Geraldo Pierin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify factors that can affect compliance to treatment with neoplastic oral drugs in a group of cancer patients. METHODS: Interviews were performed on 61 patients diagnosed with cancer and under anti-neoplastic oral therapy in a private hospital. The interviews were carried out using instruments to assess compliance. RESULTS: Most patients (95%) reported the oral treatment was not difficult. The Morisky and Green Test were positive in 28% of the patients. Factors that may aff...

  8. Objective Acoustic-Phonetic Speech Analysis in Patients Treated for Oral or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Marieke J.; ten Bosch, Louis; Kuik, Dirk J.; Quene, Hugo; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Rene; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Speech impairment often occurs in patients after treatment for head and neck cancer. New treatment modalities such as surgical reconstruction or (chemo) radiation techniques aim at sparing anatomical structures that are correlated with speech and swallowing. In randomized trials

  9. Lack of nephrotoxicity of new oral platinum drug JM216 in lung cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, E; de Vries, EGE; Meijer, S; Groen, HJM

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess renal function in patients treated with the oral platinum drug JM216 [bisacetato-ammine-dichloro-cyclohexylamine-platinum (IV)I, since the effects of JM216 on renal function have only partly been investigated using serum parameters or Cr-51-EDTA

  10. Oral mucosa and lung cancer: Are genetic changes in the oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-03

    Feb 3, 2016 ... Aim: To compare genetic aberrations in the oral epithelium of lung cancer patients with those without cancer. Subjects and ... to lung cancer, although other risk factors (such as genetic ..... NSCLC/adenocarcinoma. 6 (12.0).

  11. Determinants of End-of-Life Expenditures in Patients with Oral Cancer in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chih Lee

    Full Text Available To investigate the association of basic demographic data, socioeconomic status, medical services, and hospital characteristics with end-of-life expenditure in patients with oral cancer in Taiwan who died between 2009 to 2011.This nationwide population-based, retrospective cohort study identified 5,386 patients who died from oral cancer. We evaluated medical cost in the last month of life by universal health insurance. The impact of each variable on the end-of-life expenditure was examined by hierarchical generalized linear model (HGLM using a hospital-level random-intercept model.The mean medical cost in the last six months of life was $2,611±3,329 (U.S. dollars. In HGLM using a random-intercept model, we found that patients younger than 65 years had an additional cost of $819 over those aged ≥65 years. Patients who had a high Charlson Comorbidity Index Score (CCIS had an additional $616 cost over those with a low CCIS. Those who survived post-diagnosis less than 6 months had an additional $659 in expenses over those who survived more than 24 months. Medical cost was $249 more for patients who had medium to high individual SES, and $319 more for those who were treated by non-oncologists.This study provides useful information for decision makers in understanding end-of-life expenditure in oral cancer. We found significantly increased end-of-life expenditure in patients if they were younger than 65 years or treated by non-oncologists, or had high CCIS, medium to high individual SES, and survival of less than 6 months after diagnosis.

  12. The Cancer-Associated Virus Landscape in HIV Patients with Oral Hairy Leukoplakia, Kaposi's Sarcoma, and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Burbelo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although HIV-positive patients are at higher risk for developing a variety of infection-related cancers, the prevalence of infections with the seven known cancer-associated viruses has not been studied. Luciferase immunoprecipitation systems were used to evaluate antiviral antibodies in four 23-person groups: healthy blood donors and HIV-infected patients with oral hairy leukoplakia (OLP, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL. Antibody profiling revealed that all HIV-positive individuals were strongly seropositive for anti-gp41 and antireverse transcriptase antibodies. However, anti-p24 HIV antibody levels were highly variable and some OLP and KS patients demonstrated weak or negative responses. Profiling two EBV antigens revealed no statistical difference in antibody levels among the three HIV-infected groups. A high frequency of KSHV infection was detected in HIV patients including 100% of KS, 78% of OLP, and 57% of NHL patients. Most HIV-infected subjects (84% showed anti-HBV core antibodies, but only a few showed antibodies against HCV. MCV seropositivity was also common (94% in the HIV-infected individuals and KS patients showed statistically higher antibody levels compared to the OLP and NHL patients. Overall, 68% of the HIV-infected patients showed seropositivity with at least four cancer-associated viruses. Antibody profiles against these and other infectious agents could be useful for enhancing the clinical management of HIV patients.

  13. Detection of EBV Infection and Gene Expression in Oral Cancer from Patients in Taiwan by Microarray Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yu Yen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus is known to cause nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Although oral cavity is located close to the nasal pharynx, the pathogenetic role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV in oral cancers is unclear. This molecular epidemiology study uses EBV genomic microarray (EBV-chip to simultaneously detect the prevalent rate and viral gene expression patterns in 57 oral squamous cell carcinoma biopsies (OSCC collected from patients in Taiwan. The majority of the specimens (82.5% were EBV-positive that probably expressed coincidently the genes for EBNAs, LMP2A and 2B, and certain structural proteins. Importantly, the genes fabricated at the spots 61 (BBRF1, BBRF2, and BBRF3 and 68 (BDLF4 and BDRF1 on EBV-chip were actively expressed in a significantly greater number of OSCC exhibiting exophytic morphology or ulceration than those tissues with deep invasive lesions (P=.0265 and .0141, resp.. The results may thus provide the lead information for understanding the role of EBV in oral cancer pathogenesis.

  14. Effects of Honey on Oral Mucositis among Pediatric Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemo/Radiotherapy Treatment at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jaouni, Soad K.; Al Muhayawi, Mohammad S.; Hussein, Abear; Elfiki, Iman; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Al Muhayawi, Saad M.; Almasaudi, Saad

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common complications of cancer chemotherapy is oral mucositis. This study evaluates the therapeutic effects of honey with the focus on grade III and IV oral mucositis, reduction of bacterial and fungal infections, duration of episodes of oral mucositis, and body weight in pediatric leukemic patients undergoing chemo/radiotherapy. This is an open labeled randomized controlled study conducted at our hospital on 40 pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemo/radiotherapy. All the 40 patients included in this study experienced a sum total of 390 episodes of fever and neutropenia associated with oral mucositis. A significant reduction of oral mucositis, associated Candida, and aerobic pathogenic bacterial infections was noted in patients in the honey treatment group. Also, there is a significant decrease in the duration of hospitalization for all those in the treatment group combined with a significant increase of body weight, delayed onset, and decreased severity of pain related to oral mucositis. Complications of oral mucositis can be tremendously reduced by the topical application of local Saudi honey and honey should be used as an integrative approach in prophylaxis and treatment of chemo/radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in pediatric cancer patients. Further research is needed to elucidate and better understand the underlying mechanism.

  15. Epidemiological studies of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindborg, J J

    1977-06-01

    The FDI has shown considerable interest in the oral cancer and has in recent years arranged three symposia on the subject. The incidence of oral cancer shows marked geographic differences mostly depending upon environmental factors. In the present paper the epidemiology of oral cancer is illustrated by the relative frequency to total number of cancers and incidence rates from a number of countries. Canada has the highest rate of cancer of the vermilion border, which is extremely rare among dark-skinned people. Even within one country differences may be found, a fact which is illustrated by findings from Czechoslovakia and India. In most of the studies dealing with the etiology of oral cancer tobacco usage in its various forms is shown to be the outstanding factor.

  16. The Efficacy of Oral Melatonin in Improving Sleep in Cancer Patients with Insomnia: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kurdi, Madhuri S; Sindhu Priya Muthukalai

    2016-01-01

    Background: The natural hormone melatonin has sleep inducing properties. Insomnia in cancer patients is common. So far, melatonin has been seldom tried for the improvement of sleep in patients with malignancies. Keeping this in mind, we planned and conducted a double-blind study to test the efficacy of melatonin in promoting sleep in patients with malignancies suffering from insomnia. Objective: To assess the hypnotic efficacy of oral melatonin in cancer patients with insomnia. Materi...

  17. [Efficacy of Elental on prevention for chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in colorectal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Ishibashi, Nobuya; Kibe, Shirou; Takahashi, Kenjirou; Uchida, Shinji; Murakami, Naotaka; Yahara, Toshirou; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2012-04-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the preventive effects of elemental diet Elental (ED) on chemotherapy-induced stomatitis in patients with colorectal cancer. A total of 23 patients with colorectal cancer experiencing grade 1-3 stomatitis during treatment with chemotherapy (2- or 3-week per cycle) entered the current study. Their average age was 67 years, ranging from 44 to 84 years. A total of 22 patients received the same chemotherapy regimen, but also received more than 80 g of Elental (ED) (including 1, 932 mg of L-glutamine), per day. FOLFOX, FOLFIRI or XELOX-based chemotherapy was used. A dose reduction of 5-FU, capacitabine or S-1 was performed in 5 patients who experienced grade 2 or 3 stomatitis. The maximum grade of stomatitis decreased in 18 of the 22 patients after the first treatment course, and decreased in 20 of 22 patients after the second course with ED.The preventive efficacy of ED on stomatitis was noted in a dose-dependent manner.Similarly, the maximum grade of neutropenia decreased in 10 of 11 patients after their first or second treatment course with ED. We conclude that ED can significantly decrease the severity of chemotherapy-induced stomatitis in colorectal cancer patients in association with the control of neutropenia.

  18. Oral cancer: Etiology and risk factors: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in the world. Oral cancer is of major concern in Southeast Asia primarily because of the prevalent oral habits of betel quid chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Despite recent advances in cancer diagnoses and therapies, the 5.year survival rate of oral cancer patients has remained at a dismal 50% in the last few decades. This paper is an overview of the various etiological agents and risk factors implicated in the development of oral cancer.

  19. Comparative efficacy of a single oral dose of ondansetron and of buspirone against cisplatin-induced emesis in cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Alfieri, A. B.; Cubeddu, L. X.

    1995-01-01

    Buspirone, an agonist of the 5-HT1A subtype of serotonin receptors, has shown antiemetic activity in animal models. However, in cancer patients treated with cisplatin, ondansetron, given either i.v. (one 8-mg dose 30 min after cisplatin) or orally (one 16-mg dose at the end of cisplatin infusion) was superior (P < 0.001) to buspirone (60 mg p.o. at the end of cisplatin and 60 mg p.o., 30 min later), in all parameters of antiemetic efficacy. These results are in favour of 5-HT3 receptors, but ...

  20. Treatment for Cancer Patients with Oral Mucositis: Assessment Based on the Mucositis Study Group of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer in International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) in 2013 and Proposal of Possible Novel Treatment with a Japanese Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Kanako; Ueno, Takao; Yatsuoka, Wakako; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    The cancer patients who received chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplant and terminal care often have a wide range of stomatitis, which induces severe pain and limits fundamental life behaviors such as "eating, drinking and talking". In addition, oral mucositis frequently leads to systemic infection through opportunistic microorganisms, which causes extension of hospitalization. Severe oral mucositis often causes cancer patients to partially or completely discontinue/modify cancer therapy regimen, which adversely affects the curative effects of cancer. Therefore, the control of oral mucositis is important and indispensable for improvement of quality of life and prognosis. In this review, we introduce recent trends of the oral mucositis management in cancer patients, according to the following sentences; 1) pathophysiological mechanisms of oral mucositis, 2) assessment, 3) risk factors, 4) prevention and treatment, and 5) development of novel therapy for oral mucositis.

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a bright light and a mirror: Remove any dentures Look and feel inside the lips and the ... Early treatment may well be the key to complete recovery. Head, Neck & Oral Cancer Facts The information ...

  2. Phenylbutyrate Mouthwash Mitigates Oral Mucositis During Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, Sang-Hue; Wang, Ling-Wei [Cancer Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yi-Hsien [Division of Radiotherapy, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Yih-Lin, E-mail: ylchung@kfsyscc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Koo Foundation Sun Yat-Sen Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Deleterious oral mucositis (OM) develops during radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients. There are currently no effective cytoprotective treatments for OM without a potential risk of tumor protection. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study aimed to determine the therapeutic safety and efficacy of phenylbutyrate (an antitumor histone deacetylase inhibitor and chemical chaperone) 5% mouthwash for treating OM caused by cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2005 and June 2006, 36 HNC patients were randomized to standard oral care plus 5 mL of either phenylbutyrate 5% mouthwash (n = 17) or placebo (mouthwash vehicle, n = 19) taken four times daily (swish and spit). Treatment began when mild mucositis (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1) occurred, and ended 4 weeks after RT completion. Safety and efficacy were based on adverse events, physical examination, laboratory determinations, vital signs, Oral Mucosa Assessment Scale (OMAS) and World Health Organization scores, the ability to eat, body weight change, local control, and survival. Results: We found no severe drug-related side effect. At RT doses of 5500-7500 cGy, phenylbutyrate significantly mitigated the severity of mucositis compared with placebo, based on both the WHO score (severity {>=} 3; p = 0.0262) and the OMAS scale (ulceration score {>=} 2; p = 0.0049). The Kaplan-Meier estimates for 2- and 3-year local control, and overall survival were 100% and 80.8%, and 78.6% and 64.3%, respectively, in the phenylbutyrate group and 74.2% and 74.2%, and 57.4% and 50.2%, respectively, in the placebo group. Conclusions: This pilot trial suggested that phenylbutyrate mouthwash significantly decreased the impact of OM in HNC patients receiving RT or chemoradiotherapy and did not confront the tumor control. Larger Phase II randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  3. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A– ... Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral ...

  4. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Spencer W

    2005-08-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies, particularly radiation therapy for head and neck cancer and various forms of chemotherapy. It commonly results in severe oral pain that can compromise the duration and success of cancer management. Hospitalizations are common because patients lose the ability to take anything by mouth due to severe pain and must have alimentation supported during this period. Pain management usually requires potent narcotic analgesia. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis is commonly described as the most significant and debilitating acute complication associated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Until recently, cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis was thought to be a process involving the epithelium only. Evidence is building that the process of oral mucositis involves far more than just the epithelium, but includes multiple cellular processes of the submucosa as well. Many strategies have been evaluated to prevent oral mucositis, but the data is confusing since it is often conflicting. Therapy with the growth factor, KGF1, appears promising, as it is the only medication currently approved by the FDA. A multifaceted approach that targets the entire mucositis process will probably be needed to optimize overall prevention.

  5. Comparative evaluation of genotoxicity by micronucleus assay in the buccal mucosa over comet assay in peripheral blood in oral precancer and cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katarkar, Atul; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Khan, Masood H; Ray, Jay G; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2014-09-01

    Early detection and quantification of DNA damage in oral premalignancy or malignancy may help in management of the disease and improve survival rates. The comet assay has been successfully utilised to detect DNA damage in oral premalignant or malignancy. However, due to the invasive nature of collecting blood, it may be painful for many unwilling patients. This study compares the micronucleus (MN) assay in oral buccal mucosa cells with the comet assay in peripheral blood cells in a subset of oral habit-induced precancer and cancer patients. For this, MN assay of exfoliated epithelial cells was compared with comet assay of peripheral blood leucocytes among 260 participants, including those with oral lichen planus (OLP; n = 52), leukoplakia (LPK; n = 51), oral submucous fibrosis (OSF; n = 51), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC; n = 54) and normal volunteers (n = 52). Among the precancer groups, LPK patients showed significantly higher levels of DNA damage as reflected by both comet tail length (P cigarette + khaini > cigarette smokers > areca + khaini > areca. There was no significant difference in the comet length and MNi frequency between males and females who had oral chewing habits. An overall significant correlation was observed between MNi frequency and comet tail length with r = 0.844 and P comet assay in peripheral blood cells is perfectly reflected by the MN assay on oral exfoliated epithelial cells, and MNi frequency can be used with the same effectiveness and greater efficiency in early detection of oral premalignant conditions.

  6. Prognostic Impact of Pretreatment Plasma Fibrinogen in Patients with Locally Advanced Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Holzinger

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the prognostic significance of pretreatment plasma fibrinigen in patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOSCC.A cohort of 183 patients with locally advanced OOSCC receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy was retrospectively examined. Using ROC curve analysis, a pretreatment plasma fibrinogen cutoff value of 447mg/dL was determined. The primary endpoints were overall survival and recurrence-free survival. A secondary endpoint was to determine whether pretreatment plasma fibrinogen could predict treatment response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Cox regression models and Kaplan-Meier curves were used for survival analyses.Seventy-one patients had an elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen (fibrinogen >447mg/dL. Patients with high fibrinogen showed significantly higher pathologic stages after neoadjuvant treatment than those with low fibrinogen (p = 0.037. In univariate analysis, elevated fibrinogen was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.005 and recurrence-free survival (p = 0.008 Multivariate analysis revealed that elevated fibrinogen remained an independent risk factor for death (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.09-2.90, p = 0.021 and relapse (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.11-2.86, p = 0.016.Elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen is associated with lack of response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and reduced OS and RFS in patients with OOSCC. Thus, plasma fibrinogen may emerge as a novel prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target in OOSCC.

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on the ...

  8. Up-to-date opportunities of cervical lymph nodes ultrasound investigation in patients, suffering from oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Alymov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Incidence of oral cancer in Russia is 4.52 and mortality – 2.44. Head and neck cancer is characterized by the high risk of development of metastases in regional lymph nodes. Lymph nodes status exerts influence on the treatment plan and appears to be the major predictive factor. Regional metastases result into two-fold decrease of five-year survival. Therefore, evaluation and treatment of metastatic lymph nodes is of prime importance. Objective. The aim of this manuscript was to illustrate and summarize publications devoted to modern methods of ultrasound evaluation of cervical lymph node status in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Results. Numerous studies have demonstrated, that standard ultrasound investigation (in B-mode is characterized by high sensitivity and specificity (specificity varies from 71.0 to 96.4 %, and specificity – from 46.6 to 91.0 %, according to different studies. In addition, ultrasound efficiency exceeds that of CT. Accuracy of ultrasound as the method of cervical lymph node investigation has increased after implementation of such methods, as elastography and elastometry (this techniques allow to achieve sensitivity of 98.1 % and specificity of 100 %. 

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Oral or Nasal Fentanyl for Treatment of Breakthrough Pain in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogríguez, Dulce; Urrutia, Gerard; Escobar, Yolanda; Moya, Jordi; Murillo, Maite

    2015-09-01

    Formulations of fentanyl that use buccal, sublingual, or nasal transmucosal routes of administration have been developed for the treatment of BTP in opioid-tolerant patients with cancer. The purposes of this analysis were to identify and review published data describing the efficacy and safety of different oral or nasal transmucosal fentanyl formulations for treatment of cancer-related BTP, based on a critical analysis of scientific literature. Oral transmucosal or intranasal fentanyl is an effective treatment for management of BTP episodes due to a potent analgesic effect, rapid onset of action, and sustained effect. Furthermore, it is a reasonably safe treatment, causing generally mild adverse events not leading to treatment discontinuation. Nevertheless, further progress in standardizing methodology, definitions, and criteria used both in research and in clinical practice is needed in order to generate quality information allowing a better understanding of the comparable efficacy of available formulations of fentanyl. A more rigorous assessment of long-term safety is also needed to establish a balance between benefits and risks of the available options.

  10. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Receipt Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) ... Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ...

  11. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships ... Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents an overview of physical, mental, ...

  12. Use of next-generation sequencing in oral cavity cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh; Kruse, Torben A; Thomassen, Mads

    Background: Oral cavity cancer is a subgroup of head and neck cancer which is the world’s 6th most common cancer form. Oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) constitute almost all oral cavity cancers, and OSCC are primarily attributed by excessive alcohol consumption and tobacco exposure...... of tumour cells exists. Conclusions: Use of next generation sequencing in oral cavity cancer can give valuable insight into the biology of the disease. By investigating intra tumour heterogeneity we see that the different tumour specimens in each patient are quite homogenous, but evidence of heterogeneous...

  13. Are we able to reduce the mortality and morbidity of oral cancer; Some considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, I.

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer makes up 1%-2% of all cancers that may arise in the body. The majority of oral cancers consists of squamous cell carcinomas. Oral cancer carries a considerable mortality rate, being mainly dependent on the stage of the disease at admission. Worldwide some 50% of the patients with oral

  14. Are we able to reduce the mortality and morbidity of oral cancer; Some considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Waal, I.

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer makes up 1%-2% of all cancers that may arise in the body. The majority of oral cancers consists of squamous cell carcinomas. Oral cancer carries a considerable mortality rate, being mainly dependent on the stage of the disease at admission. Worldwide some 50% of the patients with oral ca

  15. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in oral submucous fibrosis, oral leukoplakia, and oral cancer: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha Gurudath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Present study was undertaken to estimate and compare erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (E-SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx levels in oral submucous fibrosis, oral leukoplakia, oral cancer patients, and healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: E-SOD and GPx levels were estimated in OSF, oral leukoplakia, and oral cancer patients with 25 subjects in each group. The results obtained were compared with the corresponding age-/sex- matched control groups. Results: Statistically significant ( P 0.05. Oral cancer group had the lowest levels amongst the study groups. Conclusion: Imbalance in antioxidant enzyme status may be considered as one of the factors responsible for the pathogenesis of cancer and may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target to reduce the malignant transformation in oral premalignant lesions/conditions.

  16. Outcome of patients with early stage oral cancer managed by an observation strategy towards the N0 neck using ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology: No survival difference as compared to elective neck dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flach, G.B.; Tenhagen, M.; de Bree, R.; Brakenhoff, R.H.; van der Waal, I.; Bloemena, E.; Kuik, D.J.; Castelijns, J.A.; Leemans, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Management of the clinically N0 neck in oral cancer patients remains controversial. We describe the outcome of patients with T1-T2 oral cancer and N0 neck based on ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology (USgFNAC) who were treated by transoral excision and followed by a ‘wait an

  17. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ ... site’s privacy policy when you follow the link. Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA ...

  18. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Programs (Extramural Research) NIDCR Laboratories (Intramural Research) Science News in Brief Study Takes First Comprehensive Look ... Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ...

  19. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In Skip to Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities ...

  20. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes ... Browse Studies by Topic NIDCR-Sponsored Clinical Trials Research NIDCR Strategic Plan Research Results Tools for Researchers ...

  1. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – ...

  2. Oral Cancer Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shown to participate in their development. These include lichen planus, an inflammatory disease of the oral soft ... at an uncontrolled rate, is unable to repair DNA damage within itself, or refuses to self destruct ...

  3. Absorption and tolerability of fentanyl buccal soluble film (FBSF in patients with cancer in the presence of oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn AL

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrew L Finn1, WD Charlie Hill2, Ignacio Tagarro3, Larry N Gever41Product Development, BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Co-founding partner, InVisions Consultants, LLC, San Antonio, TX, USA; 3Marketing Centre CIP CNS, Meda Pharma S.A.U., Madrid, Spain; 4Medical Affairs, Meda Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Somerset, NJ, USAPurpose: Fentanyl buccal soluble film (FBSF consists of a small, bilayered, water-soluble polymer film that adheres to the buccal mucosa and rapidly delivers fentanyl into the systemic circulation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the absorption of fentanyl from FBSF in patients with cancer, with and without grade 1 oral mucositis, and to assess the tolerability of FBSF in this patient population.Patients and methods: In an open-label, single-dose study, two groups of opioid-naive patients (ie, not receiving opioids on a regular basis with cancer received a 200 µg dose of FBSF. Patients in cohort I (n = 7 had grade 1 mucositis, and patients in cohort II (n = 7 were age- and gender-matched controls without mucositis. The FBSF dose was placed on the area of mucositis in cohort I and on a matching location in cohort II. Blood samples were collected up to 4 hours after administration, and safety assessments were made throughout the study.Results: Peak plasma concentration and area under the concentration–time curve from time 0 to 4 hours post-dose values of patients in the grade 1 mucositis cohort were lower than those observed in patients without mucositis. There was no application site irritation reported in any patient, regardless of mucositis status. Mild somnolence was reported by two patients with mucositis. There were no deaths or serious adverse events reported in this study.Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that application of FBSF to an area of grade 1 mucositis does not result in increased fentanyl exposure or irritation of the mucosa. The 200 µg dose of FBSF was well

  4. Systematic reviews of oral complications from cancer therapies, Oral Care Study Group, MASCC/ISOO : methodology and quality of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brennan, Michael T.; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.

    Oral complications are commonly experienced by patients undergoing cancer therapies. The Oral Care Study Group of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) has completed nine systematic reviews including Bisphosphonate

  5. Assessing oral cancer knowledge in Romanian undergraduate dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, A L; Ibric, S; Ibric-Cioranu, V

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the level of Romanian dental students' knowledge regarding the oral cancer risk and non-risk factors as well as oral cancer signs, symptoms, and diagnostic signs. A total of 192 first- to sixth-year undergraduate dental students (mean age 22.20 ± 2.94 years) who consented to participate in the study filled in a questionnaire enquiring about their knowledge of oral cancer. A score of the oral cancer knowledge was calculated for each participant based on their correct answers. Regarding the knowledge of oral cancer risk factors, the vast majority of the students correctly recognized tobacco (96.8 %), having a prior oral cancer lesion (85.1 %), the consumption of alcohol (77.7 %), and older age (64.2 %). Respectively, 87.7 and 54.3 % knew the tongue and the floor of mouth to be the most common oral cancer sites. Of the students, 71.3 % agreed that oral cancer examinations for those 20 years of age and older should be provided during regular periodic health examinations, 92.9 % considered that patients with suspicious oral lesions should be referred to specialists, and 84.6 % agreed that oral cancer examinations should be a routine part of a comprehensive oral examination. A significant association was found between the year of study in the dental school, age, and knowledge of the oral cancer knowledge scores. Although students' knowledge increased with academic year, there is a clear need to enhance the dental curricula in oral cancer clinical training in oral cancer prevention and examination for dental students.

  6. Combinations of genetic data in a study of oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling Thyge; Møller, Gert Lykke; Mondal, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    for a polygenic disorder will not occur in in control persons genetically unrelated to patients, so the strategy is to analyze combinations of genetic variants present exclusively in patients. In a previous study of oral cancer and leukoplakia 325 SNPs were analyzed. This study has been supplemented...... with an analysis of combinations of two SNP genotypes from among the 325 SNPs. Two clusters of combinations containing 95 patient specific combinations were significantly associated with oral cancer or leukoplakia. Of 373 patients with oral cancer 205 patients had a number of these 95 combinations in their genome...

  7. Erlotinib and the Risk of Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, William N.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Lee, J. Jack; Mao, Li; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Lin, Heather Y.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Martin, Jack W.; Lingen, Mark W.; Boyle, Jay O.; Shin, Dong M.; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Shinn, Nancy; Heymach, John V.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Tang, Ximing; Kim, Edward S.; Saintigny, Pierre; Blair, Elizabeth A.; Meiller, Timothy; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Myers, Jeffrey; El-Naggar, Adel; Lippman, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Standard molecularly based strategies to predict and/or prevent oral cancer development in patients with oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) are lacking. OBJECTIVE To test if the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib would reduce oral cancer development in patients with high-risk OPLs defined by specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) profiles. Secondary objectives included prospective determination of LOH as a prognostic marker in OPLs. DESIGN The Erlotinib Prevention of Oral Cancer (EPOC) study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-bind trial. Accrual occurred from November 2006 through July 2012, with a median follow-up time of 35 months in an ambulatory care setting in 5 US academic referral institutions. Patients with OPLs were enrolled in the protocol, and each underwent LOH profiling (N = 379); they were classified as high-risk (LOH-positive) or low-risk (LOH-negative) patients based on their LOH profiles and oral cancer history. The randomized sample consisted of 150 LOH-positive patients. INTERVENTIONS Oral erlotinib treatment (150mg/d) or placebo for 12 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Oral cancer–free survival (CFS). RESULTS A total of 395 participants were classified with LOH profiles, and 254 were classified LOH positive. Of these, 150 (59%) were randomized, 75 each to the placebo and erlotinib groups. The 3-year CFS rates in placebo- and erlotinib-treated patients were 74%and 70%, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95%CI, 0.68–2.38; P = .45). The 3-year CFS was significantly lower for LOH-positive compared with LOH-negative groups (74%vs 87%, HR, 2.19; 95%CI, 1.25–3.83; P = .01). Increased EGFR gene copy number correlated with LOH-positive status (P < .001) and lower CFS (P = .01). The EGFR gene copy number was not predictive of erlotinib efficacy. Erlotinib-induced skin rash was associated with improved CFS (P = .01). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this trial, LOH was validated as a marker of oral cancer risk and

  8. MUCOSITIS PREVENTION BY SELECTIVE ELIMINATION OF ORAL FLORA IN IRRADIATED HEAD AND NECK-CANCER PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPIJKERVET, FKL; VANSAENE, HKF; VANSAENE, JJM; PANDERS, AK; VERMEY, A; MEHTA, DM

    1990-01-01

    Mucositis induced by irradiation is the reactive inflammatory-like process of the oropharyngeal mucous membranes following irradiation. Bacteria colonizing the oral tissues are thought to contribute to this inflammatory process. The eradication of Gram-negative bacilli (selective elimination of oral

  9. MUCOSITIS PREVENTION BY SELECTIVE ELIMINATION OF ORAL FLORA IN IRRADIATED HEAD AND NECK-CANCER PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPIJKERVET, FKL; VANSAENE, HKF; VANSAENE, JJM; PANDERS, AK; VERMEY, A; MEHTA, DM

    1990-01-01

    Mucositis induced by irradiation is the reactive inflammatory-like process of the oropharyngeal mucous membranes following irradiation. Bacteria colonizing the oral tissues are thought to contribute to this inflammatory process. The eradication of Gram-negative bacilli (selective elimination of oral

  10. Changes in the protein composition of whole saliva during radiotherapy in patients with oral or pharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkonen, T.A.; Tenovuo, J.; Vilja, P.; Heimdahl, A.

    1986-09-01

    We analyzed the radiation-induced changes in the flow rate and protein composition of stimulated whole saliva in eleven patients treated for malignant conditions of the head and neck. In all patients the radiation field covered all major salivary glands and a large area of the oral mucosa. Paraffin-stimulated whole saliva samples were collected once 2 to 21 days before therapy and then after 20, 40, and 60 gray (Gy) cumulative dose of irradiation. Five patients also provided samples 6 months after the therapy. Hyposalivation or xerostomia occurred in all patients, although the pretreatment secretion rates were already relatively low. Salivary amylase activities decreased with increasing dose of radiation, especially when expressed as the amount of enzyme secreted per minute. Unusually high salivary concentrations of albumin, lactoferrin, lysozyme, salivary peroxidase, myeloperoxidase, and total protein were observed during the therapy, but most values slowly returned to pretreatment levels after cessation of radiation. It is concluded that the observed qualitative changes in whole saliva components are net effects caused by the cancer itself, radiation therapy given, systemic diseases, or medications, as well as mucosal inflammations.

  11. Assessment of quality of life of patients with oral cavity cancer who have had defects reconstructed with free anterolateral thigh perforator flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlu; Yang, Yanjie; Xu, Zhongfei; Liu, Fayu; Cheng, Yusheng; Xu, Lei; Sun, Changfu

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quality of life (QoL) in patients who have had resections of oral cancer and reconstruction by free anterolateral thigh perforator flaps. QoL was assessed by the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QoL) questionnaires 12 months postoperatively. Fifty-one of the 69 questionnaires were returned (74%). In the UW-QoL the best-scoring domain was pain, whereas the lowest scores were for chewing, saliva, and taste. In the OHIP-14 the lowest-scoring domain was handicap, followed by psychological disability, and social disability. Free anterolateral thigh perforator flaps for reconstruction of defects of the head and neck after resection for cancer significantly influenced the patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomarkers in the assessment of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normando, Ana Gabriela Costa; Rocha, Camila Lopes; de Toledo, Isabela Porto; de Souza Figueiredo, Paulo Tadeu; Dos Reis, Paula Elaine Diniz; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the capability of biomarkers to predict the risk of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients, as well as to assess the correlation between these biomarkers and the severity of mucositis. The search was performed at LILACS, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, and Web of Science. A search of the gray literature was performed on Google Scholar, OpenGrey, and ProQuest. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (MAStARI) tool, and the evidence quality was assessed by the Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. After a two-step selection process, 26 studies met the eligibility criteria. In total, 27 biomarkers were evaluated, and the most frequent were the epidermal growth factor (EGF), C-reactive protein (CRP), genetic polymorphisms, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). The meta-analysis showed an expression of polymorphisms in XRCC1 (32.66%), XRCC3 (31.00%), and RAD51 (39.16%) genes, as well as an expression of protein biomarkers (39.57%), in patients with an increased risk of developing oral mucositis. Dosing biomarkers before starting radiation therapy may be a promising method to predict the risk of developing mucositis and allow radiosensitive patients to have a customized treatment. Although there is currently limited evidence to confirm the putative implementation of serum and salivary biomarkers to assess the correlation between them and the severity of mucositis, this current review provides new research directions.

  13. Current management of oral cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Ord

    2008-01-01

    @@ This presentation will summarize some of the current areas of interest in the management of oral cancer. The presentation will be divided into a brief review of epidemiology and diagnosis, with a more extensive discussion regarding the controversial areas in surgery and a review of the adjuvant roles of radiation and chemotherapy.

  14. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei Washio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  15. Cryotherapy for oral precancers and cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuan-Hang; Lin, Hung-Pin; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Sun, Andy; Chen, Hsin-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have used cryotherapy for the treatment of oral precancers including oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral verrucous hyperplasia (OVH) as well as oral cancers including oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Cryotherapy is a method that locally destroys lesional tissues by freezing in situ. It can be carried out by either an "open" or a "closed" system. Lesional tissues are destroyed mainly through disruption of cell membrane, cellular dehydration, enzyme and protein damage, cell swelling and rupture, thermal shock injury to cells, damage to vasculature, and immune-mediated cytotoxicity. Cryotherapy is used frequently for the treatment of OL lesions with promising results. It can also be used to treat OVH and OVC lesions. Because OVH and OVC lesions are usually fungating and bulky, a combination therapy of shave excision and cryotherapy is needed to achieve a complete regression of the lesion. OSCCs have also been treated by cryotherapy. However, cryotherapy is not the main-stream treatment modality for OSCCs. Cryotherapy seems suitable for treatment of thin or relatively thick plaque-typed lesions such as OL lesions. By careful selection of patients, cryotherapy is a simple, safe, easy, conservative, and acceptable treatment modality for certain benign oral lesions and oral precancers.

  16. Phase I trial of orally administered pentosan polysulfate in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J L; Wellstein, A; Rae, J; DeLap, R J; Phipps, K; Hanfelt, J; Yunmbam, M K; Sun, J X; Duchin, K L; Hawkins, M J

    1997-12-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critically important to tumor growth and metastasis. We have shown that pentosan polysulfate (PPS) is an effective inhibitor of heparin-binding growth factors in vitro and can effectively inhibit the establishment and growth of tumors in nude mice. Following completion of our Phase I trial of s.c. administered PPS, we performed a Phase I trial of p.o. administered PPS in patients with advanced cancer to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and toxicity profile and to search for any evidence for biological activity in vivo. Patients diagnosed with advanced, incurable malignancies who met standard Phase I criteria and who did not have a history of bleeding complications were enrolled, in cohorts of three, to receive PPS p.o. t.i.d., at planned doses of 180, 270, 400, 600, and 800 mg/m2. Patients were monitored at least every 2 weeks with physical exams and weekly with hematological, chemistry, stool hemoccult, and coagulation blood studies, and serum and urine samples for PPS and basic fibroblastic growth factor (bFGF) levels were also taken. The PPS dose was escalated in an attempt to reach the MTD. Eight additional patients were enrolled at the highest dose to further characterize the toxicity profile and biological in vivo effects of PPS. A total of 21 patients were enrolled in the three cohorts of doses 180 (n = 4), 270 (n = 3), and 400 (n = 14) mg/m2. The most severe toxicities seen were grade 3 proctitis and grade 4 diarrhea; however, 20 of the 21 patients had evidence of grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These toxicities became evident at a much earlier time point as the dose was increased, but their severities were similar at all dose levels. There were no objective responses, although three patients had prolonged stabilization of previously progressing disease. Pharmacokinetic analysis suggested marked accumulation of PPS upon chronic administration. Serum and urine bFGF levels failed to show a consistent, interpretable

  17. Phase I study of intermittent and chronomodulated oral therapy with capecitabine in patients with advanced and/or metastatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparro Simona

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The combination of capecitabine and gemcitabine at Fixed Dose Rate (FDR has been demonstrated to be well tolerated, with apparent efficacy in patients with advanced cancers. FDR gemcitabine infusion leads to enhanced intracellular accumulation of drug and possible augmented clinical effect. The goals of this phase I study were to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD of chronomodulated capecitabine in patients with advanced cancer and to describe the dose-limiting toxicities (DLT, the safety profile of this way of administration. Methods Patients with advanced solid tumours who had failed to response to standard therapy or for whom no standard therapy was available were elegible for this study. Capecitabine was administered orally according to following schedule: 1/4 of dose at 8:00 a.m.; 1/4 of dose at 6:00 p.m. and 1/2 of dose at 11:00 p.m. each day for 14 consecutive days, followed by a 7-day rest period. Results All 27 patients enrolled onto the study were assessable for toxicity. The most common toxicities during the first two cycles of chemotherapy were fatigue, diarrhoea and hand foot syndrome (HFS. Only one out of the nine patients treated at capecitabine dose of 2,750 mg/m2 met protocol-specified DLT criteria (fatigue grade 4. However, at these doses the majority of cycles of therapy were delivered without dose reduction or delay. No other episodes of DLT were observed at the same dose steps and at the lower dose steps of capecitabine (1,500/1,750/2,000/2,250/2,500 mg/m2. The dose of 2,750 mg/m2 is recommended for further study. Tumor responses were observed in patients with metastatic breast and colorectal cancer. Conclusion High doses of chronomodulated capecitabine can be administered with acceptable toxicity. The evidence of antitumor activity deserves further investigation in phase II combination chemotherapy studies.

  18. A morphometric study of the protective effect of cryotherapy on oral mucositis in cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeli, M; Aldemir, M N; Bingol, F; Dogan, C; Kara, A

    2016-10-01

    We investigated cytological changes in oral mucosa smears from patients treated with cryotherapy to determine whether cryotherapy prevented mucositis caused by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) therapy. Patients with gastrointestinal malignancies were divided into four groups; control patients before 5-FU therapy, patients after 5-FU therapy without cryotherapy, patients with cryotherapy before 5-FU therapy and patients with cryotherapy after 5-FU therapy. Oral mucosa samples from all patients were assessed at the beginning and on day 14 of chemotherapy. We used exfoliative cytology to evaluate cellular changes in the oral mucosa that were caused by 5-FU. Smears from each patient were stained using the Papanicolaou method and analyzed using stereology. Smears were taken from each group before and after 5-FU infusion. We found that nuclear volume was decreased significantly in cells of the 5-FU therapy after cryotherapy patients compared to the 5-FU therapy before cryotherapy patients. We also found significantly decreased cytoplasmic volumes in the 5-FU therapy after cryotherapy patients compared to the 5-FU therapy before cryotherapy patients. The results of cytomorphometric estimations revealed that cryotherapy may be used to prevent damage to oral tissue and may decrease the frequency and duration of oral mucositis caused by 5-FU.

  19. Human Papillomavirus Infections are Common and Predict Mortality in a Retrospective Cohort Study of Taiwanese Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Huang, Chung-Guei; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Liao, Chun-Ta; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chang, Kai-Ping; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Yang, Shu-Li; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chang, Tung-Chieh; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are deemed to play a role in the pathogenesis of oral cavity cancer (OCC). However, their exact prevalence and clinical significance remain unclear. Herein, we investigated the prevalence and prognostic value of HPV infections in a large sample of Taiwanese OCC patients.This study was designed as a retrospective cohort study. Between 2004 and 2011, we identified 1002 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed OCC who were scheduled for standard treatment. HPV genotyping was performed in tumor specimens using polymerase chain reaction-based HPV blots. To investigate the temporal trends of HPV infections and their impact on 5-year overall survival (OS), patients were divided into 2 cohorts according to calendar periods: "2004 cohort" (2004-2007; n = 466) and "2008 cohort" (2008-2011; n = 536). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models were also used to identify the independent predictors of OS in the 2 cohorts. A weighted risk score was assigned to each factor based on the range of their corresponding hazard ratios and validated in both cohorts using the c-statistic.The overall prevalence of HPV infections was 19%, with a trend toward decreasing rates from 2004 to 2011. In patients without risky oral habits, the 5-year OS rate of HPV-positive patients was significantly lower than that of HPV-negative cases (49% vs 80%; P = 0.021). In the 2004 cohort, multivariate analysis identified HPV16, pathological T3/T4, pathological N1/N2, and extracapsular spread as independent adverse prognostic factors for OS. In the 2008 cohort, pathological N1/N2, pathological stage III/IV, and histological tumor depth >8 mm were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. Using a weighted grading system incorporating HPV16 infection, we devised a prognostic index that identified 4 distinct risk categories with 5-year OS rates ranging from 25% to 89% (c-statistic = 0.76) in the 2004 cohort. The validity of the index was internally

  20. Increasing incidence and survival in oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Karnov, Kirstine; Grønhøj, Christian; Jensen, David Hebbelstrup

    2017-01-01

    regression analysis in relation to location, gender, age, and calendar year at diagnosis. RESULTS: Altogether, 8299 patients with oral cancer were identified, 5062 (61%) of whom were males and 3237 (39%) were females. The median age at diagnosis was 63 years. The AAIR of patients with OC increased from 1......BACKGROUND: Oral carcinomas (OCs) make up a significant proportion of head and neck carcinomas (HNCs) and are an important cause of morbidity and mortality globally. The purpose of this population-based study was to determine trends in incidence and survival in OC in the Danish population from 1980...... to 2014. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study covered all patients registered in the nationwide Danish cancer registry (DCR) in the period 1980-2014. Age-adjusted incidence rate (AAIR) per 100,000 and annual percentage change (APC) were evaluated. Also, 5-year overall survival (OS) was calculated with Cox...

  1. Phase I study of 4-demethoxydaunorubicin by oral route in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Andersen, E; Elbaek, K

    1988-01-01

    In a phase I trial 4-demethoxydaunorubicin (4-dm DNR) was administered as oral capsules once a week to 51 adults with advanced mainly gastrointestinal solid tumors. No fatal toxicity was observed at doses up to 25.0 mg/m2. Dose-limiting granulocytopenia and non-hematologic toxicity developed...

  2. On the status and comparison of glucose intolerance in female breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis and during chemotherapy through an oral glucose tolerance test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-jie Lu

    Full Text Available AIMS: This study is to estimate the status and comparison of glucose intolerance in female breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis and during chemotherapy through an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, as well as to learn the effect of chemotherapy on the glucose metabolism of breast cancer patients. METHODS: All the 79 breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis, with the mean age of 53.2 years, and 96 breast cancer patients before the 5th or 6th cycle of chemotherapy, with the mean age of 51.5 years, participated in the study from December 2012 to October 2013. After an overnight fast, participants underwent OGTT test, and fasting and 2-hour glucose levels were measured to identify undiagnosed diabetes and prediabetes (i.e., impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance in them. Previously diagnosed diabetes among the female breast cancer patients was determined on the self-report and the medical record. RESULTS: The overall incidences of total normal glucose tolerance, prediabetes, diabetes in female breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis and during chemotherapy were 24.1% and 38.5% (p0.05, respectively, and the differences of normal glucose tolerance and prediabetes instead of diabetes between the two groups were statistically significant. About 84% of the total diabetes and prediabetes in the female breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis and 79.7% of those during chemotherapy need to be diagnosed with OGTT. CONCLUSIONS: Breast cancer patients have high incidences of diabetes and prediabetes. After chemotherapy even with steroids, some breast cancer patients with abnormal glucose metabolism may even become normal. Isolated hyperglycemia 2 hours after glucose loading is common, and OGTT should be made for breast cancer patients at initial diagnosis and during chemotherapy.

  3. Oral complications of cancer and cancer therapy: from cancer treatment to survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Joel B; Thariat, Juliette; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Barasch, Andrei; Murphy, Barbara A; Kolnick, Leanne; Popplewell, Leslie; Maghami, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Oral complications resulting from cancer and cancer therapies cause acute and late toxicities that may be underreported, underrecognized, and undertreated. Recent advances in cancer treatment have led to changes in the incidence, nature, and severity of oral complications. As the number of survivors increases, it is becoming increasingly recognized that the aggressive management of oral toxicities is needed to ensure optimal long-term oral health and general well-being. Advances in care have had an impact on previously recognized oral complications and are leading to newly recognized adverse effects. Here, the authors briefly review advances in cancer therapy, including recent advances in surgery, oral care, radiation therapy, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and medical oncology; describe how these advances affect oral health; and discuss the frequent and/or severe oral health complications associated with cancer and cancer treatment and their effect upon long-term health. Although some of the acute oral toxicities of cancer therapies may be reduced, they remain essentially unavoidable. The significant impact of long-term complications requires increased awareness and recognition to promote prevention and appropriate intervention. It is therefore important for the primary oncologist to be aware of these complications so that appropriate measures can be implemented in a timely manner. Prevention and management is best provided via multidisciplinary health care teams, which must be integrated and communicate effectively in order to provide the best patient care in a coordinated manner at the appropriate time.

  4. Effect of Oral Zinc Sulphate in Preventionof Radiation Induced OropharyngealMucositis During and After Radiotherapyin Patients with Head and Neck Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadianpanah

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Mucositis is a disturbing side effect of radiotherapy treatment forhead and neck cancer. To date, no effective modality for its prophylaxis and treatmenthas been found. We performed this study to evaluate the efficacy of oral zincsulphate in delaying the onset of oral and pharyngeal mucositis and decreasing theirseverity.Materials and Methods: Atotal of 58 patients who were treated for head andneck squamous cell carcinoma with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy wererandomly assigned to receive oral zinc sulphate (220 mg or an oral placebo 3 timesa day during their radiotherapy course. Total radiation dose was 6000 cGy to 7000cGy by conventional radiotherapy. Seventy nine percent of the patients also receivedconcurrent chemotherapy. Oral and pharyngeal mucositis were scored according toan RTOG protocol. Results:Time to onset of mucositis did not vary between the two groups.However, oral mucositis scores were less severe in the zinc group in weeks 4 to 6.The difference was statistically significant and the Pvalues for weeks 4, 5 and 6 were0.02, 0.007, and 0.012, respectively. Treatment interruptions in both groups were thesame (four cases each and all were due to dysphagia (pharyngeal mucositis.Conclusion:Our results suggest that zinc is effective in reducing the severity oforal mucositis but not pharyngeal mucositis. Treatment interruptions were morefrequently caused by pharyngeal mucositis which presented as dysphagia, rather thanoral pain that was a manifestation of oral mucositis.

  5. [Examination of the oral cavities of patients with cancer: clinical evaluation and indirect measurement of the nitric oxide level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Emilia Campos; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari; Khouri, Vivian Youssef; Guilherme, Caroline; dos Santos, Claudia Benedita; Pace, Mariangela Aparecida

    2013-02-01

    This observational study aimed to verify the association between the clinical state of the oral cavity (based on the Index of Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth and the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index) and the indirectly determined nitric oxide level in patients with oncologic and hematologic diseases. This study included 20 hospitalized patients who were in the evaluation phase prior to starting chemotherapy and who had been diagnosed with leukemia (35%), lymphoma (50%) or myeloma (15%). Fifty percent of these patients had normal oral health (no injury or trauma), and most had satisfactory (35%) or typical (35%) hygiene, but 30% had poor or very poor hygiene. The indirectly measured levels of nitric oxide ranged from 13.34 to 257. The nitric oxide level was not associated with other parameters, and there was great variability in its level. Further studies are necessary given the potential of using this indicator in the early detection of oral diseases.

  6. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Oral complications in the pediatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggott, P.J. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A number of acute oral complications may be associated with cancer therapy in children, but the extent and duration of these complications, and the most effective management techniques. have not been well described. The few studies differ in design, making comparisons difficult. Well-controlled, prospective clinical studies are needed to define the most effective strategies for the management of acute oral complications in children. However, it is clear that dental intervention prior to cancer therapy is an important factor in the optimal preparation of the patient. During cancer therapy, intensive supervised oral preventive protocols appear to be of benefit to the child's oral health, overall comfort, and well-being. Furthermore, the prevention of oral infection may significantly reduce the morbidity associated with cancer therapy. Long-term preventive oral care may help prevent dental disease and infection in medically compromised children and contribute to improving the quality of life. 41 references.

  7. Expression of p53 in the Tumor and Oral Epithelium in Patients with Cancer of Mouth and Pharynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, Fabiane Dittrich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Expressive percent of patients with oral and oral pharynx carcinomas presents with overexpression of protein p53 induced by tobacco, alcohol and radiotherapy. Objective: To describe the p53 expression in areas of the normal mucosa adjacent to the tumor and in mouth and pharynx carcinomas. Method: Prospective study with clinical follow-up of one year of 24 patients with oral and oral pharynx spinocellular carcinoma. We performed biopsies in the neoplasm and areas of the normal mucosa adjacent to the tumor, before and 9 months following radiotherapy and an immunohistochemical study of p53 expression. Results: Before radiotherapy, there was a change to the p53 expression in 20 out of the 24 biopsies made in the neoplasm and in 14 in those of normal mucosa adjacent to the tumor. Eleven patients died 1 year before clinical follow-up. From the 2 initial patients with increase of p53 after radiotherapy it remained increased in 7 in the neoplasm region and in 6 in the normal mucosa regions. We noticed association of p53 with smoking and tumor stage (p < 5%, but not with the degree of cellular differentiation and alcoholism. Conclusion: The increase to the p53 expression was viewed both in the neoplasm region and in the normal mucosa in most patients with oral and oral pharynx carcinoma before and after radiotherapy. There was a statistically significant correlation of the p53 expression with smoking and neoplasm stage.

  8. Allelic variants of XRCC1 and XRCC3 repair genes and susceptibility of oral cancer in Brazilian patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Reis, Mariana Bisarro; Losi-Guembarovski, Roberta; de Souza Fonseca Ribeiro, Enilze Maria

    2013-01-01

    genes have been found to be associated with oral cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of allelic variants Arg194Trp (rs:1799782) and Arg399Gln (rs: 25487) of XRCC1 gene and Thr241Met (rs: 861539) of XRCC3 gene and susceptibility to oral cancer. We also...... variants of the XRCC1 gene within codon 194 (OR 0.82, 95% CI: 0.44-1.51) and codon 399 (OR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.59-1.50) and within the XRCC3 gene (OR 0.72; 95% CI: 0.45-1.16) were not associated with an increased risk of oral cancer. A combinational analysis of SNPs in both genes indicated no association....... The presence of the allelic variants of these two genes had no statistically significant effect on tumor differentiation, lymph node invasion or tumor size. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that allelic variants of XRCC1 and XRCC3 are not suitable markers for susceptibility to carcinomas of the oral cavity...

  9. The efficacy of oral melatonin in improving sleep in cancer patients with insomnia: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S Kurdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The natural hormone melatonin has sleep inducing properties. Insomnia in cancer patients is common. So far, melatonin has been seldom tried for the improvement of sleep in patients with malignancies. Keeping this in mind, we planned and conducted a double-blind study to test the efficacy of melatonin in promoting sleep in patients with malignancies suffering from insomnia. Objective: To assess the hypnotic efficacy of oral melatonin in cancer patients with insomnia. Materials and Methods: After Ethical Committee approval, 50 patients (age range 20-65 years from our pain clinic "NIVARANE" who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4 th edition criteria for primary insomnia were randomized to receive melatonin 3 mg or placebo at 7 pm orally every day for 14 days from our pharmacist. After 1, 7, 14 days, the patients were reviewed with the Athens insomnia scale oral questionnaire to document the subjective sleep quality. The patients and we, the investigators were blinded to the study drug. Results: There were 2 drop outs (one from each group as they failed to complete visit on day 14. Significant differences in favor of melatonin treatment were found in clinically relevant improvements in insomnia (46.53%; P = 0.00001 vs. 11.30%; P = 0.1026 There was improvement in sleep from 1 to 7 days (19.91%; P = 0.00001 vs. 0.98%; P = 0.2563. More significant improvements were seen between 7 and 14 days (33.24%; P = 0.00001 vs. 10.42%; P = 0.1469. Conclusion: We conclude that daily intake of oral melatonin 2 h before bedtime improves sleep induction and quality in cancer patients with insomnia.

  10. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Programs (Extramural Research) NIDCR Laboratories (Intramural Research) Science News in Brief Study Takes First Comprehensive Look ... Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents an overview of physical, mental, and behavioral challenges common in patients with ...

  11. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at Methylation Patterns in Salivary Gland Tumors More Science News Grants & ... – This booklet presents an overview of physical, mental, and behavioral challenges common in patients with ...

  12. Oral Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... special light. After the patient uses a fluorescent mouth rinse, normal tissue looks different from abnormal tissue when seen under the light. Exfoliative cytology : A procedure to collect cells from the lip ...

  13. Metallothionein gene expression is altered in oral cancer and may predict metastasis and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazão-Silva, Marco T; Rodrigues, Maria Fernandes S; Eisenberg, Ana Lúcia A; Dias, Fernando L; de Castro, Luciana M; Nunes, Fábio D; Faria, Paulo R; Cardoso, Sérgio V; Loyola, Adriano M; de Sousa, Suzana C O M

    2015-09-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are proteins associated with the carcinogenesis and prognosis of various tumours. Previous studies have shown their potential as biomarkers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Aiming to understand more clearly the function of MTs in OSCC we evaluated, for the first time, the gene expression profile of MTs in this neoplasm. Tissue samples from 35 cases of tongue and/or floor of mouth OSCC, paired with their corresponding non-neoplastic oral mucosa (NNOM), were retrieved (2007-09). All tissues were analysed for the following genes using TaqMan(®) reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays: MT1A, MT1B, MT1E, MT1F, MT1G, MT1H, MT1X, MT2A, MT3 and MT4. The expression of MT1B and MT1H was seldom detected in both OSCC and NNOM. A significant loss of MT1A, MT1X, MT3 and MT4 expression and gain of MT1F expression was observed in OSCC, compared to NNOM. Cases with MT1G down-regulation exhibited the worst prognoses. The up-regulation of MT1X was restricted to non-metastatic cases, whereas up-regulation of MT3 was related to cases with lymph node metastasis. Metallothionein mRNA expression is altered significantly in oral squamous cell carcinomas. The expression of MT1G, MT1X and MT3 may aid in the prognostic discrimination of OSCC cases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Living in limbo: Being diagnosed with oral tongue cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve Philiponis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oral tongue cancer presents clinical challenges to effective diagnosis that affect patient experience. Patient experience of the diagnostic process is poorly described, making opportunities for nursing intervention unclear. Methods: We qualitatively describe, using constant comparative analysis, oral tongue cancer diagnosis using data from a larger grounded theory study of oral tongue cancer survivorship. Using constant comparative analysis - in keeping with the methodology of the main study - we analyzed 16 survivor interviews for themes explaining the patient experience of oral tongue cancer diagnosis. Results: We termed the broader diagnostic process "living in limbo." This process includes the themes describing the peri-diagnostic process itself - "self-detected lesion," "lack of concern," "seeking help," "not a straightforward diagnosis," and "hearing the diagnosis." Entry into treatment concludes "Living in Limbo" and is described by the theme "worry and trust." Conclusions: Our findings are limited by retrospective interviews and participant homogeneity among other features. Future research with prospective designs and diverse groups of people at risk for and diagnosed with oral tongue cancer, as well as targeting those who have had negative biopsies with no eventual diagnosis of oral tongue cancer, will build on our findings. Further, study of patient experience in other sociocultural context and healthcare systems is needed to inform nursing science and practice. Finally, "living in limbo" suggests that clinician and public education about oral tongue cancer diagnosis is needed.

  15. Improving oral hygiene for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Debbie; Hampson, Victoria; Queen, Kerry; Kirk, Donna; Clarkson, Jan; Young, Linda

    2015-01-13

    Systematic reviews and patient safety initiatives recommend that oral hygiene should be part of routine patient care. However, evidence suggests it is often neglected in hospitals and care homes. Research recommends encouraging beliefs that support oral hygiene, and teaching nurses appropriate skills, as necessary prerequisites to implementing best practice in hospital wards. This article describes a pilot study of an educational workshop on oral hygiene. Results from the pilot study suggest that this workshop is a feasible intervention for a service-wide trial. The literature suggests that other interventions are required to complement this approach if nurses are to make oral hygiene a priority in daily patient care.

  16. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Villar, Rosangela Correa [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Gilberto de, E-mail: gilberto.castro@usp.br [Department of Clinical Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Antequera, Reynaldo [Divisao de Odontologia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  17. The Therapeutic Effects of Rehmannia Oral Liquid for the Syndrome of Heat Accumulation with Yin Consumption in Esophagus Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy - A Report of 60 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical therapeutic effects of Rehmannia Oral Liquid on the syndrome of heat accumulation with Yin consumption in intermediate or late esophagus cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Methods: The IFN-α, TNF-α, IL-1β and TGF-β1 levels in sera were determined by the method of ABC-WLISA before and after the treatment with Rehmannia Oral Liquid. At the same time, the observation was carried out on the patient's general condition, symptoms and signs, barium meal or CT examinations, and biopsy. Another 30 cases of esophagus cancer were treated singly with radiotherapy as the control group. Results: Rehmannia Oral Liquid could obviously improve the patient's general condition, and the symptoms and signs after radiotherapy. Based on the X-ray examination and biopsy, the short-term local control rate of the treatment group and the control group was 70.0% and 40.0% respectively, showing a significant difference (P0.05) after treatment. The difference between groups was significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: Rehmannia Oral Liquid can obviously reduce the radiotherapy reaction, improve the quality of life, and raise the therapeutic effects. The action mechanism of the Liquid may lie in balancing the cytokine network and regulating the disordered signal transmission.

  18. Role of oral microbiome on oral cancers, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Yousefi, Mehdi; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-12-01

    The oral cavity is inhibited by many of the bacterial species. Some of them have a key role in the development of oral disease. Interrelationships between oral microbiome and systemic conditions such as head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Emerging evidence also suggests a link between periodontal disease and oral cancer, and the explanation being that chronic inflammation could be a major factor in both diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma is that the most frequently occurring malignancy of the oral cavity and adjacent sites, representing over 90% of all cancers. The incidence of oral cancer is increasing, significantly among young people and women. Worldwide there are 350,000-400,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. In this review we will discuss the association between the development of oral cancer in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic periodontitis, chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, candida, other microbes and described mechanisms which may be involved in these carcinoma.

  19. Radical ablative surgery and radial forearm free flap (RFFF) reconstruction for patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer: postoperative outcomes and oncologic and functional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozec, Alexandre; Poissonnet, Gilles; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Laout, Claire; Vallicioni, Jacques; Demard, François; Peyrade, Frédéric; Follana, Philippe; Bensadoun, René-Jean; Benezery, Karen; Thariat, Juliette; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Sudaka, Anne; Dassonville, Olivier

    2009-06-01

    Radical ablative surgery and radial forearm free flap (RFFF) reconstruction provide promising oncologic and functional results in patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer. To assess the postoperative outcomes and the oncologic and functional results, with their main predictive factors, after radical ablative surgery and RFFF reconstruction for patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Between 2000 and 2006, we prospectively analyzed the postoperative, oncologic and functional outcomes of all previously untreated patients who underwent this type of surgery. A total of 132 patients were enrolled in this study. There were three RFFF failures. The rate of surgical complications was 20%. The 5-year locoregional control and overall survival rates were 68% and 52%, respectively. Advanced age, high comorbidity index, elevated overall stage and tumoral involvement of the inner part of the cheek were correlated with a lower overall survival rate. A good functional result was obtained for oral diet, speech, mouth opening and aesthetic outcome in 87%, 80%, 86% and 88% of the patients, respectively. High comorbidity index, large flap surface, radiotherapy and tumoral involvement of the mobile tongue were significant predictors of poorer functional or aesthetic outcomes.

  20. Effects of exercise on swallowing and tongue strength in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, C L; Husaini, H; Falciglia, D; DeLacure, M; Branski, R C; Kraus, D; Lee, N; Ho, M; Ganz, C; Smith, B; Sanfilippo, N

    2014-05-01

    Tongue strength is reduced in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Tongue strengthening protocols have resulted in improved lingual strength and swallowing in healthy individuals, as well as in patients following a neurological event. However, no studies have examined the efficacy of tongue strengthening exercises on tongue strength, swallowing, and quality of life (QOL; Head and Neck Cancer Inventory) in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. A randomized clinical trial examined the effects of a tongue strengthening programme paired with traditional exercises vs. traditional exercises alone. Dependent variables included tongue strength, swallowing, and QOL in a group of patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Differences with regard to tongue strength and oropharyngeal swallow efficiency (OPSE) were not observed within or between groups. QOL in the eating and speech domains improved following treatment in both groups. However, the experimental group demonstrated greater impairment in QOL in the social disruption domain following treatment, whereas the control group demonstrated a slight improvement in functioning. Tongue strengthening did not yield a statistically significant improvement in either tongue strength or swallowing measures in this patient cohort. Patient compliance and treatment timing may be factors underlying these outcomes.

  1. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All ... Myths and Misconceptions Diet Hormones Immunosuppression Infectious Agents Obesity Radiation Sunlight Tobacco Genetics NCI Cancer Genetics Services ...

  2. [A randomized controlled trial of preoperative oral immunonutrition in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer: hospital stay and health care costs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares Campillo, María Del Carmen; Martín Fernández, Jesús; Amo Salas, Mariano; Casanova Rituerto, Daniel

    2016-12-09

    The use of enteral formulas with immunonutrients in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies susceptible to surgery can reduce postoperative morbidity, at the expense of reduced infectious complications, with the consequent reduction in hospital stay and health care costs. Prospective randomized study. 84 patients operated on a scheduled basis for resectable colorectal cancer were recruited. In the group YES IN Impact © Oral was administered for 8 days (3 sachets a day), compared with the NOT IN group who did not receive it. 40.5% (17) patients without immunonutrition suffered infectious complications vs. 33.3% (14) of YES IN. In patients with rectal cancer NOT IN, 50% (8) suffered minor infectious complications (p=.028). In each group (YES IN, NOT IN, colon and rectal cancer) when infectious complications were observed, the variables total hospital stay and costs doubled, with significant differences. These variables showed higher values in the group NOT IN compared with those who received immunonutrition, although these differences were not statistically significant. NOT IN patients suffered infectious complications more frequently than YES IN, with significant results in the subgroup of patients with rectal cancer. The total hospital stay and costs were slightly higher in the group not supplemented, doubling in each category significantly (YES IN, NOT IN, colon and rectal cancer), when infectious complications were observed. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Significance of DNMT3b in oral cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Chen

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore specific molecular markers that could lead to new insights into the identification of innovative treatments. The role of DNMT3b and its predictive power in the prognosis of oral cancer were identified. Human oral cancer cell lines including SCC4 and SCC25 were selected for cellular experiments. Changes in tumor growth, aggressiveness and the responsible signaling pathway were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, 125 oral cancer tissue specimens were analyzed using immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarray slides, and correlations calculated between the level of DNMT3b and the clinical outcome of patients. Our data revealed that inhibition of DNMT3b resulted in slower tumor growth, attenuated tumor invasion ability and epithelial mesenchymal transition, as determined by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Activated IL-6 signaling might be responsible to the induction of DNMT3b overexpression on oral cancer. Regarding clinical data, the incidence of DNMT3b immunoreactivity in oral cancer specimens was significantly higher than in non-malignant epithelium, and positively linked to expression of IL-6. Furthermore, expression of DNMT3b was significantly linked with the risk of lymph node involvement, disease recurrence and shorter survival in patients with pathological stage III-IV oral cancer. In conclusion, IL-6 -DNMT3b axis could be used to predict the prognosis of oral cancer in clinics, and targeting DNMT3b could represent a promising treatment strategy.

  4. Significance of DNMT3b in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Miao-Fen; Lin, Paul-Yang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore specific molecular markers that could lead to new insights into the identification of innovative treatments. The role of DNMT3b and its predictive power in the prognosis of oral cancer were identified. Human oral cancer cell lines including SCC4 and SCC25 were selected for cellular experiments. Changes in tumor growth, aggressiveness and the responsible signaling pathway were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, 125 oral cancer tissue specimens were analyzed using immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarray slides, and correlations calculated between the level of DNMT3b and the clinical outcome of patients. Our data revealed that inhibition of DNMT3b resulted in slower tumor growth, attenuated tumor invasion ability and epithelial mesenchymal transition, as determined by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Activated IL-6 signaling might be responsible to the induction of DNMT3b overexpression on oral cancer. Regarding clinical data, the incidence of DNMT3b immunoreactivity in oral cancer specimens was significantly higher than in non-malignant epithelium, and positively linked to expression of IL-6. Furthermore, expression of DNMT3b was significantly linked with the risk of lymph node involvement, disease recurrence and shorter survival in patients with pathological stage III-IV oral cancer. In conclusion, IL-6 -DNMT3b axis could be used to predict the prognosis of oral cancer in clinics, and targeting DNMT3b could represent a promising treatment strategy.

  5. Proteome data of whole saliva which are associated with development of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Jehmlich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Saliva as major human body fluid may act as an indicator of oral disease status. Oral mucositis is a common and often treatment-limiting side effect of radiotherapy for head and neck cancer patients. In this dataset, we provide the complete proteome dataset (raw and search files of the patients at baseline of radiotherapy treatment in patients undergoing radiotherapy analyzed by nano liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS. In the data set, 5323 tryptic peptides were identified which can be assigned to 487 distinct proteins (≥2 peptides. The MS data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange (“ProteomeXchange provides globally coordinated proteomics data submission and dissemination” [1] via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD003230. The data are associated with the previously published work, “Differences in the whole saliva baseline proteome profile associated with development of oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy” [2].

  6. Hand, foot and scrotal blisters in a patient with cancer receiving oral chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Jose Rodolfo; Suelves, Ana M; Bella, Archie; Lolo, Delatre

    2014-05-19

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are novel antineoplastic drugs that make use of the molecular abnormalities that have been discovered in certain types of tumours. These agents are associated with important dermatological side effects. This case report discusses an atypical presentation of the hand-foot syndrome in one patient treated with sorafenib. A 78-year-old man, recently started on sorafenib for the treatment of hepatocarcinoma with lung metastasis, presented to the emergency room with painful blistering lesions on the palms, soles and scrotum for 1 week. A punch biopsy was performed and sorafenib was withheld. Direct immunofluorescence study was negative for an autoimmune blistering disorder and histopathology stains did not show any microorganisms. A diagnosis of hand-foot syndrome was made. After 2 weeks, the patient showed marked improvement and the plan was to restart sorafenib at a lower dosage.

  7. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreizen, S. (Univ. of Texas Dental Branch, Houston (USA))

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  8. Assessment of the Survival of Dental Implants in Irradiated Jaws Following Treatment of Oral Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Meenakshi Chauhan Rana; Swati Solanki; Pujari, Sudarshan C; Eisha Shaw; Swati Sharma; Abhishek Anand Anand; Harkanwal Preet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients undergoing head and neck surgery for various pathologic conditions, implants are one of the best restorative options and are increasing widely used. Therefore, we evaluated the success of dental implants in the irradiated jaws of patients following treatment of oral cancer oral cancer treated patients. Materials and Methods: Data of oral cancer treated patients was collected retrospectively from 2002 to 2008. We took 46 oral cancer treated patients in which implants we...

  9. The role of SPECT-CT in the lymphoscintigraphic identification of sentinel nodes in patients with oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Anders; Von Buchwald, Christian; Mortensen, Jann

    2006-01-01

    CONCLUSION: SPECT-CT may improve the localization of sentinel nodes (SNs) in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Compared with planar lymphoscintigraphy SPECT-CT detected more SNs and provided additional anatomical and spatial information about their localization. New generation SP...

  10. [Antifugal susceptibility testing and antifugal traditional Chinese medicines screening of oral Candida isolated from head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy or chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Zhou, Zeng-Tong; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and resistance of pathogenic oral Candida spp. isolated from head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy or chemotherapy to antifungal agents. To screen antifugal agents from Chinese traditional and herbal drugs by NCCLS M27-A2 method. Using YBC Test Kit to identify 20 clinical oral Candida isolated from head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The in vitro susceptibilities of 20 oral Candida spp. to 5-flucytosine (5-FC), itraconazole (ITR), fluconazole (FLU), the extracts of 6 Chinese traditional and herbal drugs (caltrop, honeysuckle flower, dandelion, green tea, pine bark, red trefoil) and utility componets of 7 Chinese traditional and herbal drugs (sophorcarpidine, aloperine, archin, glycyrrhizic acid, glycosides of white peony root, glycosides of baikal skullcap root, hydrochloric berberine) were determined by NCCLS M27-A2 method. The proportion of no-C. albicans in all Candida spp. were 25%. All strains were sensitive to 5-flucytosine, 25% stains were resistant to fluconazole and 40% stains were resistant to itraconazole. In all agents from Chinese traditional and herbal drugs, glycosides of white peony root and hydrochloric berberine (C20H18CINO4) exhibited antifungal activity, especially to C. glabrates. The proportion of no-C. albicans in all oral Candida spp. isolated from head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy or chemotherapy was pretty high. NCCLS M27-A2 micro-dilution method is a reliable and reproducible method and can be used to screen antifugal agents from Chinese traditional and herbal drugs.

  11. Reassessment of risk factors for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangane, Nitin; Chawla, Shweta; Anshu; Subodh, Anshu; Gupta, Subodh Sharan; Sharma, Satish M

    2007-01-01

    A total of 140 cases of histologically confirmed oral cancer were evaluated for their demographic details, dietary habits and addiction to tobacco and alcohol using a pre-designed structured questionnaire at the Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram in Central India. These cases were matched with three sets of age and sex matched controls. Oral cancer was predominant in the age group of 50-59 years. Individuals on a non-vegetarian diet appeared to be at greater risk of developing oral cancer. Cases were habituated to consuming hot beverages more frequently and milk less frequently than controls. Consumption of ghutka, a granular form of chewable tobacco and areca nut, was significantly associated with oral cancer cases. Cases had been using oral tobacco for longer duration than controls, and were habituated to sleeping with tobacco quid in their mouth. Most cases were also addicted to smoking tobacco and alcohol consumption. Bidi (a crude cigarette) smoking was most commonly associated with oral cancer. On stratified analysis, a combination of regular smoking and oral tobacco use, as well as a combination of regular alcohol intake and oral tobacco use were significantly associated with oral cancer cases. Synergistic effects of all three or even two of the risk factors - oral tobacco use, smoking and alcohol consumption- was more commonly seen in cases when compared to controls.

  12. A phase I, randomized, open-label, parallel-cohort, dose-finding study of elacridar (GF120918) and oral topotecan in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuppens, Isa E. L. M.; Witteveen, Els O.; Jewell, Roxanne C.; Radema, Sandra A.; Paul, Elaine M.; Mangum, Steve G.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Voest, Emile E.; Schellens, Jan H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) substantially limits the oral bioavailability of topotecan. Coadministration with elacridar, an inhibitor of breast cancer resistance protein mediated drug transport, increases the bioavailability of topotecan. The aim of this study was to establish

  13. Oral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    MacCarthy, Denise

    2011-08-01

    Cancer of the head and neck region presents a challenge since, unlike other areas of the body, the boundaries are not always easy to delineate. The functional morbidity associated with head and neck cancer and its treatment are considerable. Head and neck cancer is described as cancer of the lip, mouth, tongue, tonsil, pharynx (unspecified), salivary gland, hypopharynx, larynx and other. Oral cancer refers to cancers of the lip, tongue, gingivae, floor of the mouth, palate (hard and soft), maxilla, vestibule and retromolar area up to the anterior pillar of the fauces (tonsil). When patients present with oral cancer, over 60% of them have regional (lymph node) and sometimes distant (metastatic) spread. The overall five-year survival rates for oral cancer average at between 50 and 80%, depending on the stage of the disease, varying from 86% for stage I to 12-16% for stage IV. The incidence of \\'field cancerisation\\'\\/unstable oral epithelium is high (17%), and even after successful treatment our patients need to be monitored for dental care and further disease. Unlike other areas in the body, the oral epithelium is readily accessible for examination and even self-examination. Dentists and dental hygienists are effective clinicians in the examination of the oral cavity for mouth cancer. An oral and neck examination must be part of every dental examination. An examination protocol is suggested here, which is similar to, but more detailed than, the standardised oral examination method recommended by the World Health Organisation, and consistent with those protocols followed by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

  14. Oral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    MacCarthy, Denise

    2011-08-01

    Cancer of the head and neck region presents a challenge since, unlike other areas of the body, the boundaries are not always easy to delineate. The functional morbidity associated with head and neck cancer and its treatment are considerable. Head and neck cancer is described as cancer of the lip, mouth, tongue, tonsil, pharynx (unspecified), salivary gland, hypopharynx, larynx and other. Oral cancer refers to cancers of the lip, tongue, gingivae, floor of the mouth, palate (hard and soft), maxilla, vestibule and retromolar area up to the anterior pillar of the fauces (tonsil). When patients present with oral cancer, over 60% of them have regional (lymph node) and sometimes distant (metastatic) spread. The overall five-year survival rates for oral cancer average at between 50 and 80%, depending on the stage of the disease, varying from 86% for stage I to 12-16% for stage IV. The incidence of \\'field cancerisation\\'\\/unstable oral epithelium is high (17%), and even after successful treatment our patients need to be monitored for dental care and further disease. Unlike other areas in the body, the oral epithelium is readily accessible for examination and even self-examination. Dentists and dental hygienists are effective clinicians in the examination of the oral cavity for mouth cancer. An oral and neck examination must be part of every dental examination. An examination protocol is suggested here, which is similar to, but more detailed than, the standardised oral examination method recommended by the World Health Organisation, and consistent with those protocols followed by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

  15. Evaluation of host quality of life and immune function in breast cancer patients treated with combination of adjuvant chemotherapy and oral administration of Lentinula edodes mycelia extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagashima Y

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Yukiko Nagashima,1 Noriko Maeda,2 Shigeru Yamamoto,2 Shigefumi Yoshino,2 Masaaki Oka21Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Shakaihoken Shimonoseki Kosei Hospital, Shimonoseki City, Yamaguchi, Japan; 2Department of Digestive Surgery and Surgical Oncology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube City, Yamaguchi, JapanPurpose: Anthracycline-based chemotherapies for breast cancer are well known to have adverse effects and can also negatively affect host immune function. There is therefore a necessity for an adjuvant that maintains the quality of life (QOL and immune function of cancer patients receiving anthracycline-based chemotherapies.Patients and methods: The present study investigated the effectiveness of the concomitant use of Lentinula edodes mycelia extract (LEM, an oral immunomodulator, with FEC75 (5-fluorouracil + epirubicin + cyclophosphamide therapy on host QOL and immune function in breast cancer patients with nodal metastases. Ten breast cancer patients with nodal metastases receiving surgery were enrolled in this study. Treatment with 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2, epirubicin (75 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m2 was performed every 21 days for two courses, and LEM (1800 mg/day by mouth was administered during the second course.Results: In the first course, hematological toxicity was observed and host QOL and immune function were exacerbated. In the second course, however, the number of white blood cells and lymphocytes did not decrease and host QOL was maintained. Furthermore, the cytotoxic activities of natural killer (NK and lymphokine-activated killer cells and the proportion of activated NK and NK T-cells in lymphocytes were maintained in the second course.Conclusion: It has been suggested that the concomitant use of LEM with FEC75 therapy can maintain host QOL and immune function, and offer important implications for an application of LEM as a useful oral adjuvant to anthracycline-based chemotherapies

  16. Oral cancer in Myanmar: a preliminary survey based on hospital-based cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Htun Naing; Myint, Yi Yi; Maung, Chan Nyein; Oo, Phyu Sin; Cheng, Jun; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Yagi, Minoru; Sawair, Faleh A; Saku, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of oral cancer is not clearly known in Myanmar, where betel quid chewing habits are widely spread. Since betel quid chewing has been considered to be one of the important causative factors for oral cancer, the circumstantial situation for oral cancer should be investigated in this country. We surveyed oral cancer cases as well as whole body cancers from two cancer registries from Yangon and Mandalay cities, both of which have representative referral hospitals in Myanmar, and we showed that oral cancer stood at the 6th position in males and 10th in females, contributing to 3.5% of whole body cancers. There was a male predominance with a ratio of 2.1:1. Their most frequent site was the tongue, followed by the palate, which was different from that in other countries with betel quid chewing habits. About 90% of male and 44% of female patients had habitual backgrounds of chewing and smoking for more than 15 years. The results revealed for the first time reliable oral cancer frequencies in Myanmar, suggesting that longstanding chewing and smoking habits are etiological backgrounds for oral cancer patients. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Predicting the severity and prognosis of trismus after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oral cancer patients by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun Hsieh

    Full Text Available To develop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI indicators to predict trismus outcome for post-operative oral cavity cancer patients who received adjuvant intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 22 patients with oral cancer treated with IMRT were studied over a two-year period. Signal abnormality scores (SA scores were computed from Likert-type ratings of the abnormalities of nine masticator structures and compared with the Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA test between groups. Seventeen patients (77.3% experienced different degrees of trismus during the two-year follow-up period. The SA score correlated with the trismus grade (r = 0.52, p<0.005. Patients having progressive trismus had higher mean doses of radiation to multiple structures, including the masticator and lateral pterygoid muscles, and the parotid gland (p<0.05. In addition, this group also had higher SA-masticator muscle dose product at 6 months and SA scores at 12 months (p<0.05. At the optimum cut-off points of 0.38 for the propensity score, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 93% for predicting the prognosis of the trismus patients. The SA score, as determined using MRI, can reflect the radiation injury and correlate to trismus severity. Together with the radiation dose, it could serve as a useful biomarker to predict the outcome and guide the management of trismus following radiation therapy.

  18. ORAL CANCER ITS ETIOLOGY & CONCERNS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is the largest group of cancer that categorizes into the head and neck region and worldwide health problem. Exact cause of oral cancer is unknown. Risk factors for cancer could be varied including Iron deficiency anemi a, are alcohol, tobacco, immunologic susceptibility, gene mutations, epithelial cell growth, suppressor proteins and disease of chemotherapy, such as in cases of lymphoma and leukemia. Role of viruses have also been reported in the etiology. Dietary factor s such as high fat and low fiber may play a role in carcinogenesis in some sites. High incidence of alcoholism is relevant because alcohol intake has been related to an increase risk of developing oral cancer. Other signaling factors have also been propose d to have a role. The paper presents a review on oral cancer, its causes & concern.

  19. PBK/TOPK Expression Predicts Prognosis in Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Fang Chang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is a common cancer with poor prognosis. We evaluated the expression of PBK/TOPK (PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase and its prognostic significance in oral cancer. PBK/TOPK expression was measured by immunohistochemical staining of samples from 287 patients with oral cancer. The association between PBK/TOPK expression and clinicopathological features was analyzed. The prognostic value of PBK/TOPK for overall survival was determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. A high PBK/TOPK expression level was correlated with long overall survival. The prognostic role of PBK/TOPK expression was significant in young patients (p < 0.05, patients with smoking habits (p < 0.05, and late stage disease (p < 0.05. Our results suggest that PBK/TOPK expression is enhanced in oral cancer. High PBK/TOPK expression, either alone or in subgroups according to clinicopathological features, may serve as a favorable prognostic marker for patients with oral cancer.

  20. Applications of the oral scraped (exfoliative) cytology in oral cancer and precancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acha, Amelia; Ruesga, María T; Rodríguez, María J; Martínez de Pancorbo, María A; Aguirre, José M

    2005-01-01

    Scraped (exfoliative) cytology is a simple and harmless procedure, which has been a controversial technique according to its real validity in oral pathology. Lately it has re-emerged due to its application in oral precancer and cancer as a diagnostic and predictive method as well as for monitoring patients. New diagnostic techniques have been developed, such as "brush biopsy" and multiple molecular studies using the cells collected. In this review we are going to analyse the more novel aspects related with the applications of the scraped or exfoliative cytology in oral precancerous and cancerous pathology, specially focusing on molecular studies and their diagnostic and prognostic implications.

  1. Predicting the severity and prognosis of trismus after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oral cancer patients by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Li-Chun; Chen, John W; Wang, Li-Ying; Tsang, Yuk-Ming; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Liao, Li-Jen; Lo, Wu-Chia; Lin, Yu-Chin; Tseng, Chien-Fu; Kuo, Ying-Shiung; Jhuang, Jie-Yang; Tien, Hui-Ju; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2014-01-01

    To develop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicators to predict trismus outcome for post-operative oral cavity cancer patients who received adjuvant intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 22 patients with oral cancer treated with IMRT were studied over a two-year period. Signal abnormality scores (SA scores) were computed from Likert-type ratings of the abnormalities of nine masticator structures and compared with the Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA test between groups. Seventeen patients (77.3%) experienced different degrees of trismus during the two-year follow-up period. The SA score correlated with the trismus grade (r = 0.52, ptrismus had higher mean doses of radiation to multiple structures, including the masticator and lateral pterygoid muscles, and the parotid gland (ptrismus patients. The SA score, as determined using MRI, can reflect the radiation injury and correlate to trismus severity. Together with the radiation dose, it could serve as a useful biomarker to predict the outcome and guide the management of trismus following radiation therapy.

  2. Preliminary results of phase I trial of oral uracil/tegafur (UFT, leucovorin plus irinotecan and radiation therapy for patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukunaga Mutsumi

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical attempts for locally recurrent rectal cancer often fail due to local re-recurrence and distant metastasis. Preoperative chemoradiation may enhance better local control and survival. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of oral uracil and tegafur (UFT plus leucovorin (LV, and irinotecan combined with radiation and determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD and dose limiting toxicity (DLT of the triple drug regimen. Patients and methods Patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer received escalating doses of irinotecan on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 (starting at 30 mg/m2, with 10 mg increments between consecutive cohorts and fixed doses of UFT (300 mg/m2 plus LV (75 mg/day on days 3 to 7, 10 to 14, 17 to 21, and 24 to 28. Radiation was given 5 days per week totaling 40 to 50 Gy (2Gy/day. Results Six patients were treated at the starting dose, and 2 received the full scheduled chemoradiotherapy. The other 4 patients had grade 3 diarrhea and diarrhea was the DLT. One patient had partial response and he had subsequently radical surgical resection. Median progression free survival for local recurrence was 320 days. Conclusion Irinotecan plus UFT/LV with concomitant radiotherapy in patients with locally recurrent rectal cancer was not feasible due to diarrhea in this setting. Modification of the treatment is needed.

  3. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. Oral contraception and risk of endometrial cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueck AO

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Alfred O Mueck1, Harald Seeger1, Xiangyan Ruan2 1Department of Endocrinology and Menopause, University Women's Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany; 2Department of Gynecological Endocrinology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China Abstract: No placebo-controlled studies concerning hormonal contraception in general have been published, and only investigations on biological mechanisms and observational clinical studies are available. Thus, associations can be described but not their causality. Experimental studies strongly suggest protective effects of the progestagen component of hormonal contraception against development of estrogen-related (type 1 endometrial cancer. In light of this research, it seems biologically plausible that, in more than 20 published studies, a reduction in endometrial cancer risk was achieved in up to 50% of users of combined oral contraceptives (COC, compared with nonusers. Few data exist for progestin-only oral preparations. However, in view of the mechanisms involved, a reduction in cancer risk should also be expected. Whereas hormonal dose-dependency has been investigated in only a few studies, which showed a stronger risk reduction with increasing progestagenic potency, a decreased risk dependent on duration of use has been clearly demonstrated, and after stopping COC this effect has persisted for up to 20 years. Possible confounders, including family history, parity, and smoking, have been investigated in a few studies, with only a minor impact on hormonal effect of endometrial cancer risk, with the exception of obesity, which was a strong risk factor in most but not all studies. There are obvious differences in the incidence of endometrial cancer in women using COC when evaluated in absolute numbers for Western and Asian countries, being about 3–5-fold higher in the US than in Asia. Further research should include the noncontraceptive benefit of COC

  5. EFFECT OF SELECTIVE ELIMINATION OF THE ORAL FLORA ON MUCOSITIS IN IRRADIATED HEAD AND NECK-CANCER PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPIJKERVET, FKL; VANSAENE, HKF; VANSAENE, JJM; PANDERS, AK; VERMEY, A; MEHTA, DM; FIDLER, [No Value

    Recently it has been reported that chlorhexidine 0.1% rinsing was not successful in eradication of gram-negative bacilli in patients who have head and neck cancer. These bacilli could play a role in irradiation mucositis. This study reports the effect of lozenges containing 2 mg polymyxin E, 1.8 mg

  6. Preliminary phase II results of selinexor, an oral selective inhibitor of nuclear export in patients with heavily pretreated gynecological cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergote, Ignace; Lund, Bente; Havsteen, Hanne;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding resection of the primary tumour with few or absent symptoms in patients with synchronous unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). A potential benefit of resection of the primary tumour is to prevent complications of the primary tumour in later s...

  7. Oral nutritional supplements containing (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the nutritional status of patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer during multimodality treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Barbara S; Langius, Jacqueline A E; Smit, Egbert F; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Heijboer, Annemieke C; Paul, Marinus A; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2010-10-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), (n-3) fatty acids from fish oil, have immune-modulating effects and may improve nutritional status in cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of an oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids on nutritional status and inflammatory markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing multimodality treatment. In a double-blind experiment, 40 patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly assigned to receive 2 cans/d of a protein- and energy-dense oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids (2.0 g EPA + 0.9 g DHA/d) or an isocaloric control supplement. EPA in plasma phospholipids, energy intake, resting energy expenditure (REE), body weight, fat free mass (FFM), mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), and inflammatory markers were assessed. Effects of intervention were analyzed by generalized estimating equations and expressed as regression coefficients (B). The intervention group (I) had a better weight maintenance than the control (C) group after 2 and 4 wk (B = 1.3 and 1.7 kg, respectively; P nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids beneficially affects nutritional status during multimodality treatment in patients with NSCLC.

  8. Clinical outcomes for T1-2N0-1 oral tongue cancer patients underwent surgery with and without postoperative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Eun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the results of curative surgery with and without radiotherapy in patients with T1-2N0-1 oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and to evaluate survival and prognostic factors. Methods Retrospective analysis of 86 patients with T1-2N0-1 OSCC who received surgery between January 2000 and December 2006. Fourteen patients (16.3% received postoperative radiotherapy (PORT. Patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, treatment modality, failure patterns, and survival rates were analyzed. Results The median follow-up was 45 months. The five-year overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS rates were 80.8% and 80.2%, respectively. Higher tumor grade and invasion depth ≥ 0.5 cm were the significant prognostic factors affecting five-year OS and DFS (OS rate; 65% vs. 91%, p = 0.001 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.01 for invasion depth: DFS rate; 69% vs. 88%, p = 0.005 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.013 for invasion depth. In the risk group, there was no local failure in patients with postoperative radiotherapy. Conclusions In T1-2N0-1 OSCC, factors that affected prognosis after primary surgery were higher tumor grade and deep invasion depth over 0.5 cm. Postoperative radiotherapy should be considered in early oral tongue cancer patients with these high-risk pathologic features.

  9. Estimation of lead in biological samples of oral cancer patients chewing smokeless tobacco products by ionic liquid-based microextraction in a single syringe system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Sadaf S; Kazi, Tasneem G; Arain, Asma J; Afridi, Hassan I; Arain, Muhammad B; Brahman, Kapil D; Naeemullah; Panhwar, Abdul H; Arain, Mariam S

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have reported that the chewing habit of smokeless tobacco (SLT) has been associated with oral cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the trace levels of lead (Pb) in biological samples (blood, scalp hair) of oral cancer patients and referents of the same age group (range 30-60 years). As the concentrations of Pb are very low in biological samples, so a simple and efficient ionic liquid-based microextraction in a single syringe system has been developed, as a prior step to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In this procedure, the hydrophobic chelates of Pb with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) were extracted into fine droplets of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [C4MIM][PF6] within a syringe while using Triton X-114 as a dispersant. Factors influencing the microextraction efficiency and determination, such as pH of the sample, volume of [C4MIM][PF6] and Triton X-114, ligand concentration, and incubation time, were studied. To validate the proposed method, certified reference materials were analyzed and the results of Pb(2+) were in good agreement with certified values. At optimum experimental values of significant variables, detection limit and enhancement factor were found to be 0.412 μg/L and 80, respectively. The coexisting ions showed no obvious negative outcome on Pb preconcentration. The proposed method was applied satisfactorily for the preconcentration of Pb(2+) in acid-digested SLT and biological samples of the study population. It was observed that oral cancer patients who consumed different SLT products have 2-3-fold higher levels of Pb in scalp hair and blood samples as compared to healthy referents (p < 0.001). While 31.4-50.8% higher levels of Pb were observed in referents chewing different SLT products as compared to nonconsumers (p < 0.01).

  10. Sustained Release Oral Nanoformulated Green Tea for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    prostate cancer progression in humans and is being detected in the serum of patients with prostate diseases including prostatitis , benign prostatic ... hypertrophy , and prostate cancer (4). In our study, we found that there was significant inhibition of secreted PSA levels by 13-36%, 26-54% and 57-72% in...TITLE: Sustained Release Oral Nanoformulated Green Tea for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Hasan Mukhtar, PhD

  11. Urotherapy for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldor, J

    1997-04-01

    Cancer cells release various antigens, some of which appear in the urine. Oral autourotherapy is suggested as a new treatment modality for cancer patients. It will provide the intestinal lymphatic system with the many tumor antigens against which antibodies may be produced. These antibodies may be pierced through the blood stream and attack the tumor and its cells.

  12. Oral versus intravenous fluoropyrimidines for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chionh, Fiona; Lau, David; Yeung, Yvonne; Price, Timothy; Tebbutt, Niall

    2017-07-28

    Patients prefer oral to intravenous (IV) palliative chemotherapy, provided that oral therapy is not less effective. We compared the efficacy and safety of oral and IV fluoropyrimidines for treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). To compare the effects of oral and IV fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy in patients treated with curative or palliative intent for CRC. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5), along with OVID MEDLINE, OVID Embase, and Web of Science databases, in June 2016. We also searched five clinical trials registers, several conference proceedings, and reference lists from study reports and systematic reviews. We contacted pharmaceutical companies to identify additional studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing oral and IV fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy in patients treated with curative or palliative intent for CRC. Three review authors extracted data and assessed risk of bias independently. We assessed the seven domains in the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool and three additional domains: schedules of outcome assessment and/or follow-up; use of intention-to-treat analysis; and baseline comparability of treatment arms. We included nine RCTs (total of 10,918 participants) that examined treatment with curative intent for CRC with neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant chemotherapy. We included 35 RCTs (total of 12,592 participants) that examined treatment with palliative intent for inoperable advanced or metastatic CRC with chemotherapy (31 first-line studies, two second-line studies, and two studies of first- or second-line chemotherapy). All studies included male and female participants, and no studies included participants younger than 18 years of age. Patients treated with curative intent for CRC with neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant chemotherapy • Disease-free survival (DFS): DFS did not differ between participants treated with oral versus IV fluoropyrimidines (hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence

  13. Oral care for hospice patients with severe trismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, Hannah; Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

    2012-04-01

    Oral care is a hallmark of attentive, high-quality nursing care. Oral care improves a patient's sense of well-being, communication, and nutritional status, and lowers the risk for pneumonia. However, for patients with severe trismus, oral care may seem impossible. Trismus is the inability to open the mouth more than 35 mm and often results from medical therapies for head and neck cancers. This article details a simple approach to oral care that was implemented successfully with five hospice patients with severe trismus.

  14. Current status of oral cancer chemoprevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Moni Abraham Kuriakose

    2008-01-01

    @@ Chemoprevention is the administration of agents to block or reverse carcinogenesis. Chemoprevention in oral cancer has been directed towards reversal of premalignant lesion and prevention of second primary tumor.

  15. Measuring somatic symptoms with the CES-D to assess depression in cancer patients after treatment : Comparison among patients with oral/oropharyngeal, gynecological, colorectal, and breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stewart, R.E.; Ranchor, A.V.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.

    2006-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of depression after cancer treatment. In the literature, several authors have raised questions about assessing somatic symptoms to explore depression after cancer treatment. These somatic sequelae are a consequence of cancer treatment and should cause higher depression

  16. Measuring somatic symptoms with the CES-D to assess depression in cancer patients after treatment : Comparison among patients with oral/oropharyngeal, gynecological, colorectal, and breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Stewart, R.E.; Ranchor, A.V.; Roodenburg, J.L.N.

    2006-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of depression after cancer treatment. In the literature, several authors have raised questions about assessing somatic symptoms to explore depression after cancer treatment. These somatic sequelae are a consequence of cancer treatment and should cause higher depression rat

  17. Assessment of quality of life in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Carranza, Eusebio; Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Hernández-Guisado, José María; Hens-Aumente, Elena; Gutierrez-Pérez, José Luis

    2008-11-01

    Quality of life (QL) in oral cancer patients has become one of the most important parameters to consider in the diagnosis and post-treatment follow-up. The purpose of this article has been to review the papers published that study the QL in oral cancer patients, the different QL questionnaires used, the clinical results obtained, and the systematic revisions available in the indexed literature for the last 10 years. The term QL appears as a keyword in an increasing number of articles throughout the past 10 years; however, few studies focus on oral cancer. Most of them assess all head and neck cancers, which conform to a heterogeneous group with several different features depending on location (oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx, nasopharynx and salivary glands). Most studies evaluate QL in short periods of time, normally within the first year after the diagnosis. Series do not discern between different therapeutic options, and they generally center on Northern European or Northern American populations. There are few instruments translated and validated into Spanish that measure QL, a fundamental characteristic to link QL to own patients' socio-cultural parameters. Data related with QL are mostly related to patient (age, sex, co-morbidity), tumour (location, size), and treatment (surgical treatment, radiotherapy association, reconstruction, cervical dissection, and/or feeding tube). Nowadays QL's assessment is considered an essential component of an oral cancer patient as well as the survival, morbidity and years free of disease. Although many aspects related to QL in oral cancer patients have been published throughout the past 10 years, more systematic research is needed to be able to apply it on a daily basis.

  18. Treatment of mild non-chemotherapy-induced iron deficiency anemia in cancer patients: comparison between oral ferrous bisglycinate chelate and ferrous sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Paola; Nicolini, Andrea; Manca, Maria Laura; Rossi, Giuseppe; Anselmi, Loretta; Conte, Massimo; Carpi, Angelo; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2012-09-01

    In cancer patients mild-moderate non-chemotherapy-induced iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is usually treated with oral iron salts, mostly ferrous sulfate. In this study, we compare efficacy and toxicity of oral ferrous bisglycinate chelate and ferrous sulfate in cancer patients with mild IDA. Twenty-four patients operated on for solid tumors (10 breast, 12 colorectal, 2 gastric), aged 61±10 years (range 45-75), with non-chemotherapy-induced hemoglobin (Hb) values between 10 and 12 g/dL and ferritin lower than 30 ng/mL were randomized to receive oral ferrous bisglycinate chelate, 28 mg per day for 20 days, and then 14 mg per day for 40 days (12 patients) (A group) or oral ferrous sulphate, 105 mg per day for 60 days (12 patients) (B group). Values of hemoglobin and ferritin obtained at diagnosis, 1 and 2 months from the beginning of treatment were compared. Adverse events (AEs) related to the two treatments were recorded. In the 12 patients treated with ferrous bisglycinate chelate, basal hemoglobin and ferritin values (mean±SD) were 11.6±0.8 g/dL and 16.1±8.0 ng/mL. After 2 months of treatment, they were 13.0±1.4 g/dL and 33.8±22.0 ng/mL, respectively (P=0.0003 and P=0.020). In the group treated with ferrous sulphate, hemoglobin and ferritin mean values were 11.3±0.6 g/dL and 19.0±6.4 ng/mL basally, and 12.7±0.70 g/dL and 40.8±28.1 ng/mL (Pferrous bisglycinate chelate and four (33%) with ferrous sulphate, toxicity was grade 1. In conclusion, these data suggest that ferrous bisglycinate chelate has similar efficacy and likely lower GI toxicity than ferrous sulphate given at the conventional dose of 105 mg per day for the same time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of selective elimination of the oral flora on mucositis in irradiated head and neck cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spijkervet, F.K.; Van Saene, H.K.; Van Saene, J.J.; Panders, A.K.; Vermey, A.; Mehta, D.M.; Fidler, V. (Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands))

    1991-03-01

    Recently it has been reported that chlorhexidine 0.1% rinsing was not successful in eradication of gram-negative bacilli in patients who have head and neck cancer. These bacilli could play a role in irradiation mucositis. This study reports the effect of lozenges containing 2 mg polymyxin E, 1.8 mg tobramycin, and 10 mg amphotericin B qid on the oropharyngeal flora in 15 irradiated head and neck cancer patients. The results were compared with those of a previous study in two groups of 15 patients comparing chlorhexidine rinsing with placebo. In all patients using lozenges, eradication of gram-negative bacilli and yeasts was achieved within 3 weeks. A significant increase of enterococci was found. Mucositis was significantly reduced compared with the previous two groups. All patients showed erythema only, whereas 80% of both the placebo and chlorhexidine rinsing patients suffered from severe mucositis, with signs of pseudomembranes developing from the third week of conventional irradiation protocol. The effect of selective elimination of gram-negative bacilli from the oropharynx and the prevention of severe mucositis may be explained by the eradication of these bacteria and/or neutralization of salivary endotoxin, released by gram-negative bacilli, mediating the inflammatory processes.

  20. Rational radical neck dissection for oral cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李龙江; 温玉明; 王昌美; 王莉娟

    2003-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis is the most commonly seen route for the spread of malignant epithelial tumors. Oral cancers derived from epithelial tissue occur more often in the head and neck regions with a high lymphatic metastasis rate. According to reports from Chinese researchers, the lymphatic metastasis rate of oral cancer could be as high as 40%, and clearing those involved lymph nodes in neck is one of the most important methods to treat the disease.

  1. An assessment of oral cancer curricula in dental hygiene programmes: implications for cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, K K; Kaste, L M; Homsi, K D; LeHew, C W

    2016-11-01

    To assess oral cancer prevention and early detection curricula in Illinois associate-degree dental hygiene programmes and highlight global health applications. An email invitation was sent to each Illinois associate-degree granting dental hygiene programme's oral cancer contact to participate in a survey via a SurveyMonkey™ link to a 21-item questionnaire. Questions elicited background information on each programme and inquired about curriculum and methods used for teaching oral cancer prevention and early detection. Eight of the 12 (67%) programmes responded. Three (37.5%) reported having a specific oral cancer curriculum. Five (62.5%) require students to perform examinations for signs and symptoms of oral cancer at each clinic visit. Variations exist across the programmes in the number of patients each student sees annually and the number of oral cancer examinations each student performs before graduation. Seven programmes (87.5%) conduct early detection screening in community settings. All programmes included risk assessment associated with tobacco. All other risk factors measured were treated inconsistently. Significant differences in training and experience were reported across Illinois dental hygiene programmes. Training is neither standardized nor uniformly comprehensive. Students' preparation for delivering prevention and early detection services to their patients could be strengthened to ensure competence including reflection of risk factors and behaviours in a global context. Regular review of curricular guidelines and programme content would help dental hygienists meet the expectations of the Crete Declaration on Oral Cancer Prevention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. SU-F-P-29: Impact of Oral Contrast Agent for Assisting in Outlining Small Intestine On Pelvic IMAT Dose in Patients with Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Fan, X [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: As the advanced intensity modulated arc therapy(IMAT) delivery systems becoming a main role of treatment ways, which places even greater demands on delivering accuracy. The impact of oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) for assisting in outlining the small intestine on pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer was investigated. Methods: Ten cervical cancer patients for postoperative radiotherapy underwent CT scans, and the planning target volumes (PTV) and organs at risk (including the small intestine, rectum, bladder, colon and the left and right femoral head) were contoured. The IMAT plans were generated on Oncentra v4.1 planning system for each case, PTV was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Then another plan was generated by re-calculating the radiation dose after changing the electron density of the small bowel. The first plan (plan A) was the conventional IMAT plan (with oral contrast agent), and the second one (plan B) specified the electron density of the small bowel (without oral contrast agent). Paired t-test was used to compare the dose distribution between the two plans. Results: The PTV’s D2, D50, D95, V110, conformity index, and homogeneity index of plans A and B were 5610.5 vs. 5611.4 cGy (P=0.175), 5348.5 vs. 5348.0 cGy (P=0.869), 5039 vs. 5042.3 (P=0.518), 6.0% vs. 6.1 %( P=0.886), 0.1269 vs. 0.1271 (P=0.34) and 0.8421 vs. 0.8416 (P=0.598), respectively. The volumes of the small bowel receiving at least 30 Gy (V30) and the minimum dose of 2% volume accepted (D2) for plans A and B were 31.6% vs. 31.9% (P=0.371) and 5067.8 vs. 5085.4 cGy (P=0.377), while rectum V50 of the two plans was 12.4% vs. 12.1% (P=0.489). Conclusion: The oral contrast agent (meglumine diatrizoate) filling the small intestine does not lead to a significant increase in the pelvic IMAT dose in patients with cervical cancer.

  3. Candida virulence and ethanol-derived acetaldehyde production in oral cancer and non-cancer subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnuaimi, A D; Ramdzan, A N; Wiesenfeld, D; O'Brien-Simpson, N M; Kolev, S D; Reynolds, E C; McCullough, M J

    2016-11-01

    To compare biofilm-forming ability, hydrolytic enzymes and ethanol-derived acetaldehyde production of oral Candida isolated from the patients with oral cancer and matched non-oral cancer. Fungal biofilms were grown in RPMI-1640 medium, and biofilm mass and biofilm activity were assessed using crystal violet staining and XTT salt reduction assays, respectively. Phospholipase, proteinase, and esterase production were measured using agar plate method, while fungal acetaldehyde production was assessed via gas chromatography. Candida isolated from patients with oral cancer demonstrated significantly higher biofilm mass (P = 0.031), biofilm metabolic activity (P Candida were more prevalent in patients with oral cancer than non-oral cancer (P = 0.01). In univariate regression analysis, high biofilm mass (P = 0.03) and biofilm metabolic activity (P Candida isolates to form biofilms, to produce hydrolytic enzymes, and to metabolize alcohol to acetaldehyde with their ability to promote oral cancer development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Protection of Dietary Polyphenols against Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijian Ding

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer represents a health burden worldwide with approximate 275,000 new cases diagnosed annually. Its poor prognosis is due to local tumor invasion and frequent lymph node metastasis. Better understanding and development of novel treatments and chemo-preventive approaches for the preventive and therapeutic intervention of this type of cancer are necessary. Recent development of dietary polyphenols as cancer preventives and therapeutic agents is of great interest due to their antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic activities. Polyphenols may inhibit carcinogenesis in the stage of initiation, promotion, or progression. In particular, dietary polyphenols decrease incidence of carcinomas and exert protection against oral cancer by induction of cell death and inhibition of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this review, we discuss current progress of dietary polyphenols against oral cancers in vitro, in vivo, and at population levels.

  5. Oral cavity and lip cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerawala, C; Roques, T; Jeannon, J-P; Bisase, B

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. It provides recommendations on the assessment and management of patients with cancer of the oral cavity and the lip. Recommendations • Surgery remains the mainstay of management for oral cavity tumours. (R) • Tumour resection should be performed with a clinical clearance of 1 cm vital structures permitting. (R) • Elective neck treatment should be offered for all oral cavity tumours. (R) • Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in the presence of advanced neck disease or positive margins improves control rates. (R) • Early stage lip cancer can be treated equally well by surgery or radiation therapy. (R).

  6. A marketing campaign to promote screening for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Amid I; Jedele, Jenefer M; Lim, Sungwoo; Tellez, Marisol

    2012-09-01

    Organizers of the Detroit Oral Cancer Prevention Project at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, launched a multifaceted media campaign targeted toward a high-risk population to raise awareness about oral cancer, educate the public regarding the importance of early detection and increase screening rates. The authors present data about the effectiveness of the campaign with regard to the screening behaviors of medical and dental providers. Before the start of the campaign and during each of the three years of the campaign, the authors mailed surveys to random samples of physicians and dentists practicing in targeted and non-targeted areas. More dentists than physicians reported screening patients routinely, and dentists reported that they referred more patients for biopsy or further evaluation compared with physicians. A larger proportion of dentists and physicians in the targeted area than in the nontargeted area reported that their patients had seen or heard the advertisements. A larger proportion of dentists in the targeted area than in the nontargeted area reported an increase in patients' questions and requests for screening, even after the authors accounted for demographic characteristics (adjusted odds ratio = 2.47). The survey findings show that the media campaign was effective in influencing providers' screening for signs and symptoms of oral cancer. An increase in patients' requests for screening as a result of the implementation of mass media campaigns may promote oral cancer screening and improve patients' chances of survival.

  7. The effect of clove-based herbal mouthwash on radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer: a single-blind randomized preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Moonkyoo Kong,1 Deok-Sang Hwang,2 Seong Woo Yoon,3 Jinsung Kim4 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, 2Department of Korean Medicine Obstetrics & Gynecology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, 3Department of Korean Internal Medicine, Korean Medicine Cancer Center, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, 4Department of Korean Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Republic of Korea Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of clove-based herbal mouthwash in ameliorating radiation-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods: Fourteen patients were prospectively enrolled in this study and randomized to either an experimental group or a control group. The patients of the experimental group swished their mouths with a clove-based herbal mouthwash during radiotherapy (RT, while the patients of the control group swished with clear water. The primary end point of this study was incidence of radiation-induced oral mucositis. The secondary end points were time to onset of radiation-induced oral mucositis, duration of radiation-induced oral mucositis, incidence of supplemental nutrition through feeding tube, maximum pain score, body weight loss, incidence of RT interruption, and duration of RT interruption. Results: The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash shortened the duration of grade ≥2 mucositis (24.3 days vs 37.1 days, P=0.044 and reduced body weight loss during RT (3.1% vs 7.4%, P=0.023 compared with clear water. The use of clove-based herbal mouthwash also reduced the incidence of grade 3 mucositis (28.6% vs 57.1%, supplemental nutrition (0% vs 28.6%, and RT interruption (14.3% vs 28.6%, and reduced the duration of grade 3 mucositis (5.1 days vs 17.7 days and RT interruption (1 days vs 8.5 days. In addition, clove-based herbal mouthwash

  8. Gene Therapy In Oral Cancer : An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The treatment and prevention of oral cancer is one of the major hurdles in the field ofcancer. Gene therapy is one of the recent advances in this field to tackle this hurdle with promisingprospects. This overview introduces the reader into the basic idea of gene therapy, types of genetherapy and the various modes of introduction of therapeutic gene into the cancer affected cell.

  9. Safety of an oral anticancer agent (trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet) in patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, M; Go, M; Iwai, M; Ito, D; Asano, H; Usami, E; Teramachi, H; Yoshimura, T

    2016-04-01

    We retrospectively studied the safety of trifluridine/tipiracil combination tablet (TAS-102) monotherapy in patients with advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer. Adverse events to TAS-102 monotherapy were observed in 22 out of 23 cases (95.7%). The most frequent adverse events were neutropenia (69.6%), nausea (53.2%), and malaise (30.4%). Treatment was postponed in 54 (59.3%) out of 91 courses, and in 34 (66.7%) of these 54 courses, the delay in treatment was due to bone marrow suppression. Seven patients with peritoneal metastases suffered from nausea, whilst none of the patients without peritoneal metastases had nausea (p = 0.0139). Nausea and vomiting during a previous chemotherapy cycle was significantly associated with nausea after TAS-102 treatment (p = 0.0007), and the treatment cycles were significantly longer in patients with grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (p = 0.0061). Our results suggest that the incidence of nausea was higher in patients treated with TAS-102. Therefore, it is important to inform patients of the risk of these toxicities and to provide enhanced supportive care. Moreover, we recommend that, for patients with repeated treatment postponement due to neutropenia, the dosage should be fixed based on therapeutic efficacy and prognosis.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of gamma-hydroxybutylic acid (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), the anti-angiogenic metabolites of oral fluoropyrimidine UFT, in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emi, Yasunori; Sumiyoshi, Yasushi; Oki, Eiji; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Fukui, Yousuke; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2007-12-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutylic acid (GHB) and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), the metabolites of UFT, which is an oral fluoropyrimidine, have been reported to inhibit angiogenesis with IC50 values of 25.8 ng/ml. The pharmacokinetics of GHB and GBL were examined after the administration of UFT in patients with gastric cancer. The patients received 200 mg of UFT orally twice a day. Peripheral blood samples were collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 hr after the time of dosing on day 5. The baseline and endogenous GBL concentrations in plasma were 20.2 +/- 7.5 ng/ml for patients and 16.8 +/- 4.0 ng/ml for volunteers (P = 0.221). The values of C(max) for tegafur, uracil, 5-FU and GBL were 14.7 +/- 5.2 and 4.0 +/- 2.8 microg/ml, 191.2 +/- 115.3 and 147.5 +/- 57.3 ng/ml, respectively, and the values of Tmax were 1.0 +/- 0.6, 1.1 +/- 0.6, 0.9 +/- 0.6 and 1.2 +/- 0. 6 hr, respectively. The concentration of GBL was much higher than its IC50 value for angiogenesis. GBL is thus suggested to contribute to the anticancer effects of UFT in addition to that of 5-FU, which is continuously metabolized from UFT.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase gene polymorphisms and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Andresa C; Dias do Carmo, Elaine; Dias da Silva, Marco A; Blumer Rosa, Luiz E

    2012-12-01

    Since oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most prevalent malignant cancer in the oral cavity, several researches have been performed to study the role of important enzymes in this disease. Among them, the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are highlighted, due to the fact that they are proteinases responsible to degrade many extra-cellular matrix components, making possible the invasion of neoplasic cells. Important tools in cancer prognosis have been utilized aiming to correlate high levels of MMPs and OSCC, such as immunohistochemical, zymographic and mRNA detection methods. However, these techniques are usually applied after cancer detection, characterizing a curative but not a preventive medicine. Trying to make interventions before the development of the disease and making possible the identification of people at high risk and, analysis of modifications in MMP genes has been a chance for modern medicine. Recently, polymorphisms in MMP genes have been related to different neoplasias, including OSCC. Despite investigation is beginning, MMP gene polymorphisms seems to have a promising future in oral cancer research and some of the present results have shown that there are MMP polymorphisms related to an increased risk for developing oral cancer. Key words:Oral cancer, polymorphism, matrix metalloproteinase.

  12. Pretreatment serum albumin: a prognostic indicator of survival in oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Bobdey

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Pretreatment serum albumin levels are of useful prognostic significance in oral cancer patients. Thus, this easily accessible variable may not only serve as a potent marker to predict the outcomes, but more importantly as an indicator for initiating aggressive nutrition intervention in oral cancer patients. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2135-2141

  13. Tumour thickness in oral cancer using an intra-oral ultrasound probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.L. Lodder; H.J. Teertstra; I.B. Tan; F.A. Pameijer; L.E. Smeele; M.L.F. van Velthuysen; M.W.M. van den Brekel

    2011-01-01

    To investigate tumour-thickness measurement with an intra-operative ultrasound (US) probe. A retrospective data analysis was undertaken for a total of 65 patients with a T1-2 oral cavity cancer, who were seen at a tertiary referral centre between 2004 and 2010. The correspondence between tumour thic

  14. Water pipe smoking and human oral cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastam, Samer; Li, Fu-Min; Fouad, Fouad M; Al Kamal, Haysam M; Akil, Nizar; Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin

    2010-03-01

    While cigarette smoking is recognized as an important risk factor in human oral cancers, the effect of water pipe smoking (WPS) on these cancers is not known. WPS is very common in the young adult population, especially in the Middle East, and has been associated with several respiratory problems. However, to date, there have been no studies examining the association between WPS and the progression of human oral cancers. Currently, the role of WPS in human oral cancers remains uncertain because of the limited number of investigations. This raises the question of whether WPS plays a significant role in the development of human oral carcinomas. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that human oral normal epithelial cells are vulnerable to persistent WPS; moreover, WPS could play an important role in the initiation of a neoplastic transformation of human normal oral epithelial cells. Therefore, we believe that an international collaboration of epidemiological and clinical studies as well as cellular and molecular biology investigations is necessary to answer this important question.

  15. A comparison of oral controlled-release morphine and oxycodone with transdermal formulations of buprenorphine and fentanyl in the treatment of severe pain in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosek K

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Krzysztof Nosek,1 Wojciech Leppert,2,3 Hanna Nosek,4 Jerzy Wordliczek,5 Dariusz Onichimowski6 1Non–public Saint Lazarius Health Care Unit, Biskupiec, 2Chair and Department of Palliative Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznań, 3Department of Quality of life Research, Gdańsk Medical University, Gdańsk, 4Department of Paediatrics, Regional Children Specialized Hospital, Olsztyn, 5Department of Interdisciplinary Intensive Care, Jagiellonian University College of Medicine, Kraków, 6Department of Intensive Care, Regional Hospital, Olsztyn, Poland Aim of the study: To compare analgesia and adverse effects during oral morphine and oxycodone and transdermal fentanyl and buprenorphine administration in cancer patients with pain. Patients and methods: Cancer patients treated at home and in outpatient clinics with severe pain (numerical rating scale score 6–10 fail to respond to non-opioids and/or weak opioids. All patients were randomized to either morphine, oxycodone, fentanyl or buprenorphine and divided into subgroups with predominant neuropathic and nociceptive pain component. Doses of opioids were titrated to satisfactory analgesia and acceptable adverse effects intensity. Patients were assessed at baseline and followed for 28 days. In all patient groups, immediate-release oral morphine was the rescue analgesic and lactulose 10 mL twice daily was the prophylaxis of constipation; no antiemetics were used as prophylaxis. Results: A total of 62 patients participated and 53 patients completed the study. Good analgesia was obtained for all 4 opioids, for both nociceptive and neuropathic pain. The use of co-analgesics was greater in patients with neuropathic pain. Morphine treatment was associated with less negative impact of pain on ability to walk, work and activity (trend according to Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form scores and less consumption of rescue morphine. The most common adverse effects included nausea and drowsiness

  16. Oral micro-organisms in the etiology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurman, Jukka H; Uittamo, Johanna

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel concept on carcinogenesis mediated by oral microbiota. Oral micro-organisms are capable of metabolizing alcohol to acetaldehyde. This finding casts light on the observed association between poor oral hygiene and oral cancer. Ethanol, as such, is not carcinogenic, but its first metabolite acetaldehyde is indisputably carcinogenic. Several gastro-intestinal microbial species possess the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which is also the enzyme responsible for alcohol metabolism in the liver. In oral microbiota, we observed that species such as the ubiquitous viridans streptococci and Candida also possess ADH. Ethanol can be detected in the mouth hours after the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Patients with poor oral health status have shown higher salivary acetaldehyde concentrations than those with better oral health. It is thus understandable that ADH-containing micro-organisms in the mouth present a risk for carcinogenic acetaldehyde production, with subsequent potential for the development of oral cancer, particularly among heavy drinkers. In this article, we briefly review this area of investigation and conclude by highlighting some future possibilities for the control of carcinogenesis.

  17. Systematic reviews of oral complications from cancer therapies, Oral Care Study Group, MASCC/ISOO : methodology and quality of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brennan, Michael T.; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Oral complications are commonly experienced by patients undergoing cancer therapies. The Oral Care Study Group of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) has completed nine systematic reviews including Bisphosphonate Osteonecrosi

  18. Oral cancer: a retrospective study of 100 Danish cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Rindum, J; Pindborg, J J

    1997-01-01

    One hundred Danes with oral cancer who were collected consecutively from 1986 to 1991 were evaluated retrospectively. The study included subjective and objective observations in 56% men and in 44% women. M:F ratio was 1.2:1. Fifty percent of the patients were non-smokers. Nine percent were women ...

  19. Therapeutic effect of orally administered microencapsulated oxaliplatin for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Guajardo, Gonzalo; Langer, Robert S; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the United States and other Western countries. Oral delivery of therapeutics remains the most patient accepted form of medication. The development of an oral delivery formulation for local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the gastrointestinal tract can potentially alleviate the adverse side effects including systemic cytotoxicity, as well as focus therapy to the lesions. Here we develop an oral formulation of the chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin was encapsulated in pH sensitive, mucoadhesive chitosan-coated alginate microspheres. The microparticles were formulated to release the chemotherapeutics after passing through the acidic gastric environment thus targeting the intestinal tract. In vivo, these particles substantially reduced the tumor burden in an orthotopic mouse model of colorectal cancer, and reduced mortality.

  20. Oral poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and recurrent ovarian cancer: a proof-of-concept trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audeh, M William; Carmichael, James; Penson, Richard T; Friedlander, Michael; Powell, Bethan; Bell-McGuinn, Katherine M; Scott, Clare; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Oaknin, Ana; Loman, Niklas; Lu, Karen; Schmutzler, Rita K; Matulonis, Ursula; Wickens, Mark; Tutt, Andrew

    2010-07-24

    Olaparib is a novel, orally active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor that induces synthetic lethality in homozygous BRCA-deficient cells. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of olaparib for treatment of advanced ovarian cancer in patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In this international, multicentre, phase 2 study, we enrolled two sequential cohorts of women (aged >or=18 years) with confirmed genetic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, and recurrent, measurable disease. The study was undertaken in 12 centres in Australia, Germany, Spain, Sweden, and the USA. The first cohort (n=33) was given continuous oral olaparib at the maximum tolerated dose of 400 mg twice daily, and the second cohort (n=24) was given continuous oral olaparib at 100 mg twice daily. The primary efficacy endpoint was objective response rate (ORR). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00494442. Patients had been given a median of three (range 1-16) previous chemotherapy regimens. ORR was 11 (33%) of 33 patients (95% CI 20-51) in the cohort assigned to olaparib 400 mg twice daily, and three (13%) of 24 (4-31) in the cohort assigned to 100 mg twice daily. In patients given olaparib 400 mg twice daily, the most frequent causally related adverse events were nausea (grade 1 or 2, 14 [42%]; grade 3 or 4, two [6%]), fatigue (grade 1 or 2, ten [30%]; grade 3 or 4, one [3%]), and anaemia (grade 1 or two, five [15%]; grade 3 or 4, one [3%]). The most frequent causally related adverse events in the cohort given 100 mg twice daily were nausea (grade 1 or 2, seven [29%]; grade 3 or 4, two [8%]) and fatigue (grade 1 or 2, nine [38%]; none grade 3 or 4). Findings from this phase 2 study provide positive proof of concept of the efficacy and tolerability of genetically targeted treatment with olaparib in BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer. AstraZeneca. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Oral health in patients with liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard Grønkjær, Lea; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the oral care habits and self-perceived oral health in patients with liver cirrhosis, as well as to evaluate the impact of oral health on well-being and the relation to nutritional status. Participants and methods: From October 2012 to May 2013, we...... carried out a prospective study on patients with liver cirrhosis. Questions on oral care habits and self-perceived oral health were answered, and the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14) provided information on oral conditions. The findings were compared with The Danish Institute for Health...... Services Research report on the Danish population’s dental status. Results: One hundred and seven patients participated. Their oral care habits and self-perceived oral health were poorer than the Danish population; the patients had fewer teeth (on average 19 vs. 26, P=0.0001), attended the dentist less...

  2. Dilatation and curettage is more accurate than endometrial aspiration biopsy in early-stage endometrial cancer patients treated with high dose oral progestin and levonorgestrel intrauterine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Da Hee; Seong, Seok Ju; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Bae, Hyo Sook; Kim, Mi La; Yun, Bo Seong; Jung, Yong Wook; Shim, Jeong Yun

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether less invasive endometrial (EM) aspiration biopsy is adequately accurate for evaluating treatment outcomes compared to the dilatation and curettage (D&C) biopsy in early-stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with high dose oral progestin and levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). We conducted a prospective observational study with patients younger than 40 years who were diagnosed with clinical stage IA, The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade 1 or 2 endometrioid adenocarcinoma and sought to maintain their fertility. The patients were treated with medroxyprogesterone acetate 500 mg/day and LNG-IUS. Treatment responses were evaluated every 3 months. EM aspiration biopsy was conducted after LNG-IUS removal followed D&C. The tissue samples were histologically compared. The diagnostic concordance rate of the two tests was examined with κ statistics. Twenty-eight pairs of EM samples were obtained from five patients. The diagnostic concordance rate of D&C and EM aspiration biopsy was 39.3% (κ value=0.26). Of the seven samples diagnosed as normal with D&C, three (42.8%) were diagnosed as normal by using EM aspiration biopsy. Of the eight samples diagnosed with endometrioid adenocarcinoma by using D&C, three (37.5%) were diagnosed with endometrioid adenocarcinoma by using EM aspiration biopsy. Of the 13 complex EM hyperplasia samples diagnosed with the D&C, five (38.5%) were diagnosed with EM hyperplasia by using EM aspiration biopsy. Of the samples obtained through EM aspiration, 46.4% were insufficient for histological evaluation. To evaluate the treatment responses of patients with early-stage EC treated with high dose oral progestin and LNG-IUS, D&C should be conducted after LNG-IUS removal.

  3. Dilatation and curettage is more accurate than endometrial aspiration biopsy in early-stage endometrial cancer patients treated with high dose oral progestin and levonorgestrel intrauterine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine whether less invasive endometrial (EM) aspiration biopsy is adequately accurate for evaluating treatment outcomes compared to the dilatation and curettage (D&C) biopsy in early-stage endometrial cancer (EC) patients treated with high dose oral progestin and levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS). Methods We conducted a prospective observational study with patients younger than 40 years who were diagnosed with clinical stage IA, The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade 1 or 2 endometrioid adenocarcinoma and sought to maintain their fertility. The patients were treated with medroxyprogesterone acetate 500 mg/day and LNG-IUS. Treatment responses were evaluated every 3 months. EM aspiration biopsy was conducted after LNG-IUS removal followed D&C. The tissue samples were histologically compared. The diagnostic concordance rate of the two tests was examined with κ statistics. Results Twenty-eight pairs of EM samples were obtained from five patients. The diagnostic concordance rate of D&C and EM aspiration biopsy was 39.3% (κ value=0.26). Of the seven samples diagnosed as normal with D&C, three (42.8%) were diagnosed as normal by using EM aspiration biopsy. Of the eight samples diagnosed with endometrioid adenocarcinoma by using D&C, three (37.5%) were diagnosed with endometrioid adenocarcinoma by using EM aspiration biopsy. Of the 13 complex EM hyperplasia samples diagnosed with the D&C, five (38.5%) were diagnosed with EM hyperplasia by using EM aspiration biopsy. Of the samples obtained through EM aspiration, 46.4% were insufficient for histological evaluation. Conclusion To evaluate the treatment responses of patients with early-stage EC treated with high dose oral progestin and LNG-IUS, D&C should be conducted after LNG-IUS removal. PMID:27670255

  4. Trend Analysis of Betel Nut-associated Oral Cancer 
and Health Burden in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan Jia; Chen, Jie; Zhong, Wai Sheng; Ling, Tian You; Jian, Xin Chun; Lu, Ruo Huang; Tang, Zhan Gui; Tao, Lin

    2017-01-01

    To forecast the future trend of betel nut-associated oral cancer and the resulting burden on health based on historical oral cancer patient data in Hunan province, China. Oral cancer patient data in five hospitals in Changsha (the capital city of Hunan province) were collected for the past 12 years. Three methods were used to analyse the data; Microsoft Excel Forecast Sheet, Excel Trendline, and the Logistic growth model. A combination of these three methods was used to forecast the future trend of betel nut-associated oral cancer and the resulting burden on health. Betel nut-associated oral cancer cases have been increasing rapidly in the past 12  years in Changsha. As of 2016, betel nuts had caused 8,222 cases of oral cancer in Changsha and close to 25,000 cases in Hunan, resulting in about ¥5 billion in accumulated financial loss. The combined trend analysis predicts that by 2030, betel nuts will cause more than 100,000 cases of oral cancer in Changsha and more than 300,000 cases in Hunan, and more than ¥64 billion in accumulated financial loss in medical expenses. The trend analysis of oral cancer patient data predicts that the growing betel nut industry in Hunan province will cause a humanitarian catastrophe with massive loss of human life and national resources. To prevent this catastrophe, China should ban betel nuts and provide early oral cancer screening for betel nut consumers as soon as possible.

  5. L-lysine in Treating Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy For Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Mucositis; Oral Complications of Chemotherapy; Oral Complications of Radiation Therapy; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage

  6. Oral cancer: exploring the stories in United Kingdom newspaper articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, C M; Johnson, I G; Morgan, M Z

    2016-09-09

    Objective Reports suggest that patients with oral cancer delay seeking help because they are unaware of the symptoms. The majority of adults (95%) engage with news reports and 40% read newspapers. Newspaper oral cancer stories may influence awareness and health-seeking behaviour. The aim of this study was to explore how oral cancer is portrayed in UK newspaper print media.Design Qualitative content analysis of articles from ten newspapers with the widest UK print circulation. All articles using the terms 'mouth cancer' and 'oral cancer' over a three year period were retrieved. Duplicates, non-cancer and non-human articles were excluded.Results 239 articles were analysed. Common topics included 'recent research', 'survivor stories', 'health information' and 'celebrity linkage'. Articles were often emotive, featuring smoking, alcohol, sex and celebrity. Articles lacked a proper evidence base and often failed to provide accurate information about signs and symptoms, information about prevention and signposting to treatment.Conclusions Opportunities to save lives are being missed. Further work to improve social responsibility in the media and develop guidance to enhance the quality of information, health reporting and signposting to help are indicated.

  7. Effect of a Perioperative Nutritional Supplementation with Oral Impact® in Patients undergoing Hepatic Surgery for Liver Cancer: A Prospective, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Double-Blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Philippe; Locher, Clara; Boudjema, Karim; Hamon, Catherine; Mouchel, Catherine; Malledant, Yannick; Bellissant, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative nutrition with supplements containing L-arginine, ω3-polyunsaturated fatty acids, and nucleotides could boost liver function recovery, immune response, and resistance to infection after hepatic resection. We conducted a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study to assess the effect of a perioperative nutritional supplementation with Oral Impact® in patients undergoing hepatic surgery for liver cancer. Treatment was given three times daily for 7 days before and 3 days after surgery. Primary outcome was factor V, 3 days after surgery. Thirty-five patients (placebo: 17; Oral Impact: 18) were included. Five patients (placebo: three; Oral Impact: two) were not operated and five (placebo: two; Oral Impact: three) did not undergo hepatic resection. Factor V (mean ± SD) was 70 ± 27% and 79 ± 25% (P = 0.409) 3 days after surgery and 90 ± 30% and 106 ± 16% (P = 0.066) 5 days after surgery, in placebo and Oral Impact groups, respectively. There were no significant differences between groups on other outcomes assessing liver function recovery (bile production, γ-glutamyl transferase, α-fetoprotein), immune response (CD3, CD4, CD8 cells, CD4/CD8 ratio, natural killer cells, B lymphocytes), number of infections, and tolerance. A 10-day perioperative nutritional supplementation with Oral Impact does not improve hepatic function, immune response, and resistance to infection in patients undergoing hepatic surgery for liver cancer.

  8. Erlotinib and the Risk of Oral Cancer: The Erlotinib Prevention of Oral Cancer (EPOC) Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, William N; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Lee, J Jack; Mao, Li; Cohen, Ezra E W; Lin, Heather Y; Gillenwater, Ann M; Martin, Jack W; Lingen, Mark W; Boyle, Jay O; Shin, Dong M; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Shinn, Nancy; Heymach, John V; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Tang, Ximing; Kim, Edward S; Saintigny, Pierre; Blair, Elizabeth A; Meiller, Timothy; Gutkind, J Silvio; Myers, Jeffrey; El-Naggar, Adel; Lippman, Scott M

    2016-02-01

    Standard molecularly based strategies to predict and/or prevent oral cancer development in patients with oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) are lacking. To test if the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib would reduce oral cancer development in patients with high-risk OPLs defined by specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) profiles. Secondary objectives included prospective determination of LOH as a prognostic marker in OPLs. The Erlotinib Prevention of Oral Cancer (EPOC) study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-bind trial. Accrual occurred from November 2006 through July 2012, with a median follow-up time of 35 months in an ambulatory care setting in 5 US academic referral institutions. Patients with OPLs were enrolled in the protocol, and each underwent LOH profiling (N = 379); they were classified as high-risk (LOH-positive) or low-risk (LOH-negative) patients based on their LOH profiles and oral cancer history. The randomized sample consisted of 150 LOH-positive patients. Oral erlotinib treatment (150 mg/d) or placebo for 12 months. Oral cancer-free survival (CFS). A total of 395 participants were classified with LOH profiles, and 254 were classified LOH positive. Of these, 150 (59%) were randomized, 75 each to the placebo and erlotinib groups. The 3-year CFS rates in placebo- and erlotinib-treated patients were 74% and 70%, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95% CI, 0.68-2.38; P = .45). The 3-year CFS was significantly lower for LOH-positive compared with LOH-negative groups (74% vs 87%, HR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.25-3.83; P = .01). Increased EGFR gene copy number correlated with LOH-positive status (P < .001) and lower CFS (P = .01). The EGFR gene copy number was not predictive of erlotinib efficacy. Erlotinib-induced skin rash was associated with improved CFS (P = .01). In this trial, LOH was validated as a marker of oral cancer risk and found to be associated with increased EGFR copy number (the target of the intervention

  9. Phase II study evaluating 2 dosing schedules of oral foretinib (GSK1363089, cMET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, in patients with metastatic gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish A Shah

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The receptors for hepatocyte and vascular endothelial cell growth factors (MET and VEGFR2, respectively are critical oncogenic mediators in gastric adenocarcinoma. The purpose is to examine the safety and efficacy of foretinib, an oral multikinase inhibitor targeting MET, RON, AXL, TIE-2, and VEGFR2 receptors, for the treatment of metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Foretinib safety and tolerability, and objective response rate (ORR were evaluated in patients using intermittent (240 mg/day, for 5 days every 2 weeks or daily (80 mg/day dosing schedules. Thirty evaluable patients were required to achieve alpha = 0.10 and beta = 0.2 to test the alternative hypothesis that single-agent foretinib would result in an ORR of ≥ 25%. Up to 10 additional patients could be enrolled to ensure at least eight with MET amplification. Correlative studies included tumor MET amplification, MET signaling, pharmacokinetics and plasma biomarkers of foretinib activity. RESULTS: From March 2007 until October 2009, 74 patients were enrolled; 74% male; median age, 61 years (range, 25-88; 93% had received prior therapy. Best response was stable disease (SD in 10 (23% patients receiving intermittent dosing and five (20% receiving daily dosing; SD duration was 1.9-7.2 months (median 3.2 months. Of 67 patients with tumor samples, 3 had MET amplification, one of whom had SD. Treatment-related adverse events occurred in 91% of patients. Rates of hypertension (35% vs. 15% and elevated aspartate aminotransferase (23% vs. 8% were higher with intermittent dosing. In both patients with high baseline tumor phospho-MET (pMET, the pMET:total MET protein ratio decreased with foretinib treatment. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that few gastric carcinomas are driven solely by MET and VEGFR2, and underscore the diverse molecular oncogenesis of this disease. Despite evidence of MET inhibition by foretinib, single-agent foretinib lacked efficacy in

  10. Factors that affect cancer patient compliance to oral anti-neoplastic therapy Factores que influyen en la adhesión de pacientes con cáncer a la terapia antineoplásica oral Fatores que influenciam a adesão de pacientes com câncer à terapia antineoplásica oral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Andréa Crippa Marques

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To identify factors that can affect compliance to treatment with neoplastic oral drugs in a group of cancer patients. METHODS: Interviews were performed on 61 patients diagnosed with cancer and under anti-neoplastic oral therapy in a private hospital. The interviews were carried out using instruments to assess compliance. RESULTS: Most patients (95% reported the oral treatment was not difficult. The Morisky and Green Test were positive in 28% of the patients. Factors that may affect following the treatment were significantly (pOBJETIVOS: Identificar los factores asociados a la adhesión al tratamiento con drogas de acción antineoplásica por vía oral en pacientes con cáncer. MÉTODOS: Fueron entrevistados 61 pacientes con cáncer sometidos a terapia antineoplásica por vía oral en un hospital particular, con la aplicación de instrumentos para evaluar la adhesión. RESULTADOS: La mayoría de los pacientes (95% refirió que el tratamiento oral no es difícil. El test Morisky y Green fue positivo en el 28% de los pacientes. Los factores que pueden influir en la realización del tratamiento se asociaron de forma significativa (pOBJETIVOS: Identificar fatores associados à adesão ao tratamento com drogas de ação antineoplásica por via oral em pacientes com câncer. MÉTODOS: Foram entrevistados 61 pacientes com câncer sob terapia antineoplásica via oral em hospital particular, com a aplicação de instrumentos para avaliar a adesão. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos pacientes (95% referiu que o tratamento oral não é difícil. O Teste Morisky e Green foi positivo em 28% dos pacientes. Os fatores que podem influenciar a realização do tratamento se associaram de forma significativa (p<0,05 com a variável tempo, os pacientes que apresentaram mais dificuldade, tinham mais tempo de tratamento. CONCLUSÕES: Os pacientes apresentaram atitudes positivas frente ao tratamento com medicamentos antineoplásicos orais, porém foram

  11. AZD3514, an oral selective androgen receptor down-regulator in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer - Results of two parallel first-in-human phase I studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omlin, A.; Jones, R. J.; Van Der Noll, R.; Satoh, T.; Niwakawa, M.; Smith, S. A.; Graham, J.; Ong, M.; Finkelman, R. D.; Schellens, J. H M; Zivi, A.; Crespo, M.; Riisnaes, R.; Nava-Rodrigues, D.; Malone, M. D.; Dive, C.; Sloane, R.; Moore, D.; Alumkal, J. J.; Dymond, A.; Dickinson, P. A.; Ranson, M.; Clack, G.; De Bono, J.; Elliott, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: AZD3514 is a first-in-class, orally bio-available, androgen-dependent and -independent androgen receptor inhibitor and selective androgen-receptor down-regulator (SARD). Methods: In study 1 and 2, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients (pts) were initially recruited into a

  12. Randomized study of nutritional status and treatment toxicities of oral arginine, glutamine, and Omega-3 fatty acids during concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imjai Chitapanarux

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT are at high risk of dysphagia, malnutrition, and immunosuppression. Arginine, glutamine, and Omega-3 fatty acidsare immune-enhanced nutrition that can promote cellular immunity.We aimed to examine the impact of immunonutrition diet on nutritional status, and CCRT toxicities, in this group of patients. Methods: Forty patients with HNC who treated with curative CCRT were randomized to: group A (n = 20, patients who received a regular diet and dietary counselingby a protocol dietician; group B (n = 20, patients who received a regular diet plus immune-enhanced nutrition supplements and dietary counseling by the same protocol dietician. Outcome measures were weight loss, protein and energy intake, serum pre-albumin and albumin, and toxicities of CCRT were evaluated at baseline, weekly and at the end of treatment. Results:Both groups were well balanced at baseline.One patient from group A (1/20 withdrew consent. Seven patients from group B (7/20 withdrew from the study; 1 patient could not tolerate the side effect of chemotherapy and 6 patients could not tolerate the taste of oral immune-enhanced nutrition.A significant loss in total body weight was observed in group A patients (p<0.001, whereas not significant loss in group B (p=0.109. Median percentage change from baseline of energy intake was 19.6%, and 22.9% at the end of treatment for group A, and B, respectively. The circulating levels of nutritional markers, pre-albumin and albumin decreased after CCRT in both groups. There was a significantly decreased level of albumin in group A more than group B, at the end of treatment. During CCRT; 4 patients (20% in group A and 1 patient(5% in group B developed grade 3 mucositis, respectively. One patient (5% in group A had grade 3 radiation dermatitis. Grade 3 – 4 hematologic toxicities, mainly in absolute neutrophil count (ANC were significant higher in

  13. Oral Candidiasis among Cancer Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Chennai, South India: An Evaluation of Clinicomycological Association and Antifungal Susceptibility Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, Abirami Lakshmy; Katragadda, Radhika; Thyagarajan, Ravinder; Vajravelu, Leela; Manikesi, Suganthi; Kaliappan, Shanmugam; Jayachandran, Balaji

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is one of the common manifestations seen in cancer patients on cytotoxic therapy and invasion into deeper tissues can occur if not treated promptly. Emergence of antifungal drug resistance is of serious concern owing to the associated morbidity and mortality. The present study aims at evaluation of clinicomycological association and antifungal drug susceptibility among the 180 recruited patients with cancer on chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy with signs or symptoms suggestive of oral candidiasis. Speciation and antifungal susceptibility was done by Microbroth dilution method for fluconazole, Itraconazole, and Amphotericin B as per standard microbiological techniques. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis (p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant). Candida albicans was the predominant species isolated (94) (58%) followed by Candida tropicalis (34) (20.9%). Fluconazole and Itraconazole showed an overall resistance rate of 14% and 14.8%, respectively. All the isolates were susceptible to Amphotericin B. There was a significant association between the presence of dry mouth and isolation of Candida (p < 0.001). Such clinicomicrobiological associations can help in associating certain symptoms with the isolation of Candida. Species level identification with in vitro antifungal susceptibility pattern is essential to choose the appropriate drug and to predict the outcome of therapy.

  14. Oral health in patients with liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard Grønkjær, Lea; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the oral care habits and self-perceived oral health in patients with liver cirrhosis, as well as to evaluate the impact of oral health on well-being and the relation to nutritional status. Participants and methods: From October 2012 to May 2013, we...... carried out a prospective study on patients with liver cirrhosis. Questions on oral care habits and self-perceived oral health were answered, and the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14) provided information on oral conditions. The findings were compared with The Danish Institute for Health......’ nutritional risk score (P=0.01). Conclusion: Our results showed that cirrhosis patients cared less for oral health than the background population. Their resulting problems may be contributing factors to their nutritional risk and decreased well-being. Oral health problems may thus have adverse prognostic...

  15. Risk for oral cancer from smokeless tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janbaz, Khalid Hussain; Qadir, M Imran; Basser, Hibba Tul; Bokhari, Tanveer Hussain; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco products which are used in a way other than smoking are known as smokeless tobacco. The most common smokeless tobaccos are chewing tobacco, naswar, snuff, snus, gutka, and topical tobacco paste. Any product which contains tobacco is not safe for human health. There are more than twenty-five compounds in smokeless tobacco which have cancer causing activity. Use of smokeless tobacco has been linked with risk of oral cancer. Smokeless tobacco contains tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), polonium, formaldehyde, cadmium, lead, and benzo[a]pyrene, which are carcinogenic agents. Although there is presence of some compounds, carotenoids and phenolic compounds, that have cancer inhibiting properties, they are in low concentrations. Dry snuff use is linked with higher relative risks, while the use of other smokeless tobacco is of intermediate risk. Moist snuff and chewing tobacco have a very low risk for oral cancer. Therefore, from this review article, it was concluded that smokeless tobacco has risk for oral cancer - either low, medium or high depending on the balance between cancer causing agents and cancer inhibiting agents.

  16. Survival and quality of life of patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer at 1-year follow-up of tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriela Haye Biazevic

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the survival and life quality evolution of patients subjected to surgical excision of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-seven patients treated at a Brazilian healthcare unit specialized in head and neck surgery between 2006 and 2007 were enrolled in the study. The gathering of data comprised reviewing hospital files and applying the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL questionnaire previously and 1 year after the surgery. Comparative analysis used Poisson regression to assess factors associated with survival and a paired t-test to compare preoperative and 1-year postoperative QOL ratings. RESULTS: 1 year after surgery, 7 patients were not found (dropout of the cohort; 15 had died and 25 fulfilled the UW-QOL again. The risk of death was associated with having regional metastasis previously to surgery (relative risk=2.18; 95% confidence interval=1.09-5.17 and tumor size T3 or T4 (RR=2.30; 95%CI=1.05-5.04. Survivors presented significantly (p<0.05 poorer overall and domain-specific ratings of quality of life. Chewing presented the largest reduction: from 74.0 before surgery to 34.0 one year later. Anxiety was the only domain whose average rating increased (from 36.0 to 70.7. CONCLUSIONS: The prospective assessment of survival and quality of life may contribute to anticipate interventions aimed at reducing the incidence of functional limitations in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

  17. Burden of advanced breast cancer for patients and caregivers in Europe: comparison of two treatment forms of vinorelbine, oral and intravenous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barni, Sandro; Freier, Beata; Garau, Isabel; Mouysset, Jean-Loup; Sediva, Marcela; Zamagni, Claudio; Berdeaux, Gilles; de Almeida Agudo, Cecilia

    2016-11-01

    To assess the burden of disease associated with advanced breast cancer (ABC) treated with oral (VinO) or intravenous vinorelbine (VinIV) from the perspective of patients and caregivers in five European countries. This was an observational, prospective, international, multicenter study. Patients were included in the study at the beginning of their second cycle of chemotherapy with vinorelbine and categorized into two groups depending on whether they received VinO or VinIV. At baseline (V0) and at the end of the second cycle of chemotherapy (V1), patients and caregivers were asked to complete self-administered questionnaires: SF-12 and burden of disease. At baseline, the two groups were well balanced in demographic and clinical characteristics. However, while HER2+ (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) disease was significantly more frequent in patients receiving VinIV, patients receiving VinO were predominantly treated with single-agent therapy and were older than those treated with VinIV (67.1 years versus 57.7 years [p = 0.05]). As measured with SF-12, patients with VinO had, at end of cycle 1 and end of cycle 2, significantly more favorable outcomes in physical summary score, role physical, role emotional and mental health (all p VinO (cycle 1 and 2; p VinO patients. Major significant differences, showing a lower burden of disease with VinO, were also reported from caregivers. In addition, in patients treated with VinO, mental score was almost similar to the one of the general population. VinO showed benefits over VinIV for both patients and caregivers, particularly in health related quality of life and burden of disease. Because of its observational design, results are only informative.

  18. Cancer Patients Versus Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Catherine E.; Danoff-Burg, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Two studies examined the social and emotional implications of different linguistic classifications of individuals with cancer. Undergraduates were randomly assigned to rate their reactions to either cancer patients or cancer survivors. Across studies, participants held more favorable perceptions of the character of cancer survivors relative to cancer patients and displayed more positive attitudes toward the former group. In addition, participants in Study 1 reported greater willingness to interact with cancer survivors compared with cancer patients. Positive perceptions of prognosis did not appear to account for favorable attitudes toward cancer survivors; most participants in Study 2 did not assume that cancer survivors were beyond the treatment phase of their illness or cured of their disease. Findings point to a potentially powerful effect of word choice on reactions to individuals with cancer. PMID:24371366

  19. Portable LED-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy for oral cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yung-Jhe; Huang, Ting-Wei; Cheng, Nai-Lun; Hsieh, Yao-Fang; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Duann, Jeng-Ren; Lin, Yung-Jiun; Yang, Chin-Siang; Ou-Yang, Mang

    2017-04-01

    Oral cancer is a serious and growing problem in many developing and developed countries. To improve the cancer screening procedure, we developed a portable light-emitting-diode (LED)-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) imager that contains two wavelength LED excitation light sources and multiple filters to capture ex vivo oral tissue autofluorescence images. Compared with conventional means of oral cancer diagnosis, the LIAF imager is a handier, faster, and more highly reliable solution. The compact design with a tiny probe allows clinicians to easily observe autofluorescence images of hidden areas located in concave deep oral cavities. The ex vivo trials conducted in Taiwan present the design and prototype of the portable LIAF imager used for analyzing 31 patients with 221 measurement points. Using the normalized factor of normal tissues under the excitation source with 365 nm of the central wavelength and without the bandpass filter, the results revealed that the sensitivity was larger than 84%, the specificity was not smaller than over 76%, the accuracy was about 80%, and the area under curve of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was achieved at about 87%, respectively. The fact shows the LIAF spectroscopy has the possibilities of ex vivo diagnosis and noninvasive examinations for oral cancer.

  20. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Kazanowska-Dygdała

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. Material and Methods The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. Results In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients. The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions.

  1. Oral cancer overexpressed 1 (ORAOV 1): A regulator for cell growth and tumor angiogenesis in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qianming Chen; Min Zhou; Lu Jiang; Xin Zeng; Hanshuo Yang; Zhi Wang; Jun Shen; Jingping Bai; Yuanyuan Zhang; Feng Gao

    2008-01-01

    @@ Purposes: Oral cancer overexpressed 1 (ORAOV 1) is a novel gene locating at chromosome band 11q13. Recent studies have suggested its role as a candidate oncogene in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and its prognostic value for patients with OSCC.

  2. Oral cancer preventive campaigns: are we reaching the real target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Paladino Nemoto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral cavity malignant neoplasms have a high mortality rate. For this reason, preventive campaigns have been developed, both to educate the population and to diagnose lesions at an early stage. However, there are studies that contest the validity of these endeavors, principally because the target audience of the campaigns may not conform to the group at highest risk for oral malignancy. Objective: To describe the profile of patients who avail themselves of the preventive campaign, identify the presence of oral lesions in that population, and compare that data with the epidemiological profile of patients with oral cancer. Methods: Cross-sectional historical cohort study performed by analysis of epidemiological data of the campaign "Abra a Boca para a Saúde" collected in the years from 2008 to 2013. Results: In the years analyzed, 11,965 people were treated and 859 lesions were diagnosed, all benign. There was a female predominance (52.7%, with mean age of 44 years (±15.4 years; 26% were smokers and 29% reported alcohol consumption. It is known that the group at highest risk to develop oral cancer is 60to 70-year-old men, who are alcoholic smokers. Conclusion: The population that seeks preventive campaigns is not the main risk group for the disease. This fact explains the low number of lesions and the lack of cancer detection.

  3. Bionutrition and oral cancer in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwonwu, C O; Meeks, V I

    1995-01-01

    Tobacco (smoking and smokeless) use and excessive consumption of alcohol are considered the main risk factors for oral cancer (ICD9 140-149). Conspicuous national and international variations in oral cancer incidence and mortality rates, as well as observations in migrant populations, raise the possibility that diet and nutritional status could be an important etiologic factor in oral carcinogenesis. As shown in this report, abuse of alcohol and tobacco has serious nutritional implications for the host, and generates increased production of reactive free radicals as well as eliciting immunosuppression. Maintenance of optimal competence of the immune system is critical for cancer surveillance. Active oxygen species and other reactive free radicals mediate phenotypic and genotypic alterations that lead from mutation to neoplasia. Consequently, the most widely used chemopreventive agents against oral cancer (e.g., vitamins A, E, C, and beta-carotene) are anti-oxidants/free radical scavengers. These anti-oxidants, both natural and synthetic, neutralize metabolic products (including reactive oxygen species), interfere with activation of procarcinogens, prevent binding of carcinogens to DNA, inhibit chromosome aberrations, restrain replication of the transformed cell, suppress actions of cancer promoters, and may even induce regression of precancerous oral lesions such as leukoplakia and erythroplakia. Malnutrition is characterized by marked tissue depletion of anti-oxidant nutrients, including GSH (gamma-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine), a key cellular anti-oxidant as well as a modulator of T-cell activation. GSH or its precursor cysteine inhibits activation of the nuclear transcription factor kB(NFkB), and has been shown to be protective against chemically induced oral cancer and leukoplakia. Alcohol-, tobacco-, and/or malnutrition-induced immunosuppression promotes impaired salivary gland function and oral mucosal immunity, a prominent reduction in the number of helper CD4

  4. Gene Therapy In Oral Cancer : An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaram Choudhary

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The treatment and prevention of oral cancer is one of the major hurdles in the field ofcancer. Gene therapy is one of the recent advances in this field to tackle this hurdle with promisingprospects. This overview introduces the reader into the basic idea of gene therapy, types of genetherapy and the various modes of introduction of therapeutic gene into the cancer affected cell.

  5. 口腔癌患者血清核磁共振代谢组学研究%Metabonomic studies of serum obtained from oral cancer patients using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄奇骏; 姚婕; 黎玉君; 翁合妹; 龚嘉欣; 丘翠环; 杨永霞

    2013-01-01

    Objective To research the metabolite compositions of the serum samples from oral cancer patients by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based metabonomics. Methods NMR 1H spectra were measured for serum samples from 10 healthy volunteers and 10 oral cancer patients. The spectra data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) to reveal the metabonomic profiles of serum from oral cancer patients and the corresponding biochemical changes. Results There were obvious metabonomic differences between healthy volunteers and oral cancer patients which were highlighted by the increased levels in amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, valine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, his-tidine), glutamate,glycoprotein, methylamine, dimethylamine and glucose, together with the decreased levels of lactate and choline in oral cancer patients. Conclusion The results show that the metabonome of serum from oral cancer patients differ markedly from that of the healthy volunteers, which indicates that serum NMR 'H spectroscopy in conjunction with PCA offers an efficient tool for the diagnosis of oral cancer.%目的 应用核磁共振代谢组学方法研究口腔癌患者血清代谢组的特征及其变化.方法健康人血清(健康组,10例)和口腔癌患者血清(口腔癌组,10例)样本,采用BRUKER 500 MHz 超导核磁共振波谱仪进行检测,运用PCA分析方法,研究口腔癌患者血清代谢组的特征,探讨相关生化过程的改变.结果健康组与口腔癌组患者血清代谢谱有不同的代谢特征.口腔癌患者血清中氨基酸(亮氨酸、异亮氨酸、缬氨酸、酪氨酸、苯丙氨酸、组氨酸),谷氨酸、糖蛋白、甲胺和二甲胺、葡萄糖的含量是升高的,而乳酸和胆碱的含量降低.结论根据血清代谢物的变化可以区分健康人和口腔癌患者.这种基于核磁共振氢谱的代谢组学方法可为口腔癌的诊断提供可靠代谢依据.

  6. Oral cancer incidence and survival rates in the Republic of Ireland, 1994-2009.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ali, Hala

    2016-12-20

    Oral cancer is a significant public health problem world-wide and exerts high economic, social, psychological, and physical burdens on patients, their families, and on their primary care providers. We set out to describe the changing trends in incidence and survival rates of oral cancer in Ireland between 1994 and 2009.

  7. Oral rehabilitation of segmental mandibulectomy patient with osseointegrated dental implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical management of oral cancer lesions results in explicit aesthetic and functional disfigurement, including facial deformity, loss of hard and soft tissue, impaired speech, swallowing and mastication, which modify the patient′s self-image and quality-of-life. Recent advances in head and neck reconstruction techniques and dental implant based prosthetic rehabilitation may significantly improve the quality-of-life and self-esteem for such post-surgery patients. This clinical report describes rehabilitation of oral cancer patient having segmental mandibulectomy with implant-supported fixed partial denture.

  8. The effect of a calcium phosphate mouth rinse on (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, M. A.; Burlage, F. R.; Spijkervet, F. K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Promising results of a calcium phosphate (CP) mouth rinse on reduced severity of oral mucositis have been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a CP mouth rinse on the frequency, duration and severity of (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in patients with h

  9. The effect of a calcium phosphate mouth rinse on (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, M. A.; Burlage, F. R.; Spijkervet, F. K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Promising results of a calcium phosphate (CP) mouth rinse on reduced severity of oral mucositis have been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a CP mouth rinse on the frequency, duration and severity of (chemo) radiation induced oral mucositis in patients with h

  10. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegner, Thorsten; Teriete, Peter; Hoefert, Sebastian; Krimmel, Michael; Munz, Adelheid; Reinert, Siegmar

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Material and Methods Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. Results ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. Conclusions ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, hormone receptor. PMID:27475696

  11. First-in-Human study of CH5132799, an Oral Class I PI3K Inhibitor, Studying Toxicity, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics, in Patients with Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagden, Sarah; Olmin, Aurelius; Josephs, Debra; Stavraka, Chara; Zivi, Andrea; Pinato, David J.; Anthoney, Alan; Decordova, Shaun; Swales, Karen; Riisnaes, Ruth; Pope, Lorna; Noguchi, Kohei; Shiokawa, Rie; Inatani, Michiyasu; Prince, Jenny; Jones, Keith; Twelves, Chris; Spicer, James; Banerji, Udai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This Phase I dose-escalation study investigated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and preliminary clinical activity of CH5132799. Patients and Methods Patients with metastatic solid tumors were eligible for the study. CH5132799 was administered orally once daily (QD) or twice daily (BID) in 28-day cycles. Results Thirty-eight patients with solid tumors received CH5132799 at 2-96 mg QD or 48-72 mg BID. The MTD was 48 mg on the BID schedule but was not reached on the QD schedule. DLTs were grade 3 elevated liver function tests (LFT), grade 3 fatigue, grade 3 encephalopathy, grade 3 diarrhea and grade 3 diarrhea with grade 3 stomatitis; all DLTs were reversible. Most drug-related adverse events were grade 1/2. Diarrhea (34%) and nausea (32%) were the most common events. Mean Cmax and AUC0-24 in steady state at MTD were 175 ng/ml and 1,550 ng·hr/ml respectively, consistent with efficacious exposure based on preclinical modelling. Reduction in SUVmax with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was observed in five of seven patients at MTD. A patient with PIK3CA-mutated clear cell carcinoma of the ovary achieved a partial response by GCIG CA125 criteria and further, a heavily pre-treated patient with triple negative breast cancer had marked improvement in her cutaneous skin lesions lasting 6 cycles. Conclusion CH5132799 is well tolerated at the MTD dose 48 mg BID. At this dose the drug had a favorable PK and PD profile and preliminary evidence of clinical activity. PMID:25231405

  12. Candida albicans infection in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čanković Miloš

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Systemic candidiasis in intensive care units remains an improtant problem due to antifungal resistance. Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis and they more frequent have prior fungi colonization. Due to identification of specific risk factors predisposing to fungal infection in order to threat such patients the aim of this study was to determine the presence of Candida species in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and compare it to the control subjects (patients with benign oral mucosal lesions. Methods. A total number of 30 consecutive oral cancer examined patients were included in this prospective study (24 men and 6 women with a mean age of 61.47 years, range 41-81 years. The control group consisted of 30 consecutive patients with histologically proven benign oral mucosal lesions (16 men and 14 women with a mean age of 54.53 years, range 16- 83 years. The samples for mycological examination were obtained by using sterile cotton swabs from the cancer lesion surface and in the patients of the control group from the benign mucosal lesion surface. Samples were inoculated in Sabouraud' dextrose agar. For identification purposes, Mackenzie germ tube test was performend on all isolates. Results. The prevalence of Candida was significantly higher in oral cancer patients than in control subjects (χ2 = 5.455, p = 0.020. Candida was found on nine of the 30 cancer surfaces; 5 (16.7% were identified as non-albicans Candida and 4 (13.3% as Candida albicans. In the control group, only Candida albicans was isolated from 2 (6.7% patients. In this study, no statistically significant differences in the presence of Candida species was found with respect to gender, age, smoking, alcohol consumption, wearing of dental protheses and the site of cancer lesion. Conclusion. The increased prevalence of yeasts on the surfaces of oral carcinoma indicates a need for their

  13. A systematic review of viral infections associated with oral involvement in cancer patients : a spotlight on Herpesviridea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elad, Sharon; Zadik, Yehuda; Hewson, Ian; Hovan, Allan; Correa, M. Elvira P.; Logan, Richard; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the literature for the prevalence of and interventions for oral viral infections and, based on scientific evidence, point to effective treatment protocols. Quality of life (QOL) and economic impact were assessed if available in the articles reviewed. Our search of the English

  14. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  15. Knowledge of Future Dental Practitioners towards Oral Cancer: Exploratory Findings from a Public University in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Bin Zakaria, Nazrin; Jamshed, Shazia Qasim

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess knowledge and awareness of oral cancer in the early identification of risk factors among undergraduate dental students. Methods. A total of 162 undergraduate (third, fourth, and fifth year) dental students at International Islamic University, Malaysia, were approached to participate in the study, and those who agreed were administered. A 9-item pretested questionnaire contains questions on oral examination, oral cancer risk factors, and requests for further information. Descriptive statistics were conducted using chi-square testing. Results. The response rate of the study was 70.3% (114/162), with 26 (22.8%) males and 88 (77.2%) females. All undergraduate dental students were familiar with examining the oral mucosa of their patients and most were likely to advise patients about the risk factors for developing oral cancer (98.2%). Nearly one-third (32.4%) of students reported examining patients with oral lesions as early signs for oral cancer (P < 0.001) and nearly 70% agreed that they did not have sufficient knowledge regarding the prevention and detection of oral cancer (P < 0.001). In addition, more than 95.6% agreed that there is a need for additional information/teaching regarding oral cancer. Further, 61.3% and 14.1% identified tobacco smoking and drinking alcohol as major risk factors for developing oral cancer. Conclusion. This study demonstrated lack of awareness about risk factors among undergraduate dental students regarding oral cancer. Reinforcing awareness and enhancing the benefits of early detection on prevention of oral cancer should be done through training and/or educational intervention.

  16. Cytologic and DNA-Cytometric Early Diagnosis of Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten W. Remmerbach

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this prospective study was to report on the diagnostic accuracy of conventional oral exfoliative cytology taken from white‐spotted, ulcerated or other suspicious oral lesions in our clinic. In addition we checked DNA‐image cytometry as an adjuvant diagnostic tool. Our hypothesis is that DNA‐aneuploidy is a sensitive and specific marker for the early identification of tumor cells in oral brushings. Study design. 251 cytological diagnoses obtained from exfoliative smears of 181 patients from macroscopically suspicious lesions of the oral mucosa and from clinically seemingly benign oral lesions which were exisiced for establishing histological diagnoses were compared with histological and/or clinical follow‐ups of the respective patients. Additionally nuclear DNA‐contents were measured after Feulgen restaining using a TV image analysis system. Results. Sensitivity of our cytological diagnosis on oral smears for the detection of cancer cells was 94.6%, specificity 99.5%, positive predictive value 98.1% and negative predictive value 98.5%. DNA‐aneuploidy was assumed if abnormal DNA‐stemlines or cells with DNA‐content greater 9c were observed. On this basis the prevalence of DNA‐aneuploidy in smears of oral squamous cell carcinomas in situ or invasive carcinomas was 96.4%. Sensitivity of DNA‐aneuploidy in oral smears for the detection of cancer cells was 96.4%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100% and negative 99.0%. The combination of both techniques increased the sensivity to 98.2%, specificity to 100%, positive predictive value to 100% and negative to 99.5%. Conclusions. Brush cytology of all visible oral lesions, if they are clinically considered as suspicious for cancer, are an easily practicable, cheap, non‐invasive, painless, safe and accurate screening method for detection of oral precancerous lesions, carcinoma in situ or invasive squamous cell carcinoma in all stages. We conclude that

  17. Knowledge and attitudes of Saudi dental undergraduates on oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujan, Omar; Alzoghaibi, Ibrahim; Azzeghaiby, Saleh; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Tarakji, Bassel; Hanouneh, Salah; Idress, Majdy; Alenzi, Faris Q; Iqbal, Mazhar; Taifour, Shahama

    2014-12-01

    Oral cancer awareness among future dental practitioners may have an impact on the early detection and prevention of oral cancer. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken to assess the current knowledge of future Saudi dentists on oral cancer and their opinions on oral cancer prevention. A pretested questionnaire was sent to 550 undergraduate dental students in the fourth, fifth, and sixth year of the Al-Farabi College for Dentistry and Nursing, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Questions relating to knowledge of oral cancer, risk factors, and opinions on oral cancer prevention and practices were posed. Four hundred seventy-nine students returned the questionnaire (87.1 %). Eighty-one percent of respondents correctly answered questions relating to oral cancer awareness. Eighty-seven percent of respondents felt confident in performing a systematic oral examination to detect changes consistent with oral malignancy. Interestingly, 57 % of respondents had seen the use of oral cancer diagnostics aids. Thirty-seven percent of respondents felt inadequately trained to provide tobacco and alcohol cessation advice. There is a need to reinforce the undergraduate dental curriculum with regards to oral cancer education; particularly in its prevention and early detection. Incorporating the use of oral cancer diagnostic aids should be made mandatory.

  18. [Oral cancer surgery and oral cutaneous fistulas: risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gyl Henrique A; Crivelaro, André Luiz Soares; de Oliveira, Benedito Valdecir; Pedruzzi, Paola Andrea G; de Freitas, Rosyane Rena

    2010-04-01

    To quantify the oral cutaneous fistulae after surgery and to identify possible risk factors. A retrospective study, interesting patients that were submitted to surgery, with a two years minimum post-operative follow up. The considered variables were: sex, concomitant diseases, tabacco and alcohol use, the anesthesic and pulmonary risks, clinical stage, cervical linphadenectomy, pre or postoperative radiotherapy, accidents during the surgery, wound infection and or hematoma, pulmonary infection, surgery and reconstruction extension. In 159 patients, oral cutaneous fistulae occurred in 48 patients (30,3%): Patients stage T1 in 26,6 %,T2 in 1,8 %,T3 in 16%, and T4 in 40,3% (p=0,0138). The cases N+ developed fistulae in 22.9%, (N2c with 42,8%, (p=0,0136), those with preoperative radiotherapy in 63,6% (p=0,0346) Those with wound infection in 47,3% (p=0,0146), and those with wound deiscense in 53,7 % (p=0,0030). The fistulae rate was of 60% in the regional mucocutaneous flaps reconstruction cases, 39,2% in the myocutaneous ones and 12,5% of microsurgery ones (p=0,0286). The general rate of oral cutaneous fistulae was 30,3%. The significant factors were: T stage, cervical linphadenectomy, pre or postoperative radiotherapy, wound infection and deiscense, and the use of flaps.

  19. Oral bisphosphonates and colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiken, Pia; Vestergaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are widely used as the main treatment for osteoporosis. In vitro and animal studies suggest that use of BPs may have a potential for colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention. Safety and efficacy in terms of osteoporosis prevention have only been evaluated in randomized controlled ...

  20. Clinical utility of Ancer 20 injection in oral cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Preventive effect on the occurrence of stomatitis and peripheral leukopenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirita, Tadaaki; Sugimura, Masahito [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    We conducted a comparative study to investigate the effects of polysaccharides extracted from M. tuberculosis strain Aoyama B (Ancer 20 injection) on blood cell counts and objective symptoms in oral cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. During the period of chemoradiotherapy, the number of peripheral RBC, leukocytes, platelets, and hemoglobin values in both a group treated with chemoradiotherapy and Ancer 20 injection (Group Z) and a group treated only with chemoradiotherapy (Group R) changed within the normal ranges of physiological variation. However, the peripheral lymphocyte count in Group Z fell to 67.2% and 65.7% of the pretreatment count, against 51.3% and 41.5% in Group R after two and three weeks after the initiation of the treatment, respectively. The reductions in counts were significantly mitigated in Group Z (2 weeks: p=0.040; 3 weeks: p=0.008). On the contrary, the delayed onset and lower severeness of stomatitis and fever were observed in the patients of Group Z. These results suggest that Ancer 20 injection during chemoradiotherapy reduces host immune function. (author)

  1. Suplementos orais artesanais desenvolvidos para pacientes com câncer: análise descritiva Homemade oral supplements for patients with cancer: descriptive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Garófolo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a elaboração de oito formulações de suplementos artesanais orais desenvolvidos para aumentar o consumo de energia, proteínas e micronutrientes de pacientes com câncer, analisar seu valor nutricional e avaliar a apreciação do sabor, testando dois tipos de lipídeos. MÉTODOS: Os suplementos foram desenvolvidos com base em quatro ingredientes alimentares: leite, ovos, açúcares e óleos para recuperação nutricional. As formulações foram calculadas pelo programa de apoio à nutrição NUTWIN e seu valor nutricional foi comparado às recomendações para pacientes com câncer para macronutrientes e às Ingestões Diárias Recomendadas para micronutrientes. Por meio de degustação, os suplementos foram testados para verificação do sabor quando preparados com óleo ou margarina. RESULTADOS: A quantidade de energia por mililitro variou de 1,35 a 2,17kcal, tendo 39% a 59% de carboidrato, 11% a 13% de proteína e 30% a 49% de lipídeo, fornecendo em média 43% e 77% da recomendação de energia e proteína, respectivamente. Vitaminas C e K, ácido fólico e manganês apresentaram 15% de adequação em relação às recomendações. Com relação ao sabor, 78% dos pacientes que experimentaram com óleo e 85% dos que experimentaram com margarina relataram sabor bom, sem diferença estatística entre os tipos de suplementos. CONCLUSÃO: A avaliação do sabor demonstrou que a maioria dos pacientes considerou o suplemento com sabor bom. Essas taxas foram superiores quando testados com margarina. Os resultados sugerem que o uso de suplementos orais artesanais pode ser uma alternativa viável em situações onde não há recursos suficientes para aquisição dos industrializados.OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to describe the development of eight formulations of homemade oral supplements that propose to increase the energy, protein and micronutrient intakes of patients with cancer, analyze its nutritional value and assess its

  2. Depression and anxiety in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate symptoms of depression and anxiety in the patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). METHODS: 76 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma participated in this program. All patients were rated with the self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and the self-rating depression scale (SDS). The mean scores of SAS and SDS were compared to those scores of the Norm of Chinese people. In addition, the different treatment results of the patients with different levels of anxiety and depression were studied. Further, the number of patients of SAS, SDS with more than 50 score were compared between primary cancer patients and recurrent cancer patients. RESULTS: The scores of SAS, SDS and the number of patients with more than 50 score in the patients group were obviously higher than those in Chinese Norm (P<0.01).The levels of anxiety and depression in 32 patients with recurrent cancer were more severe than those of 44 patients with primary cancer. The patients with anxiety and/or depression showed poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: Anxiety and depression are common symptoms in patients with OSCC and have negative effects on the prognosis, thus the psychological intervention for the patients must be carried out.

  3. Randomized DoubleBlind PlaceboControlled Trial of Propolis for Oral Mucositis in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AkhavanKarbassi, Mohammad Hasan; Yazdi, Mohammad Forat; Ahadian, Hakimeh; SadrAbad, Maryam Jalili

    2016-01-01

    Propolis based preparations have a wide range of applications in various specialties of dentistry. The aim of this clinical trial was to test the efficacy of propolis as a mouthwash in the reduction of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis (OM) in a single center. In this randomised, controlled study patients undergoing chemotherapy were included consecutively and randomised to an experimental group receiving propolis mouthwash (n = 20) and a control group receiving diluted water (n=20). Oral mucositis, erythema and eating and drink ability were assessed at baseline and after 3 and 7 days using the World Health Organization (WHO) scale and the oral mucositis assessment scale (OMAS). There were significant differences in OM, wound and erythema in propolis group compared to placebo, but no significant difference in eating and drink ability. However, it was interesting that 65% of the patients in the propolis group were completely healed at day 7 of the trial. No significant adverse events were reported by the patients. This study found that oral care with propolis as mouthwash for patients undergoing chemotherapy is an effective intervention to improve oral health. Our findings shouldlencourage health practitioners to apply propolis mouth rinse for the oral care of patients under chemotherapy.

  4. Randomized Double-blind Placebo-controlled Trial of Celecoxib for Oral Mucositis in Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalla, Rajesh V.; Choquette, Linda E.; Curley, Kathleen F.; Dowsett, Robert J.; Feinn, Richard S.; Hegde, Upendra P.; Pilbeam, Carol C.; Salner, Andrew L.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Peterson, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Oral mucositis (OM) is a painful complication of radiation therapy (RT) for head and neck cancer (H&NC). OM can compromise nutrition, require opioid analgesics and hospitalization for pain control, and lead to treatment interruptions. Based on the role of inflammatory pathways in OM pathogenesis, we investigated effect of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition on severity and morbidity of OM. Methods In this double-blind placebo-controlled trial, 40 H&NC patients were randomized to daily use of 200 mg celecoxib or placebo, for the duration of RT. Clinical OM, normalcy of diet, pain scores, and analgesic use were assessed 2–3 times/week by blinded investigators during the 6–7 week RT period, using validated scales. Results Twenty subjects were randomized to each arm, which were similar with respect to tumor location, radiation dose, and concomitant chemotherapy. In both arms, mucositis and pain scores increased over course of RT. Intention-to-treat analyses demonstrated no significant difference in mean Oral Mucositis Assessment Scale (OMAS) scores at 5000 cGy (primary endpoint). There was also no difference between the two arms in mean OMAS scores over the period of RT, mean worst pain scores, mean normalcy of diet scores, or mean daily opioid medication use in IV morphine equivalents. There were no adverse events attributed to celecoxib use. Conclusions Daily use of a selective COX-2 inhibitor, during period of RT for H&NC, did not reduce the severity of clinical OM, pain, dietary compromise or use of opioid analgesics. These findings also have implications for celecoxib use in H&NC treatment regimens (NCT00698204). PMID:25151488

  5. Gene Therapy For Oral Cancer - Journey To A New Horizon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Kabiraj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have been golden years for the genetics of cancer. It has become clear through the work of countless laboratory groups that both inherited and sporadic cancers arise through defects or misregulations of their genomes. Despite advances in surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the survival of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma have not significantly improved over the past several decades. Thus, an entirely new approach to its treatment utilizing genetic aids has evolved. The majority of the head and neck cancers comprise of Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. The traditional therapies for the management of cancer and their various modifications including surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have not refined the survival rates yet. Gene therapy represents a fundamentally new mode for the effective treatment of a disease. It essentially consists of the introduction of the genetic material into the target cells of an individual without producing toxic effects on surrounding tissues. The essence of gene therapy is attributed to the replacement of the defective gene with a normal gene, thus restoring the lost function in the patient’s body. The aim of this review is to analyze the different modalities of gene therapy currently used to manage precancerous and cancerous lesions of the oral cavity.

  6. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS AMONG ROMANIAN HIV PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela ARBUNE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to evaluate the oral health problems on HIV youth patients from Galati. Materials and method. A cross-sectional study assessed 102 patients with mean age 22. The most frequent oral manifestations on HIV infected youth under ART are erythema marginatum, periodontitis, candidosis and hypertrophia gingivalis. Results and discussion. Dental decay-missing-filled index on HIV patients is high. Viral HIV replication, long time pediatric exposure on HIV, male sex, smoking, and oral inflamation are related to dental poor condition. Exodontic therapy is comon among HIV youth. However, persistence of some associated oral infections is related to individual or behavioral risk factors, but also to some newly found mechanisms, such as disfunctional immune reconstruction. Seeing to antiretroviral treatment, the severity and frequency of oral manifestations decreased among HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment. Conclusions. Developing medical, social and educational programs is imperative for improving the oral health of HIV youth of Galati.

  7. Prophylactic and therapeutic management of oral complications related to chemotherapy and radiotherapy: role of dental oncology in cancer patient supportive therapy; Manejo profilatico e terapeutico das complicacoes orais associadas a quimioterapia e radioterapia: o papel da odontologia oncologica na terapia de suporte ao paciente com cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffarah, Henry Bittar [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Oncologia. Servico de Medicina Bucal]. E-mail: hbittar@terra.com.br

    2008-07-01

    Cancer patients under treatment of head and neck tumors as well as those under chemotherapy for hematologic cancers, such as lymphoma and leukemia, and those about to receive bone marrow grafts, do require preventive oral and dental care (prior to cancer treatment), as well as oral care during and after oncological treatment. Furthermore, chemo and radiotherapy-related adverse effects are also common in patients with other types of cancer, with an estimated frequency of 10 per cent in adjuvant chemotherapy (QT), 40 per cent in primary QT, 80 per cent in bone marrow transplantation, in which myeloablative regimens are introduced, and 100 per cent in head and neck radiotherapy, in which the targeted fields are those of the oral cavity. The dentist, specialized in dental oncology, works within the multidisciplinary team at the great centers of cancer treatment, contributing to improve the quality of life of these patients. The present review of literature and of the Guidelines for Management of Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head and Neck Radiation (US National Cancer Institute) aims to inform the clinical oncologist, the radio therapist, and other professionals about the resources available in Oral Supportive Therapy in both the prevention and managements of such complications. (author)

  8. [Efficacy of oral cavity care in preventing stomatitis (mucositis) in cancer chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshino, Miki; Sakai, Chie; Ogura, Takafumi; Kawasaki, Akiko; Fukuzato, Fumiko; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro

    2009-03-01

    Stomatitis is a common side effect during cancer chemotherapy. We hypothesized that careful oral cavity care using patient guidance and cleanliness index prevents stomatitis in cancer chemotherapy. We introduced oral care patient guidance including teaching good brushing methods, O'Leary's Plaque Control Record(PCR)as a cleanliness index, and Eilers' Oral Assessment Guide(OAG)as an overall index after April 2006. We evaluated the incidence of stomatitis in 20 patients(10 patients between April 2004 to May 2006 and 10 patients after April 2006)with esophageal cancer who received chemotherapy including 5-FU and CDDP. Patients receiving brushing training after 2006 were evaluated regarding cleanliness of their oral cavities using PCR index and OAG index. The rates of stomatitis were 60%(6/10)and 40%(4/10)before and after the introduction of oral care patient guidance. The average of PCR index decreased from 82% to 46% after teaching good brushing method to the patients. The average of OAG index after brushing training was 9.14 which was better score compared with previous reports. Introduction of oral care patient guidance decreased the incidence of stomatitis. Both PCR and OAG indexes were useful in evaluating the objective condition of the oral cavity and in sharing patients' information among a medical team. These indexes encouraged the patients to clean their oral cavities.

  9. Relationship of oral cancer with age, sex, site distribution and habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mandakini Mansukh; Pandya, Amrish N

    2004-04-01

    Many studies are carried out regarding age incidence, tobacco smoking and sites of oral cancer, but in Gujarat tobacco chewing in form of Gutkha is more common than smoking and start during preteen years. Tobacco chewing causing chronic inflammation, submucous fibrosis and oral cancer. This study was conducted on 504 patients to find out if there is increasing incidence of oral cancer in lower age group and its relation with sex as well which site was commonly affected. There was statistically significant increase in oral cancer in lower age group, and anatomically anterior part of oral cavity showed involvement in 61.32% of cases. Though males were affected more but female cases were 25%. So tobacco chewing has got detrimental effect on oral cavity.

  10. RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY IN ORAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahman Pally Balkishan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND To study the technical details involving commonly performed flap surgeries - Narayanan flap (forehead and scalp flap, Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous (PMMC flap and deltopectoral flap. MATERIALS AND METHODS It is a prospective study, which consisted of sample size of 30 in a period of 2 years. All the patients who presented to OGH with symptoms and signs of carcinoma cheek were diagnosed and confirmed by edge biopsy, FNAC of nodes in neck, x-ray mandible, orthopantomogram, liver function tests. RESULTS Out of the 30 patients, the malignant lesion was arising from alveolar ridge in 2 (6.7%, buccal mucosa in 16 (53.3%, floor of the mouth in 2 (6.7%, hard palate in 2 (6.7%, retromolar trigone in 1 (3.3%, lip in 3 (10% and tongue in 4 (13.3% patients. Highest number of patients were found to be in the age groups of 61-70 (40% and 51-60 (26.7% each. Median age is 64.3 years. Out of 30 cases in the study, 18 (60% were male and another 12 (40% were females. About 66.7% of the patients indulged in chewing tobacco, 13.35 in tobacco chewing and smoking and about 20% in tobacco chewing along with smoking and alcohol consumption. Out of 30 cases in the study, 20 (66.7% presented with ulcer, 8 (26.7% with ulcer and swelling while 2 (6.6% presented with trismus. Stage IV (40% were more in number. Histopathology report confirms well-differentiated SCC in 80% and in this sample no specimen is poorly differentiated. All patients underwent wide local excision. Out of the 30 cases, 6 patients were stage I who did not undergo neck dissection. Maximum number of patients underwent hemimandibulectomy (53.3%, 20% of the patients did not undergo mandibulectomy. Maximum number of reconstructions were done with pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps+deltopectoral flap (PMMC+DP in 18 (60% cases .Out of the 24 cases in our study who underwent reconstruction with the flaps described above, marginal necrosis occurred in 2 (8.3% patients with PMMC+DP flaps while

  11. Challenges of the Oral Cancer Burden in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Russell Coelho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer ranks in the top three of all cancers in India, which accounts for over thirty per cent of all cancers reported in the country and oral cancer control is quickly becoming a global health priority. This paper provides a synopsis of the incidence of oral cancer in India by focusing on its measurement in cancer registries across the country. Based on the International Classification of Disease case definition adopted by the World Health Organisation, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer, this review systematically examines primary and secondary data where the incidence or prevalence of oral cancer is known to be directly reported. Variability in age-adjusted incidence with crude incidence is projected to increase by 2030. Challenges focus on measurement of disease incidence and disease-specific risk behavior, predominantly, alcohol, and tobacco use. Future research should be aimed at improving quality of data for early detection and prevention of oral cancer.

  12. Low energy laser in prevention of oral mucositis in patients receiving radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy in Pernambuco Cancer Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelner, Natalie; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de [Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil). Dept. of Clinics and Preventive Dentistry. Discipline of Oral Pathology]. E-mail: jlisboa72@hotmail.com

    2007-07-01

    Oral mucositis induced by antineoplastic therapy causes wide-range pain and discomfort resulting in decreased quality of life. The present study evaluated the benefits of low intensity laser and 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate in the prevention of oral mucositis induced by radiation, associated or not with chemotherapy, and considered degrees/severity, time of appearance of the lesions and functional loss. Eighty-four outpatients were considered and 49 were included in this study and divided into two groups: Group 1 received laser treatments in three stages, starting three days before treatment until the end of therapy. Group 2 was instructed to do daily mouth rinses with chlorhexidine gluconate. The prevalence of clinical mucositis was 49%, and of functional mucositis, 28.6%, when the two groups were considered together. This percentage was smaller in the laser group, 44% for the clinical mucositis group and 24% for the functional. The two protocols were well tolerated and showed benefits, mainly from the point of view of functionality, and delayed the onset and development of mucositis. (author)

  13. Cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil; oral cyclophosphamide; levamisole; or no adjuvant therapy for patients with high-risk, premenopausal breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlertsen, B.; Mouridsen, Henning Torbøl; Jensen, M.B.;

    2010-01-01

    .70 in the CMF arm (P = .01). The hazard ratio for death was 0.70 in both the C arm (P = .02) and the CMF arm (P = .02) at 10 years, and the overall survival (OS) benefit was maintained during 25 years of follow-up. No significant differences were observed in IDF5 or OS between the C arm and the CMF arm...... for 48 weeks (the levamisole arm), oral cyclophosphamide 130 mg/m(2) on Days 1 through 14 every 4 weeks for 12 cycles (the C arm), or oral cyclophosphamide 80 mg/m(2) on Days 1 through 14 plus methotrexate 30 mg/m(2) and fluorouracil 500 mg/m(2) intravenously on Days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 12 cycles...... (the CMF arm). RESULTS: The 10-year invasive disease-free survival (IDFS) rate was 38.6% in the control arm compared with 55.5% in the C arm, 48.8% in the CMF arm, and 35.2% in the levamisole arm. Compared with the control arm, the hazard ratio for an IDFS event was 0.62 in the C arm (P = .001) and 0...

  14. Cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil; oral cyclophosphamide; levamisole; or no adjuvant therapy for patients with high-risk, premenopausal breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlertsen, Bent Laursen; Mouridsen, Henning T; Jensen, Maj-Britt;

    2010-01-01

    .70 in the CMF arm (P = .01). The hazard ratio for death was 0.70 in both the C arm (P = .02) and the CMF arm (P = .02) at 10 years, and the overall survival (OS) benefit was maintained during 25 years of follow-up. No significant differences were observed in IDFS or OS between the C arm and the CMF arm...... for 48 weeks (the levamisole arm), oral cyclophosphamide 130 mg/m(2) on Days 1 through 14 every 4 weeks for 12 cycles (the C arm), or oral cyclophosphamide 80 mg/m(2) on Days 1 through 14 plus methotrexate 30 mg/m(2) and fluorouracil 500 mg/m(2) intravenously on Days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 12 cycles...... (the CMF arm). RESULTS: The 10-year invasive disease-free survival (IDFS) rate was 38.6% in the control arm compared with 55.5% in the C arm, 48.8% in the CMF arm, and 35.2% in the levamisole arm. Compared with the control arm, the hazard ratio for an IDFS event was 0.62 in the C arm (P = .001) and 0...

  15. Early preventive exercises versus usual care does not seem to reduce trismus in patients treated with radiotherapy for cancer in the oral cavity or oropharynx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdal, Nina; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Aadahl, Mette

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose. In head and neck cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy, we investigated the benefi ts and harms of an early exercise regime on trismus. Material and methods. Patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy were centrally randomised to exercises 5 – 6 times ...

  16. Retrospective Audit: Does Prior Assessment by Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Reduce the Risk of Osteonecrosis of The Jaw in Patients Receiving Bone-Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Cancers to the Skeleton?--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bruce; Ali, Sacha; Pati, Jhumur; Nargund, Vinod; Ali, Enamul; Cheng, Leo; Wells, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Men who receive bone-targeted therapy for metastatic prostate cancer are at increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Development of ONJ has been associated with the administration of bone-targeted therapies in association with other risk factors. ONJ can be distressing for a patient because it can cause pain, risk of jaw fracture, body image disturbance, difficultly eating, and difficulty maintaining good oral hygiene. The aim of this article is to report results of an audit of prior assessment by oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMFS) before initiation of bone-targeted therapies and whether it may reduce the risk of ONJ in patients receiving bone-targeted therapies for advanced cancers.

  17. PRESSING MORTALITY RATE THROUGH SCREENING oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. K. Widnyani Wulan Laksmi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Based on World Health Organization (WHO data, oral cancer is one of malignancy with the highest mortality. In USA, there are more than 30.000 new cases every year. We can find many risk factors of oral cancer in our daily living. Moreover, it’s easy to find the main risk factors in our society, they are smoking, alcohol consumption, tobacco consumtion, viral infection, and bad oral hygiene. For the early stadium, Five-years survival rate is about 82% and 61% for all stadium. But, more than 50% of oral cancer has been distributed (metastatic regionally and also into the other organ far away from the oral itself when it’s detected. It will decrease 5-years survival rate to be less than 50%. So that, it’s really important to detect the oral cancer at the earlier stadium. Screening is the way to find the earlier stadium. Screening is done by some methods, start from the anamnesis, physical examination, toluidine blue staining, endoscopy, cytology, telomerase examination, and also PET-scan if it’s possible (because of the financial reasons. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  18. Prognostic value of DNA ploidy status in patients with oral leukoplakia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, J.F.; Brakenhoff, R.H.; Broeckaert, M.A.M.; Beliën, J.A.M.; Leemans, C.R.; Bloemena, E.; van der Waal, I.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is a potentially malignant disorder that will develop into oral cancer at an estimated rate of 1-2% per year. Aim of the present study is to assess the possible predictive value of DNA ploidy for malignant progression of oral leukoplakia. A cohort of 62 leukoplakia patients was stud

  19. Management of Patients with Oral Candidiasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Reibel, Jesper; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidal infections are medically treated with antifungal agents. In the fungal cell membrane, steroid ergosterol is the target of the antifungals on the market, but similarity with the human cell membrane may cause host toxicity and unintended reactions. Management of oral candidiasis depends...... in particular in patients with recurrent oral candidiasis. This risk can be reduced if different types of antifungal drugs are used over time or are combined. This chapter focuses on antifungal treatment of the medically compromised patient with oral candidiasis by highlighting the advantages and disadvantages...

  20. Alimentos contra el cáncer oral Foods against the oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ros Lluch

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El cáncer oral representa el 5% de todas las neoplasias y el 30% de los cánceres de cabeza y cuello. El porcentaje de supervivencia a los 5 años es de tan sólo el 25%, por lo que el diagnóstico y tratamiento precoces pueden salvar muchas vidas. La mayoría de los cánceres se relacionan con factores externos al organismo (tabaco, alcohol, betel, dieta y radiaciones solares, principalmente, que pueden modificarse o evitarse, es decir, prevenibles. Alrededor del 35% de los casos de cáncer están relacionados con la alimentación. Por este motivo, es importante que los profesionales de la salud informen a sus pacientes acerca de las enormes posibilidades profilácticas de la dieta. El objetivo de este trabajo de actualización bibliográfica es destacar la importancia de una alimentación saludable para la prevención del cáncer oral.Oral cancer means 5% of all malignancies and 30% of head and neck cancers. The percentage of survival at 5 years is only 25%; therefore, diagnosis and early treatment can save many lives. Most cancers are related to factors outside the body (mainly tobacco, alcohol, betel, diet and solar radiation that can be modified or avoided, i.e., they are preventable. About 35% of cancer cases are related to food. For this reason, it is important that health professionals inform their patients about the huge prophylactic potential of diet. The aim of this work of update is to highlight the importance of a healthy diet in order to prevent the oral cancer.

  1. Efficacy and safety of rebamipide liquid for chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, T; Ogawa, T; Takahashi, S; Okami, K; Fujii, T; Tanaka, K; Iwae, S; Ota, I; Ueda, T; Monden, N; Matsuura, K; Kojima, H; Ueda, S; Sasaki, K; Fujimoto, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Beppu, T; Nishimori, H; Hirano, S; Naka, Y; Matsushima, Y; Fujii, M; Tahara, M

    2017-05-05

    Recent preclinical and phase I studies have reported that rebamipide decreased the severity of chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with oral cancer. This placebo-controlled randomized phase II study assessed the clinical benefit of rebamipide in reducing the incidence of severe chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Patients aged 20-75 years with HNC who were scheduled to receive chemoradiotherapy were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive rebamipide 2% liquid, rebamipide 4% liquid, or placebo. The primary endpoint was the incidence of grade ≥ 3 oral mucositis determined by clinical examination and assessed by central review according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events version 3.0. Secondary endpoints were the time to onset of grade ≥ 3 oral mucositis and the incidence of functional impairment (grade ≥ 3) based on the evaluation by the Oral Mucositis Evaluation Committee. From April 2014 to August 2015, 97 patients with HNC were enrolled, of whom 94 received treatment. The incidence of grade ≥ 3 oral mucositis was 29% and 25% in the rebamipide 2% and 4% groups, respectively, compared with 39% in the placebo group. The proportion of patients who did not develop grade ≥ 3 oral mucositis by day 50 of treatment was 57.9% in the placebo group, whereas the proportion was 68.0% in the rebamipide 2% group and 71.3% in the rebamipide 4% group. The incidences of adverse events potentially related to the study drug were 16%, 26%, and 13% in the placebo, rebamipide 2%, and rebamipide 4% groups, respectively. There was no significant difference in treatment compliance among the groups. The present phase II study suggests that mouth washing with rebamipide may be effective and safe for patients with HNC receiving chemoradiotherapy, and 4% liquid is the optimal dose of rebamipide. ClinicalTrials.gov under the identifier NCT02085460 (the date of trial registration: March

  2. Role of Dental Profession in Oral Cancer Prevention and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Q A; Awan, K H

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of oral cancer is increasing worldwide. Malignant neoplasms of the mouth and pharynx have been rated as the 10th most common cancer in men and 7th in women, though geographical variations exist.(1)Generally, in a society, oral cancer is not properly understood. The sign and symptoms are frequently overlooked in the initial stages when it is responsive to treat.

  3. CE: Human Papillomavirus-Related Oral Cancers: The Nurse's Role in Mitigating Stigma and Dispelling Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Anne

    2017-01-01

    : The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral cancers has been rising, the cancers occurring in adults at a younger age than HPV-negative oral cancers typically do and in men more often than women. Patients who are diagnosed often don't understand the disease's etiology. Because HPV is sexually transmitted, diagnosis with an HPV-related oral cancer may prompt feelings of shame, embarrassment, and guilt. There are currently three vaccines for HPV. It's essential for nurses to educate patients on HPV transmission and HPV-related oral cancer, thus helping to mitigate the stigma and dispel myths, and to promote vaccination in at-risk populations, including children and young adults.

  4. Monascus purpureus-fermented products and oral cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2012-03-01

    Tobacco and alcohol consumption have been reported as major factors for the development of oral cancer. Edible fungi of the Monascus species have been used as traditional Chinese medicine in eastern Asia for several centuries. Monascus-fermented products have many functional secondary metabolites, including monacolin K, citrinin, ankaflavin, and monascin. In several recent studies performed in our laboratory, these secondary metabolites have shown anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-tumor activities. Many published studies have shown the efficacy of Monascus-fermented products in the prevention of numerous types of cancer. The current article discusses and provides evidence to support that Monascus-fermented metabolites may be developed as painting drugs for the mouth to prevent or cure oral carcinogenesis. This is a novel therapeutic approach focusing on tumor growth attenuation to improve patient survival and quality of life.

  5. Applications of exfoliative cytology in the diagnosis of oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz-Freitas, Márcio; García-García, Abel; Crespo-Abelleira, Antonio; Martins-Carneiro, José Luis; Gándara-Rey, José Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Exfoliative cytology is a simple non-aggressive technique that is well accepted by the patient, and that is therefore an attractive option for the early diagnosis of oral cancer, including epithelial atypias and especially squamous cell carcinoma. However, traditional exfoliative cytology methods show low sensitivity (i.e. a high proportion of false negatives) in the diagnosis of these pathologies. This low sensitivity is attributable to various factors, including inadequate sampling, procedural errors, and the need for subjective interpretation of the findings. More recently, the continuing development of automated cytomorphometric methods, DNA content determination, tumour marker detection, and diverse molecular-level analyses has contributed to renewed interest in exfoliative cytology procedures for the diagnosis of oral cancer. The present study briefly reviews developments in these areas.

  6. Botulinum toxin A for oral cavity cancer patients: in microsurgical patients BTX injections in major salivary glands temporarily reduce salivary production and the risk of local complications related to saliva stagnation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradino, Bartolo; Di Lorenzo, Sara; Moschella, Francesco

    2012-10-24

    In patients suffering from oral cavity cancer surgical treatment is complex because it is necessary to remove carcinoma and lymph node metastasis (through a radical unilateral or bilateral neck dissection) and to reconstruct the affected area by means of free flaps. The saliva stagnation in the post-operative period is a risk factor with regard to local complications. Minor complications related to saliva stagnation (such as tissue maceration and wound dehiscence) could become major complications compromising the surgery or the reconstructive outcome. In fact the formation of oro-cutaneous fistula may cause infection, failure of the free flap, or the patient’s death with carotid blow-out syndrome. Botulinum injections in the major salivary glands, four days before surgery, temporarily reduces salivation during the healing stage and thus could reduce the incidence of saliva-related complications. Forty three patients with oral cancer were treated with botulinum toxin A. The saliva quantitative measurement and the sialoscintigraphy were performed before and after infiltrations of botulinum toxin in the major salivary glands. In all cases there was a considerable, but temporary, reduction of salivary secretion. A lower rate of local complications was observed in the post-operative period. The salivary production returned to normal within two months, with minimal side effects and discomfort for the patients. The temporary inhibition of salivary secretion in the post-operative period could enable a reduction in saliva-related local complications, in the incidence of oro-cutaneous fistulas, and improve the outcome of the surgery as well as the quality of residual life in these patients.

  7. Botulinum Toxin A for Oral Cavity Cancer Patients: In Microsurgical Patients BTX Injections in Major Salivary Glands Temporarily Reduce Salivary Production and the Risk of Local Complications Related to Saliva Stagnation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolo Corradino

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In patients suffering from oral cavity cancer surgical treatment is complex because it is necessary to remove carcinoma and lymph node metastasis (through a radical unilateral or bilateral neck dissection and to reconstruct the affected area by means of free flaps. The saliva stagnation in the post-operative period is a risk factor with regard to local complications. Minor complications related to saliva stagnation (such as tissue maceration and wound dehiscence could become major complications compromising the surgery or the reconstructive outcome. In fact the formation of oro-cutaneous fistula may cause infection, failure of the free flap, or the patient’s death with carotid blow-out syndrome. Botulinum injections in the major salivary glands, four days before surgery, temporarily reduces salivation during the healing stage and thus could reduce the incidence of saliva-related complications. Forty three patients with oral cancer were treated with botulinum toxin A. The saliva quantitative measurement and the sialoscintigraphy were performed before and after infiltrations of botulinum toxin in the major salivary glands. In all cases there was a considerable, but temporary, reduction of salivary secretion. A lower rate of local complications was observed in the post-operative period. The salivary production returned to normal within two months, with minimal side effects and discomfort for the patients. The temporary inhibition of salivary secretion in the post-operative period could enable a reduction in saliva-related local complications, in the incidence of oro-cutaneous fistulas, and improve the outcome of the surgery as well as the quality of residual life in these patients.

  8. Mutations in circulating mitochondrial DNA: Cassandra of oral cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Eugene S

    2012-07-01

    Cell-free circulating nucleic acids in human blood are increasing being researched as a source of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for clinical oncology. High copy number per cell and frequent mutations in various malignancies make mitochondrial genome an attractive target for such an investigation, but practical development and validation of biomarkers based on cell-free mitochondrial DNA has been lagging. Uzawa and colleagues report in the July issue of Oncotarget that in a retrospective study of patients with oral cancer the load of mutant mitochondrial DNA in patient's serum was a strong indicator of postoperative recurrence. Based on these observations, the predictive value of circulating mutant mitochondrial DNA merits further evaluation in patients with oral and other malignancies.

  9. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in clinically N0 T1-T2 staged oral cancer: the Dutch multicenter trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flach, G.B.; Bloemena, E.; Klop, W.M.C.; van Es, R.J.J.; Schepman, K.P.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Castelijns, J.A.; Leemans, C.R.; de Bree, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Results of the Dutch multi-institutional trial on sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy in oral cancer. Patients and methods Patients were consecutively enrolled from 4 institutions, with T1/T2 oral cancer and cN0 neck based on palpation and ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology. L

  10. ORAL HEALTH CARE IN ICU PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Rosimeri Frantz Schlesener

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article consists of a literature review on the importance of oral health of Intensive Care Unit patients. The research aimed to relate the tools and techniques for performing oral hygiene, in particular the use of chlorhexidine 0.12%, and co-relate the importance of a dentist in the multidisciplinary team of ICU to monitor and intervene the patient’s oral health. As the technique of oral hygiene is performed by nursing professionals, studies reports failures in its appliance, which can cause infectious complications in patient clinical evolution, interfering in the quality of the care provided. The oral hygiene is a significant factor and when properly applied can decrease infections rates, particularly nosocomial pneumonia, in patients on mechanical ventilation. It was concluded that as oral health is closely related to general health, same oral care should be instituted for ICU patients, preferably performed by a dentist, avoiding harmful comorbidities in this situation. Keywords: Intensive Care Units, Oral Hygiene, Nursing.

  11. Oral Antithrombotic Use Among Myocardial Infarction Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elst, Menno E; Cisneros-Gonzalez, Nelly; de Blaey, Cornelis J; Buurma, Henk; de Boer, Anthonius

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of oral antithrombotics (i.e., antiplatelet agents, oral anticoagulants) after myocardial infarction (MI) in the Netherlands from 1988 to 1998. METHODS: Retrospective follow-up of 3800 patients with MI, using data from the PHARMO Record Linkage System. RESULTS: From 198

  12. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Site-specific gene expression patterns in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohwitter, Gesche; Buerger, Horst; Korsching, Eberhard; van Diest, Paul J; Kleinheinz, Johannes; Fillies, Thomas

    2017-05-10

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) are the most prevalent malignant tumours within the head and neck. Evidence exists that distinct genes are differentially regulated in SCCs of the oral cavity compared to other head and neck regions. Given this background, the aim of this study was to investigate whether such tumour site-specific gene expression can also be observed in different localizations within the oral cavity. Using tissue microarrays (TMAs), we investigated 76 SCCs of the floor of the mouth, 49 SCCs of the tongue and 68 SCCs of other anatomic regions within the oral cavity. The expression of 17 genes involved in cell cycle and growth control (p16, p21, p27, p53, cyclin D1, EGFR, c-kit, bcl-6), cell adhesion (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenin), and apoptosis/stress response genes (Hif-1-alpha, Glut 1, CA IX, caspase, hsp70, XIAP) were investigated by means of immunohistochemistry. The data were subjected to chi(2), interdependency and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Our study suggests a remote difference in the site-specific gene expression patterns of oral cancer. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) showed a significantly higher expression (p oral cavity. The increased XIAP expression was further associated with significantly decreased overall survival in all cases of SCCs of the oral cavity (p Expression levels of p53, CA IX, beta-catenin, Hif-1-alpha, and c-kit were also observed to be inversely related between SCCs of the floor of the mouth and those of the tongue respectively, although these differences did not reach statistical significance. Overall and event-free survival did not differ in patients with T1/T2/N0 SCCs according to tumour localization. In summary, the protein expression patterns of SCCs of the oral cavity suggest the existence of a molecular and morphological spectrum of SCCs in the oral cavity. In particular the expression pattern of XIAP indicates distinct gene expression patterns between carcinomas of the floor of the mouth and oral tongue

  14. Lifestyle risk factors for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    The "style of life is the unique way in which individuals try to realize their fictional final goal and meet or avoid the three main tasks of life: work, community, love" (Alfred Adler, founder of the Individual Psychology). Lifestyle refers to the way individuals live their lives and how they handle problems and interpersonal relations. The lifestyle behaviours associated to oral cancer with convincing evidence are tobacco use, betel quid chewing, alcohol drinking, low fruit and vegetable consumption (the detrimental lifestyle is high fat and/or sugar intake, resulting in low fruit and/or vegetable intake). Worldwide, 25% of oral cancers are attributable to tobacco usage (smoking and/or chewing), 7-19% to alcohol drinking, 10-15% to micronutrient deficiency, more than 50% to betel quid chewing in areas of high chewing prevalence. Carcinogenicity is dose-dependent and magnified by multiple exposures. Conversely, low and single exposures do not significantly increase oral cancer risk. These behaviours have common characteristics: (i) they are widespread: one billion men, 250 million women smoke cigarettes, 600-1200 million people chew betel quid, two billion consume alcohol, unbalanced diet is common amongst developed and developing countries; (ii) they were already used by animals and human forerunners millions of years ago because they were essential to overcome conditions such as cold, hunger, famine; their use was seasonal and limited by low availability, in contrast with the pattern of consumption of the modern era, characterized by routine, heavy usage, for recreational activities and with multiple exposures; (iii) their consumption in small doses is not recognized as detrimental by the human body and activates the dopaminergic reward system of the brain, thus giving instant pleasure, "liking" (overconsumption) and "wanting" (craving). For these reasons, effective Public Health measures aimed at preventing oral cancer and other lifestyle-related conditions

  15. Sentinel node biopsy for early-stage oral cavity cancer: the VU University Medical Center experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Toom, I.J.; Heuveling, D.A.; Flach, G.B.; van Weert, S.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; van Schie, A.; Bloemena, E.; Leemans, C.R.; de Bree, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) in head and neck cancer is recently introduced as the staging technique of oral squamous cell carcinoma. We report the results of SNB in patients diagnosed with a T1-T2 oral squamous cell carcinoma and clinically negative (N0) neck in a single center. Methods A

  16. Sentinel lymph nodes in cancer of the oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Christensen, Rikke Kølby; Sørensen, Jens Ahm;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extended histopathologic work-up has increased the detection of micrometastasis in sentinel lymph nodes in malignant melanoma and breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine if (A) step-sectioning of the central 1000 microM at 250 microM levels with immunostaining were accurate...... when compared with (B) step-sectioning and immunostaining of the entire sentinel lymph node at 250 microM levels. METHODS: Forty patients with T1/T2 cN0 oral cancer were enrolled. Three patients were excluded. In one patient no sentinel lymph node was identified. The remaining two had unidentified...... sentinel lymph nodes due to lymphoscintigraphic and surgical sampling error. The central 1000 microM of 147 sentinel lymph nodes were step-sectioned in 250-microm intervals and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and CK-KL1. All lymph nodes were recorded as negative or positive for macrometastases...

  17. Global epidemiology, risk factors and prevention of oral cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Newell Johnson

    2008-01-01

    @@ The Globacan [2002] database from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, shows 400,318 cases of oral and pharyngeal [excluding nasopharynx] cancer in the world annually, and 221,917 deaths.

  18. Xerostomia after Radiotherapy for Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Killerup Kaae, Julie; Stenfeldt, Lone; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Radiation-induced xerostomia is a frequent late side effect after treatment for oral and oropharyngeal cancers. This may induce swallowing difficulties, compromised oral well-being, reduced nutrition intake, or speech deficiencies. Consequently, quality of life is often impaired......). An abbreviated EORTC H&N35 questionnaire was completed for both visits. A small control group consisting of young and healthy individuals also tested the chewing gum. RESULTS: Twenty patients completed the study and an increase in saliva flow was observed for 14 patients. Before and after intervention...... at the beginning and at the end of the intervention. No improvement in baseline saliva was seen. Relevant changes in subjective measures of xerostomia were seen after 2 weeks of chewing the gum....

  19. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 (VHNSS 2.0 for the assessment of oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Marçon Barroso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Patients submitted to radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancer have several symptoms, predominantly oral. The Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 is an American tool developed to evaluate oral symptoms in head and neck cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to translate the Vanderbilt Head and Neck Symptom Survey version 2.0 into Brazilian Portuguese and cross-culturally adapt this tool for subsequent validation and application in Brazil. METHODS: A method used for the translation and cultural adaptation of tools, which included independent translations, synthesis of the translations, back-translations, expert committee, and pre-test, was used. The pre-test was performed with 37 head and neck cancer patients, who were divided into four groups, to assess the relevance and understanding of the assessed items. Data were submitted to descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: The overall mean of the content validity index was 0.79 for semantic and idiomatic equivalence, and it was higher than 0.8 for cultural and conceptual equivalence. The cognitive interview showed that patients were able to paraphrase the items, and considered them relevant and easily understood. CONCLUSION: The tool was translated and cross-culturally adapted to be used in Brazil. The authors believe this translation is suited for validation.

  20. Radiotherapy effect on frequency of Candida spp. and on virulence of C. albicans isolated from the oral cavity of head and neck cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA DAMBROSO

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the diversity and prevalence of yeasts, and the virulence of C. albicans found in the oral cavity during the course of ionizing radiation treatment of patients with head and neck tumor (HNTP. Samples from 21 HNTP and 24 healthy controls were isolated and identified. C. albicans isolated from two patients during radiotherapy were analyzed for virulence factors. Radiotherapy induced a higher level of both yeast colonization (81% vs 33% and non-albicans Candida (NAC colonization (52.4% vs 4.0% in HNTP than the control group. Patients were colonized by 5 different NAC species: C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei and C. kefir. On the other hand, C. albicans colonization was similar in patients and controls (6/21, 28.6% vs 7/24, 29.2%, respectively. Also, of the 11 patients assessed before and during radiotherapy, 5 (45.5% were colonized before the start of treatment and another 5 (45.5% during treatment. All of the latter were colonized by NAC species alone. Moreover, we observed a significant and continuous enhancement of C. albicans virulence as the radiotherapy progressed, in the two patients involved in this test. Thus, it is concluded that radiotherapy is an important predisposing factor for the oral candidiasis, including NAC species. Also, it may facilitate the development of more virulent C. albicans strains. Keywords: Candida. Radiotherapy. Virulence factor. Oral candidiasis.

  1. Oral myiasis in a maxillofacial trauma patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral Myiasis is a rare disease that is mostly reported in developing countries. It is primarily caused by the invasion of the human body by fly larvae. The phenomenon is well-documented in the skin, especially among animals. This case report describes the presentation of Oral Myiasis caused by Musca Nebulo (common house fly, in a 28-year-old patient, with recent maxillofacial trauma. The patient was treated by manual removal of the larvae, after topical application of turpentine oil, followed by surgical debridement and oral therapy with Ivermectin.

  2. Home-based Exercise on Functional Outcome of the Donor Lower Extremity in Oral Cancer Patients after Fibula Flap Harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yuan Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: After harvesting the fibula flap, pain, sensory disturbance, weakness of donor leg, reduced walking endurance, ankle instability, and lower walking speed had been reported. The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess functional outcome of regular home-based exercise on donor ankle strength, endurance, and walking ability after free fibula flap for mandibular reconstruction. Methods: Fourteen patients were recruited. Objective isokinetic testing and a 6-min walk test (6MWT were used to evaluate ankle strength/endurance and walking ability, respectively. Results: There was a significant increase in the peak torque of ankle dorsiflexion/foot inversion of the healthy leg and ankle dorsiflexion/foot eversion of the donor leg after exercise (p < 0.05. After home-based exercise, there was reduced asymmetry in the peak torques of ankle dorsiflexion and foot eversion and the total work of foot eversion between the donor and healthy legs. In 6MWT, no significant difference was found between the walking distances before and after exercise. Conclusion: Regular home-based exercise could improve the strength of ankle dorsiflexion and foot eversion of the donor leg, and get more symmetric ankle motor function between the donor and healthy legs.

  3. Staging N0 Oral Cancer: Lymphoscintigraphy and Conventional Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, J.B.; Soerensen, J.A.; Grupe, P.; Karstoft, J.; Krogdahl, A. [Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Depts. of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Nuclear Medicine, Radiology, and Pathology

    2005-08-01

    PURPOSE: To compare sentinel lymph node biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler ultrasonography, and palpation as staging tools in patients with T1/T2 N0 cancer of the oral cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty consecutive patients were enrolled (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90 years), 24 T1 and 16 T2 cN0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Palpation was carried out by two observers prior to inclusion. MRI, gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Lymphoscintigraphies were done after peritumoral injections of 99mTc labelled rheniumsulphide nanocolloid, followed by sentinel lymph node biopsy guided by a gamma probe and Patent Blue. Palpation, Doppler ultrasonography, MRI, and sentinel lymph node biopsy were compared to a combination of histopathology and follow-up. Diagnostic testing was performed using the x2 test. RESULTS: Histopathological examination revealed metastatic spread to the neck in 14 of 40 patients. One patient had bilateral neck disease. Sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography were performed in 80 neck sides of 40 patients and MRI in 70 neck sides (5 patients were claustrophobic). SN revealed suspicious lymph nodes in 12 necks, ultrasonography in 23 necks, and MRI in 9 necks. The positive predictive value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was 100%, ultrasonography 57%, and MRI 56%. The respective negative predictive values were 96%, 96%, and 85%. The sensitivity of sentinel lymph node biopsy 80% was comparable to ultrasonography 87%, but the sensitivity of MRI 36% was low. The specificities were 100%, 85%, and 93%, respectively. By combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and ultrasonography the overall sensitivity could have been 100%. CONCLUSION: Sentinel lymph node biopsy improved staging of patients with small N0 oral cancers. Combined sentinel lymph node biopsy and Doppler ultrasonography may further improve staging. MRI and simple palpation results were poor.

  4. Caring for cancer patients in the general dental office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, I.

    Modern therapeutic modalities and emphasis on early detection have made oral cancer a treatable, and in many cases, a curable disease. The role of the dentist in cancer patient management is two-fold. Early detection of oral lesions during routine dental examination has been shown to be a significant factor in cancer diagnosis. The dentist's other role comes after cancer treatment, specifically therapeutic radiation. Ionizing radiation can have permanent effects on both hard and soft tissues. Prescription and use of fluoride gel in topical applicators can aid in assuring oral health for post-cancer patients.

  5. Antibioticoterapia oral versus endovenosa em crianças neutropênicas febris recebendo quimioterapia Oral vs. intravenous empirical antimicrobial therapy in febrile neutropenic patients receiving childhood cancer chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Rech Cagol

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o uso de antibioticoterapia endovenosa versus oral. MÉTODOS: Foram selecionadas todas as crianças e adolescentes neutropênicos com idade inferior a 18 anos classificados como baixo risco para complicações e recebendo quimioterapia. O estudo ocorreu entre 2002 e 2005 na Unidade de Oncologia Pediátrica, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre (RS. Os pacientes, divididos em grupo A e grupo B, eram randomizados para receber terapia oral ou endovenosa. O tratamento utilizado para o grupo A foi ciprofloxacina e amoxicilina/clavulanato via oral e placebo endovenoso e, para o grupo B, cefepime e placebo oral. RESULTADOS: Foram selecionados 91 episódios consecutivos de neutropenia febril em 58 crianças. Para os pacientes do grupo A, a taxa de falência foi de 51,2% e a média de tempo de hospitalização foi de 8 dias (variação de 2-10. Para os pacientes tratados com antibioticoterapia endovenosa, a taxa de falência foi de 45,8% e a média de tempo de hospitalização foi de 7 dias (variação de 3-10. CONCLUSÃO: Neste estudo não houve diferenças entre a antibioticoterapia oral versus a terapia endovenosa. Estudos randomizados com maior número de pacientes são necessários antes de padronizar a terapêutica oral como tratamento para esta população de pacientes.OBJECTIVE: To compare the use of intravenous vs. oral antibiotic therapy. METHODS: All febrile neutropenic patients younger than 18 years old with low risk of complications and receiving chemotherapy were selected. The study was conducted from 2002 to 2005 at the Pediatric Oncology Unit of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Patients were divided into group A and group B and were randomly assigned to receive oral or intravenous therapy. The empirical antimicrobial treatment used for group A consisted in oral ciprofloxacin plus amoxicillin-clavulanate and intravenous placebo, and group B received cefepime and oral placebo

  6. Oral alterations in children with cancer. Literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Cortes-Ramírez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For dentists, there is little information on malignant tumors and complications both because their natural evolution is secondary to treatment, despite cancer in children represents 3% of all cancer cases. The goal is to make a brief review of the most common neoplasm in children, to identify them and find out the oral alterations with highest incidence both as secondary to the pathology and as a side effect of treatment. This review analyses various types of malignant neoplasms which may occur in this stage of life. They are divided into haematological: leukemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The most common leukemia is acute lymphoblastic (ALL followed by acute myeloid and granulocytic. Lymphomas develop from the lymphatic system and are divided into Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s. Cancer has become a chronic disease favoring a new group of patients who achieve survival but suffer side effects due to therapies, drugs, doses and the child’s characteristics. Oral complications appear in 40% of cases and the most frequent are mucositis, opportunistic infection, xerostomia, bleeding, periodontal disease and disorders in the development of teeth and jaw. Although cancer is located outside of the maxillofacial area, chemotherapy is aggressive for a developing organism. The side effects of radiation therapy affect the general and specific area to radiate as well as the surrounding organs and tissues. Recently, advances in diagnosis and treatment have increased survival from 20% to 80%, with long-term treatment.

  7. High-dose radiotherapy (60 Gy) with oral UFT/folinic acid and escalating doses of oxaliplatin in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber Vestermark, Lene; Jensen, Helle A; Pfeiffer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Consensus is that patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) should receive long-term chemoradiotherapy (CRT) before surgery. With the intent to offer the patients intensified concomitant chemotherapy (CT) to improve outcome and to assess tolerability and toxicity of oxaliplatin (Ox) a p...

  8. CLINICO-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF ORAL CANCER: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil H Agrawal

    2012-07-01

    common site for oral cancer was tongue. Histopathologically 52 (32.5% cases were well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, 37 (23% cases were moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma and 34 (21% cases as poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. 37 (23% cases were diagnosed as Oral Verrucous Carcinoma (a rare variant of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma. 72% cases were in either stage II or stage III. Conclusions: The most common site for oral cancer was tongue and histopathologically majority of the cases were well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma presented in advanced stages of disease. We observed higher proportion of oral cancers among young patients (below 40 years. Proportion of Oral Verrucous Carcinoma (OVC which is a rare variant of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma was also high in the study.

  9. Assessment of the Survival of Dental Implants in Irradiated Jaws Following Treatment of Oral Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Meenakshi Chauhan; Solanki, Swati; Pujari, Sudarshan C; Shaw, Eisha; Sharma, Swati; Anand, Abhishek; Singh, Harkanwal Preet

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients undergoing head and neck surgery for various pathologic conditions, implants are one of the best restorative options and are increasing widely used. Therefore, we evaluated the success of dental implants in the irradiated jaws of patients following treatment of oral cancer oral cancer treated patients. Materials and Methods: Data of oral cancer treated patients was collected retrospectively from 2002 to 2008. We took 46 oral cancer treated patients in which implants were placed in irradiated jaws for rehabilitation. Results: It was found that out of 162 dental implants placed, 52 failed. Furthermore, there was no variation in the implant survival rate in between both the jaws. Radiation dose of esthetics and quality of life of cancer treated patients. PMID:27843270

  10. Deduction of Oral Cancer Using Fuzzy Linear Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arulchinnappan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: To examine the risk factors of oral cancer at the earlier stage. Smoking, chewing, and drinking are the major risk factors which cause oral cancer considered as input variables. Approach: A case – control study was conducted at JKK Nataraj Dental College and Hospital, during the period from September 2007 to November 2009, in Namakkal District, Tamilnadu, India. Data collected were analyzed using Fuzzy Linear Regression. For this JAVA program was developed. Results: Using this fuzzy linear regression model Smoking, Drinking, and Chewing were identified as potent risk factors of oral cancer. Conclusion: Smoking, drinking, and chewing, are the most dangerous risk factors that will cause oral cancer. This study will help to improve the clinical practice, guidance for analyzing the risk factors of oral cancer.

  11. Patient adherence and persistence with oral anticancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Kathryn; Mayer, Erica; Partridge, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Given the recent significant increase in the use of oral therapies in cancer management, an understanding of patients' adherence to and persistence with oral therapy is crucial. Nonadherence and early cessation may be substantial barriers to the delivery of valuable therapies, and may impair health. Potential obstacles to adherence and persistence include personal characteristics, treatment features, and system factors. Techniques for measuring adherence and persistence include self-report, pill counts, microelectronic monitoring systems (MEMS), prescription database analysis, and the assessment of serum or urine drug levels. This review article describes available data regarding adherence and persistence among patients with cancer, as well as studies of interventions to improve adherence. All reports of studies of adherence with oral cancer therapy that the authors could find on PubMed or in the reference sections of these PubMed-located articles were included. Adherence and persistence rates ranged from 16% to 100% with different therapies and different methods of measurement. Studies that included educational, behavioral, and multidimensional interventions to improve adherence were also described. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  12. Microbiota, oral microbiome, and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Dominique S; Izard, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Only 30% of patients with a diagnosis of pancreatic cancer survive 1 year after the diagnosis. Progress in understanding the causes of pancreatic cancer has been made, including solidifying the associations with obesity and diabetes, and a proportion of cases should be preventable through lifestyle modifications. Unfortunately, identifying reliable biomarkers of early pancreatic cancer has been extremely challenging, and no effective screening modality is currently available for this devastating form of cancer. Recent data suggest that the microbiota may play a role in the disease process, but many questions remain. Future studies focusing on the human microbiome, both etiologically and as a marker of disease susceptibility, should shed light on how to better tackle prevention, early detection, and treatment of this highly fatal disease.

  13. Prevention and management guidelines to oral health care for patients with head and neck cancer: HCT20, Carisolv and Chlorhexidine varnish are suggested; Protocolo de prevencao e tratamento de sequelas bucais em pacientes submetidos a radioterapia: uso do HCT20, Carisolv e verniz de clorexidina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Guerra, Eliete Neves da; Melo, N.S. de

    2004-06-01

    Orofacial complications are unfortunately common with all modalities used in the management of patients with head and neck cancer. It is well known that hypo salivation develops if radiation therapy involves the salivary glands. A significant decrease in salivary volume can adversely affect oral comfort, mucous health, dentition, deglutition and mastication. Xerostomia may lead to consumption of diet high in carbohydrates and make good oral hygiene difficult. The purpose of this study is to report a new prevention and management guidelines to oral and dental health care for patients with head and neck cancer who will treat with radiotherapy. New materials as HCT20, Carisolv and chlorhexidine varnish are suggested. (author)

  14. What dentists should know about oral cancer screening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar B Kujan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the advances in the diagnosis and treatment of oral cancer, it remains one of the most devastating malignancies. Early detection and prevention is a major key in combating policy of cancer. Screening offers an important opportunity for early detection. Several screening methods, visual examination, toluidine blue, fluorescence imaging, and brush biopsy, were used in oral cancer screening programs. General dental practitioner plays an important role in such programs. Therefore, this review aimed to outline the required information, knowledge, and evidence-based practice on oral cancer screening for dentists in order to incorporate this service into their daily routine.

  15. Salivary MicroRNAs and Oral Cancer Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshizawa, Janice M.; Wong, David T.W.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in human saliva have recently become an emerging field in saliva research for diagnostics applications and its potential role in biological implications. miRNAs are short noncoding RNA molecules that play important roles in regulating a variety of cellular processes. Dysregulation of miRNAs are known to be associated with many diseases. miRNAs were found present in the saliva of OSCC patients and could serve as potential biomarkers for oral cancer detection. Understanding t...

  16. Sentinel lymph nodes in cancer of the oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Krogdahl, Annelise

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sentinel lymph node biopsy, step sectioning and immunohistochemistry have changed detection of tumour deposits. Isolated tumour cells (ITC) are detected more frequently than earlier because of a changed level of detection. METHODS: A total of 108 sentinel lymph nodes from 30 patients...... with T1/T2 cN0 oral cancer were re-classified histologically to find possible ITC and to describe technical pitfalls. RESULTS: Primarily we found metastatic spread in 12 of 108 sentinel lymph nodes: five macrometastasis and seven micrometastasis. After re-classification, we found seven lymph nodes...

  17. Oral myiasis in a maxillofacial trauma patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandim Balarama Gupta Vinit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a rare disease primarily caused by the invasion of tissue by larvae of certain dipteran flies. Oral myiasis is still more "rare" and "unique" owing to the fact that oral cavity rarely provides the necessary habitat conducive for a larval lifecycle. Common predisposing factors are poor oral hygiene, halitosis, trauma, senility, learning disabilities, physically and mentally challenged conditions. Oral myiasis can lead to rapid tissue destruction and disfigurement and requires immediate treatment. Treatment consists of manual removal of maggots from the oral cavity after application of chemical agents. Good sanitation, personal and environmental hygiene and cleanliness and special care for debilitated persons are the best methods to prevent oral myiasis. This case report describes the presentation of oral myiasis caused by musca nebulo (common house fly in a 40-year-old male patient, with recent maxillofacial trauma. The patient was treated by manual removal larvae by topical application of turpentine oil, followed by surgical debridement of the wound and open reduction and internal fixation of the fracture.

  18. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection and Oral Lesions in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Dental Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Katia; Kazimiroff, Julie; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Smith, Richard V.; Wiltz, Mauricio; Polanco, Jacqueline; Grossberg, Robert M.; Belbin, Thomas J.; Strickler, Howard D.; Burk, Robert D.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the risk factors associated with oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and oral lesions in 161 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive patients and 128 HIV-negative patients presenting for oral examination at 2 urban healthcare centers. Patients were interviewed on risk factors and provided oral-rinse samples for HPV DNA typing by polymerase chain reaction. Statistical associations were assessed by logistic regression. Oral HPV was prevalent in 32% and 16% of HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative patients, respectively, including high-risk HPV type 16 (8% and 2%, respectively; P = .049) and uncommon HPV types 32/42 (6% and 5%, respectively; P = .715). Among HIV-negative patients, significant risk factors for oral HPV included multiple sex partners (≥21 vs ≤5; odds ratio [OR], 9.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–49.3), heavy tobacco smoking (>20 pack-years vs none; OR, 9.2; 95% CI, 1.4–59.4), and marijuana use (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.3–12.4). Among HIV-positive patients, lower CD4+ T-cell count only was associated with oral HPV detection (≤200 vs ≥500 cells/mm3; OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.3–15.5). Detection of high-risk HPV was also associated with concurrent detection of potentially cancerous oral lesions among HIV-negative patients but not among HIV-positive patients. The observed risk factor associations with oral HPV in HIV-negative patients are consistent with sexual transmission and local immunity, whereas in HIV-positive patients, oral HPV detection is strongly associated with low CD4+ T-cell counts. PMID:25681375

  19. Incidence and risk factors for colorectal neoplasia in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishikawa, H; Sato, K; Yamauchi, T; Katakura, A; Shibahara, T; Takano, N; Nishida, J

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal adenoma and cancer are not regarded as being associated with primary oral cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether screening colonoscopy should be performed for patients with oral cancer in addition to the upper gastrointestinal endoscopic screening that is now routinely performed. Between 2007 and 2013, 162 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma were enrolled at Tokyo Dental College, Ichikawa General Hospital, and 136 individuals were assigned to colonoscopic surveillance. Advanced neoplasia was defined as an adenoma ≥ 10 mm, adenoma with villous histology or high-grade dysplasia regardless of size and invasive cancer. Associations between advanced neoplasia and clinical factors, including age, sex, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and oral cancer site and staging were determined. Advanced neoplasia, including five invasive cancers, was identified in 32 (23.5%) patients. An age- and sex-adjusted multivariate analysis revealed that smoking (Brinkmann index > 400; OR = 3.24, 95% CI = 1.28-8.18), alcohol consumption (lifetime pure ethanol consumption > 600 l; OR = 2.84, 95% CI = 1.18-6.79) and a diagnosis of cancer of the floor of the mouth (OR = 7.97, 95% CI = 2.49-25.46) were independent risk factors for advanced colorectal neoplasia. The prevalence of advanced colorectal neoplasia is unexpectedly high in patients with oral cancer. It should be recognized as a second primary tumour of oral cancer. Screening of oral cancer patients by colonoscopy should be routine practice, particularly among smokers and patients with a high intake of alcohol and cancer of the floor of the mouth. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Review of current clinical experience with prolonged (oral) etoposide in cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeJong, RS; Mulder, NH; Dijksterhuis, D; DeVries, EGE

    1995-01-01

    Prolonged oral etoposide monotherapy is an effective treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and refractory malignant lymphoma. It shows remarkable activity in relapsed or refractory breast and ovarian cancer (response rates up to 35% and 26%), and was also active in refractory germ

  1. Association of increased circulating catecholamine and glucocorticoid levels with risk of psychological problems in oral neoplasm patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixu Xie

    Full Text Available Noradrenergic pathways and glucocorticoid-mediated signal pathways have been implicated in the growth and progression of oral cancer. Patients with oral neoplasms can have high psychological distress levels, but the effects of stress-related hormones on oral neoplasm growth are unknown.We have investigated the relationships between pre-surgical measurements of psychological problems with Symptom Checklist-90-revised Inventory (SCL90-R, tumor histology, circulating blood catecholamine and glucocorticoid levels among 75 oral neoplasm patients, including 40 oral cancer patients and 35 benign oral tumor patients.The results showed that most dimension scores of SCL90-R did not show a significant difference between the two groups except depression (p = 0.0201 and obsessive-compulsion (p = 0.0093, with the scores for these symptoms being higher among oral cancer group versus the benign oral tumor group. The differences of total score, average score and other monomial factor scores were not statistically significant. The mean concentrations of catecholamine and glucocorticoid in peripheral blood of the oral cancer group were higher than those in benign oral tumor group (p<0.01. We also examined whether associations observed between biobehavioral measures and circulating blood catecholamine and glucocorticoid levels extended to other compartments in the oral cancer group.These findings suggest that stress hormones may affect oral cancer behavior by influencing the tumor micro-environment though the circulating blood.

  2. Identification of Gene and MicroRNA Signatures for Oral Cancer Developed from Oral Leukoplakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghui Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinic, oral leukoplakia (OLK may develop into oral cancer. However, the mechanism underlying this transformation is still unclear. In this work, we present a new pipeline to identify oral cancer related genes and microRNAs (miRNAs by integrating both gene and miRNA expression profiles. In particular, we find some network modules as well as their miRNA regulators that play important roles in the development of OLK to oral cancer. Among these network modules, 91.67% of genes and 37.5% of miRNAs have been previously reported to be related to oral cancer in literature. The promising results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed approach.

  3. Laser Raman detection for oral cancer based on a Gaussian process classification method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhanwei; Yang, Yongjian; Bai, Yuan; Wang, Lijun; Zhang, Chijun; Chen, He; Luo, Yusheng; Su, Le; Chen, Yong; Li, Xianchang; Zhou, Xiaodong; Jia, Jun; Shen, Aiguo; Hu, Jiming

    2013-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common neoplasm of the oral cavity. The incidence rate accounts for 80% of total oral cancer and shows an upward trend in recent years. It has a high degree of malignancy and is difficult to detect in terms of differential diagnosis, as a consequence of which the timing of treatment is always delayed. In this work, Raman spectroscopy was adopted to differentially diagnose oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral gland carcinoma. In total, 852 entries of raw spectral data which consisted of 631 items from 36 oral squamous cell carcinoma patients, 87 items from four oral gland carcinoma patients and 134 items from five normal people were collected by utilizing an optical method on oral tissues. The probability distribution of the datasets corresponding to the spectral peaks of the oral squamous cell carcinoma tissue was analyzed and the experimental result showed that the data obeyed a normal distribution. Moreover, the distribution characteristic of the noise was also in compliance with a Gaussian distribution. A Gaussian process (GP) classification method was utilized to distinguish the normal people and the oral gland carcinoma patients from the oral squamous cell carcinoma patients. The experimental results showed that all the normal people could be recognized. 83.33% of the oral squamous cell carcinoma patients could be correctly diagnosed and the remaining ones would be diagnosed as having oral gland carcinoma. For the classification process of oral gland carcinoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma, the correct ratio was 66.67% and the erroneously diagnosed percentage was 33.33%. The total sensitivity was 80% and the specificity was 100% with the Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) set to 0.447 213 595. Considering the numerical results above, the application prospects and clinical value of this technique are significantly impressive.

  4. Analgesic effectiveness and tolerability of oral oxycodone/naloxone and pregabalin in patients with lung cancer and neuropathic pain: an observational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Santis S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stefano De Santis,1 Cristina Borghesi,1 Serena Ricciardi,2 Daniele Giovannoni,1 Alberto Fulvi,2 Maria Rita Migliorino,2 Claudio Marcassa3 1Palliative Care and Cancer Pain Service, Oncological Pulmonary Unit, 2Oncological Pulmonary Unit, San Camillo-Forlanini Hospitals, Rome, 3Cardiologia Fondazione Maugeri IRCCS, Novara, Italy Introduction: Cancer-related pain has a severe negative impact on quality of life. Combination analgesic therapy with oxycodone and pregabalin is effective for treating neuropathic cancer pain. We investigated the efficacy and tolerability of a dose-escalation combination therapy with prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN-PR and pregabalin in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and severe neuropathic pain. Methods: This was a 4-week, open-label, observational study. Patients were treated with OXN-PR and pregabalin. Average pain intensity ([API] measured on a 0–10 numerical rating scale and neuropathic pain (Douleur Neuropathique 4 were assessed at study entry and at follow-up visits. The primary endpoint was response to treatment, defined as a reduction of API at T28 ≥30% from baseline. Secondary endpoints included other efficacy measures, as well as patient satisfaction and quality of life (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Distress Scale; bowel function was also assessed. Results: A total of 56 patients were enrolled. API at baseline was 8.0±0.9, and decreased after 4 weeks by 48% (4.2±1.9; P<0.0001 vs baseline; 46 (82.1% patients responded to treatment. Significant improvements were also reported in number/severity of breakthrough cancer pain episodes (P=0.001, Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (P=0.0002, Symptom Distress Scale (P<0.0001, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression (P=0.0006 and anxiety (P<0.0001 subscales, and bowel function (P=0.0003. At study end, 37 (66.0% patients were satisfied/very satisfied with the new analgesic treatment

  5. Epidemiology of Oral Cavity Cancers in a Country Located in the Esophageal Cancer Belt: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Saedi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As one of the most common cancers among head and neck malignancies, cancer of the oral cavity probably has some variations in countries with a high prevalence of esophageal cancer.  Materials and Methods: Patients with oral cavity cancer who were treated at two tertiary referral centers from January 1999 to January 2009 were included in this study. In addition to demographic data, information regarding personal and family history of head and neck cancer, use of dentures, presence of immune deficiency, consumption of alcohol, and incidence of cigarette smoking was collected. Additionally, a history of opium usage was obtained from the participants in this study. Moreover, an appropriately matched control group was selected for comparisons between the risk factors.   Results: A total of 557 patients were entered into this study over a 10-year period, of whom 219 (39.3% were female and the remaining 338 (60.7% were male. The tongue was the most common site of cancer and 9% of the patients had a history of opium abuse, but more than half of the patients did not have any recognized risk factors. The incidence and stage of cancer had a significant relationship with cigarette smoking (P= 0.013.   Conclusion: Tongue cancer in non-smokers is the predominant pattern of oral cavity cancer in Iran.

  6. Development of a mobile application for oral cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Mayra Sousa; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Ferreira, Vitor Yuri Nicolau; de Lucena Pereira, Laudenice; Correia, Ricardo João Cruz; da Silva Teixeira, Hélder Bruno; Pereira, Daniel Cláudio; Bonan, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    To develop a mobile application (app) for oral cancer screening. The app was developed using Android system version 4.4.2, with JAVA language. Information concerning sociodemographic data and risk factors for oral cancer development, e.g., tobacco and alcohol use, sun exposure and other contributing factors, such as unprotected oral sex, oral pain and denture use, were included. We surveyed a population at high risk for oral cancer development and then evaluated the sensitivity/specificity/accuracy and predictive values of clinical oral diagnosis between two blinded trained examiners, who used movies and data from the app, and in loco oral examination as gold-standard. A total of 55 individuals at high risk for oral cancer development were surveyed. Of these, 31% presented homogeneous/heterogeneous white lesions with potential of malignancy. The clinical diagnoses performed by the two examiners using videos were found to have sensitivity of 82%-100% (average 91%), specificity of 81%-100% (average 90.5%), and accuracy of 87.27%-95.54% (average 90.90%), as compared with the gold-standard. The Kappa agreement value between the gold-standard and the examiner with the best agreement was 0.597. Mobile apps including videos and data collection interfaces could be an interesting alternative in oral cancer research development.

  7. Early preventive exercises versus usual care does not seem to reduce trismus in patients treated with radiotherapy for cancer in the oral cavity or oropharynx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdal, Nina; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Aadahl, Mette

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose. In head and neck cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy, we investigated the benefi ts and harms of an early exercise regime on trismus. Material and methods. Patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy were centrally randomised to exercises 5 – 6 times......, and health-related quality of life. Mixed model analysis of repeated measures adjusted for tumour size and operation was conducted to assess the effect of early preventive exercises across time periods. Results. Of the 100 patients included, two patients withdrew and one died before the onset of radiotherapy....... The unadjusted mean difference in MID at 12 months after having completed radiotherapy was 0.83 mm (95% confi dence interval (CI) 3.64 – 5.29, p 0.71) in the exercise intervention group compared with the control group. When adjusted for operation and tumour size, the effect of the exercise intervention on mean...

  8. Immunohistochemical and quantitative changes in salivary EGF, amylase and haptocorrin following radiotherapy for oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M E; Hansen, H S; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1996-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), amylase and haptocorrin are molecules produced in the salivary glands. The aim of the present study was to determine immunohistochemical and quantitative alterations in EGF as compared with haptocorrin and amylase following radiotherapy for oral cancer. Changes...... a reduction in the mitogenic peptide EGF both immunohistochemically and quantitatively following irradiation for oral cancer, results which may contribute to the understanding of the clinical signs of mucositis........ The concentration of EGF in saliva before treatment was significantly higher in patients than in the control group (p oral tumors contribute with EGF to the saliva. In conclusion we have demonstrated...

  9. Exploring awareness, attitudes, and perceived role among oral health providers regarding HPV-related oral cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Ellen; DeBate, Rita; Dodd, Virginia; Dyer, Karen; Fuhrmann, Hollie; Helmy, Hannah; Smith, Sarah A

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV), the most common STI in the United States, is increasingly being associated with a number of cancers, including oral cancers (OC). This may change the approach of oral health providers (OHP) towards screening and identifying OC in their patients. Five focus groups were conducted in February and March 2009 with dentists and dental hygienists. Participants were recruited via presentations at monthly meetings of local dental and dental hygiene professional associations, and through association mailing and telephone lists. A total of 38 OHP participated in the focus groups (17 dentists and 21 hygienists). Analysis of focus group data was framed by three general content areas regarding HPV-related OC and the HPV vaccine, including: (a) knowledge; (b) attitudes; and (c) perceived roles. Sub-themes that emerged included issues related to the HPV vaccine, the role of professional organizations, and concerns with gender roles and confidentiality. As public awareness of the link between HPV and OC increases, OHP play an important role in addressing this issue with their patients. The current study clearly identified areas that must be addressed among OHP in order for effective and comfortable communication regarding the HPV-OC link and the potential uses of the HPV vaccines to take place, including: (a) increasing knowledge of the HPV-OC link and HPV vaccine; and (b) clarifying screening procedures, role, and expectations.

  10. Assessing oral cancer knowledge among dental students in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannick, Gabrielle F; Horowitz, Alice M; Drury, Thomas F; Reed, Susan G; Day, Terry A

    2005-03-01

    Because South Carolina has the fourth highest mortality rate for oral cancer among the 50 states, dental students in the state must be knowledgeable about prevention and early detection of the disease. In 2002, the authors surveyed 163 students using a written questionnaire (response rate, 79.1 percent). The questionnaire included questions about oral cancer risk and nonrisk factors as well as oral cancer diagnostic signs, symptoms and examination procedures. The authors performed univariate and bivariate analyses (alpha students replied that tobacco, alcohol and previous oral cancer lesions were risk factors. One hundred six students (65 percent) knew that the most likely site for oral cancer is the ventrolateral border of the tongue. Students differed in their overall knowledge of risk factors (P = .002), nonrisk factors (P students' level of knowledge increased with academic year, educators and policy-makers need to place greater emphasis on oral cancer education and training in dental schools. Morbidity and mortality are likely to be reduced if dentists know how to prevent and detect oral cancer.

  11. Assessment of oral mucosa in normal, precancer and cancer using chemiluminescent illumination, toluidine blue supravital staining and oral exfoliative cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajmohan, M; Rao, Umadevi Krishnamohan; Joshua, Elizabeth; Rajasekaran, Saraswathy Thillai; Kannan, Ranganathan

    2012-09-01

    Carcinoma in an early stage of development is hard to detect clinically because the lesion may not be palpable and color of the lesional tissue is not necessarily different from the color of the surrounding mucosa. In order to improve the efficacy of the diagnosis, techniques are being developed to complement clinical examination and to facilitate the identification of initial carcinomas. To find out the efficacy of chemiluminescent illumination (ViziLite™) for the diagnosis in precancer and cancer patients and compare this result to toluidine blue staining and oral exfoliative cytology. This study was done in 3 groups. Each group consists of 10 cases. Group I consists of normal appearing mucosa. Group II and III consist of clinically diagnosed pre-cancer and clinically suggestive of cancer respectively. Chemiluminescent illumination, toluidine blue supravital staining, oral exfoliative cytology and biopsy were performed in all cases. SPSS version 10.05 was used to calculate positive and negative predictive values. In Group I, all 10 patients showed negative result to ViziLite™. 8 patients showed positivity and 2 patients showed negativity to ViziLite™ test in Group II. 9 patients were positive and one patient was negative for ViziLite™. Chemiluminescent illumination test was sensitive for precancerous and cancerous lesions, which presented as keratotic lesions and red-white lesions. It showed negative result to erosive lesions. Toluidine blue staining test was reliable in precancerous and cancerous lesions, which present as erosive and red-white lesions. It showed negative result to keratotic lesions. Oral exfoliative cytology has diagnostic value in cancer patients than in precancer patients. These Results indicate that chemiluminescent illumination test is relatively reliable and accurate than toluidine blue staining test and useful chair side diagnostic test.

  12. Assessment of oral mucosa in normal, precancer and cancer using chemiluminescent illumination, toluidine blue supravital staining and oral exfoliative cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rajmohan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Carcinoma in an early stage of development is hard to detect clinically because the lesion may not be palpable and color of the lesional tissue is not necessarily different from the color of the surrounding mucosa. In order to improve the efficacy of the diagnosis, techniques are being developed to complement clinical examination and to facilitate the identification of initial carcinomas. Aims: To find out the efficacy of chemiluminescent illumination (ViziLite TM for the diagnosis in precancer and cancer patients and compare this result to toluidine blue staining and oral exfoliative cytology. Materials and Methods: This study was done in 3 groups. Each group consists of 10 cases. Group I consists of normal appearing mucosa. Group II and III consist of clinically diagnosed pre-cancer and clinically suggestive of cancer respectively. Chemiluminescent illumination, toluidine blue supravital staining, oral exfoliative cytology and biopsy were performed in all cases. Statistical analysis used: SPSS version 10.05 was used to calculate positive and negative predictive values. Results: In Group I, all 10 patients showed negative result to ViziLite TM . 8 patients showed positivity and 2 patients showed negativity to ViziLite TM test in Group II. 9 patients were positive and one patient was negative for ViziLite TM . Conclusions: Chemiluminescent illumination test was sensitive for precancerous and cancerous lesions, which presented as keratotic lesions and red-white lesions. It showed negative result to erosive lesions. Toluidine blue staining test was reliable in precancerous and cancerous lesions, which present as erosive and red-white lesions. It showed negative result to keratotic lesions. Oral exfoliative cytology has diagnostic value in cancer patients than in precancer patients. These Results indicate that chemiluminescent illumination test is relatively reliable and accurate than toluidine blue staining test and useful chair side

  13. Case report of an oral fibroma occurring in a patient with familial multiple lipomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radfar, Lida; Holt, Tyler; Masood, Farah

    2013-12-01

    A wide variety of lesions may manifest in the oral soft tissues that could be confusing and challenging for the clinicians. These lesions could be as simple as trauma-induced ulcers that need about 2 weeks to heal, to a more complicated situation such as oral cancer. The key points in developing diagnosis and a possible treatment plan may include a comprehensive oral examination, simple understanding of normal oral tissue features, and knowledge of common oral lesions. This will help in the development of a differential diagnosis of the oral lesions/masses based on the risk factors in that particular patient. In this case report, we present a simple oral mass in a patient who had an oral fibroma and lipomas in other areas.

  14. Oral Hygiene in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Leonardo M; Portela de Oliveira, Millena Teles; Magalhaes, Wilrama B; Bastos, Poliana Lima

    2015-11-02

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a multifactorial etiology. The symptoms are characterized by motor disorders - tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural instability, which hinder oral hygiene. Oral and dental health in Parkinson's disease has been under-documented and findings are conflicting. Moreover, a number of dentists have limited experience regarding the management of these patients. This article reviews literature published within the last fifteen years, to better understand the impact of this disease in oral health. A literature search (MEDLINE and PUBMED), using keywords Parkinson Disease and Oral Hygiene, yielded 27 articles, from which 20 were selected. All of the articles were published in English in the last 15 years.

  15. Optical screening of oral cancer: technology for emerging markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Sarif Kumar; Gupta, Lalit; Mittal, Chetan; Balakrishnan, Srinivasan; Rath, Satish Prasad; Santhosh, C; Pai, Keerthilatha M

    2007-01-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world. It is one of the most prevalent cancers in the developing countries of South Asia accounting for one third of the world burden. Sixty percent of the cancers are advanced by the time they are detected. Two methods of optical spectroscopy for detection of oral cancer have been discussed here. These methods are simple, easy to handle and non-invasive. The evaluation of the data is done automatically using pattern recognition techniques, making the screening subjective.

  16. Acoustic-phonetic and artificial neural network feature analysis to assess speech quality of stop consonants produced by patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Marieke J.; ten Bosch, Louis; Kuik, Dirk J.; Witte, Birgit I.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Rene; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.

    2012-01-01

    Speech impairment often occurs in patients after treatment for head and neck cancer. A specific speech characteristic that influences intelligibility and speech quality is voice-onset-time (VOT) in stop consonants. VOT is one of the functionally most relevant parameters that distinguishes voiced and

  17. Acoustic-phonetic and artificial neural network feature analysis to assess speech quality of stop consonants produced by patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, Marieke J.; ten Bosch, Louis; Kuik, Dirk J.; Witte, Birgit I.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. Rene; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M.

    Speech impairment often occurs in patients after treatment for head and neck cancer. A specific speech characteristic that influences intelligibility and speech quality is voice-onset-time (VOT) in stop consonants. VOT is one of the functionally most relevant parameters that distinguishes voiced and

  18. Oral drugs in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakman, J J M; Punt, C J A

    2016-07-01

    Intravenous administration of fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy has been the cornerstone of treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) for decades. The availability of oral capecitabine has improved the tolerability in monotherapy schedules, and has simplified combination schedules. Since then, other oral drugs have proven efficacy in this setting. We review the available evidence and most recent data concerning oral drugs with proven efficacy in mCRC, including capecitabine, S-1, trifluridine-tipiracil (TAS-102) and regorafenib. The use of capecitabine is widely implemented in the care of mCRC. However, with recent data supporting its prolonged use, the relatively high incidence of hand-foot syndrome (HFS) may impair quality of life. In Asian populations, S-1 is associated with equivalent efficacy but lower incidence of HFS compared to capecitabine. Further studies evaluating the effects of S-1 in Western populations are needed. Both regorafenib and TAS-102 improve the overall survival of patients in whom all other treatment options have failed. Since only a subset of patients appears to benefit, future studies to identify predictive biomarkers are needed.

  19. Association of right-sided tumors with high thymidine phosphorylase gene expression levels and the response to oral uracil and tegafur/leucovorin chemotherapy among patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadahiro, Sotaro; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Akira; Okada, Kazutake; Nagase, Hideki; Uchida, Junji

    2012-08-01

    To identify useful predictive factors for the response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (LV) and oral uracil and tegafur (UFT)/LV chemotherapy among patients with colorectal cancer, we investigated the association between the gene expression levels of pyrimidine and folate metabolism-related enzymes in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues and the response to UFT/LV neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The subjects were 76 CRC patients who were scheduled to undergo surgery. UFT (300 mg/m(2)/day) and LV (75 mg/body/day) were administered for 2 weeks before surgery. Biopsy samples were endoscopically obtained before drug administration. The gene expression levels of 14 genes in the biopsy samples were quantitatively evaluated using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Fifteen patients (19.7 %) with marked pathological regression were judged to be responders. Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) gene expression levels among the responders were significantly higher than those among the non-responders. Right-sided tumors with high TP gene expression levels were associated with a significantly higher response rate to UFT/LV chemotherapy than left-sided tumors. TP gene expression levels in primary CRC tissues and the primary tumor site may be useful predictors of the efficacy of oral UFT/LV chemotherapy.

  20. Oral cancer: the association between nation-based alcohol-drinking profiles and oral cancer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Stefano; Scully, Crispian

    2005-09-01

    The unclear association between different nation-based alcohol-drinking profiles and oral cancer mortality was investigated using, as observational units, 20 countries from Europe, Northern America, Far Eastern Asia, with cross-nationally comparable data. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were run with male age-standardised, mortality rate (ASMR) as explanatory variable and annual adult alcohol consumption, adult smoking prevalence, life expectancy, as explanatory. Large between-country differences in ASMR (range, 0.88-6.87 per 100,000) were found, but the mean value was similar to the global estimate (3.31 vs. 3.09 per 100,000). Differences in alcohol consumption (2.06-21.03 annual litres per capita) and in distribution between beverages were reported. Wine was the most prevalent alcoholic beverage in 45% of cases. Significant increases in ASMR for every litre of pure ethanol (0.15 per 100,000; 95 CI, 0.01-0.29) and spirits (0.26 per 100,000; 95 CI, 0.03-0.49), non-significant effects for beer and wine were estimated. The impact of alcohol on oral cancer deaths would be higher than expected and the drinking profile could affect cancer mortality, probably because of the different drinking pattern of spirit drinkers, usually consuming huge alcohol quantities on single occasions, and the different concentrations of ethanol and cancer-preventing compounds such as polyphenols, in the various beverages.

  1. An orthodontic device for retaining implanted radioactive sources during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuko, Noriko; Katsura, Kouji [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Sato, Katsurou; Kawana, Masahiro; Nonomura, Naobumi

    2000-03-01

    An orthodontic retainer was devised to keeping implanted radioactive sources in position and improve the quality of life during brachytherapy for cancer of the oral cavity. The retainer was used in 3 patients with oral cancer, one with cancer of the hard palate, one with cancer of the soft palate, and one with cancer of the floor of mouth, during brachytherapy using {sup 198}Au grains and {sup 137}Cs needles. These patients could speak freely. One with cancer of the hard palate could drink water and ingest semi-liquid food during treatment instead of nasal tube feeding. The plaster dental model obtained while making the retainer proved to be useful for training radiation oncologists. (author)

  2. [Proteinase activity in Candida albicans strains isolated from the oral cavity of immunocompromised patients, with oral candidiasis and in healthy subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Solís, Sandra E; Rueda-Gordillo, Florencio; Rojas-Herrera, Rafael A

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans has a variety of virulence factors, including secreted aspartyl proteases, which are determinant factors in the pathogenesis of this yeast in immunocompromised patients. Proteinase activity was identified in C. albicans strains isolated from the oral cavity of immunocompromised patients with cancer, diabetes and HIV+, with oral candidiasis and in healthy subjects. Two hundred and fifty C. albicans strains were analyzed, distributed in 5 different groups: patients with cancer, diabetes, HIV+, with oral candidiasis and healthy subjects. Proteolytic activity was identified in 46% of the strains from cancer patients, 54% from HIV+ patients, 60% from diabetics, 70% from oral candidiasis patients, and 42% from healthy subjects. Activity was higher in strains from immunocompromised and oral candidiasis patients than in healthy subjects. Differences were observed between the candidiasis-healthy, candidiasis-HIV+, and diabetic-healthy groups. No differences were observed between the oral candidiasis, diabetes and cancer patients, between the diabetes and HIV+ patients, or between the cancer patients, HIV+ patients and healthy subjects. The present results suggest that although secreted aspartyl proteases are important in the pathogenesis of C. albicans, their activity depends on host conditions. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of oral cancer epidemiology in the US reveals state-specific trends: implications for oral cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditmyer Marcia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Downward trends have been observed in oral cancer incidence and mortality in the US over the past 30 years; however, these declines are not uniform within this population. Several studies have now demonstrated an increase in the incidence and mortality from oral cancers among certain demographic groups, which may have resulted from increased risks or risk behaviors. This study examines the underlying data that comprise these trends, to identify specific populations that may be at greater risk for morbidity and mortality from oral cancers. Methods Oral cancer incidence and mortality data analyzed for this study were generated using the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER program. Results While oral cancer incidence and mortality rates have been declining over the past thirty years, these declines have reversed in the past five years among some demographic groups, including black females and white males. Sorting of these data by state revealed that eight states exhibited increasing rates of oral cancer deaths, Nevada, North Carolina, Iowa, Ohio, Maine, Idaho, North Dakota, and Wyoming, in stark contrast to the national downward trend. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of data from these states revealed increasing rates of oral cancer among older white males, also contrary to the overall trends observed at the national level. Conclusion These results signify that, despite the declining long-term trends in oral cancer incidence and mortality nationally, localized geographic areas exist where the incidence and mortality from oral cancers have been increasing. These areas represent sites where public health education and prevention efforts may be focused to target these specific populations in an effort to improve health outcomes and reduce disparities within these populations.

  4. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregivers Flu Treatment for Cancer Patients and Survivors Flu Publications Stay Informed Cancer Home Information for Patients and Caregivers Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cancer patients ...

  5. microbiological profile of oral infections in diabetic patients and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Oral exam was conducted by a Dentist to assess oral infections and oral health status of participants. Results: ... Conclusion: The oral microbiological profile of diabetic patients was different from those of non-diabetics and aerobic ... threatening conditions such as HIV/AIDS, ..... noted that diabetes was an added risk for oral.

  6. Patterns of relapse following surgery and postoperative intensity modulated radiotherapy for oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collan, Juhani; Vaalavirta, Leila; Kajanti, Mikael; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko (Dept. of Oncology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, and Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)), E-mail: kauko.saarilahti@hus.fi; Lundberg, Marie; Baeck, Leif; Maekitie, Antti (Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, and Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2011-10-15

    Background. To investigate the patterns of relapse following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) given after radical surgery for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Patients and methods. One hundred and two patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer were treated with radical surgery followed by IMRT up to a mean total dose of 60 Gy between years 2001 and 2007. Thirty-nine of the patients (%) also received concomitant weekly cisplatin. Forty of the patients had oral and 62 had oropharyngeal cancer. Data on the tumour, patient and treatment factors were collected. Following therapy the patients were followed by clinical examination, endoscopy and MRI/CT at 2- to 3-months interval up to 2 years and thereafter at 6-month intervals. Results. The mean follow-up time of the patients was 55 months (range, 26-106 months). The rate for local tumour control for the whole cohort was 92.2%: 87.5% for oral cancer patients and 96.7% for oropharyngeal cancer patients. The 5-year disease specific survival was 90.2% and 5-year overall survival 84.3%. During the follow-up eight locoregional recurrences were observed, three at the primary tumour site and one at regional nodal site and four at both sites. The mean time to primary tumour recurrence was seven months (range, 2-10 months) and to nodal recurrence seven months (range, 2-12 months). Distant metastasis occurred in six (6%) patients. The factors associated with poor prognosis were the primary tumour size and tumour site with oral cancers having worse outcome. The treatment was well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. The most frequent late toxicity was dysphagia necessitating permanent PEG in five patients. This was correlated with the advanced primary tumour size and resulting in wide tumour excision and reconstruction. Conclusions. Surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy given as IMRT results in low level of tumour recurrence

  7. Factors associated with lip and oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Lima Arrais Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study aimed to identify factors associated with the occurrence of primary cancer of the lip and oral cavity regions compared to other types of head and neck cancers according to demographic, socioeconomic data and lifestyle, in Brazil, from 2000 to 2011.METHODS: A study was conducted using Hospital Cancer Records (Instituto Nacional do Câncer, from 2000 to 2011, totaling 23,153 cases. Data were analyzed by binary logistic regression (response category: primary cancers located in the lip and oral cavity; comparison category; other types of primary cancer in the head and neck, which does not affect the lip and oral cavity at a significance level α = 5%.RESULTS: The study showed factors associated with higher incidence of cancer in the lip and oral cavity: being of advanced age (OR = 1.16, not having a family history of cancer (OR = 2.38, alcohol consumption (OR = 1.17; former tobacco use (OR = 1.51 or current tobacco use (OR = 1.65; having a previous diagnosis of cancer without treatment (OR =1.66. Being female (OR = 0.92, having completed basic (OR = 0.71 and higher (OR = 0.46 education and having previous diagnosis of cancer with treatment (OR = 0.74 constituted factors associated with lower prevalence of cancer of the lip and oral cavity.CONCLUSION: Age, absence of family history of cancer, smoking habits and alcohol consumption, and previous diagnosis of cancer without treatment were associated with a higher incidence of cancer of the lip and oral cavity.

  8. Advances in Bio-Optical Imaging for the Diagnosis of Early Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Keogh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is among the most common malignancies worldwide, therefore early detection and treatment is imperative. The 5-year survival rate has remained at a dismal 50% for the past several decades. The main reason for the poor survival rate is the fact that most of the oral cancers, despite the general accessibility of the oral cavity, are not diagnosed until the advanced stage. Early detection of the oral tumors and its precursor lesions may be the most effective means to improve clinical outcome and cure most patients. One of the emerging technologies is the use of non-invasive in vivo tissue imaging to capture the molecular changes at high-resolution to improve the detection capability of early stage disease. This review will discuss the use of optical probes and highlight the role of optical imaging such as autofluorescence, fluorescence diagnosis (FD, laser confocal endomicroscopy (LCE, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, optical coherence tomography (OCT and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM in early oral cancer detection. FD is a promising method to differentiate cancerous lesions from benign, thus helping in the determination of adequate resolution of surgical resection margin. LCE offers in vivo cellular imaging of tissue structures from surface to subsurface layers and has demonstrated the potential to be used as a minimally invasive optical biopsy technique for early diagnosis of oral cancer lesions. SERS was able to differentiate between normal and oral cancer patients based on the spectra acquired from saliva of patients. OCT has been used to visualize the detailed histological features of the oral lesions with an imaging depth down to 2–3 mm. CRM is an optical tool to noninvasively image tissue with near histological resolution. These comprehensive diagnostic modalities can also be used to define surgical margin and to provide a direct assessment of the therapeutic effectiveness.

  9. Depression in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Bag

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not enough to consider treatment and care depression in the oncology that is the most common psychiatric illness in cancer patient affects of cancer treatment and the patient`s quality of life negatively, which is determined through researches in the field. With development of psycho-oncology it has been demonstrated to establish an important link between the cancer patient`s treatment as well as psycho-social support for the patient and psychiatric treatment and care for the if it is needed. With this connection between them it has been proposed to use of bio-psycho-social-model in cancer patient to improve their care. To achieve this goal, it is expected from medical personnel to realize patients psychosocial need und if he/she has a psychiatric disorders or syndromes. For the medical personnel that work in oncology services, it is inevitable to organize in order to raise the awareness of depression in the cancer patients. In the present study, it is focused on raising the awareness of depression in cancer patient for the medical personnel. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 186-198

  10. Influence of oral glutamine supplementation on survival outcomes of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topkan Erkan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine (Gln supplementation during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (C-CRT effectively reduces the incidence and severity of acute radiation-induced esophagitis (RIE. However, there are concerns that Gln might stimulate tumor growth, and therefore negatively impact the outcomes of anticancer treatment. We retrospectively investigated the effect of co-administration of oral Gln during C-CRT on survival outcomes of patients with stage IIIB non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. We additionally evaluated role of oral Gln in preventing C-CRT-induced weight change, acute and late toxicities. Methods The study included 104 patients: 56 (53.8% received prophylactic powdered Gln (Gln+ orally at a dose of 10 g/8 h and 48 (46.2% did not receive Gln (Gln- and served as controls. The prescribed radiation dose to the planning target volume was 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Primary endpoints of progression-free survival (PFS, local/regional progression-free survival (LRPFS, and overall survival (OS were correlated with status of Gln supplementation. Results Oral Gln was well tolerated except for mild nausea/vomiting in 14 (25.0% patients. There was no C-CRT-related acute or late grade 4–5 toxicity. Administration of Gln was associated with a decrease in the incidence of grade 3 acute radiation-induced esophagitis (RIE (7.2% vs. 16.7% for Gln+ vs. Gln-; p=0.02 and late-RIE (0% vs. 6.3%; p=0.06, a reduced need for unplanned treatment breaks (7.1% vs. 20.8%; p=0.04, and reduced incidence of weight loss (44.6% vs. 72.9%; p=0.002. At a median follow-up of 24.2 months (range 9.2-34.4 the median OS, LRPFS, and PFS for Gln+ vs. Gln- cohorts were 21.4 vs. 20.4 (p=0.35, 14.2 vs.11.3 (p=0.16, and 10.2 vs. 9.0 months (p=0.11, respectively. Conclusion In our study, supplementation with Gln during C-CRT had no detectable negative impact on tumor control and survival outcomes in patients with Stage IIIB NSCLC. Furthermore, Gln appeared to have a beneficial

  11. Liaison between micro-organisms and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasprasad, Vijayan; Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sathiyajeeva, J; Karthikeyan, M; Sunitha, J; Ragunathan, Ramachandran

    2015-08-01

    Oral cancer which is a subtype of head and neck, cancer is any neoplastic tissue growth in the oral cavity. It comprises an abnormal mass of cells that foists genetic mutation and impedes the normal cell cycle, resulting in its unrestrained growth. Various studies on the plausible link between oral microbial flora and cancer notwithstanding, our understanding of their link remains obscure and inadequate. The multitude of mechanisms by which the microflora initiate or spur Carcinogenesis are still under study and scrutiny. As is widely known, the oral cavity is an abode to a wide assortment of microbes, each present in contrasting amounts. It is observed that increased growth of the microflora is concomitant with known clinical risk factors for oral cancer. Manifold bacterial species have been found to interfere directly with eukaryotic cellular signaling, adopting a style typical of tumor promoters. Bacteria are also known to impede apoptosis thereby potentially promoting carcinogenesis. The viral role in carcinogenesis (by annulling of p53 tumor suppressor gene and other cellular proteins with subsequent alteration in host genome function) is well documented. Furthermore, the changes occurring in the commensal microflora in accompaniment with cancer development could possibly be used as a diagnostic indicator for early cancer detection. The intention of this review is to obtain a better understanding of the "role" that micro-organisms play in oral cancer etiology.

  12. Natural ways to prevent and treat oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Danaraddi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one of the usual causes of mortality all over the world, with a five-year survival rate of only 50%. Oral cancers are treated primarily by surgery with / without adjuvant radiotherapy and / or chemotherapy. However, there is significant post-treatment morbidity and mortality secondary to recurrences. Dietary supplements like fruits and vegetables are rich in phytochemicals and provide a variety of antioxidants like vitamin A, C, E. Spirulina, Selenium, Green tea (EGCG, Neem, Tomatoes (lycopene, Turmeric (curcumin, and some medicinal mushrooms are also used as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. This overview emphasizes on natural therapies to fight against oral cancer. Thus, there are several natural compounds that can enhance the prevention of oral cancer.

  13. ORAL OPIOIDS IN THE TREATMENT OF CANCER PAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZYLICZ, Z; TWYCROSS, RG

    1991-01-01

    Persistent severe cancer pain should be treated with opioid drugs, principally morphine. It can be administered orally, rectally and parenterally. Morphine is metabolised in the liver mainly to glucuronides, of which morphine-6-glucuronide is a powerful analgesic. Oral morphine should be administere

  14. ORAL-THERAPY FOR SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POSTMUS, PE; SMIT, EF

    After a remarkable improvement of the very poor prognosis of small cell lung cancer with very simple therapy such as iv and oral cyclophosphamide the role of oral therapy has become minimal. However, since more than a decade results of combination chemotherapy are at a plateau and it is necessary to

  15. [Nutrition and cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuramaki, T; Hirata, K; Isobe, M

    1998-03-01

    Nutritional therapy for cancer patients includes various objectives such as improvement of cachexia, elucidation of the mechanism of malnutrition, development of therapy for anorexia, nutrition support during chemotherapy or radiotherapy, and inhibition of tumor growth under controlled caloric intake. This review describes recent remarkable developments in nutritional therapy for cancer patients. Cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor which induce proteolysis and lipolysis are involved in the cause of malnutrition and cachexia in cancer patients. IL-1 also plays a significant role in the development of cancer anorexia via direct action in the brain. For anorexia therapy, progestogens have been shown to improve appetite and food intake in cancer patients. Moreover, glutamine supplementation improves the host protein metabolism without enhancement of tumor growth during chemotherapy. Among the effects of caloric intake on anticancer therapy, AO-90, a methionine-free intravenous amino acid solution, has been shown to increase the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil in clinical studies. From these observations, recent progress in nutritional therapy for cancer patients has been remarkable. Further study of nutritional therapy is required in order to maintain or improve the quality of life of cancer patients in the future.

  16. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Grupe, Peter;

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate lymphatic mapping combined with sentinel lymph node biopsy as a staging procedure, and to evaluate the possible clinical implications of added oblique lymphoscintigraphy and/or tomography and test the intra- and interobserver reproducibility of lymphoscintigraphy. MATERIAL...... AND METHODS: Forty patients (17 F and 23 M, aged 32-90) with 24 T1 and 16 T2 squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. Planar lymphoscintigraphy, emission and transmission tomography were performed. Detection and excision of the sentinel nodes were guided by a gamma probe. The sentinel nodes were step......-sectioning and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and cytokeratin (CK 1). Histology and follow-up were used as "gold standard". Tumor location, number of sentinel lymph nodes, metastasis, and recurrences were registered. Two observers evaluated the lymphoscintigraphic images to assess the inter-rater agreement. RESULTS...

  17. Analgesic effectiveness and tolerability of oral oxycodone/naloxone and pregabalin in patients with lung cancer and neuropathic pain: an observational analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Stefano; Borghesi, Cristina; Ricciardi, Serena; Giovannoni, Daniele; Fulvi, Alberto; Migliorino, Maria Rita; Marcassa, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer-related pain has a severe negative impact on quality of life. Combination analgesic therapy with oxycodone and pregabalin is effective for treating neuropathic cancer pain. We investigated the efficacy and tolerability of a dose-escalation combination therapy with prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN-PR) and pregabalin in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and severe neuropathic pain. Methods This was a 4-week, open-label, observational study. Patients were treated with OXN-PR and pregabalin. Average pain intensity ([API] measured on a 0–10 numerical rating scale) and neuropathic pain (Douleur Neuropathique 4) were assessed at study entry and at follow-up visits. The primary endpoint was response to treatment, defined as a reduction of API at T28 ≥30% from baseline. Secondary endpoints included other efficacy measures, as well as patient satisfaction and quality of life (Brief Pain Inventory Short Form), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Distress Scale; bowel function was also assessed. Results A total of 56 patients were enrolled. API at baseline was 8.0±0.9, and decreased after 4 weeks by 48% (4.2±1.9; P<0.0001 vs baseline); 46 (82.1%) patients responded to treatment. Significant improvements were also reported in number/severity of breakthrough cancer pain episodes (P=0.001), Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (P=0.0002), Symptom Distress Scale (P<0.0001), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression (P=0.0006) and anxiety (P<0.0001) subscales, and bowel function (P=0.0003). At study end, 37 (66.0%) patients were satisfied/very satisfied with the new analgesic treatment. Combination therapy had a good safety profile. Conclusion OXN-PR and pregabalin were safe and highly effective in a real-world setting of severe neuropathic cancer pain, with a high rate of satisfaction, without interference on bowel function. PMID:27445495

  18. Estimation of serum malondialdehyde in oral cancer and precancer and its association with healthy individuals, gender, alcohol, and tobacco abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chole Revant

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco and alcohol induces generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for high rate of lipid peroxidation. Malondialdehyde is the most widely used marker of lipid peroxidation. The aim of the study was to estimate serum malondialdehyde level in oral precancer, oral cancer, and normal individuals. Materials and Methods: In this study serum malondialdehyde was measured according to the method of Ohkawa et al in 30 normal individuals and 30 patients each with histopathologically diagnosed oral precancer, and oral cancer. Results: The mean serum malondialdehyde level in the control group was found to be 5.107 ± 2.32 ηmol/ml, whereas it was 9.33 ± 4.89 ηmol/ml and 14.34 ± 1.43 ηmol/ml in oral precancer and oral cancer, respectively. There was statistically significant increase in serum malondialdehyde levels in the oral precancer and oral cancer patients compared with the control group. Conclusion: Increased serum malondialdehyde in oral cancer and oral precancer would serve as a valuable marker for both preventive and clinical intervention, and may deserve further investigation for the early diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  19. Cell migration is regulated by AGE-RAGE interaction in human oral cancer cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Yao Ko

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end products (AGEs are produced in an irreversible non-enzymatic reaction of carbohydrates and proteins. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM are known to have elevated AGE levels, which is viewed as a risk factor of diabetes-related complications. In a clinical setting, it has been shown that patients with oral cancer in conjunction with DM have a higher likelihood of cancer metastasis and lower cancer survival rates. AGE-RAGE (a receptor of AGEs is also correlated with metastasis and angiogenesis. Recent studies have suggested that the malignancy of cancer may be enhanced by glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study examined the apparently close correlation between AGE-RAGE and the malignancy of SAS oral cancer cell line. In this study, AGEs increased ERK phosphorylation, enhanced cell migration, and promoted the expression of RAGE, MMP2, and MMP9. Using PD98059, RAGE antibody, and RAGE RNAi to block RAGE pathway resulted in the inhibition of ERK phosphorylation. Cell migration, MMP2 and MMP9 expression were also reduced by this treatment. Our findings demonstrate the importance of AGE-RAGE with regard to the malignancy of oral cancer, and help to explain the poor prognosis of DM subjects with oral cancer.

  20. PLGA-Chitosan nanoparticle-mediated gene delivery for oral cancer treatment: A brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, L. M.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Doolaanea, A. A.; Ichwan, S. J. A.

    2017-08-01

    Cancer becomes a serious issue on society with increasing of their growth and proliferation, either in well economic developed countries or not. Recent years, oral cancer is one of the most threatening diseases impairing the quality of life of the patient. Scientists have emphasised on application of gene therapy for oral cancer by using nanoparticle as transportation vectors as a new alternative platform in order to overcome the limitations of conventional approaches. In modern medicine, nanotechnologies’ application, such as nanoparticles-mediated gene delivery, is one of promising tool for therapeutic devices. The objective of this article is to present a brief review summarizes on the current progress of nanotechnology-based gene delivery treatment system targeted for oral cancer.

  1. Application of fuzzy consensus for oral pre-cancer and cancer susceptibility assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satarupa Banerjee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Health questionnaire data assessment conventionally relies upon statistical analysis in understanding disease susceptibility using discrete numbers and fails to reflect physician’s perspectives and missing narratives in data, which play subtle roles in disease prediction. In addressing such limitations, the present study applies fuzzy consensus in oral health and habit questionnaire data for a selected Indian population in the context of assessing susceptibility to oral pre-cancer and cancer. Methodically collected data were initially divided into age based small subgroups and fuzzy membership function was assigned to each. The methodology further proposed the susceptibility to oral precancers (viz. leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis and squamous cell carcinoma in patients considering a fuzzy rulebase through If-Then rules with certain conditions. Incorporation of similarity measures using the Jaccard index was used during conversion into the linguistic output of fuzzy set to predict the disease outcome in a more accurate manner and associated condition of the relevant features. It is also expected that this analytical approach will be effective in devising strategies for policy making through real-life questionnaire data handling.

  2. Validation of Reference Genes for Oral Cancer Detection Panels in a Prospective Blinded Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack L Martin

    Full Text Available Reference genes are needed as internal controls to determine relative expression for clinical application of gene expression panels. Candidate constitutively expressed genes must be validated as suitable reference genes in each body fluid and disease entity. Prior studies have predominantly validated oral squamous cell carcinoma associated messenger RNAs (mRNAs based on quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR quantification cycle (Cq values without adjustment for housekeeping genes.One hundred sixty eight patients had saliva collected before clinically driven biopsy of oral lesions suspicious for cancer. Seven potential housekeeping mRNAs and six pre-specified oral cancer associated mRNAs were measured with qPCR by personnel blinded to tissue diagnosis. Housekeeping gene stability was determined with the NormFinder program in a training set of 12 randomly selected cancer and 24 control patients. Genes with stability indices 0.02 in the training set and were not further tested. MT-ATP6, RPL30, RPL37A, RPLP0 and RPS17 all had stability indices <0.02 in the training set and in the verification set. The geNorm M values were all ≤1.10. All six pre-specified cancer genes (IL8, IL1, SAT, OAZ1, DUSP1 and S100P were up-regulated in cancer versus control patients with from nearly twofold to over threefold higher levels (p<0.01 for all based on delta Cq values.Five reference genes are validated for use in oral cancer salivary gene expression panels. Six pre-specified oral carcinoma associated genes are demonstrated to be highly significantly up-regulated in cancer patients based on delta Cq values. These cancer and reference genes are suitable for inclusion in gene expression panels for research and clinical applications.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01587573.

  3. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the American Cancer Society document Nasopharyngeal Cancer. Cancers that start in the larynx (voice box) or the hypopharynx (the part of the throat below the oropharynx) are discussed in the American Cancer Society document Laryngeal & Hypopharyngeal Cancer . Tumors and growths ...

  4. STOMATOLOGIC ASPECTS IN THERAPY OF LOCALLY DISTRIBUTED CANCER OF ORAL CAVITY MUCUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Matyakin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the investigation: to improve prophylaxis of dental complications during the therapy in the patients with locally distributed cancer of oral cavity mucus.Materials. Results of sanation of oral cavity in 305 patients with cancer of oral and pharyngeal area are analyzed.Results. The best results are noted in the patients given surgical sanation before chemo-radial therapy. The most number of complications is observed when teeth were extracted after chemical therapy in the period of radial therapy at summary focal dose above 20 Gy as well as in the late periods after radial therapy.Conclusion. A complex of preventive measures with using haemostatic sponge with canamycin in such patients decreases the number of complications and the terms of healing of alveoli of extracted teeth.

  5. Post-therapeutic surveillance schedule for oral cancer: is there agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guicai; Dierks, Eric J; Bell, R Bryan; Bui, Tuan G; Potter, Bryce E

    2012-12-01

    Patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma represent a diverse group, and the treatment these patients undergo also varies widely. Some patients undergo local excision alone while others require extensive surgery, often with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The post-therapeutic surveillance schedule for these patients tends to be a "one size fits all" formula for all head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients, which has often been dictated by institutional doctrine or a senior surgeon's dogma. The post-therapeutic needs and risks of a T1 oral cancer patient treated with surgery alone differ from those of a patient with advanced laryngeal carcinoma, and the follow-up regimen should be tailored to the specific patient's risk of loco-regional recurrence, distant metastasis, and other related medical issues. A total of 65 papers were identified, 18 of which either focused on follow-up strategy for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma or their tabular data allowed these cases to be extracted. Internationally recognized cancer entities were also queried. No international consensus was achieved about the follow-up strategies. The value of post-therapeutic surveillance schedule following oral cancer treatment is generally not in dispute, although patient-initiated symptom-driven visits can be effective in identifying tumor recurrence for oral cancer patients. The range of appointment interval schemes tends to identify a progressive escalation of visit intervals such that there are more visits in the first year than in the second, and fewer yet during the third. Patients may fail to comply with their clinic visit structure. Most references agree that follow-up beyond the third year is unnecessary and may waste medical resources as well as the time of both patient and surgeon. There is no agreement as to the need for or interval of imaging studies.

  6. Sarcopenia in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindapasirt, Jarin

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia, characterized by a decline of skeletal muscle plus low muscle strength and/or physical performance, has emerged to be an important prognostic factor for advanced cancer patients. It is associated with poor performance status, toxicity from chemotherapy, and shorter time of tumor control. There is limited data about sarcopenia in cancer patients and associated factors. Moreover, the knowledge about the changes of muscle mass during chemotherapy and its impact to response and toxicity to chemotherapy is still lacking. This review aimed to provide understanding about sarcopenia and to emphasize its importance to cancer treatment.

  7. Oral cancer--current knowledge, practices and implications for training among an Irish general medical practitioner cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Riordain, Richeal

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the current knowledge and practices of general medical practitioners (GMPs) in Ireland regarding the examination of the oral cavity and the detection of oral malignancy and the training they had received at both undergraduate and postgraduate level and since commencing in practice. A questionnaire survey of GMPs in Ireland was conducted. One hundred and fifty four (65.3%) of the practitioners reported regularly examining the oral mucosa of their patients. Almost half of these (n=68) further qualified this response by stating that they only examined the oral mucosa if the patient reported pain in this area or if the patient specifically requested an oral examination for some reason. Eighty one (34.3%) practitioners surveyed felt confident in their ability to detect oral malignancies with the remaining two thirds unsure of whether they would be able to detect oral cancer. There was a significant association between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on examination of the oral cavity and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=4.811, p<0.05]. A statistically significant association was also found between the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching on the diagnosis of oral malignant disease and whether practitioners felt confident in their ability to detect oral cancer [chi(2)(1)=6.194, p<0.05]. In conclusion the level of knowledge of Irish general medical practitioners needs to be addressed with appropriate initiatives both at undergraduate level and via CME.

  8. Effect of Oral Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA Supplementation on DHA Levels and Omega-3 Index in Red Blood Cell Membranes of Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Molfino

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in cell membrane may influence breast cancer (BC patients' prognosis, affecting tumor cells sensitivity to chemo- and radio-therapy and likely modulating inflammation. The possibility of identifying BC patients presenting with low DHA levels and/or low ability of DHA incorporation into cell membrane might help to treat this condition.Methods: We enrolled BC patients and healthy controls, recording their seafood dietary intake. DHA in form of algal oil was administered for 10 consecutive days (2 g/day. Blood samples were collected at baseline (T0 and after 10 days of supplementation (T1 to assess DHA, omega-3 index, as the sum of DHA + eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, in red blood cells (RBC membranes and plasma tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 levels. Pre- and post-treatment fatty acid profiles were obtained by gas-chromatography. Parametric and non-parametric tests were performed, as appropriate, and P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Forty-three women were studied, divided into 4 groups: 11 patients with BRCA1/2 gene mutation (M group, 12 patients with familiar positive history for BC (F group, 10 patients with sporadic BC (S group, and 10 healthy controls (C group. DHA and omega-3 index increased from T0 to T1 in the 3 groups of BC patients and in controls (P < 0.001. No difference was found in DHA incorporation between each group of BC patients and between patients and controls, except for M group, which incorporated higher DHA levels with respect to controls (β = 0.42; P = 0.03. No association was documented between cytokines levels and DHA and omega-3 index at baseline and after DHA supplementation. Independent of the presence of BC, women considered as “good seafood consumers” showed at baseline DHA and omega-3 index higher with respect to “low seafood consumers” (P = 0.04; P = 0.007, respectively. After supplementation, the increase in DHA levels was

  9. Relationship between mucositis and changes in oral microflora during cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napeñas, Joel J; Brennan, Michael T; Bahrani-Mougeot, Farah K; Fox, Philip C; Lockhart, Peter B

    2007-01-01

    It is thought that the incidence and severity of cancer chemotherapy-associated mucositis is caused in part by changes in the oral bacterial microflora. This systematic review examined the role of oral bacterial microflora changes in the development of oral mucositis during chemotherapy. Thirteen prospective clinical trials were identified, involving 300 patients with 13 different cancer diagnoses. There was great variability in patient populations, bacterial sample collection methodology, and oral sample sites. No clear pattern regarding qualitative and quantitative oral flora changes emerged among these studies. The most frequent Gram-negative species isolated during chemotherapy were from the Enterobacteriaceae family, Pseudomonas sp. and E. coli. The most common Gram-positive species isolated were Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. Five studies assessed the role of oral flora changes in the genesis of oral mucosal changes, with no consensus among them. More detailed studies are required to understand the relationship between chemotherapy, alterations in the nature and magnitude of the oral microflora, and the presence of mucositis.

  10. CORRECTION OF MALNUTRITION IN CANCER P ATIENTS WITH ORAL SUPPLEMENTS (SIPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Khomyakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Malnutrition occurs in 40 to 80 percent of cancer patients. Malnutrition in cancer patients is associated with poorer overall survival, reduced benefit from surgical and medical therapies, increased therapy-related toxicity, poorer quality of life. Early diagnostics of malnutrition and purpose of nutritional therapy is one of important components of supportive care at all steps of anticancer treatment. The modern tools for evaluation of the nutritional status and the principles of nutritional support at cancer patients, including oral nutritional supplements (siping are presented in the article.

  11. Evaluation of Oral Health in Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rathy Ravindran; M.G. Deepa; A.K. Sruthi; Cherian Kuruvila; Priya, S.; S.Sunil; Joseph Edward; G Roopesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral cav ity re flects the general health status of a person and diagnosing and treating oral manifestations of systemic disease pose a greater challenge. Even though there is strong evidence that supports the relationship between oral health and diabetes mellitus, oral health awareness is lacking among diabetic patients and health professionals. The present study was undertaken to determine the oral health status in type II diabetic patients and also...

  12. Cystic disease, family history of breast cancer, and use of oral contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, D V; Elinson, L; Morgan, R W

    1981-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies show a lower frequency of fibrocystic breast disease among users of oral contraceptives than among women who have never used them. Family history of breast cancer appears to be more common among benign breast disease patients than among their controls. To determine the use of oral contraceptives and the presence of family history of breast cancer, information was obtained from 211 cystic cases and their matched controls from the metropolitan Toronto area. Cystic cases compared to controls had a higher proportion of women with a family history of breast cancer (21% vs 15%). For both a positive and negative family history of breast cancer, as well as for all women combined, the mean duration of oral contraceptive use was lower for cystic cases than for controls. The odds ratio for oral contraceptive use according to family history of breast cancer for cystic cases and controls was 0.42 and 0.81 respectively. The possibility that a woman is more protected against benign breast disease by using oral contraceptives if she has a family history of breast cancer deserves more attention in future investigations on the long-term effects of birth control pills.

  13. Phase I trial of split-dose induction docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF chemotherapy followed by curative surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (TISOC-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oertel Katrin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induction chemotherapy (ICT with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF followed by radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for unresectable locally advanced head and neck cancer. This phase I study was designed to investigate the safety and tolerability of a split-dose TPF ICT regimen prior to surgery for locally advanced resectable oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods Patients received TPF split on two dosages on day 1 and 8 per cycle for one or three 3-week cycles prior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Docetaxel was escalated in two dose levels, 40 mg/m2 (DL 0 and 30 mg/m2 (DL −1, plus 40 mg/m2 cisplatin and 2000 mg/m2 fluorouracil per week using a 3 +3 dose escalation algorithm. Results Eighteen patients were enrolled and were eligible for toxicity and response. A maximum tolerated dose of 30 mg/m2 docetaxel per week was reached. The most common grade 3+ adverse event was neutropenia during ICT in 10 patients. Surgery reached R0 resection in all cases. Nine patients (50% showed complete pathologic regression. Conclusions A split-dose regime of TPF prior to surgery is feasible, tolerated and merits additional investigation in a phase II study with a dose of 30 mg/m docetaxel per week. Trial registration number NCT01108042 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

  14. Oral health after breast cancer treatment in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Amódio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Oral health can affect a patient’s general health and quality of life. Given the increase in breast cancer survival rates, investigations of factors influencing the quality of life of survivors have gained importance. Therefore, the objective of our study was to characterize oral health in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. METHODS: We conducted a matched case-control study. Forty-eight women who survived breast cancer (age 62.1±9.1 years and 48 healthy controls (age 61.8±8.6 years were included. For each case and control, a complete oral evaluation chart was completed. RESULTS: The prevalence of chronic periodontal disease was 98% in breast cancer survivors and 87% in controls. The breast cancer survivors had a median of 16 remaining teeth, whereas controls had a median of 22 remaining teeth (p = 0.03. The percentage of sites with gingival bleeding was 16.05% (0-100% in breast cancer survivors and 0% (0-72% in controls (p = 0.04. CONCLUSION: Chronic periodontal disease and tooth loss were highly prevalent in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. To improve survivors’ quality of life, a preventive oral health evaluation should be available prior to cancer treatment.

  15. Intraoperative 3-D imaging improves sentinel lymph node biopsy in oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemel, Christina; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K.; Lapa, Constantin [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kuebler, Alexander; Hartmann, Stefan; Linz, Christian; Mueller-Richter, Urs [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Plastic Surgery, Wuerzburg (Germany); Geissinger, Eva; Wild, Vanessa [University Wuerzburg, Institute of Pathology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the feasibility and potential advantages of freehand single-photon emission computed tomography (fhSPECT) compared with conventional intraoperative localization techniques for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in oral cancer. Between November 2012 and February 2014, 23 consecutive patients with clinical T1/T2 oral squamous cell carcinoma and a cN0 neck were recruited. All patients underwent SLNB followed by elective neck dissection (END). All patients received preoperative lymphoscintigraphy. To detect the SLNs intraoperatively, fhSPECT with a combination of conventional acoustic SLN localization and 3-D visual navigation was used. All but one of the SLNs detected by preoperative imaging were successfully mapped intraoperatively by fhSPECT (detection rate 98 %), including those in six patients with a tumour in the floor of the mouth. A histopathology analysis revealed positive SLNs in 22 % of patients. No further metastases were found in LNs resected during END. SLNB correctly predicted the final LN stage in all patients (accuracy 100 %). Additional radioactive LNs, which were not present on preoperative lymphoscintigraphy, were observed in three patients. FhSPECT is a feasible technology that allows the accurate identification of SLNs in oral cancer. FhSPECT overcomes the shine-through phenomenon, one of the most important limitations of SLNB, thereby confirming the importance of SLNB in patients with cN0 oral cancer. (orig.)

  16. GST null genotype and antioxidants: Risk indicators for oral pre-cancer and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bathi Renuka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : This study was undertaken to detect the gene polymorphism of detoxification enzymes and estimate the antioxidant enzyme status in patients with oral cancer, oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis (OSF. Materials and Methods : The GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene polymorphism was evaluated using polymerase chain reaction; the antioxidant enzyme was estimated using biochemical methods. Statistical analyses were performed using student t-test and odds-ratio to estimate relative risk (RR. Results : The RR at 95% confidence interval (CI for GSTM1 and GSTT1 was statistically significant for all groups. The mean values of glutathione were significantly raised in all groups. The mean values of ceruloplasmin and malonaldehyde was statistically significant among cancer and OSF patients but was insignificant in smokers and cases with leukoplakia. Conclusion : Several genes perform the same function which implies the need to test for several genetic polymorphisms to identify individuals at high risk. The level of antioxidant enzymes correlate with the degree of oxidative damage. The need for further studies is emphasised.

  17. [Therapeutic effect of rebamipide for oral mucositis associated with FEC therapy for breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enami, Akiko; Masuda, Norikazu; Yamamura, Jun; Mizutani, Makiko; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Shikata, Ayako; Masaoka, Miyuki; Takada, Seiko; Bamba, Nao; Yamamoto, Mie; Abe, Megumi; Makihara, Katsuya

    2014-11-01

    No guidelines for supportive drug therapy have been established for oral mucositis occurring during cancer chemotherapy. We retrospectively examined the progression of oral mucositis in 91 patients with breast cancer who received the 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC)-100 regimen between September 2007 and August 2008. Daily rebamipide was administered to patients with oral mucositis as per hospital protocol to evaluate the hypothesized preventive and mucosal protective effects of rebamipide(Mucosta®). Oral mucositis was observed in 43 patients (47%)during 4 courses of FEC. The median age of the patients was 55 years(range, 32-76 years). Of the 91 patients, 49 patients who did not receive rebamipide during the 4 FEC courses were classified as group A, 14 patients who received rebamipide before the start of FEC were classified as group B, and 28 patients who received rebamipide after developing oral mucositis were classified as group C. The incidence of oral mucositis at the start of FEC with or without rebamipide administration was observed in 5 patients in group B (36%) and 38 patients in groups A and C (49%) (p=0.3472). The mucositis grade was G1 in 4 patients and G2 in 1 patient in group B, and G1 in 20 patients and G2 plus G3 in 18 patients in groups A and C (p=0.2467). In group C, the grade decreased in 25 patients (89%) and did not occur (G0) in 17 patients (61%) during the next course, and 15 patients (54%) continued to the final course without any occurrence of mucositis. These results suggest that rebamipide is effective for the treatment of oral mucositis. Although significant differences were not observed in the groups, rebamipide has the potential to prevent development of oral mucositis and alleviate its symptoms, and seems promising as a new supportive drug therapy. We hope to verify the preventive and protective effects of rebamipide by conducting a prospective, randomized trial while treating oral mucositis with basic oral care

  18. Prevention and management guidelines to oral health care for patients with head and neck cancer: HCT20, Carisolv and chlorhexidine varnish are suggested; Protocolo de prevencao e tratamento de sequelas bucais em pacientes submetidos a radioterapia: uso deo HCT20, Carisolv e verniz de clorexidina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Eliete Neves da Silva; Melo, Nilce Santos de [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude. Dept. de Odontologia]. E-mail: elieteneves@terra.com.br

    2004-07-01

    Orofacial complications are unfortunately common with all modalities used in the management of patients with head and neck cancer. It is well known that hypo salivation develops if radiation therapy involves the salivary glands. A significant decrease in salivary volume can adversely affect oral comfort, mucosal health, dentition, deglutition and mastication. Xerostomia may lead to consumption of diet high in carbohydrates and make good oral hygiene difficult. (author)

  19. RECURRENT ORAL CANCER: CURRENT AND EMERGING THERAPEUTIC APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Daniela Silva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer cavity (OCC is associated with high incidence of loco-regional recurrences, which account for the majority of treatment failures post-surgery and radiotherapy. The time-course of relapse manifestation and metastasis are unpredictable. Relapsed OCC represents a major clinical challenge in part due to their aggressive and invasive behaviors. Chemotherapy remains the only option for advanced OCC whenever salvage surgery or re-irradiation is not feasible, but its efficacy is limited as a result of the drug resistance development. Alternatives to use of different permutations of standard cytotoxic drugs or combinations with modulators of drug resistance have led to incremental therapeutic benefits. The introduction of targeted agents and biologics against selective targets that drive cancer progression has opened-up optimism to achieve superior therapeutic activity and overcome drug resistance because, unlike the non-selective cytotoxic, the target can be monitored at molecular levels to identify patients who can benefit from the drug. This review discusses the multifactorial aspects of clinical drug resistance and emerging therapeutic approaches in recurrent OCC, emphasizing recent advances in targeted therapies, immunotherapy, and potential relevance of new concepts such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell hypothesis to drug resistance.

  20. O itinerário terapêutico: história oral de idosos com câncer Itinerario terapéutico: historia oral de ancianos con cáncer Therapeutic itinerary: oral history of elderly patients with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelita Visentin

    2010-01-01

    adecuados dentro de la realidad sociocultural en la que se encuentran los subsistemas de cuidado a la salud.OBJECTIVE: To identify and describe the therapeutic itinerary of elderly patients with cancer treated in outpatient services and hosted in support homes, in the city of Curitiba, state of Paraná. METHODS: It was performed a qualitative research with an approach based on the method of Oral History Theme (HOT. Five interviews were held with elders who were in treatment for cancer. The analysis of the stories was made by means of the specific technique of HOT. RESULTS: It was found five main tones and a central theme. CONCLUSION: The stories analysis showed the path the elders must follow in the subsystems of health care. Therapeutic itinerary of the elderly with cancer was surrounded by doubts, pain, hopes and sadness. Hope in the family and God were the guarantees to overcome the disease. The nurse must know the therapeutic itinerary followed by the elderly to plan the appropriate care, within the social-cultural reality in which subsystems act in health care.

  1. Early preventive exercises versus usual care does not seem to reduce trismus in patients treated with radiotherapy for cancer in the oral cavity or oropharynx: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgdal, Nina; Juhl, Carsten; Aadahl, Mette; Gluud, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In head and neck cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy, we investigated the benefits and harms of an early exercise regime on trismus. Patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy were centrally randomised to exercises 5-6 times for 45 minutes during and after radiotherapy supervised by a physiotherapist in addition to usual care versus usual care alone. The primary outcome was change in maximal interincisor distance (MID) measured at 5 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes were change in cervical ranges of motion, tissue tightness, and health-related quality of life. Mixed model analysis of repeated measures adjusted for tumour size and operation was conducted to assess the effect of early preventive exercises across time periods. Of the 100 patients included, two patients withdrew and one died before the onset of radiotherapy. The unadjusted mean difference in MID at 12 months after having completed radiotherapy was 0.83 mm (95% confidence interval (CI) -3.64-5.29, p = 0.71) in the exercise intervention group compared with the control group. When adjusted for operation and tumour size, the effect of the exercise intervention on mean MID from baseline to 12-month follow-up was 5.92 mm (95% CI -0.48-12.33, p = 0.07). Of the secondary outcomes, cervical rotation showed a statistically significant deterioration in the exercise group compared with the control group (p = 0.01). No significant effects were observed on the other secondary outcomes. In patients with cancer in the oral cavity or oropharynx, early supervised exercises combined with self-care treatment focusing on mobility exercises to reduce trismus do not seem to provide additional beneficial effects compared with usual care during curative radiotherapy.

  2. Patient adherence to oral anticancer drugs: an emerging issue in modern oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, V; Schöffski, P; Wolter, P

    2011-01-01

    The steady increase in the use of oral anticancer drugs in modern oncology has created a paradigm shift, challenging traditional attitudes towards cancer care and requiring new concepts of organization of oncology services. Important issues are the prolonged treatment period, management of toxicity, treatment adherence, reimbursement conditions and patient and family education. Although most patients generally prefer oral therapy over intravenous treatment for reasons of convenience, the daily use of oral anticancer drugs can be a challenging commitment for many patients. Reports on adherence and persistence among patients with cancer show that adherence ranges from 16% to 100%, depending on the type of therapy and the measurement/definition of adherence. Apart from demographic, disease and therapy related factors, the determinants that mostly influence (non-)adherence are the satisfaction with care activities performed at the initiation of the drug treatment, and the perceived necessity of treatment. Therefore, patient education addressing these issues is considered the cornerstone of successful oral anticancer treatment. Studies examining the role of different health care providers in the pharmacotherapeutic care of patients with cancer, treated with oral anti-cancer drugs, support the need for a multidisciplinary approach to achieve a maximum benefit for the individual patient and consequently for the whole health system. Limiting adverse events and developing appropriate supportive care are only some aspects that need to be considered in this.

  3. A genetic programming approach to oral cancer prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Sze Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The poten