WorldWideScience

Sample records for oral anticoagulant therapy

  1. Improving the quality of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadisseur, Alain Peter Anton

    2006-01-01

    Oral anticoagulant therapy has changed little since the development of the coumarin drugs after the Second World War. The basic nature of the therapy, i.e. the balancing between thrombosis and haemorrhage, makes it a therapy difficult to manage. Add to this the many influences from co-morbidity,

  2. Improving the quality of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadisseur, Alain Peter Anton

    2006-01-01

    Oral anticoagulant therapy has changed little since the development of the coumarin drugs after the Second World War. The basic nature of the therapy, i.e. the balancing between thrombosis and haemorrhage, makes it a therapy difficult to manage. Add to this the many influences from co-morbidity, c

  3. Improving the quality of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadisseur, Alain Peter Anton

    2006-01-01

    Oral anticoagulant therapy has changed little since the development of the coumarin drugs after the Second World War. The basic nature of the therapy, i.e. the balancing between thrombosis and haemorrhage, makes it a therapy difficult to manage. Add to this the many influences from co-morbidity, c

  4. Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with new oral agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Esquivel, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Thromboembolic disease is a major leading cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized countries. Currently, the management of these patients is challenging due to the availability of new drugs with proven efficacy and security compared to traditional oral vitamin K antagonists. These compounds are characterized by a predictable pharmacokinetic profile for which blood monitoring is not routinely needed. Nevertheless, some data have suggested inter-patient variability in the anticoagulant effect of these drugs, raising concerns about their effectiveness and safety. Although mass-spectrometry is the gold standard to determine drug plasma concentrations, this method is not widely available in every-day practice and some coagulation assays are commonly used to determine the anticoagulant effect of these drugs. The present review aims to summarize the current knowledge regarding the clinical question of how and when to monitor patients with new anticoagulant oral agents. PMID:26713281

  5. Monitoring Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: Measuring Coagulant Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attermann, Jorn

    and the time for the next visit based on laboratory analyses of the INR. This conventional treatment regimen is relatively inconvenient for the patient, since it requires frequent outpatient visits and venipunctures. Moreover, errors may occur due to insufficient communication between patient and physician...... of anticoagulant therapy. The specific hypotheses were: • The precision of patient’s own measurements of INR performed at home on a portable coagulometer is sufficient to allow for self management of OAT (substudy 1). • For selected pairs of thromboplastins, the relation between logarithmic prothrombin times...... substudy it was shown that for selected patients the precision of the patients’ own measurements of INR is sufficient to allow for reliable routine patient self testing of INR. In the same substudy we found large discrepancies between the INR measurements on portable coagulometers and in the Department...

  6. Effects of computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Corell, Pernille; Madsen, Poul

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: BACKGROUND: Computer-assistance and self-monitoring lower the cost and may improve the quality of anticoagulation therapy. The main purpose of this clinical investigation was to use computer-assisted oral anticoagulant therapy to improve the time to reach and the time spent within...... in a computer system by an algorithm specific to each group. The third group received traditional anticoagulation treatment by physicians. The obtained INR values were compared regarding the time to reach, and the time spent within, the therapeutic target range, corresponding to INR values from 2 to 3. RESULTS......: Patients randomized to computer-assisted anticoagulation and the CoaguChek® system reached the therapeutic target range after 8 days compared to 14 days by prescriptions from physicians (p = 0.04). Time spent in the therapeutic target range did not differ between groups. The median INR value measured...

  7. Use of Oral Anticoagulation Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation after Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Stine Funder; Christensen, Louisa M; Christensen, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    Background. The knowledge is still sparse about patient related factors, influencing oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC) rates, in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Aims. To assess the use of OAC in ischemic stroke patients diagnosed with AF and to identify patient related factors...

  8. Oral anticoagulant therapy related to oral surgery procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Knežević Milan; Petrović Dragan; Jović Nebojša; Bosch Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Today there must be established protocol in oral surgery treatment for the patients which are under anticoagulant treatment via oral (ATO). This is due to danger of the possible complications and also for increased demand for hospital treatment of these patients, which can be estimated now days as high as 8%. In the present study, the authors intent to define all the parameters for creation of one acting protocol applicable to this group of patients and concluding that there is no necessary n...

  9. Dental procedures in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saour, J N; Ali, H A; Mammo, L A; Sieck, J O

    1994-05-01

    Over a 10-year period a uniform management plan for patients receiving long term oral anticoagulation therapy for prosthetic heart valves and needing dental procedures was instituted. Those undergoing dental extraction or gum hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology (Group A) had their oral anticoagulation discontinued two days prior to the procedure which was carried out only if the INR was 1.5 or less on the day of the procedure. Patients who needed dental fillings or gum hygiene in the absence of gross gum pathology (Group B) continued their anticoagulation therapy and had these procedures completed provided the INR was 3.0 or less. The main outcome measured were valve thrombosis, thromboembolism and excessive bleeding requiring hospitalization and/or blood transfusion. In Group A, 240 procedures were carried out; 212 dental extractions and 28 dental hygiene in the presence of gross gum pathology. They had a brief period of under-anticoagulation (3-7 days) to an INR of 1.5 or less. In Group B, 156 procedures were performed. No patient developed valve thrombosis or thromboembolism. Two patients, both in Group A needed hospitalization for observation but no blood transfusion. This management plan was easy to implement. Patients needed one extra visit to the anticoagulation clinic within one week of the procedure. It was both safe and effective.

  10. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Hanna; Grove, E; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard

    Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers: 11.000 patient-years of follow-up H Nilsson1,2,3, EL Grove2, TB Larsen3, M Maegaard1, TD Christensen1 1Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery & Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 2Department...... of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 3Department of Cardiology, Aalborg Hospital & Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark haana_86@hotmail.com Objectives: Patient-self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists have...... clinical practice. Materials and methods: A case-series study including all patients who had passed an exam in PSM in the period 1995-2012 at Aarhus University Hospital or Aalborg University Hospital, including 2200 patients and 11000 patient-years in total. The effectiveness was measured using...

  11. Bridging of oral anticoagulation therapy for invasive procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulos, Alex C

    2005-09-01

    The management of patients who need temporary interruption of chronic oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy for an elective surgical or invasive procedure is problematic and complex. Patient and procedural risk factors for thrombosis and bleeding, anticoagulant-related risks of bleeding, and clinical consequences of a thrombotic or bleeding event need to be assessed and properly risk-stratified in the perioperative period. Certain procedures, such as dental, endoscopic, and cutaneous procedures, can be completed without discontinuing OAC, but most procedures with a high bleeding risk (including major surgeries) will necessitate temporary discontinuation of OAC. Bridging therapy with shorter-acting anticoagulants, such as heparin, for patients at intermediate to high risk of thromboembolism represents one strategy to maintain functional anticoagulation during this period. Large, prospective cohort studies and registries of patients on chronic OAC who underwent bridging therapy mostly with low-molecular-weight heparin have been completed recently. This paper reviews these clinical data on bridging therapy and provides an evidence-based perioperative management strategy for the at-risk patient on chronic OAC.

  12. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in secondary stroke prevention – impact of the novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Luger,1 Carina Hohmann,2 Daniela Niemann,1 Peter Kraft,3 Ignaz Gunreben,3 Tobias Neumann-Haefelin,2 Christoph Kleinschnitz,3 Helmuth Steinmetz,1 Christian Foerch,1 Waltraud Pfeilschifter1 1Department of Neurology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, 2Department of Neurology, Klinikum Fulda gAG, Fulda, 3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany Background: Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT potently prevents strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA have been the standard of care for long-term OAT for decades, but non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC have recently been approved for this indication, and raised many questions, among them their influence on medication adherence. We assessed adherence to VKA and NOAC in secondary stroke prevention. Methods: All patients treated from October 2011 to September 2012 for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack with a subsequent indication for OAT, at three academic hospitals were entered into a prospective registry, and baseline data and antithrombotic treatment at discharge were recorded. At the 1-year follow-up, we assessed the adherence to different OAT strategies and patients’ adherence to their respective OAT. We noted OAT changes, reasons to change treatment, and factors that influence persistence to the prescribed OAT. Results: In patients discharged on OAT, we achieved a fatality corrected response rate of 73.3% (n=209. A total of 92% of these patients received OAT at the 1-year follow-up. We observed good adherence to both VKA and NOAC (VKA, 80.9%; NOAC, 74.8%; P=0.243 with a statistically nonsignificant tendency toward a weaker adherence to dabigatran. Disability at 1-year follow-up was an independent predictor of lower adherence to any OAT after multivariate analysis, whereas the choice of OAT did not have a relevant influence. Conclusion: One-year adherence to OAT after stroke is strong (>90% and patients

  13. Review of Urgent Reversal Therapies for Oral Anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Mondin II

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulation has proven to be one of the most essential breakthroughs in cardiology in the last 100 years. The first major oral anticoagulant, warfarin, is a 4-hydroxycourmarin first synthesized in the 1940s for use as a rodenticide. It was not until 1954 that warfarin was finally approved by the FDA for use in patients requiring systemic anticoagulation. For over 55 years, warfarin was the only oral anticoagulant available in the United States until the approval of dabigatran in 2010, ushering in the era of the direct oral anticoagulants. This article will review modalities of anticoagulation reversal including activated charcoal, hemodialysis, blood-derived products, and medications currently available as well as in development.

  14. New oral anticoagulants and dual antiplatelet therapy: Focus on apixaban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Rosano, Giuseppe

    2016-12-15

    The combination of AF and coronary artery disease not only is a common clinical setting, it is also a complex setting to deal with anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy, and it is associated with significantly higher mortality rates. Unfortunately, there are no sufficient data available to optimally guide clinical practice in such settings. This review focuses specifically on newer oral anticoagulants (NOACs) associated with dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). There are no randomized studies comparing vitamin K antagonists and NOACs in patients with AF undergoing PCI either for acute coronary syndromes or for stable patients, i.e. those patients who have an indication to receive DAPT. Moreover, new antiplatelet agents such as ticagrelor and prasugrel have entered the market for acute coronary syndromes. So far, there are no large-scale randomized studies published evaluating these newer antiplatelet agents in patients with AF receiving either vitamin K antagonists or NOACs, adding to the uncertainty on how to use these antithrombotics in combination when both coronary artery disease (unstable or stable patients) and AF converge in a given patient. The lack of large outcome trials and the large number of possible combinations are reflected in the wide variety of practices in the real world. To date, given the lack of data, watchfulness when using NOACs as component of DAPT or triple oral antithrombotic therapy is warranted.

  15. Venous Thromboembolism Anticoagulation Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2009-01-01

    @@ VTE of the main treatment for anticoagulant thera-py, anticoagulant therapy drug of choice for low molecu-lar weight heparin (LMWH) for the overwhelming major-ity of clinicians agree that long-term oral anticoagulant therapy is still Vit. K antagonist (mainly warfarin).

  16. Management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy for endoscopic procedures: introduction to novel oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. González-Bárcenas

    Full Text Available The development of novel antithrombotic therapy in the past few years and its prescription in patients with cardiovascular and circulatory disease has widened the spectrum of drugs that need to be considered when performing an endoscopic procedure. The balance between the thrombotic risk patients carry due to their medical history and the bleeding risk involved in endoscopic procedures should be thoroughly analyzed by Gastroenterologists. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs impose an additional task. These agents, that specifically target factor IIa or Xa, do not dispose of an anticoagulation monitoring method nor have an antidote to revert their effect, just as with antiplatelet agents. Understanding the fundamental aspects of these drugs provides the necessary knowledge to determine the ideal period the antithrombotic therapy should be interrupted in order to perform the endoscopic procedure, offering maximum safety for patients and optimal results.

  17. Management of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy for endoscopic procedures: Introduction to novel oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Bárcenas, Martha L; Pérez Aisa, Ángeles

    2016-02-01

    The development of novel antithrombotic therapy in the past few years and its prescription in patients with cardiovascular and circulatory disease has widened the spectrum of drugs that need to be considered when performing an endoscopic procedure. The balance between the thrombotic risk patients carry due to their medical history and the bleeding risk involved in endoscopic procedures should be thoroughly analyzed by Gastroenterologists. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) impose an additional task. These agents, that specifically target factor IIa or Xa, do not dispose of an anticoagulation monitoring method nor have an antidote to revert their effect, just as with antiplatelet agents. Understanding the fundamental aspects of these drugs provides the necessary knowledge to determine the ideal period the antithrombotic therapy should be interrupted in order to perform the endoscopic procedure, offering maximum safety for patients and optimal results.

  18. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy in two centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Hanna; Grove, E; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard

    of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus; 3Department of Cardiology, Aalborg Hospital & Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark haana_86@hotmail.com Objectives: Patient-self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists have...... demonstrated efficacy in randomized clinical trials. An important question remains about its clinical effectiveness. We hypothesized that implementation of PSM in everyday clinical practice could improve the quality of treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PSM in everyday...... clinical practice. Materials and methods: A case-series study including all patients who had passed an exam in PSM in the period 1995-2012 at Aarhus University Hospital or Aalborg University Hospital, including 2200 patients and 11000 patient-years in total. The effectiveness was measured using...

  19. NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN THE THERAPY OF ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Satybaldyeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The vitamin K antagonist warfarin is an essential medicine from a group of anticoagulants, which is used to treat antiphospholipid syndrome (APS. However, it has a number of disadvantages especially in patients who need longterm and frequently lifetime prevention of thromboses. New oral anticoagulants, such as dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa®, rivaroxaban (Xarelto®, apixaban (Eliquis and others, have been recently synthesized. Unlike warfarin, they are administered at fixed doses, require neither routine monitoring nor diet, and interact with drugs only in small amounts. The new oral anticoagulants have been approved for certain indications, but the data of performed trials are inapplicable to patients with APS. These medicines are expected to improve quality of life in patients with this condition. 

  20. The new oral anticoagulants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2010-01-01

    In patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation oral anticoagulation with the vitamin K antagonists acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon and warfarin reduces the risk of stroke by more than 60%, whereas single or double antiplatelet therapy is much less effective and sometimes associated with a similar ble

  1. Safety and efficacy of bone wax in patients on oral anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasny, Marta; Krasny, Kornel; Fiedor, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular conditions, apart from neoplastic diseases, remain the major cause of death in developed countries; therefore, the number of patients receiving oral anticoagulants is constantly increasing. Anticoagulant therapy considerably reduced mortality in patients with history of myocardial infarction among others. Although many interventions may be performed without withdrawal of the anticoagulant and tooth extraction was qualified as a procedure of low hemorrhage risk, a majority of dentists refer the patient to a cardiologist several days before the elective tooth extraction to withdraw anticoagulants. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bone wax used to stop bleeding after dental procedures in a group of patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy and find an answer to a question, whether it is justified to temporarily withdraw anticoagulants for this type of procedures. The study involved 176 patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy undergoing tooth extraction (154 subjects) or surgical extraction of a retained tooth (48 subjects). After the procedure, in each case the alveolus was filled with bone wax to stop bleeding. In all patients involved in the study bleeding from the alveolus was successfully stopped during the procedure. None of the subjects reported increased bleeding from the operational site after coming back home. Bone wax is a good, efficient, and safe material to block bleeding from the alveolus following tooth extractions, also in patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy. The study demonstrated that withdrawal or adjustment of anticoagulant therapy is not necessary before an elective tooth extraction.

  2. Factors Affecting Patients' Perception On, and Adherence To, Anticoagulant Therapy: Anticipating the Role of Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Ekta Y; Bajorek, Beata

    2017-04-01

    The role of the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in practice has been given extensive consideration recently, albeit largely from the clinician's perspective. However, the effectiveness and safety of using anticoagulants is highly dependent on the patient's ability to manage and take these complex, high-risk medicines. This structured narrative review explores the published literature to identify the factors underpinning patients' non-adherence to anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF), and subsequently contemplates to what extent the DOACs might overcome the known challenges with traditional warfarin therapy. This review comprised a two-tier search of various databases and search platforms (CINAHL, Cochrane, Current Contents Connect, EMBASE, MEDLINE Ovid, EBSCO, PubMed, Google, Google Scholar) to yield 47 articles reporting patients perspectives on, and patients adherence to, anticoagulant therapy. The findings from the literature were synthesised under five interacting dimensions of adherence: therapy-related factors, patient-related factors, condition-related factors, social-economic factors and health system factors. Factors negatively affecting patients' day-to-day lives (especially regular therapeutic drug monitoring, dose adjustments, dietary considerations) predominantly underpin a patient's reluctance to take warfarin therapy, leading to non-adherence. Other patient-related factors underpinning non-adherence include patients' perceptions and knowledge about the purpose of anticoagulation; understanding of the risks and benefits of therapy; socioeconomic status; and expectations of care from health professionals. In considering these findings, it is apparent that the DOACs may overcome some of the barriers to traditional warfarin therapy at least to an extent, particularly the need for regular monitoring, frequent dose adjustment and dietary considerations. However, their high cost, twice-daily dosing and gastrointestinal adverse effects may present

  3. A review of traditional and novel oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy for dermatologists and dermatologic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Deanna G; Wilkerson, Eric C; Love, W Elliot

    2015-03-01

    Dermatologic surgeons will increasingly encounter patients on novel oral antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications. We conducted a complete overview of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and side effects of traditional and novel oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapies along with dietary supplements with anticoagulant or antiplatelet properties. A PubMed search was completed for "aspirin," "warfarin," "clopidogrel," "dabigatran," "rivaroxaban," "apixaban," "prasugrel," and "ticagrelor." Review articles and publications emphasizing perioperative management of oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications were selected. An additional PubMed search was completed for "hemorrhage," "bleeding," and "thrombosis" in conjunction with "dermatology," "dermatologic surgery," and "cutaneous surgery." Aspirin, clopidogrel, and warfarin have shortfalls in dosing, monitoring, and efficacy. Several trials show superior efficacy with dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, with equal or reduced risk of bleeding compared with warfarin. Prasugrel and ticagrelor may be associated with an increased bleeding risk. Many over-the-counter medications also have anticoagulant properties with associated bleeding risks that cannot be overlooked. There are few publications evaluating the novel oral anticoagulants' effects on outpatient surgical procedures. Novel anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs are revolutionizing therapy for cardiovascular diseases. As these medications become more prevalent, dermatologists and dermatologic surgeons must be mindful of the bleeding risk that will apply in our everyday practices. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Changing trends in anti-coagulant therapies. Are heparins and oral anti-coagulants challenged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, J; Iqbal, O; Cunanan, J; Demir, M; Wahi, R; Clarke, M; Adiguzel, C; Bick, R

    2008-06-01

    The conventional management of thrombotic and cardiovascular disorders is based on the use of heparin, oral anticoagulants and aspirin. Despite progress in the sciences, these drugs still remain a challenge and mystery. The development of low molecular weight heparins (LMWHS) and the synthesis of heparinomimetics represent a refined use of heparin. Additional drugs will continue to develop. However, none of these drugs will ever match the polypharmacology of heparin. Aspirin still remains the leading drug in the management of thrombotic and cardiovascular disorders. The newer antiplatelet drugs such as adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitors, GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors and other specific inhibitors have limited effects and have been tested in patients who have already been treated with aspirin. Warfarin provides a convenient and affordable approach in the long-term outpatient management of thrombotic disorders. The optimized use of these drugs still remains the approach of choice to manage thrombotic disorders. The new anticoagulant targets, such as tissue factor, individual clotting factors, recombinant forms of serpins (antithrombin, heparin co-factor II and tissue factor pathway inhibitors), recombinant activated protein C, thrombomodulin and site specific serine proteases inhibitors complexes have also been developed. There is a major thrust on the development of orally bioavailable anti-Xa and IIa agents, which are slated to replace oral anticoagulants. Both the anti-factor Xa and anti-IIa agents have been developed for oral use and have provided impressive clinical results. However, safety concerns related to liver enzyme elevations and thrombosis rebound have been reported with their use. For these reasons, the US Food and Drug Administration did not approve the orally active antithrombin agent Ximelagatran for several indications. The synthetic pentasaccharide (Fondaparinux) has undergone clinical development. Unexpectedly, Fondaparinux also produced major

  5. Stabilization of oral anticoagulant therapy in hospitalized patients and characteristics associated with lack of stabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Joosten, P; Risselada, A; van den Boogaart, MHA; Egberts, ACG; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2000-01-01

    The initiation and stabilization of oral anticoagulant therapy in hospitalized patients in a setting without specialized medical or pharmaceutical advice, was studied. In addition, potential risk factors for lack of stabilization were studied. All patients from three wards (orthopaedic surgery, gene

  6. Odontostomatologic management of patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy: a retrospective multicentric study

    OpenAIRE

    Scacco Salvatore; Inchingolo Alessio D; Marrelli Massimo; Abenavoli Fabio M; Tatullo Marco; Inchingolo Francesco; Papa Francesco; Inchingolo Angelo M; Dipalma Gianna

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Today, we frequently find patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), a prophylaxis against the occurrence of thromboembolic events. An oral surgeon needs to know how to better manage such patients, in order to avoid hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications. Materials and methods A group of 193 patients (119 men aged between 46 and 82 and 74 women aged between 54 and 76) undergoing OAT for more than 5 years were managed with a standardized management protocol a...

  7. Vitamin K and stability of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, Eva Karolien

    2011-01-01

    One of the causes of unstable anticoagulation is a variable vitamin K intake. The main objective of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that the INR is particularly sensitive to changes in vitamin K intake when vitamin K status is low, and that patients with a low vitamin K intake would therefore

  8. Vitamin K and stability of oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, Eva Karolien

    2011-01-01

    One of the causes of unstable anticoagulation is a variable vitamin K intake. The main objective of this thesis was to test the hypothesis that the INR is particularly sensitive to changes in vitamin K intake when vitamin K status is low, and that patients with a low vitamin K intake would therefore

  9. Oral surgery for patients on anticoagulant therapy: current thoughts on patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doonquah, Ladi; Mitchell, Anika D

    2012-01-01

    Minor oral surgical procedures make up a significant part of the daily practice of dentistry. With the increased sophistication of medical technology and medications there is increased likelihood of performing surgery on patients who are being treated for conditions that require some type of anticoagulant therapy. These patients are at an increased risk for perioperative bleeding or thrombotic complications if anticoagulation is discontinued or the dosage is adjusted. Therefore, a fine balance needs to be obtained and adequate preparation of these patients is the key to establishing this balance. This article reviews suggested approaches to the management of such patients.

  10. Antiplatelet therapy for stable coronary artery disease in atrial fibrillation patients taking an oral anticoagulant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberts, Morten; Gislason, Gunnar H.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The optimal long-term antithrombotic treatment of patients with coexisting atrial fibrillation and stable coronary artery disease is unresolved, and commonly, a single antiplatelet agent is added to oral anticoagulation. We investigated the effectiveness and safety of adding antiplatelet...... or thromboembolism, whereas risk of bleeding is increased significantly. The common practice of adding antiplatelet therapy to oral VKA anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation and stable coronary artery disease warrants reassessment........23-1.82]) or clopidogrel (hazard ratio, 1.84 [95% confidence interval, 1.11-3.06]) was added to VKA. Conclusions In atrial fibrillation patients with stable coronary artery disease, the addition of antiplatelet therapy to VKA therapy is not associated with a reduction in risk of recurrent coronary events...

  11. 'Ins' and 'outs' of triple therapy: Optimal antiplatelet therapy in patients on chronic oral anticoagulation who need coronary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewilde, W; Verheugt, F W A; Breet, N; Koolen, J J; Ten Berg, J M

    2010-09-01

    Chronic oral anticoagulant treatment is obligatory in patients (class I) with mechanical heart valves and in patients with atrial fibrillation with CHADS2 score >1. When these patients undergo percutaneous coronary intervention with placement of a stent, there is also an indication for treatment with aspirin and clopidogrel. Unfortunately, triple therapy is known to increase the bleeding risk. For this group of patients, the bottom line is to find the ideal therapy in patients with indications for both chronic anticoagulation therapy and percutaneous intervention to prevent thromboembolic complications such as stent thrombosis without increasing the risk of bleeding. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:444-50.).

  12. Implementing evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy: a community-based participatory project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, Maya; Wüthrich, Erika; Stauffer, Yvonne; Herczeg, Franziska; Fattinger, Karin; Hirter, Kathrin; Papalini, Marianne; Herrmann, Luzia

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed at developing and implementing evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy. The number of persons with chronic diseases who live at home is increasing. They have to manage multiple diseases and complex treatments. One such treatment is oral anticoagulation therapy, a high risk variable dose medication. Adherence to oral anticoagulation therapy is jeopardised by limited information about the medications, their risk and complications, the impact of individual daily routine and the limited inclusion of family members in education. Hence, improved and tailored education is essential for patients and families to manage oral anticoagulation therapy at home. A community-based participatory research design combined with the Precede-Proceed model was used including a systematic literature review, posteducation analysis, an online nurse survey, a documentation analysis and patient/family interviews. The study was conducted between April 2010-December 2012 at a department of general internal medicine in a teaching hospital in Switzerland. Participants were the department's nursing and medical professionals including the patients and their families. The evidence-based patient and family education on oral anticoagulation therapy emerged comprising a learning assessment, teaching units, clarification of responsibilities of nurse professionals and documentation guidelines. The inclusion of the whole department has contributed to the development and implementation of this evidence-based patient family education on oral anticoagulation therapy, which encompasses local characteristics and patient preferences. This education is now being used throughout the department. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy for mechanical heart valve patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas D; Attermann, Jørn; Pilegaard, Hans K;

    2001-01-01

    .4%–2.9%) for the control group. Conclusion: Self-management of OAT is a feasible and safe concept for selected patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses also on a long-term basis. It provides at least as good and most likely better quality of anticoagulant therapy than conventional management assessed by time within......Objective: Self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) has shown good results on a short-term basis. We hypothesize that self-management of OAT provides a better quality of treatment than conventional management also on a long-term basis. The aim of this study was to assess the quality...... of self-management of OAT in patients with mechanical heart valve prostheses on a 4-year perspective in a prospective, non-randomized study. Design: Twenty-four patients with mechanical heart valves and on self-managed OAT were followed for up to 4 years. A matched, retrospectively selected group...

  14. The intracerebral haemorrhage associated to oral anticoagulant therapy: the practical management of urgent reversal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH represents the most feared complication of therapy with vitamin K antagonists (VKA, so-called oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT. This is a real emergency in clinical practice, being burdened by high mortality, morbidity and residual functional disability. In recent years, there have been widespread indications for the correct management of VKA associated ICH. The urgent OAT reversal represents the cornerstone of VKA associated ICH therapy. The knowledge of these guidelines is of fundamental importance in clinical practice. The urgent OAT reversal could stop the hematoma enlargement which is considered one of the main risk factor of poor outcome in this clinical setting. The aim of urgent OAT reversal is bringing the INR (International Normalized Ratio to values ≤ 1.4. It is possible by using prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC, fresh frozen plasma (FFP, recombinant activated factor VII (raFVII together with vitamin K1 intravenous infusion. In this article the Authors review the practical management of urgent OAT reversal in patients suffering for VKA related ICH.

  15. The practical management of bleedings during treatment with direct oral anticoagulants: the emergency reversal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding represents the most feared complication of the new oral anticoagulants, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs, as well as all the antithrombotic therapies. During the acute phase of bleeding in patients taking anticoagulants, restoration of an effective hemostasis represents the cornerstone of practical management. While vitamin K antagonists are effectively and promptly reversed by specific antidotes such as prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs, fresh frozen plasma or vitamin K, it is still not clear how to manage the urgent reversal of DOACs during life-threatening or major bleedings due to the lack of specific antidotes. However, in vitro and ex vivo studies have suggested some potential strategies to reverse DOACs in clinical practice, other than general support measures that are always recommended. Activated charcoal could be used in subjects with DOAC-related bleedings presenting to the emergency department within two hours of the last oral intake. Non-activated or activated PCCs (FEIBA and recombinant activated Factor VII (raFVII seem to be the optimal strategy for urgent reversal of dabigatran, while non-activated PCCs seem to have efficacy in reversing rivaroxaban. Due to its low plasma protein binding, dabigatran could be also dialyzed in urgent cases. Clinically relevant non-major bleedings and minor bleedings should be treated with general and local measures, respectively, and, when necessary, with dose delay or drug withdrawal. In this article, the Authors describe the practical approach to bleedings occurring during DOACs treatment.

  16. Feasibility Study of a Mobile Health Intervention for Older Adults on Oral Anticoagulation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ah Lee PhD, RN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral anticoagulation treatment (OAT such as warfarin therapy is recommended for older adults with atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or who are at risk for venous thromboembolism. Despite its proven benefits, older adults report both dissatisfaction with OAT and reduced quality of life that can potentially lead to low adherence to OAT and decreased treatment efficacy. Objective: To test the feasibility of Mobile Applications for Seniors to enhance Safe anticoagulation therapy (MASS, a mobile-based health technology intervention designed to promote independence and self-care. Methods: This pilot study used a single-arm experimental pre–post design to test the feasibility of a 3-month intervention using MASS in 18 older adults (male: n = 14; White: n = 9; Hispanic: n = 7; Other: n = 2; M age = 67. MASS was available in English or Spanish. Participants completed surveys about their OAT knowledge, attitudes, quality of life with OAT, and adherence at baseline and at a 3-month follow-up. Satisfaction with the MASS intervention was also assessed at follow-up. Results: Anticoagulation knowledge significantly improved from baseline to follow-up (Mbase = 12.5 ± 5.51, Mfollow-up = 14.78 ± 3.93, p = .007. Other outcomes were not different, pre- and post-tests. Participants reported they were generally satisfied with MASS, its ease of use and its usefulness. Conclusion: The results showed use of MASS improved older adults’ knowledge of OAT. Using mHealth apps may enhance self-care among older adults with chronic conditions who are also taking oral anticoagulants.

  17. Feasibility Study of a Mobile Health Intervention for Older Adults on Oral Anticoagulation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ah Lee PhD, RN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral anticoagulation treatment (OAT such as warfarin therapy is recommended for older adults with atrial fibrillation, heart failure, or who are at risk for venous thromboembolism. Despite its proven benefits, older adults report both dissatisfaction with OAT and reduced quality of life that can potentially lead to low adherence to OAT and decreased treatment efficacy. Objective: To test the feasibility of Mobile Applications for Seniors to enhance Safe anticoagulation therapy (MASS, a mobile-based health technology intervention designed to promote independence and self-care. Method s: This pilot study used a single-arm experimental pre–post design to test the feasibility of a 3-month intervention using MASS in 18 older adults (male: n = 14; White: n = 9; Hispanic: n = 7; Other: n = 2; M age = 67. MASS was available in English or Spanish. Participants completed surveys about their OAT knowledge, attitudes, quality of life with OAT, and adherence at baseline and at a 3-month follow-up. Satisfaction with the MASS intervention was also assessed at follow-up. Results: Anticoagulation knowledge significantly improved from baseline to follow-up ( M base = 12.5 ± 5.51, M follow-up = 14.78 ± 3.93, p = .007. Other outcomes were not different, pre- and post-tests. Participants reported they were generally satisfied with MASS, its ease of use and its usefulness. Conclusion: The results showed use of MASS improved older adults’ knowledge of OAT. Using mHealth apps may enhance self-care among older adults with chronic conditions who are also taking oral anticoagulants.

  18. Adherence to oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation. Focus on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raparelli, Valeria; Proietti, Marco; Cangemi, Roberto;

    2017-01-01

    and persistence. A multi-level approach, including patients' preferences, factors determining physicians' prescribing habits and healthcare system infrastructure and support, is warranted to improve initiation and adherence of anticoagulants. Adherence to NOACs is paramount to achieve a clinical benefit...

  19. Thromboembolic risk in 16 274 atrial fibrillation patients undergoing direct current cardioversion with and without oral anticoagulant therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Lock; Jepsen, Rikke Malene H G; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To study the risk of thromboembolism in a nationwide cohort of atrial fibrillation patients undergoing direct current (DC) cardioversion with or without oral anticoagulant coverage. METHODS AND RESULTS: A retrospective study of 16 274 patients in Denmark discharged from hospital after a first......-time DC cardioversion for atrial fibrillation between 2000 and 2008. Use of oral anticoagulant therapy within 90 days prior and 360 days after DC cardioversion was obtained from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The risk of thromboembolism was estimated by calculating incidence rates...... and by multivariable adjusted Cox proportional-hazard models. During the initial 30 days following discharge, the thromboembolic incidence rate was 10.33 per 100 patient-years for the no prior oral anticoagulant therapy group [n = 5084 (31.2%)], as compared with 4.00 per 100 patient-years for the prior oral...

  20. Effectiveness of self-managed oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with recurrent venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Skjøth, Flemming; Grove, Erik Lerkevang;

    2016-01-01

    Patient-self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) with vitamin K antagonists for venous thromboembolism (VTE) has demonstrated efficacy in randomised, controlled trials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PSM of OAT in everyday clinical practice...... on recurrent VTE and bleeding up to a weighted rate difference of 0.86 (95 % CI 0.00-1.72) in favour of PSM. In conclusion, PSM of anticoagulant treatment was associated with a statistically significant lower rate of recurrent VTE and all-cause death compared to patients on conventionally managed anticoagulant...... to the control group with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.63; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.42-0.95, whereas no difference was seen with bleeding (HR: 0.95; 95 % CI 0.44-2.02). The risk of all-cause death was lower for PSM patients (HR: 0.41; 95 % CI 0.21-0.81). A net clinical benefit analysis sums the effect...

  1. Low standard oral anticoagulation therapy for Chinese patients with St.Jude mechanical heart valves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓刚; 胡盛寿; 祁国奇; 周玉燕

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the efficacy of the low standard oral anticoagulation therapy following St Jude Medical (SJM) valve implantation for Chinese patients.Methods Totally 805 patients with a mean age of 42.70±11.09 years, enrolled into this study. Among them, 230 underwent aortic valve replacements (AVR), 381 mitral valve replacements (MVR), 189 double valve replacements (DVR) and 5 tricuspid valve replacememts (TVR). All patients received postoperative oral anticoagulation therapy based on a low standard of international normalized ratio (INR, 2.0-2.5). Of the 805 patients, 710 were followed up for 0.25-13 years (a median, 4.15 years). Results Postoperatively, 17 adverse events occurred. Operative mortality was 2.11%. The most frequent cause of operative mortality was a low cardiac output. During follow-up, there were 47 anticoagulant-induced hemorrhages [1.59%/patient-year (pt-yr)], 10 cases of thromboembolism (0.34%/pt-yr), and 3 mechanical valve thromboses (0.19%/pt-yr). There were 44 late deaths and the linearized late mortality rates were 0.51%pt-yr. Estimates of actuarial survival for all patients at 5 and 10 years was 97.45% (0.70%) and 77.96% (17.44%), respectively.Conclusions A low target INR range of 2.0-2.5 is preferable for Chinese patients so as to reduce the severe bleeding complications in those with conventionally higher levels of INR. The long-term results were satisfactory in terms of the numbers of those who suffered thrombosis, embolism and bleeding.

  2. Odontostomatologic management of patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy: a retrospective multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchingolo, Francesco; Tatullo, Marco; Abenavoli, Fabio M; Marrelli, Massimo; Inchingolo, Alessio D; Scacco, Salvatore; Papa, Francesco; Inchingolo, Angelo M; Dipalma, Gianna

    2011-07-19

    Today, we frequently find patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), a prophylaxis against the occurrence of thromboembolic events. An oral surgeon needs to know how to better manage such patients, in order to avoid hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications. A group of 193 patients (119 men aged between 46 and 82 and 74 women aged between 54 and 76) undergoing OAT for more than 5 years were managed with a standardized management protocol and a 2-months follow-up. The aim of the present study was to apply a protocol, which could provide a safe intra- and postoperative management of patients on OAT. Among the 193 patients, only 2 had postoperative complications. We think that the protocol used in the present study can be used for complete safety in the treatment of this type of patients.

  3. Odontostomatologic management of patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy: a retrospective multicentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scacco Salvatore

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Today, we frequently find patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT, a prophylaxis against the occurrence of thromboembolic events. An oral surgeon needs to know how to better manage such patients, in order to avoid hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications. Materials and methods A group of 193 patients (119 men aged between 46 and 82 and 74 women aged between 54 and 76 undergoing OAT for more than 5 years were managed with a standardized management protocol and a 2-months follow-up. The aim of the present study was to apply a protocol, which could provide a safe intra- and postoperative management of patients on OAT. Results Among the 193 patients, only 2 had postoperative complications. Conclusions We think that the protocol used in the present study can be used for complete safety in the treatment of this type of patients.

  4. Oral anticoagulant therapy during and after coronary angioplasty the intensity and duration of anticoagulation are essential to reduce thrombotic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Berg, J M; Hutten, B A; Kelder, J C; Verheugt, F W; Plokker, H W

    2001-04-24

    In the randomized Balloon Angioplasty and Anticoagulation Study (BAAS), the addition of oral anticoagulants to aspirin significantly reduced early and late events after coronary angioplasty. However, bleeding episodes were increased. The present report studied the intensity and the duration of anticoagulation as predictors of thrombotic and bleeding events. A total of 530 patients, 34% of whom received a stent, were treated with aspirin plus coumarins. Half of the patients were randomized to angiographic follow-up. The target international normalized ratio (INR) was 2.1 to 4.8 during angioplasty and 6-month follow-up. Thrombotic events were death, myocardial infarction, target lesion revascularization, and thrombotic stroke. Bleeding complications were hemorrhagic stroke, major extracranial bleeding, and false aneurysm. "Optimal" anticoagulation was defined as an INR in the target range for at least 70% of the follow-up time. There were 17 early thrombotic events (3.2%), 7 early bleeding episodes (1.3%), and 10 false aneurysms (1.9%). The incidence rate for both early thrombotic and bleeding events was lowest in patients in the target range. A total of 61 late thrombotic events occurred (11.6%). Optimal anticoagulation was an independent predictor of late thrombotic events (relative risk, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.57) and was associated with a 0.21 mm (95% CI, 0.17 to 0.42) larger vessel lumen at 6 months. Late bleeding episodes (1.4%) were lowest in patients in the target range. Coumarins started before coronary angioplasty with a target INR of 2.1 to 4.8 led to the lowest procedural event rate, without an increase in bleeding episodes. During follow-up, optimal anticoagulation was associated with a decrease in the incidence of late events by 67% and a significant improvement in 6-month angiographic outcome.

  5. Preadmission oral anticoagulant therapy and clinical outcome in patients hospitalised with acute stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Tobias Pilgaard; Svendsen, Marie Louise; Hansen, Morten Lock;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Information about the effect of preadmission oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) on stroke outcome in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is scarce. A systematic review was done of the existing data on the association between preadmission OAT and stroke outcome in patients with AF....... METHOD: We performed a systematic search in the PubMed Database, the Embase Database and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews identifying 13 studies that met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: The studies included a total of 18,523 patients with AF and admission with stroke. Of these, 1,169 had...... a haemorrhagic stroke. The proportion of patients in preadmission OAT varied from 5 to 37%, and the proportion who did not receive any antithrombotic therapy (AT) varied from 22 to 75%. The risk of having a severe stroke for patients with an international normalised ratio (INR)

  6. The debate concerning oral anticoagulation: whether to suspend oral anticoagulants during dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    António, Natália; Castro, Graça; Ramos, Domingos; Machado, António; Gonçalves, Lino; Macedo, Tice; Providência, Luís A

    2008-04-01

    The management of patients taking long-term oral anticoagulants who require dental surgery is still highly controversial. The risk of bleeding associated with dental treatment under oral anticoagulants must be weighed against the risk of thromboembolism associated with suspension of antithrombotic therapy. Mortality and morbidity associated with thromboembolic events are higher than those associated with hemorrhagic events after minor oral surgery procedures. Evidence-based information does not support oral anticoagulant suspension before minor oral surgery. The authors propose a management protocol for chronically anticoagulated patients who require a dental procedure, to reduce both thromboembolic risk and the risk of bleeding.

  7. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients on long-term oral anticoagulation therapy: Endoscopic findings, clinical management and outcome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos C Thomopoulos; Konstantinos P Mimidis; George J Theocharis; Anthie G Gatopoulou; Georgios N Kartalis; Vassiliki N Nikolopoulou

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a severe complication in patients receiving long-term oral anticoagulant therapy.The purpose of this study was to describe the causes and clinical outcome of these patients.METHODS: From January 1999 to October 2003, 111patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB)were hospitalized while on oral anticoagulants. The causes and clinical outcome of these patients were compared with those of 604 patients hospitalized during 2000-2001with AUGIB who were not taking warfarin.RESULTS: The most common cause of bleeding was peptic ulcer in 51 patients (45%) receiving anticoagulants compared to 359/604 (59.4%) patients not receiving warfarin (P<0.05). No identifiable source of bleeding could be found in 33 patients (29.7%) compared to 31/604(5.1%) patients not receiving anticoagulants (P= 0.0001).The majority of patients with concurrent use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSATDs) (26/35, 74.3%) had a peptic ulcer as a cause of bleeding while 32/76 (40.8%)patients not taking a great dose of NSATDs had a negative upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. Endoscopic hemostasis was applied and no complication was reported.Six patients (5.4%) were operated due to continuing or recurrent hemorrhage, compared to 23/604 (3.8%) patients not receiving anticoagulants. Four patients died, the overall mortality was 3.6% in patients with AUGIB due to anticoagulants, which was not different from that in patients not receiving anticoagulant therapy.CONCLUSION: Patients with AUGIB while on long-term anticoagulant therapy had a clinical outcome, which is not different from that of patients not taking anticoagulants.Early endoscopy is important for the management of these patients and endoscopic hemostasis can be safely applied.

  8. Characteristics of Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients Receiving Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulant Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisanao Akiyama

    Full Text Available The first non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC introduced to the market in Japan was dabigatran in March 2011, and three more NOACs, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have since become available. Randomized controlled trials of NOACs have revealed that intracranial hemorrhage (ICH occurs less frequently with NOACs compared with warfarin. However, the absolute incidence of ICH associated with NOACs has increased with greater use of these anticoagulants, and we wanted to explore the incidence, clinical characteristics, and treatment course of patients with NOACs-associated ICH.We retrospectively analyzed the characteristics of symptomatic ICH patients receiving NOACs between March 2011 and September 2014.ICH occurred in 6 patients (5 men, 1 woman; mean ± SD age, 72.8 ± 3.2 years. Mean time to onset was 146.2 ± 111.5 days after starting NOACs. Five patients received rivaroxaban and 1 patient received apixaban. None received dabigatran or edoxaban. Notably, no hematoma expansion was observed within 24 h of onset in the absence of infusion of fresh frozen plasma, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VIIa or hemodialysis. When NOAC therapy was initiated, mean HAS-BLED and PANWARDS scores were 1.5 ± 0.5 and 39.5 ± 7.7, respectively. Mean systolic blood pressure was 137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg within 1 month before spontaneous ICH onset.Six symptomatic ICHs occurred early in NOAC therapy but hematoma volume was small and did not expand in the absence of infusion of reversal agents or hemodialysis. The occurrence of ICH during NOAC therapy is possible even when there is acceptable mean systolic blood pressure control (137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg and HAS-BLED score ≤ 2. Even stricter blood pressure lowering and control within the acceptable range may be advisable to prevent ICH during NOAC therapy.

  9. Antiplatelet therapy strategies after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients needing oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Etienne, Christophe; Angoulvant, Denis; Simeon, Edouard; Fauchier, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    Long-term oral anticoagulant (OAC) and dual-antiplatelet therapy are commonly needed in patients with atrial fibrillation and in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), respectively. The combination of atrial fibrillation and PCI is frequent, and leads to a dilemma for antithrombotic therapy, where risk of stroke or stent thrombosis must be balanced with bleeding risk. In the WOEST study, 573 patients on OAC undergoing PCI were randomly assigned to receive clopidogrel alone or clopidogrel plus aspirin. The primary end point was the occurrence of any bleeding episode during 1-year follow-up. Clopidogrel alone administered to patients taking OAC after PCI was associated with a significantly lower rate of bleeding complications than clopidogrel plus aspirin. Moreover, a composite secondary end point of death, myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis was significantly lower in the dual-therapy group compared with the triple-therapy group. In spite of its limitations, the WOEST study constitutes a major breakthrough, showing that long-term aspirin after PCI may be obsolete in certain circumstances. This needs to be confirmed in further studies.

  10. Self management of oral anticoagulant therapy in children with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas D; Attermann, Jørn; Hjortdal, Vibeke E.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The concept of self – management of oral anticoagulation has been shown to entail better quality of treatment than conventional management when assessed in selected adults. We have extended the concept of self – management to include children with congenital cardiac disease......, hypothesizing self-management of oral anticoagulation is also possible in this subset of patients. Our aim was to assess the quality of self-management. Methods: We trained 14 children aged from 2.2 to 15.6 years, with a mean age of 9.7 years, and their parents, in domiciliary analysis of the International...

  11. close: Closure of patent foramen ovale, oral anticoagulants or antiplatelet therapy to prevent stroke recurrence: Study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Jean-Louis; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Amarenco, Pierre; Arquizan, Caroline; Aubry, Pierre; Barthelet, Martine; Bertrand, Bernard; Brochet, Eric; Cabanes, Laure; Donal, Erwan; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Ernande, Laura; Finet, Gérard; Fraisse, Alain; Giroud, Maurice; Guérin, Patrice; Habib, Gilbert; Juliard, Jean-Michel; Leys, Didier; Lièvre, Michel; Lusson, Jean-René; Marcon, François; Michel, Patrick; Moulin, Thierry; Mounier-Vehier, François; Pierard, Luc; Piot, Christophe; Rey, Christian; Rodier, Gilles; Roudaut, Raymond; Schleich, Jean-Marc; Teiger, Emmanuel; Turc, Guillaume; Vuillier, Fabrice; Weimar, Christian; Woimant, France; Chatellier, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    Currently available data do not provide definitive evidence on the comparative benefits of closure of patent foramen ovale, oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet therapy in patients with patent foramen ovale-associated cryptogenic stroke To assess whether transcatheter patent foramen ovale closure plus antiplatelet therapy is superior to antiplatelet therapy alone and whether oral anticoagulant therapy is superior to antiplatelet therapy, for secondary stroke prevention in patients aged 16 to 60 years with a large patent foramen ovale or a patent foramen ovale associated with an atrial septal aneurysm, and an otherwise unexplained ischaemic stroke or retinal ischaemia. Six hundred and sixty-four patients were included in the study. CLOSE is an academic-driven, multicentre, randomized, open-label, three-group, superiority trial with blinded adjudication of outcome events. The trial has been registered with Clinical Trials Register (Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00562289). Patient recruitment started in December 2007. Patient follow-up will continue until December 2016. Expected mean follow-up = 5.6 years. The primary efficacy outcome is the occurrence of fatal or nonfatal stroke. Safety outcomes include fatal, life-threatening or major procedure- or device-related complications and fatal, life-threatening or major haemorrhagic complications. CLOSE is the first specifically designed trial to assess the superiority of patent foramen ovale closure over antiplatelet therapy alone and the superiority of oral anticoagulants over antiplatelet therapy to prevent stroke recurrence in patients with patent foramen ovale-associated cryptogenic stroke. © 2016 World Stroke Organization.

  12. Measurement of warfarin in the oral fluid of patients undergoing anticoagulant oral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Ghimenti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients on warfarin therapy undergo invasive and expensive checks for the coagulability of their blood. No information on coagulation levels is currently available between two controls. METHODOLOGY: A method was developed to determine warfarin in oral fluid by HPLC and fluorimetric detection. The chromatographic separation was performed at room temperature on a C-18 reversed-phase column, 65% PBS and 35% methanol mobile phase, flow rate 0.7 mL/min, injection volume 25 µL, excitation wavelength 310 nm, emission wavelength 400 nm. FINDINGS: The method was free from interference and matrix effect, linear in the range 0.2-100 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.2 ng/mL. Its coefficient of variation was <3% for intra-day measurements and <5% for inter-day measurements. The average concentration of warfarin in the oral fluid of 50 patients was 2.5±1.6 ng/mL (range 0.8-7.6 ng/mL. Dosage was not correlated to INR (r = -0.03, p = 0.85 but positively correlated to warfarin concentration in the oral fluid (r = 0.39, p = 0.006. The correlation between warfarin concentration and pH in the oral fluid (r = 0.37, p = 0.009 confirmed the importance of pH in regulating the drug transfer from blood. A correlation between warfarin concentration in the oral fluid and INR was only found in samples with pH values ≥7.2 (r = 0.84, p = 0.004. CONCLUSIONS: Warfarin diffuses from blood to oral fluid. The method allows to measure its concentration in this matrix and to analyze correlations with INR and other parameters.

  13. Oral anticoagulation therapy after radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation and the risk of thromboembolism and serious bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karasoy, Deniz; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Hansen, Jim

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the long-term risk of thromboembolism and serious bleeding associated with oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy beyond 3 months after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: Linking Danish administrative registries, 4050 patients undergoing...... first-time RFA (2000-11) were identified. Risk of thromboembolism and serious bleeding according to OAC therapy were analysed by incidence rates (presented per 100 person-years) and Cox proportional-hazard models. The median age was 59.5 years (interquartile range, IQR: 52.8-65.2); 26.5% were females.......42(0.86-2.35)95%CI] in multivariable analysis. Beyond 3 months after RFA 87 (2.1%) serious bleedings occurred; incidence rates with and without OAC were 0.99 (0.77-1.27)95%CI and 0.44 (0.29-0.65)95%CI, respectively. Oral anticoagulation therapy was significantly associated with serious bleeding risk [hazard ratio 2...

  14. [Therapy education for patients receiving oral anti-coagulants vitamin K antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satger, Bernadette; Blaise, Sophie; Fontaine, Michèle; Yver, Jacqueline; Allenet, Benoît; Baudrant, Magali; Pernod, Gilles; Bosson, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-01

    The vitamin K antagonists (VKA) remain to this day the only oral form of therapeutic anticoagulation. Approximately 1% of the French population, mainly elderly, is treated with these anticoagulants. Oral anticoagulants have significant risks of iatrogenic complications; indeed they are the leading cause of such drug-induced complications, predominantly hemorrhages. AFSSAPS (French Drug and Medical Products Agency) clinical practice recommendations, repeatedly disseminated, emphasize the education of patients receiving VKAs. Managing oral anticoagulant treatment is challenging, with a significant risk of under- or overdosing and consequently, thrombosis or hemorrhage. The therapeutic window is narrow, multiple drug-interactions are possible, and the specific dose required for a particular individual to achieve appropriate International Normalized Ratio (INR) levels is unpredictable. The literature contains few randomized controlled trials about the efficacy of education for patients treated with oral anticoagulants. These education programs are not standardized and are therefore varied and difficult to compare. Nevertheless, studies demonstrate the importance of patient education programs in reducing the risk of hemorrhage and achieving better treatment stability. The Grenoble region hospital-community network for vascular diseases (GRANTED) has developed an education program for these patients, consisting of individual sessions for the patient and/or a friend or family member (either at a health care facility or at the patient's home), telephone support and group sessions, and using educational tools and supports. There is also a link with the general practitioner who receives a report. This approach makes it possible to adapt the educational message to individual patients and their daily lives, as well as directly involving them in the management of their treatment.

  15. Practice points in gynecardiology: Abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women taking oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Angela H E M; Euler, Mia von; Bongers, Marlies Y; Rolden, Herbert J A; Grutters, Janneke P C; Ulrich, Lian; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of premenopausal women are currently using antithrombotic and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy for various cardiovascular indications. These may induce or exacerbate abnormal uterine bleeding and more awareness and knowledge among prescribers is required. Heavy and irregular menstrual bleeding is common in women in their forties and may have a variety of underlying causes that require different treatment options. Thus using anticoagulants in premenopausal women demands specific expertise and close collaboration between cardiovascular physicians and gynecologists. In this article we summarize the scope of the problem and provide practical recommendations for the care for young women taking anticoagulants and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy. We also recommend that more safety data on uterine bleeding with novel anticoagulants in premenopausal women should be obtained.

  16. Improved therapeutic safety of oral anticoagulant therapy in Germany: the Saarland model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörsdorf, S; Leipnitz, G; Pindur, G; Schenk, J F; Erdlenbruch, W; Krischek, B; Wenzel, E

    1999-01-01

    In contrast to other European countries, in Germany more than 90% of oral anticoagulated patients are controlled by general practitioners. The International Normalized Ratio (INR) system in laboratory control is not in widespread use, often leading to misinterpretations of prothrombin time (PT) measurements. To improve the management of anticoagulated patients, a model was developed, consisting of different questionnaires and on the base of the INR system. Since 1993, 60 patients in our Department's outpatient anticoagulant clinic and since 1996 16 patients in the office of a general practitioner were followed for 146.32 patient years. There were no thromboembolic events and no major bleedings during follow-up. A total of 126 minor bleedings occurred in 30 patients. There were no significant differences in INR values and stable phases between the two centers; however, significantly shorter stable phases in patients with bleeding episodes were noted. Thus, this model seems to be useful also in general practitioners' hands.

  17. Management of dental patients receiving antiplatelet therapy or chronic oral anticoagulation: A review of the latest evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dézsi, Csaba András; Dézsi, Balázs Bence; Dézsi, András Döme

    2017-12-01

    The perioperative management of patients treated with antithrombotic medications who undergo surgical procedures represents a common clinical problem. Dental interventions are usually associated with a low risk of bleeding; however, the dental implications of new antithrombotic agents are not yet fully understood. The present review is based on the latest evidence and recommendations published on the periprocedural management of dental patients treated with single or dual antiplatelet therapy, vitamin K antagonists, or direct oral anticoagulants for a variety of indications.

  18. Comparison of laboratory and immediate diagnosis of coagulation for patients under oral anticoagulation therapy before dental surgery

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Dental surgery can be carried out on patients under oral anticoagulation therapy by using haemostyptic measures. The aim of the study was a comparative analysis of coagulation by laboratory methods and immediate patient diagnosis on the day of the planned procedure. Methods On the planned day of treatment, diagnoses were carried out on 298 patients for Prothrombin Time (PT), the International Normalised Ratio (INR), and Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT). The decision to pr...

  19. Clinical consequences of hospital variation in use of oral anticoagulant therapy after first-time admission for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M L; Gadsbøll, N; Rasmussen, S;

    2009-01-01

    -2796.2008.02061.xObjective. To analyse how hospital factors influence the use of oral anticoagulants (OAC) in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients and address the clinical consequences of hospital variation in OAC use. Design and subjects. By linkage of nationwide Danish administrative registers we conducted...... thromboembolic events were observed amongst patients from low OAC use hospitals. Our study emphasizes the need for a continued vigilance on implementation of international AF management guidelines.......-Copenhagen University Hospital; Glostrup Hospital; Rigshospitalet-Copenhagen University Hospital; University of Copenhagen; Copenhagen, Denmark). Clinical consequences of hospital variation in use of oral anticoagulant therapy after first-time admission for atrial fibrillation. J Intern Med 2009; doi:10.1111/j.1365...

  20. Needs and barriers to improve the collaboration in oral anticoagulant therapy: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drewes Hanneke W

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT involves many health care disciplines. Even though collaboration between care professionals is assumed to improve the quality of OAT, very little research has been done into the practice of OAT management to arrange and manage the collaboration. This study aims to identify the problems in collaboration experienced by the care professionals involved, the solutions they proposed to improve collaboration, and the barriers they encountered to the implementation of these solutions. Methods In the Netherlands, intensive follow-up of OAT is provided by specialized anticoagulant clinics (ACs. Sixty-eight semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 103 professionals working at an AC. These semi-structured interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed inductively. Wagner's chronic care model (CCM and Cabana's framework for improvement were used to categorize the results. Results AC professionals experienced three main bottlenecks in collaboration: lack of knowledge (mostly of other professionals, lack of consensus on OAT, and limited information exchange between professionals. They mentioned several solutions to improve collaboration, especially solutions of CCM's decision support component (i.e. education, regular meetings, and agreements and protocols. Education is considered a prerequisite for the successful implementation of other proposed solutions such as developing a multidisciplinary protocol and changing the allocation of tasks. The potential of the health care organization to improve collaboration seemed to be underestimated by professionals. They experienced several barriers to the successful implementation of the proposed solutions. Most important barriers were the lack motivation of non-AC professionals and lack of time to establish collaboration. Conclusions This study revealed that the collaboration in OAT is limited by a lack of knowledge, a lack of consensus, and a

  1. Patients' perspectives on self-testing of oral anticoagulation therapy: Content analysis of patients' internet blogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Ian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients on oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT require regular testing of the prothrombin time (PT and the international normalised ratio (INR to monitor their blood coagulation level to avoid complications of either over or under coagulation. PT/INR can be tested by a healthcare professional or by the patient. The latter mode of the testing is known as patient self-testing or home testing. The objective of this study was to elicit patients' perspectives and experiences regarding PT/INR self-testing using portable coagulometer devices. Methods Internet blog text mining was used to collect 246 blog postings by 108 patients, mainly from the USA and the UK. The content of these qualitative data were analysed using XSight and NVivo software packages. Results The key themes in relation to self-testing of OAT identified were as follows: Patient benefits reported were time saved, personal control, choice, travel reduction, cheaper testing, and peace of mind. Equipment issues included high costs, reliability, quality, and learning how to use the device. PT/INR issues focused on the frequency of testing, INR fluctuations and individual target (therapeutic INR level. Other themes noted were INR testing at laboratories, the interactions with healthcare professionals in managing and testing OAT and insurance companies' involvement in acquiring the self-testing equipment. Social issues included the pain and stress of taking and testing for OAT. Conclusions Patients' blogs on PT/INR testing provide insightful information that can help in understanding the nature of the experiences and perspectives of patients on self-testing of OAT. The themes identified in this paper highlight the substantial complexities involved in self-testing programmes in the healthcare system. Thus, the issues elicited in this study are very valuable for all stakeholders involved in developing effective self-testing strategies in healthcare that are gaining

  2. Safety and efficacy of oral anticoagulation therapy in Chinese patients with concomitant atrial fibrillation and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, L Y; Siu, C W; Yue, W S; Lau, C P; Lip, G Y; Tse, H F

    2011-05-01

    Limited evidence is available on the safety and efficacy of anticoagulants in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) patients with concomitant hypertension. We investigated the safety and efficacy of 476 consecutive anticoagulated Chinese outpatients with non-valvular AF and hypertension. Occurrence of ischaemic stroke and major bleeding, and international normalized ratio (INR) values during these events were recorded. There was no significant difference in anticoagulation control between patients with or without hypertension. INR-specific incidence rates of the events were calculated, which showed no excessive risk for ischaemic stroke (2.5 vs 1.6% per year, P=0.22) or major bleeding (3.9 vs 3.2% per year, P=0.29) in non-valvular AF patients with or without hypertension. In multivariate analysis, congestive heart failure, smoking and high CHADS2 score were independent predictors for ischaemic stroke, whereas use of antiplatelet agents was an independent predictor for bleeding. It can be noted that hypertension was not associated with ischaemic stroke or major bleeding. Hypertensive patients who achieved target blood pressure control (risk compared with those not achieving target blood pressure. Our findings demonstrate the effects of hypertension on the outcomes of warfarin therapy; further investigation is needed to clarify whether more aggressive antihypertensive therapy could result in better outcomes in hypertensive patients with non-valvular AF.

  3. 'Ins' and 'outs' of triple therapy: Optimal antiplatelet therapy in patients on chronic oral anticoagulation who need coronary stenting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewilde, W.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Breet, N.; Koolen, J.J.; Berg, J.M. ten

    2010-01-01

    Chronic oral anticoagulant treatment is obligatory in patients (class I) with mechanical heart valves and in patients with atrial fibrillation with CHADS2 score >1. When these patients undergo percutaneous coronary intervention with placement of a stent, there is also an indication for treatment

  4. New oral anticoagulants in addition to single or dual antiplatelet therapy after an acute coronary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldgren, Jonas; Wallentin, Lars; Alexander, John H; James, Stefan; Jönelid, Birgitta; Steg, Gabriel; Sundström, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Oral anticoagulation in addition to antiplatelet treatment after an acute coronary syndrome might reduce ischaemic events but increase bleeding risk. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding direct thrombin or factor-Xa inhibition by any of the novel oral anticoagulants (apixaban, dabigatran, darexaban, rivaroxaban, and ximelagatran) to single (aspirin) or dual (aspirin and clopidogrel) antiplatelet therapy in this setting. All seven published randomized, placebo-controlled phase II and III studies of novel oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndromes were included. The database consisted of 30 866 patients, 4135 (13.4%) on single, and 26 731 (86.6%) on dual antiplatelet therapy, with a non-ST- or ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome within the last 7-14 days. We defined major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) as the composite of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, or stroke; and clinically significant bleeding as the composite of major and non-major bleeding requiring medical attention according to the study definitions. When compared with aspirin alone the combination of an oral anticoagulant and aspirin reduced the incidence of MACE [hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval 0.70; 0.59-0.84], but increased clinically significant bleeding (HR: 1.79; 1.54-2.09). Compared with dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel, adding an oral anticoagulant decreased the incidence of MACE modestly (HR: 0.87; 0.80-0.95), but more than doubled the bleeding (HR: 2.34; 2.06-2.66). Heterogeneity between studies was low, and results were similar when restricting the analysis to phase III studies. In patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome, the addition of a new oral anticoagulant to antiplatelet therapy results in a modest reduction in cardiovascular events but a substantial increase in bleeding, most pronounced when new oral anticoagulants are combined with dual antiplatelet therapy.

  5. Anticoagulant Therapy In Ischemic Stroke Or TIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Mehrvar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death  . Anticoagulants   have been used to treat patients with acute ischemic stroke for many years. Despite their widespread use, the usefulness of emergency anticoagulation is a subject of debate. Disagreements exist about the best agent to administer, the route of administration, the use of a bolus dose to start treatment, the level of anticoagulation required, and the duration of treatment. There are 2 types of anticoagulants: Parenteral and oral. Heparin is an anticoagulant that used parenteral. Oral anticoagulants are including Warfarin and new anticoagulants such as Dabigatrn,Rivaroxaban ,Apixaban and other newer drugs. In patients with noncardioembolic  ischemic stroke or TIA antiplatelet agents are treatment of choice and preferred to anticoagulants. In cardioembolic  ischemic stroke or TIA with high risk of reembolization  anticoagulants  are considered as preferred treatment.  Warfarin, apixaban10mg/d ,Rivaroxaban20mg/d, and dabigatran 150 mg/d are all indicated for the prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with nonvalvular AF, whether paroxysmal or permanent.Also anticoagulant therapy is recommended for ischemic stroke or TIA patients in the setting of acute MI, atrial or ventricular thrombosis or dilated and restricted cardiomyopathy. Some valvular heart diseases are other indication for anticoagulant therapy in ischemic stroke or TIA patients. Ischemic  Stroke or TIA in patients with Cerebral vein thrombosis and  known hypercoagulable state specially anti phospholipid antibody syndrome are other indications for anticoagulant treatment.

  6. Dental management of patients taking novel oral anticoagulants (NOAs): Dabigatran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, Alberto; Alvarado, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Background A new group of oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) with clear advantages over classic dicoumarin oral anticoagulants (warfarin and acenocoumarol) has been developed in recent years. Patients being treated with oral anticoagulants are at higher risk for bleeding when undergoing dental treatments. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through April 2016 for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge, PubMed and Cochrane Library using the keywords “dabigatran”, “rivaroxaban”, “apixaban”, “edoxaban”, “new oral anticoagulants”, “novel oral anticoagulants”, “bleeding” and “dental treatment”. Results There is no need for regular coagulation monitoring of patients on dabigatran therapy. Whether or not to temporarily discontinue dabigatran must be assessed according to the bleeding risk involved in the dental procedure to be performed. Conclusions The number of patients under treatment with new oral anticoagulants will increase in the coming years. It is essential to know about the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of new oral anticoagulants and about their interactions with other drugs. It is necessary to develop clinical guidelines for the perioperative and postoperative management of these new oral anticoagulants in oral surgical procedures, and to carefully evaluate the bleeding risk of dental treatment, as well as the thrombotic risk of suppressing the new oral anticoagulant. Key words:Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, novel oral anticoagulants, bleeding. PMID:28210451

  7. Discrepancies between Patients' Preferences and Educational Programs on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Survey in Community Pharmacies and Hospital Consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquart de Terline, Diane; Hejblum, Gilles; Fernandez, Christine; Cohen, Ariel; Antignac, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy is increasingly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic complications in various clinical situations. Nowadays, education programs for patients treated with anticoagulants constitute an integrated component of their management. However, such programs are usually based on the healthcare providers' perceptions of what patients should know, rather than on patients' preferences. To investigate patients' viewpoints on educational needs and preferred modalities of information delivery. We conducted an observational study based on a self-administered questionnaire. To explore several profiles of patients, the study was designed for enrolling patients in two settings: during outpatient consultations in a cardiology department (Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris, France) and in community pharmacies throughout France. Of the 371 patients who completed the questionnaire, 187 (50.4%) were recruited during an outpatient consultation and 184 (49.6%) were recruited in community pharmacies. 84.1% of patients were receiving a vitamin K antagonist and 15.6% a direct oral anticoagulant. Patients ranked 16 of 21 (76.2%) questionnaire items on information about their treatment as important or essential; information on adverse effects of treatment was the highest ranked domain (mean score 2.38, 95% CI 2.30-2.46). Pharmacists (1.69, 1.58-1.80), nurses (1.05, 0.95-1.16), and patient associations (0.36, 0.29-0.44), along with group sessions (0.85, 0.75-0.95), the internet (0.77, 0.67-0.88), and delivery of material at the patient's home (1.26, 1.14-1.38), were ranked poorly in terms of delivering educational material. This study revealed substantial discrepancies between patient preferences and current educational programs. These findings should be useful for tailoring future educational programs that are better adapted to patients, with a potential associated enhancement of their effectiveness.

  8. Impact of valvular heart disease on oral anticoagulant therapy in non-valvular atrial fibrillation: results from the RAMSES study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başaran, Özcan; Dogan, Volkan; Beton, Osman; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Aykan, Ahmet Çağrı; Kalaycıoğlu, Ezgi; Bolat, Ismail; Taşar, Onur; Şafak, Özgen; Kalçık, Macit; Yaman, Mehmet; İnci, Sinan; Altıntaş, Bernas; Kalkan, Sedat; Kırma, Cevat; Biteker, Murat

    2017-02-01

    The definition of non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is controversial. We aimed to assess the impact of valvular heart disease on stroke prevention strategies in NVAF patients. The RAMSES study was a multicenter and cross-sectional study conducted on NVAF patients (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02344901). The study population was divided into patients with significant valvular disease (SVD) and non-significant valvular disease (NSVD), whether they had at least one moderate valvular disease or not. Patients with a mechanical prosthetic valve and mitral stenosis were excluded. Baseline characteristics and oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapies were compared. In 5987 patients with NVAF, there were 3929 (66%) NSVD and 2058 (34%) SVD patients. The predominant valvular disease was mitral regurgitation (58.1%), followed by aortic regurgitation (24.1%) and aortic stenosis (17.8%). Patients with SVD had higher CHA2DS2VASc [3.0 (2.0; 4.0) vs. 4.0 (2.0; 5.0), p valvular heart disease with the predominance of mitral regurgitation. Patients with SVD were at greater risk of stroke and bleeding compared to patients with NSVD. Although patients with mitral regurgitation should be given more aggressive anticoagulant therapy due to their higher risk of stroke, they are undertreated compared to patients with aortic valve diseases.

  9. New Type of Oral Anticoagulants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽霖

    2012-01-01

    Since 1960,so far,has half a century,long-term oral vitamin K antagonists (VKA) for anticoagulation main plan,but the shortcomings of the VKA but not allow to ignore:( 1 ) the VKA effect to be slow,VKA after diagnosis should be immediate treatment,this plan have to start with unfractionated heparin (UFH),low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and fondaparinux injection,use 5 ~ 10 d transition again after oral VKA,this plan for outpatient greatly inconvenience;(2) in the use of heparin drugs there is also monitoring problem during or the occurrence of heparin induction thrombocytopenic thrombosis disease (HITT) risk;(3) VKA treatment vulnerable to food,drugs,to VKA considerations of the interference of the individual differences are of great reaction;(4)VKA treatment window,need to narrow in close monitoring of adjusting dosage benefits under,but the present survey indicates that at least a third of patients with clinically failed to control the INR within the scope of the treatment.So send development new anticoagulants,especially oral anticoagulants listed was imminent

  10. Effectiveness of self-managed oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with recurrent venous thromboembolism. A propensity-matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Skjøth, Flemming; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Nielsen, Peter Brønnum; Christensen, Thomas Decker

    2016-08-30

    Patient-self-management (PSM) of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) with vitamin K antagonists for venous thromboembolism (VTE) has demonstrated efficacy in randomised, controlled trials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PSM of OAT in everyday clinical practice. Prospectively registered patient data were obtained from databases at two hospitals, and cross-linkage with national patient registries provided detailed information on comorbidities and events. Patients with VTE performing PSM affiliated to major PSM centres were included as cases (N=444). A control group of patients on conventional treatment was propensity score selected in a ratio of 1:5 (N=2220) within matched groups. The effectiveness and safety was estimated using recurrent VTE, major bleeding events and all-cause death as outcomes. We found a lower rate of recurrent VTE among PSM patients compared to the control group with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.63; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.42-0.95, whereas no difference was seen with bleeding (HR: 0.95; 95 % CI 0.44-2.02). The risk of all-cause death was lower for PSM patients (HR: 0.41; 95 % CI 0.21-0.81). A net clinical benefit analysis sums the effect on recurrent VTE and bleeding up to a weighted rate difference of 0.86 (95 % CI 0.00-1.72) in favour of PSM. In conclusion, PSM of anticoagulant treatment was associated with a statistically significant lower rate of recurrent VTE and all-cause death compared to patients on conventionally managed anticoagulant treatment. All major thromboembolic outcomes were less frequent among self-managed patients, whereas bleedings were observed with similar frequency.

  11. Triple antithrombotic therapy versus double antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation in patients requiring chronic oral anticoagulation: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jayswal Saheb K; DENG Bing-qing; HU Qing-song; XIE Shuang-lun; GENG Deng-feng; NIE Ru-qiong

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether an addition of OAC to double antiplatelet therapy for patients with an indication of chronic oral anticoagulation undergoing PCI-S may improve clinical outcomes is still debated.This meta-analysis aimed to update and re-compare the benefits and risks of triple antithrombotic therapy (TT) with double anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) after in patients who requiring oral anticoagulation after percutaneous coronary interventions with stenting (PCI-s).Methods Ten reports of observational retrospective or prospective studies were retrieved,including a total of 6296 patients,follow-up period ranging from 1 year to 2 years.Results Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups.The main finding of this study is the overall incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE),myocardial infarction (MI) and stent thrombosis was comparable between two groups.Patients with П was associated with significant reduction in ischemic stroke (OR:0.27; 95% CI:0.13-0.57;P=0.0006) as compared to DAPT.We reaffirmed triple therapy significantly increased the risk of major bleeding (OR:1.47;95% CI:1.22-1.78; P <0.0001) and minor bleeding (OR:1.55; 95% CI:1.07-2.24; P=0.02).Conclusions Triple therapy is more efficacious in reducing the occurrence of ischemic stroke in PCI-s patients with an indication of chronic oral anticoagulation (OAC),compared with DAPT.However,it significantly increased major and minor risk of bleeding.It is imperative that further prospective randomized controlled trials are required to define the best therapeutic strategy for patients with an indication of chronic OAC undergoing PCI-s.

  12. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage versus thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥48 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30–50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation). PMID:26873868

  13. Anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylek, Elaine M

    2013-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common significant cardiac rhythm disorder, and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. Atrial fibrillation confers a fivefold increased risk of stroke, and these strokes are associated with significant mortality and disability. The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, has been the mainstay of anticoagulant therapy for patients with AF, reducing the risk of stroke by 65%. Despite its efficacy, warfarin remains underused in clinical practice because of its variable dose response, diet and medication interactions, and need for frequent monitoring. Stroke prevention in AF has entered an exciting therapeutic era with new classes of targeted anticoagulants that avoid the many pitfalls of the vitamin K antagonists. Dabigatran, an oral thrombin inhibitor, and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, have demonstrated efficacy for stroke prevention and a reduced risk of intracranial hemorrhage relative to warfarin. Translating the efficacy of clinical trials into effective use of these novel agents in clinical practice will require an understanding of their pharmacokinetic profiles, dose selection, and management in select clinical situations.

  14. Current perspectives on dental patients receiving coumarin anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, W W; Konzelman, J L; Sutley, S H

    1997-03-01

    Despite approximately 40 years of experience with oral anticoagulant drugs, controversy still exists about the safety of dental treatment in a patient receiving this therapy. The authors review the topic in depth and offer detailed recommendations for the dental management of patients receiving coumarin anticoagulant therapy.

  15. Treatment Adherence as a New Choice Factor for Optimization of Oral Anticoagulation Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Hemostatic Gene Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Skirdenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate treatment adherence and prevalence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene mutations in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF and provide rationale of choice for oral anticoagulation therapy.Material and methods. Treatment adherence was evaluated in 137 AF patients (aged 35-85 years with quantitative estimation of drug therapy adherence along with compliance to medical support and lifestyle modifications. Among them 82 patients underwent polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene polymorphisms.Results. Patients receiving anticoagulation therapy are characterized by lower level of adherence compared to patients without anticoagulants (65.2±19.3% vs 68.5±19.1%; Wald-Wolfowitz; p<0.05. Considering all studied parameters men are less adherent than women (54.7±18.6% vs 60.6±16.7%; Kolmogorov-Smirnov; p<0.05. Patients receiving new oral anticoagulants (NOAC have better compliance compared with patients of warfarin group. Mutations in CYP2C9 gene were detected in 32.9%, VKORC1 – in 68.3%, and their combination – in 21.9% of study participants. Warfarin therapy may be potentially dangerous in such patients due to low adherence.Conclusion. Considering high prevalence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 gene mutations treatment adherence should be estimated to optimize choice of anticoagulation therapy. NOAC treatment should be considered in patients with low adherence for prevention of thromboembolic complications.

  16. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Franchini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate. This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE.

  17. The Active Metabolite of Warfarin (3'-Hydroxywarfarin) and Correlation with INR, Warfarin and Drug Weekly Dosage in Patients under Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Pharmacogenetics Study

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Warfarin oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) requires regular and frequent drug adjustment monitored by INR. Interindividual variability, drug and diet interferences, and genetics (VKORC1 and CYP2C9) make the maintenance/reaching of stable INR a not so easy task. HPLC assessment of warfarin/enantiomers was suggested as a valid monitoring-tool along with INR, but definite results are still lacking. We evaluated possible correlations between INR, warfarin/3’-hydroxywarfarin, and drug we...

  18. Risk of bleeding and stroke with oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation in Taiwan: a nationwide cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Data on the use of oral anticoagulation (OAC and antiplatelet therapy and the risk of bleeding and stroke amongst Asian patients with atrial fibrillation (AF are limited. We investigated the risks of bleeding and stroke with use of oral anticoagulation (OAC and antiplatelet therapy as mono- or combination therapy, in patients with AF from a Chinese nationwide cohort study.We studied a cohort of 10384 patients (57.2% men, age 67.8 ± 13.2 yrs between 1999 and 2010 from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Records of prescriptions were obtained during follow-up. The main outcome was a recurrent stroke during the follow-up period. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models were used for this analysis.We documented 1009 events for bleeding, as well as 224 hemorrhagic stroke and 1642 ischemic stroke events during a median 3.2 (interquartile range, 1.05-6.54 years' follow-up. Compared with warfarin users, patients with antiplatelet therapy had a lower risk of bleeding (adjusted relative risk [RR], 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.49-0.71, p<0.001 whilst combination therapy had a non-statistically significant higher bleeding risk (RR, 1.33, 95%, 0.91-1.94, p = 0.20. Patients on antiplatelet monotherapy had a similar risk for ischemic stroke compared with OAC (RR 1.05, 95% CI, 0.89-1.25, p = 0.50, whilst those on combination therapy had a significantly higher risk (RR 1.90, 95% CI, 1.34-2.70, p<0.001.In a national representative cohort, antiplatelet therapy had no significant difference in ischemic stroke risk to warfarin. For bleeding, aspirin had a lower risk compared to warfarin. This may reflect poor anticoagulation control, highlighting important missed opportunities for improved stroke prevention, especially in countries where anticoagulation management is suboptimal.

  19. Adherence to a new oral anticoagulant treatment prescription: dabigatran etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bellamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L Bellamy1, N Rosencher1, BI Eriksson21Anaesthesiology Department, Hôpital Cochin (AP-HP, René Descartes University, Paris 75014 France; 2Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital Sahlgrenska/Ostra, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The recent development of new oral anticoagulants, of which dabigatran etexilate is currently at the most advanced stage of development, is the greatest advance in the provision of convenient anticoagulation therapy for many years. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran etexilate, is already on the market in Europe. The main interest probably will be to improve the prescription and the adherence to an effective thromboprophylaxis in medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation without bleeding side effects, without the need for monitoring coagulation, and without drug and food interactions such as vitamin K anticoagulant (VKA treatment. Dabigatran is particularly interesting for extended thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery in order to avoid daily injection for a month. However, oral long-term treatments such as VKA are not systematically associated with a higher compliance level than injected treatments such as low-molecular-weight heparins. Indeed, adherence to an oral treatment, instead of the usual daily injection in major orthopedic surgery, is complex, and based not only on the frequency of dosing but also on patient motivation, understanding, and socio-economic status. New oral anticoagulants may be useful in this way but education and detection of risk factors of nonadherence to treatment are still essential.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, adherence, compliance, education, dabigatran

  20. Therapeutic achievement with long-term oral anticoagulants in post-myocardial infarction patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Azar (Aida)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractTreatment with oral anticoagulant therapy entails a delicate balance between over( risk of bleeding) and under- (risk of thrombemboli) anticoagulation. Therapy is therefore monitored to maintain its anticoagulant effect within a narrow range. The main aim of this research was to

  1. Safety of intramuscular influenza vaccine in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy: a single blinded multi-centre randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benítez Mència

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza vaccines are recommended for administration by the intramuscular route. However, many physicians use the subcutaneous route for patients receiving an oral anticoagulant because this route is thought to induce fewer hemorrhagic side effects. Our aim is to assess the safety of intramuscular administration of influenza vaccine in patients on oral anticoagulation therapy. Methods Design: Randomised, controlled, single blinded, multi-centre clinical trial. Setting: 4 primary care practices in Barcelona, Spain. Participants: 229 patients on oral anticoagulation therapy eligible for influenza vaccine during the 2003–2004 season. Interventions: intramuscular administration of influenza vaccine in the experimental group (129 patients compared to subcutaneous administration in the control group (100 patients. Primary outcome: change in the circumference of the arm at the site of injection at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes: appearance of local reactions and pain at 24 hours and at 10 days; change in INR (International Normalized Ratio at 24 hours and at 10 days. Analysis was by intention to treat using the 95% confidence intervals of the proportions or mean differences. Results Baseline variables in the two groups were similar. No major side effects or major haemorrhage during the follow-up period were reported. No significant differences were observed in the primary outcome between the two groups. The appearance of local adverse reactions was more frequent in the subcutaneous administration group (37,4% vs. 17,4%, 95% confidence interval of the difference 8,2% to 31,8%. Conclusion This study shows that the intramuscular administration route of influenza vaccine in patients on anticoagulant therapy does not have more side effects than the subcutaneous administration route. Registration number NCT00137579 at clinicaltrials.gov

  2. New oral anticoagulants: key messages for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Giorgi-Pierfranceschi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New oral anticoagulants are an effective and safe alternative to vitamin K antagonists in many fields of clinical practice. The use of the direct inhibitors of activated Factor II (dabigatran and activated Factor X (apixaban and rivaroxaban, both in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF and those with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE, is of great interest for internal medicine physicians. This paper aims to give practical guidance on management (starting therapy, follow up and bleeding complications of patients treated with dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban for NVAF or acute VTE providing practical tables concerning the phases of therapy, management of complications, drug interaction and dose adjustment if renal impairment occurs.

  3. Practice points in gynecardiology: Abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women taking oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, A.H.E.M.; Euler, M.; Bongers, M.Y.; Rolden, H.J.A.; Grutters, J.P.C.; Ulrich, L.; Schenck-Gustafsson, K.

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of premenopausal women are currently using antithrombotic and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy for various cardiovascular indications. These may induce or exacerbate abnormal uterine bleeding and more awareness and knowledge among prescribers is required. Heavy and irregular menstrual

  4. Emergency management of patients being treated with oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Manzato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K antagonists (VKA are among the most widely prescribed drugs in the industrialized world. In fact, for decades, VKA have been the only orally available anticoagulant for the primary and secondary prevention of venous and arterial thrombotic events. Their efficacy has been widely demonstrated in a series of studies carried out in the 1990s. Since the incidences of atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism increase exponentially with age, the number of anticoagulated patients is destined to increase. This paper examines anticoagulation therapy management with particular attention to the use of VKA.

  5. [Genetic predisposition to bleeding during oral anticoagulants treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes Díaz, R; Nantes, O; Molina, E; Zozaya, J; Hermida, J

    2008-01-01

    The degree of anticoagulation obtained during oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) varies among patients due to individual and environmental factors. The rate of anticoagulation influences the hemorrhagic risk. Therefore, it is plausible that patients specially sensitive to oral anticoagulants are at higher hemorrhagic risk, specially during the first weeks. The role of a series of polymorphisms of the enzymes involved in the metabolism of VKA or in the vitamin K cycle are reviewed. Three polymorphisms, two in the cytochrome P450 2C9 and one in the VKORC1 enzyme, are responsible for a high portion of the variability observed in the sensitivity to AVK. Although the available literature suggests that these genetic variants could increase the risk of severe hemorrhage, larger, well designed studies are needed to confirm this notion.

  6. [New oral anticoagulants - influence on coagulation tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, L; Nagler, M; Wuillemin, W A

    2014-01-01

    The new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) represent alternative antithrombotic agents for prophylaxis and therapy of thromboembolic diseases. They act either by inhibition of the clotting factor Xa or IIa (thrombin). As a consequence, they influence several coagulation assays (for example prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time). Because of the short half-life of these new agents, these changes show great variations in the course of 24 hours. Furthermore, there are significant differences of laboratory results depending on the used reagents. We explain the influence of apixaban, rivaroxaban (factor Xa inhibitors) and dabigatran (thrombin inhibitor) on the most commonly used coagulation assays. Besides we show that this influence depends on the way of action of the drug as well as on the principle of the coagulation assay. Being aware of this relationships helps to interpret the results of coagulation assays under influence of NOACs correctly.

  7. Post-operative Bleeding Risk in Dental Surgery for Patients on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Quan; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Hongchen

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Minor dental surgery is invasive and hemorrhagic. Thus, in patients treated with anticoagulants, the bleeding risk related to these invasive procedures is concerning. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate this risk by comparing the post-operative bleeding rates of oral anticoagulation treatment (OAT) patients (without interrupted or altered anticoagulant intake) with non-OAT patients. Methods: PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched for eligible studies that compared the post-operative (following minor dental surgery) bleeding rates of OAT patients without interrupted or altered therapy with those of non-OAT patients. Relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were used to identify the association between the bleeding rate and different dental surgeries or anticoagulants. Results: Thirty two full text articles were assessed for eligibility and 20 studies were excluded according to the selection criteria. Finally, 12 studies and a total of 2102 OAT patients and 2271 non-OAT patients were included. A pooled analysis indicated that the post-operative bleeding risk in OAT patients is higher than that of non-OAT patients (RR: 2.794, 95% CI: 1.722–4.532, P = 0.000). The pooled RRs in the dental implant surgery and dental extraction subgroups were 2.136 (95% CI: 0.825–5.531, P = 0.118) and 2.003 (95% CI: 0.987–4.063, P = 0.054), respectively. As for the different oral anticoagulants, the pooled RR in the subgroup of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) was 1.603 (95% CI: 0.430–5.980, P = 0.482), while the pooled RR in the vitamin K antagonists subgroup was 3.067 (95% CI: 1.838–5.118, P = 0.000). Conclusion: Under current evidence, OAT patients were under a higher post-operative bleeding risk than the non-OAT patients following minor dental surgery. For the dental implant surgeries and dental extractions, our study failed to demonstrate a higher risk of bleeding in the OAT

  8. Differences between warfarin and new oral anticoagulants in dental clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, M; MARTINEZ, L.S.; De Franco, R.; FORTE, V.; BARLATTANI, A.; BOLLERO, P.

    2016-01-01

    The oral anticoagulant therapy is used for the cure and the prevention of thromboembolic diseases. In the last fifty years the warfarin has been considered the oral anticoagulant of choice. However, its use is limited by a narrow therapeutic index and by a complex pharmacodynamics, which requires regular adjustments and monitoring of the dose. Recently, three new oral anticoagulant – dabigatran etexilato (direct thrombin inhibitor), rivaroxaban and apixaban (Xa factor direct inhibitor) – have...

  9. The new oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation: an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, oral anticoagulation with the vitamin K antagonists acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon and warfarin reduces the risk of stroke by more than 60 %, whereas single or double antiplatelet therapy is much less effective and sometimes associated with a similar b

  10. [Clinical perspectives on the management of bleeding in patients on oral anticoagulants: the DECOVER Study (DElphi Consensus on oral COagulation and therapy action reVERsal)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Vicente; Martín, Alfonso; Lecumberri, Ramón; Coll-Vinent, Blanca; Suero, Coral; González-Porras, José Ramón; Marco, Pascual; Mateo, José; Roldán, Vanesa; Soulard, Stéphane; Crespo, Carlos; Camats, Míriam

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the level of agreement between hematologists and emergency medicine physicians regarding the best clinical practices for managing bleeding and anticoagulant reversal. Nationwide Spanish multicenter Delphi method study with a panel of experts on anticoagulation and the management of bleeding. Two survey rounds were carried out between April and September 2015. Consensus was reached when more than 75% of the panelists scored items in the same tertile. Fifteen hematologists and 17 emergency medicine specialists from 14 Spanish autonomous communities participated. Consensus was reached on the use of both hemodialysis and an activated prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) to antagonize significant/major bleeding in patients taking dabigatran. Use of an activated PCC was considered sufficient for patients on rivaroxaban or apixaban. The panel did not consider any PCC to be both effective and safe. Tests for activated partial thromboplastin, thrombin, diluted thrombin, and ecarin clotting times were considered useful in patients treated with dabigatran. A specific anti-Xa activity assay was suggested for patients who developed bleeds while treated with rivaroxaban or apixaban. Specific antidotes for direct-acting oral anticoagulants would be useful when severe bleeding occurs according to 97% of the panelists. Such antidotes would substantially change current treatment algorithms. The points of consensus were generally in line with clinical practice guidelines, but the Delphi process revealed that there are aspects of the clinical management of bleeding that require unified criteria. The need for specific antidotes for direct-acting oral anticoagulants was emphasized.

  11. Use and Outcomes of Antiarrhythmic Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Receiving Oral Anticoagulation: Results from the ROCKET AF Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Breithardt, Günter; Passman, Rod; Hankey, Graeme J.; Patel, Manesh R.; Becker, Richard C.; Singer, Daniel E.; Hacke, Werner; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A.A.; Califf, Robert M.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiarrhythmic drugs (AAD) and anticoagulation are mainstays of atrial fibrillation (AF) treatment. Objective We aimed to study the use and outcomes of AAD therapy in anticoagulated AF patients. Methods Patients in the ROCKET AF trial (n=14,264) were grouped by AAD use at baseline: amiodarone, other AAD, or no AAD. Multivariable adjustment was performed to compare stroke, bleeding, and death across groups, as well as across treatment assignment (rivaroxaban or warfarin). Results Of 14,264 patients randomized, 1681 (11.8%) were treated with an AAD (1144 [8%] with amiodarone, 537 [3.8%] with other AADs). Amiodarone-treated patients were less-often female (38% vs. 48%), had more persistent AF (64% vs. 40%), and more concomitant heart failure (71% vs. 41%) than patients receiving other AADs. Patients receiving no AAD more closely-resembled amiodarone-treated patients. Time in therapeutic range was significantly lower in warfarin-treated patients receiving amiodarone versus no AAD (50% vs. 58%, p<0.0001). Compared with no AAD, neither amiodarone (adjusted HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.74–1.31, p=0.9) nor other AADs (adjusted HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.37–1.17, p=0.15) were associated with increased mortality. Similar results were observed for embolic and bleeding outcomes. Rivaroxaban treatment effects in patients not on an AAD were consistent with the overall trial (primary endpoint adjusted HR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68–0.98, pinteraction=0.06; safety endpoint adjusted HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.90–1.24, pinteraction=0.33). Conclusion Treatment with AADs was not associated with increased morbidity or mortality in anticoagulated patients with AF. The influence of amiodarone on outcomes in patients receiving rivaroxaban requires further study. PMID:24833235

  12. [New oral anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation: a neurologist's view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, E.J. van; Koudstaal, P.J.; Roos, Y.B.; Brouwers, P.J.; Kappelle, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    - Recent randomized controlled trials have shown that new oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban en apixaban) in patients with atrial fibrillation are equally or more effective in preventing cerebral infarction than vitamin K antagonists (VKA).- New oral anticoagulants cause significant less i

  13. Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shashi; Danik, Stephan B; Altman, Robert K; Barrett, Conor D; Lip, Gregory Y H; Chatterjee, Saurav; Roubin, Gary S; Natale, Andrea; Danik, Jacqueline S

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are frequently used to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. These patients are often also on aspirin or other antiplatelet agents. It is possible that treatment with both NOACs and aspirin or other antiplatelet drug may be effective in decreasing stroke, but data are sparse regarding the efficacy and safety of using both agents for stroke prevention. To address these issues, data were pooled from the 4 recent randomized, controlled trials of NOACs: apixaban, rivaroxaban, dabigatran, and edoxaban, which included 42,411 patients; 14,148 (33.4%) were also on aspirin or other antiplatelet drug. The number of thromboembolic events among participants on NOAC and aspirin/antiplatelet was compared with the number of events in patients on NOAC alone. Bleeding rates were also compared between those on NOAC + aspirin/antiplatelet and on NOAC alone. These results were compared with thromboembolic and bleeding events in the warfarin + aspirin/antiplatelet versus warfarin alone. No greater risk for thromboembolism was seen in patients on NOACs compared with patients on both NOACs and aspirin/antiplatelet drug. In this nonrandomized comparison, there was initially a signal toward higher thromboembolic rates among NOAC users also on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs (relative risk, 1.16; 95% confidence intervals, 1.05, 1.29) when compared with NOAC alone. This likely reflected the higher CHADS2 scores of those on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs. When the analysis was limited to studies that included aspirin rather than other antiplatelet drugs, no difference was seen for thromboembolic rates comparing dual therapy to NOAC alone (relative risk, 1.02; 95% confidence intervals, 0.90, 1.15). Higher rates of bleeding were seen with aspirin/antiplatelet drug in conjunction with NOAC. In this meta-analysis and nonrandomized comparison of aspirin/antiplatelet users and nonusers also on anticoagulation, there was no additional

  14. Triple Antithrombotic Therapy after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI in Patients with Indication for Oral Anticoagulation: Data from a Single Center Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid L Staudacher

    Full Text Available Antithrombotic therapy consisting of a dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT and oral anti-coagulation (OAC with a vitamin k antagonist is often referred to as triple therapy. This combined anticoagulation is applied in patients undergoing coronary artery stent implantation while also having an indication for OAC. Triple therapy increases the risk for bleeding events compared to either DAPT or OAC alone and thereby might be associated with adverse outcomes. Clinical data on the frequency of bleeding events in patients on triple therapy from clinical trials derives from pre-selected patients and may differ from the real world patients. We report data on patient characteristics and bleeding incidence of patients dismissed on triple therapy from a single university hospital. Within the time span from January 2000 to December 2012, we identified a total of 213 patients undergoing PCI who were prescribed a triple therapy for at least 4 weeks (representing 0.86% of all patients treated. The usage of triple therapy significantly increased over the observed time period. The average CHA2DS2-VASc Score was 3.1 ± 1.1 with an average HAS-BLED score of 2.5 ± 0.86 representing a high-risk group for thromboembolic events as well as considerable risk for bleeding events. An on-treatment bleeding incidence of 9.4% was detected, with gastrointestinal and airway bleeding being the most frequent (5.1% and 1.4%, respectively. This is consistent with data from clinical trials and confirms the high risk of bleeding in patients on DAPT plus OAC. 29.0% of all patients receiving triple therapy had an indication for OAC other than non-valvular atrial fibrillation. This substantial patient group is underrepresented by clinical trials and needs further attention.

  15. New oral anticoagulants and their implications for dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, John Edward; Stassen, Leo F A

    2014-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is used in several conditions to prevent or treat thromboembolism. Over the last 40 years, warfarin has been the oral anticoagulant of choice and has been considered the mainstay of treatment. However, its use is limited by a narrow therapeutic index and complex pharmacodynamics, necessitating regular monitoring and dose adjustments. Recently, two new oral anticoagulants--dabigatran etexilate (a direct thrombin inhibitor) and rivaroxiban (a factor Xa inhibitor)--have been approved for use in North America and Europe. Unlike warfarin, dabigatran and rivaroxiban are relatively small molecules that work as anticoagulants by targeting specific single steps of the coagulation cascade. Their advantages, relative to warfarin, include: predictable pharmacokinetics; limited food and drug interactions; rapid onset of action; and, short half-life. They require no monitoring. However, they lack a specific reversal agent. The number of patients taking dabigatran and rivaroxaban is increasing. Therefore, it is inevitable that dentists will be required to perform invasive procedures on this cohort of patients. This paper outlines the various properties of the new oral anticoagulants and the most recent guidelines regarding the management of these dental patients taking these medications.

  16. Substantial differences in initiation of oral anticoagulant therapy and clinical outcome among non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients treated in inpatient and outpatient settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Anders Pretzmann; Hansen, Morten Lock; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are encountered and treated in different healthcare settings, which may affect the quality of care. We investigated the use of oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy and the risk of thrombo-embolism (TE) and bleeding, according to the healthcare setting....... METHODS AND RESULTS: Using national Danish registers, we categorized non-valvular AF patients (2002-11) according to the setting of their first-time AF contact: hospitalization (inpatients), ambulatory (outpatients), or emergency department (ED). Event rates and hazard ratios (HRs), calculated using Cox...... regression analysis, were estimated for outcomes of TE and bleeding. We included 116 051 non-valvular AF patients [mean age 71.9 years (standard deviation 14.1), 51.3% males], of whom 55.2% were inpatients, 41.9% outpatients, and 2.9% ED patients. OAC therapy 180 days after AF diagnosis among patients...

  17. Oral anticoagulant treatment with and without aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, R; Rouvier, J; Gurfinkel, E

    1995-07-01

    For preventing thromboembolic events, the concurrent use of oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs has been proposed. In prosthetic heart valves the use of moderate intensity anticoagulants [International Normalized Ratio (INR) 2-3] plus aspirin (100 mg/day) decreases the amount and severity of embolic episodes. The possibility that the same regimen could provide benefit in the prevention of thrombotic events in other arterial diseases is also indicated by the ATACS trial in unstable angina. The ongoing studies in ischemic heart diseases will also give the answer to this possibility.

  18. [Bridging: Perioperative management of chronic anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Göttl, U; Langer, F; Limperger, V; Mesters, R; Trappe, R U

    2014-06-01

    Oral anticoagulants [Vitamin-K-Antagonists, Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban] or antiplatelet agents [Aspirin, Clopidogrel, Prasugrel, Ticagrelor] are effective in preventing thromboembolic diseases. In case of interventional of surgical procedures patients with indications for chronic anticoagulation [atrial fibrillation, valve prosthesis, venous thromboembolism] or use of antiplatelet agents [cerebrovascular events, cardiovascular events] will require interruption of antithrombotic/antiplatelet therapy with the need of replacement with a short-acting agent. Due to limited data available from randomized studies and meta-analyses the evidence level is low in the majority of recommendations. Therefore for each patient the bleeding and thrombosis risk depending on the individual patient constitution and the planned intervention must be weighted. In patients with an intermediate risk for thrombosis the bleeding risk of the scheduled intervention will influence the bridging recommendation: In patients with a low bleeding risk oral anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy can be continued or reduced in intensity. In patients with an intermediate or high bleeding risk along with a low thrombosis risk a temporary interruption of the anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy is feasible. In patients with a high thrombosis and bleeding risk anticoagulation should be bridged with unfractionated heparin [renal insufficiency] or low molecular weight heparin. In the latter risk situation, inhibition of platelet function can be achieved with short-lasting GPIIb-IIIa inhibitors [Eptifibatide, Tirofiban]. Prior to intervention patients treated with the new oral anticoagulants [Dabigatran; Rivaroxaban; Apixaban] are requested to temporary interrupt the anticoagulation depending on the individual drug half-life and their renal function. Bridging therapy with heparin prior to intervention is not necessary with the new oral anticoagulants.

  19. New oral anticoagulants: their role and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Susie; Laffan, Mike

    2013-12-01

    After 60 years in which warfarin has been the only practical oral anticoagulant, a number of new oral anticoagulants are entering practice. These drugs differ in a several important respects from warfarin; most notably they have a reliable dose-response effect which means they can be given without the need for monitoring. Their simpler metabolism and mode of action also results in fewer interactions with other drugs and with diet. However, some of their other properties such as renal clearance (to varying degrees), short half-life and lack of an available antidote may slow their rate of introduction. Large trials have established their non-inferiority to warfarin in a number of indications and in some cases their superiority. To date they have been licensed for prophylaxis following high risk orthopaedic procedures, non-valvular atrial fibrillation and treatment of venous thromboembolism, but is not clear that they will supplant warfarin in all areas.

  20. Reversing anticoagulant effects of novel oral anticoagulants: role of ciraparantag, andexanet alfa, and idarucizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu TY

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tiffany Y Hu,1 Vaibhav R Vaidya,2 Samuel J Asirvatham2,31Mayo Medical School, 2Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs are increasingly used in clinical practice, but lack of commercially available reversal agents is a major barrier for mainstream use of these therapies. Specific antidotes to NOACs are under development. Idarucizumab (aDabi-Fab, BI 655075 is a novel humanized mouse monoclonal antibody that binds dabigatran and reverses its anticoagulant effect. In a recent Phase III study (Reversal Effects of Idarucizumab on Active Dabigatran, a 5 g intravenous infusion of idarucizumab resulted in the normalization of dilute thrombin time in 98% and 93% of the two groups studied, with normalization of ecarin-clotting time in 89% and 88% patients. Two other antidotes, andexanet alfa (PRT064445 and ciraparantag (PER977 are also under development for reversal of NOACs. In this review, we discuss commonly encountered management issues with NOACs such as periprocedural management, laboratory monitoring of anticoagulation, and management of bleeding. We review currently available data regarding specific antidotes to NOACs with respect to pharmacology and clinical trials.Keywords: novel oral anticoagulant, dabigatran, idarucizumab, reversal

  1. Perioperative Management in Gynecological Patients Receiving Oral Anticoagulation Therapy%口服抗凝剂的妇科手术患者围手术期管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙娟

    2011-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation medicine may cause women with heavy menstrual bleeding and changing their blood system, and with the characteristics of gynecology and gynecological surgery,it is a difficult clinical problem in gynecological surgery. When there is an operation,the doctor should balance individual risk for thromboembolism and bleeding.How to use anticoagulator and to select proper time is crucial to successful. Therefore,it is important and clinical significance in preoperative evaluation and perioperative management in gynecological surgery. This article discussed the application of the anticoagulant therapy in the gynecological clinical treatment.%口服抗凝剂可造成妇女的月经量增多及凝血系统发生改变,加之妇科患者及妇科手术独有的特点,妇科手术患者围手术期抗凝管理是个重要的临床难题.口服抗凝剂的患者如进行手术,将面临着出血及血栓形成的风险,医生既要考虑手术前后可能出现的出血情况,又要避免因暂时停用抗凝药物而发生血栓栓塞的危险,此类患者手术成功的关键是抗凝剂的使用情况及手术时间的选择.因此,妇科手术患者的术前评估及术中、术后管理具有重要的临床意义.综述低分子肝素作为桥梁的围手术抗凝方法在妇科临床工作中的应用.

  2. MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS ON ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY UNDERGOING DENTAL SURGICAL PROCEDURES. Review Article.

    OpenAIRE

    Atanaska Dinkova; Donka G. Kirova; Delyan Delev

    2013-01-01

    Dental treatment performed in patients receiving oral anticoagulant drug therapy is becoming increasingly common in dental offices.The aim of oral anticoagulant therapy is to reduce blood coagulability to an optimal therapeutic range within which the patient is provided some degree of protection from thromboembolic events. This is achieved at the cost of a minor risk of haemorrhage. Frequently raised questions concern the safety and efficacy of the various anticoagulation regimens and their a...

  3. Treatment Changes among Users of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Husted, Steen Elkjaer; Grove, Erik Lerkevang;

    2016-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation discontinuing anticoagulant therapy are left unprotected against ischaemic stroke. Further, switching between oral anticoagulants may be associated with a transiently increased risk of bleeding or thromboembolism. However, there is a paucity of real-life data on ...

  4. Combined aspirin and anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Charlotte H; Eckman, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    The combined use of aspirin and oral anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD) has been questioned due to an increased risk of major bleeding with little to no benefit in preventing ischemic events. (1) To better understand patterns and indications for combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy and identify patients who might reasonably be treated with oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy alone. (2) To perform an updated literature review regarding the use of combined antiplatelet and OAC therapy in patients with AF and stable CAD. Retrospective review. Patients within the University of Cincinnati Health System with a diagnosis of non-valvular AF, excluding those with acute coronary syndrome or revascularization within the last 12 months. Numbers and indications for combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy and sequence of events leading to the initiation of each. Of 948 patients receiving OAC, 430 (45 %) were receiving concomitant OAC and aspirin. Among patients receiving combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy, 49 and 42 % of patients respectively, had CAD or DM. In a more detailed analysis including chart review of 219 patients receiving combined OAC and aspirin, 27 % had a diagnosis of CAD and 14 % had a diagnosis of DM prior to the development of AF. These patients were initially treated with aspirin. Warfarin was added when they subsequently developed AF but aspirin wasn't discontinued. A surprisingly large proportion of patients (22.8 %) had no obvious indication for dual therapy. Prior myocardial infarction, CAD, vascular disease and DM (among others) increase the likelihood of receiving combined antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy among patients with AF. A literature review suggests this may lead to increased major bleeding with little benefit in decreasing either AF-related stroke or cardiovascular events.

  5. Antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy in microlaryngeal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, David O; Dang, Jennifer H; Fritz, Mark A; Garrett, C Gaelyn

    2014-04-01

    Indications for antiplatelet and anticoagulation use are expanding. There is no evidence to direct therapeutic management in patients undergoing microlaryngeal surgeries. Our aim was to compare bleeding complications between microlaryngeal surgeries performed for patients preoperatively taken off and maintained on antiplatelet and/or anticoagulation therapy. Retrospective cohort study. Patients undergoing microlaryngeal surgeries (2008-2009) on baseline antiplatelet and/or anticoagulation therapy were identified. Records were reviewed to determine whether therapy was stopped preoperatively. The primary outcome, bleeding complication, was compared between those taken off and maintained on therapy. Patient characteristics, surgical data, and outcomes were assessed. Of 287 microlaryngeal surgeries, 26% were performed for patients on antiplatelet (23%) and/or anticoagulation (3%) therapy. There was no difference in bleeding complications between patients' naïve to and on baseline antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy [naïve: 3.8% vs. on: 5.3%, P = 0.58] and no thromboembolic events. Among surgeries performed for patients on baseline antiplatelet therapy, 35% preoperatively stopped therapy. No observed difference in bleeding complications was observed between those taken off or maintained on therapy [off: 8.0% vs. on: 4.9%, P = 0.63]. Of 3% of surgeries performed for patients on warfarin, no bleeding complications occurred, even among the 8/10 with therapeutic international normalized ratios. Perioperative management decisions regarding antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy are becoming more common. Results suggest that antiplatelet therapy can be maintained during microlaryngeal surgery without increasing bleeding risk. Further prospective research is required to confirm findings and rigorously investigate the safety of continuing warfarin and other anticoagulation therapy in these surgeries. 4. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and

  6. [The role of new oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierard, Luc; Sprynger, Muriel

    2014-08-27

    New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are going to deeply modify the treatment of non valvular atrial fibrillation and thromboembolic disease. They are non-inferior to warfarin and trials show a similar bleeding rate (even lower for some NOACs). Nevertheless one must be cautious when dealing with patients at risk (elderly patients, frail ones, renal or liver impairment...) and practicians must be well aware of doses and contraindications. NOACs' long- term tolerance is not yet well-known. In cancer, their benefit-risk ratio compared to low molecular weight heparin remains to be determined.

  7. Sangramento durante a anticoagulação oral: alerta sobre um mal maior Sangrado durante la anticoagulación oral: alerta sobre un mal mayor Bleeding during oral anticoagulant therapy: warning against a greater hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Lara Lavítola

    2009-08-01

    del sexo femenino. La estenosis mitral estaba presente en 218 pacientes (64,4%, la prótesis biológica mitral en 64 (18,9% y la insuficiencia de la válvula mitral en 56 (16,5%. El sangrado ocurrió en 65 pacientes (19,2% y de forma grave en 7 (10%. En 38/65 pacientes (58,5%, se identificó nueva enfermedad asociada, facilitadora del sangrado. En el 100% de los pacientes con sangrado en el intervalo terapéutico, se encontró enfermedad asociada, contra el 49,05% de diagnóstico de enfermedades asociadas en aquellos con INR > 3,5 (p = 0,001. CONCLUSIÓN: El diagnóstico de enfermedad local asociada al sangrado fue frecuente entre los medicados con anticoagulante oral (58,5%. Hubo asociación entre sangrado con INR en el intervalo terapéutico (INR 2,0-3,5 y diagnóstico de patología predisponente a sangrado (p BACKGROUND: Bleeding is one of the main concerns in patients undergoing oral anticoagulation therapy. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the determinant causes of bleeding in patients undergoing oral anticoagulant therapy. METHODS: A total of 360 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF undergoing oral anticoagulant (ACo therapy, with a target INR of 2.0-3.5, were followed prospectively for a period of 48 ± 7.2 months. The patients were evaluated on average every 30 days and were investigated regarding the presence of associated pathology that could lead to bleeding. RESULTS: A total of 338 patients participated in the present study. Of these, 210 (62.13% were females. Mitral stenosis was present in 218 patients (64.4%, a mitral biological prosthesis in 64 (18.9% and mitral valve failure in 56 (16.5% patients. Bleeding occurred in 65 patients (19.2%, being severe in 7 (10% patients. In 38/65 patients, a new associated disease was identified, which facilitated bleeding. An associated disease was identified in 100% of the patients with bleeding within the therapeutic range, against 49.05% of associated disease diagnosis in those with an INR > 3.5 (p=0.001. CONCLUSION: The

  8. [Novel oral anticoagulants and atrial fibrillation in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation treatment relies on anticoagulation therapy that reduces the risk of stroke. Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) were the only oral anticoagulant drugs for more than 50 years, but they are difficult to manage especially in the elderly. In France, VKA are the main cause of iatrogenic hospitalizations with about 17,000 hospitalizations per year and around 4,000 to 5,000 deaths per year. Pharmacologic properties of VKA, especially the narrow therapeutic margin explain the complexity of their management. Several studies have shown that patients treated with VKA were on average only 50% of the time with an INR in the therapeutic range. In other words, patients are, half of the time, either-under treated or over-treated. Within this framework, development of new oral anticoagulant drugs appeared necessary, in order to obtain drugs with larger therapeutic margin and a better risk/benefit profile than VKA. Three large randomized clinical trials including almost 50,000 patients with 20,000 subjects over 75 years old and 8,000 over 80 years old, show a better risk/benefit profile of the new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) than VKA, characterized by a 50% reduction of cerebral hemorrhages, 22% reduction of stroke and 12% reduction of total mortality. Meanwhile, their renal elimination and the lack of control of the biological efficacy need to be taken into account for their prescription. Renal failure (estimated glomerular filtration rate according to Cockcroft formula < 30 mL/min) contraindicates their use. Their half-life is shorter than that of VKA and the biological monitoring is not available, thus a good adherence to the treatment is important. Studies specifically conducted among geriatric older population with poly-pathologies and frail are therefore needed to evaluate tolerance of NOAC in real life conditions.

  9. Genetic determinants of response and adverse effects following vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameshwar S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants (warfarin/acenocoumarol are commonly used anticoagulants that require careful clinical management to balance the risks of over anticoagulation and bleeding with those of under anticoagulation and clotting. Genetic variants of the enzyme that metabolizes vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant, cytochrome P-450 2C9 (CYP2C9, and of a key pharmacologic target of vitamin K antagonists anticoagulant, vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORC1, contribute to differences in patients responses to various anticoagulant doses. Methods: In thirty patients on oral vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant therapy, presented with either clotting manifestations (valve thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and DVT or prolonged INR/bleeding manifestations, we assessed CYP2C9 genotypes, VKORC1 haplotypes, clinical characteristics, response to therapy (as determined by the international normalized ratio [INR], and bleeding events. Results: Of the thirty patients, thirteen patients INR was high and four patients presented with major bleeding and four with minor bleeding manifestations. Out of thirteen patients with high INR, ten patients showed CYP2C9 polymorphism ( 1/ 3 and 2/ 3 of poor metabolizer genotype. Most of the high INR patients were recently started on oral vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant. Most patients presented with clotting manifestations with below therapeutic INR are noncompliant with anticoagulants. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the CYP2C9 polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of over anticoagulation and of bleeding events among patients on vitamin K antagonists' anticoagulant setting. Screening for CYP2C9 variants may allow clinicians to develop dosing protocols and surveillance techniques to reduce the risk of adverse drug reactions in patients receiving vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants. However the cost-effectiveness of genotyping of patients must be considered. [Int J Res Med Sci

  10. Anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Receptor Blockers Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors Antiarrhythmics Antiplatelet Therapy Aspirin Beta-Blockers Blood Thinners Calcium Channel Blockers Digitalis Medicines Diuretics Inotropic Agents Nitrates Statins, Cholesterol-Lowering Medicines Anticoagulants Related terms: ...

  11. [Antidotes to novel direct oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorev, N G; Momot, A P; Kon'kova, V O

    During the last 10 years, several novel direct oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have entered the clinical arena and were registered in the Russian Federation for use in patients presenting with atrial fibrillation, venous thrombosis, and pulmonary artery thromboembolism. NOACs are classified into two groups: direct thrombin inhibitor (notably dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (including rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban). Their disadvantage is lack of specific antidotes in case of an emergency situation (injury, infarction, stroke requiring thrombolysis, urgent operation). The review contains the data on the existing therapeutic regimens of treating haemorrhage on the background of taking these coagulants. This is followed by analysing the present-day results of clinical trials aimed at working out pharmaceutical agents (andexanet alpha, idarucizumab, aripazine) being antidotes to direct thrombin inhibitor and the factor Xa inhibitors. Administration of these agents makes it possible to reverse coagulation and minimize the aftermaths of haemorrhage in patients taking these drugs, in emergency situations.

  12. Suboptimal Use of Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation: Has the Introduction of Direct Oral Anticoagulants Improved Prescribing Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamneh, Endalkachew A; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R

    2016-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and the associated risk of stroke are emerging epidemics throughout the world. Suboptimal use of oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention has been widely reported from observational studies. In recent years, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been introduced for thromboprophylaxis. We conducted a systematic literature review to evaluate current practices of anticoagulation in AF, pharmacologic features and adoption patterns of DOACs, their impacts on proportion of eligible patients with AF who receive oral anticoagulants, persisting challenges and future prospects for optimal anticoagulation. In conducting this review, we considered the results of relevant prospective and retrospective observational studies from real-world practice settings. PubMed (MEDLINE), Scopus (RIS), Google Scholar, EMBASE and Web of Science were used to source relevant literature. There were no date limitations, while language was limited to English. Selection was limited to articles from peer reviewed journals and related to our topic. Most studies identified in this review indicated suboptimal use of anticoagulants is a persisting challenge despite the availability of DOACs. Underuse of oral anticoagulants is apparent particularly in patients with a high risk of stroke. DOAC adoption trends are quite variable, with slow integration into clinical practice reported in most countries; there has been limited impact to date on prescribing practice. Available data from clinical practice suggest that suboptimal oral anticoagulant use in patients with AF and poor compliance with guidelines still remain commonplace despite transition to a new era of anticoagulation featuring DOACs.

  13. High platelet reactivity--the challenge of prolonged anticoagulation therapy after ACS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, M.A.; Jaspers Focks, J.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), one-year event rates after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) vary from 9-12%. The development of novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) without a need for monitoring has initiated renewed interest for prolonged adjunctive anticoagulation. Importantly, the cornerstone

  14. Unplanned pregnancy on a direct oral anticoagulant (Rivaroxaban): A warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, B; Neal, R; Myers, O; Ruparelia, M

    2016-03-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs or NOACs -non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants), as the name suggests, are oral anticoagulants with a direct inhibitory action either against factor X or factor II (thrombin). Pregnant women were excluded from participating in all the large trials of the DOACs and they are considered contra-indicated in pregnancy and breast feeding. We present a case of inadvertent exposure to rivaroxaban in a woman who presented at 25 weeks' gestation. The management of her pregnancy and delivery is described, and the previous published case reports are reviewed with a discussion about the use of DOACs in woman of childbearing age.

  15. [Progress of anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Olmedo, Miguel; Suárez Fernández, Carmen

    2015-08-07

    Atrial fibrillation is currently a very prevalent disease and it represents one of the most common causes of disabling stroke. Antithrombotic therapies have reduced the incidence of this complication although they pose many limitations and difficulties. As a result, a large number of high risk patients do not receive an appropriate treatment. In recent years, four new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) with relevant advantages in comparison to vitaminK antagonists have been released. Four large phaseiii clinical trials have demonstrated that NOAC are at least as safe and efficacious as warfarin in stroke prevention in non-valve atrial fibrillation patients with moderate-high thrombotic risk, being their main advantage the reduction in intracranial hemorrhage. The arrival of these drugs has caused great expectations in the management of these patients but also new doubts. Lacking data in some subgroups of frail patients, the absence of specific antidotes available and specially their high cost represent nowadays the main limitations for their generalization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Differences between warfarin and new oral anticoagulants in dental clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, M; Martinez, L S; Franco, R; Forte, V; Barlattani, A; Bollero, P

    2016-01-01

    The oral anticoagulant therapy is used for the cure and the prevention of thromboembolic diseases. In the last fifty years the warfarin has been considered the oral anticoagulant of choice. However, its use is limited by a narrow therapeutic index and by a complex pharmacodynamics, which requires regular adjustments and monitoring of the dose. Recently, three new oral anticoagulant - dabigatran etexilato (direct thrombin inhibitor), rivaroxaban and apixaban (Xa factor direct inhibitor) - have been approved for use in europe. Increasing the number of patients taking these drugs, it is important that the dentist knows these new oral anticoagulants, their indications and methods of action, in particular for the management of patients, who require invasive treatments. With regard to the management of the patient threated with the new oral anticoagulants (NAO), there have been new significant changes in the procedure compared to the one followed by patients treated with warfarin. This led to the development of new guidelines that the dentist has to follow in order to ensure a safe and appropriate dental treatment and reduce any postoperative complications. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of the new oral anticoagulants compared to warfarin, especially in terms of risks of bleeding events and intra and postoperative complications, in patients requiring multiple dental extractions.

  17. Self-monitoring and self-management of oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, Carl J; Garcia-Alamino, Josep M; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Ward, Alison M; Perera, Rafael; Bankhead, Clare; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Fitzmaurice, David; Mahtani, Kamal R; Onakpoya, Igho J

    2016-07-05

    The introduction of point-of-care devices for the management of patients on oral anticoagulation allows self-testing by the patient at home. Patients who self-test can either adjust their medication according to a pre-determined dose-INR (international normalized ratio) schedule (self-management), or they can call a clinic to be told the appropriate dose adjustment (self-monitoring). Increasing evidence suggests self-testing of oral anticoagulant therapy is equal to or better than standard monitoring. This is an updated version of the original review published in 2010. To evaluate the effects on thrombotic events, major haemorrhages, and all-cause mortality of self-monitoring or self-management of oral anticoagulant therapy compared to standard monitoring. For this review update, we re-ran the searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), 2015, Issue 6, the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to June week 4 2015), Embase (Ovid, 1980 to 2015 week 27) on 1 July 2015. We checked bibliographies and contacted manufacturers and authors of relevant studies. We did not apply any language restrictions . Outcomes analysed were thromboembolic events, mortality, major haemorrhage, minor haemorrhage, tests in therapeutic range, frequency of testing, and feasibility of self-monitoring and self-management. Review authors independently extracted data and we used a fixed-effect model with the Mantzel-Haenzel method to calculate the pooled risk ratio (RR) and Peto's method to verify the results for uncommon outcomes. We examined heterogeneity amongst studies with the Chi(2) and I(2) statistics and used GRADE methodology to assess the quality of evidence. We identified 28 randomised trials including 8950 participants (newly incorporated in this update: 10 trials including 4227 participants). The overall quality of the evidence was generally low to moderate. Pooled estimates showed a reduction in thromboembolic events (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.45 to 0

  18. Multivariate relationships between international normalized ratio and vitamin K-dependent coagulation-derived parameters in normal healthy donors and oral anticoagulant therapy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golanski Jacek

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives International Normalized Ratio (INR is a world-wide routinely used factor in the monitoring of oral anticoagulation treatment (OAT. However, it was reported that other factors, e. g. factor II, may even better reflect therapeutic efficacy of OAT and, therefore, may be potentialy useful for OAT monitoring. The primary purpose of this study was to characterize the associations of INR with other vitamin K-dependent plasma proteins in a heterogenous group of individuals, including healthy donors, patients on OAT and patients not receiving OAT. The study aimed also at establishing the influence of co-morbid conditions (incl. accompanying diseases and co-medications (incl. different intensity of OAT on INR. Design and Methods Two hundred and three subjects were involved in the study. Of these, 35 were normal healthy donors (group I, 73 were patients on medication different than OAT (group II and 95 were patients on stable oral anticoagulant (acenocoumarol therapy lasting for at least half a year prior to the study. The values of INR and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT ratio, as well as activities of FII, FVII, FX, protein C, and concentration of prothrombin F1+2 fragments and fibrinogen were obtained for all subjects. In statistical evaluation, the uni- and multivariate analyses were employed and the regression equations describing the obtained associations were estimated. Results Of the studied parameters, three (factors II, VII and X appeared as very strong modulators of INR, protein C and prothrombin fragments F1+2 had moderate influence, whereas both APTT ratio and fibrinogen had no significant impact on INR variability. Due to collinearity and low tolerance of independent variables included in the multiple regression models, we routinely employed a ridge multiple regression model which compromises the minimal number of independent variables with the maximal overall determination coefficient. The best

  19. Anticoagulant therapy in patients undergoing dental interventions: a critical review of the literature and current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isola, G; Matarese, G; Cordasco, G; Rotondo, F; Crupi, A; Ramaglia, L

    2015-02-01

    Patients treated with oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) represent an issue to the dentist, as an increasing number of people are using anticoagulant drugs for cardiovascular disease. The choice of an eventual suspension or continuation of anticoagulant therapy is important when considering an efficient management of the patient. Patients in anticoagulant therapy and requiring dental procedures sometimes represent therapeutic concerns especially concerning the suspension of the anticoagulant treatment. At the moment there is no consensus among international experts of a possible discontinuation of therapy before invasive dental procedures. In this paper, the authors try to focus on this topic through a critical review of the literature. Most of the studies suggest the continuation of the anticoagulant treatment with heparin before invasive oral surgical interventions. Based on the data of the literature, two rules must be adopted in clinical practice: 1) maintenance of anticoagulation related to the international normalized ratio (INR); 2) local application of antifibrinolytic agents to ensure a proper hemostatic process. Given the widespread use of anticoagulant drugs in cardiovascular disease, dentists must often face the problem of the therapy and, since there is no consensus on the management of these patients, the authors propose, after a thorough critical review of the literature, the implementation of a multiphase protocol of surgical approach to be implemented with safety in daily clinical practice.

  20. Anticoagulant therapy and its impact on dental patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thean, D; Alberghini, M

    2016-06-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants have been studied in the past decade, and have now started to enter the market. These drugs are reported to be as effective as, or more effective than, warfarin. In Australia, the Therapeutic Goods Administration has approved dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. The use of these newer anticoagulants is likely to increase in time, and it is important for dentists to have a sound understanding of the mechanisms of action, reversal strategies, and management guidelines for patients taking oral anticoagulants. This article discusses the process of coagulation, available anticoagulants and their monitoring and reversal, and provides clinical advice on the management of patients on anticoagulants who require dental treatment.

  1. Management of oral anticoagulation in patients undergoing minor dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaali, Yathreb; Barnes, Geoffrey D; Froehlich, James B; Kaatz, Scott

    2012-08-01

    Approximately 4.2 million patients in the United States are taking warfarin, making it the 11th most prescribed drug. Warfarin is primarily used for treatment of venous thromboembolic disease and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation and mechanical heart valves. Dentists frequently encounter anticoagulated patients and are faced with management decisions in these patients who require dental procedures. Observational studies suggest the risk of thrombosis if anticoagulation is suspended during dental procedures is higher than the risk of bleeding if anticoagulation is not suspended. Several groups now offer guidelines that recommend most minor dental procedures should be performed while on therapeutic warfarin. The recent approval of several new oral anticoagulants has introduced greater complexity to the management of the anticoagulated patient, and this narrative review will discuss current guidelines, the scientific underpinnings of the guidelines, and offer some practical suggestions for patients that are receiving the new agents.

  2. New antiplatelet drugs and new oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig-Oberhuber, V; Filipovic, M

    2016-09-01

    In our daily anaesthetic practice, we are confronted with an increasing number of patients treated with either antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents. During the last decade, changes have occurred that make the handling of antithrombotic medication a challenging part of anaesthetic perioperative management. In this review, the authors discuss the most important antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, the perioperative management, the handling of bleeding complications, and the interpretation of some laboratory analyses related to these agents.

  3. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation agents in anticoagulant naive atrial fibrillation patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Sørensen, Rikke; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2015-01-01

    the drug came on market. By October, 2013, 40% were being started on warfarin and dabigatran, respectively, and another 20% were started on either rivaroxaban or apixaban. Rivaroxaban and apixaban users generally had a higher predicted risk of stroke and bleeding compared with warfarin and dabigatran users....... Older age, female gender, and prior stroke were some of the factors associated with NOAC use vs. warfarin, whereas chronic kidney disease, myocardial infarction, and heart failure showed the opposite association. CONCLUSION: Among oral anticoagulation-naïve AF patients initiated on oral anticoagulation...

  4. Management of the Bleeding Patient Receiving New Oral Anticoagulants: A Role for Prothrombin Complex Concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Baumann Kreuziger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ease of dosing and simplicity of monitoring make new oral anticoagulants an attractive therapy in a growing range of clinical conditions. However, newer oral anticoagulants interact with the coagulation cascade in different ways than traditional warfarin therapy. Replacement of clotting factors will not reverse the effects of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, or apixaban. Currently, antidotes for these drugs are not widely available. Fortunately, withholding the anticoagulant and dialysis are freqnently effective treatments, particularly with rivaroxaban and dabigatran. Emergent bleeding, however, requires utilization of Prothrombin Complex Concentrates (PCCs. PCCs, in addition to recombinant factor VIIa, are used to activate the clotting system to reverse the effects of the new oral anticoagulants. In cases of refractory or emergent bleeding, the recommended factor concentrate in our protocols differs between the new oral anticoagulants. In patients taking dabigatran, we administer an activated PCC (aPCC [FELBA] due to reported benefit in human in vitro studies. Based on human clinical trial evidence, the 4-factor PCC (Kcentra is suggested for patients with refractory rivaroxaban- or apixaban-associated hemorrhage. If bleeding continues, recombinant factor VIIa may be employed. With all of these new procoagulant agents, the risk of thrombosis associated with administration of factor concentrates must be weighed against the relative risk of hemorrhage.

  5. The management of dental patients taking new generation oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alun; Gibson, John; Crighton, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Recently, new oral anticoagulants have been introduced as alternatives to warfarin. While national guidelines for treatment of dental patients taking warfarin as an anticoagulant are well-established, no such information is available for these novel therapeutic agents. At present, the local guidance available is contradictory between different health boards/health planning units, and liaison with the medical practitioner managing the individual patient's anticoagulation is imperative if any invasive procedure is proposed. This paper examines the available evidence regarding these drugs and sets out proposals for clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients in primary dental care.

  6. New oral anticoagulants in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmar Vega, Lara; de Francisco, A L M; Bada da Silva, Jairo; Galván Espinoza, Luis; Fernández Fresnedo, Gema

    2016-12-08

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop bleeding and thrombotic tendencies, so the indication of anticoagulation at the onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) is complex. AF is the most common chronic cardiac arrhythmia, and thromboembolism and ischemic stroke in particular are major complications. In recent years, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed, and they have shown superiority over the classical AVK in preventing stroke, systemic embolism and bleeding risk, constituting an effective alternative to those resources.

  7. Home management of oral anticoagulation via telemedicine versus conventional hospital-based treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henry; Lauterlein, Jens-Jacob; Sørensen, Patricia D

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an expert computer system for the control of oral anticoagulation therapy, accessible by the patients via their own computer. To investigate if the weekly measurement and dosing of international normalized ratio (INR) at home using the online Internet-based system was superior...

  8. [Tranexamic acid gel in patients treated with oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés-de Ramón, Jorge; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bravo-Llatas, Carmen; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio

    2014-12-09

    Patients treated with oral anticoagulants have increased susceptibility to bleeding, and therefore any surgical medical procedure and especially oral surgery requires a therapeutic approach that minimizes bleeding effects in these patients. The working hypothesis was based on studies of local application of tranexamic acid after maxillofacial interventions as effective therapeutic alternative for the prevention and control of bleeding. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of the application of a gel solution tranexamic acid after tooth extraction in anticoagulated patients in terms of healing time and degree of healing. The results indicate that application of tranexamic acid gel is very effective for consistency and maintenance in the place of action and shows its efficacy as a procoagulant material. The application of a gel solution of tranexamic acid in oral anticoagulants patients ameliorates healing time and the bleeding time within the first 48-72 h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed after a trial of antidepressants, she was treated with ECT in the course of full anticoagulation with enoxaparin. After five ECT sessions, her mood was significantly better and she was walking and eating spontaneously. She did not present complications related either to PE or to anticoagulation. After the eighth ECT session, she evolved with hypomania, which was managed with oral medication adjustments. The patient was completely euthymic at discharge. Conclusion The case we presented provides further evidence to the anecdotal case reports on the safety of ECT in the course of concomitant full anticoagulant therapy after PE, and illustrates how, with the proper precautions, the benefits of ECT in such condition might outweigh its risks.

  10. Determination of the International Sensitivity Index of a new near-patient testing device to monitor oral anticoagulant therapy--overview of the assessment of conformity to the calibration model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripodi, A; Chantarangkul, V; Clerici, M; Negri, B; Mannucci, P M

    1997-08-01

    A key issue for the reliable use of new devices for the laboratory control of oral anticoagulant therapy with the INR is their conformity to the calibration model. In the past, their adequacy has mostly been assessed empirically without reference to the calibration model and the use of International Reference Preparations (IRP) for thromboplastin. In this study we reviewed the requirements to be fulfilled and applied them to the calibration of a new near-patient testing device (TAS, Cardiovascular Diagnostics) which uses thromboplastin-containing test cards for determination of the INR. On each of 10 working days citrated whole blood and plasma samples were obtained from 2 healthy subjects and 6 patients on oral anticoagulants. PT testing on whole blood and plasma was done with the TAS and parallel testing for plasma by the manual technique with the IRP CRM 149S. Conformity to the calibration model was judged satisfactory if the following requirements were met: (i) there was a linear relationship between paired log-PTs (TAS vs CRM 149S); (ii) the regression line drawn through patients data points, passed through those of normals; (iii) the precision of the calibration expressed as the CV of the slope was <3%. A good linear relationship was observed for calibration plots for plasma and whole blood (r = 0.98). Regression lines drawn through patients data points, passed through those of normals. The CVs of the slope were in both cases 2.2% and the ISIs were 0.965 and 1.000 for whole blood and plasma. In conclusion, our study shows that near-patient testing devices can be considered reliable tools to measure INR in patients on oral anticoagulants and provides guidelines for their evaluation.

  11. Anticoagulant therapy in pregnant patients with metabolic syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzynski, Radzisław; Poniedzialek-Czajkowska, Elzbieta; Kimber-Trojnar, Zaneta; Leszczynska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy is a specific state of heightened coagulability related to the increase in procoagulant agents and to the reduced fibrinolysis. Pregnancy is associated with a 4-fold increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) and this risk still increases to 14-fold during puerperium. A correlation between the metabolic syndrome and development of cardiovascular events and cerebrovascular incidents has been described. Such a relationship is referred to a hypercoagulable state due to increased serum levels of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), fibrinogen, factor (F) VII and VIII, von Willebrand factor and from endothelial activation, caused by increased circulating adhesion molecules. As to the risk of VTE, the probability for its association with cardiovascular incidents is increased by common underlying mechanisms such as the activation of platelets and the blood coagulation. A correlation between idiopathic VTE and the metabolic syndrome has been reported. The anticoagulant therapy may be recommended during the pregnancy for the treatment or the prophylaxis of VTE and, in women with artificial heart valves, for the prevention of the valve thrombosis and systemic embolisation. There are also specific conditions during pregnancy which benefit from anticoagulant use, such as recurrent fetal loss, thrombophilia and assisted reproductive technology. There are no published specific data about using of anticoagulant agents in pregnant patients with the metabolic syndrome except for a few articles addressing reproductive problems. The mechanisms of anticoagulant action were studied with the focus on heparinoids, because of their safety not only for the patient but also for the fetus. The new oral anticoagulants were also shortly described although they have been contraindicated during the pregnancy.

  12. Nonoclusive thrombosis of mechanical mitral valve prosthesis caused by inadequate treatment of anticoagulant therapy resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Branislava

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oral anticoagulants have been used in the prevention of thromboembolic complications for over six decades. A rare, but possible problem in the application of these medications could be resistance to them. Case report. We presented a patient with nonocclusive thrombosis of the mechanical mitral prosthesis due to inadequately treated resistance to peroral anticoagulant therapy. Resistance to oral anticoagulant medications was proven by an increased dosage of warfarin up to 20 mg and, after that, acenokumarol to 15 mg over ten days which did not lead to an increase in the international normalized ratio (INR value over 1.2. On the basis of information that she did not take food rich in vitamin K or medications which could reduce effects of oral anticoagulants, and that she did not have additional illnesses and conditions that could cause an inadequate response to anticoagulant therapy, it was circumstantially concluded that this was a hereditary form of resistance. Because of the existing mechanical prosthetics on the mitral position, low molecular heparin has been introduced into the therapy. The patient reduced it on her own initiative, leading to nonocclusive valvular thrombosis. Conclusion. When associated complications like absolute arrhithmia does not exist, the finding of resistance to oral anticoagulant agents is an indication for the replacement of a mechanical prosthetic with a biological one which has been done in this patients.

  13. Dual antiplatelet therapy versus oral anticoagulation plus dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation and low-to-moderate thromboembolic risk undergoing coronary stenting: design of the MUSICA-2 randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambola, Antonia; Montoro, J Bruno; Del Blanco, Bruno García; Llavero, Nadia; Barrabés, José A; Alfonso, Fernando; Bueno, Héctor; Cequier, Angel; Serra, Antonio; Zueco, Javier; Sabaté, Manel; Rodríguez-Leor, Oriol; García-Dorado, David

    2013-10-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) is the recommended therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) because it reduces the risk of stroke and other thromboembolic events. Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is required after percutaneous coronary intervention and stenting (PCI-S). In patients with AF requiring PCI-S, the association of DAPT and OAC carries an increased risk of bleeding, whereas OAC therapy or DAPT alone may not protect against the risk of developing new ischemic or thromboembolic events. The MUSICA-2 study will test the hypothesis that DAPT compared with triple therapy (TT) in patients with nonvalvular AF at low-to-moderate risk of stroke (CHADS2 score ≤2) after PCI-S reduces the risk of bleeding and is not inferior to TT for preventing thromboembolic complications. The MUSICA-2 is a multicenter, open-label randomized trial that will compare TT with DAPT in patients with AF and CHADS2 score ≤2 undergoing PCI-S. The primary end point is the incidence of stroke or any systemic embolism or major adverse cardiac events: death, myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, or target vessel revascularization at 1 year of PCI-S. The secondary end point is the combination of any cardiovascular event with major or minor bleeding at 1 year of PCI-S. The calculated sample size is 304 patients. The MUSICA-2 will attempt to determine the most effective and safe treatment in patients with nonvalvular AF and CHADS2 score ≤2 after PCI-S. Restricting TT for AF patients at high risk for stroke may reduce the incidence of bleeding without increasing the risk of thromboembolic complications. © 2013.

  14. Clinical considerations on the posology of direct oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Peñataro, J; Avendaño-Solá, C; González-Juanatey, J R

    2016-10-01

    The efficacy of dicoumarin anticoagulants has been shown in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. However, they have drawbacks such as the need to adjust the dosage and the interaction with drugs and food. Direct oral anticoagulants are an effective and safe alternative and have a less complicated clinical management. There is considerable debate on the selection criteria for the posology regimens of direct oral anticoagulants. The differences among them and their administration regimens have raised questions about the clinical, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic selection criteria that support the posology. This review critically analyses the available evidence and its impact on the final selection of the dosage regimen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  15. Antithrombotic management in patients with percutaneous coronary intervention requiring oral anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Zalewski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic evolution of therapeutic options including the use of vitamin K antagonists (VKA, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOAC, more potent antiplatelet drugs as well as new generation drug-eluting stents could lead to the view that the current recommendations on the management of patients with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI requiring oral anticoagulation do not keep up with the results of several clinical studies published within the last 5 years. In the present overview, we summarize the recent advances in antithrombotic management used in atrial fibrillation patients undergoing PCI for stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndrome (ACS. The safety and efficacy of prasugrel and ticagrelor taken with oral anticoagulants also remain to be established in randomized trials; therefore the P2Y12 inhibitor clopidogrel on top of aspirin or without is now recommended to be used together with a VKA or NOAC. It is still unclear which dose of a NOAC in combination with antiplatelet agents and different stents should be used in this clinical setting and whether indeed NOAC are safer compared with VKA in such cardiovascular patients. Moreover, we discuss the use of anticoagulation in addition to antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention in patients with ACS. To minimize bleeding risk in anticoagulated patients following PCI or ACS, the right agent should be prescribed to the right patient at the right dose and supported by regular clinical evaluation and laboratory testing, especially assessment of renal function when a NOAC is used.

  16. Personalised treatment with oral anticoagulant drugs : clinical and economic issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, T.I.

    2013-01-01

    Coumarin derivatives such as acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon and warfarin are frequently used for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation or for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. These oral anticoagulants have a narrow therapeutic range and a large var

  17. New oral anticoagulants for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Amber; Azimi, Nassir; Forest, Christopher P

    2015-11-01

    Four new oral anticoagulants have been approved for reducing stroke risk in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Compared with warfarin, these agents offer a more predictable dose response with fewer food and drug interactions and no regular blood monitoring, although some of the drugs have an increased risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding. This article reviews the new drugs.

  18. Novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dobreanu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in relation to stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF), particularly into the use of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) for stroke prevention, among members of the EHRA electrophysiology (EP) ...

  19. Laboratory monitoring of novel oral anticoagulants rivaroxaban and dabigatran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerenberg, E.S.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Sijpkens, M.K.; Meijers, J.C.; Büller, H.R.; Levi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rivaroxaban and dabigatran are new oral anticoagulants that both have been licensed worldwide for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and rivaroxaban also for venous thrombosis. Both drugs specifically inhibit one coagulation factor, factor Xa and thrombin, respectively, and both compou

  20. Novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feher, G; Illes, Z; Komoly, S;

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is an uncommon cause of stroke with extremely diverse clinical features, predisposing factors, brain imaging findings, and outcome. Anticoagulation is the cornerstone of CVT management, however, it is not supported by high-quality evicence. Novel oral anticoagulan...

  1. Pharmacology of new oral anticoagulants: mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their mechanism of action, the new oral anticoagulants are named direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs. Dabigatran is a selective, competitive, direct inhibitor of thrombin (Factor IIa while rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban act by directly inhibiting the activated Factor X (FXa in a selective and competitive manner. DOACs have a relatively short half-life and almost immediate anticoagulant activity, and rapidly reach the plasma peak concentration. Therefore, they do not need a phase of overlapping with parenteral anticoagulants. After their withdrawal, their removal is sufficiently rapid, although influenced by renal function. Dabigatran is the only DOACs to be administered as a pro-drug and becomes active after drug metabolization. The route of elimination of dabigatran is primarily renal, whereas FXa inhibitors are mainly eliminated by the biliary-fecal route. The drug interactions of DOACs are mainly limited to drugs that act on P-glycoprotein for dabigatran and on P-glycoprotein and/or cytochrome P3A4 for anti-Xa. DOACs have no interactions with food. Given their linear pharmacodynamics, with a predictable dose/response relationship and anticoagulant effect, DOACs are administered at a fixed dose and do not require routine laboratory monitoring.

  2. Cost implications of formulary decisions on oral anticoagulants in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskupiak, Joseph; Ghate, Sameer R; Jiao, Tianze; Brixner, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major public health issue. The major complication of AF is an increased risk of stroke. Warfarin, long used for stroke prophylaxis in AF patients, has a narrow therapeutic window and numerous food and drug interactions necessitating regular laboratory monitoring. New oral anticoagulants (e.g., dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban) may meet the need for predictable anticoagulation with fixed, unmonitored dosing. To review costs of monitoring, bleeding, and stroke in AF patients to analyze costs of anticoagulants for stroke prophylaxis in AF patients. A literature search on the costs of treating AF used PubMed/MEDLINE databases (to April 2012) focusing on studies in the United States. Key words or MeSH terms were used, such as "observational studies," "oral anticoagulants," "warfarin," "cost of bleeding," "cost of stroke," and "cost of INR monitoring." The literature focused mainly on short-term, in-hospital expenditures and less on long-term care costs. Annual overall costs per patient for treating AF in the United States ranged from $18,454 to $38,270. Annual incremental costs of treating AF ranged from $8,705 to $16,311. Annual inpatient costs ranged from $7,841 to $22,582 per patient. Annual costs of anticoagulation monitoring ranged from $291 to $943 per patient. Intracranial hemorrhage and major gastrointestinal bleeding with oral anticoagulants were uncommon but expensive: 1-year costs ranged from $7,584 to $193,804. Annual direct costs of stroke in AF patients ranged from $23,143 to $37,620 (incremental cost of $7,824 to $8,232 vs. AF patients without stroke). AF-associated direct costs are high and can be broken into costs of warfarin monitoring and direct costs of managing consequences of anticoagulant therapy-stroke and bleeding.

  3. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE. For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. Keywords: venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulant, prevention, treatment, primary

  4. Laboratory Assessment of the Anticoagulant Activity of Direct Oral Anticoagulants: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Bethany T; Cuker, Adam; Siegal, Deborah M; Crowther, Mark; Garcia, David A

    2017-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are the treatment of choice for most patients with atrial fibrillation and/or noncancer-associated venous thromboembolic disease. Although routine monitoring of these agents is not required, assessment of anticoagulant effect may be desirable in special situations. The objective of this review was to summarize systematically evidence regarding laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched for studies reporting relationships between drug levels and coagulation assay results. We identified 109 eligible studies: 35 for dabigatran, 50 for rivaroxaban, 11 for apixaban, and 13 for edoxaban. The performance of standard anticoagulation tests varied across DOACs and reagents; most assays, showed insufficient correlation to provide a reliable assessment of DOAC effects. Dilute thrombin time (TT) assays demonstrated linear correlation (r(2) = 0.67-0.99) across a range of expected concentrations of dabigatran, as did ecarin-based assays. Calibrated anti-Xa assays demonstrated linear correlation (r(2) = 0.78-1.00) across a wide range of concentrations for rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. An ideal test, offering both accuracy and precision for measurement of any DOAC is not widely available. We recommend a dilute TT or ecarin-based assay for assessment of the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran and anti-Xa assays with drug-specific calibrators for direct Xa inhibitors. In the absence of these tests, TT or APTT is recommended over PT/INR for assessment of dabigatran, and PT/INR is recommended over APTT for detection of factor Xa inhibitors. Time since last dose, the presence or absence of drug interactions, and renal and hepatic function should impact clinical estimates of anticoagulant effect in a patient for whom laboratory test results are not available. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier

  5. Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants for Stroke Prevention in Special Populations with Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Arnaud; Angoulvant, Denis; Philippart, Raphael; Clementy, Nicolas; Babuty, Dominique; Fauchier, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke or systemic embolism compared with normal sinus rhythm. These strokes may efficiently be prevented in patients with risk factors using oral anticoagulant therapy, with either vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) (i.e., direct thrombin inhibitors or direct factor Xa inhibitors). Owing to their specific risk profiles, some AF populations may have increased risks of both thromboembolic and bleeding events. These AF patients may be denied oral anticoagulants, whilst evidence shows that the absolute benefits of oral anticoagulants are greatest in patients at highest risk. NOACs are an alternative to VKAs to prevent stroke in patients with "non-valvular AF", and NOACs may offer a greater net clinical benefit compared with VKAs, particularly in these high-risk patients. Physicians have to learn how to use these drugs optimally in specific settings. We review concrete clinical scenarios for which practical answers are currently proposed for use of NOACs based on available evidence for patients with kidney disease, elderly patients, women, patients with diabetes, patients with low or high body weight, and those with valve disease.

  6. Evaluation of bleeding in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellenbart, Erika L; Faulkenberg, Kathleen D; Finks, Shannon W

    2017-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are recognized by evidence-based treatment guidelines as the first-line option for the treatment of venous thromboembolism and prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. As use of these anticoagulants has become favored over the past several years, reported bleeding-related adverse drug events with these agents has increased. In randomized clinical trials, all DOACs have a reduced risk for intracranial hemorrhage, while major and other bleeding results have varied among the agents compared to vitamin K antagonists. We have reviewed the bleeding incidence and severity from randomized and real-world data in patients receiving DOACs in an effort to provide the clinician with a critical review of bleeding and offer practical considerations for avoiding adverse events with these anticoagulants.

  7. Measurement and reversal of the direct oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Bethany T; Cuker, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) offer noninferior efficacy and improved safety compared to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Unlike VKAs, DOACs do not require routine laboratory monitoring of anticoagulant effect and dose adjustment. In certain situations, however, laboratory assessment of anticoagulant effect may be desirable. Here we review the utility of currently available assays for assessment of DOAC effect and recommend an optimal assessment strategy for each drug, including calibrated dilute thrombin time or ecarin-based assays for dabigatran and calibrated anti-Xa activity assays for the factor Xa inhibitors. We also discuss reversal strategies, both specific and nonspecific, for each drug, including the preferential use of idarucizumab for the reversal of dabigatran and two agents, andexanet and ciraparantag, currently under development for the reversal of rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Minimizing bleeding risk in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habert JS

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Steven Habert Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Many primary care physicians are wary about using direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF. Factors such as comorbidities, concomitant medications, and alcohol misuse increase concerns over bleeding risk, especially in elderly and frail patients with AF. This article discusses strategies to minimize the risk of major bleeding events in patients with AF who may benefit from oral anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention. The potential benefits of the DOACs compared with vitamin K antagonists, in terms of a lower risk of intracranial hemorrhage, are discussed, together with the identification of reversible risk factors for bleeding and correct dose selection of the DOACs based on a patient’s characteristics and concomitant medications. Current bleeding management strategies, including the new reversal agents for the DOACs and the prevention of bleeding during preoperative anticoagulation treatment, in addition to health care resource use associated with anticoagulation treatment and bleeding, are also discussed. Implementing a structured approach at an individual patient level will minimize the overall risk of bleeding and should increase physician confidence in using the DOACs for stroke prevention in their patients with nonvalvular AF. Keywords: anticoagulants, atrial fibrillation, bleeding, primary care

  9. The Role of Anticoagulation Clinics in the Era of New Oral Anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Testa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulation Clinics (ACs are services specialized in management of patients on anticoagulant treatment. At present, ACs manage patients chiefly on antivitamin K antagonists (AVKs, but patient population has already changed in the last few years, because of an increase of treatments with other anticoagulant drugs, which require different management systems. The strong increase in the number of patients at AC, mainly on long-term treatment, has determined the development of web management, through telemedicine systems, improving the quality of life and maintaining the same clinical quality levels. New oral anticoagulants (NOAs have shown to be as effective as AVK antagonists in stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for treatment of venous thromboembolism in addition to VTE prophylaxis in orthopaedic surgery, when administered at a fixed dose, but patient adherence and compliance are crucial for good quality treatment. At present, lacking data from the real world, an oversimplification of treatment with NOAs could cause unjustified risks for patients and also a possible future underuse of good drugs. For these reasons the vigilance must be high and ACs can have a crucial role in defining which is the best management for NOA patients and how to do it, as it happened for AVKs.

  10. The role of anticoagulation clinics in the era of new oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Zimmermann, Anke; Bassi, Laura; Zambelli, Silvia; Cancellieri, Emilia

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulation Clinics (ACs) are services specialized in management of patients on anticoagulant treatment. At present, ACs manage patients chiefly on antivitamin K antagonists (AVKs), but patient population has already changed in the last few years, because of an increase of treatments with other anticoagulant drugs, which require different management systems. The strong increase in the number of patients at AC, mainly on long-term treatment, has determined the development of web management, through telemedicine systems, improving the quality of life and maintaining the same clinical quality levels. New oral anticoagulants (NOAs) have shown to be as effective as AVK antagonists in stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for treatment of venous thromboembolism in addition to VTE prophylaxis in orthopaedic surgery, when administered at a fixed dose, but patient adherence and compliance are crucial for good quality treatment. At present, lacking data from the real world, an oversimplification of treatment with NOAs could cause unjustified risks for patients and also a possible future underuse of good drugs. For these reasons the vigilance must be high and ACs can have a crucial role in defining which is the best management for NOA patients and how to do it, as it happened for AVKs.

  11. Prophylaxis of Stroke and a Therapeutic Approach to Venous Thromboembolism Using Novel Oral Anticoagulants (NOAC’s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.K. Mohammed Rayees

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the prophylaxis of stroke in Non valvular Atrial Fibrillation (NVAF as well as Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT and Pulmonary Embolism (PE treatment, the Novel Oral Anticoagulants are becoming popular management option. These NOACs have efficacy similar to that of Warfarin along with non inferior safety profiles. Though Warfarin has been widely used because of its anticoagulant effect and also has a probable reversibility in terms of bleeding, it may also be disadvantageous sometimes in few cases such as food interactions, drug and drug interaction, having a poor and unpredictable therapeutic response. The use of Novel Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs, approved by U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA rendered a new hope in patients who needed anticoagulant therapy. There are about four Novel Oral Anticoagulants approved by FDA, which includes Dabigatran (direct thrombin inhibitor, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban and Edoxaban (selective factor Xa Inhibitors. The predictable pharmacokinetics and minimal drug interactions of apixaban should allow for safe anticoagulation in the majority of patients, including temporary interruption for elective procedures. The main aim is to provide better treatment and prophylaxis of stroke, venous thromboembolism and Pulmonary Embolism using Novel Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs as they exhibit minimal adverse effects when compared to Warfarin.

  12. Clinical considerations of anticoagulation therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) increases the risk of stroke.New anticoagulation agents have recently provided alternative and promising approaches.This paper reviews the current state of anticoagulation therapy in AF patients,focusing on various clinical scenarios and on comparisons,where possible,between western and eastern populations.

  13. Anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in awake transcervical injection laryngoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jennifer H; Liou, Nelson Eddie; Ongkasuwan, Julina

    2017-08-01

    Vocal fold movement impairment (VFMI) due to neuronal injury occurs in 20% to 30% of surgeries in the region of the aortic arch. Early injection laryngoplasty can aid with postoperative pulmonary toilet in these high-risk cardiovascular patients. The purpose of this study is to determine whether continuing antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy during awake transcervical injection laryngoplasty surgery is safe, and if there is any increase in bleeding complications in these patients. This is a retrospective review of patients undergoing awake injection laryngoplasty surgery for VFMI between 2013 and 2016 at a tertiary academic center specializing in aortic and mediastinal diseases. Records were reviewed for patients regarding baseline antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, and whether these medications were stopped or continued preoperatively. The primary outcome was bleeding complications. Of the 95 surgeries reviewed, 44 (46%) were performed for patients on antiplatelet therapy, and 71 (75%) for patients on anticoagulation therapy. None of the patients on antiplatelet therapy had their treatment discontinued. Of the patients on anticoagulation, 13 (16.4%) had their therapy held prior to surgery. There was no observed difference in bleeding complications between patients who were continued on antiplatelet or anticoagulation treatment versus those whose therapy was withheld. These results suggest that patients undergoing awake transcervical injection laryngoplasty for VFMI can be maintained on antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy without increased risk of bleeding. Further larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:1850-1854, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. New Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC and Their Use Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Schwarb

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ideal anticoagulant is oral, has a wide therapeutic range, predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, a rapid onset of action, an available antidote, minimal side effects and minimal interactions with other drugs or food. With the development of the novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC, we now have an alternative to the traditional vitamin K antagonists (VKA for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. DOACs have limited monitoring requirements and very predictable pharmacokinetic profiles. They were shown to be non-inferior or superior to VKA in the prophylaxis or treatment of thromboembolic events. Particularly in terms of safety they were associated with less major bleeding, including intracranial bleeding, thus providing a superior benefit for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Despite these advantages, there are remaining limitations with DOACs: their dependence on renal and hepatic function for clearance and the lack of an approved reversal agent, whereas such antidotes are successively being made available. DOACs do not need regular monitoring to assess the treatment effect but, on the other hand, they interact with other drugs and interfere with functional coagulation assays. From a practical point of view, the properties of oral administration, simple dosing without monitoring, a short half-life allowing for the possibility of uncomplicated switching or bridging, and proven safety overwhelm the disadvantages, making them an attractive option for short- or long-term anticoagulation.

  15. [Acute coronary syndrome: Is there a place for direct oral anticoagulants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayla, Guillaume; Leclercq, Florence; Schmutz, Laurent; Cornillet, Luc; Ledermann, Bertrand; Messner, Patrick; Lattuca, Benoit

    2016-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism and atrial fibrillation are two important indications of direct oral anticoagulants. Acute coronary syndrome is another potential indication of prolonged antithrombotic therapy in addition to antiplatelet therapy. Phase 2 and 3 studies were conducted with different molecules at different doses in acute coronary syndrome in addition to dual antiplatelet therapy. Studies have not shown a reduction of ischemic events for dabigatran and apixaban, but an excess of bleeding complications was observed. A reduction of ischemic events and stent thrombosis was observed with low dose of rivaroxaban taken twice a day but with an increased risk of major bleeding complications. This data was used to obtain a European marketing authorization but the positioning of the molecule remains difficult. A new study is currently being conducted to test rivaroxaban in association with a P2Y12 inhibitor without aspirin. Direct oral anticoagulants can also be used after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients requiring long-term oral anticoagulants. Dedicated studies are currently being conducted to confirm the optimal doses and the ideal association of antithrombotic drugs.

  16. Oral Anticoagulant Use After Bariatric Surgery: A Literature Review and Clinical Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karlyn A; Lee, Craig R; Farrell, Timothy M; Moll, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery may alter the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination (disposition) of orally administered drugs via changes to the gastrointestinal tract anatomy, body weight, and adipose tissue composition. As some patients who have undergone bariatric surgery will need therapeutic anticoagulation for various indications, appropriate knowledge is needed regarding anticoagulant drug disposition and resulting efficacy and safety in this population. We review general considerations about oral drug disposition in patients after bariatric surgery, as well as existing literature on oral anticoagulation after bariatric surgery. Overall, available evidence on therapeutic anticoagulation is very limited, and individual drug studies are necessary to learn how to safely and effectively use the direct oral anticoagulants. Given the sparsity of currently available data, it appears most prudent to use warfarin with international normalized ratio monitoring, and not direct oral anticoagulants, when full-dose anticoagulation is needed after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. POST-NOAC: Portuguese observational study of intracranial hemorrhage on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Matos, Cláudia; Alves, José Nuno; Marto, João Pedro; Ribeiro, Joana Afonso; Monteiro, Ana; Araújo, José; Silva, Fernando; Grenho, Fátima; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Sargento-Freitas, João; Pinho, João; Azevedo, Elsa

    2017-08-01

    Background There is a lower reported incidence of intracranial hemorrhage with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants compared with vitamin K antagonist. However, the functional outcome and mortality of intracranial hemorrhage patients were not assessed. Aims To compare the outcome of vitamin K antagonists- and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants-related intracranial hemorrhage. Methods We included consecutive patients with acute non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage on oral anticoagulation therapy admitted between January 2013 and June 2015 at four university hospitals. Clinical and demographic data were obtained from individual medical records. Intracranial hemorrhage was classified as intracerebral, extra-axial, or multifocal using brain computed tomography. Three-month functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale. Results Among 246 patients included, 24 (9.8%) were anticoagulated with a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and 222 (90.2%) with a vitamin K antagonists. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants patients were older (81.5 vs. 76 years, p = 0.048) and had intracerebral hemorrhage more often (83.3% vs. 63.1%, p = 0.048). We detected a non-significant trend for larger intracerebral hemorrhage volumes in vitamin K antagonists patients ( p = 0.368). Survival analysis adjusted for age, CHA2DS2VASc, HAS-BLED, and anticoagulation reversal revealed that non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants did not influence three-month mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.39-1.80, p = 0.638). Multivariable ordinal regression for three-month functional outcome did not show a significant shift of modified Rankin Scale scores in non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants patients (odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95%CI 0.55-2.87, p = 0.585). Conclusions We detected no significant differences in the three-month outcome between non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants- and

  18. Minimizing bleeding risk in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habert, Jeffrey Steven

    2016-01-01

    Many primary care physicians are wary about using direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). Factors such as comorbidities, concomitant medications, and alcohol misuse increase concerns over bleeding risk, especially in elderly and frail patients with AF. This article discusses strategies to minimize the risk of major bleeding events in patients with AF who may benefit from oral anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention. The potential benefits of the DOACs compared with vitamin K antagonists, in terms of a lower risk of intracranial hemorrhage, are discussed, together with the identification of reversible risk factors for bleeding and correct dose selection of the DOACs based on a patient’s characteristics and concomitant medications. Current bleeding management strategies, including the new reversal agents for the DOACs and the prevention of bleeding during preoperative anticoagulation treatment, in addition to health care resource use associated with anticoagulation treatment and bleeding, are also discussed. Implementing a structured approach at an individual patient level will minimize the overall risk of bleeding and should increase physician confidence in using the DOACs for stroke prevention in their patients with nonvalvular AF.

  19. Antidotes for novel oral anticoagulants: current status and future potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Mark; Crowther, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    The direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the anti-Xa agents rivaroxaban, edoxaban, and apixaban are a new generation of oral anticoagulants. Their advantage over the vitamin K antagonists is the lack of the need for monitoring and dose adjustment. Their main disadvantage is currently the absence of a specific reversal agent. Dabigatran's, unlike the anti-Xa agents, absorption can be reduced by activated charcoal if administered shortly after ingestion and it can be removed from the blood with hemodialysis. Prothrombin complex concentrate, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, and recombinant factor VIIa all show some activity in reversing the anticoagulant effect of these drugs but this is based on ex vivo, animal, and volunteer studies. It is unclear, which, if any, of these drugs is the most suitable for emergency reversal. Three novel molecules (idarucizumab, andexanet, and PER977) may provide the most effective and safest way of reversal. These agents are currently in premarketing studies.

  20. New oral anticoagulants in non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Pietro; Adduci, Carmen; Santini, Daria; Musumeci, Beatrice; Tocci, Giuliano

    2013-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of embolic stroke. Dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) to a target international normalized ratio (INR) range of 2.0-3.0 reduce the risk of ischemic stroke and are currently recommended in all patients with AF at moderate-high risk for stroke or systemic embolism. However, VKAs have several drawbacks, including unpredictable anticoagulant response, food and drug interactions, need for regular laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment. These limitations prompted the introduction of new oral anticoagulants (NOA) that target thrombin and factor Xa, key-enzymes in the coagulation pathway. NOA have predictable pharmacodynamics, allowing fixed dosing without the need of laboratory monitoring, and have few drug and food interactions. The present review focuses on pharmacological properties, safety, and appropriate clinical use of dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban.

  1. Anticoagulation therapy prevents portal-splenic vein thrombosis after splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Lai; Shi-Chun Lu; Guan-Yin Li; Chuan-Yun Li; Ju-Shan Wu; Qing-Liang Guo; Meng-Long Wang; Ning Li

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare the incidence of early portal or splenic vein thrombosis (PSVT) in patients treated with irregular and regular anticoagulantion alter splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization.METHODS:We retrospectively analyzed 301 patients who underwent splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization for portal hypertension due to cirrhosis between April 2004 and July 2010.Patients were categorized into group A with irregular anticoagulation and group B with regular anticoagulation,respectively.Group A (153 patients) received anticoagulant monotherapy for an undesignated time period or with aspirin or warfarin without low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) irregularly.Group B (148 patients) received subcutaneous injection of LMWH routinely within the first 5 d after surgery,followed by oral warfarin and aspirin for one month regularly.The target prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR) was 1.25-1.50.Platelet and PT/INR were monitored.Color Doppler imaging was performed to monitor PSVT as well as the effectiveness of thrombolytic therapy.RESULTS:The patients' data were collected and analyzed retrospectively.Among the patients,94 developed early postoperative mural PSVT,including 63patients in group A (63/153,41.17%) and 31 patients in group B (31/148,20.94%).There were 50 (32.67%)patients in group A and 27 (18.24%) in group B with mural PSVT in the main trunk of portal vein.After the administration of thrombolytic,anticoagulant and antiaggregation therapy,complete or partial thrombus dissolution achieved in 50 (79.37%) in group A and 26 (83.87%) in group B.CONCLUSION:Regular anticoagulation therapy can reduce the incidence of PSVT in patients who undergo splenectomy with gastroesophageal devascularization,and regular anticoagulant therapy is safer and more effective than irregular anticoagulant therapy.Early and timely thrombolytic therapy is imperative and feasible for the prevention of PSVT.

  2. Effects of oral anticoagulation with various INR levels in deep vein thrombosis cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karabay Özalp

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim In order to avoid the complications associated with thromboembolic disease, patients with this condition typically are placed on long-term anticoagulant therapy. This report compares bleeding complications in this patient population by level of achieved INR. Materials and Methods During the 6-year period between January 1997 and January 2003, 386 patients with venous thromboembolism of the lower extremities were admitted to the Cardiovascular Surgery Outpatient Clinic of Alsancak State Hospital. Of the 386 patients, 198 (51.2% were women, and the average age was 52.3 years. All diagnoses of venous thromboembolism were confirmed by means of Doppler ultrasonography. Further investigation showed occult neoplasms in 22 (5.6% of the cases. We excluded the patients with occult disease, and the remaining 364 constituted our study population. Results Oral anticoagulation was standardized at 6 months' duration in all cases. We divided the patients into two groups. Group I consisted of 192 patients (52.7% with INR values between 1.9 and 2.5; Group II comprised 172 patients with INR values between 2.6 and 3.5. Complications in each group were assessed and compared. The minor hemorrhage rate was 1.04% in Group I and 4.06% in Group II. The major hemorrhage rate was also 1.04% in Group I and was 6.3% in Group II. We determined that the complication rates for both minor and major hemorrhage were significant in patients with INR values above 2.5. Conclusion Oral anticoagulation must be followed closely in patients with venous thromboembolism. Higher INR levels are associated with significant increases in hemorrhage and associated complications. INR values of 2.0 to 2.5 are sufficient for long-term anticoagulant therapy, ensuring ideal anticoagulation levels and minimizing the complication rate.

  3. Why develop antidotes and reversal agents for non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washam, Jeffrey B; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several years, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been introduced into clinical practice for the treatment of venous thromboembolism and prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Clinical trials have shown these agents to have similar or less risk of major bleeding as compared to warfarin therapy. Moreover, when patients do experience a major bleeding event administration of advanced factor products is rare, and post-bleed outcomes are similar in those receiving a NOAC compared to those receiving warfarin. However, there are situations where urgent reversal of NOAC anticoagulation would be desirable. The following review focuses on the outcomes and management strategies for patients experiencing a major bleed with warfarin or NOAC agents and describes the rationale for the development of therapies capable of targeted NOAC-reversal.

  4. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in emergency setting for patients receiving oral anticoagulants – practice updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprita, R; Oprita, B; Diaconescu, B; Bratu, MR; Berceanu, D

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulants are frequently used medications in diverse cardiovascular diseases. Their uses highly increase the risk of bleeding from upper and lower gastrointestinal sources, whether there is a classic vitamin K antagonist or a novel oral anticoagulant. Their interruption can promote procoagulation status with different thromboembolic accidents. Discontinuation of oral anticoagulants before the elective procedures is standardized but there are no guidelines for managing bleeding lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract concomitant with anticoagulation. Also, because some of the anticoagulants are new comers, there is no specific antidote, and so their anticoagulation effect cannot be antagonized fast in order to reduce the bleeding. Therefore, the endoscopic hemostasis must be definitive and efficient. This is a short review of the current management for the bleeding lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract in patients taking oral anticoagulants. PMID:28255372

  5. Epidural analgesia and anticoagulant therapy. Experience with one thousand cases of continuous epidurals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoom, J A; Sih, I L

    1983-03-01

    One thousand lumbar epidural blocks in 950 patients undergoing vascular surgery are reported. All patients were receiving oral anticoagulants pre-operatively. Mean thrombotest (TT) was 19.3% (normal range 70-130%). During surgery intravascular heparin was administered. At the end of surgery, the kaolin cephalin clotting time (KCCT) was 68 (+/- 0.8) seconds (normal range 35-60 seconds), and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) was 536 (77.9%, normal control of 100%). Despite the anticoagulant therapy, no side effects were observed in any patient which could be related to haemorrhage or haematoma formation in the epidural space. It is concluded that, provided adequate precautions are taken, epidural analgesia can be safely used in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy.

  6. Simultaneous intrahepatic and subgaleal hemorrhage in antiphospholipid syndrome following anticoagulation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Chul; Baek, Yang-Hyun; Han, Sang-Young; Lee, Sung-Wook; Chung, Won-Tae; Lee, Sung-Won; Kang, Sang-Hyeon; Cho, Duk-Song

    2013-10-14

    Warfarin is a widely used anticoagulant. Interindividual differences in drug response, a narrow therapeutic range and the risk of bleeding render warfarin difficult to use clinically. An 18-year-old woman with antiphospholipid syndrome received long-term warfarin therapy for a recurrent deep vein thrombosis. Six years later, she developed right flank pain. We diagnosed intrahepatic and subgaleal hemorrhages secondary to anticoagulation therapy. After stopping oral anticoagulation, a follow-up computed tomography showed improvement in the hemorrhage. After restarting warfarin because of a recurrent thrombosis, the intrahepatic hemorrhage recurred. We decided to start clopidogrel and hydroxychloroquine instead of warfarin. The patient has not developed further recurrent thrombotic or bleeding episodes. Intrahepatic hemorrhage is a very rare complication of warfarin, and our patient experienced intrahepatic and subgaleal hemorrhage although she did not have any risk factors for bleeding or instability of the international normalized ratio control.

  7. Patient time requirements for anticoagulation therapy with warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Daniel E; Bryant Shilliday, Betsy; Laundon, W Russell; Pignone, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most patients receiving warfarin are managed in outpatient office settings or anticoagulation clinics that require frequent visits for monitoring. To measure the amount and value of time required of patients for chronic anticoagulation therapy with warfarin. /Participants. Prospective observation of a cohort of adult patients treated at a university-based anticoagulation program. Measurements. Participants completed a questionnaire and a prospective diary of the time required for 1 visit to the anticoagulation clinic, including travel, waiting, and the clinic visit. The authors reviewed subjects' medical records to obtain additional information, including the frequency of visits to the anticoagulation clinic. They used the human capital method to estimate the value of time. Eighty-five subjects completed the study. The mean (median) total time per visit was 147 minutes (123). Subjects averaged 15 visits per year (14) and spent 39.0 hours (29.3) per year on their visits. Other anticoagulation-related activities, such as communication with providers, pharmacy trips, and extra time preparing food, added an average of 52.7 hours (19.0) per year. The mean annual value of patient time spent traveling, waiting, and attending anticoagulation visits was $707 (median $591). The mean annual value when also including other anticoagulation-related activities was $1799 (median $1132). The time required of patients for anticoagulation visits was considerable, averaging approximately 2.5 hours per visit and almost 40 hours per year. for reducing patient time requirements, such as home-based testing, could reduce costs for patients, employers, and companions.

  8. Combined administration of antibiotics and direct oral anticoagulants: a renewed indication for laboratory monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2014-10-01

    The recent development and marketing of novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represents a paradigm shift in the management of patients requiring long-term anticoagulation. The advantages of these compounds over traditional therapy with vitamin K antagonists include a reportedly lower risk of severe hemorrhages and the limited need for laboratory measurements. However, there are several scenarios in which testing should be applied. The potential for drug-to-drug interaction is one plausible but currently underrecognized indication for laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effect of DOACs. In particular, substantial concern has been raised during Phase I studies regarding the potential interaction of these drugs with some antibiotics, especially those that interplay with permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome 3A4 (CYP3A4). A specific electronic search on clinical trials published so far confirms that clarithromycin and rifampicin significantly impair the bioavailability of dabigatran, whereas clarithromycin, erythromycin, fluconazole, and ketoconazole alter the metabolism of rivaroxaban in vivo. Because of their more recent development, no published data were found for apixaban and edoxaban, or for potential interactions of DOACs with other and widely used antibiotics. It is noteworthy, however, that an online resource based on Food and Drug Administration and social media information, reports several hemorrhagic and thrombotic events in patients simultaneously taking dabigatran and some commonly used antibiotics such as amoxicillin, cephalosporin, and metronidazole. According to these reports, the administration of antibiotics in patients undergoing therapy with DOACs would seem to require accurate evaluation as to whether dose adjustments (personalized or antibiotic class driven) of the anticoagulant drug may be advisable. This might be facilitated by direct laboratory assessments of their anticoagulant effect ex vivo.

  9. Review of atrial fibrillation outcome trials of oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassand, Jean-Pierre

    2012-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is strongly associated with cardioembolic stroke, and thromboprophylaxis is an established means of reducing stroke risk in patients with AF. Oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin have been the mainstay of therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF. However, they are associated with a number of limitations, including excessive bleeding when not adequately controlled. Antiplatelet agents do not match vitamin K antagonists in terms of their preventive efficacy. Dual-antiplatelet therapy (clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid) or combined antiplatelet-vitamin K antagonist therapy in AF has also failed to provide convincing evidence of their additional benefit over vitamin K antagonists alone. Novel oral anticoagulants, including the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and direct Factor Xa inhibitors such as rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have now been approved or are currently in late-stage clinical development in AF. These newer agents may provide a breakthrough in the optimal management of stroke risk.

  10. Switching, Adverse Effects and Use of Over-the-Counter Analgesics among Users of Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Maja Hellfritzsch; Hyllested, Lea Maria Rønneberg; Meegaard, Line

    2017-01-01

    Oral anticoagulants are widely used but information on important aspects in that respect is not available from medical registers or clinical databases. Therefore, we conducted a survey including patients filling a prescription for oral anticoagulants at two large Danish community pharmacies. We...

  11. Dietary vitamin K guidance: an effective strategy for stable control of oral anticoagulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous factors have been identified as risk factors for instability of oral anticoagulation, including variability in vitamin K intake. However few studies have directly tested the feasibility of manipulating dietary vitamin K to achieve stable oral anticoagulation. Recent findings from a rando...

  12. Anticoagulation therapy in intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation:Does IABP really need anti-coagulation?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chen-yang(蒋晨阳); ZHAO Li-li(赵莉莉); WANG Jian-an(王建安); SAN Jiang(单江); MOHAMMOD Balgaith

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if intra-aortic balloon pump(IABP) is contraindicated without anticoagulation therapy. Methods: Some 153 IABP patients in the King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center(KSA) were randomly assigned into two groups. Anticoagulation group(Group A) consisted of 71 patients who were given heparin intravenously with target aPTT 50-70 seconds. Non-anticoagulation group(Group B) consisted of 82 patients without intravenous heparin during balloon pumping. Hematological parameters including platelet count, D-dimer, Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1(PAI-1) and fibrinogen degradation products(FDP) were checked respectively at the point of baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours and 24 hours post IABP counterpulsation. Clot deposits on balloon surface, vascular complications from IABP including bleeding and limb ischemia were recorded. Results: Platelet count and PAI-1 level decreased at 24 hours and 48 hours in both groups (P0.05). Three patients in Group A and 2 patients in Group B developed minor limb ischemia(P>0.05). No major limb ischemia in either group. Two patients in Group A suffered major bleeding and required blood transfusion or surgical intervention, whereas no patient had major bleeding in Group B. Eight patients had minor bleeding in Group A, but only 2 patients in Group B(P<0.05). No clot deposit developed on IABP surface in either group. Conclusion: IABP is safe without routine anticoagulation therapy. Selecting appropriate artery approach and early detection intervention are key methods for preventing complications.

  13. Anticoagulation therapy in intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation: Does IABP really need anti-coagulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋晨阳; 赵莉莉; 王建安; 单江; MOHAMMODBalgaith

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if intra-aortic balloon pump(IABP) is contraindicated without anticoag-ulation therapy. Methods: Some 153 IABP patients in the King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center(KSA) were random-ly assigned into two groups. Anticoagulation group( Group A) consisted of 71 patients who were given heparin intravenously with target aPTT 50 - 70 seconds. Non-anticoagulation group( Group B) consisted of 82 patients without intravenous heparin during balloon pumping. Hematological parameters including platelet count, D-dimer, Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and fibrinogen degradation products(FDP) were checked respectively at the point of baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours and 24 hours post IABP counterpulsation. Clot deposits on balloon surface, vascular complications from IABP including bleeding and limb ischemia were recorded.Results: Platelet count and PAI-1 level decreased at 24 hours and 48 hours in both groups ( P 0.05) . Three patients in Group A and 2 patients in Group B developed minor limb ischemia( P > 0.05). No major limb ischemia in either group. Two patients in Group A suffered major bleeding and required blood transfusion or surgical intervention, whereas no patient had major bleeding in Group B. Eight patients had minor bleeding in Group A, but only 2 patients in Group B ( P <0.05). No clot deposit developed on IABP surface in either group. Conclusion: IABP is safe without routine anticoagulation therapy. Selecting appropriate artery approach and early detection intervention are key methods for preventing complications.

  14. Practical management for urgent reversal of oral anticoagulation in patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Imberti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In case of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH during oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT it is mandatory to obtain the fast and complete normalisation of haemostasis, in order to minimise the risk of haematoma enlargement. Furthermore, if neurosurgery is requested, the immediate correction of haemostatic balance allows the execution of emergency intervention, thus reducing the risk of intra- and post-surgical haemorrhagic complications. Currently prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC in combination with vitamin K represents the gold standard treatment for patients with ICH during OAT. This treatment should be preferred to the administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP in order to guarantee a fast and almost immediate normalisation of blood coagulation.

  15. Comparative study of two portable systems for oral anticoagulant monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, Marta; Lafuente, Pedro José; Unanue, Iciar; Iriarte, José Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Portable prothrombin time (PT) monitors offer the potential for both simplifying and improving oral anticoagulation management. It is necessary to evaluate their concordance and correlation with other PT systems. Our objective was to evaluate the concordance and clinical correlation of two portable PT determination systems, ProTime (ITC) and CoaguChek S (Roche Diagnostics). In all, 20 healthy individuals and 60 anticoagulated patients stabilized over 3 months in a therapeutic International Normalized Ratio (INR) range between 2-3.5 were studied. A drop of capillary blood was obtained simultaneously from two different fingers of each patient and applied to the monitor's application zone. The mean INR of the patients' blood samples of the two monitors differed by 0.01 units (2.32+/-0.63 for Pro Time and 2.33+/-0.68 for CoaguChek). The percentage of simple concordance and the kappa index were 88.3 and 75.9%, respectively. The coefficient of correlation was 0.922. The mean difference (bias) between the monitors was 0.01. The portable PT monitors evaluated presented a high percentage of concordance in INR results.

  16. MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS ON ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY UNDERGOING DENTAL SURGICAL PROCEDURES. Review Article.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanaska Dinkova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental treatment performed in patients receiving oral anticoagulant drug therapy is becoming increasingly common in dental offices.The aim of oral anticoagulant therapy is to reduce blood coagulability to an optimal therapeutic range within which the patient is provided some degree of protection from thromboembolic events. This is achieved at the cost of a minor risk of haemorrhage. Frequently raised questions concern the safety and efficacy of the various anticoagulation regimens and their accompanying thromboembolic and bleeding risks relative to invasive dental procedures.The aim of this literature review is to evaluate the available evidence on the impact of anticoagulant medications on dental treatment and highlight certain patient management issues closely interrelated to various aspects of dental treatment. For that purpose literature search in the electronic database of Medscape, Pubmed-Medline, Science Direct, and EBSCO host, in the data base of Medical University Plovdiv and specialised published books in general medicine and dentistry was made.A total of 33 publications between 1995 and 2013 were identified: 12 review articles, 11 randomized controlled and non-randomised studies, 6 guidelines and practical guides, 1 meta-analysis and 3 specialised books.

  17. The debate concerning oral anticoagulation: whether to suspend oral anticoagulants during dental treatment

    OpenAIRE

    António, Natália; Castro, Graça; Ramos, Domingo; Machado, António; Gonçalves, Lino; Macedo, Tice; Providência, Luís A.

    2008-01-01

    A abordagem dos doentes cronicamente anticoagulados com necessidade de intervenções estomatológicas continua a suscitar grande controvérsia. O aumento do risco hemorrágico associado aos procedimentos estomatológicos sob anticoagulação oral deve ser pesado relativamente ao risco trombótico acrescido causado pela interrupção da terapêutica antitrombótica. Em cirurgia oral minor, a mortalidade e morbilidade é superior nos episódios tromboembólicos comparativament...

  18. Cost-effectiveness of oral anticoagulants for treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canestaro, William J; Patrick, Amanda R; Avorn, Jerry; Ito, Kouta; Matlin, Olga S; Brennan, Troyen A; Shrank, William H; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2013-11-01

    New anticoagulants may improve health outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation, but it is unclear whether their use is cost-effective. A Markov state transition was created to compare 4 therapies: dabigatran 150 mg BID, apixaban 5 mg BID, rivaroxaban 20 mg QD, and warfarin therapy. The population included those with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation who were eligible for treatment with warfarin. Compared with warfarin, apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran, costs were $93 063, $111 465, and $140 557 per additional quality-adjusted life year gained, respectively. At a threshold of $100 000 per quality-adjusted life year, apixaban provided the greatest absolute benefit while still being cost-effective, although warfarin would be superior if apixaban was 2% less effective than expected. Although apixaban was the optimal strategy in our base case, in probabilistic sensitivity analysis, warfarin was optimal in an equal number of iterations at a cost-effectiveness threshold of $100 000 per quality-adjusted life year. While at a standard cost-effectiveness threshold of $100 000 per quality-adjusted life year, apixaban seems to be the optimal anticoagulation strategy; this finding is sensitive to assumptions about its efficacy and cost. In sensitivity analysis, warfarin seems to be the optimal choice in an equal number of simulations. As a result, although all the novel oral anticoagulants produce greater quality-adjusted life expectancy than warfarin, they may not represent good value for money.

  19. Personalized antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy: applications and significance of pharmacogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitelshees, Amber L; Voora, Deepak; Lewis, Joshua P

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, substantial effort has been made to better understand the influence of genetic factors on the efficacy and safety of numerous medications. These investigations suggest that the use of pharmacogenetic data to inform physician decision-making has great potential to enhance patient care by reducing on-treatment clinical events, adverse drug reactions, and health care-related costs. In fact, integration of such information into the clinical setting may be particularly applicable for antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapeutics, given the increasing body of evidence implicating genetic variation in variable drug response. In this review, we summarize currently available pharmacogenetic information for the most commonly used antiplatelet (ie, clopidogrel and aspirin) and anticoagulation (ie, warfarin) medications. Furthermore, we highlight the currently known role of genetic variability in response to next-generation antiplatelet (prasugrel and ticagrelor) and anticoagulant (dabigatran) agents. While compelling evidence suggests that genetic variants are important determinants of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy response, significant barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic testing exist and are described herein. In addition, we briefly discuss development of new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies as well as implications for enhanced patient care. In conclusion, pharmacogenetic testing can provide important information to assist clinicians with prescribing the most personalized and effective antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy. However, several factors may limit its usefulness and should be considered. PMID:25897256

  20. [Oral anticoagulation in chronic kidney disease with atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito, Víctor; Seras, Miguel; Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema

    2015-05-21

    Atrial fibrillation is a common finding in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), which increases markedly the embolism risk. The CHADS2 and HAS-BLED scales, used in the general population to assess the risk/benefit of oral anticoagulation (OAC), underestimate respectively the risk of embolism and haemorrhage in CKD, making it difficult to decide whether to use OAC or not. Based on the available evidence, it seems indicated to use OAC in stage 3 CKD, while it is controversial in advanced stages. New OAC such as dabigatran and rivaroxaban have been approved in stage 3 CKD but their role is still somewhat uncertain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in elective percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Berg, Jurriën M; Plokker, HW Thijs; Verheugt, Freek WA

    2001-01-01

    Thrombosis plays a major role in acute vessel closure both after coronary balloon angioplasty and after stenting. This review will address the role of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in preventing early thrombotic complications after percutaneous coronary intervention. The focus will be on agents that are routinely available and commonly used.

  2. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in elective percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verheugt Freek WA

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thrombosis plays a major role in acute vessel closure both after coronary balloon angioplasty and after stenting. This review will address the role of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in preventing early thrombotic complications after percutaneous coronary intervention. The focus will be on agents that are routinely available and commonly used.

  3. Using Artificial Intelligence to Reduce the Risk of Nonadherence in Patients on Anticoagulation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labovitz, Daniel L; Shafner, Laura; Reyes Gil, Morayma; Virmani, Deepti; Hanina, Adam

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the use of an artificial intelligence platform on mobile devices in measuring and increasing medication adherence in stroke patients on anticoagulation therapy. The introduction of direct oral anticoagulants, while reducing the need for monitoring, have also placed pressure on patients to self-manage. Suboptimal adherence goes undetected as routine laboratory tests are not reliable indicators of adherence, placing patients at increased risk of stroke and bleeding. A randomized, parallel-group, 12-week study was conducted in adults (n=28) with recently diagnosed ischemic stroke receiving any anticoagulation. Patients were randomized to daily monitoring by the artificial intelligence platform (intervention) or to no daily monitoring (control). The artificial intelligence application visually identified the patient, the medication, and the confirmed ingestion. Adherence was measured by pill counts and plasma sampling in both groups. For all patients (n=28), mean (SD) age was 57 years (13.2 years) and 53.6% were women. Mean (SD) cumulative adherence based on the artificial intelligence platform was 90.5% (7.5%). Plasma drug concentration levels indicated that adherence was 100% (15 of 15) and 50% (6 of 12) in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Patients, some with little experience using a smartphone, successfully used the technology and demonstrated a 50% improvement in adherence based on plasma drug concentration levels. For patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants, absolute improvement increased to 67%. Real-time monitoring has the potential to increase adherence and change behavior, particularly in patients on direct oral anticoagulant therapy. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02599259. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. 口服抗凝治疗两种监测方法的Meta分析%Comparison of two monitoring methods for oral anticoagulant therapy: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张希; 许哲; 唐白云; 陈艳玲; 王治平; 吴钟凯; 殷胜利

    2010-01-01

    目的 评价口服抗凝治疗自我监测的方法 是否优于传统方法 .方法 通过多种途径检索截至2008年10月关于两种监测方法 比较的前瞻性随机对照试验,然后进行meta分析.结果 纳入的17项研究分析结果 显示自我监测方法 较之传统方法 治疗达标率高,并且能将伞因死亡率降低近三分之一;栓塞事件发生率减少54%;大出血事件发生率减少.亚组分析显示,自我调整药量组较之依靠专业人员调整药量组全因死亡率及栓寒事件发生率明显降低,但大出血事件发生率未降低.结论 口服抗凝治疗自我监测的方法 较传统方法 优越,但实施之前必须对病人进行教育与严格培训.%Objective Both underuse and overuse of anticoagulant therapy may lead to severe adverse effects. Emerging portable monitering devices, which provides reliable and accurate measurements, were reported to be potential alternatives to tra-ditional monitering recta-analysis regimens. This study was intended to evaluate the effects of serf-monitoring or serf-management (self-testing and serf-dosing) of anticoagulant as compared with that of traditional monitoring. Methods Relevant trials reported before October 2008 were identified in a number of electronic database and analyzed with software RevMan 4.2. The primary out-comes included death from any cause, major bleeding event, thromboembolic event and the proportion of patients whose interna-tional normalized ratio (INR) were within the therapeutic range. Results Seventeen RCT of serf-monitoring were identified.Pooled estimates revealed significant reductions in the thromboembolic events (odds ratio 0.46, 95% CI0.33 -0.64), all-cause mortality (0.61,0.40 -0.93), and major haemorrhage (0.80, 0.58 - 1.10) with self-monitoring as comparing with traditional monitoring. No difference was noted in minor haemorrhage. 15 trials reported improvements in the mean proportion of patients whose INR were within target

  5. Personalized antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy: applications and significance of pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beitelshees AL

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amber L Beitelshees,1,* Deepak Voora,2,* Joshua P Lewis,1,* 1Program for Personalized and Genomic Medicine and Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Nutrition, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Center for Applied Genomics & Precision Medicine, Department of Medicine, Duke School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA*All authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In recent years, substantial effort has been made to better understand the influence of genetic factors on the efficacy and safety of numerous medications. These investigations suggest that the use of pharmacogenetic data to inform physician decision-making has great potential to enhance patient care by reducing on-treatment clinical events, adverse drug reactions, and health care-related costs. In fact, integration of such information into the clinical setting may be particularly applicable for antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapeutics, given the increasing body of evidence implicating genetic variation in variable drug response. In this review, we summarize currently available pharmacogenetic information for the most commonly used antiplatelet (ie, clopidogrel and aspirin and anticoagulation (ie, warfarin medications. Furthermore, we highlight the currently known role of genetic variability in response to next-generation antiplatelet (prasugrel and ticagrelor and anticoagulant (dabigatran agents. While compelling evidence suggests that genetic variants are important determinants of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy response, significant barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic testing exist and are described herein. In addition, we briefly discuss development of new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies as well as implications for enhanced patient care. In conclusion, pharmacogenetic testing can provide important information to assist clinicians with prescribing the most personalized and effective antiplatelet and

  6. New oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation and acute coronary syndromes: ESC Working Group on Thrombosis-Task Force on Anticoagulants in Heart Disease position paper.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caterina, R. de; Husted, S.; Wallentin, L.; Andreotti, F.; Arnesen, H.; Bachmann, F.; Baigent, C.; Huber, K.; Jespersen, J.; Kristensen, S.D.; Lip, G.Y.; Morais, J.; Rasmussen, L.H.; Siegbahn, A.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Weitz, J.I.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, vitamin K antagonists were the only available oral anticoagulants, but with numerous limitations that prompted the introduction of new oral anticoagulants targeting the single coagulation enzymes thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (apixaban, rivaroxaban, and edoxaban) and given in fi

  7. Oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: current status, special situations, and unmet needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.; Granger, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    In patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists reduces the risk of stroke by more than 60%. But vitamin K antagonists have limitations, including causing serious bleeding such as intracranial haemorrhage and the need for anticoagulation monitoring.

  8. New perspectives and recommendations for anticoagulant therapy post orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Kropf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant therapy is essential for the prevention of risks associated with the formation of thrombus in patients after surgery, especially in orthopedics. Recently, new oral anticoagulants were introduced in the therapeutic arsenal. This fact is important, because the current drug of choice in clinical practice is enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin. As all injecting drugs, enoxaparin may reduce patients' adherence to treatment by dissatisfaction with and resistance to the administration. This article reviews the available literature on the overall utility of these innovative medicines, approaching the pharmacology, the compared efficacy in relation to current agents, and the potential targets for new agents, as well as points to new trends in research and development. The article also contributes with a practical guide for use and recommendations to health professionals, especially focusing on the reversibility of hemorrhagic events, and discusses the importance of convenience/satisfaction of use, the cost of treatment, and the risk-benefit profile for patients.A terapia anticoagulante é fundamental para a prevenção de riscos associados à formação de trombos em pacientes pós-cirúrgicos, principalmente em ortopedia. Recentemente, novos anticoagulantes orais foram introduzidos no arsenal terapêutico. Tal fato é importantíssimo, visto que o atual medicamento de primeira escolha na prática clínica é a enoxaparina, uma heparina de baixo peso molecular. Por ser de uso injetável, a enoxaparina pode diminuir a adesão do paciente ao tratamento, devido à insatisfação e à resistência quanto à via de administração. Este artigo revisa a literatura disponível sobre a utilidade total desses medicamentos inovadores ao abordar a farmacologia, a eficácia em comparação com os agentes atuais e os alvos potenciais para novos agentes, bem como aponta as novas tendências em pesquisa e desenvolvimento. O artigo também contribui

  9. Cirugía oral en pacientes bajo terapia anticoagulante: modelo experimental para la evaluación de la eficacia de la cola de fibrina Oral surgery in patients treated with anticoagulating therapy: experimental model for evaluation of fibrin glue efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Taormina

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: En la práctica de cirugía oral en los pacientes bajo terapia anti coagulante, el empleo de un sistema eficaz de acción hemostática es de extrema relevancia, porque puede evitar la alteración del régimen terapéutico anticoagulante y el riesgo de un exceso de sangrado. En el presente trabajo se investiga la capacidad hemostática de la cola de fibrina como presidio hemostático en los pacientes bajo terapia anticoagulante, exponiendo los resultados de la experimentación sobre la base de un Standard de referencia del trauma quirúrgico y de la intensidad de la terapia anticoagulante. Materiales y métodos: Han sido seleccionados 20 pacientes en terapia anticoagulante con una edad comprendida entre los 44 y 79 años, se han realizado, según las modalidades apropiadas, simples exodoncias o más complejas de dientes mono-, bi- y tri-radiculares. Tras la alveoloplastia se ha colocado una esponja de fibrina reabsorbible en forma de gel (Gingistat® y se ha realizado la sutura. El trauma quirúrgico ha sido clasificado por medio de una escala cuantitativa que puede expresar de forma unívoca el grado de trauma. La categoría de trauma por cada paciente se establece por la suma de los valores obtenidos de cada uno de los procedimientos unitarios. Ha sido posible evaluar el coeficiente de relación entre la intensidad del efecto anticoagulante (medido por medio del lNR y número de complicaciones hemorrágicas que se han verificado, además de entre el grado de trauma quirúrgico y el número de complicaciones que se han presentado. Resultados y Conclusiones: Se demuestra que el utilizo terapéutico de la cola de fibrina puede ser considerado como un válido soporte por la optimización de la hemostasis en los pacientes con alteraciones de la coagulación inducidas farmacológica menteAim of the work: The authors emphasize how an effective emostatic method is extremely important in patients treated with anticoagulating therapy

  10. Novel oral anticoagulants to prevent stroke in atrial fibrillation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2010-01-01

    Warfarin reduces the risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation by around 60%, while antiplatelet therapy is much less effective. Bleeding is, however, a notable adverse effect with warfarin. Another major drawback of warfarin is the need for frequent clotting assessment. Oral agents have been developed

  11. Newer non-vitamin K-antagonist direct oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rubboli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available standard dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT of aspirin and clopidogrel is associated with a substantial absolute incidence of adverse events, including death, myocardial infarction and stroke after an acute coronary syndrome (ACs. Combination therapy of an oral anticoagulant and DAPT has been previously proposed in order to improve efficacy, but has not gained popularity owing to the cumbersome management of vitamin K-antagonists (VKA. The recent introduction of newer, non-VKA, direct oral anticoagulants (NOAC, including dabigatran, apixaban, and rivaroxaban, has renewed the interest in combination therapy, owing to the more favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of these drugs. Whereas phase II studies with dabigatran, apixaban, and rivaroxaban have consistently shown an increased bleeding risk with combination therapy, a potential increased efficacy has emerged for apixaban and rivaroxaban, thereby prompting phase III studies, namely APPRAIsE-2 with apixaban and ATLAs ACs 2-TIMI 51 with rivaroxaban. Both APPRAIsE-2 and ATLAs ACs 2-TIMI 51 studies confirmed a dose-dependent increase in major, including intracranial, bleeding with apixaban and rivaroxaban when combined with DAPT. Low-dose rivaroxaban on the other hand, was associated with significantly higher efficacy on the occurrence of combined cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke, as well as of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis. Owing to the persistent uncertainty regarding the net clinical benefit of combined therapy of NOAC, namely low-dose rivaroxaban, and DAPT, further studies are warranted to identify the ACs patient who will benefit most from such treatment, also in comparison to current standard DAPT of aspirin and prasugrel or ticagrelor.

  12. Point-of-care monitoring of oral anticoagulation therapy in children. Comparison of the CoaguChek XS system with venous INR and venous INR using an International Reference Thromboplastin preparation (rTF/95).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Anthea; Ignjatovic, Vera; Summerhayes, Robyn; Newall, Fiona; Burgess, Janet; DeRosa, Lydia; Monagle, Paul

    2009-07-01

    Point-of-care (POC) monitoring of oral anticoagulation has been widely adopted in both paediatric and adult patients. A new POC system, the CoaguChek XS has recently been developed to measure the international normalised ratio (INR) and may offer significant advantages. The CoaguChek XS utilises a new method of electrochemical clot detection based on thrombin generation. This system has not been previously evaluated in children with reference to the laboratory gold standard, the prothrombin time using reference thromboplastin. It was the objective to compare values obtained by the CoaguChek XS system with both the venous INR and the gold standard for anticoagulant monitoring, prothrombin time with reference thromboplastin (rTF/95). To evaluate the impact of testing using the CoaguChek XS on clinical anticoagulant dosing decisions. Fifty paired venous INR and capillary CoaguChek XS results were obtained from 31 children (aged up to 16 years). The laboratory gold standard, a manual prothrombin time with reference thromboplastin (rTF/95) was additionally performed on 26 samples. Correlation between the CoaguChek XS result and the venous INR was r = 0.810. Agreement between the CoaguChek XS result and the reference INR was shown to be higher (r=0.95), in the subset analysed by this method. Correlation between the venous INR and reference INR was r=0.90. Despite changes to the methodology of testing with the CoaguChek XS POC monitoring system, the accuracy of this method when compared with both the venous INR and gold standard reference INR was satisfactory. This resulted in infrequent changes to clinical decision making regarding anticoagulation.

  13. Oral Anticoagulants and Atrial Fibrillation: An Update for the Clinical Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Inna E

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation is an important strategy for the prevention of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation. Development of new oral agents has created a need to educate nurses to administer these medications and provide patient education.

  14. Oral Anticoagulation: the impact of the therapy in health-related quality of life at six-month follow-up Anticoagulación oral: impacto de la terapia en la calidad de vida relacionada a la salud a lo largo de seis meses Anticoagulação oral: impacto da terapia na qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde ao longo de seis meses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Rodrigues da Silva Carvalho

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to study the changes in health-related quality of life from beginning of anticoagulation therapy to six-month follow-up, and to study associations of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics with measures of quality of life and general health status at six-month follow-up, in individuals using oral anticoagulation due to various medical indications for the therapy. METHOD: prospective study performed at a city in the state of Paraná, Brazil, composed of 78 patients. Measures included the Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale and the Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form SF-36. RESULTS: mean age was 57 years (S.D.= 16 and 54% were women. Compared to the beginning of therapy, there was a statistically significant improvement in health-related quality of life at six-month follow-up. Linear regression analyses explained 32% and 30%, respectively, of the variance of the Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale and of the general health status. There was improvement in all components of the SF-36, except Mental Health. CONCLUSION: The use of oral anticoagulation therapy was associated with improvement in health-related quality of life in the first six months of therapy. This study is longitudinal and therefore, has fewer limitations than cross-sectional studies published to date in the Nursing literature in Brazil.OBJETIVO: Estudiar los cambios en la calidad de vida relacionada con la salud desde el inicio de la anticoagulación oral y al final de seis meses de tratamiento, y estudiar las asociaciones de las características sociodemográficas y clínicas con las medidas de calidad de vida y salud general seis meses después de iniciar la terapia, en pacientes con diversas indicaciones clínicas de anticoagulación oral. MÉTODO: Se realizó un estudio prospectivo en una ciudad de Paraná, Brasil, evaluando 78 pacientes. Las herramientas aplicadas fueron la Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale y el Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form

  15. Oral anticoagulants in pediatric cardiac practice: A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Shreepal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the pediatric heart surgery, especially the Fontan procedure, has necessitated an increased use of oral anticoagulants in pediatric cardiac patients. Warfarin is the standard agent used for most pediatric indications, though there are very few randomized control studies in children regarding its use. This review summarizes the current indications and evidence base regarding the use of oral anticoagulants in the pediatric age group.

  16. Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants: Practical Considerations for Emergency Medicine Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, W Frank; Rafique, Zubaid; Singer, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation- (NVAF-) related stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are cardiovascular diseases associated with significant morbidity and economic burden. The historical standard treatment of VTE has been the administration of parenteral heparinoid until oral warfarin therapy attains a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin has been the most common medication for stroke prevention in NVAF. Warfarin use is complicated by a narrow therapeutic window, unpredictable dose response, numerous food and drug interactions, and requirements for frequent monitoring. To overcome these disadvantages, direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs)-dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban-have been developed for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolic events (SEE) in patients with NVAF and for the treatment of VTE. Advantages of DOACs include predictable pharmacokinetics, few drug-drug interactions, and low monitoring requirements. In clinical studies, DOACs are noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of NVAF-related stroke and the treatment and prevention of VTE as well as postoperative knee and hip surgery VTE prophylaxis, with decreased bleeding risks. This review addresses the practical considerations for the emergency physician in DOAC use, including dosing recommendations, laboratory monitoring, anticoagulation reversal, and cost-effectiveness. The challenges of DOACs, such as the lack of specific laboratory measurements and antidotes, are also discussed.

  17. Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants: Practical Considerations for Emergency Medicine Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Frank Peacock

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation- (NVAF- related stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE are cardiovascular diseases associated with significant morbidity and economic burden. The historical standard treatment of VTE has been the administration of parenteral heparinoid until oral warfarin therapy attains a therapeutic international normalized ratio. Warfarin has been the most common medication for stroke prevention in NVAF. Warfarin use is complicated by a narrow therapeutic window, unpredictable dose response, numerous food and drug interactions, and requirements for frequent monitoring. To overcome these disadvantages, direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs—dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban—have been developed for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolic events (SEE in patients with NVAF and for the treatment of VTE. Advantages of DOACs include predictable pharmacokinetics, few drug-drug interactions, and low monitoring requirements. In clinical studies, DOACs are noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of NVAF-related stroke and the treatment and prevention of VTE as well as postoperative knee and hip surgery VTE prophylaxis, with decreased bleeding risks. This review addresses the practical considerations for the emergency physician in DOAC use, including dosing recommendations, laboratory monitoring, anticoagulation reversal, and cost-effectiveness. The challenges of DOACs, such as the lack of specific laboratory measurements and antidotes, are also discussed.

  18. Prescription practices and medical knowledge on direct oral anticoagulants in a reference hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correa, Manuela

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The experience and knowledge concerning the use of direct oral anticoagulants among specialists in Medellin, Colombia, are not known. Our goal was to describe the use of these drugs in patients treated at Hospital Pablo Tobón Uribe and to assess the level of knowledge regarding this issue in professionals from this institution. Materials and methods: Cross sectional study conducted between January 2012 and January 2013. Two strategies to collect information were used, namely: Analysis of relevant medical records and evaluation of knowledge about the appropriate use and prescription of direct oral anticoagulants in the group of medical specialists. Results: 114 records were included in the analysis; rivaroxaban was the most frequently prescribed drug (87% followed by dabigatran (13%. The main indication was prophylaxis in orthopedic surgery (69%. Average of correct answers among the different specialists evaluated was 67% with no apparent difference between them. Conclusion: rivaroxaban was prescribed more often than dabigatran; however, this fact does not appear to be associated with a clear and sufficient medical knowledge about these drugs. No reports of adverse events associated with this therapy were found.

  19. [Perioperative Management of Lung Cancer Patients with atrial fibrillation being treated by antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shinya; Kasai, Yoshitaka; Matsuura, Natsumi; Tarumi, Shintaro; Nakano, Jun; Okuda, Masaya; Goto, Masashi; Ryu, Dagu; Go, Tetsuhiko; Yokomise, Hiroyasu

    2015-04-01

    In an aging society, the high incidence of surgery for the patients with ischemic heart disease(IHD)or atrial fibrillation(Af) under antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy is a great problem. Interruption of antiplatelet or anticoagulant oral agents in the perioperative period may increase the risk of coronary or cerebral events. We retrospectively reviewed the surgical outcomes for lung cancer patients with IHD or Af. We reviewed 135 patients with lung cancer(41~88 years;97 men) who had preoperative oral administration of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs for IHD or Af between 2005 and 2012 at 2 centers, and analyzed retrospectively the perioperative medications and complications. IHD, Af and vasospastic angina(VSA) were complicated in 94, 33 and 8 patients, respectively. Drugeluted and bare-metal stents had been placed in 18 and 19 patients. Oral agents were aspirin in 68 patients, ticlopidine in 10 patients, clopidogrel in 15 patients and warfarin in 25 patients. These agents were stopped 2 to 60 days before surgery. Perioperative heparinization was performed in 22 patients. Oral agents were restarted after confirmation of hemostasis and no need for further invasive treatment. The surgical procedures were lobectomy in 88 patients, segmentectomy in 19 and partial resection in 25. There were no hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications in a perioperative period except 1 case of pulmonary hemorrhage and 1 case of cerebral infarction. No perioperative hospital death was documented. Short-term interruption of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs before lung cancer surgery and heparinization was acceptable from the view of perioperative outcomes.

  20. Cost effectiveness of novel oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation depending on the quality of warfarin anticoagulation control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzic, Andrej; Kos, Mitja

    2015-04-01

    Vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin, are standard treatments for stroke prophylaxis in patients with atrial fibrillation. Patient outcomes depend on quality of warfarin management, which includes regular monitoring and dose adjustments. Recently, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that do not require regular monitoring offer an alternative to warfarin. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether cost effectiveness of NOACs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation depends on the quality of warfarin control. We developed a Markov decision model to simulate warfarin treatment outcomes in relation to the quality of anticoagulation control, expressed as percentage of time in the therapeutic range (TTR). Standard treatment with adjusted-dose warfarin and improved anticoagulation control by genotype-guided dosing were compared with dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban. The analysis was performed from the Slovenian healthcare payer perspective using 2014 costs. In the base case, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for apixaban, dabigatran and edoxaban was below the threshold of €25,000 per quality-adjusted life-years compared with adjusted-dose warfarin with a TTR of 60%. The probability that warfarin was a cost-effective option was around 1%. This percentage rises as the quality of anticoagulation control improves. At a TTR of 70%, warfarin was the preferred treatment in half the iterations. The cost effectiveness of NOACs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who are at increased risk for stroke is highly sensitive to warfarin anticoagulation control. NOACs are more likely to be cost-effective options in settings with poor warfarin management than in settings with better anticoagulation control, where they may not represent good value for money.

  1. Spontaneous sublingual and intramural small-bowel hematoma in a patient on oral anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Moftah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous sublingual hematoma and intramural small bowel hematoma are rare and serious complications of anticoagulant therapy. Though previously reported individually, there has been no previous report of the same two complications occurring in a single patient. A 71-year-old Caucasian man, who was on warfarin for atrial fibrillation, presented with difficulty in swallowing due to a sublingual hematoma. He was observed in our intensive care unit, his warfarin was held and he recovered with conservative management. He represented two months later with a two day history of abdominal pain and distension. An abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT scan now showed small bowel obstruction due to intramural small bowel hematoma and haemorrhagic ascites. Again, this was treated expectantly with a good outcome. In conclusion, life threatening haemorrhagic complications of oral anticoagulant therapy can recur. Conservative treatment is successful in most cases, but an accurate diagnosis is mandatory to avoid unnecessary surgery. CT scan is the investigation of choice for the diagnosis of suspected haemorrhagic complications of over coagulation.

  2. Patterns of initiation of oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation- quality and cost implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Nihar R; Krumme, Alexis A; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Shrank, William H; Brill, Gregory; Pezalla, Edmund J; Spettell, Claire M; Brennan, Troyen A; Matlin, Olga S; Avorn, Jerry; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2014-11-01

    Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban have been approved for use in patients with atrial fibrillation based upon randomized trials demonstrating their comparable or superior efficacy and safety relative to warfarin. Little is known about their adoption into clinical practice, whether utilization is consistent with the controlled trials on which their approval was based, and how their use has affected health spending for patients and insurers. We used medical and prescription claims data from a large insurer to identify patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who were prescribed an oral anticoagulant in 2010-2013. We plotted trends in medication initiation over time, assessed corresponding insurer and patient out-of-pocket spending, and evaluated the cumulative number and cost of anticoagulants. We identified predictors of novel anticoagulant initiation using multivariable logistic models. Finally, we estimated the difference in total drug expenditures over 6 months for patients initiating warfarin versus a novel anticoagulant. There were 6893 patients with atrial fibrillation that initiated an oral anticoagulant during the study period. By the end of the study period, novel anticoagulants accounted for 62% of new prescriptions and 98% of anticoagulant-related drug costs. Female sex, lower household income, and higher CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASC, and HAS-BLED scores were significantly associated with lower odds of receiving a novel anticoagulant (P <.001 for each). Average combined patient and insurer anticoagulant spending in the first 6 months after initiation was more than $900 greater for patients initiating a novel anticoagulant. This study demonstrates rapid adoption of novel anticoagulants into clinical practice, particularly among patients with lower CHADS2 and HAS-BLED scores, and high health care cost consequences. These findings provide important directions for future comparative and cost-effectiveness research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Successful Anticoagulation Therapy for Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Mobile Aortic Thrombi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Oh; Moon, Seong Ho; Kim, Jong Woo; Byun, Joung Hun; Kim, Sung Hwan; Yang, Jun Ho; Lee, Chung-Eun; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2016-01-01

    Hypercoagulable states have been associated with aortic thrombosis. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is one of the commonest types of acquired thrombophilia. We report the case of successful anticoagulation management in an APS patient with mobile thrombi within the aorta. A 58-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department (ED) with right-sided hemiparesis. His first symptoms were noted approximately 12–16 hours before presentation to the ED. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute embolic infarction of the left frontal and parietotemporal lobes. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) demonstrated mobile thrombi attached to the wall of the ascending aorta and aortic arch. The patient was diagnosed with APS based on positivity of anti-beta-2 glycoprotein 1 antibodies, and was initiated on anticoagulation therapy. Repeated TEE and CTA revealed complete resolution of the thrombi after 12 days of treatment; the patient was discharged well. PMID:28042559

  4. [Bilateral renal infarction after discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoignet, Charles-Éric; Le Borgne, Pierrick; Ugé, Sarah; Veneziano, Rinaldo; Brunhuber, Claudia; Kam, Claire; Bilbault, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    Acute renal infarction is an uncommon and often under diagnosed condition mostly because of misleading symptoms. Accurate data regarding clinical presentation, laboratory tests, diagnostic and treatment are lacking. Detection is often delayed or missed because of non-specific clinical presentation. The mechanisms of acute renal infarction are various, mainly embolic or thrombotic. Abdominal CT scan remains the most valuable exam to confirm the diagnosis. Therapeutic guidelines for the treatment of renal embolism have not been well established. The standard treatment strategy includes anticoagulation with or without thrombolysis. Despite the uncertainty regarding management, the renal outcome remains favorable. Some patients do develop some degree of renal insufficiency during the acute episode. We report here the case of a 73-year-old woman with bilateral acute renal infarction after discontinuation of anticoagulant therapy.

  5. Uninterrupted oral anticoagulation versus bridging in patients with long-term oral anticoagulation during percutaneous coronary intervention : subgroup analysis from the WOEST trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewilde, Willem J. M.; Janssen, Paul W.; Kelder, Johannes C.; Verheugt, Freek W. A.; De Smet, Bart J. G. L.; Adriaenssens, Tom; Vrolix, Mathias; Brueren, Guus B.; Vandendriessche, Tom; Van Mieghem, Carlos; Cornelis, Kristoff; Vos, Jeroen; Breet, Nicoline J.; ten Berg, Jurrien M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the optimal periprocedural antithrombotic strategy in patients on long-term oral anticoagulation (OAC) who require percutaneous coronary intervention with stenting. Methods and results: The WOEST study was a randomised controlled trial which recruited 573 patients on long-term O

  6. Management of abnormal uterine bleeding in women with mechanical heart valve prosthesis and anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Pradip Kumar; Rakshit, Bibek Mohan; Jana, Narayan; Dutta, Sanjib; Roy, Subesha Basu; Sengupta, Gautam

    2011-12-01

    In a prospective observational case series, we assessed the effects and management and outcome of oral anticoagulant associated abnormal uterine bleeding in women with mechanical heart valve prosthesis. Six women with mechanical heart valve prosthesis, who were admitted with persistent severe vaginal bleeding between 2003 and 2010, were evaluated. For each woman, detailed history, treatment received, if there was any complication and their final outcome and satisfaction were recorded. All the 6 women were parous, with their ages ranging from 27 to 50 years. They were receiving oral anticoagulant therapy for mechanical heart valve prosthesis. Of the 6 women, 4 had uterine fibroids, and the other 2 had dysfunctional uterine bleeding.Three patients with uterine fibroids underwent abdominal hysterectomy, and one underwent balloon thermal ablation of endometrium. While 1 patient with dysfunctional uterine bleeding underwent hysterectomy, the other patient desirous for further children, required levonorgestrel intra-uterine system. Two women requiring hysterectomy, developed postoperative complications, one a massive intraperitoneal haemorrhage and another a rectus sheath haematoma. At follow-up, 5 women were satisfied, and 1 woman had died suddenly at home 1 year after hysterectomy. Because of the twin problem of heart disease and anticoagulant therapy, treatment of abnormal vaginal bleeding in these women is extremely challenging. Although medical treatment yields only temporary relief, endometrial ablative procedures or levonorgestrel intra-uterine system provides more durable solution. As anticoagulant associated peri-operative haemorrhage can be potentially fatal, hysterectomy should be reserved for women with major pelvic pathologies. Proper counselling and integrated management involving gynaecologist, cardiologist, haematologist and anaesthesiologist is essential to tackle this problem.

  7. Suboptimal use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başaran, Özcan; Dogan, Volkan; Beton, Osman; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Aykan, Ahmet Cağri; Kalaycioğlu, Ezgi; Bolat, Ismail; Taşar, Onur; Şafak, Özgen; Kalcik, Macit; Yaman, Mehmet; İnci, Sinan; Altintaş, Bernas; Kalkan, Sedat; Kirma, Cevat; Biteker, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the potential misuse of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and the physicians’ adherence to current European guideline recommendations in real-world using a large dataset from Real-life Multicenter Survey Evaluating Stroke Prevention Strategies in Turkey (RAMSES Study). RAMSES study is a prospective, multicenter, nationwide registry (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02344901). In this subgroup analysis of RAMSES study, patients who were on NOACs were classified as appropriately treated (AT), undertreated (UT), and overtreated (OT) according to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. The independent predictors of UT and OT were determined by multivariate logistic regression. Of the 2086 eligible patients, 1247 (59.8%) received adequate treatment. However, off-label use was detected in 839 (40.2%) patients; 634 (30.4%) patients received UT and 205 (9.8%) received OT. Independent predictors of UT included >65 years of age, creatinine clearance ≥50 mL/min, urban living, existing dabigatran treatment, and HAS-BLED score of <3, whereas that of OT were creatinine clearance <50 mL/min, ongoing rivaroxaban treatment, and HAS-BLED score of ≥3. The suboptimal use of NOACs is common because of physicians’ poor compliance to the guideline recommendations in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Older patients who were on dabigatran treatment with good renal functions and low risk of bleeding were at risk of UT, whereas patients who were on rivaroxaban treatment with renal impairment and high risk of bleeding were at risk of OT. Therefore, a greater emphasis should be given to prescribe the recommended dose for the specified patients. PMID:27583892

  8. Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants for Cardioversion in Atrial Fibrillation: An Updated Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda, Giulia; Ricci, Fabrizio; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2017-04-01

    Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants are now proven alternatives to vitamin K antagonists for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. However, there are few data on the efficacy and safety of their use for cardioversion, in which the risk of thromboembolic events is heightened. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis of patients undergoing both electrical and pharmacologic cardioversion for atrial fibrillation in the RE-LY, ROCKET-AF, ARISTOTLE, ENGAGE AF-TIMI 48, X-VeRT, and ENSURE-AF trials. We assessed Mantel-Haenszel pooled estimates of risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for stroke/systemic embolism and major bleeding at ≤42 days of follow-up. The analysis pooled 6148 patients in whom 6854 cardioversions for atrial fibrillation were performed. Compared with vitamin K antagonists, non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant therapy was associated with a similar risk of stroke/systemic embolism (RR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.38-1.75) and major bleeding (RR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.51-1.87). We found no significant statistical heterogeneity among studies (Cochrane Q P = .75, I(2) = 0% for stroke/systemic embolism; P = .54; I(2) = 0% for major bleeding). The short-term incidence of thromboembolism and major bleeding after cardioversion on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants was comparable to the incidence observed on dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonist therapy. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants are a reasonable alternative to vitamin K antagonists in patients undergoing cardioversion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New oral anticoagulants: clinical indications, monitoring and treatment of acute bleeding complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenger-Eriksen, C; Münster, A-M; Grove, E L

    2014-07-01

    New oral anticoagulants like the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran (Pradaxa®), and factor Xa-inhibitors, rivaroxaban (Xarelto®) and apixaban (Eliquis®) are available for prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic disease. They are emerging alternatives to warfarin and provide equal or better clinical outcome together with reduced need for routine monitoring. Methods for measuring drug concentrations are available, although a correlation between plasma drug concentrations and the risk of bleeding has not been firmly established. Standard laboratory measures like prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time are not sensitive enough to detect thrombin or factor Xa inhibition provided by new oral anticoagulants. Thus, these standard tests may only be used as a crude estimation of the actual anticoagulation status. Further challenges regarding patients receiving new oral anticoagulants who presents with major bleeding or need for emergency surgery pose a unique problem. No established agents are clinically available to reverse the anticoagulant effect, although preclinical data report prothrombin complex concentrate as more efficient than fresh frozen plasma or other prohaemostatic agents. This review summaries current knowledge on approved new oral anticoagulants and discusses clinical aspects of monitoring, with particular focus on the management of the bleeding patient.

  10. New oral anticoagulants in thromboembolism prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Sosa Rosado, José Manuel; Médico Cardiólogo, Clínica Internacional, Lima, Perú.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice. The value of anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists like warfarin in the prevention of embolic phenomena is widely demonstrated but managing is difficult because of its known interactions with other drugs and even food. Looking for the ideal anticoagulant in the last years new antithrombotic agents have appeared and others are in advanced phases of investigation. In the current review results of new anticoag...

  11. [Effectiveness of anticoagulant oral treatment in patients with thrombus in left ventricle after acute myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, A M; Valdespino, A; Solorio, S; Badui, E; Enciso, R; Lepe, L; Lara, A; Ocampo, S; Alonso, R; Romero, M A

    1997-01-01

    Left ventricular mural thrombi (LVMT) is a complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), that may produce peripheral embolism which could be fatal. In order to establish an adequate time of oral anticoagulant (OA) therapy, we undertook a prospective study that included 45 patients with AMI and left ventricular thrombi detected by echocardiographic study, in the first 5 to 10 days postinfarction, the study was repeated, in 3 and 6 months. Treatment with oral anticoagulant was initiated at the point of the detection of thrombi maintaining an INR of 1.5 to 2. Thirty nine patients (79%) were males and 6 (11%) were females, with an age of 29 to 85 years and a range of 62 +/- 11 years. Forty four patients (98%) presented anterior wall infarction and 1 (2%) posteroinferior infarction. In patients with anterior infarction, in 38 (85%) the thrombi was located at the apical wall (p < 0.05), 5 (11%) in the septal wall and other (2%) in anterior and apical walls. The patient with the posteroinferior infarction presented extension to the right ventricle, where the thrombus was located (2%). The contractility alterations related with thrombi were diskinesia, followed by hipokinesia and finally akinesia. The ejection fraction had not relationship with thrombi formation. LVMT dissolved in 32 patients (71%) at 3 months (p < 0.05), in 8 (18%) in 6 months and in 5 (11%) it was maintained for more than 6 months. None of the patients presented complications of OA. We conclude that the LVMT are more frequent in anterior infarctions, essentially in those that present diskinesia. The majority of LVMT are resolved in 6 months with OA therapy.

  12. Differences in attitude, education, and knowledge about oral anticoagulation therapy among patients with atrial fibrillation in Europe: result of a self-assessment patient survey conducted by the European Heart Rhythm Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Madrid, Antonio; Potpara, Tatjana S; Dagres, Nikolaos; Chen, Jian; Larsen, Torben B; Estner, Heidi; Todd, Derick; Bongiorni, Maria G; Sciaraffia, Elena; Proclemer, Alessandro; Cheggour, Saida; Amara, Walid; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this patient survey was to analyse the knowledge about blood thinning medications relative to gender, age, education, and region of residence in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). A total of 1147 patients with AF [mean age 66 ± 13 years, 529 (45%) women] from eight European countries responded to this survey. Most patients understood that the indication for anticoagulation therapy was to 'thin the blood', but 8.1% responded that the purpose of the medication was to treat the arrhythmia. Patients with college or university grades reported less frequent deviations from their target INR range compared with those without schooling (2.8% vs. 5.1%, P education (57.0%), P education and only 20.5% of those without schooling (P education level and patients' knowledge have a direct influence on the global management of the anticoagulation. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy for atherothrombotic disease: the role of current and emerging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiolillo, Dominick J; Ferreiro, José Luis

    2013-08-01

    Coronary atherothrombotic disease, including chronic stable angina and acute coronary syndromes (ACS), is associated with significant global burden. The acute clinical manifestations of atherothrombotic disease are mediated by occlusive arterial thrombi that impair tissue perfusion and are composed of a core of aggregated platelets, generated by platelet activation, and a superimposed fibrin mesh produced by the coagulation cascade. Long-term antithrombotic therapies, namely oral antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, have demonstrated variable clinical effects. Aspirin and P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists have been shown to reduce the risk for thrombosis and ischaemic events by blocking the thromboxane (Tx) A2 and platelet P2Y12 activation pathways, respectively, whereas the benefits of oral anticoagulants have not been consistently documented. However, even in the presence of aspirin and a P2Y12 receptor antagonist, the risk for ischaemic events remains substantial because platelet activation continues via pathways independent of TxA2 and ADP, most notably the protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 platelet activation pathway stimulated by thrombin. Emerging antithrombotic therapies include those targeting the platelet, such as the new P2Y12 antagonists and a novel class of oral PAR-1 antagonists, and those inhibiting the coagulation cascade, such as the new direct factor Xa antagonists, the direct thrombin inhibitors, and a novel class of factor IX inhibitors. The role of emerging antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants in the long-term management of patients with atherothrombotic disease will be determined by the balance of efficacy and safety in large ongoing clinical trials.

  14. Bosentan and oral anticoagulants in HIV patients: what we can learn of cases reported so far

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Morales-Molina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension is an infrequent but nevertheless serious life-threatening severe complication of HIV infection. It can be treated with bosentan and oral anticoagulants. Bosentan could induce the acenocoumarol metabolism and it increases the INR values. Until now, no study of interaction between bosentan and oral anticoagulants in HIV patients has reported. So we present a case of this interaction between these drugs and we reviewed MEDLINE to identify all the papers published so far. In our case, several weeks after increasing dose of bosentan acenocoumarol dose had to be progressively increased to 70 mg/week (+33% without obtaining an adequate INR level (2.0-3.0. Forty-nine days later, we achieved a therapeutic INR with 90 mg/week of warfarin. The use of bosentan and oral anticoagulants together in these patients require a closer monitoring during first weeks of treatment, after increasing the bosentan dose and even during longer periods of time.

  15. Point-of-care coagulation testing for assessment of the pharmacodynamic anticoagulant effect of direct oral anticoagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Helen; Herth, Natalie; Kasper, Alexander; Wendt, Thomas; Schuettfort, Gundolf; Weil, Yvonne; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud; Linnemann, Birgit; Herrmann, Eva; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2014-10-01

    This investigation was carried out with already available point-of-care testing (POCT) systems for coagulation parameters to evaluate the qualitative and semiquantitative determination of the time- and concentration-dependent anticoagulant effects of the direct oral anticoagulants rivaroxaban and dabigatran. The whole blood prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), and activated clotting time (ACT) were determined using the GEM PCL Plus coagulation system. Whole blood PT was also measured on the CoaguCheck XS instrument. In addition, PT and aPTT values were obtained in citrated plasma using the PT reagent Neoplastin Plus and the STA APTT reagent. Drug concentrations of rivaroxaban and dabigatran were determined with a chromogenic anti-Xa assay and the hemoclot assay, which are reported to have good agreement with liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry measurements. POCT was performed in 27 consecutive patients who received rivaroxaban 10, 15, or 20 mg once daily and in 15 patients receiving dabigatran 110 or 150 mg twice daily. Blood samples were collected predose and 2 hours after observed drug intake at steady state. Two hours after observed rivaroxaban administration, the whole blood PT measured on the GEM PCL Plus was prolonged by an average of 64.5% in comparison with predose levels. Less differentiation was observed for rivaroxaban when the PT was measured on the CoaguCheck XS instrument or in plasma (prolongation of 24.1% and 36.8%, respectively). After 2 hours observed dabigatran administration, the whole blood aPTT was comparable with plasma values and was prolonged by 23.5% in comparison with trough values. Significant concentration-dependent prolongations of the activated clotting time were observed to different extents for both direct anticoagulants. Direct oral anticoagulants display variable ex vivo effects on different POCT-assays. POCT for aPTT is sensitive to increased concentrations of dabigatran

  16. Evaluation of a continuous quality improvement program in anticoagulant therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Ariane; Lahaie, Alexandre; Odobasic, Bojan; Tremblay, Marie-Philip; Wazzan, Dana; Caron, Stéphanie; Leblanc, Caroline; Martineau, Josée; Lalonde, Lyne

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ACO Program (Programme ACO), a continuous quality improvement program (CQIP) in anticoagulation therapy, was offered in community pharmacies as a pilot project. Objective: To evaluate the participants’ appreciation for the various activities of the program. Methods: Participants had access to training activities, including an audit with feedback, online training activities (OTA), clinical tools and support from facilitators. Cognitive behavioural learning determinants were evaluated before and 5 months after the beginning of the program. Participants’ satisfaction and perception were documented via online questionnaires and a semistructured interview. Results: Of the 52 pharmacists in the ACO Program, 47 participated in this evaluation. Seventy-seven percent of the participants completed at least 1 OTA and 6% published on the forum. The feeling of personal effectiveness rose from 8.01 (7.67-8.35) to 8.62 (8.24-8.99). The audit and feedback, as well as the high-quality OTA and their lecturers, were the most appreciated elements. Discussion: There was a high OTA participation rate. The facilitators seemed to play a key role in the CQIP. The low level of participation in the forum reflects the known phenomenon of social loafing. Technical difficulties affecting the platform and data collection for the audit with feedback constituted limitations. Conclusion: The CQIP in anticoagulation therapy is appreciated by community pharmacists and is associated with an improved feeling of personal effectiveness. PMID:27829859

  17. Beyond warfarin: the new generation of oral anticoagulants and their implications for the management of dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firriolo, F John; Hupp, Wendy S

    2012-04-01

    Warfarin has been the primary anticoagulant drug used in the USA for more than 50 years. However, 2 novel types of oral anticoagulants have recently been approved for use in the USA. These are direct thrombin inhibitors (e.g., dabigatran etexilate) and factor Xa inhibitors (e.g., rivaroxaban). Dental health care providers may soon encounter patients who are being prescribed these medications. This article describes the pharmacologic properties and medical uses of these new oral anticoagulants. Also discussed are implications for the management of dental patients being treated with these new oral anticoagulants, including potential interactions with drugs commonly used or prescribed in the course of dental treatment.

  18. Protocol for Cerebral Microbleeds during the Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants or Warfarin Therapy in Stroke Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation (CMB-NOW) Study: Multisite Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Shunya; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nagata, Eiichiro; Mizuma, Atsushi; Yutani, Sachiko; Nakayama, Taira; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yanagimachi, Noriharu; Okazaki, Takashi; Kitagawa, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    Anticoagulants are widely used to prevent recurrence of ischemic stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, but in some patients, they also cause bleeding, particularly intracranial hemorrhage. One of the independent predictors of intracerebral hemorrhage is the presence of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs); a high incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage is reported in warfarin-treated patients with multiple CMBs. Longitudinal study suggested that the presence of CMBs at baseline is a predictor of new CMBs in warfarin-treated patients. However, there has been no study on the progression of CMBs in patients receiving the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This study tests the hypothesis that the incidence of hemorrhagic stroke is lower in patients receiving NOACs (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) than in those receiving warfarin, and this difference reflects the difference in the effects of warfarin and NOACs on the progression of CMBs. We will enroll 200 patients with at least 1 CMB detected by 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (T2(∗)-weighted imaging) at baseline and who have received NOACs or warfarin for at least 12 months. Primary end point is the proportion of subjects with an increased number of CMBs at month 12 of treatment with NOACs or warfarin. If the results of this study support the efficacy of NOACs for preventing increase of CMBs, this would be of great interest to domestic and overseas clinicians, in view of the potential therapeutic impact, including that on primary prevention of ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Approach to the new oral anticoagulants in family practice: part 1: comparing the options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douketis, James; Bell, Alan David; Eikelboom, John; Liew, Aaron

    2014-11-01

    To compare key features of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs)-dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban-and to address questions that arise when comparing the NOACs. PubMed was searched for recent (January 2008 to week 32 of 2013) clinical studies relating to NOAC use for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) and for the treatment of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE). All NOACs are at least as effective as warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF, and are at least as safe in terms of bleeding risk according to 3 large trials. Meta-analyses of these trials have shown that, compared with warfarin therapy, NOACs reduced total mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and intracranial bleeding, and there was a trend toward less overall bleeding. Practical advantages of NOACs over warfarin include fixed once- or twice-daily oral dosing without the need for coagulation monitoring, and few known or defined drug or food interactions. Potential drawbacks of NOACs include a risk of bleeding that might be increased in patients older than 75 years, increased major gastrointestinal bleeding with high-dose dabigatran, increased dyspepsia with dabigatran, the lack of a routine laboratory test to reliably measure anticoagulant effect, and the lack of an antidote for reversal. No direct comparisons of NOACs have been made in randomized controlled trials, and the choice of NOAC is influenced by individual patient characteristics, including risk of stroke or VTE, risk of bleeding, and comorbidity (eg, renal dysfunction). The NOACs represent important alternatives in the management of patients with AF and VTE, especially for patients who have difficulty accessing regular coagulation monitoring. The companion to this article addresses common "what if" questions that arise in the long-term clinical follow-up and management of patients receiving NOACs. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  20. Coagulation Testing in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Taking Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purrucker, Jan C; Haas, Kirsten; Rizos, Timolaos; Khan, Shujah; Poli, Sven; Kraft, Peter; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Dziewas, Rainer; Binder, Andreas; Palm, Frederick; Jander, Sebastian; Soda, Hassan; Heuschmann, Peter U; Veltkamp, Roland

    2017-01-01

    In patients who present with acute ischemic stroke while on treatment with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs), coagulation testing is necessary to confirm the eligibility for thrombolytic therapy. We evaluated the current use of coagulation testing in routine clinical practice in patients who were on NOAC treatment at the time of acute ischemic stroke. Prospective multicenter observational RASUNOA registry (Registry of Acute Stroke Under New Oral Anticoagulants; February 2012-2015). Results of locally performed nonspecific (international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, and thrombin time) and specific (antifactor Xa tests, hemoclot assay) coagulation tests were documented. The implications of test results for thrombolysis decision-making were explored. In the 290 patients enrolled, nonspecific coagulation tests were performed in ≥95% and specific coagulation tests in 26.9% of patients. Normal values of activated partial thromboplastin time and international normalized ratio did not reliably rule out peak drug levels at the time of the diagnostic tests (false-negative rates 11%-44% [95% confidence interval 1%-69%]). Twelve percent of patients apparently failed to take the prescribed NOAC prior to the acute event. Only 5.7% (9/159) of patients in the 4.5-hour time window received thrombolysis, and NOAC treatment was documented as main reason for not administering thrombolysis in 52.7% (79/150) of patients. NOAC treatment currently poses a significant barrier to thrombolysis in ischemic stroke. Because nonspecific coagulation test results within normal range have a high false-negative rate for detection of relevant drug concentrations, rapid drug-specific tests for thrombolysis decision-making should be established. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01850797. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Peri-operative management of anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in gastrointestinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degirmenci, S-E; Steib, A

    2014-04-01

    Peri-operative management of the risks of hemorrhage and thrombosis related to gastrointestinal surgery tailored to patient characteristics are part of daily multidisciplinary practice tasks. The goal of this update is to discuss current practices concerning antithrombosis prophylaxis and the management of recently developed anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents. The duration of prophylaxis is 1 month for oncological surgery. The recommended doses in bariatric surgery are twice daily injections of low-molecular weight heparin without exceeding a total dose of 10,000 IU/day. Dual antiplatelet therapy is necessary for 6 weeks after placement of bare-metal stents, from 6-12 months for drug-eluting stents, and 12 months after an acute coronary artery syndrome. Abrupt discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy exposes the patient to an increased risk of thrombosis. Data are insufficient to make specific recommendations for antiplatelet therapy in gastrointestinal surgery. For major digestive surgery, prescription of daily aspirin should be discussed case by case. If discontinuation of treatment is absolutely necessary, this should be as short as possible (aspirin: 3 days, ticagrelor and clopidogrel: 5 days, prasugrel: 7 days). The modalities for elective management of new oral anticoagulants are similar to those for classical vitamin K antagonists (VKA) therapy, except that any overlapping with heparin administration must be avoided. In the emergency setting, an algorithm can be proposed depending on the drug, the available coagulation tests and the interval before performing surgery.

  2. Aligning health care policy with evidence-based medicine: the case for funding direct oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James A; Earl, Karen M; O'Neill, Blair J; Sharma, Mukul; Huynh, Thao; Leblanc, Kori; Ward, Richard; Teal, Philip A; Cox, Jafna L

    2014-10-01

    Misalignment between evidence-informed clinical care guideline recommendations and reimbursement policy has created care gaps that lead to suboptimal outcomes for patients denied access to guideline-based therapies. The purpose of this article is to make the case for addressing this growing access barrier to optimal care. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) is discussed as an example. Stroke is an extremely costly disease, imposing a significant human, societal, and economic burden. Stroke in the setting of AF carries an 80% probability of death or disability. Although two-thirds of these strokes are preventable with appropriate anticoagulation, this has historically been underprescribed and poorly managed. National and international guidelines endorse the direct oral anticoagulants as first-line therapy for this indication. However, no Canadian province has provided these agents with an unrestricted listing. These decisions appear to be founded on silo-based cost assessment-the drug costs rather than the total system costs-and thus overlook several important cost-drivers in stroke. The discordance between best scientific evidence and public policy requires health care providers to use a potentially suboptimal therapy in contravention of guideline recommendations. It represents a significant obstacle for knowledge translation efforts that aim to increase the appropriate anticoagulation of Canadians with AF. As health care professionals, we have a responsibility to our patients to engage with policy-makers in addressing and resolving this barrier to optimal patient care. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of new oral anticoagulants in the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rudakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the cost-effectiveness of apixaban in the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE compared with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH/warfarin and other new oral anticoagulants (NOACs. Material and methods. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using a Markov model, developed on the basis of the results of AMPLIFY AMPLIFY-Ext trials, and network meta-analyzes on the use of antithrombotic drugs in acute VTE and long-term administration after VTE. Markov cycle duration was 3 months. The duration of therapy in the simulation was 6 and 12 months. The time horizon of the study was 5 years. Life expectancy and costs were discounted by 3.5% per year. The costs on drugs were estimated based on the registered marginal cost price. Besides, the analysis was performed to the weighted average auctions prices for NOACs. The costs of monitoring and treatment of complications were calculated on the basis of the collective agreement of compulsory health insurance system (St. Petersburg, 2015. Results. Apixaban provided significant cost savings compared with other modes of anticoagulant therapy for hospital treatment. Apixaban provided cost savings compared with other NOACs with a minimal increase in life expectancy with regard to quality in long-term analysis. Apixaban provided an increase in life expectancy compared with the appointment of LMWH/warfarin, but required some increase in costs. At therapy duration of 6 months, the costs per one additional year of life with regard to quality and to one additional calendar year of life were 309.8-403.7 and 481.6-627.4 thousand rubles, respectively; at therapy duration of 12 months – 1254.4-1476.9 and 649.0-764.1 thousand rubles, respectively. Conclusion. Apixaban provided a reduction in the incidence of bleeding compared with other NOACs and LMWH/warfarin with comparable efficacy in treatment and secondary prevention of VTE. Apixaban therapy costs were lower than these

  4. Cost-effectiveness of new oral anticoagulants in the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rudakova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the cost-effectiveness of apixaban in the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE compared with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH/warfarin and other new oral anticoagulants (NOACs. Material and methods. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using a Markov model, developed on the basis of the results of AMPLIFY AMPLIFY-Ext trials, and network meta-analyzes on the use of antithrombotic drugs in acute VTE and long-term administration after VTE. Markov cycle duration was 3 months. The duration of therapy in the simulation was 6 and 12 months. The time horizon of the study was 5 years. Life expectancy and costs were discounted by 3.5% per year. The costs on drugs were estimated based on the registered marginal cost price. Besides, the analysis was performed to the weighted average auctions prices for NOACs. The costs of monitoring and treatment of complications were calculated on the basis of the collective agreement of compulsory health insurance system (St. Petersburg, 2015. Results. Apixaban provided significant cost savings compared with other modes of anticoagulant therapy for hospital treatment. Apixaban provided cost savings compared with other NOACs with a minimal increase in life expectancy with regard to quality in long-term analysis. Apixaban provided an increase in life expectancy compared with the appointment of LMWH/warfarin, but required some increase in costs. At therapy duration of 6 months, the costs per one additional year of life with regard to quality and to one additional calendar year of life were 309.8-403.7 and 481.6-627.4 thousand rubles, respectively; at therapy duration of 12 months – 1254.4-1476.9 and 649.0-764.1 thousand rubles, respectively. Conclusion. Apixaban provided a reduction in the incidence of bleeding compared with other NOACs and LMWH/warfarin with comparable efficacy in treatment and secondary prevention of VTE. Apixaban therapy costs were lower than these

  5. Trends in oral anticoagulant choice for acute stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in Japan: The SAMURAI‐NVAF Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arihiro, Shoji; Todo, Kenichi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kazumi; Furui, Eisuke; Terasaki, Tadashi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Kamiyama, Kenji; Takizawa, Shunya; Okuda, Satoshi; Okada, Yasushi; Kameda, Tomoaki; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Mochizuki, Hiroshi; Ito, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Takahiro; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Nishiyama, Kazutoshi; Kario, Kazuomi; Sato, Shoichiro; Koga, Masatoshi; Nagatsuka, K; Minematsu, K; Nakagawara, J; Akiyama, H; Shibazaki, K; Maeda, K; Shibuya, S; Yoshimura, S; Endo, K; Miyagi, T; Osaki, M; Kobayashi, J; Okata, T; Tanaka, E; Sakamoto, Y; Takizawa, H; Takasugi, J; Tokunaga, K; Homma, K; Kinoshita, N; Matsuki, T; Higashida, K; Shiozawa, M; Kanai, H; Uehara, S

    2015-01-01

    Background Large clinical trials are lack of data on non‐vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants for acute stroke patients. Aim To evaluate the choice of oral anticoagulants at acute hospital discharge in stroke patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and clarify the underlying characteristics potentially affecting that choice using the multicenter Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk‐factor Assessment and Improvement‐NVAF registry (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01581502). Method The study included 1192 acute ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (527 women, 77·7 ± 9·9 years old) between September 2011 and March 2014, during which three nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant oral anticoagulants were approved for clinical use. Oral anticoagulant choice at hospital discharge (median 23‐day stay) was assessed. Results Warfarin was chosen for 650 patients, dabigatran for 203, rivaroxaban for 238, and apixaban for 25. Over the three 10‐month observation periods, patients taking warfarin gradually decreased to 46·5% and those taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants increased to 48·0%. As compared with warfarin users, patients taking nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants included more men, were younger, more frequently had small infarcts, and had lower scores for poststroke CHADS 2, CHA 2 DS 2‐VASc, and HAS‐BLED, admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale, and discharge modified Rankin Scale. Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants were started at a median of four‐days after stroke onset without early intracranial hemorrhage. Patients starting nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants earlier had smaller infarcts and lower scores for the admission National Institutes of Health stroke scale and the discharge modified Rankin Scale than those starting later. Choice of nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants was independently associated with 20‐day or

  6. [Dental extractions in patients taking anticoagulants: is alteration of the anticoagulant regime necessary?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Carlos

    2005-05-25

    A major concern in the management of patients under anticoagulants is the potential for excessive bleeding after dental procedures. Recommendations for the administration of oral anticoagulants in conjunction with oral surgery range from complete withdrawal of anticoagulants to the maintenance of an unchanged therapy. Rising evidences show that the alteration of anticoagulation is not necessary for patients with INR of 4 or less previous to tooth extractions. Topical antifibrinolytics as tranexamic acid control successfully alveolar bleeding. It is time to stop interrupting anticoagulant therapy for oral surgery. A theoretical risk of hemorrhage after dental surgery in patients at therapeutic levels of anticoagulation exists but it is minimal and is greatly overweighed by the risk of thromboembolism after alteration of the anticoagulant therapy.

  7. A case of bilateral hemarthrosis due to pseudoaneurysms in a patient on anticoagulation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kyeong Min; Kim, Ja Kyung; Seo, Young Il; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2013-06-01

    Hemarthrosis can occur in patients with a predisposition to hemorrhage, such as hemophiliacs or patients on anticoagulation therapy. If hemarthrosis recurs after supportive treatment, however, other etiologies such as anatomical abnormalities should be considered. Spontaneous articular pseudoaneurysm associated with anticoagulation treatment has not been reported previously. We describe a patient on anticoagulation therapy with bilateral hemarthrosis due to pseudoaneurysms. After failing to respond to the correction of over-anticoagulation, magnetic resonance imaging led to the diagnosis of articular pseudoaneurysm. The patient was treated successfully by transarterial embolization.

  8. High antiangiogenic and low anticoagulant efficacy of orally active low molecular weight heparin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Woo; Jeon, Ok Cheol; Kim, Sang Kyoon; Al-Hilal, Taslim Ahmed; Jin, Shun Ji; Moon, Hyun Tae; Yang, Victor C; Kim, Sang Yoon; Byun, Youngro

    2010-12-20

    Heparin, an anticoagulant that is widely used clinically, is also known to bind to several kinds of proteins through electrostatic interactions because of its polyanionic character. These interactions are mediated by the physicochemical properties of heparin such as sequence composition, sulfation patterns, charge distribution, overall charge density, and molecular size. Although this electrostatic character mediates its binding to many proteins related with tumor progression, thereby providing its antiangiogenic property, the administration of heparin for treating cancer is limited in clinical applications due to several drawbacks, such as its low oral absorption, unsatisfactory therapeutic effects, and strong anticoagulant activity which induces hemorrhaging. Here, we evaluated novel, orally active, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) derivatives (LHD) conjugated with deoxycholic acid (DOCA) that show reduced anticoagulant activity and enhanced antiangiogenic activity. The chemical conjugate of LMWH and DOCA was synthesized by conjugating the amine group of N-deoxycholylethylamine (EtDOCA) with the carboxylic groups of heparin at various DOCA conjugation ratios. The LMWH-DOCA conjugate series (LHD1, LHD1.5, LHD2, and LHD4) were further formulated with poloxamer 407 as a solubilizer for oral administration. An in vitro endothelial tubular formation and in vivo Matrigel plug assay were performed to verify the antiangiogenic potential of LHD. Finally, we evaluated tumor growth inhibition of oral LHD administration in a SCC7 model as well as in A549 human cancer cell lines in a mouse xenograft model. Increasing DOCA conjugation ratios showed decreased anticoagulant activity, eventually to zero. LHD could block angiogenesis in the tubular formation assay and the Matrigel plug assay. In particular, oral administration of LHD4, which has 4 molecules of DOCA per mole of LMWH, inhibited tumor growth in SCC7 mice model as well as A549 mice xenograft model. LHD4 was orally

  9. Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K inhibitors and determinants of successful self-management in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo Aguirre, E; Galo-Anza, A; Dorronsoro-Barandiaran, O; Del Burgo, E Uranga-Saez; Ostiza Irigoyen, A; Garcia-Carro, A; Lopez-Fernandez, I; Colera, N; Saez-Garbayo, P; Tamayo-Uria, I

    2016-09-13

    Self-management may be an option to monitor oral anticoagulant therapy in health systems, but before recommending it, we need to assess patients' ability to take on this task. The purpose of the study was to describe patients' ability to self-manage and associated factors. This was a 3-year prospective quasi-experimental study with a control group. Overall, 333 patients on anticoagulant therapy from seven primary care health centres of the Basque Health Service were included in the intervention group and followed up for 6 months after the intervention, assessing their ability to self-test and self-manage. The intervention consisted of a patient training programme, providing detailed information on their condition and its treatment, and practical training in how to use a portable blood coagulation monitor and adjust their anticoagulant dose. Comparisons were made with a control group (333 patients receiving OAT under usual care from the same seven health centres). Outcome variables were ability to self-manage, quality of the outcome (in terms of time in therapeutic range), and quality of life in the intervention group, and general patient characteristics (age and sex), clinical variables (reason for OAT, INR range), and quality of the outcome (in terms of percentage of INR measurements in range and complications) in both groups. Overall, 26.13 % of patients invited to participate in the intervention agreed. Of these, 99 % successfully learned to self-manage their OAT. Just 4.2 % did not complete the follow-up, in all cases for reasons unrelated to self-management, and 4.5 % required additional learning support. Outcomes were better than under usual care in terms of percentage of INR measurements in range (12 %), rate of complications (4 %) and quality of life (9.2 %). Patients were only followed-up period for 6 months and the study was conducted in a single health organization. Though patients eligible to participate were selected randomly, they were not randomly

  10. Quality of anticoagulation therapy in neurological patients in a tertiary care hospital in north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Singh

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: It may be concluded that stable therapeutic INR is difficult to maintain in neurological patients. Optimal modification of diet, drug and dose of oral anticoagulant may help in stabilization of INR.

  11. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma associated with anticoagulation therapy and antiplatet therapy: Two centers experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmuttalip Simsek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: To analyze the characteristics of the patients with diagnosis of spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma associated with anticoagulation therapy and antiplatet therapy. Methods: From January 2006 to March 2013, 9 patients (6 from Haseki Training and Research Hospital - Urology Department and 3 from Istanbul Medical Faculty - Gynecology and Obstetric Department were included in the study. Patients charts including sex, age, comorbidities, main complaint, and medication intake were examined. Also initial hemoglobin level, initial International Normalized Ratio level, red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma units transfused were evaluated. Results: Median age was 60 year-old. Abdominal pain and flank pain were common symptoms. Eight patients were taking only anticoagulation therapy, 2 only antiplatet therapy and 1 both anticoagulation and antiplatet therapy. Median initial hemoglobin value was 9,0 g/dL and median International Normalized Ratio level was 3.2 Patients were evaluated by abdominal ultrasonography or abdominal computer tomography. Seven patients were treated conservatively. Only one patient died because of septic shock with a mortality ratio of 11%. Conclusion: Despite benefits of anticoagulation and antiplatet theraphy these agents have serious side-affects as retroperitoneal hemorrhage in elderly patients taking multi-drug medication.

  12. The potential interaction between oral anticoagulants and acetaminophen in everyday practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Geven, LM; Kuitert, NA; Risselada, A; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The drug-drug interaction between oral anticoagulants (especially warfarin) and acetaminophen has been described, but evidence is conflicting and evidence for a similar interaction between acenocoumarol or phenprocoumon and acetaminophen is limited. Therefore, a study was performed to det

  13. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation usage according to age among patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Gadsbøll, Kasper;

    2016-01-01

    Among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, Danish nationwide registries (2011-2015) were used to examine temporal trends of initiation patterns of oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment according to age. Overall, 43,299 AF patients initiating vitamin K antagonists (VKA) (42%), dabigatran (29...

  14. Improved control of oral anticoagulant dosing : A randomized controlled trial comparing two computer algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Y; Rombouts, E K; Kruithof, C J; van der Meer, F J M; Rosendaal, F R

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efforts to improve dosing quality in oral anticoagulant control include the use of computer algorithms. As current algorithms are simplistic and give dosage proposals in a small fraction of patients, we developed an algorithm based on principles of system and control engineering that giv

  15. The potential interaction between oral anticoagulants and acetaminophen in everyday practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bemt, PMLA; Geven, LM; Kuitert, NA; Risselada, A; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The drug-drug interaction between oral anticoagulants (especially warfarin) and acetaminophen has been described, but evidence is conflicting and evidence for a similar interaction between acenocoumarol or phenprocoumon and acetaminophen is limited. Therefore, a study was performed to det

  16. Novel Oral Anticoagulants for Stroke Prophylaxis and Venous Thromboembolism Prevention and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith G. Alsayegh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs are becoming popular management options for stroke prophylaxis in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation as well as deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism treatment and prophylaxis. NOACs have similar efficacy to warfarin along with noninferior safety profiles. Patient comorbidities, size, renal and hepatic function, and concomitant drug regimen play a role in which NOAC a physician may choose.

  17. The latest recommendations on the use of new oral anticoagulants in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Witkowski

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs has become a breakthrough in anticoagulant treatment and it is expected to rise significantly in upcoming years. The use of conventional anticoagulants have several limitations: subcutaneous administration of heparin, or close monitoring of INR during application of vitamin K antagonists. In the last decade, target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOAC including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban have been marketed for prophylaxis and treatment. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the potential uses, side effects, and management of these agents in routine practice. NOACs have major pharmacologic advantages, including a rapid onset and offset of action, fewer drug interactions than conventional anticoagulants, and predictable pharmacokinetics. These agents are gaining popularity among both physicians and patients because of their easiness of administration and the eliminating the requirement for regular coagulation monitoring. In this review, we focus on discussing practical recommendations for the use of NOACs and the risks and benefits of incorporating them into routine practice.

  18. Direct oral anticoagulants and digestive bleeding: therapeutic management and preventive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, David; Boustière, Christian; Ferrari, Emile; Albaladejo, Pierre; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Benamouzig, Robert

    2017-06-01

    The use of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) was an important step forward in the management of atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism (VTE). The DOACs, anti-IIa for dabigatran and anti-Xa for rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, all have a rapid onset of action and a short half life. There is no need for routine hemostasis testing for treatment monitoring of a DOAC. Compared with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), DOACs may increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (relative risk 1.25). Withholding the DOAC treatment, evaluating the time of the last intake and estimating the patient's renal function are the first steps in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. For patients without impaired renal function, achieving low coagulation takes around 24 h after the last intake of a DOAC. The use of DOAC antagonists will be helpful in controlling bleeding in the most severe and urgent situations. Idarucizumab is available for clinical use for dabigatran and andexanet is currently being reviewed by drug agencies for rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban. It is important to assess the bleeding risk associated with the planned procedure, and the patient's renal function before withholding DOAC therapy for a scheduled intervention. It is mandatory to strengthen the local hemostasis strategies in DOAC-treated patients undergoing a therapeutic endoscopic procedure. Resuming or not resuming anticoagulation with a DOAC after bleeding or a risky procedure depends on the thrombotic and bleeding risk as well as the procedure involved. This discussion should always involve the cardiologist and decisions should be taken by a pluridisciplinary team.

  19. Non-vitamin k antagonist oral anticoagulants do not increase cerebral microbleeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tsukasa; Kawamura, Yuichiro; Sato, Nobuyuki; Kano, Kohei; Takahashi, Kae; Asanome, Asuka; Sawada, Jun; Katayama, Takayuki; Hasebe, Naoyuki

    2015-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a cardiac arrhythmia that frequently induces ischemic strokes. Nowadays, non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have come into widespread use for cardiogenic embolism prevention in place of warfarin. Recently, cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) have been noticed for their potential implication in cerebral small vessel disease. We hypothesized that NOACs do not have an unfavorable influence over cerebral small vessels and investigated whether NOACs increase CMBs in AF patients in a prospective manner. We performed baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations on the 69 enrolled AF patients and re-examined second round of MRI 1 year later. The enrolled patients continued the same anticoagulation therapy during the meantime. CMBs did not develop in the 23 patients with NOACs for 1 year. Nine patients with antiplatelets also did not develop CMBs. On the other hand, 3 of 21 patients continued on warfarin and 3 of 9 with warfarin and antiplatelets had CMBs. When divided into 2 groups according to whether the CMBs developed, significant differences in the incidence of using NOACs were observed between the 2 groups (P = .02). A multivariate regression analysis showed that warfarin was independently related to the new development of CMBs (hazard ratio, 10.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-94.99; P = .03). This is the first report to clarify that NOACs do not increase CMBs in AF patients longitudinally in 1 year. Further consideration will be continued with a much longer follow-up in large samples. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Managing patients taking novel oral anticoagulants (NOAs) in dentistry: a discussion paper on clinical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Costantinides, Fulvia; Rizzo, Roberto; Pascazio, Lorenzo; Maglione, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion on how to approach patients taking new orally administered anticoagulants (NOAs) dabigatran etexilate (a direct thrombin inhibitor), rivaroxaban and apixaban (factor Xa inhibitors), before, during and after dental treatment in light of the more recent knowledges. Discussion In dentistry and oral surgery, the major concerns in treatment of patients taking direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors is the risk of haemo...

  1. Predisposición genética al sangrado durante el tratamiento con anticoagulantes orales Genetic predisposition to bleeding during treatment oral anticoagulants treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Montes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La anticoagulación conseguida durante el tratamiento con anticoagulantes orales antagonistas de la vitamina K (AVK varía entre unos pacientes y otros debido a factores individuales y ambientales. La intensidad de la anticoagulación condiciona el riesgo hemorrágico. Por tanto, es probable que los pacientes especialmente sensibles a los AVK corran un riesgo hemorrágico mayor, especialmente durante las primeras semanas. En esta revisión se va a discutir el papel de una serie de polimorfismos de las enzimas involucradas en la metabolización de los AVK o en el ciclo de la vitamina K. Dos polimorfismos del citocromo P450 2C9 y uno de la enzima VKORC1 son responsables de un alto porcentaje de la variabilidad observada en la sensibilidad a los AVK. Aunque parece que dichas alteraciones genéticas se asocian con el riesgo de experimentar una hemorragia severa, confirmar este extremo requerirá estudios más amplios y mejor diseñados.The degree of anticoagulation obtained during oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists (VKA varies among patients due to individual and environmental factors. The rate of anticoagulation influences the hemorrhagic risk. Therefore, it is plausible that patients specially sensitive to oral anticoagulants are at higher hemorrhagicc risk, specially during the first weeks. The role of a series of polymorphisms of the enzymes involved in the metabolism of VKA or in the vitamin K cycle are reviewed. Three polymorphisms, two in the cytochrome P450 2C9 and one in the VKORC1 enzyme, are responsible for a high portion of the variability observed in the sensitivity to AVK. Although the available literature suggests that these genetic variants could increase the risk of severe hemorrhage, larger, well designed studies are needed to confirm this notion.

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Underdosing Non-vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Hina, Kazuyoshi; Higashiya, Shunichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masaaki; Kamikawa, Shigeshi; Komatsubara, Issei; Kusachi, Shozo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Some patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) received underdoses of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in the real world. Underdosing is defined as administration of a dose lower than the manufacturer recommended dose. Objectives: To identify the efficacy and safety of underdosing NOACs as perioperative anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation ablation. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients who received rivaroxaban or dabigatran etexilate according to dosage: adjusted low dosage (reduced by disturbed renal function; n = 30), underdosage (n = 307), or standard dosage (n = 683). Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and dosing decisions were at the discretion of treating cardiologists. Results: Patients who received underdosed NOACs were older, more often female, and had lower body weight and lower renal function than those who received standard dosages. Activated clotting time at baseline in patients who received adjusted low dosage or underdosages was slightly longer than that in patients receiving standard dosages (156 ± 23, 151 ± 224, and 147 ± 24 seconds, respectively). Meaningful differences were not observed in other coagulation parameters. Adjusted low-, under-, and standard-dosing regimens did not differ in perioperative thromboembolic complications (0/30, 0.0%; 1/307, 0.3%; and 0/683, 0%, respectively) or major (0/30, 0.0%; 2/307, 0.6%; 3/683, 0.4%) and minor (1/30, 3.3%; 13/307, 4.2%; 25/683, 3.6%) bleeding episodes. When comparisons were performed for each NOAC, similar results were observed. Conclusions: With consideration of patient condition, age, sex, body weight, body mass index, and renal function, underdosing NOACs was effective and safe as a perioperative anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation ablation. The therapeutic range of NOACs is potentially wider than manufacturer recommendations. PMID:28170360

  3. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Nick; Lummis, Katie; Sood, Ruchit; Kane, John Samuel; Corp, Aaron; Subramanian, Venkataraman

    2017-02-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants are increasingly used for a wide range of indications. However, data are conflicting about the risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding with these drugs. We compared the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants, warfarin, and low-molecular-weight heparin. For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched MEDLINE and Embase from database inception to April 1, 2016, for prospective and retrospective studies that reported the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with use of a direct oral anticoagulant compared with warfarin or low-molecular-weight heparin for all indications. We also searched the Cochrane Library for systematic reviews and assessment evaluations, the National Health Service (UK) Economic Evaluation Database, and ISI Web of Science for conference abstracts and proceedings (up to April 1, 2016). The primary outcome was the incidence of major gastrointestinal bleeding, with all gastrointestinal bleeding as a secondary outcome. We did a Bayesian network meta-analysis to produce incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% credible intervals (CrIs). We identified 38 eligible articles, of which 31 were included in the primary analysis, including 287 692 patients exposed to 230 090 years of anticoagulant drugs. The risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants did not differ from that with warfarin or low-molecular-weight heparin (factor Xa vs warfarin IRR 0·78 [95% CrI 0·47-1·08]; warfarin vs dabigatran 0·88 [0·59-1·36]; factor Xa vs low-molecular-weight heparin 1·02 [0·42-2·70]; and low-molecular-weight heparin vs dabigatran 0·67 [0·20-1·82]). In the secondary analysis, factor Xa inhibitors were associated with a reduced risk of all severities of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with warfarin (0·25 [0.07-0.76]) or dabigatran (0.24 [0.07-0.77]). Our findings show no increase in risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding with direct oral anticoagulants compared with

  4. Atrial fibrillation and stroke in the perspective of new oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Funda Baş

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is an independent, powerful risk factor for stroke. Until recently, acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin and warfarin were the only approved treatment options for stroke prophylaxis. Although warfarin provides a significantly better risk reduction in stroke compared to placebo and aspirin, its usage difficulties entailed investigation of new treatment alternatives. Studies showed that new oral anticoagulants (such as dabigatran, apixaban and rivaroxaban are as efficient and safe as warfarin. New anticoagulants seem appealing by their rapid onset of action and low drug and diet interactions, together with not necessitating any routine monitoring; however lack of specific antidotes constitute a disadvantage at the moment.

  5. Determination of dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban by ultra-performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) and coagulation assays for therapy monitoring of novel direct oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, E M H; Boonen, K; van den Heuvel, D J A; van Dongen, J L J; Schellings, M W M; Emmen, J M A; van der Graaf, F; Brunsveld, L; van de Kerkhof, D

    2014-10-01

    Three novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have recently been registered by the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency Commission: dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban. To quantify DOACs in plasma, various dedicated coagulation assays have been developed. To develop and validate a reference ultra-performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method and to evaluate the analytical performance of several coagulation assays for quantification of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban. The developed UPLC-MS/MS method was validated by determination of precision, accuracy, specificity, matrix effects, lower limits of detection, carry-over, recovery, stability, and robustness. The following coagulation assays were evaluated for accuracy and precision: laboratory-developed (LD) diluted thrombin time (dTT), Hemoclot dTT, Pefakit PiCT, ECA, Liquid anti-Xa, Biophen Heparin (LRT), and Biophen DiXal anti-Xa. Agreement between the various coagulation assays and UPLC-MS/MS was determined with random samples from patients using dabigatran or rivaroxaban. The UPLC-MS/MS method was shown to be accurate, precise, sensitive, stable, and robust. The dabigatran coagulation assay showing the best precision, accuracy and agreement with the UPLC-MS/MS method was the LD dTT test. For rivaroxaban, the anti-factor Xa assays were superior to the PiCT-Xa assay with regard to precision, accuracy, and agreement with the reference method. For apixaban, the Liquid anti-Xa assay was superior to the PiCT-Xa assay. Statistically significant differences were observed between the various coagulation assays as compared with the UPLC-MS/MS reference method. It is currently unknown whether these differences are clinically relevant. When DOACs are quantified with coagulation assays, comparison with a reference method as part of proficiency testing is therefore pivotal. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  6. New oral anticoagulants in severe trauma patients: enemy at the gates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea-Guerrero, J J; Quintana Díaz, M

    2015-04-01

    The high incidence of trauma, especially in elderly people anticoagulated with new oral anticoagulants (NOAs), has become a major challenge, particularly in critical situations with life-threatening bleeding. Under these circumstances, urgent NOA reversion becomes mandatory. Prothrombin complex has become a frequent indication in critical situations in which rapid reversal of anticoagulation is needed and where the use of fresh frozen plasma is limited. This study offers our point of view regarding the usefulness of NOAs, not only in the prevention of cardioembolic events but also as regards their emergent reversion in cases of severe bleeding associated to trauma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  7. The predictability of bleeding by prothrombin times sensitive or insensitive to PIVKA during intensive oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnesen, H; Smith, P

    1991-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of PIVKA (Proteins Induced by Vitamin K Absence or Antagonism) on the bleeding tendency during oral anticoagulation, we studied consecutive patients intensively treated with warfarin (INR greater than 4.8). The level of anticoagulation was measured with the PIVKA-insensitive Normotest (NT) as well as with the PIVKA-sensitive Thrombotest (TT), and the results are expressed as per cent coagulant activity. The NT/TT ratio was determined. Twenty patients with bleeding episodes had a mean NT/TT ratio of 2.06 as compared to 2.20 in 143 patients without bleeding episodes (p = 0.08). As the NT/TT ratio was not higher in patients with bleedings, we conclude that PIVKA are of no importance for bleeding during anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists.

  8. Stroke prevention in the elderly atrial fibrillation patient with comorbid conditions: focus on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turagam MK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohit K Turagam, Poonam Velagapudi, Greg C FlakerDivision of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO, USAAbstract: Stroke prevention in elderly atrial fibrillation patients remains a challenge. There is a high risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism but also a high risk of bleeding if anticoagulants are prescribed. The elderly have increased chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, polypharmacy, and overall frailty. For all these reasons, anticoagulant use is underutilized in the elderly. In this manuscript, the benefits of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants compared with warfarin in the elderly patient population with multiple comorbid conditions are reviewed.Keywords: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants, novel oral anticoagulants, warfarin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban

  9. Discontinuation of oral anticoagulation preceding acute ischemic stroke--prevalence and outcomes: Comprehensive chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanga, Subba R; Satti, Sudhakar R; Williams, James; Weintraub, William; Doorey, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Oral anticoagulants (OAC) are the therapy of choice to prevent thromboembolism in patients at risk. Discontinuation of OAC prior to elective medical and surgical procedures may reduce the risk of bleeding, but may expose patients to increased risk of thromboembolism and ischemic stroke. The current public health burden of ischemic strokes associated with OAC discontinuation is unknown. We aimed to study the prevalence OAC discontinuation in patients who presented with acute ischemic stroke as well as the outcomes of these strokes. Retrospective cross-sectional study by intensive chart review of all acute ischemic stroke patients over 6 months in a large tertiary care community hospital. A total of 431 patients with acute ischemic stroke were admitted during study period, of which 11 (2.6%) had OAC discontinuation within 120 days prior to the index admission. Several strokes occurred after relatively brief discontinuations. The patient group with discontinuation was older, had higher comorbidities and also had a clinically significant stroke and resulting higher mortality and morbidity. About 2.6% or 1 in every 38 of all ischemic stokes occurred after OAC discontinuation. Strokes occurring after OAC discontinuation also have higher mortality and morbidity. Our data suggest that any planned discontinuation of OAC, however brief, should be carefully considered.

  10. Anticoagulation therapy a risk factor for the development of chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspegren, Oskar P.; Åstrand, Ramona; Lundgren, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy.......Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease among the elderly and with increasing incidence we have chosen to focus on associations between development and recurrence of CSDH and anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet agent therapy....

  11. Anticoagulant therapy for ischemic stroke: A review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Shahpouri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, anticoagulants have been used in the emergent treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Anticoagulants are prescribed in an effort to prevent first or recurrent stroke, especially among patients with cardioembolism due to arterial fibrillation and large-artery atherosclerotic disease. Despite the widespread use, efficacy and safety of anticoagulants are controversial. Experts have given a broad spectrum of opinions. Surveys of practitioners have also demonstrated a lack of consensus on the use of anticoagulants for ischemic stroke. The uncertainty is due, in large part, to the lack of definitive clinical data. A review by the panel of the Stroke Council of the American Heart Association found no strong evidence for effectiveness of anticoagulants in treating acute ischemic stroke. Several clinical trials have suggested that utility of emergent anticoagulation has no significant effect in improving clinical outcomes for patients with acute ischemic stroke. In the present review, we have attempted to provide a framework for the emergent use of anticoagulants in acute ischemic stroke patients.

  12. Local hemostatic measures in anticoagulated patients undergoing oral surgery: a systematized literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Wildson Gurgel Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To conduct a systematized review of the literature about the main local hemostatic measures to control postoperative bleeding in anticoagulated patients. METHODS: A systematized review of literature was performed in the electronic database Medline (PubMed without restriction of the publication date. The eligibility criteria were studies involving maintenance of the anticoagulant therapy, prospective studies, retrospective studies, randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical studies, comparative studies, multicentric studies or case-control studies. Studies discontinuing anticoagulant therapy, case reports, literature reviews, in vitro studies, animal experiments and articles written in language not compatible with the search strategy adopted in this work were excluded. RESULTS: Twenty-four articles that met the adopted eligibility criteria were selected, enrolling 3891 subjects under anticoagulant therapy. A total of 171 cases of hemorrhage was observed. Tranexamic acid was the main local hemostatic measure used to controlling of postoperative bleeding. CONCLUSION: The local hemostatic measures proved to be effective according to previously published studies. Nevertheless, further clinical studies should be conducted to confirm this effectiveness.

  13. Periodontal and biochemical bone metabolism assessment on a chronic oral anticoagulation population treated with dicoumarins

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Lacomba, Daniel; Roa-López, Antonio; González-Jaranay, Maximino; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim is to evaluate periodontal alteration and biochemical markers associated with bone turnover in chronic oral with dicoumarins anticoagulant treatment patients. Material and Methods 80 patients treated with oral anticoagulants were divided into 2 cohort: Group A (n=36) 6 month to 1 year with anticoagulant treatment and Group B (n=44) > 2 years with anticoagulant treatment. Clinical evaluation included: Clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index (PI) and gingival index (GI). Analytically biochemical parameters of bone remodeling (calcium and phosphorus), formation (total acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin) and resorption (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and beta-crosslaps) were evaluated. Results High values of PI (67-100%) especially in men and in Group B were observed. Men with anticoagulation treatment length showed an increased GI (49.167 vs 78.083) while Group B women showed a decreased GI in comparison with Group A (59.389 vs 42.120). Women presented a greater average CAL than men as well as Group B vs Group A but without statistical significance. All biochemical markers were decreased respect to values of general population. Osteocalcin in GroupB women showed a statistically significant outcome vs GroupA (p=0.004). Acid phosphatase (total and tartrate-resistant) has a slight increase in Group B women versus Group A, and Beta-crosslap showed lower values in Group A men than Group B and slightly lower in Group A women versus Group B, without statistical significance. Conclusions Patients showed a slight to moderate degree of periodontal affectation, especially gingivitis related to bacterial plaque. Periodontal disorders tended to be more severe in Group B. While bone remodeling showed an overall decrease with greater affectation of bone neoformation phenomena, bone destruction tended to recover and normalize in time. Key words:Periodontal disease, dicoumarin, biochemical markers, bone remodeling. PMID:28160591

  14. Does novel oral anticoagulant improve anticoagulation for non-valvular atrial fibrillation associated stroke: An inpatient registration study in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-Di Liu; Rong Zhao; Xue-Mei Wang; Shuo Wang; Xiao-Lei Shen; Xiao-Xiao Tao; Bo Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To summarize the use rate,safety,efficacy of antithrombotics in stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) prevention,and reasons for not using dabigatran etexilate (DE) in Shanghai,China.Methods:Non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF)-associated stroke patients were prospectively registered as an electronic database.Use rate of antithrombofics and reasons for not using DE were extracted during follow-up.Patients' baseline characteristics,recurrent ischemic stroke/TIA events and bleeding complications were analyzed.Patients:From April 2012 to August 2014,110 inpatients with NVAF-associated stroke were studied in our hospital.NVAF was diagnosed by 12-lead electrocardiogram,24 h Holter and echocardiography.Results:Before introduction of DE (April 2013),use rates of warfarin and antiplatelets were 28.9% (11/38) and 60.5% (23/38)respectively; after that,use rates of warfarin,DE,and antiplatelets were 20.8% (15/72),12.5% (9/72),and 43.1% (31/72).The DE did not improve use of anticoagulants (P =0.639).There were 19 (17.3%) recurrent ischemic stroke events up to October 2015; two (9.5%) in the non-user group,10 (18.5%) in the antiplatelet group,and seven (20.0%) in the anticoagulants group (P =0.570).Furthermore,recurrence rates were similar between the DE group (20.0%) and the Warfarin group (20.0%,P =1.000).The most common reason for not using DE was financial concerns (61.0%),followed by inconvenience to purchase (14.0%) and hemorrhage concerns (11.0%).Two patients using warfarin found fecal occult blood so they stopped warfarin and began to use antiplatelet drugs.No bleeding event occurred in the other groups.Only one patient had side effects (dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux)from DE.Conclusion:The use rate of either DE or warfarin in Shanghai was low; DE had not improved anticoagulation therapy for NVAF patients in Shanghai mainly because DE had not been covered by health insurance.

  15. [Restraints to anticoagulation prescription in atrial fibrillation and attitude towards the new oral anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Da-Silva, Tiago; Souto Moura, Teresa; Azevedo, Luísa; Sá Pereira, Margarida; Virella, Daniel; Alves, Marta; Borges, Luís

    2013-01-01

    Introdução e Objetivos: Avaliar a taxa de prescrição de anticoagulantes orais na fibrilhação auricular, os fatores associados à não prescrição, os motivos referidos pelos clínicos para não prescrição de anticoagulantes incluindo os de nova geração e realizar estudo evolutivo a médio prazo. Material e Métodos: Estudo prospetivo sobre casos consecutivos de doentes com fibrilhação auricular com alta hospitalar. Registaram- se os scores CHA2DS2VASc e HASBLED, comorbilidades associadas e a medicação prévia e à data de alta. Na alta hospitalar, o médico assistente indicou em questionário o motivo de não prescrição de anticoagulantes orais e dos novos anticoagulantes orais. Exclusão: contra-indicação absoluta para anticoagulação, CHA2DS2VASc ≤ 1 e doença valvular. Os doentes foram reavaliados um ano após o recrutamento do primeiro doente. Resultados: Identificaram-se 103 candidatos a anticoagulação oral (79,6 ± 8,0 anos; CHA2DS2VASc 5,8 ± 1,4; HASBLED 2,6 ± 1,0; HASBLED ≥ 3 em 55,3%); os anticoagulantes foram prescritos em 34,0%. Fatores associados à não prescrição por ordem decrescente de relevância: uso prévio de antiagregantes, doente acamado e/ou demente, ausência de insuficiência cardíaca e número de fatores de risco hemorrágico. Razões invocadas para não prescrição por ordem decrescente de frequência: risco hemorrágico elevado, pequeno benefício, incapacidade de seguir o esquema terapêutico e dificuldade na monitorização da razão normalizada internacional (INR). Os novos anticoagulantes não foram prescritos e as razões invocadas foram, por ordem decrescente de frequência: informação insuficiente sobre estes fármacos, risco hemorrágico elevado, custo elevado e pequeno benefício. Aos 8,2 ± 2,5 meses de estudo evolutivo 33,3% dos doentes encontravam-se sob anticoagulação sem que os novos anticoagulantes tivessem sido prescritos. Conclusões: Nesta amostra, a taxa de prescrição de

  16. Direct Oral Anticoagulant- or Warfarin-Related Major Bleeding: Characteristics, Reversal Strategies, and Outcomes From a Multicenter Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Schulman, Sam; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Holbrook, Anne M; Simpson, Christopher S; Shepherd, Lois E; Wells, Philip S; Giulivi, Antonio; Gomes, Tara; Mamdani, Muhammad; Khuu, Wayne; Frymire, Eliot; Johnson, Ana P

    2017-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have expanded the armamentarium for antithrombotic therapy. Although DOAC-related major bleeding was associated with favorable outcomes compared with warfarin in clinical trials, warfarin effects were reversed in bleeding events. Red blood cell transfusions occurred more often in DOAC bleeding events than in warfarin events (52.0% vs 39.5%; adjusted relative risk [aRR], 1.32; 95% CI, 1.19-2.47). However, units of blood products transfused were not different between the two groups. Thirty-four DOAC cases (7.4%) received activated prothrombin complex concentrates or recombinant factor VIIa. In-hospital mortality was lower following DOAC bleeding events (9.8% vs 15.2%; aRR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.49-0.89), although differences in 30-day mortality did not reach statistical significance (12.6% vs 16.3%; aRR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61-1.03). In this unselected cohort of patients with oral anticoagulant-related hemorrhage with high rates of warfarin reversal, in-hospital mortality was lower among DOAC-associated bleeding events. These findings support the safety of DOACs in routine care and present useful baseline measures for evaluations of DOAC-specific reversal agents. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dabigatran: A new oral anticoagulant. Guidelines to follow in oral surgery procedures. A systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Martínez-Acitores, Lucía; López-Pintor, Rosa Mª; Casañas-Gil, Elisabeth; Hernández-Vallejo, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Background Dabigatran is a newly commercialized drug that is replacing other anticoagulants in the prevention of venous thromboembolism, stroke and systemic arterial valve embolism. It acts directly on thrombin presenting in a dynamic and predictable way, which does not require monitoring these patients. Therefore, we consider the need to assess whether their use increases the risk of bleeding involved before any dental treatment. Material and Methods We performed a systematic review with a bibliographic search in PubMed/Medline along with the Cochrane Library. We excluded articles dealing with all anticoagulants other than dabigatran, and works about surgical treatments in anatomical locations other than the oral cavity. Results We included a total of 13 papers of which 1 was a randomized clinical trial, 9 narrative literature reviews, 1 case series, 2 clinical cases and 1 expert opinion. Because we did not obtain any properly designed clinical trials, we were unable to conduct a meta-analysis. Conclusions Currently, there is no consensus on the procedure to be followed in patients taking dabigatran. However, all authors agree to treat each case individually in accordance to the risk of embolism, postoperative bleeding and renal function. Also, it is necessary to perform minimally invasive interventions, and take the appropriate local anti-hemolytic measures. Key words:Oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, risk of bleeding, oral surgery, dentistry. PMID:27694780

  18. Thrombolytic-plus-Anticoagulant Therapy versus Anticoagulant-Alone Therapy in Submassive Pulmonary Thromboembolism (TVASPE Study: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Taherkhani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of thrombolytic agents in the treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with acute submassive pulmonary embolism (PTE remains controversial. We, therefore, conducted this study to compare the effect of thrombolytic plus anticoagulation versus anticoagulation alone on early death and adverse outcome following submassive PTE.Methods: We conducted a study of patients with acute pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension or right ventricular dilatation/dysfunction but without arterial hypotension or shock. The patients were randomly assigned in a single-blind fashion to receive an anticoagulant [Enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice a day] plus a thrombolytic [Alteplase (100 mg or Streptokinase (1500000 u/2 hours] or an anticoagulant [Enoxaparin (1 mg/kg twice a day] alone. The primary endpoint was in-hospital death or clinical deterioration requiring an escalation of treatment. The secondary endpoints of the study were major bleeding, pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular dilatation at the end of the first week, and exertional dyspnea at the end of the first month.Results: Of 50 patients enrolled, 25 patients were randomly assigned to receive an anticoagulant plus a thrombolytic and the other 25 patients were given an anticoagulant alone. The incidence of the primary endpoints was significantly higher in the anticoagulant-alone group than in the thrombolytic-plus-anticoagulant group (p value = 0.022. At the time of discharge, pulmonary artery pressure was significantly higher in the anticoagulant-alone group than in the thrombolytic- plus-anticoagulant group (p value = 0.018; however, reduction in the right ventricular size or normalization of the right ventricle showed non-significant differences between the two groups. There was no significant difference regarding the New York Heat Association (NYHA functional class between the two groups at the end of the first month (p value = 0.213. No fatal bleeding or cerebral bleeding

  19. Is stopping of anticoagulant therapy really required in a minor dental surgery? - How about in an endodontic microsurgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Wook Cho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, oral anticoagulants are commonly prescribed to numerous patients for preventing cardiovascular accident such as thromboembolism. An important side effect of anticoagulant is anti-hemostasis. In a major surgery, the oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT regimen must be changed before the surgery for proper post-operative bleeding control. However, in a minor dental surgery and endodontic surgery, the necessity for changing or discontinuing the OAT is open to debate. In this study, risks of the consequences were weighed and analyzed. In patients who stop the OAT, the occurrence of thromboembolic complication is rare but the result is fatal. In patients who continuing the OAT, post-operative bleeding can be controlled well with the local hemostatic measures. In the endodontic surgery, there are almost no studies about this issue. The intra-operative bleeding control is particularly important in the endodontic surgery because of its delicate and sensitive procedures such as inspection of resected root surface using dental microscope and retrograde filling. Further studies are necessary about this issue in the viewpoint of endodontic surgery.

  20. Is stopping of anticoagulant therapy really required in a minor dental surgery? - How about in an endodontic microsurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Euiseong

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, oral anticoagulants are commonly prescribed to numerous patients for preventing cardiovascular accident such as thromboembolism. An important side effect of anticoagulant is anti-hemostasis. In a major surgery, the oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) regimen must be changed before the surgery for proper post-operative bleeding control. However, in a minor dental surgery and endodontic surgery, the necessity for changing or discontinuing the OAT is open to debate. In this study, risks of the consequences were weighed and analyzed. In patients who stop the OAT, the occurrence of thromboembolic complication is rare but the result is fatal. In patients who continuing the OAT, post-operative bleeding can be controlled well with the local hemostatic measures. In the endodontic surgery, there are almost no studies about this issue. The intra-operative bleeding control is particularly important in the endodontic surgery because of its delicate and sensitive procedures such as inspection of resected root surface using dental microscope and retrograde filling. Further studies are necessary about this issue in the viewpoint of endodontic surgery.

  1. Does anticoagulant therapy improve pregnancy outcome equally, regardless of specific thrombophilia type?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Mirjana; Mikovic, Zeljko; Mitic, Gorana; Djordjevic, Valentina; Mandic, Vesna; Rakicevic, Ljiljana; Radojkovic, Dragica

    2014-03-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of anticoagulant therapy in women with thrombophilia and to detect the possible differences among carriers of mutations (factor V [FV] Leiden and FIIG20210) and those with natural anticoagulant deficiency. The 4-year prospective investigation included 85 pregnant women, with a history of recurrent fetal loss (RFL). They were treated with prophylactic doses of low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparin) starting from 6 to 8 weeks of gestation. Pregnancy outcomes were evaluated based on the thrombophilia type. Carriers of thrombophilic mutations had a live birth rate of 93%, compared to 41.6% for women with natural anticoagulant deficiencies. Significant differences between the groups were also observed for intrauterine fetal death, intrauterine growth restriction, and postpartum thrombosis. The optimal therapy for women with natural anticoagulant deficiency and RFL remains unclear and future prospective study with a large number of patients is required to determine the best treatment for these severe thrombophilic conditions.

  2. Transitions of care in anticoagulated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michota F

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Franklin Michota Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Anticoagulation is an effective therapeutic means of reducing thrombotic risk in patients with various conditions, including atrial fibrillation, mechanical heart valves, and major surgery. By its nature, anticoagulation increases the risk of bleeding; this risk is particularly high during transitions of care. Established anticoagulants are not ideal, due to requirements for parenteral administration, narrow therapeutic indices, and/or a need for frequent therapeutic monitoring. The development of effective oral anticoagulants that are administered as a fixed dose, have low potential for drug-drug and drug-food interactions, do not require regular anticoagulation monitoring, and are suitable for both inpatient and outpatient use is to be welcomed. Three new oral anticoagulants, the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate, and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, have been approved in the US for reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation; rivaroxaban is also approved for prophylaxis and treatment of deep vein thrombosis, which may lead to pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery. This review examines current options for anticoagulant therapy, with a focus on maintaining efficacy and safety during transitions of care. The characteristics of dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are discussed in the context of traditional anticoagulant therapy. Keywords: hemorrhagic events, oral anticoagulation, parenteral anticoagulation, stroke, transitions of care

  3. Recent advances in the development of specific antidotes for target-specific oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yoonsun; Yam, Felix K

    2015-02-01

    Warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, has been the only orally available anticoagulant for > 60 years. During the past decade, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved several target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) for the prophylaxis and treatment of arterial and venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. These new agents have several advantages over warfarin including more predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, fewer food and drug interactions, and lack of need for routine coagulation monitoring. However, unlike warfarin, currently no antidotes are available to reverse the anticoagulant effect of TSOACs. Specific antidotes for TSOACs may not be needed in most situations due to their short half-life, yet the absence of antidotes for these agents is a concern, especially in emergent situations such as life-threatening major bleeding or nonelective major surgery. Several specific antidotes for TSOACs including idarucizumab, andexanet alfa, and aripazine have been developed and have shown promise in early clinical trials evaluating their efficacy and safety. In this narrative review, the progress made in developing specific antidotes for TSOACs is summarized based on the latest available preclinical and clinical data.

  4. Health related quality of life of patients undergoing oral anticoagulation therapy Calidad de vida relacionada a la salud de pacientes que usan anticoagulación oral Qualidade de vida relacionada à saúde de pacientes em uso de anticoagulação oral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaiara Scalçone Almeida Corbi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive cross-sectional study, which aimed to analyze the health related quality of life (HRQoL and its relationship with gender, age, duration and indication for the use of oral anticoagulants. A total of 178 patients were interviewed and the HRQoL was assessed through eight domains of the SF-36. The descriptive statistics used were, the Student's t, ANOVA and Tukey's tests for the comparison of the means between the groups. The indication for use was predominantly the metallic prosthetic heart valve (50% with warfarin the most widely prescribed anticoagulant (83.3%. The means of the domains of the SF-36 ranged from 82 (Social aspects to 54.8 (Physical aspects. Women, elderly, patients diagnosed with atrial fibrillation and with less than one year of medication use, presented a worse HRQoL evaluation. The results obtained can guide nursing actions, in that they indicate possible associations between the HRQoL and the sociodemographic and clinical variables of the patients.Se trata de un estudio descriptivo, de tipo corte transversal, que tuvo como objetivo analizar la calidad de vida relacionada a la salud (CVRS y su relación con sexo, edad, tiempo e indicación de uso de anticoagulantes orales. Fueron entrevistados 178 pacientes y la CVRS fue evaluada por los ocho dominios del SF-36. Fue utilizada estadística descriptiva, las pruebas: t Student, ANOVA y Tukey, para comparación de los promedios entre los grupos. La indicación para el uso fue predominantemente la prótesis cardíaca metálica (50% y la warfarina el anticoagulante más prescrito (83,3%. Los promedios de los dominios del SF-36 variaron de 82 (Aspectos sociales a 54,8 (Aspectos físicos. Mujeres, ancianos, y pacientes con diagnóstico de fibrilación atrial y con menos de un año de uso del medicamento, presentaron peor evaluación de la CVRS. Los resultados obtenidos pueden orientar acciones de enfermería, en la medida en que indican posibles asociaciones entre

  5. THE PROBLEM OF THE USE OF NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS IN CANCER PATIENTS RECEIVING CHEMOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Rumyantsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite large number of known risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE in cancer patients existing prediction models do not allow definite identification of cancer patients that have indications for anticoagulant prevention. Besides, heparin and warfarin use for VTE prevention in cancer is accompanied by some problems. New oral anticoagulants (NOAC are promising drugs for use in oncology practice; however their use is complicated by the lack of data on efficacy and safety in these patients, potential drug interactions and the possibility of unpredictable changes in effect during chemotherapy. Widespread use of NOAC for the prevention and treatment of tumor-associated VTE prior to phase III trials is not recommended. However, the criteria for selection of patients for whom the study of the efficacy and safety of NOAC is a priority can now be developed.

  6. Preventive Strategies against Bleeding due to Nonvitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessire Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dabigatran etexilate (DE, rivaroxaban, and apixaban are nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs that have been compared in clinical trials with existing anticoagulants (warfarin and enoxaparin in several indications for the prevention and treatment of thrombotic events. All NOACs presented bleeding events despite a careful selection and control of patients. Compared with warfarin, NOACs had a decreased risk of intracranial hemorrhage, and apixaban and DE (110 mg BID had a decreased risk of major bleeding from any site. Rivaroxaban and DE showed an increased risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding compared with warfarin. Developing strategies to minimize the risk of bleeding is essential, as major bleedings are reported in clinical practice and specific antidotes are currently not available. In this paper, the following preventive approaches are reviewed: improvement of appropriate prescription, identification of modifiable bleeding risk factors, tailoring NOAC’s dose, dealing with a missed dose as well as adhesion to switching, bridging and anesthetic procedures.

  7. Oral anticoagulants and status of antidotes for the reversal of bleeding risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebright, Joseph; Mousa, Shaker A

    2015-03-01

    Anticoagulants have been used in clinical practice for more than 50 years. Their indications expand, as more people are diagnosed each year with atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism. Vitamin K antagonists have been the most popular choice due to their effectiveness and their ability to reverse bleeding using a known antidote; oral and intravenous vitamin K have long been known to reverse the effects of warfarin. With new classes of anticoagulants making their way onto the market, such as factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban) and direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran), the need for new reversal agents is paramount. Patients tend to be more receptive to these medications because they do not require routine blood monitoring, can be used at fixed doses, and do not have major drug or food interactions. Antidotes for these medications have shown promise in animal models and are currently in clinical trials.

  8. Oral Appliances Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your sleep doctor may schedule you for a sleep study to verify treatment success. Follow-Up Visits Follow-up visits with your dentist will be needed to ensure the optimal fit of the oral appliance. Effective oral appliances ...

  9. Haemorrhage in the labyrinth caused by anticoagulant therapy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callonnec, F.; Gerardin, E.; Thiebot, J. [Department of Radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 1 rue de Germont, F-76031 Rouen cedex (France); Marie, J.P.; Andrieu Guitrancourt, J. [Department of Otolaryngology, Rouen University Hospital (France); Marsot-Dupuch, K. [Department of Radiology, St. Antoine, Paris University Hospital (France)

    1999-06-01

    We report a patient who experienced a severe vertiginous episode with bilateral tinnitus and progressive right-sided hearing loss. She had Marfan`s disease and was on anticoagulant treatment. The fluid in the labyrinth gave higher signal than cerebrospinal fluid on T1-weighted images, suggesting haemorrhage. The radiological follow-up is discussed. (orig.) With 2 figs., 11 refs.

  10. Oral Anticoagulants Initiation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation: Real-World Data from a Population-Based Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Bernal, Clara L.; Hurtado, Isabel; García-Sempere, Aníbal; Peiró, Salvador; Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about initial prescription of currently used oral anticoagulants (OAC), and correlated characteristics in real-world practice. We aimed to assess patterns of initiation of Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOAC) in naive patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and the factors associated with starting treatment with NOAC. Methods: Population-based retrospective cohort study of all patients with NVAF who had a first prescription of OAC from November 2011 to February 2014 in the Valencia region, Spain (n = 21,881). Temporal trends of OAC initiation are described for the whole population and by type of OAC and therapeutic agent. Factors associated with starting treatment with NOAC (vs. VKA) were identified using logistic multivariate regression models. Results: Among the patients initiating OAC, 25% started with NOAC 2 years after market release. Regarding temporal trends, prescription of NOAC doubled during the study period. VKA prescription also increased (by around 13%), resulting in a 30% rise in total treatment initiation with OAC during 2011–2014. NOAC initiation (vs. VKA) was associated with a lower baseline risk of thromboembolism and higher income. Conclusions: In this Spanish population-based cohort, initiation of OAC therapy saw a rapid increase, mainly but not exclusively, due to a two-fold rise in the use of NOAC. Initiation with NOAC was associated with a lower baseline risk of thromboembolism and higher income, which opposes the indications of NOAC use and reflects disparities in care. Inadequate prescription patterns might threaten the effectiveness and safety of these therapies, thus monitoring OAC prescription is necessary and should be setting-specific. PMID:28261098

  11. Photoselective vaporization of the prostate in men with a history of chronic oral anti-coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer F. Karatas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: A considerable percentage of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH also have additional cardiac pathologies, which often require anticoagulant therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP for BPH in cardiac patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 67 patients suffering from BPH and high risk cardiac pathologies were operated on using laser prostatectomy. All patients had cardiac pathologies with bleeding disorders requiring anticoagulant use, and underwent standard urologic evaluation for BPH. Patients were treated with laser prostatectomy for relief of the obstruction using the KTP/532 laser energy at 80 W. RESULTS: The mean patient age was 71.4 years (range 55-80. Mean prostate volume on transrectal ultrasonography was 73.2 mL (range 44-120. Operation time ranged from 40 to 90 min, with an average value of 55 min. The average hospital stay was 48 hours (range 12-72 and the Foley catheters were removed within 48 hours, with a mean catheterization time of 34.2 ± 5.9 hours (0-48. No patient required an additional procedure due to severe bleeding necessitating intervention during the early postoperative phase. Mean International symptoms scoring system (IPSS values and post voiding residual volume decreased and peak urinary flow rate increased (p < 0.001. Our results showed that the mean prostate volume had decreased by 53% at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: High-power photo selective laser vaporization prostatectomy is a feasible, safe, and effective alternative for the minimal invasive management of BPH, particularly in cardiac patients receiving anticoagulant therapy.

  12. A randomized trial of patient self-managed versus physician-managed oral anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderji, Rubina; Gin, Kenneth; Shalansky, Karen; Carter, Cedric; Chambers, Keith; Davies, Cheryl; Schwartz, Linda; Fung, Anthony

    2004-09-01

    Self-management (SM) of warfarin by patients is an attractive strategy, particularly if it improves anticoagulation control and can be done safely under minimal physician supervision. To compare the effect of SM with physician-management (PM) on the maintenance of therapeutic anticoagulation. A randomized, open-label eight-month trial was performed. Patients 18 years of age and older were eligible if they were receiving warfarin for at least one month before enrolment and required anticoagulation for at least one year to a target international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.0 to 3.0 or 2.5 to 3.5. Exclusion criteria were a known hypercoaguable disorder, mental incompetence, a language barrier or an inability to attend training sessions. Patients randomly assigned to SM tested their INR using a point-of-care device (Pro Time Microcogulation System, International Technidyne Corporation, USA) and adjusted their warfarin doses using a nomogram. Patients randomly assigned to PM received usual care from their general practitioner. The primary outcome was to demonstrate 20% improvement in anticoagulation control by SM. One hundred forty patients were randomly assigned (70 per group). Thirteen patients dropped out of SM early due to an inability to self-manage. Based on intention-to-treat analysis, there was no difference in the proportion of INR in range (SM 64.8% versus PM 58.7%, P=0.23) or time in target range (SM 71.8% versus PM 63.2%, P=0.14). Patients managing their own therapy spent less time below the therapeutic range (15.0% versus 27.3%, P=0.04). There were three major complications of thrombosis or bleeding, all occurring in the PM arm. All patients who completed SM preferred to continue with that strategy. SM was not significantly better than PM in maintaining therapeutic anticoagulation. SM was feasible and appeared safe in the present study population.

  13. Clinical outcome in patients with venous thromboembolism receiving concomitant anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoran, Inna; Brenner, Benjamin; Sakharov, Gleb; Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Lorenzo, Alicia; Madridano, Olga; López-Sáez, Juan Bosco; Monreal, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Patients with arterial disease receiving antiplatelet agents may develop venous thromboembolism (VTE) and need anticoagulant therapy, although concomitant use of these drugs may increase bleeding risk. We analyzed RIETE data and compared clinical outcomes depending on decision to discontinue or maintain antiplatelet therapy at VTE diagnosis. Consecutive patients with acute VTE were enrolled in RIETE. Only patients receiving antiplatelet therapy at baseline were included in this analysis. Primary outcomes were: rate of subsequent ischemic events, major bleeding or death during anticoagulation course. 1178 patients who received antiplatelet drugs at VTE diagnosis were included. Antiplatelet therapy was discontinued in 62% of patients. During anticoagulation course, patients also receiving antiplatelet therapy had higher rates of lower limb amputations (2.28 vs. 0.21 events per 100 patients-years; pantiplatelet therapy were found to have a significantly higher rate of limb amputations (odds ratio: 15.3; 95% CI: 1.02-229) and an increased number of composite outcomes including all-cause deaths, arterial and VTE events (odds ratio: 1.46; CI: 1.03-2.06), with no differences in major bleeding rate. Concomitant anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy in patients with VTE and arterial disease is not associated with increased risk for bleeding, recurrent VTE or death. The worse outcome observed in patients who continued antiplatelet therapy requires further investigations. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Control of anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy. Managing patients with acute thrombotic disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, D. R.; Fernandez, L. A.

    1993-01-01

    Indications for using standard anticoagulants, heparin and warfarin; the dosage and route of administration; the importance of monitoring therapy with reliable laboratory indices; and complications of therapy are discussed. Acetylsalicylic acid and ticlopidine can be used as antiplatelet agents. Because their effect on platelet function is not monitored clinically, their clinical indications are emphasized.

  15. Healthcare resources and needs in anticoagulant therapy for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. SAMOA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Egocheaga-Cabello, M I; Gállego-Culleré, J; Ignacio-García, E; Manzano-Espinosa, L; Martín-Martínez, A; Mateo-Arranz, J; Polo-García, J; Vargas-Ortega, D

    2017-05-01

    To determine, in the various medical specialties, the healthcare process for anticoagulated patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, to determine the available and necessary resources and to identify potential areas of improvement in the care of these patients. We performed a cross-sectional survey of primary care and specialised physicians involved in the care of anticoagulated patients. The questionnaires referred to the healthcare process, the indication and prescription of anticoagulant therapy and the barriers and deficiencies present for these patients. A total of 893 physicians participated in the study, 437 of whom worked in primary care and 456 of whom were specialists (mostly cardiologists). Forty-two percent of the family doctors indicated that they assessed and prescribed anticoagulant therapy, and 66% performed the regular follow-up of these patients. In both healthcare settings, the physicians noted the lack of standardised protocols. There was also a lack of quality control in the treatment. The role of primary care in managing anticoagulated patients has grown compared with previous reports. The responses of the participating physicians suggest marked gaps in the standardisation of the healthcare process and several areas for improvement in these patients' follow-up. The promotion of training in direct-acting anticoagulant drugs remains pivotal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  16. The use of vitamin K in patients on anticoagulant therapy: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanslik, Thomas; Prinseau, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    Anticoagulation with antivitamin K (AVK) is very effective for primary and secondary prevention of thromboembolic events. However, questions persist about the risks and management of over-anticoagulation. For reversal of excessive anticoagulation by warfarin, AVK withdrawal, oral or parenteral vitamin K administration, prothrombin complex or fresh frozen plasma may be used, depending on the excess of anticoagulation, the existence and site of active bleeding, patient characteristics and the indication for AVK. In over-anticoagulated patients, vitamin K aims at rapid lowering of the international normalized ratio (INR) into a safe range to reduce the risk of major bleeding and therefore improving patient outcome without exposing the patient to the risk of thromboembolism due to overcorrection, resistance to AVK, or an allergic reaction to the medication. The risk of bleeding increases dramatically when the INR exceeds 4.0-6.0, although the absolute risk of bleeding remains fairly low, 10.0, a dose of 5mg may be more appropriate. Overcorrection of the INR or resistance to warfarin is unlikely if the above doses of vitamin K are used. Vitamin K is less effective for over-anticoagulation after treatment with acenocoumarol or phenprocoumon than after treatment with warfarin.

  17. Direct-acting oral anticoagulants: pharmacology, indications, management, and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, Ma Luisa; Lecumberri, Ramón; Terleira-Fernández, Ana Isabel; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, several direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOAC) have become available for use in Europe and other regions in indications related to prophylaxis and treatment of venous and arterial thromboembolism. They include the oral direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa, Boehringer Ingelheim) and the oral direct FXa inhibitors rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer HealthCare), apixaban (Eliquis, Bristol-Myers Squibb), and edoxaban (Lixiana/Savaysa, Daiichi-Sankyo). The new compounds have a predictable dose response and few drug-drug interactions (unlike vitamin k antagonists), and they do not require parenteral administration (unlike heparins). However, they accumulate in patients with renal impairment, lack widely available monitoring tests for measuring its anticoagulant activity, and no specific antidotes for neutralization in case of overdose and/or severe bleeding are currently available. In this review, we describe the pharmacology of the DOAC, the efficacy, and safety data from pivotal studies that support their currently approved indications and discuss the postmarketing experience available. We also summarize practical recommendations to ensure an appropriate use of the DOAC according to existing data. Finally, we discuss relevant ongoing studies and future perspectives.

  18. Knowledge of Patients with Mechanical Valve Prostheses Concerning Chronic Oral Anticoagulant Therapy Conocimiento de los pacientes portadores de prótesis valvular mecánica sobre la terapia de anticoagulación oral crónica Conhecimento de pacientes portadores de prótese valvar mecânica sobre a terapia com anticoagulação oral crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Teixeira Rocha

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to chronic Oral Anticoagulant Therapy (OAT is directly related to patients' understanding of the therapy. This study verified the knowledge of patients with mechanical valve prostheses concerning OAT. This is a contemporary cross-sectional study, the sample is composed of patients with mechanical valve prostheses (MVP in outpatient follow-up. A 10-question instrument was used; answers were ‘know' (1 point, ‘know partially' (half point, or ‘do not know' (zero. Patients were grouped according to the result obtained: ≤ 4 points was considered insufficient knowledge; > 4 ≤ 8 equated to moderate knowledge; and > 8 was considered appropriate knowledge. Of the 110 patients, 61.8% presented moderate knowledge, 40.9% were not able to name at least one factor that may alter the INR (International Normalized Ratio and 37.3% were not able to report their INR target range. The majority of patients presented moderate knowledge concerning the treatment. Strategies to improve knowledge on the topic should be implemented to minimize risks.El objetivo de este estudio fue verificar el conocimiento de pacientes con prótesis valvular sobre la terapia de anticoagulación oral. La adhesión a la terapia de anticoagulación oral crónica está directamente relacionada al entendimiento del paciente sobre esta terapia. Se trata de un estudio transversal contemporáneo, en el cual se incluyeron pacientes de ambulatorio con prótesis valvular mecánica (PVM. Se aplicó un cuestionario con 10 preguntas; las respuestas fueron "sabe" (1 punto, "sabe parcialmente" (medio punto, "no sabe" (cero puntos. Los pacientes fueron agrupados según la puntuación obtenida: ≤ 4 puntos, conocimiento insuficiente; > 4 ≤ 8 puntos, conocimiento regular; > 8 puntos, conocimiento adecuado. De los 110 pacientes incluidos, el 61,8% demostró conocimiento regular, 40,9% no supieron citar un factor que altera el REI (razón estandarizada internacional y 37,3% no supieron

  19. Renal function in atrial fibrillation patients switched from warfarin to a direct oral anticoagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhas, Anum S; Jiang, Qingmei; Gu, Xiaokui; Haymart, Brian; Kline-Rogers, Eva; Almany, Steve; Kozlowski, Jay; Krol, Gregory D; Kaatz, Scott; Froehlich, James B; Barnes, Geoffrey D

    2016-11-01

    All available direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are at least partially eliminated by the kidneys. These agents are increasingly being used as alternatives to warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to identify changes in renal function and associated DOAC dosing implications in a multicenter cohort of atrial fibrillation patients switched from warfarin to DOAC treatment. We included all patients in the Michigan Anticoagulation Quality Improvement Initiative cohort who switched from warfarin to a DOAC with atrial fibrillation as their anticoagulant indication between 2009 and 2014, and who had at least two creatinine values. Compliance with FDA-recommended dosing based on renal function was assessed. Of the 189 patients switched from warfarin to a DOAC, 34 (18.0 %) had a baseline creatinine clearance renal function. Of these 23 patients, 6 (26.1 %) should have impacted the DOAC dosing, but only 1 patient actually received an appropriate dose adjustment. Additionally, 15 (7.9 %) of patients on DOACs had a dose change performed, but only one patient demonstrated a change in renal function to justify the dose adjustment. Most atrial fibrillation patients who switched from warfarin to a DOAC had stable renal function. However, the majority of patients who had a change in renal function did not receive the indicated dose change. As the use of DOACs expands, monitoring of renal function and appropriate dose adjustments are critical.

  20. Predictive factors for obtaining a correct therapeutic range using antivitamin K anticoagulants: a tertiary center experience of patient adherence to anticoagulant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurcuţ R

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ruxandra Jurcuţ,1 Sebastian Militaru,1 Oliviana Geavlete,1 Nic Drăgotoiu,1 Sergiu Sipoş,1 Răzvan Roşulescu,2 Carmen Ginghină,1 Ciprian Jurcuţ2 1Prof Dr CC Iliescu Emergency Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 2Dr Carol Davila Central University Emergency Military Hospital, Bucharest, Romania Background: Patient adherence is an essential factor in obtaining efficient oral anticoagulation using vitamin K antagonists (VKAs, a situation with a narrow therapeutic window. Therefore, patient education and awareness are crucial for good management. Auditing the current situation would help to identify the magnitude of the problem and to build tailored education programs for these patients. Methods: This study included 68 hospitalized chronically anticoagulated patients (mean age 62.6±13.1 years; males, 46% who responded to a 26-item questionnaire to assess their knowledge on VKA therapy management. Laboratory and clinical data were used to determine the international normalized ratio (INR at admission, as well as to calculate CHA2DS2-VASC and HAS-BLED scores for patients with atrial fibrillation. Results: The majority of patients (62% were receiving VKA for atrial fibrillation, the others for a mechanical prosthesis and previous thromboembolic disease or stroke. In the atrial fibrillation group, the mean CHA2DS2-VASC score was 3.1±1.5, while the average HAS-BLED score was 1.8±1.2. More than half of the patients (53% had an INR outside of the therapeutic range at admission, with the majority (43% having a low INR. A correct INR value was predicted by education level (higher education and the diagnostic indication (patients with mechanical prosthesis being best managed. Patients presenting with a therapeutic INR had a trend toward longer treatment duration than those outside the therapeutic range (62±72 months versus 36±35 months, respectively, P=0.06. There was no correlation between INR at admission

  1. Economic evaluation of strategies for restarting anticoagulation therapy after a first event of unprovoked venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, M; Ensor, J; Moore, D; Fitzmaurice, D; Jowett, S

    2017-08-01

    Essentials Correct duration of treatment after a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown. We assessed when restarting anticoagulation was worthwhile based on patient risk of recurrent VTE. When the risk over a one-year period is 17.5%, restarting is cost-effective. However, sensitivity analyses indicate large uncertainty in the estimates. Background Following at least 3 months of anticoagulation therapy after a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE), there is uncertainty about the duration of therapy. Further anticoagulation therapy reduces the risk of having a potentially fatal recurrent VTE but at the expense of a higher risk of bleeding, which can also be fatal. Objective An economic evaluation sought to estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of using a decision rule for restarting anticoagulation therapy vs. no extension of therapy in patients based on their risk of a further unprovoked VTE. Methods A Markov patient-level simulation model was developed, which adopted a lifetime time horizon with monthly time cycles and was from a UK National Health Service (NHS)/Personal Social Services (PSS) perspective. Results Base-case model results suggest that treating patients with a predicted 1 year VTE risk of 17.5% or higher may be cost-effective if decision makers are willing to pay up to £20 000 per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. However, probabilistic sensitivity analysis shows that the model was highly sensitive to overall parameter uncertainty and caution is warranted in selecting the optimal decision rule on cost-effectiveness grounds. Univariate sensitivity analyses indicate variables such as anticoagulation therapy disutility and mortality risks were very influential in driving model results. Conclusion This represents the first economic model to consider the use of a decision rule for restarting therapy for unprovoked VTE patients. Better data are required to predict long-term bleeding risks during therapy in this

  2. Management of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in the Perioperative Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie Dincq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of oral anticoagulation has evolved with the arrival of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs including an anti-IIa agent (dabigatran etexilate and anti-Xa agents (rivaroxaban and apixaban. The main specificities of these drugs are predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics but special attention should be paid in the elderly, in case of renal dysfunction and in case of emergency. In addition, their perioperative management is challenging, especially with the absence of specific antidotes. Effectively, periods of interruption before surgery or invasive procedures depend on half-life and keeping a permanent balance between bleeding and thromboembolic risks. In addition, few data regarding the link between plasma concentrations and their effects are provided. Routine laboratory tests are altered by NOACs and quantitative measurements are not widely performed. This paper provides a review on the management of NOACs in the perioperative setting, including the estimation of the bleeding and thrombotic risk, the periods of interruption, the indication of heparin bridging, the usefulness of laboratory tests before surgery or invasive procedure, and the time of resuming. Most data are based on expert’s opinions.

  3. Direct oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents. Clinical relevance and options for laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbing, D; Spannagl, M

    2014-01-01

    Oral anticoagulants and platelet receptor blockers are widely used in clinical practice with the aim of reducing the risk of thrombotic complications in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Their regular intake and adequate antithrombotic action is vital and this is way numerous assays have been developed for laboratory testing and monitoring of these agents. Available assays can be stratified into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assays. Such assays are increasingly used in clinical routine and their daily use is triggered by the advent of the novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) as an alternative for vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatment, which are dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, and by the advent of prasugrel or ticagrelor as an alternative for clopidogrel with regard to platelet P2Y12 receptor inhibition. In this review the most important and most commonly used laboratory assays are summarized as well as their clinical implications with the focus on DOACs as an alternative for VKAs and the different P2Y12 receptor blockers for antiplatelet treatment.

  4. Direct oral anticoagulants for secondary prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF, both permanent and paroxysmal, and history of previous transient ischemic attack (TIA or stroke represent a category of patients at high risk of new embolic events, independently of the presence of other risk factors. In these patients, national and international guidelines recommend oral anticoagulants as first choice for antithrombotic prevention. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs have been demonstrated to be not inferior to warfarin for many end points in NVAF patients in terms of efficacy and safety. The post hoc analysis in selected subgroups of patients enrolled in the three mega trials of phase III comparing DOACs (RE-LY, ROCKET-AF and ARISTOTLE with warfarin help to evaluate whether superiority and non-inferiority persist in these subgroups. Here, patients with NVAF and history of previous TIA/stroke receiving DOACs as secondary prevention are compared with patients with the same characteristics receiving warfarin. An analysis of these patients has been recently published (separately for each of three DOACs. This analysis shows that DOACs maintain their non-inferiority when compared with warfarin in secondary prevention, representing a real alternative in this context of patients at high risk for ischemic and bleeding events.

  5. Survival of heparins, oral anticoagulants, and aspirin after the year 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Jawed; Hoppensteadt, Debra A; Fareed, Daniel; Demir, Muzaffer; Wahi, Rakesh; Clarke, Melaine; Adiguzel, Cafer; Bick, Rodger

    2008-02-01

    The conventional management of thrombotic and cardiovascular disorders is based on the use of heparin, oral anticoagulants, and aspirin. Despite remarkable progress in life sciences, these drugs still remain a challenge and a mystery to us, and their use is far from optimized. The development of low-molecular-weight heparins and the synthesis of heparinomimetics, such as the chemically synthesized pentasaccharide, represent a refined use of heparin. Additional drugs from this knowledge will continue to develop; however, none of these drugs will ever match the polypharmacology of heparin. Aspirin still remains the leading drug in the management of thrombotic and cardiovascular disorders. The newer antiplatelet drugs such as adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitors, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, and other specific inhibitors have limited effects and have been tested in patients who have already been treated with aspirin. Warfarin provides a convenient and affordable approach in the long-term outpatient management of thrombotic disorders. The optimized use of these drugs still remains as the approach of choice to manage thrombotic disorders. The new anticoagulant targets, including specific sites in the hemostatic network such as tissue factor, individual clotting factors (IIa, VIIa, IXa, Xa, XIIa, and XIIIa), recombinant forms of serpins (antithrombin, heparin cofactor II, and tissue factor pathway inhibitors), recombinant activated protein C, thrombomodulin, and site-specific serine protease inhibitor complexes have also been developed. There is a major thrust on the development of orally bioavailable anticoagulant drugs (anti-Xa and anti-IIa agents), which are slated to replace oral anticoagulants. Both the anti-factor Xa and antithrombin agents have been developed for oral use and have provided impressive clinical outcomes in sponsor trials for the postsurgical prophylaxis of venous thrombosis; however, safety concerns related to liver enzyme elevations and

  6. The c.-1639g>A polymorphism of the VKORC1 gene and his influence on the therapeutic response during oral anticoagulants use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovač Mirjana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. A single nucleotide polymorphism c.- 1639G>A in the promoter region of vitamin K-epoxide reductase (VKORC1 gene has been found to account for most of the variability in response to oral anticoagulants (OA. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence and the effect of c.-1639G>A polymorphism on the acenocoumarol dosage requirements in the group of patients under stable anticoagulation, and to estimate the variability in response to OA. Methods. Our study included 200 consecutive patients requiring low (n = 43, medium (n = 127 and high (n = 30 acenocoumarol dose. Results. Out of 43 low dose patients, 40 (93 % carried the A allele. The A allele was less frequent in the group of 30 patients requiring high dose: among these patients 13 (43.3% carried the A allele in the heterozygous form and none of them carried AA genotype. The patients with GG genotype required 2.6 times higher dose than the patients carriers of AA genotype (p < 0.0001. In 33 patients (16.5% the overdose occurred during the initiation of anticoagulant therapy and in 11 patients (5.5% it was associated with bleeding. Out of the group of 33 overdosed patients, 27 and 6 patients carried AA and GA genotype, respectively (p < 0.000001. Conclusion. VKORC1 significantly influenced OA dose and predicted individuals predisposed to unstable anticoagulation. The carriers of AA genotype required 2.6 time lower doses of OA than the carriares of GG genotype. Pharmacogenetic testing could predict a high risk of overdose among 28.5 % of our patients - carriers of AA genotype, before anticoagulation therapy initiation.

  7. Pharmacogenetics and anticoagulant therapy: two cases of genetically determined response to warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez-Dias, Nuno; Correia, Maria José; Coutinho, Ana; Fernandes, Catarina; Diogo, A Nunes; Lopes, Mário G

    2009-09-01

    Inter- and intra-individual variability of response to warfarin means that its anticoagulant effect must be monitored, given the risk of thromboembolic complications and bleeding. This variability is influenced by gender, age, body mass index, smoking, diet, comorbid conditions, drug interactions and genetic factors. Pharmacogenetics refers to the study of genetic background to predict drug response, effectiveness and risk of adverse effects in a given patient. The authors illustrate its relevance in two case reports. A 40-year-old woman admitted for massive pulmonary thromboembolism underwent anticoagulant and fibrinolytic therapy, following which warfarin was needed in unusually high doses to achieve effective anticoagulation. The genetic variants c.430CC and c.1075AA of the CYP2C9 gene were identified, predisposing to rapid warfarin metabolism, as well as the c.-1639GG variant of the VKORC1 gene, associated with low sensitivity to the drug. Together, these variants give high resistance to warfarin. In the second case, a 76-year-old man with permanent atrial fibrillation developed excessive prolongation of prothrombin time after being treated with 5 mg/day warfarin for 5 days. The genetic variants c.430CC and c.1075AC of the CYP2C9 gene and 1639AA of the VKORC1 gene were identified. Together, these polymorphisms confer high sensitivity to warfarin, necessitating smaller doses to maintain therapeutic anticoagulation levels. The authors review the relevance of the study of genetic polymorphisms related to anticoagulant therapy and discuss its potential usefulness in clinical practice.

  8. Clinical management of spontaneous intracranial haemorrhage associated with oral anticoagulants: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Masotti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH is associated with high mortality and morbidity, and for this reason it is the most feared complication of oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT. Recommendations are available for the immediate reversal of OAT, but these measures are not always used uniformly and rapidly. The aim of this study was to critically review the treatment of spontaneous OAT-related ICH in our hospital. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of patients admitted to our ward between January 2006 and January 2010 for spontaneous OAT-related ICH. Results: In the analyzed period, 15 patients were hospitalized for OAT-related ICH (supratentorial in 66.5%, infratentorial in 20%, acute subdural hematoma in 13.5%. In 66.5% of the patients, the INR on arrival was within the therapeutic range. In 60% of the cases, the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS on arrival was > 8/15. Three-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC was administered in 80% of the cases, and 30% of patients received fresh frozen plasma (FFP and recombinant activated factor VII (FVIIra. One patient received PCC plus PFC, and another received PCC with FVIIra. FFP alone was used in 13.5% of the patients. All of the patients received intravenously administered vitamin K1. Treatment was started in the Emergency Room in 33.5% of the cases; in the other 66.5% it began on our ward. In 66.5% of the patients, the treatment was effective in reversing OATwithin 8 hours. In 2 cases, the hematoma was surgically evacuated, and the patients survived. Total mortality for OAT-related ICH was 46.5% (32.9% in non-OAT-related ICH. In 71.5% of the patients with OAT-related haemorrhages, death occurred within 48 hours of arrival. Sixty percent of the patients with ICH > 60 cm3 (20% in patients with ICH < 60 cm3 and 100% of those with GCS < 7/15 died. For survivors, the median modified Rankin Scale at discharge was 3. All survivors were still alive at 3 months after

  9. Anticoagulation Therapy and Imaging in Neonates With a Unilateral Thalamic Hemorrhage Due to Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersbergen, Karina J.; de Vries, Linda S.; van Straaten, H. L. M. (Irma); Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Nievelstein, Ruter A. J.; Groenendaal, Floris

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis is a rare disorder with a high risk of an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. Until now, anticoagulation therapy has been restricted to neonates without an associated parenchymal hemorrhage. In this study, we describe sequential neuroimaging find

  10. Tutorial in oral antithrombotic therapy: Biology and dental implications

    OpenAIRE

    Fakhri, Hamid Reza; Janket, Sok Ja; Jackson, Elizabeth A.; Alison E Baird; Dinnocenzo, Richard; Meurman, Jukka H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent developments of new direct oral anticoagulants that target specific clotting factors necessitate understanding of coagulation biology. The objective of this tutorial is to offer dental professionals a review of coagulation mechanisms and the pharmacodynamics of the conventional and new oral anticoagulants. Also, we summarized the dental implications of the conventional and new anticoagulants. Method: We searched Medline using search terms “antithrombotic”, “antihemostasis” ...

  11. A Study of the Management of Patients Taking Novel Oral Antiplatelet or Direct Oral Anticoagulant Medication Undergoing Dental Surgery in a Rural Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Johnston

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Novel oral antiplatelet (NOAP (prasugrel and ticagrelor and direct oral anticoagulant drugs (DOAC (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban have emerged in the last decade. This study was undertaken to determine current approaches taken to the management of patients taking these agents in dental practice in a remote and rural setting. Methods: A small retrospective study was carried out in a small island population that identified patients taking one of the above drugs. All national health service and private dental records were examined to determine the type of treatment carried out and whether drug therapy, treatment plans or actual treatment were modified as a result of NOAP or DOAC therapy. In addition other outcomes such as referral to another service for advice or treatment and any adverse bleeding events were noted. Results: 156 dental encounters for 95 patients taking one of the drugs were identified. Significant events were identified in sixteen encounters and the management of patients taking each drug type differed significantly between cases but no patients returned with troublesome post-operative bleeding. Conclusions: The approaches taken by dental surgeons in Orkney in the management of the NOAPs and DOACs varied and this is likely to be a reflection of the limited literature available.

  12. Oral anticoagulation to prevent thrombosis recurrence in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Boluda, Juan-Carlos; Arellano-Rodrigo, Eduardo; Cervantes, Francisco; Alvarez-Larrán, Alberto; Gómez, Montse; Barba, Pere; Mata, María-Isabel; González-Porras, José-Ramón; Ferrer-Marín, Francisca; García-Gutiérrez, Valentín; Magro, Elena; Moreno, Melania; Kerguelen, Ana; Pérez-Encinas, Manuel; Estrada, Natàlia; Ayala, Rosa; Besses, Carles; Pereira, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    It is unclear whether anticoagulation guidelines intended for the general population are applicable to patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET). In the present study, the risk of thrombotic recurrence was analyzed in 150 patients with PV and ET treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) because of an arterial or venous thrombosis. After an observation period of 963 patient-years, the incidence of re-thrombosis was 4.5 and 12 per 100 patient-years under VKA therapy and after stopping it, respectively (P thrombosis associated with a prior history of remote thrombosis. Both the protective effect of VKA therapy and the predisposing factors for recurrence were independent of the anatomical site involved in the index thrombosis. Treatment periods with VKA did not result in a higher incidence of major bleeding as compared with those without VKA. These findings support the use of long-term anticoagulation for the secondary prevention of thrombosis in patients with PV and ET, particularly in those with history of remote thrombosis.

  13. Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: Understanding the New Oral Anticoagulants Dabigatran, Rivaroxaban, and Apixaban

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Ru San

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike vitamin K antagonists (VKAs, the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs—direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and direct activated factor X inhibitors, rivaroxaban, and apixaban—do not require routine INR monitoring. Compared to VKAs, they possess relatively rapid onset of action and short halflives, but vary in relative degrees of renal excretion as well as interaction with p-glycoprotein membrane transporters and liver cytochrome P450 metabolic enzymes. Recent completed phase III trials comparing NOACs with VKAs for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF—the RE-LY, ROCKET AF, and ARISTOTLE trials—demonstrated at least noninferior efficacy, largely driven by significant reductions in haemorrhagic stroke. Major and nonmajor clinically relevant bleeding rates were acceptable compared to VKAs. Of note, the NOACs caused significantly less intracranial haemorrhagic events compared to VKAs, the mechanisms of which are not completely clear. With convenient fixed-dose administration, the NOACs facilitate anticoagulant management in AF in the community, which has hitherto been grossly underutilised. Guidelines should evolve towards simplicity in anticipation of greater use of NOACs among primary care physicians. At the same time, the need for caution with their use in patients with severely impaired renal function should be emphasised.

  14. Dynamics of vitamin K antagonist and new oral anticoagulants use in atrial fibrillation: a Danish drug utilization study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Poulsen, B. K.; Larsen, Michael Due;

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundDetailed data on real-life utilization of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in atrial fibrillation are sparse. ObjectivesTo describe the dynamics of VKA and NOAC use: that is, (i) how patients moved in and out of, as well as between, use of VKAs and NOACs...

  15. Trends in antithrombotic drug use and adherence to non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanemaaijer, Susan; Sodihardjo, Fong; Horikx, Annemieke; Wensing, Michel; de Smet, Peter A G M; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Teichert, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) became available in the Netherlands in 2008, providing another antithrombotic treatment besides vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and antiplatelet agents (APAs). Objective To describe the patterns of antithrombotic drug use between 2008 and 2013 by exa

  16. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Ida; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A; Cohen, Alexander T; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S; Prins, Martin H

    2016-03-17

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation. Despite the absence of data, World Health Organization guidelines state that use of estrogen-containing contraceptives confers an "unacceptable health risk" during established anticoagulation for VTE. We compared the incidences of recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding with and without concomitant hormonal therapy in women aged abnormal uterine bleeding. In total, 1888 women were included. VTE incidence densities on and off hormonal therapy were 3.7%/year and 4.7%/year (adjusted HR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-1.39), respectively, and were 3.7%/year and 3.8%/year, respectively, for estrogen-containing and progestin-only therapy. The adjusted HR for all abnormal uterine bleeding (on vs off hormonal therapy) was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.66-1.57). Abnormal uterine bleeding occurred more frequently with rivaroxaban than with enoxaparin/VKA (HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.57-2.89). Hormonal therapy was not associated with an increased risk of recurrent VTE in women receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. The observed increased risk of abnormal uterine bleeding with rivaroxaban needs further exploration.

  17. Dabigatran: A new oral anticoagulant. Guidelines to follow in oral surgery procedures. A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Corcuera, M; Ramírez-Martínez-Acitores, L; López-Pintor, R-M; Casañas-Gil, E; Hernández-Vallejo, G

    2016-11-01

    Dabigatran is a newly commercialized drug that is replacing other anticoagulants in the prevention of venous thromboembolism, stroke and systemic arterial valve embolism. It acts directly on thrombin presenting in a dynamic and predictable way, which does not require monitoring these patients. Therefore, we consider the need to assess whether their use increases the risk of bleeding involved before any dental treatment. We performed a systematic review with a bibliographic search in PubMed/Medline along with the Cochrane Library. We excluded articles dealing with all anticoagulants other than dabigatran, and works about surgical treatments in anatomical locations other than the oral cavity. We included a total of 13 papers of which 1 was a randomized clinical trial, 9 narrative literature reviews, 1 case series, 2 clinical cases and 1 expert opinion. Because we did not obtain any properly designed clinical trials, we were unable to conduct a meta-analysis. Currently, there is no consensus on the procedure to be followed in patients taking dabigatran. However, all authors agree to treat each case individually in accordance to the risk of embolism, postoperative bleeding and renal function. Also, it is necessary to perform minimally invasive interventions, and take the appropriate local anti-hemolytic measures.

  18. The recent clinical trials on use of the novel direct oral anticoagulants in patients with venous thromboembolism: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gualtiero Palareti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, encompassing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, requires an immediate anticoagulation, that has been carried out so far by administering a parenteral anticoagulant drug (heparin or derivatives overlapped with an oral vitamin K antagonist (VKA, more often warfarin. Several new direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs, with a mechanism of action completely different than VKA, have been developed in recent years. Recent clinical trials have investigated their use in VTE patients showing results at least equal for efficacy and safety, and sometime even better, as the standard anticoagulant treatment. There are differences in the design of the trials. In two cases the involved DOAC was administered immediately after VTE diagnosis as a single drug treatment (rivaroxaban and apixaban, whereas in the other trials (involving dabigatran and edoxaban the DOAC was administered after an initial course of approximately 7 days with heparin or derivatives. Some clinical trials have also investigated the use of DOACs for extended anticoagulant treatment after the acute phase. Aim of this article is to review the results of the currently available clinical trials that have compared the use of DOACs versus the standard of care in patients with VTE.

  19. [Pharmacogenetics of oral anticoagulants: individualized drug treatment for more efficacy and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriot, Marie-Anne; Beaune, Philippe

    2007-06-30

    Oral anti-vitamin K (AVK) anticoagulants constitute the first cause of iatrogenic accidents in France because of narrow therapeutic index and bleeding risk. The wide interindividual variation in AVK response is partly genetically determined. The main enzyme responsible for the metabolism of AVK is the hepatic cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9). Vitamine K epoxide reductase complex subunit I (VKORC1) is a key enzyme in the vitamin K cycle, cofactor required for the activation of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors, and is the target enzyme of AVK inhibition. Genetic variations affecting both CYP2C9 and VKORC1 are associated with variability in drug response and may explain differences in dose requirements. Genotyping for CYP2C9 and VKORC1 variants before initiation of treatment may allow clinicians to develop dosing protocols and identify the patients at a higher risk for bleeding complications.

  20. Direct oral anticoagulants in the secondary prevention of stroke and transient ischemic attack in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnao, Valentina; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    In patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and history of transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke, the rate of vascular events is higher in comparison to patients without history of stroke or TIA. A meta-analysis of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) studies, including only patients with history of stroke or TIA, report a significant reduction of 15 % in the rates of composite of stroke and systemic embolism in patients treated with DOACs, compared to those treated with warfarin. Furthermore, a reduction of 14 % for major bleeding, as well as a 56 % reduction for hemorrhagic stroke over a median follow-up of 1.8-2.0 years is reported. The combination of DOACs and antiplatelet agents carries the potential of additive benefits in patients with NVAF and other vascular diseases. However, the rate of major bleeding is higher among patients who receive concomitantly antiplatelet agents, compared to those taking only a single drug category. The risk of major bleeding seems to be higher among patients receiving dual antiplatelet agents, compared to those receiving a single antiplatelet drug. When NVAF is associated with an acute coronary syndrome requiring dual antiplatelet therapy (e.g. coronary angioplasty and stenting), DOACs plus this therapy should be considered. However, this therapy has to be administered for the shortest possible time, according to the patient's haemorrhagic and thrombotic risks, and stent type. When NVAF is associated with carotid stenosis, a single antiplatelet therapy should be considered. Regarding carotid revascularization, it seems preferable to treat these patients with endarterectomy, so to avoid dual antiplatelet therapy, which is generally administered after stenting.

  1. Anticoagulant therapy for sepsis-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation: the view from Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iba, T; Gando, S; Thachil, J

    2014-07-01

    The current management of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is based on aggressive treatment of the underlying condition and resuscitation with appropriate blood products. Anticoagulant therapy has appeared and disappeared in the different guidelines and important documents detailing the treatment of DIC. For example, Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines, the 'global standard' for the management of severe sepsis, had recombinant activated protein C highly recommended in the original version, but this was withdrawn in the latest version due to the lack of evidence. In contrast, recent international guidance released from the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis has introduced the potential efficacy of other agents. In sepsis-related DIC, the basis for anticoagulant therapy comes from the mounting evidence for the anti-inflammatory effects which these agents possess and can prove beneficial in septic situations. Several studies have clearly shown the important cross-talk between coagulation and inflammation in patients with sepsis. More recently, neutrophil extracellular traps and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), especially histones, have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the coagulopathy of sepsis. Once again, the natural anticoagulants have an important function in neutralizing the effects of DAMPs and histones. In this review, in addition to examining the important role of anticoagulants in the septic milieu, the clinical studies examining antithrombin, recombinant thrombomodulin and plasma-derived activated protein C are detailed. However, large-scale randomized controlled trials are yet to be performed, with important consideration of the timing, dosage and duration of treatment.

  2. Battle of oral anticoagulants in the field of atrial fibrillation scrutinized from a clinical practice (the real world perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidal Hector O

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Warfarin has a long history of benefit and has become the gold standard medication for the prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Nevertheless, it is far from perfect and there is no doubt that new drugs must be found to replace warfarin. The new oral anticoagulants that are on the market or awaiting approval or under research offer some benefits but not enough to replace warfarin until results of additional studies can show an adequate balance between effectiveness/safety and cost/benefit. There are several issues concerning the new oral anticoagulants. It is essential that the effect of any anticoagulant can be measured in plasma. But to date, there is no test to assess the effect or therapeutic range for the new oral anticoagulants. There is no antidote to neutralize the action of the new drugs in cases of bleeding or when acute surgical intervention is necessary. Dabigatran requires dose adjustment in patients with moderate renal impairment and is contraindicated in patients with severe renal failure. Rivaroxaban should be used with caution in patients with severe renal impairment. Apixaban excretion is also partly dependent on renal function, although the impact of renal insufficiency has not yet been determined. How anticoagulant bridging can be done before surgery has not yet been established. In conclusion, although thousands of patients have been treated in phase III studies, additional data are necessary before conclusions can be drawn on the potential for these new anticoagulant drugs to replace warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  3. PREVENTION OF THROMBOEMBOLIC COMPLICATIONS IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION - RAT POISON OR NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS: DO WE HAVE A CHOICE, AND SHOULD WE BE AFRAID TO MAKE IT? FIRST CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH RIVAROXABAN IN NIZHNY NOVGOROD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Koroleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adequate primary and secondary prevention of thromboembolic complications is one of the main goals of management of patients with atrial fibrillation. Many years of practice and experience of warfarin use, unfortunately, did not lead to wider and more efficient use of anticoagulation therapy. New oral anticoagulants devoid of drawbacks of warfarin, which prevented its prescription and long-term use, have appeared in the past few years. One of them, the most studied, with the largest list of indications for use, and very attractive, is rivaroxaban.

  4. PREVENTION OF THROMBOEMBOLIC COMPLICATIONS IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION - RAT POISON OR NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS: DO WE HAVE A CHOICE, AND SHOULD WE BE AFRAID TO MAKE IT? FIRST CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH RIVAROXABAN IN NIZHNY NOVGOROD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Koroleva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Adequate primary and secondary prevention of thromboembolic complications is one of the main goals of management of patients with atrial fibrillation. Many years of practice and experience of warfarin use, unfortunately, did not lead to wider and more efficient use of anticoagulation therapy. New oral anticoagulants devoid of drawbacks of warfarin, which prevented its prescription and long-term use, have appeared in the past few years. One of them, the most studied, with the largest list of indications for use, and very attractive, is rivaroxaban.

  5. challenges in management of warfarin anti-coagulation in advanced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-01

    Jul 1, 2013 ... hyper-coagulable state in advanced HIV/AIDS patients has ... state in these patients with abnormalities in the coagulation ... Oral anti-coagulation therapy with warfarin ..... as stasis, trauma, or known hypercoagulability (e.g..

  6. Management of the anticoagulated dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J H

    1996-11-01

    An understanding of the primary mechanisms of hemostasis, including the coagulation pathways and the intrinsic, extrinsic, and common systems, is the basis for treating the anticoagulated patient. Two major anticoagulants are used for treating those who may be at risk for thromboembolic crisis. These drugs include Coumadin, which is an oral anticoagulant, and heparin, a parenteral anticoagulant, which is often used for acute thromboembolic episodes or for hospitalization protocols that include significant surgical procedures. The practitioner should be familiar with common dental drugs that can interact with anticoagulants and should consult with the patient's physician before administering any such drugs. By placing the patient into one of three dental treatment categories, appropriate anticoagulation therapy can be rendered to each patient according to his or her needs. Low-risk procedures require no change in anticoagulation medication. For moderate-risk procedures, withdrawal of anticoagulation medication 2 days before the procedure and verified with the PT the day of the procedure is indicated. For high-risk dental procedures, using a heparin protocol should be strongly considered. In all instances of dental treatment, the oral tissues should be treated atraumatically using local hemostatic measures for control of hemorrhage. Treating medically compromised patients who are on a variety of medications is becoming more common in dentistry today. Understanding the underlying disease and the appropriate protocol for treatment of anticoagulated patients reduces the risk of thromboembolism and hemorrhagic complications.

  7. Is Endoscopic Therapy Safe for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Anticoagulated Patients With Supratherapeutic International Normalized Ratios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Choong Nam; Chung, Hyun Soo; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Ha Yan; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    The management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in anticoagulated patients with supratherapeutic international normalized ratios (INRs) presents a challenge. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the safety of endoscopic therapy for UGIB in anticoagulated patients with supratherapeutic INR in terms of rebleeding and therapeutic outcomes. One hundred ninety-two anticoagulated patients who underwent endoscopic treatment for UGIB were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the occurrence of rebleeding within 30 days of the initial therapeutic endoscopy: no-rebleeding group (n = 168) and rebleeding group (n = 24). The overall rebleeding rate was 12.5%. Bleeding from gastric cancer and bleeding at the duodenum were significantly related to rebleeding in a univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis determined that presenting symptoms other than melena (hematemesis, hematochezia, or others) (odds ratio, 3.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.44-10.76) and bleeding from gastric cancer (odds ratio, 6.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-29.25) were significant factors predictive of rebleeding. Supratherapeutic INR at the time of endoscopic therapy was not significantly associated with rebleeding in either univariate or multivariate analysis. Significant differences in bleeding-related mortality, additional intervention to control bleeding, length of hospital stay, and transfusion requirements were revealed between the rebleeding and no-rebleeding groups. There were no significant differences in therapeutic outcomes between patients with INR within the therapeutic range and those with supratherapeutic INR. Supratherapeutic INR at the time of endoscopic therapy did not change rebleeding and therapeutic outcomes. Thus, we should consider endoscopic therapy for UGIB in anticoagulated patients, irrespective of INR at the time of endoscopic therapy.

  8. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and adjusted observational results of use of clopidogrel, aspirin, and oral anticoagulants in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Taha, Salma; Moretti, Claudio;

    2015-01-01

    randomized controlled trials or multivariate analysis. In 9 studies, 1,317 patients were treated with DAPT and 1,547 with TT. DAPT offered a significant reduction of major bleeding at 1 year for overall studies and for the subset of observational works providing adjusted data (odds ratio [OR] 0.51, 95......The optimal antiaggregant therapy after coronary stenting in patients receiving oral anticoagulants (OACs) is currently debated. MEDLINE and Cochrane Library were searched for studies reporting outcomes of patients who underwent PCI and who were on triple therapy (TT) or dual-antiplatelet therapy...... or multivariate analysis. Six studies tested OAC and clopidogrel (1,263 patients) versus OAC, aspirin, and clopidogrel (3,055 patients) with a significant reduction of bleeding (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.64 to 0.98), without affecting rates of death, MI, stroke, and stent thrombosis (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.23) also...

  9. Considerations for Medication Management and Anticoagulation During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ashley; Li, Fanny; Gross, A Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Providing safe and high-quality care to critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) includes adequate drug dosing and evaluation of patients' response to medications during therapy. Pharmacokinetic drug studies in acute kidney injury and CRRT are limited, considering the number of medications used in critical care. Therefore, it is important to understand the basic principles of drug clearance during CRRT by evaluating drug properties, CRRT modalities, and how they affect medication clearance. Few published studies have addressed drug disposition and clinical response during CRRT. Additionally, clotting in the CRRT circuit is a concern, so a few options for anticoagulation strategies are presented. This article reviews (1) the CRRT system and drug property factors that affect medication management, (2) the evidence available to guide drug dosing, and (3) anticoagulation strategies for critically ill patients receiving CRRT. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  10. Efficacy and safety of the target-specific oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: the real-life evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Vincenzo; Rago, Anna; Proietti, Riccardo; Di Meo, Federica; Antonio Papa, Andrea; Calabrò, Paolo; D’Onofrio, Antonio; Nigro, Gerardo; AlTurki, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our article is to provide a concise review for clinicians entailing the main studies that evaluated the efficacy and safety of target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOAs) for thromboembolic stroke prevention in the real-world setting. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common supraventricular arrhythmias that requires anticoagulation therapy to prevent stroke and systemic embolism. TSOAs, dabigatran, apixaban and rivaroxaban have become available as an alternative to warfarin anticoagulation in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Randomized clinical trials showed non-inferior or superior results in efficacy and safety of the TSOAs compared with warfarin for stroke prevention in NVAF patients. For this reason, the 2012 update to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of AF recommends TSOAs as broadly preferable to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in the vast majority of patients with NVAF [Camm et al. 2012]. Although the clinical trial results and the guideline’s indications, there is a need for safety and efficacy data from unselected patients in everyday clinical practice. Recently, a large number of studies testing the efficacy and the safety of TSOAs in clinical practice have been published. The aim of our article is to provide a concise review for clinicians, outlining the main studies that evaluated the efficacy and safety of TSOAs for thromboembolic stroke prevention in the real-world setting. PMID:28255434

  11. A Study of the Management of Patients Taking Novel Oral Antiplatelet or Direct Oral Anticoagulant Medication Undergoing Dental Surgery in a Rural Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Johnston

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Novel oral antiplatelet (NOAP) (prasugrel and ticagrelor) and direct oral anticoagulant drugs (DOAC) (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) have emerged in the last decade. This study was undertaken to determine current approaches taken to the management of patients taking these agents in dental practice in a remote and rural setting. Methods: A small retrospective study was carried out in a small island population that identified patients taking one of the above drugs. All national ...

  12. ACD-A solution as anticoagulant during continuous renal replacement therapy in high risk bleeding patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨松涛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of ACDA solution as anticoagulant during continuous renal replacement therapy(CRRT)in high risk of bleeding patients.Methods Forty high risk bleeding patients on continuous veno-venous hemofiltration(CVVH)were randomly divided into two groups:ACD-A group(22 patients,61 cases)and heparin-free group(18 patients,47cases).Serum creatinine,function of the coagulation

  13. Comparison of Anticoagulant Effects on Vein Grafts between Human TFPI Gene Transfection and Aspirin Oral Administration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deguang FENG; Cheng ZHOU; Quan LI; Kailin ZHANG; Xionggang JIANG; Song LENG; Heping DENG; Jiane FENG; Tucheng SUN; Long WU

    2008-01-01

    To develop a more efficient antithrombotic way after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), the anticoagulant effects were compared of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) gene transfection and aspirin oral administration (traditional method) on vein grafts. An eukaryotic expression plasmid pCMV-(Kozak) TFPI was prepared. Animal model of carotid artery bypass grafting was constructed. In operation, endothelial cells of vein grafts in TFPI group and empty plasmid control group were transfected with pCMV-(Kozak) TFPI and empty plasmid pCMV respectively, while no transfection was conducted in aspirin control group. After operation, aspirin (2 mg·kg-1·d-1) was administered (I.g.) in aspirin control group. Three days later, grafts (n=10) were harvested for RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses of exogenous gone expression and for pathological, scanning electron microscopic observation of thrombus. Thirty days later, the patency rates of remnant grafts (n=10) were recorded by vessel Doppler ultrasonography. Human TFPI gene products were detected in gene transferred vein grafts. Three days later, thrombi were found in 7 animals of aspirin control group and in 8 animals of empty plasmid control group, but in only 1 of TFPI group (P<0.01). Thirty days later, 5 grafts were occluded in empty plasmid control group, but none of grafts was occluded in the other groups (P<0.05). The endothelial surfaces of grafts in both of the control groups were covered with aggregated erythrocytes and platelets, and it were not seen in TFPI group. R was suggested that the anticoagulant effects on vein grafts of human TFPI gene trans- fection are better than those of aspirin.

  14. Managing venous thromboembolism in Asia: winds of change in the era of new oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alexander; Chiu, Kuan Ming; Park, Kihyuk; Jeyaindran, Sinnadurai; Tambunan, Karmel L; Ward, Christopher; Wong, Raymond; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2012-09-01

    Despite advances in the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE), treatment of many patients worldwide, especially in Asia, remains inadequate and/or discordant with prevailing guidelines. Although epidemiological studies consistently report lower incidences of VTE in Asians than Caucasians, VTE rates in Asia have probably been gravely underestimated, partly due to comparatively lesser ascertainment. It is becoming evident that Asians are at much higher risk of VTE than was hitherto supposed. Nevertheless, VTE risk-assessment is not routine in Asia and thromboprophylaxis rates are much lower than in Western nations. It is important to base decisions about anticoagulation on individual circumstances and weigh the potential benefits and risks. The conventional VTE management paradigm is not ideal. New oral anticoagulants offer advantages over current modalities that may help to streamline patient care and reduce healthcare costs. Initially, they will be mainly used in uncomplicated cases and, in the absence of clear differences in efficacy or safety, convenience, tolerability/adherence and cost will determine treatment choice. There is clear scope to improve VTE prevention and treatment in Asia. Key priorities are raising awareness of best practice and properly implementing guidelines. Uncertainty about the burden of VTE and concern about bleeding are barriers. High-quality Asian epidemiological data are needed to guide healthcare policy and evidence-based practice. More data on the occurrence and management of bleeding complications in Asian patients are also required. Meanwhile, physicians should remain vigilant and strive to act early, decisively and appropriately to diagnose and treat VTE, particularly in patients at high risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Management recommendations for invasive dental treatment in patients using oral antithrombotic medication, including novel oral anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diermen, D.E.; van der Waal, I.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aims were (1) to search the scientific literature from 2007 to 2012 for guidelines and new studies on the dental management of patients using oral antithrombotic medication; (2) to summarize the articles' evidence and recommendations; and (3) to propose an updated clinical practice gui

  16. Prothrombin complex concentrate administration for bleeding associated with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants: The SAMURAI-NVAF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Sohei; Sato, Shoichiro; Todo, Kenichi; Okada, Yasushi; Furui, Eisuke; Matsuki, Takayuki; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Koga, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Jun C; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Arihiro, Shoji; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2017-04-15

    Antidotes appropriate for non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are not yet in widespread clinical use. Efficacy of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) in NOAC-associated bleeding remains unclarified. Ten NOAC users (4 women, median 74years old) who developed major bleeding and received PCC were prospectively enrolled. Eight single-center NOAC users (0 women, median 74years old) with intracerebral hemorrhage, who over the same period did not receive PCC, were studied for comparison. Of the 10 PCC-treated patients, 8 developed intracerebral hemorrhage, 1 developed subdural hematoma, and another developed gastrointestinal bleeding. The median size of intracerebral hemorrhage was 8mL, relatively lower than the reported size for patients without NOACs. Patients received a median of 1000IU or 16IU/kg of PCC. Before and 1h after PCC administration, the median PT-INR changed from 1.41 to 1.09 (pbleeding and were given relatively low doses of PCC. The effect of PCC on early cessation of bleeding was unclear, while the therapy did not trigger thromboembolic complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Administration of Coagulation-Altering Therapy in the Patient Presenting for Oral Health and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaszynski, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    Oral health care providers are concerned with how to manage patients prescribed coagulation-altering therapy during the perioperative/periprocedural period for dental and oral surgery interventions. Management and recommendation can be based on medication pharmacology and the clinical relevance of coagulation factor levels/deficiencies. Caution should be used with concurrent use of medications that affect other components of the clotting mechanisms; prompt diagnosis and any necessary intervention to optimize outcome is warranted. However, evidence-based data on management of anticoagulation therapy during oral and maxillofacial surgery/interventions is lacking. Therefore, clinical understanding and judgment are needed along with appropriate guidelines matching patient- and intervention-specific recommendations.

  18. Tratamento da superdosagem de anticoagulantes orais Reversal of excessive oral anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Maria Lourenço

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a resposta de 73 pacientes com superdosagem de droga anti-vitamina K (AVK a 3 esquemas de tratamento. MÉTODOS: Os 73 pacientes foram avaliados em 94 ocasiões e divididos em 3 grupos: grupo A (N=32 , suspensão do AVK por 2 dias e introdução de dose menor; grupo B (N=37, suspensão do AVK e reavaliação em 4 dias; grupo C (N=25, vitamina K por via oral. A razão normalizada internacional (RNI final foi considerada adequada quando entre 2,0 e 4,0. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença entre os tratamentos (chi²=2,352, p=0,671 para 61 pacientes com RNI inicial 8. Cinco dos 7 pacientes do grupo B que continuaram com superdosagem tinham RNI PURPOSE: To evaluate the response of 73 patients with antivitamin K (AVK overdose to 3 different therapeutic regimens. METHODS: Seventy three patients were evaluated in 94 occasions: group A (N=32, consisted of drug withdrawal for 2 days followed by reduced dosage; group B (N=37, drug withdrawal and reassessment within 4 days; group C (N=25, oral administration of vitamin K. Therapeutic range was set between INR-values of 2 and 4. RESULTS: Reversal regimens did not result in differences among 61 patients who had initial INR 4, but 5 of them were bellow 4.5, without increased bleeding risk. There were 10 patients in group C bellow therapeutic range, 6 of them with INR < 1.6, with risk of thromboembolism. Thirteen patients bled, but none required transfusion. CONCLUSION: Reversal of excessive oral anticoagulation can be safely performed by initial withdrawal of the drug, followed by lower doses. Vitamin K administration may lead to INR bellow the therapeutic range. This should be reserved for patients with high INR or in the presence of bleeding.

  19. Interpreting the quality of health care database studies on the comparative effectiveness of oral anticoagulants in routine care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneeweiss S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Schneeweiss, Krista F Huybrechts, Joshua J Gagne Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Background: Dabigatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor, has now been available for 2 years in the US for the prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, and direct Xa inhibitors are also starting to enter the market. Studies examining the effects of new oral anticoagulants in health care databases are beginning to emerge. The purpose of this study was to describe the validity of early published observational studies on the comparative safety and effectiveness of new oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation. Methods: We identified published nonrandomized post-marketing studies (articles or conference abstracts or posters and critically appraised their internal validity, with a particular focus on their ability to control confounding and other biases. Results: Two full-length journal articles, three conference posters, two conference presentation abstracts, and a US Food and Drug Administration analysis form the basis of the early comparative effectiveness and safety experience with new oral anticoagulants. Some published studies exhibit substantial biases and have insufficient precision for several important endpoints. Several studies suffer from biases arising from comparing ongoing users of the older drug, warfarin, who seem to tolerate it, to initiators of the new treatment who may have switched from warfarin or have had no prior experience with anticoagulants. Analyses tended to not adjust or not adjust adequately for confounding, and unsound propensity score application was also observed. Several studies introduced selection bias by excluding patients who died during follow-up and by restricting the study population to those with continuous database enrollment following cohort entry. We

  20. Effect of regional citrate versus systemic heparin anticoagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy rewarming in dogs with accidental hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui YUAN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the influences of regional citrate or systemic heparin anticoagulation on acid-base balance, coagulation, electrolytes, serum creatinine, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and cardiac index (CI during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT rewarming in accidental hypothermia dogs. Methods  Nineteen adult beagles were given abdominal trauma coupled with deep hypothermia [(28±0.5℃] induced by seawater immersion for establishing animal model of trauma. According to rewarming ways, the animal models were randomly divided into three groups, comparison group (warm bath rewarming, n=5, CRRT rewarming-systemic heparin anticoagulation group (heparin anticoagulation group, n=7 and CRRT rewarming-regional citrate anticoagulation group (citrate anticoagulation group, n=7. During the rewarming routine blood examination was performed, and blood chemistry, coagulation function, blood gas and hemodynamic status were assayed, at the same time the mortality was recorded. Results  During the rewarming, the mortality was 14.3% (1/7 in heparin anticoagulation group, 40.0% (2/5 in warm bath group and 0 in regional citrate anticoagulation group. Blood temperature in creased to 38℃, the heparin anticoagulation group showed a significant decrease of platelet compared with citrate anticoagulation group and comparison group (P0.05. Conclusions  CRRT plus warm bath rewarming have better effect on improving metabolic acidosis than warm bath rewarming alone in accidental hypothermia dogs. In comparison with systemic heparin anticoagulation, regional citrate anticoagulation has smaller influences on coagulation system and platelet when CRRT rewarming performed in accidental hypothermia dogs. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.10.05

  1. Are there guidelines for implantable spinal cord stimulator therapy in patients using chronic anticoagulation therapy? - A review of decision-making in the high-risk patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsis F Ghaly

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our literature search did not reveal any evidence of SCS therapy among patients with chronic anticoagulation. This case illustrated a complicated clinical case scenario wherein a percutaneous SCS implantation would normally be contraindicated due to severe thoracic spinal stenosis and chronic anticoagulation which could lead to possible paralysis or even a lethal consequences associated with the possible formation of a thoracic epidural hematoma.

  2. Antithrombotic treatment for patients on oral anticoagulation undergoing coronary stenting: a review of the available evidence and practical suggestions for the clinician.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubboli, A.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dual antiplatelet treatment with aspirin and a thienopyridine is the antithrombotic treatment recommended after coronary stenting. Such strategy is generally not applicable in most patients with an indication for oral anticoagulation (OAC), for whom however, information about the optimal

  3. Choosing a particular oral anticoagulant and dose for stroke prevention in individual patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Aisenberg, James; Ansell, Jack;

    2016-01-01

    stroke risk factor (CHA2DS2VASc score of 1 in males, 2 in females); and (vi) patients with a single first episode of paroxysmal AF. Although there are no major differences in terms of efficacy and safety between the NOACs for some clinical scenarios, in others we are able to suggest that particular drugs......Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have a high risk of stroke and mortality, which can be considerably reduced by oral anticoagulants (OAC). Recently, four non-vitamin-K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were compared with warfarin in large randomized trials for the prevention of stroke and systemic...... embolism. Today's clinician is faced with the difficult task of selecting a suitable OAC for a patient with a particular clinical profile or a particular pattern of risk factors and concomitant diseases. We reviewed analyses of subgroups of patients from trials of vitamin K antagonists vs. NOACs for stroke...

  4. A Retrospective Study of Continuous Renal Therapy and Anticoagulation in Patients with Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the application of continuous renal replacement therapy(CRRT) and heparin anticoagulation in patients with HFRS, and to explore a more suitable anticoagulant strategy. MethodsEighty-five severe-type patients (severe group) and 71 critical-type patients (critical group) were enrolled in this study. The frequency of CRRT was compared between the two groups; the frequency of CRRT treated with and without heparin anticoagulation and the frequency of hemorrhage and channel blood clotting induced by the two anticoagulant strategies were observed. ResultsThe frequency of CRRT in the critical group was higher than thatin the severe group (P<0.001). The frequency of CRRT initiated during the overlapping phases in the critical group was signiifcantly higher than that of the severe group (P=0.032). The total times of CRRT was 103, and 70 of them were treated with heparin anticoagulation. The frequencies of hemorrhage induced by heparin anticoagulation and no heparinization were 16 and 0, respectively, and the frequencies of channel blood clotting were 2 and 4, respectively. Conclusions CRRT has been used extensively in the critical-type patients with HFRS. The heparin anticoagulation and no anticoagulant strategies should be used more rationally in patients treated with CRRT, according to the clinical characteristics of the disease.

  5. Subclinical hyperthyroidism seems not to have a significant impact on systemic anticoagulation in patients with coumarin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucerius, Jan; Naubereit, Anna; Joe, Alexius Y; Ezziddin, Samer; Biermann, Kim; Risse, Jörn; Palmedo, Holger; Oldenburg, Johannes; Biersack, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-11-01

    There is little data regarding the impact of subclinical hyperthyroidism on coagulation metabolism in patients undergoing systemic anticoagulation therapy with coumarin derivates. In this retrospective analysis we studied 233 patients with benign thyroid disorders receiving therapeutic iodine-131, as well as concomitant systemic anticoagulation therapy (subclinical hyperthyroidism: n = 178; overt hyperthyroidism: n = 15; euthyroidism: n = 40). Multivariate regression analyses were performed in the total study population as well as in the subgroup of patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism to identify the possible impact of several variables on anticoagulation therapy, large enough to push the International Normalized Ratio (INR) level out of the therapeutic range (INR 3.0). Therapy with antibiotics or nitrates was significantly associated with INR-values >3.0 in the total population, while ACE inhibitors were associated with lower incidence of INR-values subclinical hyperthyroidism, therapy with antibiotics was predictive of INR-values >3.0, whereas therapy with thyroid suppressive drugs or TSH-values subclinical hyperthyroidism and euthyroidism intraindividual comparison with regard to the possible impact on anticoagulation therapy was performed which failed to show any significant differences in INR-values between the two thyroid metabolic conditions. In conclusion, subclinical hyperthyroidism seems to have no significant impact on coagulation metabolism in patients receiving anticoagulation therapy.

  6. The Success of Self-Testing for Anticoagulation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetin Songur

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The optimal therapeutic range for INR of the patient who were on warfarin therapy is narrow. There are various methods of INR monitoring to adjust the appropriate dosage of warfarin therapy. This study aims to test the reliability of POC (Point of care devices used for INR(International normalized ratio monitoring. Material and Method: Forty six  patients who were on warfarin therapy for any reasons were enrolled for this study. Their INR  were divided into 3 groups according to their laboratory INR results. Grup 1 had INR results lower than 2, group 2 had INR levels of 2 to 3.5, group 3 had INR levels of higher than 3.5 INR of the patients were remeasured with the POC device.  Results: The ages of the patients were between 24 to 84. Twenty six patients were male and 20 were female. The mean INR level of laboratory measurements was 1.26 in group 1 whereas it was 1.45 for POC device measurements. There were not statistically significant difference between two devices for group 1 (p=0.15. In group 2 the mean INR levels were measured by laboratory instrument and POC device were 2.74 and 3.51 respectively (p=0,01. In group 3 mean INR levels were measured by laboratory instrument and POC device were 4.27 and 5.25 respectively (p=0.01. Discussion: We suppose it is rational to adjust warfarin dosage by specialists using laboratory results in order to prevent hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications.

  7. [Therapy strategies for acute coronary syndrome and after coronary interventions. Antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divchev, D; Nienaber, C; Ince, H

    2011-11-01

    There is ongoing development of new therapeutic regimens in the use of antithrombotic agents and anticoagulants focussing on acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with an increasing impact on current guidelines over the last years. This was especially accompanied by an increase in innovative percutaneous coronary interventional (PCI) methods in patients with ACS, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) with a need for therapeutics with more sufficient and effective antiplatelet action. On the other hand, newer direct and indirect thrombin inhibitors with primary use in prevention and therapy of thromboembolic events have been shown to have beneficial and even superior effects in ACS with or without PCI. The current review aims to report on the evidence-based use of approved antithrombotic agents and anticoagulants in ACS with special focus on PCI according to the actualized European guidelines.

  8. Prevalence of Bleeding Complications Following Ultrasound-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injections in Patients on Anticoagulation or Antiplatelet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVallee, Jeffrey; Royer, Regan; Smith, Geoffrey

    2017-06-16

    Patients on anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy may be at higher risk for bleeding complications following intramuscular chemodenervation injections. Musculoskeletal ultrasound may be able to reduce the risk of bleeding complications by providing real-time visualization of vascular structures and postinjection monitoring. Limited data exist addressing the risk of bleeding complications following ultrasound-guided botulinum neurotoxin intramuscular chemodenervation procedures in the setting of anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy. To provide initial outcome data regarding bleeding complications in patients on anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy who have received ultrasound-guided botulinum neurotoxin intramuscular chemodenervation procedures. Retrospective, medical record review. Academic institution outpatient spasticity clinic. Total of 328 ultrasound-guided intramuscular botulinum toxin injections performed in 15 patients (mean age 53.8 years) with the predominant indication for chemodenervation being spastic paresis secondary to stroke. The medical records of all patients receiving ultrasound-guided intramuscular chemodenervation procedures performed between July 1, 2011, and October 16, 2015, were reviewed for demographic information, details regarding anticoagulation therapy, procedure specifics, and postinjection bleeding complications. All patients had a postinjection ultrasound to screen for hematoma. Prevalence of clinically significant bleeding complications and of sonographically documented subclinical bleeding complications following ultrasound-guided chemodenervation procedures in patients on anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy. Of 328 procedures, only 2 subclinical hematomas were detected, resulting in a bleeding complication rate of 0.61% in this patient population. The target muscles in these cases were tibialis posterior and pronator teres, and both cases were in patients on anticoagulation therapy (as opposed to antiplatelet

  9. Economic evaluation of the new oral anticoagulants for the prevention of thromboembolic events: a cost-minimization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolino, Milena Soriano; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne; Bovendorp, Ana Carolina Caixeta; Marques, Naiara Silveira; Silva, Lilian Azevedo da; Turquia, Cintia Proveti Barbosa; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials have shown that the new oral anticoagulants have at least similar impact regarding reduction of thromboembolic events, compared with warfarin, with similar or improved safety profiles. There is little data on real costs within clinical practice. Our aim here was to perform economic analysis on these strategies from the perspective of Brazilian society and the public healthcare system. Cost-minimization analysis; anticoagulation clinic of Hospital Municipal Odilon Behrens, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. Patients at the anticoagulation clinic were recruited between August and October 2011, with minimum follow-up of four weeks. Operational and non-operational costs were calculated and corrected to 2015. This study included 633 patients (59% women) of median age 62 years (interquartile range -49-73). The mean length of follow-up was 64 ± 28 days. The average cost per patient per month was $ 54.26 (US dollars). Direct costs accounted for 32.5% of the total cost. Of these, 69.5% were related to healthcare professionals. With regards to indirect costs, 52.4% were related to absence from work and 47.6% to transportation. Apixaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban were being sold to Brazilian public institutions, on average, for $ 49.87, $ 51.40 and $ 52.16 per patient per month, respectively, which was lower than the costs relating to warfarin treatment. In the Brazilian context, from the perspective of society and the public healthcare system, the cumulative costs per patient using warfarin with follow-up in anticoagulation clinics is currently higher than the strategy of prescribing the new oral anticoagulants.

  10. Economic evaluation of the new oral anticoagulants for the prevention of thromboembolic events: a cost-minimization analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Soriano Marcolino

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Randomized clinical trials have shown that the new oral anticoagulants have at least similar impact regarding reduction of thromboembolic events, compared with warfarin, with similar or improved safety profiles. There is little data on real costs within clinical practice. Our aim here was to perform economic analysis on these strategies from the perspective of Brazilian society and the public healthcare system. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cost-minimization analysis; anticoagulation clinic of Hospital Municipal Odilon Behrens, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. METHODS: Patients at the anticoagulation clinic were recruited between August and October 2011, with minimum follow-up of four weeks. Operational and non-operational costs were calculated and corrected to 2015. RESULTS: This study included 633 patients (59% women of median age 62 years (interquartile range 49-73. The mean length of follow-up was 64 ± 28 days. The average cost per patient per month was $ 54.26 (US dollars. Direct costs accounted for 32.5% of the total cost. Of these, 69.5% were related to healthcare professionals. With regards to indirect costs, 52.4% were related to absence from work and 47.6% to transportation. Apixaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban were being sold to Brazilian public institutions, on average, for $ 49.87, $ 51.40 and $ 52.16 per patient per month, respectively, which was lower than the costs relating to warfarin treatment. CONCLUSION: In the Brazilian context, from the perspective of society and the public healthcare system, the cumulative costs per patient using warfarin with follow-up in anticoagulation clinics is currently higher than the strategy of prescribing the new oral anticoagulants.

  11. Efficacy and safety of the new oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolic complications: meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Petrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Analysis of the efficacy and safety of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs in the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE.Material and methods. This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs was made in accordance with the instructions “Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA”.Results. The meta-analysis included 5 RCTs. NOACs were as effective as vitamin K antagonists (VKAs in preventing recurrent symptomatic VTE (RR=0.93; 95% CI 0.77-1.12; p=0.44. The incidence of recurrent thrombosis (RR=0.82; 95% CI 0.63-1.08; p=0.16 and deep vein thrombosis ± fatal or nonfatal pulmonary embolism (RR=1.06; 95% CI 0.81-1.40; p=0.66 was comparable in the groups of comparison. Meta-analysis of the safety of the NOACs suggested significant reduction of risk of major bleeding as compared with standard therapy (RR=0.54; 95% CI 0.42-0.69; р<0.00001. The incidence of all types of bleeding was significantly lower with NOACs (RR=0.70; 95% CI 0.51-0.95; p=0.02. All-cause mortality rate was comparable between the groups (RR=0.93; 95% CI 0.76-1.13; p=0.46.Conclusions. NOACs are as effective as the standard therapy, at that they are much safer in VTE treatment.

  12. DATA OF CLINICAL PRACTICE AS A TOOL FOR CHOICE OF DIRECT ORAL ANTICOAGULANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. А. Napalkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The review actualizes the need to validate data  obtained in randomized clinical trials (RCT by the results of routine clinical practice (RCP. Definitely, both methods have some disadvantages. Only patients with minimal comorbidity and a number of other restrictions are included into the RCT in accordance with strict procedures and treatment protocol. On the contrary, the analysis of the RCP shows that data  bases  of insurance companies and medical records are associated with less exact information about the patients, heterogeneity of comparison groups might be significant, and end points evaluation can be different. At the same time, if the RCT data are confirmed by the key results of the RCP analysis, it is a strong  evidence of the credibility of information, obtained by the both methods. The analysis of various RCP data bases published over the past 2 years shows that, among all new oral anticoagulants, apixaban is associated with the best adherence to treatment and lowest bleeding incidence in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These results confirm good safety profile of apixaban which was previously demonstrated in ARISTOTLE trial. On the contrary, rivaroxaban was associated with the most frequent bleeding in long-term use in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  13. Direct oral anticoagulant use in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation with valvular heart disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Ryan E; Kabra, Rajesh; Oliphant, Carrie S

    2016-12-22

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are indicated for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), which, according to the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society atrial fibrillation (AF) guidelines, excludes patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis, a mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve, or mitral valve repair. However, the data regarding use of DOACs in AF patients with other types of valvular heart disease (VHD) are unclear. We aimed to summarize and evaluate the literature regarding the safety and efficacy of DOAC use in NVAF patients with other types of VHD. After an extensive literature search, a total of 1 prospective controlled trial, 4 subanalyses, and 1 abstract were identified. Efficacy of the DOAC agents in NVAF patients with VHD mirrored the overall trial results. Bleeding risk was significantly increased in VHD patients treated with rivaroxaban, but not for dabigatran or apixaban. Of the bioprosthetic valve patients enrolled in the Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation (ARISTOTLE) trial, no safety or efficacy concerns were identified. In conclusion, subanalyses of DOAC landmark AF trials revealed that dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban may be safely used in AF patients with certain types of VHD: aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, and mitral regurgitation. More evidence is needed before routinely recommending these agents for patients with bioprosthetic valves or mild mitral stenosis. Patients with moderate to severe mitral stenosis or mechanical valves should continue to receive warfarin, as these patients were excluded from all landmark AF trials.

  14. The use of oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation: cohort study data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Gaisenok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the rate of prescription of oral anticoagulants (OAC in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF depending AF type and the reasons for their not-prescribing according to cohort study data.Material and methods. Patients (n=58 with AF were included into the study. The rate of OAC, including new OAC (NOAC, prescription depending type AF and the reasons for their not-prescribing were studied.Results. The rate of OAC use was 46.5% (warfarin – 22.4%, NOAC – 20.7%, antiplatelet agents use – 60.3%. The reasons for the lack of OAC use were: contraindications (high risk of hemorrhage or bleeding history – 5.2%; patient’s inability to comply with the recommendations and the valvular AF, which does not allow to recommend NOAC – 25.8%; preference for a doctor based on the patient's refusal or preference – 22.4%. OAC use in patients with persistent AF was recorded significantly more frequently than in paroxysmal AF (85.71% vs 24.32%; χ2=17.9; p<0.0001.Conclusions. A large part of patients with AF remains without OAC prescribing. More active use of NOAC will allow to correct current situation

  15. Direct oral anticoagulants: analysis of worldwide use and popularity using Google Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2017-08-01

    Four direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been approved for clinical use by many medicines regulatory agencies around the world. Due to increasing use of these drugs in routine practice, we planned an original study to investigate their worldwide diffusion using a popular Web-search engine. Two electronic searches were performed using Google Trends, the former using the keywords "warfarin" AND "heparin" AND "fondaparinux", and the latter using the keywords "warfarin" AND "dabigatran" AND "rivaroxaban" AND "apixaban" AND "edoxaban", both using the search criterion "prescription drug". No language restriction was applied, and the searches were carried out from the first date available in Google Trends (January 1(st), 2004) to present time (June 1(st), 2017). The median Google Trends score of warfarin (i.e., 86) was consistently higher than that of heparin (54; PGoogle searches for DOACs were performed in North America, central-eastern Europe and Australia. The results of our analysis suggest that the popularity of DOACs is constantly increasing around the world, whereas that of warfarin has exhibited a constant and inexorable decline.

  16. Emergency correction of coagulation before major surgery in two elderly patients on oral anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pechlaner Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recommendations for urgent reversal of oral anticoagulation with vitamin K1 antagonists are largely derived from case series employing empirical dosing regimens with vitamin K1 and prothrombin complex concentrates. Data on the use of prothrombin complex concentrates in this indication are scarce in the elderly who are at high risk of both hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications. The two cases presented here describe patients older than 75 years who underwent rapid International Normalized Ratio (INR reversal with prothrombin complex concentrates for surgical treatment of a bleeding ruptured spleen and for emergency surgery of a dissecting aorta. Both patients had their INRs rapidly corrected to ≤ 1.6 and underwent operation without complications. Evidence on treatment of patients who present with elevated INR and who have major bleeding or need to undergo emergency surgery is based mainly on observational studies. The two elderly patients presented here underwent successful emergency surgery after their INRs had been corrected with the intravenous use of vitamin K1 in combination with prothrombin complex concentrate that was administered according to current guideline recommendations.

  17. Management of major bleedings during anticoagulant treatment with the oral direct thrombin inhibitor ximelagatran or warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernlöf, Gunilla; Sjöström, Britta M; Lindell, Klas M; Wall, Ulrika E

    2009-12-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants are currently investigated in phase III programmes, mainly with inhibition of factor Xa or thrombin as their pharmacological target. Advantages are expected with these new drugs compared with vitamin K antagonists, but one potential drawback is the lack of specific antidotes. During the clinical studies with ximelagatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor withdrawn due to hepatic side effects, investigators were instructed to manage bleedings with routine measures. We have retrospectively tried to assess whether this was sufficient or whether there was a need for reversal strategies. The study population consisted of patients with major bleedings in three long-term studies (104 ximelagatran, 155 warfarin). All individual patient narratives were reviewed with respect to management of the bleeding. Complementary data were retrieved from the data-based case report forms. Approximately, two of three of the patients in both groups were subject to some kind of treatment. One-third (1/3) in both groups had transfusions documented and/or received specific medication. Vitamin K was given more often to warfarin patients. Two ximelagatran patients received prothrombin complex (four-factor concentrate), but one was a patient with a severe hepatopathy suspected to be drug-induced. Overall, the case descriptions did not reveal any apparent differences in the course of events between groups. We found no indications that the lack of an antidote posed a clinical problem in patients treated with ximelagatran as compared with warfarin. The relatively short half-life of melagatran, the active metabolite of ximelagatran, may have contributed to these results.

  18. Monitoring the Effects and Antidotes of the Non-vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahmat, Nur A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    major challenges: the need for reliable laboratory assays to assess their anticoagulation effect, and the lack of approved antidotes to reverse their action. This article provides an overview of monitoring the anticoagulant effect of NOACs and their potential specific antidotes in development....

  19. Perioperative management of the chronically anticoagulated patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, J A

    2001-09-01

    Common indications for chronic anticoagulation include mechanical prosthetic heart valve, non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation, and venous thromboembolism. Perioperative management of the chronically anticoagulated patient is a complex medical problem, and includes the following issues: urgency of surgery, risk of thromboembolism in the absence of anticoagulation, bleeding risk, consequences of bleeding, ability to control bleeding physically, and duration of bleeding risk after the procedure. Most patients can be managed safely by stopping oral anticoagulants 4-5 days before surgery and restarting anticoagulation after the procedure at the patient's usual daily dose. In general, dental procedures and cataract extraction can be performed without interrupting anticoagulation. Most other procedures can be safely performed with an INR patients with double-wing prosthetic valves (e.g., St. Jude, Carbomedics) in the aortic position, uncomplicated atrial fibrillation, or a remote (>3 months) history of venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulants can be stopped 4-5 days before surgery and restarted at the usual daily dose immediately after surgery. For other patients at higher risk of thrombosis, "bridging therapy" with outpatient low molecular weight heparin is safe and effective. For urgent procedures, a small dose of oral vitamin K usually will reduce the INR within 24-36 hours to a level sufficient for surgery and avoids exposure to transfused blood products.

  20. Association Between Usual Vitamin K Intake and Anticoagulation in Patients Under Warfarin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Na; Lee, Ji Sun; Noh, Min Young; Sung, Mi-Kyung

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the correlation between usual vitamin K intake and response to anticoagulant therapy among patients under warfarin therapy. We conducted a retrospective survey of patients (n = 50) on continuous warfarin therapy. Clinical information and laboratory parameters were sourced from medical records. Anticoagulant effect was evaluated by using the percent time in therapeutic range (TTR) and the coefficient of variation (CV) of International normalized ratio (INR). Dietary vitamin K intake was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire that has been developed for the purpose of assessing dietary intake of vitamin K. A total of 50 patients aged between 21 and 87 years were included in the study. The mean vitamin K intake was 262.8 ± 165.2 µg/day. Study subjects were divided into tertiles according to their usual vitamin K intake. The proportion of men was significantly higher in second and third tertile than first tertile (p = 0.028). The mean percent TTR was 38.4 ± 28.4% and CV of INR was 31.8 ± 11.8%. Long-term warfarin therapy group (≥ 3 years) had a higher percentage of TTR as compared to the control group (vitamin K intake and percent TTR (p > 0.05). In conclusion, no significant association was observed between usual vitamin K intake and anticoagulant effects. Further studies are required to consider inter-individual variability of vitamin K intake. Development of assessment tools to measure inter-individual variability of vitamin K intake might be helpful.

  1. Citrate versus unfractionated heparin for anticoagulation in continuous renal replacement therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Yu-jie; ZHANG Ling; ZENG Xiao-xi; FU Ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Unfractionated heparin is the most commonly used anticoagulant in continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT),but it can increase the risk of bleeding.Citrate is a promising substitute.Our study was to assess the efficacy and safety of citrate versus unfractionated heparin in CRRT.Methods We searched the MEDLINE,the EMBASE,the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials,and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database until up to November 2011 for randomized controlled trials comparing citrate with unfractionated heparin in adult patients with acute kidney injury prescribed CRRT.The primary outcome was mortality and the secondary outcomes included circuit survival,control of uremia,risk of bleeding,transfusion rates,acid-base statuses,and disturbance of sodium and calcium homeostasis.Results Four trials met the inclusion criteria.Meta-analysis found no significant difference between two anticoagulants on mortality.Less bleeding and more hypocalcemic episodes were with citrate.Citrate was superior or comparable to unfractionated heparin in circuit life.Conclusions Citrate anticoagulation in CRRT seems to be superior in reducing bleeding risk and with a longer or similar circuit life,although there is more metabolic derangement.Mortality superiority has not been approved.

  2. Hypocalcaemia following thyroidectomy unresponsive to oral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, Zac C; Schofield, Christopher; Prinsloo, Peter J J; Sturrock, Nigel D C

    2014-01-01

    Hypocalcaemia due to hypoparathyroidism following thyroidectomy is a relatively common occurrence. Standard treatment is with oral calcium and vitamin D replacement therapy; lack of response to oral therapy is rare. Herein we describe a case of hypoparathyroidism following thyroidectomy unresponsive to oral therapy in a patient with a complex medical history. We consider the potential causes in the context of calcium metabolism including: poor adherence, hungry bone syndrome, malabsorption, vitamin D resistance, bisphosphonate use and functional hypoparathyroidism secondary to magnesium deficiency. Malabsorption due to intestinal hurry was likely to be a contributory factor in this case and very large doses of oral therapy were required to avoid symptomatic hypocalcaemia.

  3. Critique on the use of the standardized avian acute oral toxicity test for first generation anticoagulant rodenticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Nimish B.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2012-01-01

    Avian risk assessments for rodenticides are often driven by the results of standardized acute oral toxicity tests without regards to a toxicant's mode of action and time course of adverse effects. First generation anticoagulant rodenticides (FGARs) generally require multiple feedings over several days to achieve a threshold concentration in tissue and cause adverse effects. This exposure regimen is much different than that used in the standardized acute oral toxicity test methodology. Median lethal dose values derived from standardized acute oral toxicity tests underestimate the environmental hazard and risk of FGARs. Caution is warranted when FGAR toxicity, physiological effects, and pharmacokinetics derived from standardized acute oral toxicity testing are used for forensic confirmation of the cause of death in avian mortality incidents and when characterizing FGARs' risks to free-ranging birds.

  4. Use of oral anticoagulants in African-American and Caucasian patients with atrial fibrillation: is there a treatment disparity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinboboye O

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Olakunle AkinboboyeQueens Heart Institute, Rosedale, NY, USAAbstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF is a very common cardiac arrhythmia, and its prevalence is increasing along with aging in the developed world. This review discusses racial differences in the epidemiology and treatment of AF between African-American and Caucasian patients. Additionally, the effect of race on warfarin and novel oral anticoagulant use is discussed, as well as the role that physicians and patients play in achieving optimal treatment outcomes. Despite having a lower prevalence of AF compared with Caucasians, African-Americans suffer disproportionately from stroke and its sequelae. The possible reasons for this paradox include poorer access to health care, lower health literacy, and a higher prevalence of other stroke-risk factors among African-Americans. Consequently, it is important for providers to evaluate the effects of race, health literacy, access to health care, and cultural barriers on the use of anticoagulation in the management of AF. Warfarin-dose requirements vary across racial groups, with African-American patients requiring a higher dose than Caucasians to maintain a therapeutic international normalized ratio; the novel oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban seem to differ in this regard, although data are currently limited. Minority racial groups are not proportionally represented in either real-world studies or clinical trials, but as more information becomes available and other social issues are addressed, the treatment disparities between African-American and Caucasian patients should decrease.Keywords: antithrombotic, atrial fibrillation, stroke, warfarin, race

  5. Management of Bleeding With Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in the Era of Specific Reversal Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Christian T; Giugliano, Robert P; Antman, Elliott M

    2016-07-19

    Vitamin K antagonists are commonly used by clinicians to provide anticoagulation to patients who have or are at risk of having thrombotic events. In addition to familiarity with the dosing and monitoring of vitamin K antagonists, clinicians are accustomed to using vitamin K if there is a need to reverse the anticoagulant effect of vitamin K antagonists. There are now 4 new non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) that are attractive alternatives to vitamin K antagonists. Despite similar or lower rates of serious bleeding with NOACs in comparison with warfarin, there is a pressing need for strategies to manage bleeding when it does occur with NOACs and to reverse the pharmacological effect of these agents if needed. Important steps in minimizing bleeding risks with NOACs include dose adjustment of the agents in the setting of renal dysfunction and avoidance of the concomitant use of other antithrombotic agents if feasible. Laboratory measurement of the anticoagulant effect of NOACs is best accomplished with specialized assays, although some of the more widely available coagulation tests can provide information that is potentially useful to clinicians. Nonspecific hemostatic agents such as prothrombin complex concentrates and recombinant factor VIIa can be used to reverse the effect of NOACs. More specific reversing agents include the approved humanized monoclonal antibody fragment idarucizumab for reversing the effects of dabigatran, the investigational factor Xa decoy andexanet alfa, and the synthetic small molecule ciraparantag. Both andexanet and ciraparantag have been reported to reverse the effects of the anti-Xa NOACs (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban), and a number of other anticoagulant agents in common clinical use, as well.

  6. Effects of anticoagulant therapy on pregnancy outcomes in patients with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Ilknur; Mutlu, Mehmet Firat; Biri, Aydan; Bulut, Berk; Erdem, Mehmet; Erdem, Ahmet

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of anticoagulant therapy on pregnancy outcomes in 204 patients with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric outcomes. Patients with poor obstetric history (pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth retardation, fetal death, placental abruption, recurrent pregnancy loss) and having hereditary thrombophilia were included in this study. Poor obstetric outcomes were observed more frequently in patients who had not taken anticogulant therapy compared with treated group. Live birth rate, gestational age at birth and Apgar scores were significantly higher in the treated group when compared with the untreated group. There were no significant differences in terms of birthweight, mode of delivery and admission rates to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) plus acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) had higher gestational age at birth, Apgar scores, live birth rate and a lower abortion rates when compared with controls; in contrast, no significant difference was observed in terms of birthweight, mode of delivery, obstetric complications and admission rates to NICU. There were no significant differences between control group and both LMWH only and ASA only groups in terms of gestational age at birth, Apgar scores, birthweight, mode of delivery, obstetric complications and admission rates to NICU. Only LMWH group had higher live birth rate as compared with control group. The use of only ASA did not seem to affect the perinatal complication rates and outcomes. In conclusion, anticoagulant therapy with both LMWH and ASA seems to provide better obstetric outcomes in pregnant women with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric outcomes.

  7. Ensuring medication adherence with direct oral anticoagulant drugs: lessons from adherence with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Minno, Alessandro; Spadarella, Gaia; Tufano, Antonella; Prisco, Domenico; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    Medication adherence (taking drugs properly) is uncommon among patients on warfarin. Poor adherence to warfarin leads to an increase in adverse medical events, including stroke in atrial fibrillation (AF). Factors related to patients, physicians and the health system account for poor adherence. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are easier to use than warfarin, with fewer drug and food interactions and no need for routine blood monitoring. A proper use of DOACs may reduce the risk of stroke in AF. However, in clinical settings where no laboratory monitoring is needed, a poor medication adherence is common and may impact clinical outcomes. In the management of chronic disorders, careful knowledge of the individual patient's attitudes and behaviors is a pre-requisite for a successful doctor-patient communication. To increase patient's awareness of the risks and benefits of DOACs and, in turn, increase medication adherence, at each follow-up visit physicians should screen for priorities and motivational problems; check for the lack of understanding and/or knowledge; assess any health system or personal barriers to medication adherence; identify appropriate interventions and provide tailored support to patient needs. Dissemination of guidelines to the health care chain (prescribing physician, general practitioners, caregivers, nurses, pharmacists) further encourages medication adherence. However, the long-term effect of some of these strategies is unknown; one tool may not fit all patients, and the prescribing physician should consider individualization of these aids to ensure medication adherence and persistence (continuing to take drugs properly in long-term treatments) for DOACs in every day practice.

  8. Early introduction of direct oral anticoagulants in cardioembolic stroke patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellari, Manuel; Carletti, Monica; Danese, Alessandra; Bovi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are superior to warfarin in reduction of the intracranial bleeding risk. The aim of the present study was to assess whether early DOAC introduction (1-3 days after onset) in stroke patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (nVAF) may be safe and effective, compared with DOAC introduction after 4-7 days. We conducted a prospective analysis based on data collected from 147 consecutive nVAF patients who started DOAC within 7 days after stroke onset. In all patients, we performed pre-DOAC CT scan 24-36 h after onset and follow-up CT scan at 7 days after DOAC introduction. Outcome measures were post-DOAC intracranial bleeding (new any intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in patients with pre-DOAC infarct without hemorrhagic transformation (HT) or expansion of ICH in patients with pre-DOAC infarct with asymptomatic HT) and post-DOAC recurrent ischemic stroke (any new ischemic infarct) on follow-up CT scan. 97 patients started DOAC after 1-3 days and 50 patients started DOAC after 4-7 days. On pre-DOAC CT scan, 132 patients had an infarct without HT and 15 an infarct with asymptomatic HT. On follow-up CT scan, new any ICH was noted in seven patients (asymptomatic in 6) and asymptomatic expansion of ICH in one patient. We found no association between early DOAC introduction and intracranial bleeding. Large infarct remained the only independent predictor of post-DOAC intracranial bleeding. No patients suffered recurrent ischemic stroke after DOAC introduction. Early DOAC introduction might be safe in carefully selected patients with nVAF who experience small- and medium-sized cardioembolic ischemic strokes. Further investigation will be needed.

  9. Monitoring of Anticoagulant Therapy in Heart Disease: Considerations for the Current Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Goodarzynejad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinicians should be aware of new developments to familiarize themselves with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of new anticoagulant agents to appropriately and safely use them. For the moment, cardiologists and other clinicians also require to master currently available drugs, realizing the mechanism of action, side effects, and laboratory monitoring to measure their anticoagulant effects. Warfarin and heparin have narrow therapeutic window with high inter- and intra-patient variability, thereby the use of either drug needs careful laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment to ensure proper antithrombotic protection while minimizing the bleeding risk. The prothrombin time (PT and the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT are laboratory tests commonly used to monitor warfarin and heparin, respectively. These two tests depend highly on the combination of reagent and instrument utilized. Results for a single specimen tested in different laboratories are variable; this is mostly attributable to the specific reagents and to a much lesser degree to the instrument used. The PT stands alone as the single coagulation test that has undergone the most extensive attempt at assay standardization. The international normalized ratio (INR was introduced to ‘‘normalize’’ all PT reagents to a World Health Organization (WHO reference thromboplastin preparation standard, such that a PT measured anywhere in the world would result in an INR value similar to that which would have been achieved had the WHO reference thromboplastin been utilized. However, INRs are reproducible between laboratories for only those patients who are stably anticoagulated with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs (i.e., at least 6 weeks of VKA therapy, and are not reliable or reproducible between laboratories for patients for whom VKA therapy has recently been started or any other clinical conditions associated with a prolonged PT such as liver disease, disseminated

  10. Safety Assessment of Anticoagulation therapy in Patients with Hemorrhagic Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anticoagulation therapy is a routine treatment in patients with hemorrhagic cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT. However, fear of hemorrhagic complications and deterioration course following anticoagulation often disturbs the responsible physician.Methods: This was a Prospective observational study on consecutive CVT patients with hemorrhagic venous infarction or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH admitted in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran, during 2006-2012. The diagnosis of CVT in suspected cases was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance venography (MRI/MRV, and computerized tomography (CT angiography following established diagnostic criteria. Demographic data, clinical manifestations from onset to end of the observation period, location of thrombus, location and size of infarction and hemorrhage, and clinical course during treatment were recorded. Choice of the treatment was left to the opinion of the treating physician. Clinical course during 1 week of treatment was assessed based on the baseline modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score. Three or more points decrease or increase of modified NIHSS after 1 week of treatment was considered as improvement or deterioration courses, respectively. Other clinical courses were categorized as stabilization course.Results: 102 hemorrhagic CVT patients (80 females,22 males with mean age of 38.6 ± 8 years were prospectively investigated. Of the 102 hemorrhagic CVT patients in the acute phase, 52 patients (50.9% were anticoagulated with adjusted dose intravenous heparin infusion and 50 cases (49.1% received subcutaneous enoxaparin 1mg/Kg twice daily. Decreased consciousness had a significant effect on the clinical course of the patients (X2 = 9.493, df = 2, P = 0.009. Presence of SAH had no significant effect on the clinical course of our anticoagulated hemorrhagic CVT cases (X2 = 0.304, df = 2,P = 0.914. Extension of Infarction in more than two thirds of a

  11. Changes in coagulation and lytic activity of the blood and tissues at the pelvic trauma during anticoagulant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Vlasov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was exploration of coagulation and lytic activity in blood and tissues during anticoagulation therapy in the early posttraumatic period in patients with pelvic bone fracture. The study was based on experiment researches using methods allowing to estimate coagulation activity in different tissues (skeletal muscles, liver, kidneys, heart, lungs and blood at pelvic trauma during anticoagulation therapy. It was established that at pelvic trauma using anticoagulation therapy (fraxiparine leads to hemostatic system modification in the early posttraumatic period. We observed fast decrease of a hypercoagulability in a blood plasma (organism level and growth fibrinolytic activity. In liver, kidneys, heart and lungs tissues (organ level we also registered correction the hemostatic disorders. However, the rate of these recovery processes in tissues is lower than in the blood. Especially low it was in skeletal muscles in the area of injury. Thus, it is proved that anticoagulant therapy at a pelvic trauma affects on the extrinsic coagulation pathway less than on the intrinsic coagulation pathway. The established regularity explains the risks of coagulation abnormalities in the early posttraumatic period during anticoagulation treatment.

  12. Oral surgery in patients under antithrombotic therapy. Narrative review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggelo Carrizo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Population aging and the increasing rates of cardiovascular diseases have raised the number of patients receiving antithrombotic therapy in elective or emergency dental care, including surgical procedures. The aim of this article is to review the evidence and clinical guidelines for management of patients on antithrombotic therapy published in the past five years. The American Antithrombotic Therapy Guideline - 2012 - generally recommends not to suspend antiplatelet or anticoagulant treatment in dental procedures since they are considered to have low bleeding risk and easy resolution. In the dental field, there is ample published evidence regarding oral surgical procedure management, especially by maxillofacial surgeons, showing a low number of complications associated with extractions or other minor oral surgical procedures without suspending antithrombotic drugs and only taking some minimum safeguards, such as healing by first intention or the use of some local hemostatic agents. In general, patients under chronic antithrombotic therapy should keep their medication when undergoing low and medium complexity dental procedures, since complications are minor and easy to handle. Due to interactions between them, particular care should be taken with patients using more than one drug.

  13. Treatment discontinuations with new oral agents for long-term anticoagulation: insights from a meta-analysis of 18 randomized trials including 101,801 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Saurav; Sardar, Partha; Giri, Jay S; Ghosh, Joydeep; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2014-07-01

    To systematically examine discontinuation rates with new US Food and Drug Administration-approved oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with various indications for long-term anticoagulation. Poor adherence to medications is considered a potential and frequent cause of treatment failure. We searched the PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Science, and CINAHL databases for articles published from January 1, 2001, through September 15, 2013. The following Medical Subject Heading terms and/or keywords were used for our database searches: rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban, new oral anticoagulants, oral thrombin inhibitors, and oral factor Xa inhibitors. Articles in English that focused on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing NOACs (apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban) with conventional therapy or placebo were abstracted. Independent extraction of relevant data was performed by 2 authors. The primary end point of interest was discontinuation due to all causes. Other end points of interest were discontinuation due to adverse events, consent withdrawal, and nonadherence. Eighteen RCTs including a total of 101,801 patients were included for analysis. Total study drug discontinuation rates were not statistically different with NOACs in comparison to pharmacologically active comparators for treatment of venous thromboembolism/pulmonary embolism (risk ratio [RR], 0.91; 95% CI, 0.74-1.13; P=.40) and for NOACs in comparison to warfarin and aspirin for prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (RR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.87-1.17; P=.92). In contrast, in acute coronary syndromes, total study drug discontinuation with NOACs was significantly higher than with placebo (RR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.07-1.83; P=.01). Overall discontinuations were comparable to those with active comparators. Study drug discontinuations with NOACs were not significantly different from those with conventional drugs in treatment of venous

  14. Evaluation of a continuous quality improvement program in anticoagulant therapy: Feasibility, satisfaction and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Ariane; Lahaie, Alexandre; Odobasic, Bojan; Tremblay, Marie-Philip; Wazzan, Dana; Caron, Stéphanie; Leblanc, Caroline; Martineau, Josée; Lalonde, Lyne

    2016-11-01

    The ACO Program (Programme ACO), a continuous quality improvement program (CQIP) in anticoagulation therapy, was offered in community pharmacies as a pilot project. To evaluate the participants' appreciation for the various activities of the program. Participants had access to training activities, including an audit with feedback, online training activities (OTA), clinical tools and support from facilitators. Cognitive behavioural learning determinants were evaluated before and 5 months after the beginning of the program. Participants' satisfaction and perception were documented via online questionnaires and a semistructured interview. Of the 52 pharmacists in the ACO Program, 47 participated in this evaluation. Seventy-seven percent of the participants completed at least 1 OTA and 6% published on the forum. The feeling of personal effectiveness rose from 8.01 (7.67-8.35) to 8.62 (8.24-8.99). The audit and feedback, as well as the high-quality OTA and their lecturers, were the most appreciated elements. There was a high OTA participation rate. The facilitators seemed to play a key role in the CQIP. The low level of participation in the forum reflects the known phenomenon of social loafing. Technical difficulties affecting the platform and data collection for the audit with feedback constituted limitations. The CQIP in anticoagulation therapy is appreciated by community pharmacists and is associated with an improved feeling of personal effectiveness.

  15. Risk of death and stroke associated with anticoagulation therapy after mitral valve repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valeur, Nana; Mérie, Charlotte; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2016-01-01

     months were comparable in the two groups with 23 (2%) among patients without VKA and 6 (1%) among VKA-treated. CONCLUSION: VKA treatment after mitral valve repair is associated with a markedly lower risk of adverse events as stroke or death without excess major bleeding risk during the first 3 months......OBJECTIVE: Guidelines generally recommend oral anticoagulation to be considered the first 3 months after mitral valve repair based on small studies and consensus. However, in several studies no benefit of anticoagulation has been found. METHODS: From the national registries we identified all Danish...... and propensity matched models. RESULTS: 2188 patients without prior VKA use, stroke or death day 7 after discharge were included and median follow-up was 4.9 years (0-13.7). 859 (39%) were discharged on VKAs and 523 (24%) experienced death or stroke, 60 of these occurred within the first 3 months and 24 between...

  16. Risk of gastrointestinal bleeding during anticoagulant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas-Gimeno, Aitor; Lanas, Angel

    2017-06-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) is a major problem in patients on oral anticoagulation therapy. This issue has become even more pressing since the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in 2009. Areas covered: Here we review current evidence related to GIB associated with oral anticoagulants, focusing on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and post-marketing observational studies. Dabigatran 150 mg twice daily and rivaroxaban 20 mg once daily increase the risk of GIB compared to warfarin. The risk increase with edoxaban is dose-dependent, while apixaban shows apparently, no increased risk. We summarize what is known about GIB risk factors for individual anticoagulants, the location of GIB in patients taking these compounds, and prevention strategies that lower the risk of GIB. Expert opinion: Recently there has been an important shift in the clinical presentation of GIB. Specifically, upper GIB has decreased with the decreased incidence of peptic ulcers due to the broad use of proton pump inhibitors and the decreased prevalence of H. pylori infections. In contrast, the incidence of lower GIB has increased, due in part to colonic diverticular bleeding and angiodysplasia in the elderly. In this population, the addition of oral anticoagulation therapy, especially DOACs, seems to increase the risk of lower GIB.

  17. Switching, Adverse Effects and Use of Over-the-Counter Analgesics among Users of Oral Anticoagulants: A Pharmacy-based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Hyllested, Lea Maria Rønneberg; Meegaard, Line; Wiberg-Hansen, Alexander; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Pottegård, Anton

    2017-07-01

    Oral anticoagulants are widely used but information on important aspects in that respect is not available from medical registers or clinical databases. Therefore, we conducted a survey including patients filling a prescription for oral anticoagulants at two large Danish community pharmacies. We collected information concerning the patients' knowledge of their anticoagulant treatment including prior drug switching. Further, patients were asked about use of over-the-counter analgesics, adverse effects and how the treatment affected their everyday life. Among 335 eligible patients, 301 (90%) agreed to participate. Atrial fibrillation was the most common indication (65%), and most patients filled a prescription for a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) (58%). Among the 12% (n = 35) of participants who had switched oral anticoagulant treatment, 69% had switched from a vitamin K antagonist (VKA) to a NOAC. Switching was most frequently caused by inconvenience (34%) and adverse effects (23%). Although half of all patients had recently bought over-the-counter analgesics, purchase of ibuprofen and aspirin was rare (6%). More VKA users than NOAC users felt limited in their everyday life because of anticoagulant treatment (18% versus 9%). Among non-incident NOAC users, 21% had experienced adverse effects during their current treatment. Based on first-hand information from a large sample of anticoagulant users, we conclude that the main drug-related issues leading to anticoagulant switching and perceived limitations in everyday life were inconvenience and adverse effects. This varied between drug groups. Further, use of NSAIDs obtained over the counter was rare. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  18. Direct oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation: can data from randomized clinical trials be safely transferred to the general population? No.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marietta, Marco

    2015-09-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) represent an innovative and relevant treatment for the prevention of cardiac embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Their introduction has been followed by an ample debate on their appropriate use, considering that they can offer an effective treatment for the many patients with AF, which are not taking any effective anticoagulant treatment, even though they have a substantial thromboembolic risk (1). On the other hand, DOAC are much less tested in everyday clinical practice and much more expensive than anti-vitamin k anticoagulants (AVKs). Starting from the quite favorable results of the available randomized controlled trials (RCTs)--showing that DOAC are at least non-inferior to AVK and that may be even better for some outcomes--this article discusses their transferability to the majority of AF patients. In summary, the body of evidence supports the efficacy and safety of DOAC in patients carrying demographic and clinical characteristics similar to subjects included in RCT, but their use in less well-characterized subpopulations requires particular caution, while waiting for more reliable data from the real world.

  19. [Treatment with inhibitors of new oral direct anticoagulants in patients with severe bleedings or urgent surgical procedures. The new dabigatran antidote: the place of idarucizumab in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Zoltán

    2016-03-20

    Only vitamin K antagonists could be applied as oral anticoagulants over the past six decades. Coumarols have narrow therapeutic range, and unpredictable anticoagulant effects are resulted by multiple drug interactions. Therefore, regular routine monitoring of the international normalized ratio is necessary. There are two groups of factor-specific anticoagulants: molecules with anti-FIIa (dabigatran) and anti-FXa (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) effect. Author summarizes the most important clinical features of the new oral anticoagulants, their indications and the possibilities of laboratory controls. Bleedings are the most important side effects of anticoagulants. This review summarizes the current published evidences for new oral anticoagulants reversal (non-specific and specific) agents, especially in cases with severe acute bleedings or urgent surgery procedures. It reports on how to use inhibitors, the recommended doses and the most important clinical results. The review focuses on idarucizumab - already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency - which has a key role as the first specific inhibitor of dabigatran.

  20. Good quality of oral anticoagulation treatment in general practice using international normalised ratio point of care testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Tina Heidi; Lind, Bent

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oral anticoagulation treatment (OACT)with warfarin is common in general practice. Increasingly,international normalised ratio (INR) point of care testing(POCT) is being used to manage patients. The aim of thisstudy was to describe and analyse the quality of OACT withwarfarin...... in the management of patients in warfarintreatment provided good quality of care. Sampling intervaland diagnostic coding were significantly correlated withtreatment quality. FUNDING: The study received financial support from theSarah Krabbe Foundation, the General Practitioners’ Educationand Development Foundation...

  1. Comparative study of anticoagulation versus saline flushes in continuous renal replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarik Amit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic heparinization during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT is associated with disadvantage of risk of bleeding. This study analyses the efficacy of frequent saline flushes compared with heparin anticoagulation to maintain filter life. From January 2004 to November 2007, 65 critically ill patients with acute renal failure underwent CRRT. Continuous venovenous hemodialfiltration (CVVHDF was performed using Diapact Braun CRRT machine. 1.7% P.D. fluid was used as dialysate. 0.9% NS with addition of 10% Ca Gluconate, Magnesium Sulphate, Soda bicarbonate and Potassium Chloride added sequentially in separate units were used for replacement, carefully monitoring their levels. Anticoagulation of extracorporeal circuit was achieved with unfractionated heparin (250-500 units alternate hour in 35 patients targeting aPTT of 45-55 seconds. No anticoagulation was used in 30 patients with baseline APTT > 55 seconds and extracorporeal circuit was maintained with saline flushes at 30 min interval. 65 pa-tients including 42 males. Co-morbidities were comparable in both groups. HMARF was signifi-cantly more common in heparin group while Sepsis was comparable in both the groups. CRRT parameters were similar in both groups. Average filter life in heparin group was 26 ± 6.4 hours while it was 24.5 ± 6.36 hours in heparin free group ( P=NS. Patients receiving heparin had 16 bleeding episodes (0.45/patient while only four bleeding episodes occurred in heparin free group (0.13/patient, P< 0.05. Mortality was 71% in heparin group and 67% in heparin free group. Frequent saline flushes is an effective mode of maintainance of extracorporeal circuit in CRRT when aPTT is already on the higher side, with significantly decreased bleeding episodes.

  2. Safety and efficacy of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant treatment compared with warfarin in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation who develop acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack: a multicenter prospective cohort study (daVinci study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Naoki; Kimura, Kazumi; Tateishi, Yohei; Fujimoto, Shigeru; Kaneko, Nobuyuki; Urabe, Takao; Tsujino, Akira; Iguchi, Yasuyuki

    2016-11-01

    The safety and efficacy of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant (NOAC) compared with warfarin in treating patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) who developed acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (AIS/TIA), particularly those receiving tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA) therapy, remains unclear. Between April 2012 and December 2014, we conducted a multicenter prospective cohort study to assess the current clinical practice for treating such patients. We divided the patients into two groups according to the administration of oral anticoagulants (warfarin or NOACs) and tPA therapy. The risk of any hemorrhagic or ischemic event was compared within 1 month after the onset of stroke. We analyzed 235 patients with AIS/TIA including 73 who received tPA therapy. Oral anticoagulants were initiated within 2-4 inpatient days. NOACs were administered to 49.8 % of patients, who were predominantly male, younger, had small infarcts, lower NIHSS scores, and had a lower all-cause mortality rate (0 vs. 4.2 %, P = 0.06) and a lower risk of any ischemic events (6.0 vs. 7.6 %, P = 0.797) compared with warfarin users. The prevalence of all hemorrhagic events was equivalent between the two groups. Early initiation of NOACs after tPA therapy appeared to lower the risk of hemorrhagic events, although there was no significant difference (0 vs. 5.6 %, P = 0.240). Although more clinicians are apt to prescribe NOACs in minor ischemic stroke, NOAC treatment may provide a potential benefit in such cases. Early initiation of NOACs after tPA therapy may reduce the risk of hemorrhagic events compared with warfarin.

  3. Consistency of safety and efficacy of new oral anticoagulants across subgroups of patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Lega

    Full Text Available AIMS: The well-known limitations of vitamin K antagonists (VKA led to development of new oral anticoagulants (NOAC in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the consistency of treatment effects of NOAC irrespective of age, comorbidities, or prior VKA exposure. METHODS AND RESULTS: All randomized, controlled phase III trials comparing NOAC to VKA up to October 2012 were eligible provided their results (stroke/systemic embolism (SSE and major bleeding (MB were reported according to age (≤ or >75 years, renal function, CHADS2 score, presence of diabetes mellitus or heart failure, prior VKA use or previous cerebrovascular events. Interactions were considered significant at p <0.05. Three studies (50,578 patients were included, respectively evaluating apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran versus warfarin. A trend towards interaction with heart failure (p = 0.08 was observed with respect to SSE reduction, this being greater in patients not presenting heart failure (RR = 0.76 [0.67-0.86] than in those with heart failure (RR = 0.90 [0.78-1.04]; Significant interaction (p = 0.01 with CHADS2 score was observed, NOAC achieving a greater reduction in bleeding risk in patients with a score of 0-1 (RR 0.67 CI 0.57-0.79 than in those with a score ≥2 (RR 0.85 CI 0.74-0.98. Comparison of MB in patients with (RR 0.97 CI 0.79-1.18 and without (RR 0.76 CI 0.65-0.88 diabetes mellitus showed a similar trend (p = 0.06. No other interactions were found. All subgroups derived benefit from NOA in terms of SSE or MB reduction. CONCLUSIONS: NOAC appeared to be more effective and safer than VKA in reducing SSE or MB irrespective of patient comorbidities. Thromboembolism risk, evaluated by CHADS2 score and, to a lesser extent, diabetes mellitus modified the treatment effects of NOAC without complete loss of benefit with respect to MB reduction.

  4. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of regional citrate anticoagulation on critical patients with continuous renal replacement therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Li You

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the efficacy and safety of regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) in continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for critical patients.Methods:A total of 83 critical patients need CRRT in the intensive care units of our hospital from July 2012 to June 2016 were recruited in the study, and the patients were divided into two groups randomly, the patients in observation group received the RCA treatment, and the patients in control group received traditional low molecular heparin anticoagulation. The difference of safety indicators, biochemical indicators, extracorporeal circulation blood coagulation condition and complications in patients were determined between two groups.Results: Compared with control group, the patients in observation group had an elevated level of iCa2+, the level of chloride ion reduced, the use time of filter increased, the bleeding cases reduced, the concentrations of urea nitrogen, creatinine TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and NO were all significantly downregulated, the data have a significant difference (P < 0.05).Conclusions:RCA is a safe and effective method for CRRT in patients with a high risk of bleeding.

  6. Enhancement of photodynamic therapy effect by temporally inhibiting infarction with anticoagulant heparin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liyong; Zhao, Hongyou

    2008-12-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is one of the tumor-targeting therapeutics, and has been an established medical practice in recent years. PDT mediates tumor destruction mainly by killing tumor cells directly and damaging the tumor-associated vasculature, also inducing an immune response against tumor cells. For the Photofrin-mediated PDT, Vascular system injury is the predominant destruction that results in vascular collapse and blood plasma leakage, then leading to tumor infarction. However, thrombus formation during PDT may influence the light transmission and oxygen supply. Also some tumor cells not killed by PDT may irritate angiogenesis, causing the tumor recurrence under the condition of hypoxia after PDT. In our work, to prolong coagulation and formation of thrombus, an anticoagulant heparin was employed before the Photofrin-mediated PDT. After being administrated both Photofrin and anticoagulant heparin, the BALB/c mice with the subcutaneous EMT6 mammary carcinomas model were exposed to laser (635nm). And then an enhanced effect was received. Our experiments indicated that its antitumor effect may be attributed to the improvement of the light delivery to the deep part of tumor and oxygen supply for PDT. The results suggested that heparin can be used to enhance the effect of PDT in a solid tumor treatment.

  7. Massive retroperitoneal hematoma as a complication of anticoagulation therapy in a patient treated in a pulmonary intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stjepanović Mihailo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Retroperitoneal hematoma may occur as a result of trauma, but also from rupture of arterial aneurysms (aortic or iliac, surgical complications, tumors or anticoagulation therapy. Case report. We presented a patient on permanent anticoagulation therapy. On the day of admission to our institution, the patient had the value of his INR 5.57 which required immediate suspension of the therapy. The main symptom in this patient was pain in the right inguinal canal with propagation along the right leg, which was indicated in clinical picture of spontaneous retroperitoneal haematoma. After three days the fall of hemoglobin occurred, so the additonal diagnostics was done. A computed tomography of the abdomen was performed showing well limited, large retroperitoneal hematoma (213 x 79 x 91 mm. Transfusion of concentrated red blood cells was performed twice with satisfactory correction of hemoglobin level, and four units of fresh frozen plasma. The patient was hemodynamically stabilized and discharged after a two-month long intensive care unit treatment, with the advice to use low-molecular weight heparin 2 x 0.4 mg subcutaneusly, due to persistent arrhythmia. Conclusion. In patients on anti-coagulation therapy regular monitoring of the anticoagulant status is extremely important, because of the possibility of fatal complications development, such as retroperitoneal hematoma.

  8. Massive retroperitoneal hematoma as a complication of anticoagulation therapy in a patient treated in a pulmonary intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjepanović, Mihailo; Buha, Ivana; Raljević, Snezana; Babić, Uroš; Savić, Milan; Mašković, Jovana; Roksandić, Marina; Marić, Dragana

    2015-06-01

    Retroperitoneal hematoma may occur as a result of trauma, but also from rapture of arterial aneurysms (aortic or iliac), surgical complications, tumors or anticoagulation therapy. We presented a patient on permanent anticoagulation therapy. On the day of admission to our institudon, the patient had the value of his INR 5.57 which required immediate suspension of the therapy. The main symptom in this patient was pain in the right inguinal canal with propagation along the right leg, which was indicated in clinical picture of spontaneous retroperitoneal haematoma. After three days the fall of hemoglobin occurred, so the additonal diagnostics was done. A computed tomography of the abdomen was performed showing well limited, large retroperitoneal hematoma (213 x 79 x 91 mm). Transfusion of concentrated red blood cells was performed twice with satisfactory correction of hemoglobin level, and four units of fresh frozen plasma. The patient was hemodynamically stabilized and discharged after a two-month long intensive care unit treatment, with the advice to use low-molecular weight heparin 2 x 0.4 mg subcutaneusly, due to persistent arrhythmia. In patients on anticoagulation therapy regular monitoring of the anticoagulant status is extremely important, because of the possibility of fatal complications development, such as retroperitoneal hematoma.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants versus Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Patients Undergoing Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Santarpia

    Full Text Available Use of the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs is endorsed by current guidelines for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF. However efficacy and safety of NOACs in patients undergoing catheter ablation (RFCA of AF has not been well established yet.To perform a meta-analysis of all studies comparing NOACs and vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (VKAs in patients undergoing RFCA.Studies were searched for in PubMed and Google Scholar databases.Studies were considered eligible if: they evaluated the clinical impact of NOACs versus VKAs; they specifically analyzed the use of anticoagulants during periprocedural phase of RFCA; they reported clinical outcome data.25 studies were selected, including 9881 cases. The summary measure used was the risk ratio (RR with 95% confidence interval (CI. The random-effects or the fixed effect model were used to synthesize results from the selected studies.There was no significant difference in thromboembolic complications (RR 1.39; p=0.13. Bleeding complications were significantly lower in the NOACs-treated arm as compared to VKAs (RR=0.67, p<0.001. Interestingly, a larger number of thromboembolic events was found in the VKAs-treated arm in those studies where VKAs had been interrupted during the periprocedural phase (RR=0.68; p=ns. In this same subgroup a significantly higher incidence of both minor (RR=0.54; p=0.002 and major bleeding (RR=0.41; p=0.01 events was recorded. Conversely, the incidence of thromboembolic events in the VKAs-treated arm was significantly lower in those studies with uninterrupted periprocedural anticoagulation treatment (RR=1.89; p=0.02.As with every meta-analysis, no patients-level data were available.The use of NOACs in patients undergoing RFCA is safe, given the lower incidence of bleedings observed with NOACs. On the other side, periprocedural interruption of VKAs and bridging with heparin is associated with a higher bleeding rate with no

  10. Direct oral anticoagulants in real practice: which doses for which patients. Limitations and bleeding risk compared to vitamin K antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Landini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The new oral direct anticoagulants (DOACs could represent a new frontier for management of thromboembolic diseases. However, the new drugs have limitations that need to be considered. Despite the fact that their efficacy and safety profile are at least not inferior to comparators, bleeding risk represents the most feared complication, as for all the antithrombotic drugs. Bleeding risk increases with conditions that interfere with pharmacokinetics, in addition to the risk strictly linked to patients or their co-morbidities. Since all DOACs are excreted from kidneys (even though at different percentages according to the different molecules, renal impairment represents one of the leading causes of DOACs accumulation and bleeding risk. Moderate renal failure is the main condition in which dose adjustment of DOACs could be required, while severe renal impairment represents an absolute contraindication for their use. Renal function must, therefore, be carefully monitored before prescription and during assumption. The older population is at higher bleeding risk, and dose adjustment of DOACs could be required. Although to a lesser degree than oral anticoagulant vitamin K antagonists, DOACs can have drug interactions, especially with P-glycoprotein and cytochrome P3A4 inducers or inhibitors, and these interactions must be taken into account in real practice to avoid accumulation or under dosage. The concomitant use of other drugs, especially antithrombotics, may expose the patients to bleeding risk by reducing the hemostatic properties.

  11. Concurrent use of tramadol and oral vitamin K antagonists and the risk of excessive anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Meegaard, P. M.; Holck, L. H.

    2013-01-01

    ). SUBJECTS: Both cases and controls were selected from users of VKA. Cases were defined by being hospitalised with a main diagnosis indicating excessive anticoagulation. For each case, we selected 15 controls among VKA users, matched by age and sex. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Odds ratio for experiencing excessive...

  12. Oral anticoagulant treatment with coumarin derivatives does not influence plasma homocysteine concentration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, H.P.J.; Heijer, M. den; Gerrits, W.B.J.; Schurgers, L.J.; Havekes, M.; Blom, H.J.; Bos, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High circulating levels of homocysteine are a risk factor for arterial and venous thrombosis. This association has been established in numerous case-control studies. In some of these studies, patients were treated with anticoagulants at the time of venapuncture. It is not clear whether h

  13. Left atrial appendage occlusion with Amplatzer Cardio Plug is an acceptable therapeutic option for prevention of stroke recurrence in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and contraindication or failure of oral anticoagulation with acenocumarol

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes, Maximiliano A; Lucía Pertierra; Federico Rodriguez-Lucci; Virginia A. Pujol-Lereis; Sebastián F. Ameriso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) appears as a therapeutic option for some atrial fibrillation patients not suitable for oral anticoagulation because an increased hemorrhagic risk or recurrent ischemic events despite anticoagulant treatment. Methods Report of consecutive atrial fibrillation patients treated with LAAO with Amplatzer Cardio Plug because contraindication or failure of oral anticoagulation with acenocumarol. CHA2DS2VASC, HAS-BLED, NIHSS, mRS, procedural complicati...

  14. Left atrial appendage occlusion with Amplatzer Cardio Plug is an acceptable therapeutic option for prevention of stroke recurrence in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and contraindication or failure of oral anticoagulation with acenocumarol

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes,Maximiliano A; Lucía Pertierra; Federico Rodriguez-Lucci; Pujol-Lereis,Virginia A.; Ameriso,Sebastián F

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) appears as a therapeutic option for some atrial fibrillation patients not suitable for oral anticoagulation because an increased hemorrhagic risk or recurrent ischemic events despite anticoagulant treatment. Methods Report of consecutive atrial fibrillation patients treated with LAAO with Amplatzer Cardio Plug because contraindication or failure of oral anticoagulation with acenocumarol. CHA2DS2VASC, HAS-BLED, NIHSS, mRS, procedural complicati...

  15. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of dual antiplatelet therapy with or without warfarin in patients with a clinical indication for DAPT and chronic anticoagulation: A meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavishi, Chirag; Koulova, Anna; Bangalore, Sripal; Sawant, Ashwin; Chatterjee, Saurav; Ather, Sameer; Valencia, Jose; Sarafoff, Nikolaus; Rubboli, Andrea; Airaksinen, Juhani K; Lip, Gregory Y H; Tamis-Holland, Jacqueline E

    2016-07-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) and triple therapy (TT, dual antiplatelet plus warfarin) in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) or PCI with stenting (PCI-S) who also require chronic oral anticoagulation. Recommendations for the optimal antiplatelet/anticoagulant treatment regimen for patients undergoing PCI-S or MI who also require oral anticoagulation are largely based on evidence from observational studies and expert opinions. A systematic search was performed for studies comparing TT vs. DAPT in patients post PCI-S or MI and requiring chronic anticoagulation. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were ischemic stroke, major bleeding, MI, and stent thrombosis. Pooled relative risks (RR) were calculated using random effects model. A total of 17 studies were included, with 14,921 patients [TT: 5,819(39%) and DAPT: 9,102(61%)] and a mean follow-up of 1.6 years. The majority of patients required oral anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation. Compared to DAPT, patients treated with TT had no significant difference in all-cause mortality [RR: 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.61-1.08, P = 0.15], MI [RR 0.74, 95% CI: 0.51-1.06, P = 0.10], and stent thrombosis [RR 0.67, 95% CI: 0.35-1.30, P = 0.24]. Patients treated with TT had significantly increased risk of major bleeding [RR 1.20, 95% CI: 1.03-1.39, P = 0.02], whereas the risk for ischemic stroke was significantly lower [RR 0.59, 95% CI: 0.38-0.92, P = 0.02]. All-cause mortality appears similar in patients treated with TT or DAPT although TT was associated with higher rates of major bleeding and a lower risk for ischemic stroke. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Emerging oral therapies for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Colleen E; Umhauer, Margaret A

    2011-02-01

    Despite notable advances in the understanding of multiple sclerosis (MS) and the availability of several treatment options, there is a need for therapies that are more effective, safe, convenient, and well tolerated. Several new oral MS therapies are being investigated. Because data on these new therapies continue to emerge, nurses will play a pivotal role in educating patients regarding the benefits and risks of potential treatments and in monitoring patients for response, safety, tolerability, and adherence. This article reviews the oral MS therapies recently approved as well as those currently in development or submitted for Food and Drug Administration approval.

  17. Administración oral de preparado parenteral de vitamina K en anticoagulación excesiva por warfarina Oral administration of intravenous preparation of Vitamin K for excessive anticoagulation due to warfarin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoleima Lozada

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La warfarina es frecuentemente usada en la terapia anticoagulante actual, su acción debe ser monitorizada usando el tiempo de protrombina expresado como International Normalized Ratio (INR; cuando se excede el rango de seguridad se puede administrar vitamina K (Vit-K, preferentemente por vía oral. Dicha presentación no está disponible en Venezuela. Se realizó un ensayo clínico, doble ciego, donde a 20 pacientes, edad 18-60 años, sin sangrado e INR inicial de 6 a 10 inclusive; les fue suspendida la warfarina e inmediatamente agrupados al azar a recibir dosis única de Vit-K (oral 1.25mg de Vit-K fraccionada de una presentación parenteral o placebo. El punto final primario, INR Anticoagulation therapy with warfarin, a common clinical practice, needs to be monitored using protombine time expressed as the International Normalized Ratio (INR; when safety range is exceeded, Vitamin K (Vit-K could be administered with preference orally. In Venezuela the specific oral preparation for Vit-K is not available. This is a double blinded, randomized, placebo controlled, clinical trial; 20 patients, age 18-60 year with initial INR ≥ 6, ≤10, were randomized to oral Vit-K 1.25mg (prepared from intravenous presentation or placebo plus withholding warfarin. INR < 3.5 at 24 hours of treatment (the primary end point was achieved by 70% among Vit-K, and 20% among placebo patients; given an absolute risk reduction (ARR, of 50% (CI95%: 14.4-85.6 ρ = 0.028, NNT 2 (CI95%: 1.3 - 6.9. No adverse events were recorded including INR < 2 at 24 hours of treatment administration. Our results are consistent with studies where specific oral presentation of Vit-K was used. The results indicate that oral administration of Vit-K, prepared from an intravenous Vit-K preparation, is safe and more effective to revert excessive anticoagulation than simply withholding warfarin, in places where specific preparation of oral Vit-K is not available or too expensive.

  18. POSSIBILITIES OF MODERN ORAL DIABETES THERAPY* -

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-01-23

    Jan 23, 1971 ... deals with problems and possibilities of oral therapy, especially with the .... 4. Effect of intravenous tolbuta- mide and HB 419 on blood glucose. (BG) and serum ... An additional dose of 50 g carbohydrate given orally -f-hour ...

  19. The Role of Pharmacomechanical Endovascular Intervention for Iliofemoral Vein Thrombosis Compared to Conventional Anticoagulation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Sub; Jo, Won Min

    2017-01-01

    Although anticoagulation therapy is the primary treatment for deep vein thrombosis (DVT), it has not been associated with the rapid recanalization of the venous occlusion. Moreover, it is associated with long-term disability due to post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). In contrast, pharmacomechanical endovascular intervention (PMI) results in more rapid clinical improvement in DVT patients, but there are few reports on its long-term outcomes. This retrospective study evaluated the clinical effectiveness of PMI compared to conventional anticoagulation therapy (ACA) for acute and subacute iliofemoral DVT. We reviewed the medical records of 102 patients with iliofemoral DVT. A total of 46 patients for ACA and 56 patients for PMI were enrolled. We analyzed the clinical differences between the PMI and ACA groups by comparing the clinical signs, residual DVT free-rate, and PTS-free rate. There were no statistically significant differences in the demographic characteristics and risk factors except age between the groups (age: ACA, 52.0 ± 18.0 years; PMI, 59.0 ± 17.0 years; P = 0.035). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year residual DVT-free rate (ACA = 84.7%, 71.6%, and 46.0%; PMI = 82.1%, 76.8%, and 76.8%, respectively; P = 0.235) was not significantly different. However, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year PTS-free rate was significantly different (ACA = 93.5%, 74.0%, and 55.7%; PMI = 92.9%, 90.0%, and 90.0%, respectively; P = 0.019). There was no significant difference in the rate of other complications. PMI showed a lower incidence of PTS during the follow-up period. Therefore, PMI should be considered as an effective therapeutic modality for patients with iliofemoral DVT.

  20. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Spencer W

    2005-08-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies, particularly radiation therapy for head and neck cancer and various forms of chemotherapy. It commonly results in severe oral pain that can compromise the duration and success of cancer management. Hospitalizations are common because patients lose the ability to take anything by mouth due to severe pain and must have alimentation supported during this period. Pain management usually requires potent narcotic analgesia. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis is commonly described as the most significant and debilitating acute complication associated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Until recently, cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis was thought to be a process involving the epithelium only. Evidence is building that the process of oral mucositis involves far more than just the epithelium, but includes multiple cellular processes of the submucosa as well. Many strategies have been evaluated to prevent oral mucositis, but the data is confusing since it is often conflicting. Therapy with the growth factor, KGF1, appears promising, as it is the only medication currently approved by the FDA. A multifaceted approach that targets the entire mucositis process will probably be needed to optimize overall prevention.

  1. Genetic Polymorphisms and Anticoagulation Therapy with Individualizing%基因指导下的抗凝治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴岩峰; 丁红; 刘庆萍; 王辉

    2014-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is currently prescribed for treatment on thrombotic disorders, such as acute coronary syndromes, atrial fibrillation, vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism. Currently, anticoagulants include heparin, warfarin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and so on. However, anticoagulants vary in dose on individual patient. One of the hot researches is how to increase the efifcacy and safety of anticoagulation. Genetic polymorphisms are thought to contribute to the wide intraindividual variability in anticoagulant drug response. Here, we review the genetic mechanisms contributing to the variability in response to warfarin and dabigatran, and propose the personal management of anticoagulation therapy.%抗凝治疗是急性冠状动脉综合征、心房颤动、静脉血栓形成、肺栓塞等栓塞类疾病非常有效的治疗手段。抗凝药物包括肝素、华法林、达比加群、利伐沙班、阿哌沙班等。抗凝药物剂量个体差异大、出血风险高。如何提高抗凝治疗的有效性和安全性作为目前的研究热点。基因多态性在抗凝药物的剂量效应关系方面起了非常重要的作用。本文旨在探讨影响华法林、达比加群等抗凝药物的遗传因素,为个体化治疗提供依据。

  2. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage for prevention of thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation for patients with contraindication to or failure of oral anticoagulation: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, Ana; Paiva, Luís; Providência, Rui; Trigo, Joana; Botelho, Ana; Costa, Marco; Leitão-Marques, António

    2013-06-01

    In non-valvular atrial fibrillation 90% of thrombi originate in the left atrial appendage (LAA). Percutaneous LAA closure has been shown to be non-inferior to warfarin for prevention of thromboembolism. To evaluate the initial experience of a single center in percutaneous LAA closure in patients with high thromboembolic risk and in whom oral anticoagulation was impractical or contraindicated or had failed. Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and CHADS2 score ≥2 in whom oral anticoagulation was impractical or contraindicated or had failed underwent percutaneous LAA closure according to the standard technique. After the procedure, dual antiplatelet therapy was maintained for one month, followed by single antiplatelet therapy indefinitely. Patients were followed by clinical assessment and transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography. The procedure was performed in 22 of the 23 selected patients (95.7%), mean age 70±9 years, CHADS2 score 3.2±0.9 and CHA2DS2-VASC score 4.7±1.4. Intraprocedural device replacement was necessary only in the first patient, due to oversizing. The following periprocedural complications were observed: one femoral pseudoaneurysm, three femoral hematomas and two minor oropharyngeal bleeds, resolved by local hemostatic measures. During a 12±8 month follow-up a mild peri-device flow and a thrombus adhering to the device, resolved under with enoxaparin therapy, were identified. The rate of transient ischemic attack (TIA)/stroke was lower than expected according to the CHADS2 score (0 vs. 6.7±2.2%). In our initial experience, this procedure proved to be a feasible, safe and effective alternative for atrial fibrillation patients in whom oral anticoagulation is not an option. Only relatively minor complications were observed, with a lower than expected TIA/stroke rate. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Is Post-TIPS Anticoagulation Therapy Necessary in Patients with Cirrhosis and Portal Vein Thrombosis? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu; Jiang, Ming-Shan; Zhang, Hai-Long; Weng, Ning-Na; Luo, Xue-Feng; Li, Xiao; Yang, Li

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To determine whether posttransjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement anticoagulation therapy could benefit patients with cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis (PVT) from the perspective of a change in portal vein patency status and clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from each patient. From October 2012 to February 2014, patients with cirrhosis and PVT who underwent TIPS placement were randomly assigned to the anticoagulation therapy or control group. All patients were followed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the TIPS procedure. Outcome measures were a change of portal vein patency status and clinical measures including gastrointestinal rebleeding, shunt dysfunction, hepatic encephalopathy, and survival. Student t test, χ(2) test, Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney U test, and logistical regression were applied where appropriate. Results A total of 64 patients were enrolled in the study, with 31 allocated to the anticoagulation group and 33 allocated to the control group. Overall, thrombi were improved in 61 patients (96.8%) after the procedure. PVT recanalization (ie, complete disappearance; reconstruction of cavernous transformation) was achieved in 26 patients (83.9%) in the anticoagulation therapy group and in 23 (71.8%) patients in tthe control group (P = .252). The presence of a superior mesenteric vein thrombus may help predict recanalization failure (unadjusted relative risk = 0.243; 95% confidence interval: 0.070, 0.843; P = .026). Clinical outcomes were also similar between the two groups. Conclusion Anticoagulation therapy may not be necessary in certain patients with PVT because TIPS placement alone can achieve a high persistent recanalization rate. (©) RSNA, 2015.

  4. Hemorragia por dicumarínicos: Incidencia, factores de riesgo y comparación con los nuevos anticoagulantes orales Bleeding during anti-vitamin K treatment: Incidence, risk factors and comparison with the new oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Korin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available La hemorragia es la complicación principal de los anticoagulantes orales, dicumarínicos o los nuevos agentes anti-Factor Xa y antitrombínicos. Se analizan los distintos factores de riesgo asociados a sangrado con los agentes clásicos y su vinculación probable con los nuevos fármacos. Se compara la incidencia de sangrado mayor en fibrilación auricular y en tromboembolismo venoso por ambos grupos de antitrombóticos. Además de las propiedades intrínsecas de los agentes clásicos y de los nuevos, serán las características de los pacientes y el correcto empleo terapéutico, los factores que impacten en la incidencia de sangrado en su uso diario, más allá de los datos publicados en los estudios clínicos.Bleeding is the main complication of oral anticoagulants, anti-vitamin K or new drugs such as anti-factor Xa or anti-thrombin agents. Risk factors associated with bleeding during warfarin therapy are discussed. For the new drugs no published data is available yet. Comparative frequencies of major bleeding during anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism are shown. Beyond the intrinsic properties of the classic and new agents, patients characteristics and co-morbidities and an appropriate management of the antithrombotic therapy will be the factors associated with bleeding incidence in real life.

  5. Impact of inhalation therapy on oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Godara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation therapy has been employed as the mainstay of the treatment in chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Beta-2 agonists, anticholinergic bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, and sodium cromoglycate are often used alone or in combination in an inhaled form. Studies have shown that inhaled drugs used in the treatment have some adverse effects on the oral health based on their dosage, frequency, and duration of use. Several oral conditions such as xerostomia, dental caries, candidiasis, ulceration, gingivitis, periodontitis, and taste changes have been associated with inhalation therapy. Since the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases is rising, it is important to provide optimal oral care to the individuals receiving inhalation therapy. This article will review the influence of inhaled drugs on the oral health of individuals and adequate management and prevention of the same.

  6. Gene Therapy In Oral Cancer : An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The treatment and prevention of oral cancer is one of the major hurdles in the field ofcancer. Gene therapy is one of the recent advances in this field to tackle this hurdle with promisingprospects. This overview introduces the reader into the basic idea of gene therapy, types of genetherapy and the various modes of introduction of therapeutic gene into the cancer affected cell.

  7. Outpatient treatment of low-risk venous thromboembolism with monotherapy oral anticoagulation: patient quality of life outcomes and clinician acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kline JA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey A Kline,1,2 Zachary P Kahler,1,3 Daren M Beam1,2 1Department of Emergency Medicine, 2Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, University of South Carolina Greenville School of Medicine, Greenville, SC, USA Background: Oral monotherapy anticoagulation has facilitated home treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE in outpatients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to measure efficacy, safety, as well as patient and physician perceptions produced by a protocol that selected VTE patients as low-risk patients by the Hestia criteria, and initiated home anticoagulation with an oral factor Xa antagonist. Methods: Patients were administered the Venous Insufficiency Epidemiological and Economic Study Quality of life/Symptoms ques­tionnaire [VEINEs QoL/Sym] and the physical component summary [PCS] from the Rand 36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF36]. The primary outcomes were VTE recurrence and hemorrhage at 30 days. Secondary outcomes compared psychometric test scores between patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT to those with pulmonary embolism (PE. Patient perceptions were abstracted from written comments and physician perceptions specific to PE outpatient treatment obtained from structured survey. Results: From April 2013 to September 2015, 253 patients were treated, including 67 with PE. Within 30 days, 2/ 253 patients had recurrent DVT and 2/253 had major hemor­rhage; all four had DVT at enrollment. The initial PCS scores did not differ between DVT and PE patients (37.2±13.9 and 38.0±12.1, respectively and both DVT and PE patients had similar improvement over the treatment period (42.2±12.9 and 43.4±12.7, respectively, consistent with prior literature. The most common adverse event was menorrhagia, present in 15% of women. Themes from patient-written responses reflected satisfaction with increased autonomy. Physicians’ (N=116

  8. Adherence to recommendations of the Therapeutic Positioning Report about treatment with oral anticoagulants in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation. The ESPARTA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez Fernández, Carmen; Mostaza, Jose María; Castilla Guerra, Luis; Cantero Hinojosa, Jesus; Suriñach, Josep Maria; Acosta de Bilbao, Fernando; Tamarit, Juan José; Diaz Diaz, José Luis; Hernandez, Jose Luis; Cazorla, Daniel; Ràfols, Carles

    2017-10-06

    To evaluate the adherence to the recommendations in clinical practice performed by the Therapeutic Positioning Report (TPR) of the Spanish Agency of Medicines and Sanitary Products about the treatment with oral anticoagulants in patients aged≥75 years old with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) treated in Internal Medicine departments in Spain. Observational, cross-sectional and multicenter study in which 837 patients aged≥75 years old with NVAF, with stable treatment with oral anticoagulants at least 3 months before inclusion, and that had started treatment with oral anticoagulants before the inclusion period were included. Mean age was 83.0±5.0 years old, mean CHADS2 score 3.2±1.2, mean CHA2DS2-VASc score 5.0±1.4, and mean HAS-BLED score 2.1±0.9. A percentage of 70.8 of patients were treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and the rest of patients with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). A percentage of 65.6 of patients treated with VKA did not follow the recommendations made by the TPR compared with 43.0% of patients treated with DOACs (P<.0001). In the case of VKA, the main reason for being considered as not appropriate according to the TPR was having poor control of anticoagulation and not switching to DOACs, whereas in the case of DOACs, it was not receiving the adequate dose according to the TPR. In a high proportion of anticoagulated elderly patients with NVAF in Spain, the recommendations performed by the TPR are not followed, particularly with VKA, since patients are not switched to DOACs despite time in therapeutic range. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Anticoagulation for Prosthetic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kaneko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of prosthetic valve requires consideration for anticoagulation. The current guideline recommends warfarin on all mechanical valves. Dabigatran is the new generation anticoagulation medication which is taken orally and does not require frequent monitoring. This drug is approved for treatment for atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism, but the latest large trial showed that this drug increases adverse events when used for mechanical valve anticoagulation. On-X valve is the new generation mechanical valve which is considered to require less anticoagulation due to its flow dynamics. The latest study showed that lower anticoagulation level lowers the incidence of bleeding, while the risk of thromboembolism and thrombosis remained the same. Anticoagulation poses dilemma in cases such as pregnancy and major bleeding event. During pregnancy, warfarin can be continued throughout pregnancy and switched to heparin derivative during 6–12 weeks and >36 weeks of gestation. Warfarin can be safely started after 1-2 weeks of discontinuation following major bleeding episode.

  10. Characteristics and clinical research of new oral anticoagulants%新型口服抗凝药的特点和临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建光; 周颖奇

    2013-01-01

    Oral anticoagulants play an important role in the prevention and managment of heart and cerebral thrombosis disease. New oral anticoagulants including dabigatran etexilate (direct thrombin inhibitor) and inhibition of factor Xa such as rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban and betrixaban. Monitoring is not necessary and less interaction is found in these new oral anticoagulants. Evidence-based medical tests confirm that new oral anticoagulants are more safety and efficacy and less adverse reactions than warfarin and enoxaparin on postoperative blood clots, atrial fibril ation and acute coronary syndrome.%口服抗凝药在心脑血管血栓疾病的防治中发挥了重要作用,新型口服抗凝药包括直接凝血酶抑制剂达比加群,Xa因子抑制剂利伐沙班、阿哌沙班、贝曲西班和依杜沙班,无需监测、相互作用少,循证医学试验证实在术后血栓、心房颤动,以及急性冠脉综合征中疗效及安全性好于华发林、依诺肝素等,不良反应小。

  11. Ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke associated with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and warfarin use in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Lip, Gregory Y H;

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are widely used as stroke prophylaxis in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF), but comparative data are sparse. PURPOSE: To compare dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban vs. VKA and the risk of stroke/thromboembolism (TE...

  12. The Risk/Benefit Analysis of Oral Anticoagulant Treatment in Atrial Fibrillation Using HAS-BLED and CHA2DS2-VASc Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela Silivastru (Cozlea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the risk and the benefit of oral anticoagulant treatment in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF patients, using the two scores recommended by the guidelines: the CHA2DS2-VASc score and HAS-BLED score.

  13. The Severity of Intracranial Hemorrhages Measured by Free Hemoglobin in the Brain Depends on the Anticoagulant Class: Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M. Ware

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Anticoagulant therapy is broadly used to prevent thromboembolic events. Intracranial hemorrhages are serious complications of anticoagulation, especially with warfarin. Direct oral anticoagulants reduce but do not eliminate the risk of intracranial hemorrhages. The aim of this study is to determine the degree of intracranial hemorrhage after application of anticoagulants without additional triggers. Methods. Rats were treated with different anticoagulant classes (vitamin K antagonists, heparin, direct thrombin inhibitor, and factor Xa inhibitor. Brain hemorrhages were assessed by the free hemoglobin concentration in the brain parenchyma. Results. Vitamin K antagonists (warfarin and brodifacoum significantly increased free hemoglobin in the brain. Among direct oral anticoagulants, thrombin inhibitor dabigatran also significantly increased free hemoglobin in the brain, whereas treatment with factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban did not have significant effect on the free hemoglobin concentration. Conclusions. Our data indicates that the severity of brain hemorrhages depends on the anticoagulant class and it is more pronounced with vitamin K antagonists.

  14. A survey of anticoagulation practice among German speaking microsurgeons – Perioperative management of anticoagulant therapy in free flap surgery [Erhebung über die antikoagulatorische Praxis unter deutschsprachigen Mikrochirurgen – Perioperatives Management der antikoagulatorischen Therapie bei freien Lappentransplantaten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokuszies, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: Anticoagulation is a crucial element in microsurgery. Although various clinical studies and international surveys have revealed that anticoagulation strategies can vary and result in similar outcomes, anticoagulative regimen are far away from standardization. In Germany and german speaking countries standardized anticoagulation protocols concerning free flap surgery do not exist so far. Methods: To evaluate the current practice of clinics in Germany, Austria and Switzerland with specialization in microsurgery we performed a questionnaire surveying the perioperative regimen of anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy in free flap surgery. The microsurgeons were interrogated on several anticoagulant, rheologic and antiplatelet medications, their dosage and perioperative frequency of application pre-, intra- and postoperative.Results: The questionnaire revealed that the used antithrombotic and perioperative regimens varied from department to department presumably based on the personal experience of the surgeon. Multiple approaches are used with a wide range of anticoagulants used either alone or in combination, with different intervals of application and different dosages. Conclusion: Therefore consensus meetings should be held in future leading to conduct prospective multicenter studies with formulation of standardized anticoagulative and perioperative protocols in microsurgery reducing flap failure to other than pharmacologic reasons.[german] Hintergrund: Die Antikoagulation stellt ein zentrales Element in der Mikrochirurgie dar. Zahlreiche klinische Studien und internationale Erhebungen zu antikoagulatorischen Strategien weisen eine grosse Varianz bei vergleichbaren Resultaten nach, entbehren jedoch einer Standardisierung. Auch in Deutschland und deutschsprachigen Ländern fehlen bislang standardisierte Regime zur Antikoagulation in der Mikrochirurgie.Methodik: Zur Erhebung der antikoagulatorischen Praxis unter

  15. New Insights into the Pros and Cons of the Clinical Use of Vitamin K Antagonists (VKAs) Versus Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gorp, Rick H; Schurgers, Leon J

    2015-11-17

    Vitamin K-antagonists (VKA) are the most widely used anticoagulant drugs to treat patients at risk of arterial and venous thrombosis for the past 50 years. Due to unfavorable pharmacokinetics VKA have a small therapeutic window, require frequent monitoring, and are susceptible to drug and nutritional interactions. Additionally, the effect of VKA is not limited to coagulation, but affects all vitamin K-dependent proteins. As a consequence, VKA have detrimental side effects by enhancing medial and intimal calcification. These limitations stimulated the development of alternative anticoagulant drugs, resulting in direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) drugs, which specifically target coagulation factor Xa and thrombin. DOACs also display non-hemostatic vascular effects via protease-activated receptors (PARs). As atherosclerosis is characterized by a hypercoagulable state indicating the involvement of activated coagulation factors in the genesis of atherosclerosis, anticoagulation could have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. Additionally, accumulating evidence demonstrates vascular benefit from high vitamin K intake. This review gives an update on oral anticoagulant treatment on the vasculature with a special focus on calcification and vitamin K interaction.

  16. New Insights into the Pros and Cons of the Clinical Use of Vitamin K Antagonists (VKAs Versus Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick H. van Gorp

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K-antagonists (VKA are the most widely used anticoagulant drugs to treat patients at risk of arterial and venous thrombosis for the past 50 years. Due to unfavorable pharmacokinetics VKA have a small therapeutic window, require frequent monitoring, and are susceptible to drug and nutritional interactions. Additionally, the effect of VKA is not limited to coagulation, but affects all vitamin K-dependent proteins. As a consequence, VKA have detrimental side effects by enhancing medial and intimal calcification. These limitations stimulated the development of alternative anticoagulant drugs, resulting in direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC drugs, which specifically target coagulation factor Xa and thrombin. DOACs also display non-hemostatic vascular effects via protease-activated receptors (PARs. As atherosclerosis is characterized by a hypercoagulable state indicating the involvement of activated coagulation factors in the genesis of atherosclerosis, anticoagulation could have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. Additionally, accumulating evidence demonstrates vascular benefit from high vitamin K intake. This review gives an update on oral anticoagulant treatment on the vasculature with a special focus on calcification and vitamin K interaction.

  17. Therapeutic concordance of two portable monitors and two routine automatic oral anticoagulant monitoring systems using as reference the manual prothrombin time technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, Marta; Lafuente, Pedro José; Unanue, Iciar; Santos, Mónica; Iriarte, Jose Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Two models of capillary blood prothrombin time (PT) monitoring systems were evaluated for analytical performance and then compared with two routine PT systems using the reference manual technique and a high-sensitivity thromboplastin. Two sets of 60 and 80 plasmas were analyzed from anticoagulated patients stabilized over 3 months in an INR range 2-3.5 for therapy. Capillary PT determination was performed in two portable monitors, CoaguChek S and CoaguChek PT (Roche Diagnostics), and plasma automatic methods were Neoplastine/STA (Diagnostics Stago) and PT-FibrinogenHsPlus/ACL7000 (Instrumental Laboratories). Thromboplastin Bilbao (TBi), an in-house high-sensitivity rabbit thromboplastin (ISI=1.08), recommended as the reference reagent by an External Spanish Oral Anticoagulant Quality Assessment, was used in the PT manual technique. The two monitors' coefficients of correlation with the reference system were 0.74 for CoaguChek S and 0.81 for CoaguChek PT. The automatic routine systems showed a correlation of 0.92 (Neoplastine/STA) and 0.91 (PT-FbHsPlus/ACL7000). Clinical agreement expressed as the percentage of simple correlation ranged between 75.0% (CoaguChek S) and 88.9% (Neoplastine/STA). The systems having the best kappa index with the manual technique were CoaguChek PT (71.9%) and the Neoplastine/STA system (73%). The routine PT management systems exhibited better correlation and percentage of concordance when using the TBi/manual technique than did the portable monitors, which moreover performed unequally in this regard.

  18. [Clinical characteristics of patients with atrial fibrillation treated with direct oral anticoagulants attended in primary care setting. The SILVER-AP study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Figuera, Mariano; Cinza, Sergio; Marín, Nuria; Egocheaga, Isabel; Prieto, Miguel Angel

    2017-07-29

    To analyse the clinical characteristics and management of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) treated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC). Observational, cross-sectional and multicentre study. Autonomous Communities in which the general practitioner can prescribe DOAC (n=9). The study included a total of 790 patients on chronic treatment with anticoagulants, and on whom therapy was changed, as well as being currently on treatment with DOAC for at least for 3 months. A record was made of the sociodemographic and clinical management date. Mean age was 78.6±8.4 years, and 50.5% of patients were men. Mean CHADS2 score was 2.6±1.2, mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 4.3±1.6, and the mean HAS-BLED score was 2.3±1.0. Mean duration of treatment with DOAC was 15.8±12.5 months. Rivaroxaban was the DOAC most frequently prescribed (57.8%), followed by dabigatran (23.7%), and apixaban (18.5%). Of the patients receiving rivaroxaban, 70.2% were taking the dose of 20mg/daily. Of the patients receiving dabigatran, 41.7% were taking the dose of 150mg twice daily, and in the case of apixaban, 56.2% were taking the dose of 5mg twice daily. Satisfaction (ACTS Burdens scale 52.0±7.2 and ACTS Benefits scale 12.1±2.2), and therapeutic adherence (97.8% of patients took their medication regularly) with DOAC were high. Patients treated with DOAC in Spain have a high thromboembolic risk. A significant proportion of patients receive a lower dose of DOAC than that recommended according to their clinical profile. Satisfaction and medication adherence are high. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Good quality of oral anticoagulation treatment in general practice using international normalised ratio point of care testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Tina Heidi; Lind, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oral anticoagulation treatment (OACT) with warfarin is common in general practice. Increasingly, international normalised ratio (INR) point of care testing (POCT) is being used to manage patients. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse the quality of OACT with warfarin...... in general practice in the Capital Region of Denmark using INR POCT. METHODS: A total of 20 general practices, ten single-handed and ten group practices using INR POCT, were randomly selected to participate in the study. Practice organisation and patient characteristics were recorded. INR measurements were...... collected retrospectively for a period of six months. For each patient, time in therapeutic range (TTR) was calculated and correlated with practice and patient characteristics using multilevel linear regression models. RESULTS: We identified 447 patients in warfarin treatment in the 20 practices using POCT...

  20. Good quality of oral anticoagulation treatment in general practice using international normalised ratio point of care testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Tina Heidi; Lind, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oral anticoagulation treatment (OACT)with warfarin is common in general practice. Increasingly,international normalised ratio (INR) point of care testing(POCT) is being used to manage patients. The aim of thisstudy was to describe and analyse the quality of OACT withwarfarin...... was notsignificant (4.2 percentage points (pp); 95% confidenceinterval (CI): –0.8-9.2). Short sampling intervals, e.g. 10-20days (–11 pp, 95% CI: –16-–6)) and lack of diagnostic coding(–11.8 pp; 95% CI: –19.9-–3.7) were correlated with a lowTTR. CONCLUSION: In our study most of the general practices usingINR POCT...... in the management of patients in warfarintreatment provided good quality of care. Sampling intervaland diagnostic coding were significantly correlated withtreatment quality. FUNDING: The study received financial support from theSarah Krabbe Foundation, the General Practitioners’ Educationand Development Foundation...

  1. Major cerebral events in Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis: is anticoagulant therapy safe?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Olaison, Lars;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of anticoagulation on major cerebral events in patients with left-sided Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE). METHODS: A prospective cohort study; the use of anticoagulation and the relation to major cerebral events was evaluated separately at onset...

  2. Adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Olivera-Fernandez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral chemotherapy agents offer advantages including cost, patient comfort and potential improvement in quality of life versus intravenous drugs. However ensuring adherence and monitoring adverse effects is more difficult. The aim of this study was to examine the real adherence in patients with oral chemotherapy agents in our hospital, to assess the influence of patient and treatment characteristics, to identify reasons for non adherence, to identify pportunities for improvement pharmaceutical care and to assess the potential relation between adherence and treatment outcomes. Method: observational, prospective study for a period of four month, in the patients who were dispensing oral chemotherapy agents in outpatient setting. The medical prescriptions, medical history and patient interviews were used to collect data. Results: 141 patients were assessing. 72% were considered as fully adherent, while 28% reported some kind of non adherence. Adherence was influenced by time from diagnosis and adverse effects. No relationship between adherence and treatment outcomes was found. Conclusions: Adherence to oral chemotherapy was 72%, identifing opportunities for improvement pharmaceutical care to prevent adverse effects and to improve our patient adherence

  3. [Adherence to oral antineoplastic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera-Fernandez, R; Fernandez-Ribeiro, F; Piñeiro-Corrales, G; Crespo-Diz, C

    2014-11-03

    Introducción: Los tratamientos antineoplasicos orales presentan ventajas en cuanto a coste, comodidad y mejora potencial en la calidad de vida respecto al tratamiento endovenoso, pero es mas dificil controlar la adherencia y monitorizar los efectos adversos. El objetivo de este estudio fue conocer la adherencia real en pacientes con antineoplasicos orales en nuestro centro, analizar la influencia de las caracteristicas del paciente y del tratamiento, identificar motivos de no adherencia, oportunidades de mejora en la atencion farmaceutica y evaluar la posible relacion adherencia y respuesta al tratamiento. Método: estudio prospectivo observacional de cuatro meses de duracion, en los pacientes con tratamiento antineoplasico oral dispensado desde la consulta de farmacia oncologica. Para la recogida de datos se utilizaron: orden medica, historia clinica y visita con entrevistas al paciente. Resultados: Se evaluaron un total de 141 pacientes. Un 72% se considero totalmente adherente, mientras que en un 28% se detecto algun tipo de no adherencia. El tiempo desde el diagnostico y la presencia de efectos adversos fueron las variables que afectaron a la adherencia. No se pudo demostrar relacion entre adherencia y respuesta al tratamiento. Conclusiones: La adherencia al tratamiento antineoplasico oral en nuestro centro fue del 72%, identificando oportunidades de mejora en la atencion farmaceutica dirigidas a prevenir los efectos adversos y a potenciar la adherencia de nuestros pacientes.

  4. Cirugía oral en pacientes bajo terapia anticoagulante: modelo experimental para la evaluación de la eficacia de la cola de fibrina Oral surgery in patients treated with anticoagulating therapy: experimental model for evaluation of fibrin glue efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Taormina, G; R Papagna; Carini, F; G Denotti; D Calzavara

    2004-01-01

    Introducción: En la práctica de cirugía oral en los pacientes bajo terapia anti coagulante, el empleo de un sistema eficaz de acción hemostática es de extrema relevancia, porque puede evitar la alteración del régimen terapéutico anticoagulante y el riesgo de un exceso de sangrado. En el presente trabajo se investiga la capacidad hemostática de la cola de fibrina como presidio hemostático en los pacientes bajo terapia anticoagulante, exponiendo los resultados de la experimentación sobre la bas...

  5. The role of prothrombin complex concentrates in reversal of target specific anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babilonia, Katrina; Trujillo, Toby

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years a new era for patients requiring anticoagulation has arrived. The approval of new target specific oral anticoagulants offers practitioners several advantages over traditionally used vitamin K antagonist agents including predictable pharmacokinetics, rapid onset of action, comparable efficacy and safety, all without the need for routine monitoring. Despite these benefits, hemorrhagic complicates are inevitable with any anticoagulation treatment. One of the major disadvantages of the new oral anticoagulants is lack of specific antidotes or reversal agents for patients with serious bleeding or need for urgent surgery. As use of the new target specific oral anticoagulants continues to increase, practitioners will need to understand both the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetic properties of the agents, as well as, the available literature with use of non-specific therapies to reverse anticoagulation. Four factor prothrombin complex concentrates have been available for several years in Europe, and recently became available in the United States with approval of Kcentra. These products have shown efficacy in reversing anticoagulation from vitamin K antagonists, however their usefulness with the new target specific oral anticoagulants is poorly understood. This article will review the properties of dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, as well as the limited literature available on the effectiveness of prothrombin complex concentrates in reversal of their anticoagulant effects. Additional studies are needed to more accurately define the role of prothrombin complex concentrates in patients with life threatening bleeding or who require emergent surgery, as current data is both limited and conflicting.

  6. Gene Therapy In Oral Cancer : An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaram Choudhary

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The treatment and prevention of oral cancer is one of the major hurdles in the field ofcancer. Gene therapy is one of the recent advances in this field to tackle this hurdle with promisingprospects. This overview introduces the reader into the basic idea of gene therapy, types of genetherapy and the various modes of introduction of therapeutic gene into the cancer affected cell.

  7. Novos anticoagulantes orais no tromboembolismo venoso e fibrilhação auricular New oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism and atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Silvestre

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Os antagonistas da vitamina K foram, durante mais de 50 anos, os únicos anticoagulantes orais disponiveis. A imprevisibilidade da farmacocinética e farmacodinâmica desta classe de fármacos, responsável pela dificuldade na sua utilização, conduziu à necessidade do desenvolvimento de novas moléculas anticoagulantes. Estão actualmente diponíveis os resultados dos estudos de novos anticoagulantes orais no tromboembolismo venoso e na fibrilhação auricular, que se revêem neste trabalho.For more than 50 years, vitamin K antagonists were the only oral anticoagulants available. The unpredictability of its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, responsible for its difficult clinical management, has raised the need of new anticoagulants. Results of trials involving the new anticoagulants in venous thromboembolism and atrial fibrillation are now available and reviewed in this paper.

  8. A single-dose of oral nattokinase potentiates thrombolysis and anti-coagulation profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Yuko; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Homma, Toshiyuki; Esaki, Kazuki; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Clark, Joseph F; Hamaoka, Takafumi

    2015-06-25

    Our aim was to determine the quantitative effects of a single-dose of Nattokinase (NK) administration on coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters comprehensively in healthy male subjects. A double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over NK intervention study was carried out in 12 healthy young males. Following the baseline blood draw, each subject was randomized to receive either a single-dose of 2,000 FU NK (NSK-SD, Japan Bio Science Laboratory Co., Ltd) or placebo with subsequent cross-over of the groups. Subjects donated blood samples at 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours following administration for analysis of coagulation/fibrinolysis parameters. As a result, D-dimer concentrations at 6, and 8 hours, and blood fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products at 4 hours after NK administration elevated significantly (p administration (p administration appears enhancing fibrinolysis and anti-coagulation via several different pathways simultaneously.

  9. The SAMe-TT2R2 score and decision-making between a vitamin K antagonist or a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Pastor, María Asunción; Roldán, Vanessa; Valdés, Mariano; Lip, Gregory Y H; Marín, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy is essential in patients with atrial fibrillation and clinicians need guidance on decision-making between the vitamin K antagonists (VKA), e.g. warfarin, or non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants. Observational studies have shown that patients who receive VKA therapy spend a significant percentage of their time with international normalized ratio values outside of the therapeutic range (time in therapeutic range, TTR <60%.) Recently, a clinical score has been developed with commonly encountered clinical features, the SAMe-TT2R2 score, to help decision-making with regard to whether a patient is likely to do well, or not, with a VKA. Those with a SAMe-TT2R2 score of 0-1 are likely to do well on a VKA, while those with a SAMe-TT2R2 score ≥ 2 are on probability going to achieve suboptimal TTR. In this article, we provide an overview of the main published retrospective and prospective studies that have validated the SAMe-TT2R2 score and its value for decision-making in daily clinical practice.

  10. Comparison between single antiplatelet therapy and combination of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy for secondary prevention in ischemic stroke patients with antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Okuma, Yasuhisa Kitagawa, Takashi Yasuda, Kentaro Tokuoka, Shigeharu Takagi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Satisfactory results have not yet been obtained in therapy for secondary prevention in ischemic stroke patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS. We therefore compared single antiplatelet therapy and a combination of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy for secondary prevention in ischemic stroke patients with APS. The subjects were 20 ischemic stroke patients with antiphospholipid antibody, 13 with primary antiphospholipid syndrome and 7 with SLE-related antiphospholipid syndrome. Diagnosis of APS was based on the 2006 Sydney criteria. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to either single antiplatelet therapy (aspirin 100 mg or a combination of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy (target INR: 2.0-3.0; mean 2.4±0.3 for the secondary prevention of stroke according to a double-blind protocol. There was no significant difference between the two groups in age, gender, NIH Stroke Scale on admission, mRS at discharge, or rate of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, or cardiac disease. We obtained Kaplan-Meier survival curves for each treatment. The primary outcome was the occurrence of stroke. The mean follow-up time was 3.9±2.0 years. The cumulative incidence of stroke in patients with single antiplatelet treatment was statistically significantly higher than that in patients receiving the combination of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy (log-rank test, p-value=0.026. The incidence of hemorrhagic complications was similar in the two groups. The recent APASS study did not show any difference in effectiveness for secondary prevention between single antiplatelet (aspirin and single anticoagulant (warfarin therapy. Our results indicate that combination therapy may be more effective in APS-related ischemic stroke.

  11. Extracciones dentarias en pacientes en tratamiento con anticoagulantes: revisión de la literatura Dental extractions in patients under anticoagulant therapy: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Visintini

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo del trabajo. En pacientes en terapia con anticoagulantes orales, una simple extracción puede provocar hemorragias importantes. En la literatura se describen dos enfoques terapéuticos en casos de intervenciones quirúrgicas en esta categoría de pacientes. Uno propone la reducción de la dosis terapéutica del fármaco, mientras que el segundo sugiere la sustitución con heparina. El objetivo de este trabajo es revisar la literatura que trata este tema con el fin de obtener un protocolo ideal. Conclusiones. En caso de extracciones simples es suficiente usar anestesia con vasoconstrictor (en el caso de que no haya otras contraindicaciones, realizar suturas bien tensadas, aplicar coadyuvantes hemostáticos locales y ácido tranexámico tópico. Solo en casos de intervenciones más complejas, o con valores de INR mayores a 3,5, será necesario reducir la dosis del fármaco y consecuente sustitución con heparina de acuerdo a las instrucciones del hematólogo y del cardiólogo.Aim of the work. In patients treated with oral anticoagulants, even simple tooth extractions can produce large hemorrhages. There are two main therapeutic outlines suggested in literature in case of little oral surgery. The first one is based on the reduction of the therapeutic dose of the drug, and the second one on the substitution with heparin. The aim of this paper was to review the.literature on the management of patients treated with anticoagulants in order to obtain univocal guidelines. Conclusion. In case of simple tooth extractions generally a vasoconstrictive anaesthetic (if there are no other contraindications, tight sutures, the application of hemostats and tronexamic acid are enough. Only in case of more complex surgery or of INR values higher than 3,5 it is necessory to reduce the anticoagulant dose or to change the therapy with heparin, if agreed by the hoemotologist and/ or the cardiologist.

  12. Discovery of anticoagulant drugs: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, Ma Luisa; Calvo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Lecumberri, Ramón; Rocha, Eduardo; Pozo-Hernández, Carmen; Terleira-Fernández, Ana Isabel; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio

    2012-06-01

    The history of the traditional anticoagulants is marked by both perseverance and serendipity. The anticoagulant effect of heparin was discovered by McLean in 1915, while he was searching for a procoagulant in dog liver. Link identified dicumarol from spoiled sweet clover hay in 1939 as the causal agent of the sweet clover disease, a hemorrhagic disorder in cattle. Hirudin extracts from the medicinal leech were first used for parenteral anticoagulation in the clinic in 1909, but their use was limited due to adverse effects and difficulties in achieving highly purified extracts. Heparins and coumarins (i.e.: warfarin, phenprocoumon, acenocoumarol) have been the mainstay of anticoagulant therapy for more than 60 years. Over the past decades, the drug discovery paradigm has shifted toward rational design following a target-based approach, in which specific proteins, or "targets", are chosen on current understandings of pathophysiology, small molecules that inhibit the target's activity may be identified by high-throughput screening and, in selected cases, these new molecules can be developed further as drugs. Despite the application of rational design, serendipity has still played a significant role in some of the new discoveries. This review will focus on the discovery of the main anticoagulant drugs in current clinical use, like unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparins, fondaparinux, coumarins (i.e.: warfarin, acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon), parenteral direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) (i.e.: argatroban, recombinant hirudins, bivalirudin), oral DTIs (i.e.: dabigatran) and oral direct factor Xa inhibitors (i.e.: rivaroxaban, apixaban).

  13. Melagatran and ximelagatran: new drug. No real simplification of anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    (1) The reference drug for prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism after hip or knee replacement surgery is a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), given subcutaneously for 1 to 5 weeks. Vitamin K antagonists, including warfarin, have similar risk-benefit balances. (2) Subcutaneous melagatran and its oral metabolic precursor ximelagatran have recently been granted marketing authorisation in France for use as prophylaxis after hip or knee replacement surgery. Melagatran, unlike LMWH, is a specific thrombin inhibitor. (3) There are four randomised double-blind trials in more than 9000 patients comparing these agents with a LMWH (enoxaparin in three trials, dalteparin in one). Melagatran was given subcutaneously for one or two days before being replaced with ximelagatran (as soon as oral feeding was possible) for 6 to 9 days. These trials showed no advantage of melagatran-ximelagatran in terms of clinical endpoints such as symptomatic deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and death from all causes. (4) Three randomised double-blind trials have compared ximelagatran with warfarin in more than 5000 patients. Treatment lasted 7 to 12 days. Ximelagatran was no better than warfarin when assessed using clinical endpoints. (5) In these trials melagatran-ximelagatran did not increase the risk of bleeding compared with LMWH or warfarin. (6) Melagatran-ximelagatran can cause an increase in serum transaminase activity, and is contraindicated if pretreatment serum transaminase activity is more than twice the upper limit of normal. (7) Trials versus warfarin showed a higher risk of myocardial infarction in patients taking ximelagatran (0.7% versus 0.16%). (8) There are few data on the patient subgroups most likely to receive melagatran-ximelagatran, namely patients over 75, underweight and overweight patients, and patients with renal failure. (9) There is currently no clotting test that allows the melagatran-ximelagatran dose regimen to be adjusted in patients who have an

  14. Prescription of oral anticoagulation for patients with atrial fibrillation and previous hospitalization in a cardiology department. Experience in actual practice in a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabregat-Andrés, Ó; Cubillos-Arango, A; Chacón-Hernández, N; Montagud, V; Morell, S; Fácila, L

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the main reason for oral anticoagulation in our community. New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) overcome the disadvantages of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), although there are scarce data on its use in our community. The aim of our study was to assess the use of NOACs and anticoagulation control using VKA as measured by the time within the therapeutic range (TTR) in an actual clinical scenario. A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted of 816 patients admitted to cardiology over a period of 3 years, with a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation and anticoagulant treatment at discharge. We assessed the percentage of patients prescribed NOACs and the TTR with VKA. We compared safety and efficacy events during the 15-month follow-up among the patients prescribed NOAC, those prescribed VKA with a good TTR and those with a poor TTR. The percentage of patients prescribed NOAC was 7.6%. Serial INR measurements found that 71.3% of patients had a poor TTR. Although the groups were not comparable, a higher incidence of the combined event was observed in those treated with VKA and a poor TTR compared with those prescribed NOAC (p=.01). For patients with a previous hospitalization in cardiology in a tertiary hospital and a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation, the rate of NOAC prescription is low, and the TTR with VKA was poor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  15. State of the art: Oral antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbel, Paul A; Myat, Aung; Kubica, Jacek; Tantry, Udaya S

    2016-01-01

    Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are central to the propagation of coronary thrombosis following rupture, fissure, or erosion of an atherosclerotic plaque. This chain of deleterious events underlies the pathophysiological process leading to an acute coronary syndrome. Therefore, oral antiplatelet therapy has become the cornerstone of therapy for the management of acute coronary syndrome and the prevention of ischemic complications associated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Landmark trials have established aspirin, and the addition of clopidogrel to aspirin, as key therapeutic agents in the context of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Dual antiplatelet therapy has been the guideline-mandated standard of care in acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary intervention. Despite the proven efficacy of dual antiplatelet therapy, adverse ischemic events continue to occur and this has stimulated the development of novel, more potent antiplatelet agents. We focus this state-of-the-art review on the most recent advances in oral antiplatelet therapy, treading the tightrope of potency versus bleeding risk, the quest to determine the optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy and future of personalized antiplatelet therapy.

  16. Oral surgery in patients under antithrombotic therapy. Narrative review.

    OpenAIRE

    Anggelo Carrizo; David Carrasco

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aging population and increase of cardiovascular diseases have raised the number of patients receiving antithrombotic therapy in elective or emergency dental care, including surgical procedures. The aim of this article is to review the evidence and clinical guidelines published in the past five years for dental management of patients on antithrombotic therapy. The American Antithrombotic Therapy Guideline - 2012 - generally recommends not to suspend antiplatelet or anticoagulant trea...

  17. Pancreatite aguda devida a hematoma intramural do duodeno por uso de anticoagulante Acute pancreatitis due to intramural hematoma of the duodenum by use of anticoagulant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer FARHOUD

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Racional - A hemorragia intramural espontânea do duodeno causada por complicações da terapêutica anticoagulante é rara e seu tratamento controverso. Objetivo -- Apresentar a experiência advinda do tratamento de doente com essa condição clínica. Relato do caso - Expõe-se o caso de uma mulher de 71 anos de idade, que há 3 meses fazia uso de anticoagulante oral para tratamento de trombose venosa profunda dos membros inferiores. Apresentou-se com cefaléia e dores abdominais intensas no andar superior do abdome, associadas a náuseas e vômitos. Os exames laboratoriais e de imagem comprovaram o diagnóstico de surto agudo de pancreatite, decorrente de hematoma intramural de duodeno. Os valores de protrombina (49,7 s e o sangramento de tecidos moles cervicais e urinário, sugeriam complicação da terapêutica anticoagulante. Resultados - A terapêutica conservadora foi efetiva, tendo a doente recebido alta, assintomática, no 10º dia de internação. Conclusão - É recomendado o emprego do anticoagulante em doses menores nos doentes de risco e adequado controle dos parâmetros da coagulação. Acredita-se ser ideal a conduta conservadora e recomenda-se a cirurgia somente nos casos que evoluem com complicações.Background - Spontaneous intramural hemorrhage of the duodenum due to anticoagulant therapy is rare and the treatment is controversial. Objective - To present the acquired knowledge with the treatment of these disease. Case report - A 71-year-old women receiving for a 3 month period an anticoagulant therapy presented cervical bleeding of soft tissues and symptoms of acute pancreatitis and high small bowel obstruction. Early noninvasive diagnosis by computed tomographic scan was possible and conservative therapy proved successful in complete resolution of the pancreatitis and obstructive symptoms, with resumption of oral intake in the fourth day of treatment. The frequency of bleeding in high risk patients during warfarin therapy

  18. Consideraciones prácticas para el uso de los nuevos anticoagulantes orales Practical considerations for the use of new oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián M Aristizábal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A pesar de la eficacia comprobada acerca del uso de warfarina como terapia anticoagulante, las múltiples interacciones, el estrecho margen terapéutico y la necesidad de monitorización seriada han planteado el escenario para el desarrollo de nuevos medicamentos como dabigatran, rivaroxaban y apixaban que ofrecen nuevas alternativas para el tratamiento del paciente anticoagulado. El conocimiento de las características farmacológicas y farmacocinéticas así como el contexto específico en el cual pueden usarse se convierten en una necesidad para los médicos que se enfrentan a este tipo de pacientes.Despite the proven efficacy on the use of warfarin as anticoagulant therapy, the multiple interactions, narrow therapeutic index and the need for serial monitoring have raised the need for the development of new drugs such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, that offer new alternatives for treating the anticoagulated patient. Knowledge of the pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic characteristics and the specific context in which they can be used become a necessity for physicians faced with these patients.

  19. Oral cyclosporine therapy for refractory severe vernal keratoconjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil S Gokhale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the success of oral cyclosporine therapy in a patient with severe vision-threatening vernal keratoconjunctivitis. A child presented with severe allergy which was not controlled with topical steroids, cyclosporine and mast cell stabilizers. Oral steroids were required repeatedly to suppress inflammation. Child showed a dramatic improvement and stabilization with oral cyclosporine therapy. Oral cyclosporine therapy can be tried in severe vision-threatening allergy refractory to conventional therapy.

  20. [Inefficient management of personal health in oral anticoagulation. Home nursing care in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Castañón, Lorena

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes an 83 year-old immobilised patient with multiple diseases and on polypharmacy. Nursing care is developed at home. The patient is included in patient care programs for the anticoagulated and polymedicated patient. Nursing assessments were made using the Marjory Gordon functional health patterns, by which we identified, among others, problems related to non-compliance with the pharmacological treatment. The Nurse's Diagnosis was: Ineffective Management of own health. With the support of NANDA, NOC and NIC taxonomy we determined the nursing objectives and interventions. The expected results of the Care Plan were achieved. Polypharmacy in the elderly can lead to treatment problems, increasing hospital admissions, morbidity and mortality and health expenditure Nursing care at home is a continuous development process and is increasing due to aging of the population, the prevalence of chronic diseases, as well as the increased life expectancy. It is estimated that in 2030, 24% of the Spanish population will be over 64 years. The physical, sensory, cognitive and chronic disabilities of aging make this type of care necessary. It is a major element in the comprehensive care of these patients, by checking the correct use of medication, symptom control, helping them to be autonomous in managing their disease and establishing a fluid relationship between the patients and their family.

  1. A novel prothrombin time assay for assessing the anticoagulant activity of oral factor Xa inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Yu Chen; Wang, Zhaoqing; Knabb, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    Conventional prothrombin time (PT) assays have limited sensitivity and dynamic range in monitoring the anticoagulant activity of direct factor Xa inhibitors. Hence, new assays are needed. We modified a PT assay by adding calcium chloride (CaCl2) to the thromboplastin reagent to increase assay dynamic range and improve sensitivity. Effects of calcium and sodium ion concentrations, and sample handling, were evaluated to optimize assay performance. Increasing concentrations of calcium ions produced progressive increases in PT across the factor Xa inhibitor concentrations of 0 to 2500 nmol/L for razaxaban and apixaban. The greatest effect was seen when the thromboplastin reagent was diluted 1:2.25 with 100 mmol/L CaCl2 (thus selected for routine use). The optimized assay showed an interassay precision of 1.5 to 9.3 percentage coefficient of variation (%CV) for razaxaban and 3.1 to 4.6 %CV for apixaban. We conclude that the modified PT assay is likely to be suitable as a pharmacodynamic marker for activity at therapeutic concentrations of factor Xa inhibitors.

  2. Quality of oral anticoagulation with phenprocoumon in regular medical care and its potential for improvement in a telemedicine-based coagulation service--results from the prospective, multi-center, observational cohort study thrombEVAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Jürgen H; Göbel, Sebastian; Keller, Karsten; Coldewey, Meike; Ullmann, Alexander; Lamparter, Heidrun; Jünger, Claus; Al-Bayati, Zaid; Baer, Christina; Walter, Ulrich; Bickel, Christoph; ten Cate, Hugo; Münzel, Thomas; Wild, Philipp S

    2015-01-23

    The majority of studies on quality of oral anticoagulation (OAC) therapy with vitamin K-antagonists are performed with short-acting warfarin. Data on long-acting phenprocoumon, which is frequently used in Europe for OAC therapy and is considered to enable more stable therapy adjustment, are scarce. In this study, we aimed to assess quality of OAC therapy with phenprocoumon in regular medical care and to evaluate its potential for optimization in a telemedicine-based coagulation service. In the prospective observational cohort study program thrombEVAL we investigated 2,011 patients from regular medical care in a multi-center cohort study and 760 patients from a telemedicine-based coagulation service in a single-center cohort study. Data were obtained from self-reported data, computer-assisted personal interviews, and laboratory measurements according to standard operating procedures with detailed quality control. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was calculated by linear interpolation method to assess quality of OAC therapy. Study monitoring was carried out by an independent institution. Overall, 15,377 treatment years and 48,955 international normalized ratio (INR) measurements were analyzed. Quality of anticoagulation, as measured by median TTR, was 66.3% (interquartile range (IQR) 47.8/81.9) in regular medical care and 75.5% (IQR 64.2/84.4) in the coagulation service (P service with TTR at 76.2% [(IQR 65.6/84.7); P = 0.001)]. Prospective follow-up of coagulation service patients with pretreatment in regular medical care showed an improvement of the TTR from 66.2% (IQR 49.0/83.6) to 74.5% (IQR 62.9/84.2; P service. Treatment in the coagulation service contributed to an optimization of the profile of time outside therapeutic range, a 2.2-fold increase of stabile INR adjustment and a significant decrease in TTR variability by 36% (P Quality of anticoagulation with phenprocoumon was comparably high in this real-world sample of regular medical care. Treatment in a

  3. CORRIGENDUM to Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Owing to errors made by the authors, Charles J. Glueck, Kevin Lee, Marloe Prince, Vybhav Jetty, Parth Shah, and Ping Wang, the following article contains errors. Glueck CJ, Lee K, Prince M, et al. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant. J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep. 2016;4(3):1-6. doi: 10.1177/2324709616661833 PMID:28321420

  4. Managing new oral anticoagulants in the perioperative period%新型口服抗凝药在围术期的合理应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建; 王飞

    2014-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation is an important clinical issue.At present,the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs)are increasingly replacing traditional anticoagulants in clinical practice.Advantages of these new agents include their rapid onset and elimination,predictable anticoagulant effect and no need for routine monitoring.Objective To report the recent progress in NOACs applied in the perioperative period.Content To summarize the current literature on NOACs' pharmacology and clinical application,especially in the period of operation.Trend If possible,the NOACs should be suspended preoperatively for a certain time based on patient's renal function and operative procedure.%背景 抗凝是重要的临床问题,目前传统抗凝药正逐渐被新型口服抗凝药(new oral anticoagulants,NOACs)取代.NOACs的优势包括可口服、起效迅速、消除快、抗凝效果具有可预测性、无需常规监测等. 目的 综述NOACs在围术期应用的最新研究进展. 内容 概述NOACs的药理学特点及临床应用,探讨其在围术期的合理应用. 趋向 NOACs应根据患者肾功能和具体手术操作在术前尽量停用适当的时间.

  5. Acute airway obstruction due to spontaneous intrathyroid hemorrhage precipitated by anticoagulation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Kokatnur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute airway compromise due to hemorrhage in of thyroid gland is a rare life-hreating condition. The increasing use of anticoagulants for various reasons is likely increased the occurrence of this this complication. We describe an elderly patient on anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, which developed swelling on the right side of neck causing acute airway obstruction requiring emergency intubation for airway protection. Computed tomographic scan showed massive intrathyroid hemorrhage along with substernal extension. She had supratherapeutic INR which was appropriately corrected emergently. She underwent resection of the thyroid gland which showed multinodular goiter without any evidence of malignancy. Our case illustrates the rare but lethal bleeding complication of anticoagulants in critical anatomical area and we request physicians should be wary of similar conditions.

  6. Transperineal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy is safe even when patients are on combination antiplatelet and/or anticoagulation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kimitoshi; Washino, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yuhki; Konishi, Tsuzumi; Ohshima, Masashi; Arai, Yoshiaki; Miyagawa, Tomoaki

    2017-07-05

    To assess whether hemorrhagic complications associated with transperineal prostate biopsy increased in patients on antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant therapy. In total, 598 consecutive patients underwent transperineal prostate biopsy. The medication group comprised patients who took anti-thromboembolic agents, and the control group comprised those who did not take these agents. No anti-thromboembolic agent was stopped before, during, or after prostate biopsy in the medication group. Complications developing in both groups were compared and classified using the modified Clavien classification system. Subgroup analyses to compare complications in patients taking single antiplatelet, single anticoagulant, and dual antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant agents, and multivariate analyses to predict bleeding risk were also performed. Of the 598 eligible patients, 149 comprised the medication group and 449 comprised the control group. Hematuria (Grade I) developed in 88 (59.1%) and 236 (52.5%) patients in the medication and control group, respectively (p = 0.18). Clot retention (Grade I) was more frequently observed in the medication group than the controls (2.0% versus 0.2%, respectively, p antiplatelet agent. Other complications were generally similar among the groups. In the multivariate analysis, taking more than two anti-thromboembolic agents was the only significant risk factor for bleeding events. No severe complication developed after the transperineal biopsies in either group, although minor bleeding was somewhat more frequent in the medication group. It may not be necessary to discontinue anticoagulant and/or antiplatelet agents when transperineal prostate biopsy is contemplated.

  7. Direct oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism, with a focus on patients with pulmonary embolism: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, M Luisa; Lecumberri, Ramón; Terleira-Fernández, Ana Isabel; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a relatively common cardiovascular emergency. PE and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) are considered expressions of the same disease, termed as venous thromboembolism (VTE). In the present review, we describe and meta-analyze the efficacy and safety data available with the direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC; dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban) in clinical trials testing these new compounds in the acute/long-term and extended therapy of VTE, providing subgroup analyses in patients with index PE. We analyzed ten studies in 35,019 randomized patients. A total of 14,364 patients (41%) had index PE. In the acute/long-term treatment of VTE, the DOAC showed comparable efficacy in preventing recurrent VTE to standard treatment in patients with index PE (risk ratio [RR]: 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.70-1.11) and index DVT (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.75-1.16) (P for subgroup differences =0.76). VTE recurrence depending on PE anatomical extension and presence/absence of right ventricular dysfunction was only reported in two trials, with results being consistent with those obtained in the overall study populations. In the single trial comparing extended therapy of VTE with DOAC versus warfarin, the point estimate for recurrent VTE tended to disfavor the DOAC in patients with index PE (RR: 2.05; 95% CI: 0.83-5.03) and in patients with index DVT (RR: 1.11; 95% CI: 0.49-2.50) (P for subgroup differences =0.32). In trials that compared DOAC versus placebo for extended therapy, the reduction in recurrent VTE was consistent in patients with PE (RR: 0.15; 95% CI: 0.01-1.82) and in patients with DVT (RR: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.10-0.61) (P for subgroup differences =0.71). The DOAC were associated with a consistently lower risk of clinically relevant bleeding (CRB) than standard treatment of acute VTE and higher risk of CRB than placebo for extended therapy of VTE regardless of index event. In summary, the DOAC were as effective as, and safer than, standard

  8. Retrospective Cohort Study Examining Reduced Intensity and Duration of Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Therapy Following Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion with the WATCHMAN Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Matthew K; Ramkumar, Satish; Cameron, James D; Pang, Benjamin; Nerlekar, Nitesh; Kotschet, Emily; Alison, Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy are recommended following WATCHMAN implantation (45 days and 6 months) to reduce the risk of embolic events. These patients are often also at high risk of recurrent bleeding complications. We aimed to assess the safety of reduced duration of treatment with anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy in the early post implant period. This was a retrospective cohort study assessing the duration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in 47 consecutive patients following WATCHMAN implant. The primary outcome was rate of major bleeding, stroke and systemic embolic complications. The secondary endpoints were rate of device thrombus and peri-device leak >4mm as assessed by transoesophogeal echocardiography. Forty-seven patients were followed up for a mean of 2.4+/-1.7 years (111.4 total patient-years). The rate of stroke was 1.8/100 patient-years (two events) and the rate of major bleeding complication was 8.9/100 patient-years. Three patients had peri-device leak >4mm and no patients had device thrombus visualised. 70.2% of patients had discontinued anticoagulation at 45 days, 89.4% had discontinued dual antiplatelet therapy at 90 days. Seven patients were not on any form of anticoagulant or antiplatelet at five months. Comparison of probability of survival free from stroke by time of cessation of anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy demonstrated no significant differences (p-value for log rank test 0.238 and 0.820). Following WATCHMAN implant shortened periods of anticoagulants and antiplatelets may be considered, particularly in the context of high bleeding risk. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy on severe ischemic complications in patients with giant cell arteritis: a cumulative meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Narvaez, Javier; Muñoz-Cacho, Pedro

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy on the occurrence of severe ischemic complications in GCA patients at diagnosis and while on treatment with corticosteroids (CS), and the risk of bleeding in these patients. A comprehensive search of PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases was completed and supplemented by hand searching of the references of all selected articles published from 1992 through December 2012. The cumulative meta-analysis included 6 retrospective studies that provided a total of 914 GCA patients. The effect of established antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy on the occurrence of severe ischemic complications in patients with GCA at diagnosis and on the development of new severe ischemic complications in patients with GCA after diagnosis and while on treatment with CS were evaluated; as well as the risk of bleeding in patients with GCA on concomitant treatment with CS and antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy. Antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy before the diagnosis of GCA was not associated with a protection to develop severe ischemic complications (OR: 0.661; 95% CI [0.287-1.520]; p=0.33). However, such a therapy may prevent from severe ischemic complications after the diagnosis of GCA (OR: 0.318; [0.101-0.996]; p=0.049) without increasing the risk of bleeding in patients with GCA on concomitant treatment with CS (OR: 0.658; [0.089-4.856]; p=0.682). Antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy prior to the diagnosis of GCA was not associated with reduction in severe ischemic complications. However, antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy demonstrated a marginal benefit when used together with CS therapy in patients with established GCA without associated bleeding risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Direct oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism, with a focus on patients with pulmonary embolism: an evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Outes A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Gómez-Outes,1 Mª Luisa Suárez-Gea,1 Ramón Lecumberri,2 Ana Isabel Terleira-Fernández,3,4 Emilio Vargas-Castrillón3,41Division of Pharmacology and Clinical Evaluation, Medicines for Human Use, Spanish Agency for Medicines and Medical Devices (AEMPS, Madrid, Spain; 2Department of Hematology, University Clinic of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; 3Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Hospital Clínico, Madrid, Spain; 4Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Pulmonary embolism (PE is a relatively common cardiovascular emergency. PE and deep vein thrombosis (DVT are considered expressions of the same disease, termed as venous thromboembolism (VTE. In the present review, we describe and meta-analyze the efficacy and safety data available with the direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC; dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban in clinical trials testing these new compounds in the acute/long-term and extended therapy of VTE, providing subgroup analyses in patients with index PE. We analyzed ten studies in 35,019 randomized patients. A total of 14,364 patients (41% had index PE. In the acute/long-term treatment of VTE, the DOAC showed comparable efficacy in preventing recurrent VTE to standard treatment in patients with index PE (risk ratio [RR]: 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.70–1.11 and index DVT (RR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.75–1.16 (P for subgroup differences =0.76. VTE recurrence depending on PE anatomical extension and presence/absence of right ventricular dysfunction was only reported in two trials, with results being consistent with those obtained in the overall study populations. In the single trial comparing extended therapy of VTE with DOAC versus warfarin, the point estimate for recurrent VTE tended to disfavor the DOAC in patients with index PE (RR: 2.05; 95% CI: 0.83–5.03 and in patients with index DVT (RR: 1.11; 95% CI: 0.49–2.50 (P for subgroup differences =0.32. In trials that compared DOAC

  11. Hemorragias intracraneales de carácter evitable asociadas a anticoagulantes orales en pacientes con fibrilación auricular Avoidable intracranial hemorrhages associated with oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. García Luque

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción y objetivo: El aumento de la prescripción de anticoagulantes orales ha provocado un aumento de hemorragias intracraneales, la reacción adversa más grave asociada a este grupo farmacológico. El objetivo del estudio es evaluar el carácter evitable de hemorragias intracraneales asociada a anticoagulantes orales que causan ingreso hospitalario en pacientes con fibrilación auricular. Método: Supervisión de las historias clínicas de los pacientes que ingresaron en los Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocío (01/01/03 al 31/03/07 con hemorragia intracraneal y fibrilación auricular; considerando hemorragia intracraneal asociada a anticoagulantes orales aquellas con una relación ≥ posible al aplicar el algoritmo de causalidad del Sistema Español de Farmacovigilancia. Para valorar el carácter evitable de la hemorragia intracraneal se ha estudiado la relación beneficio/riesgo del uso de anticoagulantes orales. Resultados: Al menos 20/57 (35,1% hemorragias intracraneales asociadas a anticoagulantes orales pudieron ser potencialmente evitables, de las cuales en 7/20 (35% el desenlace fue mortal, presentando secuelas 8/13 (61,5% de los supervivientes. El fármaco sospechoso de interaccionar con anticoagulantes orales referenciado con mayor frecuencia fue el omeprazol, 11/57 (19%, a pesar de estar documentada esta interacción como altamente probable en la Bibliografía y en los protocolos del Hospital. Conclusiones: La relación beneficio/riesgo del uso de anticoagulantes orales, el control estricto del Índice Normalizado Internacional, junto con las posibles interacciones medicamentosas deben ser evaluadas de forma individualizada y periódicamente para minimizar el riesgo de hemorragia intracraneal, que en un porcentaje elevado de casos es una reacción adversa potencialmente evitable y mortal.Introduction and objectives: The increase in oral anticoagulants prescription has caused an increase in intracranial hemorrhages

  12. New anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J McRae

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Simon J McRae, Jeffrey S GinsbergDepartment of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CanadaAbstract: Anticoagulant therapy is effective at preventing the development of venous thromboembolism in high-risk patients, and reduces morbidity and mortality in individuals with established thromboembolic disease. Vitamin K antagonists and heparins are currently the most commonly used anticoagulant drugs, but they have practical limitations. Therefore, new antithrombotic agents with predictable dose-responses (thereby decreasing the need for monitoring without compromising efficacy or safety, ideally available in an oral formulation and with a rapidly reversible anticoagulant effect, are needed. New drugs fulfilling some of the above criteria have been developed and have proven to be effective agents for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism.Keywords: venous thromboembolism, anticoagulants, antithrombotic

  13. Oral anticoagulation and antiplatelets in atrial fibrillation patients after myocardial infarction and coronary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberts, Morten; Gislason, Gunnar H.; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk of thrombosis and bleeding according to multiple antithrombotic treatment regimens in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients after myocardial infarction (MI) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background The optimal antithrombo...... after MI/PCI, OAC and clopidogrel was equal or better on both benefit and safety outcomes compared to triple therapy. (C) 2013 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation...

  14. Safety of dental extraction among consecutive patients on oral anticoagulant treatment managed using a specific dental management protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Ezio; Martinelli, Franco; Bacci, Christian; Cordioli, GianPiero; Girolami, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    We found no prospective studies on dental extraction in anticoagulated patients in the literature, even though most authors suggest that there is no need to change anticoagulant treatment and to utilize a local haemostatic measure after extraction. In the present study, we have verified the incidence of bleeding complications after dental extraction in a group of 250 consecutive anticoagulated patients. Two hundred and fifty non-anticoagulated subjects requiring dental extraction represented the control group. In all patients, anticoagulant treatment was not changed (International Normalized Ratio, 1.8-4) and local haemostatic measures (fibrin sponge, silk suture and a gauze saturated with tranexamic acid) were used. All procedures were performed in an outpatient clinic setting. We registered four bleeding complications in the group of anticoagulated patients and three in the control group. The difference of bleeding complications in the two groups was not statistically different (relative risk, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-6.04; P = 0.7). None of the post-operative late bleeding required hospitalization and/or blood transfusions, and further local measures were sufficient to stop the bleeding. The protocol proposed in the present study makes dental extractions in anticoagulated patients possible on an outpatient basis with a cost reduction for the community and minor discomfort for the patients.

  15. Current Perioperative Management of Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Use in Neuroendovascular Therapy: Analysis of JR-NET1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENOMOTO, Yukiko; YOSHIMURA, Shinichi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; EGASHIRA, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate current perioperative antithrombotic management in neuroendovascular therapy in Japan, we analyzed perioperative anticoagulant and antiplatelet use in various procedures and examined their relationships with periprocedural adverse events. Patient's data from nationwide surveys administered by the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET) between January 2005 and December 2007 (JR-NET1) and January 2008 and December 2009 (JR-NET2) were retrospectively analyzed. Compared to JR-NET1, the frequency of perioperative antiplatelet therapy and dual or triple therapy were increased for either aneurysm coiling and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or stenting in JR-NET2. Although ischemic complications were significantly decreased (4.2% vs. 2.1%, p antiplatelet therapy (preoperative: 5.3% vs. 9.2%, p therapy was performed more frequently and intensively in neuroendovascular therapy in Japan. While ischemic complications were decreased, hemorrhagic complications and severe adverse events were increased. These results suggest that intensive antithrombotic therapy has a potential risk of hemorrhagic complications for Japanese patients. PMID:24305029

  16. Refractory overactive bladder: Beyond oral anticholinergic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W Glinski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this review, we discuss the treatment of refractory overactive bladder (OAB that has not adequately responded to medication therapy and we propose an appropriate care pathway to the treatment of OAB. We also attempt to address the cost of OAB treatments. Materials and Methods: A selective expert review of the current literature on the subject of refractory OAB using MEDLINE was performed and the data is summarized. We also review our experience in treating refractory OAB. The role and outcomes of various treatment options for refractory OAB are discussed and combined therapy with oral anticholinergics is explored. Emerging remedies including intravesical botulinum toxin injection and pudendal neuromodulation are also reviewed, along with conventional surgical options. Results: In general behavioral therapy, pelvic floor electrical stimulation, magnetic therapy and posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS, have shown symptom decreases in 50-80% of patients with OAB. Depending on the study, combination therapy with oral anticholinergics seems to improve efficacy of behavioral therapy and PTNS in approximately 10-30%. In multicenter, long-term randomized controlled trials, sacral neuromodulation has been shown to improve symptoms of OAB and OAB incontinence in up to 80% of the patients treated. Studies involving emerging therapies such as pudendal serve stimulation suggest that there may be a 15-20% increase in efficacy over sacral neuromodulation, but long-term studies are not yet available. Another emerging therapy, botulinum toxin, is also showing similar success in reducing OAB symptoms in 80-90% of patients. Surgical approaches, such as bladder augmentation, are a last resort in the treatment of OAB and are rarely used at this point unless upper tract damage is a concern and all other treatment options have been exhausted. Conclusion: The vast majority of OAB patients can be managed successfully by behavioral options with or

  17. Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs: the tide continues to come in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blann A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Andrew Blann University of Birmingham Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, City Hospital, Birmingham, UKThrombosis is the major common endpoint in most human diseases. In the coronary circulation, occlusive thrombi and/or the rupture of atherosclerotic plaque causes myocardial infarction, and in the cerebral circulation thrombosis, causes ischemic stroke. In the venous circulation, venous thromboembolism (VTE, manifesting clinically as pulmonary embolus and deep vein thrombosis (DVT, is a frequent complication among inpatients, and contributes to longer hospital stays with increased morbidity and mortality. Until perhaps 5 years ago, heparinoids (unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin [LMWH], and fondaparinux and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs: warfarin, acenocoumarol, phenocoumarol were the only options for the prevention of thrombotic stroke in atrial fibrillation, and of VTE in general. Although effective, these traditional drugs have several practical, management, and clinical disadvantages, a fact that our colleagues in industry have not been slow to recognize and address by developing improved drugs, now collectively known as nonvitamin K antagonist oral anti coagulants (NOACs. These agents are steadily replacing the heparinoids and VKAs in both inpatient and outpatient prevention and treatment of thrombosis.

  18. Oral antiplatelet therapy for acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, Peter A G; Counsell, Carl; Tseng, Mei-Chiun; Cecconi, Emanuela

    2014-03-26

    In people with acute ischaemic stroke, platelets become activated and can cause blood clots to form and block an artery in the brain, resulting in damage to part of the brain. Such damage gives rise to the symptoms of stroke. Antiplatelet therapy might reduce the volume of brain damaged by ischaemia and also reduce the risk of early recurrent ischaemic stroke, thereby reducing the risk of early death and improving long-term outcomes in survivors. However, antiplatelet therapy might also increase the risk of fatal or disabling intracranial haemorrhage. To assess the efficacy and safety of immediate oral antiplatelet therapy (that is started as soon as possible and no later than two weeks after stroke onset) in people with acute presumed ischaemic stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 16 October 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2013), MEDLINE (June 1998 to May 2013), and EMBASE (June 1998 to May 2013). In 1998, for a previous version of this review, we searched the register of the Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration, MedStrategy and contacted relevant drug companies. Randomised trials comparing oral antiplatelet therapy (started within 14 days of the stroke) with control in people with definite or presumed ischaemic stroke. Two review authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and assessed trial quality. For the included trials, they extracted and cross-checked the data. We included eight trials involving 41,483 participants. No new trials have been added since the last update.Two trials testing aspirin 160 mg to 300 mg once daily, started within 48 hours of onset, contributed 98% of the data. The risk of bias was low. The maximum follow-up was six months. With treatment, there was a significant decrease in death or dependency at the end of follow-up (odds ratio (OR) 0.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91 to 0.99). For every 1000 people treated with

  19. Potential Effect of Substituting Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate for Estimated Creatinine Clearance for Dosing of Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Janice B

    2016-10-01

    To determine the potential effect of substituting glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimates for renal clearance estimated using the Cockcroft-Gault method (CrCL-CG) to calculate direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) dosing. Simulation and retrospective data analysis. Community, academic institution, nursing home. Noninstitutionalized individuals aged 19 to 80 from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (2011/12) (n = 4,687) and medically stable research participants aged 25 to 105 (n = 208). Age, height, weight, sex, race, serum creatinine, CrCL-CG, and GFR (according to the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations). Outcome measures were dosing errors if GFR were to be substituted for CrCL-CG. Renal clearance estimates according to all methods were highly correlated (P < .001), although at lower clearances, substitution of GFR estimates for CrCL-CG resulted in failure to recognize needs for dose reductions of rivaroxaban or edoxaban in 28% of NHANES subjects and 47% to 56% of research subjects. At a CrCL-CG of less than 30 mL/min, GFR estimates missed indicated dosage reductions for dabigatran in 18% to 21% of NHANES subjects and 57% to 86% of research subjects. Age and weight contributed to differences between renal clearance estimates (P < .001), but correction of GFR for body surface area (BSA) did not reduce dosing errors. At a CrCL-CG greater than 95 mL/min, edoxaban is not recommended, and GFR esimates misclassified 24% of NHANES and 39% of research subjects. Correction for BSA reduced misclassification to 7% for NHANES and 14% in research subjects. Substitution of GFR estimates for estimated CrCl can lead to failure to recognize indications for reducing DOAC dose and potentially higher bleeding rates than in randomized trials. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. A novel prothrombin time method to measure all non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants (NOACs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas L; Arbring, Kerstin; Wallstedt, Maria; Rånby, Mats

    2017-09-11

    There is a clinical need for point-of-care (POC) methods for non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants (NOACs). We modified a routine POC procedure: Zafena's Simple Simon™ PT-INR, a room-temperature, wet-chemistry prothrombin time method of the Owren-type. To either increase or decrease NOAC interference, two assay variants were devised by replacing the standard 10 µL end-to-end capillary used to add the citrated plasma sample to 200 µL of prothrombin time (PT) reagent by either a 20 µL or a 5 µL capillary. All assay variants were calibrated to show correct PT results in plasma samples from healthy and warfarin-treated persons. For plasmas spiked with dabigatran, apixaban, or rivaroxaban, the 20 µL variant showed markedly higher PT results than the 5 µL. The effects were even more pronounced at room temperature than at +37 °C. In plasmas from patients treated with NOACs (n = 30 for each) there was a strong correlation between the PT results and the concentration of NOACs as determined by the central hospital laboratory. For the 20 µL variant the PT response of linear correlation coefficient averaged 0.90. The PT range was INR 1.1-2.1 for dabigatran and apixaban, and INR 1.1-5.0 for rivaroxaban. Using an INR ratio between the 20 µL and 5 µL variants (PTr20/5) made the NOAC assay more robust and independent of the patient sample INR value in the absence of NOAC. Detection limits were 80 µg/L for apixaban, 60 µg/L for dabigatran, and 20 µg/L for rivaroxaban. A wet-chemistry POC PT procedure was modified to measure the concentrations of three NOACs using a single reagent.

  1. Efficacy and safety of the drugs used to reverse direct oral anticoagulants: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Marchand, Mylene; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Tien, Homer; Nathens, Avery; Shah, Prakesh

    2017-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are effective and safe for prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic phenomena. However, managing DOACs during bleeding emergencies is challenging. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted on studies addressing efficacy and safety of the drugs used for reversal of DOACs. Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched up to September 2016. Studies that examined clinical and laboratory effects of drugs used to reverse DOACs were included. Risk of bias was assessed using Newcastle-Ottawa scale and Cochrane Collaboration tool. Primary and secondary outcomes assessed were reversal of clinical bleeding, clotting assays, and safety, respectively. Overall effect estimates were pooled, and clinical and statistical heterogeneity were assessed. Meta-analysis was conducted using random-effects model. Four cohort studies in bleeding patients (n = 230) and eight randomized controlled trials in healthy volunteers (n = 381) were included, both with moderate risk of bias. Reversal of clotting assays in healthy volunteers was frequently reported, demonstrating that prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) reversed prothrombin time (PT) and endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) substantially. For PT, pooled mean difference was 1.68 seconds (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.33 to 3.70 sec; p < 0.01; I(2)  = 97%). For ETP, pooled mean difference was 2.16 seconds (95% CI, 0.57 to 3.75 sec; p < 0.01; I(2)  =( ) 98%). Andexanet alfa and idarucizumab both reverse clotting assays. No important safety concerns were identified. Clotting assays are partially reversed by PCC in healthy volunteers. Idarucizumab and andexanet alfa have solid laboratory reversal effect and potential to be clinically efficacious and safe. However, clinical evidence is still lacking for all agents. © 2017 AABB.

  2. Financial Impact of Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants in Medicaid: Budgetary Assessment Based on Number Needed to Treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairman, Kathleen A; Davis, Lindsay E; Kruse, Courtney R; Sclar, David A

    2017-04-01

    Faced with rising healthcare costs, state Medicaid programs need short-term, easily calculated budgetary estimates for new drugs, accounting for medical cost offsets due to clinical advantages. To estimate the budgetary impact of direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) compared with warfarin, an older, lower-cost vitamin K antagonist, on 12-month Medicaid expenditures for nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) using number needed to treat (NNT). Medicaid utilization files, 2009 through second quarter 2015, were used to estimate OAC cost accounting for generic/brand statutory minimum (13/23%) and assumed maximum (13/50%) manufacturer rebates. NNTs were calculated from clinical trial reports to estimate avoided medical events for a hypothetical population of 500,000 enrollees (approximate NVAF prevalence × Medicaid enrollment) under two DOAC market share scenarios: 2015 actual and 50% increase. Medical service costs were based on published sources. Costs were inflation-adjusted (2015 US$). From 2009-2015, OAC reimbursement per claim increased by 173 and 279% under maximum and minimum rebate scenarios, respectively, while DOAC market share increased from 0 to 21%. Compared with a warfarin-only counterfactual, counts of ischemic strokes, intracranial hemorrhages, and systemic embolisms declined by 36, 280, and 111, respectively; counts of gastrointestinal hemorrhages increased by 794. Avoided events and reduced monitoring, respectively, offset 3-5% and 15-24% of increased drug cost. Net of offsets, DOAC-related cost increases were US$258-US$464 per patient per year (PPPY) in 2015 and US$309-US$579 PPPY after market share increase. Avoided medical events offset a small portion of DOAC-related drug cost increase. NNT-based calculations provide a transparent source of budgetary-impact information for new medications.

  3. Reversible retinopathy associated with oral deferasirox therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Harpreet S; Yan, Jiong

    2013-07-17

    A 17-year-old girl with a history of sickle cell anaemia undergoing chronic blood transfusions and iron-chelation therapy presented for multiple ophthalmic examinations. During treatment with deferoxamine, her examination remained stable but 2 years after changing to deferasirox she presented with decreased visual acuity and only mild funduscopic changes. Marked electrophysiological abnormalities were also evident. After cessation of deferasirox, her visual acuity improved and electrophysiological responses improved. No prior reports of deferasirox-related retinopathy are available. We suggest that oral deferasirox caused a reversible retinopathy in our patient and clinicians be aware of this entity.

  4. Reversible retinopathy associated with oral deferasirox therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Harpreet S; Yan, Jiong

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl with a history of sickle cell anaemia undergoing chronic blood transfusions and iron-chelation therapy presented for multiple ophthalmic examinations. During treatment with deferoxamine, her examination remained stable but 2 years after changing to deferasirox she presented with decreased visual acuity and only mild funduscopic changes. Marked electrophysiological abnormalities were also evident. After cessation of deferasirox, her visual acuity improved and electrophysiological responses improved. No prior reports of deferasirox-related retinopathy are available. We suggest that oral deferasirox caused a reversible retinopathy in our patient and clinicians be aware of this entity. PMID:23867877

  5. Cost effectiveness of new oral anticoagulants for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation in two different European healthcare settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, Talitha I; Redekop, William K; Hasrat, Fazila; de Boer, Anthonius; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke Hilse

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were to investigate the cost effectiveness of apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran compared with coumarin derivatives for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation in a country with specialized anticoagulation clinics (the Netherlands) and in a country withou

  6. ANALYSIS OF THE INFLUENCE OF THROMBOEMBOLIC COMPLICATIONS PREVENTION WITH ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS ON BUDGET IN PATIENTS WITH NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rudakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a risk factor for thromboembolic complications, requiring administration of vitamin K antagonists (warfarin or the new oral anticoagulants (apixaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban.Aim. To assess the influence of apixaban use on the budget as an alternative to warfarin, dabigatran or rivaroxaban use in patients with non-valvular AF in the Russian Federation (RF.Material and methods. The analysis was performed with the perspective of the health care budget with 5 year horizon period and by the pharmacoeconomic model developed by Pharmerit International (Rotterdam, Netherlands and adapted for the RF. The cardiovascular complications rate in the model was in line with the results of comparative clinical trials: ARISTOTLE, AVERROES, RE-LY, ROCKET-AF. The analysis suggested that 100% of patients with atrial fibrillation were transferred on apixaban instead of warfarin, dabigatran or rivaroxaban. The analysis was based on the assumption that patients were fully committed to the therapy over the horizon of the study, ie, refusal of treatment was not considered. The possibility of episodes of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, the severity of which corresponded to previously published data for the Russian population, was considered in the study. The present study was performed based on two scenarios. In the first of them the cost of anticoagulation therapy was determined on the basis of the average weighted prices of public procurement for the period from 04.01.2014 to 01.04.2015. The alternative scenario purported to demonstrate potential savings of the budget of the health care system on the inclusion of apixaban in the list of essential drugs. This scenario took into account that the cost of dabigatran and rivaroxaban corresponded to registered maximum selling price including 10% VAT and 10% of the wholesale allowance and the cost of apixaban - presumed maximum selling price which the producer intends to register in case the

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE INFLUENCE OF THROMBOEMBOLIC COMPLICATIONS PREVENTION WITH ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS ON BUDGET IN PATIENTS WITH NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rudakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a risk factor for thromboembolic complications, requiring administration of vitamin K antagonists (warfarin or the new oral anticoagulants (apixaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban.Aim. To assess the influence of apixaban use on the budget as an alternative to warfarin, dabigatran or rivaroxaban use in patients with non-valvular AF in the Russian Federation (RF.Material and methods. The analysis was performed with the perspective of the health care budget with 5 year horizon period and by the pharmacoeconomic model developed by Pharmerit International (Rotterdam, Netherlands and adapted for the RF. The cardiovascular complications rate in the model was in line with the results of comparative clinical trials: ARISTOTLE, AVERROES, RE-LY, ROCKET-AF. The analysis suggested that 100% of patients with atrial fibrillation were transferred on apixaban instead of warfarin, dabigatran or rivaroxaban. The analysis was based on the assumption that patients were fully committed to the therapy over the horizon of the study, ie, refusal of treatment was not considered. The possibility of episodes of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, the severity of which corresponded to previously published data for the Russian population, was considered in the study. The present study was performed based on two scenarios. In the first of them the cost of anticoagulation therapy was determined on the basis of the average weighted prices of public procurement for the period from 04.01.2014 to 01.04.2015. The alternative scenario purported to demonstrate potential savings of the budget of the health care system on the inclusion of apixaban in the list of essential drugs. This scenario took into account that the cost of dabigatran and rivaroxaban corresponded to registered maximum selling price including 10% VAT and 10% of the wholesale allowance and the cost of apixaban - presumed maximum selling price which the producer intends to register in case the

  8. Anticoagulation therapy for thromboembolism prevention: a case of warfarin-induced skin necrosis in the setting of protein C deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jonathan; Ramai, Daryl; Alchi, Ramiz; Bloomfield, Dennis

    2017-05-12

    Patients with protein C deficiency are at increased risk for thrombolic diseases. Non-vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant options should be considered in patients with warfarin-induced skin necrosis (WISN) in the setting of protein C. We report a 41-year-old African American male patient with WISN and protein C deficiency who was treated with rivaroxaban followed by dabigatran. After 1 month on rivaroxaban, he began experiencing blood in his stools, unrelenting pain in his lower extremities, found it difficult to obtain medication despite having insurance and as a result did not maintain compliance. He was then assessed at the hospital, symptomatically treated and discharged on dabigatran. After 6 weeks, he reported symptomatic relief and less side effects. This case involved a head-to-head clinical comparison of rivaroxaban and dabigatran as alternatives to warfarin anticoagulation therapy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. [Prevalence of oral anticoagulation and quality of its management in primary healthcare: A study by the Health Sentinel Network of the Region of Valencia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boned-Ombuena, Ana; Pérez-Panadés, Jordi; López-Maside, Aurora; Miralles-Espí, Maite; Guardiola Vilarroig, Sandra; Adam Ruiz, Desamparados; Zurriaga, Oscar

    2017-04-10

    To estimate the prevalence of patients with oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) in the Region of Valencia and to evaluate the quality of management of OAT with vitaminK antagonists (VKA) carried out in primary healthcare. Observational cross-sectional study conducted through the Health Sentinel Network of the Region of Valencia, which includes a survey and the retrospective analysis of OAT monitoring. Primary healthcare, Region of Valencia, Spain. All patients aged 18years or older on OAT who consulted during the year 2014. The population covered by the 59 doctors of the Health Sentinel Network constitutes 2.2% of the adult population of the Region of Valencia, and it is representative of it. Demographic, socioeconomic and health data as well as information concerning OAT. Quality of OAT management with VKA was assessed by means of the percentage of time in therapeutic range (TTR), computed using the Rosendaal method. A total of 1,144 patients were recorded (mean age 74.5±11 years; 49.7% women). Prevalence of OAT in the Region of Valencia is 1.3 cases per 100 population. The characteristic profile of these patients is an old person, with several comorbidities and a low level of education, who lives accompanied. Atrial fibrillation is the most common indication. 82.8% of patients on OAT with VKA were monitored in primary healthcare. The average TTR was 65.0%, and 53.9% of patients had a TTR ≥65%. Among inadequately controlled patients, 74.4% were perceived as well-controlled by their primary care doctor. Prevalence of OAT is high, and it is expected to increase. The degree of control achieved meets the generally accepted quality standard (mean TTR ≥65%), and it is comparable to that observed in other national and international studies. However, there is wide scope for improvement. It is crucial to optimize the management of this therapy in the most effective and cost-effective way. Among other measures, access of physicians to their patients' clinical information

  10. Comparative risk of major bleeding with new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and phenprocoumon in patients with atrial fibrillation: a post-marketing surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohnloser, Stefan H; Basic, Edin; Nabauer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are at least as effective and safe as vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). All pivotal trials have compared NOACs to warfarin. However, other VKAs are commonly used, for instance phenprocoumon. A retrospective cohort study using a German claims database assessed the comparative risks of bleeding leading to hospitalization during therapy with NOACs and phenprocoumon in AF patients. Endpoints consisted of major bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, and any bleeding. Data were collected from January 1, 2013 to March 31, 2015. Patients newly initiated on dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, or phenprocoumon were included. Hazard Ratios for bleeding events were derived from Cox proportional hazard models, adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics. Propensity score matching was performed as a sensitivity analysis. A total of 35,013 patients were identified, including 3138 on dabigatran, 3633 on apixaban, 12,063 on rivaroxaban, and 16,179 on phenprocoumon. Patients prescribed apixaban or phenprocoumon were older compared to those on dabigatran or rivaroxaban and had a higher CHA2DS2-VASc score. After adjusting for baseline confounders, apixaban was associated with lower risks of major bleeding (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.51-0.90, p = 0.008), gastrointestinal bleeding (HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.39-0.72, p < 0.001), and any bleeding (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.70-0.92, p = 0.002) compared to phenprocoumon. There were no significant differences in bleeding risk between dabigatran and phenprocoumon. Rivaroxaban was associated with more gastrointestinal bleeding (HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.21-1.60, p < 0.001) and any bleeding (HR 1.19, 95% CI 1.10-1.28, p < 0.001). Sensitivity analysis using propensity score matching confirmed these observations. Apixaban therapy is associated with a significantly reduced risk of bleeding compared to phenprocoumon. Bleeding risk with dabigatran was

  11. Real-world comparison of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and warfarin in Asian octogenarian patients with atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chang Hee; Kim, Minsu; Kim, Jun; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy and safety of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and warfarin in Asian octogenarian atrial fibrillation (AF) patients have not been established in a real-world setting. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of NOACs and warfarin in Korean octogenarian patients. Methods A total of 293 consecutive patients aged ≥ 80 years with non-valvular AF who had taken either NOACs (148 cases, 50.5%) or warfarin (145 cases, 49.5%) were retrospectively reviewed. The efficacy outcome was the composite of stroke or systemic embolism. The safety outcome was major bleeding. Results The follow-up duration was 375 patient-years (172 patient-years with NOACs and 203 patient-years with warfarin). Patients on NOACs were slightly older (P = 0.006) and had slightly higher HAS-BLED scores (P = 0.034). The efficacy of both anticoagulants was high (1.16% for NOACs vs. 2.98% for warfarin per 100 patient-years, P = 0.46). The safety outcome was relatively high in both NOACs and warfarin groups (8.96% vs. 12.46%, P = 0.29). The efficacy and safety outcomes tended to decrease non-significantly in low dose NOACs than in common dose NOACs or warfarin (0.85% vs. 1.84% vs. 2.98% in efficacy outcome, P = 0.69; and 6.97% vs. 13.29% vs. 12.46% in safety outcome, P = 0.34). Conclusions NOACs were highly effective for prevention of stroke or systemic embolism in Asian octogenarian AF patients. However, major bleeding occurred excessively high in both anticoagulant groups. Further study is required on the optimal anticoagulant regimen in octogenarian population. PMID:27605936

  12. Canalization effect in the coagulation cascade and the interindividual variability of oral anticoagulant response. a simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corlan Alexandru D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing the predictability and reducing the rate of side effects of oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT requires further clarification of the cause of about 50% of the interindividual variability of OAT response that is currently unaccounted for. We explore numerically the hypothesis that the effect of the interindividual expression variability of coagulation proteins, which does not usually result in a variability of the coagulation times in untreated subjects, is unmasked by OAT. Results We developed a stochastic variant of the Hockin-Mann model of the tissue factor coagulation pathway, using literature data for the variability of coagulation protein levels in the blood of normal subjects. We simulated in vitro coagulation and estimated the Prothrombin Time and the INR across a model population. In a model of untreated subjects a "canalization effect" can be observed in that a coefficient of variation of up to 33% of each protein level results in a simulated INR of 1 with a clinically irrelevant dispersion of 0.12. When the mean and the standard deviation of vitamin-K dependent protein levels were reduced by 80%, corresponding to the usual Warfarin treatment intensity, the simulated INR was 2.98 ± 0.48, a clinically relevant dispersion, corresponding to a reduction of the canalization effect. Then we combined the Hockin-Mann stochastic model with our previously published model of population response to Warfarin, that takes into account the genetical and the phenotypical variability of Warfarin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We used the combined model to evaluate the coagulation protein variability effect on the variability of the Warfarin dose required to reach an INR target of 2.5. The dose variance when removing the coagulation protein variability was 30% lower. The dose was mostly related to the pretreatment levels of factors VII, X, and the tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI. Conclusions It may be worth

  13. Impact of genetic and clinical factors on dose requirements and quality of anticoagulation therapy in Polish patients receiving acenocoumarol: dosing calculation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkanin-Bartnik, Jolanta; Pogorzelska, Hanna; Szperl, Małgorzata; Bartnik, Aleksandra; Koziarek, Jacek; Bilinska, Zofia T

    2013-11-01

    Despite the recent emergence of new oral anticoagulants, vitamin K antagonists remain the primary therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation and the only therapy licensed for use in patients with artificial heart valves. The aim of this study was (a) to assess the impact of clinical and genetic factors on acenocoumarol (AC) dose requirements and the percentage of time in therapeutic range (%TTR) and (b) to develop pharmacogenetic-guided AC dose calculation algorithm. We included 235 outpatients of the Institute of Cardiology (Warsaw), mean age 69.3, 46.9% women, receiving AC for artificial heart valves and/or atrial fibrillation. A multiple linear-regression analysis was performed using log-transformed effective AC dose as the dependent variable, and combining CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotyping with other clinical factors as independent predictors. We identified factors that influenced the AC dose: CYP2C9 polymorphisms (P=0.004), VKORC1 polymorphisms (Pgenetic factors explained 49.0% of AC dose variability. We developed a dosing calculation algorithm that is, to the best of our knowledge, the first one to assess the effect of such clinical factors as creatinine clearance and dietary vitamin K intake on the AC dose. The clinical usefulness of the algorithm was assessed on separate validation group (n=50) with 70% accuracy. Dietary vitamin K intake higher than 200 mcg/day improved international normalized ratio control (%TTR 73.3±17 vs. 67.7±18, respectively, P=0.04). Inclusion of a variety of genetic and clinical factors in the dosing calculation algorithm allows for precise AC dose estimation in most patients and thus improves the efficacy and safety of the therapy.

  14. ORAL-THERAPY FOR SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POSTMUS, PE; SMIT, EF

    After a remarkable improvement of the very poor prognosis of small cell lung cancer with very simple therapy such as iv and oral cyclophosphamide the role of oral therapy has become minimal. However, since more than a decade results of combination chemotherapy are at a plateau and it is necessary to

  15. [Impact of an education program on patient behaviour favoring prevention of drug-related adverse events: a pilot study in patients receiving oral anticoagulants for thromboembolic venous disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, S; Allenet, B; Pichot, O; Figari, G; Calop, J; Carpentier, P; Bosson, J L

    2004-07-01

    Adverse events related to oral anticoagulants represent a major public health problem. Including patient education as part of the prevention strategy could contribute to improved effectiveness and safer use of drugs. The present study aimed at evaluating the outcomes of a patient education program inspired by recommendations from French Health Authorities (AFSSAPS) and based on an "individual guidance" approach. The study was conducted in two groups of hospitalized patients treated with oral anticoagulants for thromboembolic disease. Each patient in the first (intervention) group attended an individual teaching session conducted at discharge by a trained pharmacist. Patients in the second (control) group were given usual care. These two groups were compared at inclusion (before intervention) and three months later. The outcomes considered were the acquisition of: 1) knowledge, 2) risk anticipation and compliance behaviours characterized by the stability of INR and the incidence of hemorrhagic episodes during the period of observation. Fifty-nine patients (average age 65 years) were included (29 in the intervention group and 30 in the control group). Three months after the intervention, the intervention group exhibited 1) better knowledge (higher rate of restitution of treatment-related information--name of the drug, administration plan, targeted range for INR (...), interpretation of INR results (p<0.05), management of a specific scenario where INR declines concomitant to elevation of anticoagulant dose (p<0.05)); 2) higher rates of relevant behaviours (p<0.05)--in the event of a missed dose, anticipating an event with a high risk of bleeding, dealing with signs of overdose--and higher compliance profile (ns) (stability of INR, and number of hemorragic episodes). A multivariate model integrating the potential explanatory variables for frequency of hemorrhagic episodes at 3 months (demographic data, history of thrombotic disease, INR stability, reference group

  16. Quality assurance for point-of-care testing of oral anticoagulation: a large-scale evaluation of the Hemochron Junior Signature Microcoagulation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, J M; Bogo, P H; McGregor, E; Pippard, M J; Kerr, R

    2009-04-01

    We report the first large-scale evaluation of the Hemochron Junior Signature (HJS) Microcoagulation System for community monitoring of oral anticoagulation and establishment of a programme of internal and external quality assurance. Over 1600 HJS results, with a simultaneous venous sample for central analysis, were obtained over a 19 month period. Monitoring of an initial period of HJS results (n = 135) revealed an International Normalized Ratio (INR) over estimation (mean +1.05), with only 27% of results within 0.5 of the central laboratory INR. A correction factor was introduced which reduced the INR bias to +0.07 and improved the percentage of results within 0.5 of the central laboratory INR to 76% (n = 353). A revised correction factor was later introduced to adjust for an under estimation at higher INR values. This changed the INR bias to -0.05, with 76% of results within 0.5 of the central laboratory INR (n = 1174). Local external quality assurance samples were distributed monthly with a total of 791 samples during the study period. 84% of test results were within 15% of the median value (range 73-97% per month). These results emphasize the value of a robust quality assurance programme when using point-of-care devices for community monitoring of oral anticoagulation.

  17. Adverse effects of anticoagulation treatment: clinically significant upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skok

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last years, the use of oral anticoagulant treatment has increased dramatically, principally for the prevention of venous thrombosis and thrombembolic events. This treatment is demanding, especially among the elderly with concommitant diseases and different medication. Aim of the study to evaluate the rate of serious complications, clinically significant hemorrhage from upper gastointestinal tract in patients treated with oral antiocoagulants in a prospective cohort study.Patients and methods: Included were patients admitted to our institution between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2003 due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Emergency endoscopy and laboratory testing was performed in all patients.Results: 6416 patients were investigated: 2452 women (38.2 % and 3964 men (61.8 %, mean age 59.1 years, SD 17.2. Among our patients, 55 % were aged over 60 years. In 86.4 % of patients the source of bleeding was confirmed in the upper gastrointestinal tract. In the last week prior to bleeding, 20.4 % (1309/6416 of all patients were regularly taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulant therapy or antiplatelet agents in single daily doses at least. 6.3 % of patients (82/1309 with abundant hemorrhage from upper gastrointestinal tract were using oral anticoagulant therapy and had INR > 5 at admission, 25.6 % of them had INR > 10. The mortality of patients using oral anticoagulants and INR > 5 was 17.1 %.Conclusions: Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a serious complication of different medications, particularly in elderly patients. Safe use of anticoagulant therapy is based on careful selection of patients and correct intake of the prescribed drugs.

  18. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Oral complications in the pediatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggott, P.J. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A number of acute oral complications may be associated with cancer therapy in children, but the extent and duration of these complications, and the most effective management techniques. have not been well described. The few studies differ in design, making comparisons difficult. Well-controlled, prospective clinical studies are needed to define the most effective strategies for the management of acute oral complications in children. However, it is clear that dental intervention prior to cancer therapy is an important factor in the optimal preparation of the patient. During cancer therapy, intensive supervised oral preventive protocols appear to be of benefit to the child's oral health, overall comfort, and well-being. Furthermore, the prevention of oral infection may significantly reduce the morbidity associated with cancer therapy. Long-term preventive oral care may help prevent dental disease and infection in medically compromised children and contribute to improving the quality of life. 41 references.

  19. Perioperative Anticoagulation of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices Implantation in Patients Receiving Long-term Anticoagulant Therapy%长期抗凝者植入心脏植入装置围手术期抗凝策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜运秋(综述); 田颖(审校)

    2016-01-01

    大量需要植入心脏植入装置的患者正在接受长期抗凝治疗,围手术期面临出血和血栓栓塞事件的双重风险,多数指南推荐根据患者血栓栓塞危险度决定抗凝方案。围手术期进行肝素桥接或双联抗血小板治疗可显著增加囊袋血肿发生的风险,而不间断华法林可能是平衡利弊的优秀策略。现对长期抗凝者心脏植入型电子装置植入围手术期抗凝策略的现状和进展进行综述。%A large proportion of patients who require cardiovascular implantable electronic devices ( CIED ) implantation surgery are receiving long-term anticoagulant therapy , undertaking risks of both hemorrhagic and thromboembolic events during perioperative period . Most guidelines recommend altering anticoagulant regimens according to thromboembolism risks .The use of perioperative heparin bridging or dual antiplatelet therapy significantly increases the risk of pocket-hematoma .Warfarin continuation appears promising in terms of balancing the pros and cons .This article aims at reviewing the current status and potential development of CIED perioperative management of anticoag -ulant therapy .

  20. Anticoagulant Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ann-Charlotte

    Although sewer rat control is carried out in more than 80 % of all Danish municipalities, with usage of large amounts of anticoagulant rodenticides, knowledge on anticoagulant resistance among rats living in the sewers is limited. As rat problems in urban areas are believed to be related to sewer...... problems (70-90 % in UK and DK) unawareness of resistance amongst these populations of Brown rats may constitute a future control problem and knowledge on this issue has become crucial. Rats were captured in sewers from seven different locations in the suburban area of Copenhagen. Locations was chosen...... to represent different sewer rat management strategies i) no anticoagulants for approx. 20 years ii) no anticoagulants for the last 5 years and iii) continuous control for many years. Animals were tested for resistance to bromadiolone by Blood-Clotting Response test, as bromadiolone is the most frequently used...

  1. Maternal malaria induces a procoagulant and antifibrinolytic state that is embryotoxic but responsive to anticoagulant therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Avery

    Full Text Available Low birth weight and fetal loss are commonly attributed to malaria in endemic areas, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie these poor birth outcomes are incompletely understood. Increasing evidence suggests that dysregulated hemostasis is important in malaria pathogenesis, but its role in placental malaria (PM, characterized by intervillous sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum, proinflammatory responses, and excessive fibrin deposition is not known. To address this question, markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis were assessed in placentae from malaria-exposed primigravid women. PM was associated with significantly elevated placental monocyte and proinflammatory marker levels, enhanced perivillous fibrin deposition, and increased markers of activated coagulation and suppressed fibrinolysis in placental plasma. Submicroscopic PM was not proinflammatory but tended to be procoagulant and antifibrinolytic. Birth weight trended downward in association with placental parasitemia and high fibrin score. To directly assess the importance of coagulation in malaria-induced compromise of pregnancy, Plasmodium chabaudi AS-infected pregnant C57BL/6 mice were treated with the anticoagulant, low molecular weight heparin. Treatment rescued pregnancy at midgestation, with substantially decreased rates of active abortion and reduced placental and embryonic hemorrhage and necrosis relative to untreated animals. Together, the results suggest that dysregulated hemostasis may represent a novel therapeutic target in malaria-compromised pregnancies.

  2. Cataract surgery and anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, SA; VanRij, G

    1996-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 240 members of the Netherlands Intraocular implant Club (NIOIC) to register their policy followed in 1993 with regard to anticoagulant therapy (ACT) and the use of aspirin in patients having cataract surgery. Ninety-one (32%) forms were suitable for analysis. Most eye sur

  3. Could Some Geriatric Characteristics Hinder the Prescription of Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation in the Elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Denoël

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported underprescription of anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation (AF. We conducted an observational study on 142 out of a total of 995 consecutive ≥75 years old patients presenting AF (14% when admitted in an emergency unit of a general hospital, in search of geriatric characteristics that might be associated with the underprescription of anticoagulation therapy (mostly antivitamin K at the time of the study. The following data was collected from patients presenting AF: medical history including treatment and comorbidities, CHADS2 score, ISAR scale (frailty, Lawton’s scale (ADL, GDS scale (mood status, MUST (nutrition, and blood analysis (INR, kidney function, and albumin. Among those patients for who anticoagulation treatment was recommended (73%, only 61% were treated with it. In the group with anticoagulation therapy, the following characteristics were observed more often than in the group without such therapy: a recent (≤6 months hospitalization and medical treatment including digoxin or based on >3 different drugs. Neither the value of the CHADS2 score, nor the geriatric characteristics could be correlated with the presence or the absence of an anticoagulation therapy. More research is thus required to identify and clarify the relative importance of patient-, physician-, and health care system-related hurdles for the prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy in older patients with AF.

  4. Radiation therapy for oral verrucous carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamamoto, Yasushi; Niino, Keiji; Yoshino, Masanari; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Yoshizawa, Nobuo; Takahashi, Koji [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Itagaki, Takatomo; Watarai, Jiro

    2000-12-01

    In order to examine the usefulness of radiotherapy for verrucous carcinoma, eight cases of oral verrucous carcinoma treated with radiation therapy were reviewed. Definitive radiotherapy was performed in six patients and preoperative radiotherapy was performed in two patients. Definitive radiotherapy doses ranged from 20 to 60 Gy (median: 47.5 Gy) and preoperative radiotherapy doses were 25 Gy, delivered with a daily fraction size of 2.5 Gy in principle. All cases that received definitive irradiation became CR, but two of these patients underwent local recurrence; one was a patient irradiated with only 20 Gy and the other case underwent local recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma. In the cases irradiated with 45 Gy or more, 4 of 5 cases were locally controlled. No patient underwent regional lymph node metastases. One of two patients that received preoperative radiotherapy had local recurrence in spit of a negative surgical margin. Because the radiosensitivity of verrucous carcinoma was often good and anaplastic transformation was not common, radiotherapy can become a radical treatment for verrucous carcinoma. (author)

  5. Periprocedural Management of Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Review of Existing Heterogeneity and Contemporary Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekaran, Prasad; Parashara, Deepak K

    2015-12-01

    Non vitamin-K oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have considerably enhanced anticoagulation practice for non-valvular atrial fibrillation with specific advantages of fixed dosing, non-fluctuant therapeutic levels and obviation of therapeutic level monitoring. NOAC pharmacology is remarkable for considerable renal excretion. Heterogeneity in the precise time cut-offs for discontinuation of NOACs prior to elective surgical or percutaneous procedures arise from the non-linear variations of drug excretion with different levels of creatinine clearances as in chronic kidney disease. Multiple authors have suggested cut-offs leading to ambiguity among practicing clinicians. Recent data pertaining to systemic thromboembolism, stroke and major bleeding derived from randomized controlled clinical trials have simplified the periprocedural management of NOACs. This review focusses on heterogeneity in the management of NOACs in patients with CKD in this peculiar scenario and highlights the contemporary evidence to support a unified approach towards perioperative management of NOACs. Multiple antidotes targeted towards binding of specific NOACs have been developed and are in the testing phase, thereby offering immense potential for rapid and complete reversal of NOAC activity in emergent procedures and major bleeding episodes. Targeted research on thromboembolism, stroke and major bleeding following temporary periprocedural interruption of NOACs using multicentric registries could further expand the clinical utility of these agents.

  6. Prevention of one-year vein-graft occlusion after aortocoronary-bypass surgery : a comparison of low-dose aspirin, low-dose aspirin plus dipyridamole, and oral anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J; Hillege, H. L.; Kootstra, G. J.; Ascoop, C. A. P. L.; Pfisterer, M.; van Gilst, W. H.; Lie, K. I.

    1993-01-01

    Aspirin, alone or in combination with dipyridamole, is known to prevent occlusion of aortocoronary vein grafts. The benefit of dipyridamole in addition to aspirin remains controversial, and the efficacy and safety of oral anticoagulants for prevention of vein-graft occlusion have not been

  7. PREVENTION OF ONE-YEAR VEIN-GRAFT OCCLUSION AFTER AORTOCORONARY-BYPASS SURGERY - A COMPARISON OF LOW-DOSE ASPIRIN, LOW-DOSE ASPIRIN PLUS DIPYRIDAMOLE, AND ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS