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Sample records for optomechanical zipper cavity

  1. Electrostatically tunable optomechanical "zipper" cavity laser

    CERN Document Server

    Perahia, Raviv; Meenehan, Sean; Alegre, Thiago P Mayer; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    A tunable nanoscale "zipper" laser cavity, formed from two doubly clamped photonic crystal nanobeams, is demonstrated. Pulsed, room temperature, optically pumped lasing action at a wavelength of 1.3 micron is observed for cavities formed in a thin membrane containing InAsP/GaInAsP quantum-wells. Metal electrodes are deposited on the ends of the nanobeams to allow for micro-electro-mechanical actuation. Electrostatic tuning and modulation of the laser wavelength is demonstrated at a rate of 0.25nm/V^2 and a frequency as high as 6.7MHz, respectively.

  2. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  3. Cavity Optomechanical Magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Forstner, S; Knittel, J; van Ooijen, E D; Swaim, J D; Harris, G I; Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H

    2011-01-01

    A cavity optomechanical magnetometer is demonstrated where the magnetic field induced expansion of a magnetostrictive material is transduced onto the physical structure of a highly compliant optical microresonator. The resulting motion is read out optically with ultra-high sensitivity. Detecting the magnetostrictive deformation of Terfenol-D with a toroidal whispering gallery mode (TWGM) resonator a peak sensitivity of 400 nT/Hz^.5 was achieved with theoretical modelling predicting that sensitivities of up to 500 fT/Hz^.5 may be possible. This chip-based magnetometer combines high-sensitivity and large dynamic range with small size and room temperature operation.

  4. Cavity optomechanical magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, S; Prams, S; Knittel, J; van Ooijen, E D; Swaim, J D; Harris, G I; Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H

    2012-03-23

    A cavity optomechanical magnetometer is demonstrated. The magnetic-field-induced expansion of a magnetostrictive material is resonantly transduced onto the physical structure of a highly compliant optical microresonator and read out optically with ultrahigh sensitivity. A peak magnetic field sensitivity of 400  nT  Hz(-1/2) is achieved, with theoretical modeling predicting the possibility of sensitivities below 1  pT  Hz(-1/2). This chip-based magnetometer combines high sensitivity and large dynamic range with small size and room temperature operation.

  5. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-01

    "Cavity-optomechanics" aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  6. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Michael [Booz Allen Hamilton, 3811 Fairfax Drive, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Cavity-optomechanics” aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  7. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-ENS-CNRS, Paris (France); Van Brackel, Emmanuel [Département de Physique, ENS, Paris (France); Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier [Département Mesures Physiques, ONERA, Châtillon (France); Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele [Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés, IN2P3-CNRS, Lyon (France)

    2014-12-04

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  8. Dissipative structures in optomechanical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquín; Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; Patera, Giuseppe; Roldán, Eugenio; de Valcárcel, Germán J.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the increasing interest in the properties of multimode optomechanical devices, here we study a system in which a driven longitudinal mode of a large-area optical cavity is dispersively coupled to a deformable mechanical element. Two different models naturally appear in such scenario, for which we predict the formation of periodic patterns, localized structures (cavity solitons), and domain walls, among other complex nonlinear phenomena. Further, we propose a realistic design based on intracavity membranes where our models can be studied experimentally. Apart from its relevance to the field of nonlinear optics, the results put forward here are a necessary step towards understanding the quantum properties of optomechanical systems in the multimode regime of both the optical and the mechanical degrees of freedom.

  9. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Djafari-Rouhani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  10. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); El-Jallal, Said [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Physique du Rayonnement et de l’Interaction Laser Matière, Faculté des sciences, Université de Moulay Ismail, Meknès (Morocco)

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  11. Tunable Cavity Optomechanics with Ultracold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Purdy, T P; Botter, T; Brahms, N; Ma, Z -Y; Stamper-Kurn, D M

    2010-01-01

    We present an atom-chip-based realization of quantum cavity optomechanics with cold atoms localized within a Fabry-Perot cavity. Effective sub-wavelength positioning of the atomic ensemble allows for tuning the linear and quadratic optomechanical coupling parameters, varying the sensitivity to the displacement and strain of a compressible gaseous cantilever. We observe effects of such tuning on cavity optical nonlinearity and optomechanical frequency shifts, providing their first characterization in the quadratic-coupling regime.

  12. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhn, A G; Ducloux, O; Chartier, C; Traon, O Le; Briant, T; Cohadon, P -F; Heidmann, A; Michel, C; Pinard, L; Flaminio, R

    2011-01-01

    We present a new micromechanical resonator designed for cavity optomechanics. We have used a micropillar geometry to obtain a high-frequency mechanical resonance with a low effective mass and a very high quality factor. We have coated a 60-$\\mu$m diameter low-loss dielectric mirror on top of the pillar and are planning to use this micromirror as part of a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, to laser cool the resonator down to its quantum ground state and to monitor its quantum position fluctuations by quantum-limited optical interferometry.

  13. High-Q silica zipper cavity for optical radiation pressure driven MOMS switch

    CERN Document Server

    Tetsumoto, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    We design a silica zipper cavity that has high optical and mechanical Q (quality factor) values and demonstrate numerically the feasibility of a radiation pressure driven micro opto-mechanical system (MOMS) directional switch. The silica zipper cavity has an optical Q of 6.0x10^4 and an effective mode volume Vmode of 0.66{\\lambda}^3 when the gap between two cavities is 34 nm. We found that this Q/V_mode value is five times higher than can be obtained with a single nanocavity design. The mechanical Q (Q_m) is determined by thermo-elastic damping and is 2.0x10^6 in a vacuum at room temperature. The opto-mechanical coupling rate g_OM is as high as 100 GHz/nm, which allows us to move the directional cavity-waveguide system and switch 1550-nm light with 770-nm light by controlling the radiation pressure.

  14. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave-mixing between photons and phonons and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong nonlocal effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a novel multi-cavity optomechanical device: a "photon see-saw", in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of the see-saw, are modulated anti-symmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other...

  15. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave mixing between photons and phonons, and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong non-local effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a multicavity optomechanical device in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of this 'photon see-saw', are modulated antisymmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation, which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other empty cavity during every oscillation cycle in a well-regulated fashion.

  16. Ponderomotive light squeezing with atomic cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, Daniel W C; Brahms, Nathan; Purdy, Thomas P; Schreppler, Sydney; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2011-01-01

    Accessing distinctly quantum aspects of the interaction between light and the position of a mechanical object has been an outstanding challenge to cavity-optomechanical systems. Only cold-atom implementations of cavity optomechanics have indicated effects of the quantum fluctuations in the optical radiation pressure force. Here we use such a system, in which quantum photon-number fluctuations significantly drive the center of mass of an atomic ensemble inside a Fabry-Perot cavity. We show that the optomechanical response both amplifies and ponderomotively squeezes the quantum light field. We also demonstrate that classical optical fluctuations can be attenuated by 26 dB or amplified by 20 dB with a weak input pump power of < 40 pW, and characterize the optomechanical amplifier's frequency-dependent gain and phase response in both the amplitude and phase-modulation quadratures.

  17. Cavity Mode Frequencies and Large Optomechanical Coupling in Two-Membrane Cavity Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, J; Malossi, N; Vitali, D

    2015-01-01

    We study the cavity mode frequencies of a Fabry-Perot cavity containing two vibrating dielectric membranes and the corresponding optomechanical coupling. Due to optical interference, extremely large optomechanical coupling of the membrane relative motion is achieved when the two membranes are placed very close to a resonance of the inner cavity formed by the two membranes, and in the limit of highly reflective membranes. The upper bound of the coupling strength is given by the optomechanical coupling associated with the much shorter inner cavity, consistently with the analysis of A. Xuereb et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 223601 (2012).

  18. A microelectromechanically controlled cavity optomechanical sensing system

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, Houxun; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been applied to many measurement problems in physics, chemistry, biology and medicine. In parallel, cavity optomechanical systems have achieved quantum-limited displacement sensitivity and ground state cooling of nanoscale objects. By integrating a novel cavity optomechanical structure into an actuated MEMS sensing platform, we demonstrate a system with high quality-factor interferometric readout, electrical tuning of the optomechanical coupling by two orders of magnitude, and a mechanical transfer function adjustable via feedback. The platform separates optical and mechanical components, allowing flexible customization for specific scientific and commercial applications. We achieve displacement sensitivity of 4.6 fm/Hz^1/2 and force sensitivity of 53 aN/Hz^1/2 with only 250 nW optical power launched into the sensor. Cold-damping feedback is used to reduce the thermal mechanical vibration of the sensor by 3 orders of magnitude and to broaden the sensor bandwidth by a...

  19. Vector cavity optomechanics in the parameter configuration of optomechanically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hao; Huang, Ya-Min; Wan, Liang-Liang; Wu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    We propose the concept of vector cavity optomechanics in which the polarization behavior of light fields is introduced to achieve optomechanical control. The steady states and optomechanically induced transparency are studied in the vector regime, and we show that the polarization of optical fields may be a powerful tool to identify the underlying physical process and control the signal of optomechanically induced transparency. In particular, the conditions for obtaining a linearly polarized output probe field is given, which reveal some nontrivial polarizing effects. Despite its conceptual simplicity, vector cavity optomechanics may entail a wide range of intriguing phenomena and uncover a novel understanding for optomechanical interaction.

  20. Cavity Optomechanics in the Quantum Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botter, Thierry Claude Marc

    An exciting scientific goal, common to many fields of research, is the development of ever-larger physical systems operating in the quantum regime. Relevant to this dissertation is the objective of preparing and observing a mechanical object in its motional quantum ground state. In order to sense the object's zero-point motion, the probe itself must have quantum-limited sensitivity. Cavity optomechanics, the interactions between light and a mechanical object inside an optical cavity, provides an elegant means to achieve the quantum regime. In this dissertation, I provide context to the successful cavity-based optical detection of the quantum-ground-state motion of atoms-based mechanical elements; mechanical elements, consisting of the collective center-of-mass (CM) motion of ultracold atomic ensembles and prepared inside a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, were dispersively probed with an average intracavity photon number as small as 0.1. I first show that cavity optomechanics emerges from the theory of cavity quantum electrodynamics when one takes into account the CM motion of one or many atoms within the cavity, and provide a simple theoretical framework to model optomechanical interactions. I then outline details regarding the apparatus and the experimental methods employed, highlighting certain fundamental aspects of optical detection along the way. Finally, I describe background information, both theoretical and experimental, to two published results on quantum cavity optomechanics that form the backbone of this dissertation. The first publication shows the observation of zero-point collective motion of several thousand atoms and quantum-limited measurement backaction on that observed motion. The second publication demonstrates that an array of near-ground-state collective atomic oscillators can be simultaneously prepared and probed, and that the motional state of one oscillator can be selectively addressed while preserving the near-zero-point motion of

  1. Cavity optomechanics with arrays of thick dielectric membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, Bhagya; Dantan, Aurelien

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanical arrays made of structured flexible dielectrics are a promising system for exploring quantum and many-body optomechanical phenomena. We generalize investigations of the optomechanical properties of periodic arrays of one-dimensional scatterers in optical resonators to the case of vibrating membranes whose thickness is not necessarily small with respect to the optical wavelength of interest. The array optical transmission spectrum and its optomechanical coupling with a linear Fabry-Perot cavity field are investigated both analytically and numerically.

  2. Cavity optomechanics with arrays of thick dielectric membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Bhagya; Xuereb, André; Dantan, Aurélien

    2016-11-01

    Optomechanical arrays made of structured flexible dielectrics are a promising system for exploring quantum and many-body optomechanical phenomena. We generalize investigations of the optomechanical properties of periodic arrays of one-dimensional scatterers in optical resonators to the case of vibrating membranes whose thickness is not necessarily small with respect to the optical wavelength of interest. The array optical transmission spectrum and its optomechanical coupling with a linear Fabry-Perot cavity field are investigated both analytically and numerically.

  3. Achieving High Sensitivity in Cavity Optomechanical Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-08

    contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the Army position, policy...architecture  with  Terfenol-­‐D  affixed  to  the  top  of   the   toroid .  (b)  New  cavity  optomechanical  magnetometer...architecture  with  Terfenol-­‐D  affixed  inside   the   toroid  in  a  specially  designed  cavity.   Fig.  2

  4. Chip-scale cavity optomechanics in lithium niobate

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Wei C

    2016-01-01

    We develop a chip-scale cavity optomechanical system in single-crystal lithium niobate that exhibits high optical quality factors and a large frequency-quality product as high as $3.6\\times 10^{12}$ Hz at room temperature and atmosphere. The excellent optical and mechanical properties together with the strong optomechanical coupling allow us to efficiently excite the coherent regenerative optomechanical oscillation operating at 375.8 MHz with a threshold power of 174 ${\\rm \\mu W}$ in the air. The demonstrated lithium niobate optomechanical device enables great potential for achieving electro-optic-mechanical hybrid systems for broad applications in sensing, metrology, and quantum physics.

  5. Cavity optomechanical spring sensing of single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenyan; Jiang, Wei C.; Lin, Qiang; Lu, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Label-free bio-sensing is a critical functionality underlying a variety of health- and security-related applications. Micro-/nano-photonic devices are well suited for this purpose and have emerged as promising platforms in recent years. Here we propose and demonstrate an approach that utilizes the optical spring effect in a high-Q coherent optomechanical oscillator to dramatically enhance the sensing resolution by orders of magnitude compared with conventional approaches, allowing us to detect single bovine serum albumin proteins with a molecular weight of 66 kDa at a signal-to-noise ratio of 16.8. The unique optical spring sensing approach opens up a distinctive avenue that not only enables biomolecule sensing and recognition at individual level, but is also of great promise for broad physical sensing applications that rely on sensitive detection of optical cavity resonance shift to probe external physical parameters.

  6. Measurement-induced macroscopic superposition states in cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hoff, Ulrich B; Neergaard-Nielsen, Jonas S; Andersen, Ulrik L

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel proposal for generating quantum superpositions of macroscopically distinct states of a bulk mechanical oscillator, compatible with existing optomechanical devices operating in the readily achievable bad-cavity limit. The scheme is based on a pulsed cavity optomechanical quantum non-demolition (QND) interaction, driven by displaced non-Gaussian states, and measurement-induced feedback, avoiding the need for strong single-photon optomechanical coupling. Furthermore, we show that single-quadrature cooling of the mechanical oscillator is sufficient for efficient state preparation, and we outline a three-pulse protocol comprising a sequence of QND interactions for squeezing-enhanced cooling, state preparation, and tomography.

  7. Devil's Staircase in an Optomechanical Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hui; Buks, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    We study self-excited oscillation (SEO) in an on-fiber optomechanical cavity. While the phase of SEO randomly diffuses in time when the laser power that is injected into the cavity is kept constant, phase locking may occur when the laser power is periodically modulated in time. We investigate the dependence of phase locking on the amplitude and frequency of the laser power modulation. We find that phase locking can be induced with a relatively low modulation amplitude provided that the ratio between the modulation frequency and the frequency of SEO is tuned close to a rational number of relatively low hierarchy in the Farey tree. To account for the experimental results a one dimensional map, which allows evaluating the time evolution of the phase of SEO, is theoretically derived. By calculating the winding number of the one dimensional map the regions of phase locking can be mapped in the plane of modulation amplitude and modulation frequency. Comparison between the theoretical predictions and the experimenta...

  8. Cavity optomechanics on a microfluidic resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Wonsuk; Liu, Jing; Tomes, Matthew; Fan, Xudong; Carmon, Tal

    2012-01-01

    Light pressure is known to excite or cool vibrations in microresonators for sensing quantum-optomechanical effects and we now show that it can be explored for investigations with liquids. Currently, optical resonances are utilized to detect analytes in liquids. However, optomechanical oscillations have never been excited when devices were immersed in liquid. This is because replacing the surrounding air with water inherently increases the acoustical impedance and the associated acoustical-radiation losses. Here we fabricate a hollow optomechanical bubble resonator with water inside, and use light pressure to excite 8 MHz - 140 MHz vibrations with 1 mW optical-threshold power and >2000 mechanical Q, constituting the first time that any microfluidic system is optomechanically actuated. Bridging between optomechanics and microfluidics will enable recently developed capillaries and on-chip bubbles to vibrate via optical excitation; and allow optomechanics with non-solid material phases including bio-analytes, sup...

  9. Quantum states preparation in cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Wenchao

    Quantum entanglement and quantum superposition are fundamental properties of quantum mechanics, which underline quantum information and quantum computation. Preparing quantum states in the macroscopic level is both conceptually interesting for extending quantum physics to a broader sense and fundamentally important for testing the validity of quantum mechanics. In this dissertation, schemes of preparing macroscopic entanglement and macroscopic superposition states in cavity optomechanics are studied using the unitary evolution method in the nonlinear regime or Lyapunov equation in the linearized regime. Quantum entanglement and quantum superposition states can be realized using experimentally feasible parameters with the proposals in this dissertation. Firstly, a scheme of entangling two movable end mirrors in a Fabry-Perot cavity that are coupled to a common single photon superposition state is studied. It is shown that strong entanglement can be obtained either in the single-photon strong coupling regime deterministically or in the single-photon weak coupling regime conditionally. Secondly, a scheme of entangling two movable end mirrors, that are coupled to two-mode entangled fields generated from a correlated-emission laser is investigated. By tuning the input driving laser frequencies at the Stokes sidebands of the cavity, the radiation-pressure coupling can be linearized as an effective beam-splitter-like interaction. Hence entanglement can be transferred from the two-mode fields to the two mechanical mirrors. Macroscopic entanglement between macroscopic mirrors persists at temperature ~ 1K. Thirdly, a scheme of creating macroscopic quantum superpositions of a mechanical mirror via periodically flipping a photonic qubit is proposed. Quantum superposition states of a mechanical mirror can be obtained via the nonlinear radiation coupling with a single-photon superposition state. However, the difference between two superposed mechanical states is very small due

  10. A chip-scale integrated cavity-electro-optomechanics platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winger, M.; Blasius, T. D.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present an integrated optomechanical and electromechanical nanocavity, in which a common mechanical degree of freedom is coupled to an ultrahigh-Q photonic crystal defect cavity and an electrical circuit. The system allows for wide-range, fast electrical tuning of the optical nanocavity resona...... the way for a new class of micro-sensors utilizing optomechanical back-action for thermal noise reduction and low-noise optical read-out....

  11. Measurement-Induced Macroscopic Superposition States in Cavity Optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Ulrich B.; Kollath-Bönig, Johann; Neergaard-Nielsen, Jonas S.; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-09-01

    A novel protocol for generating quantum superpositions of macroscopically distinct states of a bulk mechanical oscillator is proposed, compatible with existing optomechanical devices operating in the bad-cavity limit. By combining a pulsed optomechanical quantum nondemolition (QND) interaction with nonclassical optical resources and measurement-induced feedback, the need for strong single-photon coupling is avoided. We outline a three-pulse sequence of QND interactions encompassing squeezing-enhanced cooling by measurement, state preparation, and tomography.

  12. Deformable two-dimensional photonic crystal slab for cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Antoni, T; Briant, T; Cohadon, P -F; Heidmann, A; Braive, R; Beveratos, A; Abram, I; Gatiet, L Le; Sagnes, I; Robert-Philip, I

    2011-01-01

    We have designed photonic crystal suspended membranes with optimized optical and mechanical properties for cavity optomechanics. Such resonators sustain vibration modes in the megahertz range with quality factors of a few thousand. Thanks to a two-dimensional square lattice of holes, their reflectivity at normal incidence at 1064 nm reaches values as high as 95%. These two features, combined with the very low mass of the membrane, open the way to the use of such periodic structures as deformable end-mirrors in Fabry-Perot cavities for the investigation of cavity optomechanical effects

  13. Squeezing-enhanced measurement sensitivity in a cavity optomechanical system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerdoncuff, Hugo; Hoff, Ulrich Busk; Harris, Glen I.;

    2015-01-01

    We determine the theoretical limits to squeezing-enhanced measurement sensitivity of mechanical motion in a cavity optomechanical system. The motion of a mechanical resonator is transduced onto quadrature fluctuations of a cavity optical field and a measurement is performed on the optical field e...

  14. Low-dissipation cavity optomechanics in single-crystal diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, Matthew; Lake, David P; Barclay, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal diamond cavity optomechanical devices are a promising example of a hybrid quantum system: by coupling mechanical resonances to both light and electron spins, they can enable new ways for photons to control solid state qubits. However, creating devices from high quality bulk diamond chips is challenging. Here we demonstrate single-crystal diamond cavity optomechanical devices that can enable photon-phonon-spin coupling. Cavity optomechanical coupling to $2\\,\\text{GHz}$ frequency ($f_\\text{m}$) mechanical resonances is observed. In room temperature ambient conditions, the resonances have a record combination of low dissipation ($Q_\\text{m} > 9000$) and high frequency, with $Q_\\text{m}\\cdot f_\\text{m} \\sim 1.9\\times10^{13}$ sufficient for room temperature single phonon coherence. The system is nearly sideband resolved, and radiation pressure is used to excite $\\sim 31\\,\\text{pm}$ amplitude mechanical self-oscillations that can drive diamond color centre electron spin transitions.

  15. Cascaded optical transparency in multimode-cavity optomechanical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Linran; Fong, King Y; Poot, Menno; Tang, Hong X

    2015-01-14

    Electromagnetically induced transparency has great theoretical and experimental importance in many areas of physics, such as atomic physics, quantum optics and, more recent, cavity optomechanics. Optical delay is the most prominent feature of electromagnetically induced transparency, and in cavity optomechanics, the optical delay is limited by the mechanical dissipation rate of sideband-resolved mechanical modes. Here we demonstrate a cascaded optical transparency scheme by leveraging the parametric phonon-phonon coupling in a multimode optomechanical system, where a low damping mechanical mode in the unresolved-sideband regime is made to couple to an intermediate, high-frequency mechanical mode in the resolved-sideband regime of an optical cavity. Extended optical delay and higher transmission as well as optical advancing are demonstrated. These results provide a route to realize ultra-long optical delay, indicating a significant step towards integrated classical and quantum information storage devices.

  16. Observation of generalized optomechanical coupling and cooling on cavity resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawadsky, Andreas; Kaufer, Henning; Nia, Ramon Moghadas; Tarabrin, Sergey P; Khalili, Farid Ya; Hammerer, Klemens; Schnabel, Roman

    2015-01-30

    Optomechanical coupling between a light field and the motion of a cavity mirror via radiation pressure plays an important role for the exploration of macroscopic quantum physics and for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs). It has been used to cool mechanical oscillators into their quantum ground states and has been considered to boost the sensitivity of GW detectors, e.g., via the optical spring effect. Here, we present the experimental characterization of generalized, that is, dispersive and dissipative, optomechanical coupling, with a macroscopic (1.5  mm)2-size silicon nitride membrane in a cavity-enhanced Michelson-type interferometer. We report for the first time strong optomechanical cooling based on dissipative coupling, even on cavity resonance, in excellent agreement with theory. Our result will allow for new experimental regimes in macroscopic quantum physics and GW detection.

  17. Observation of generalized optomechanical coupling and cooling on cavity resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Sawadsky, Andreas; Nia, Ramon Moghadas; Tarabrin, Sergey P; Khalili, Farid Ya; Hammerer, Klemens; Schnabel, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Optomechanical coupling between a light field and the motion of a cavity mirror via radiation pressure plays an important role for the exploration of macroscopic quantum physics and for the detection of gravitational waves (GWs). It has been used to cool mechanical oscillators into their quantum ground states and has been considered to boost the sensitivity of GW detectors, e.g. via the optical spring effect. Here, we present the experimental characterization of generalized, that is, dispersive and dissipative optomechanical coupling, with a macroscopic (1.5mm)^2-sized silicon nitride (SiN) membrane in a cavity-enhanced Michelson-type interferometer. We report for the first time strong optomechanical cooling based on dissipative coupling, even on cavity resonance, in excellent agreement with theory. Our result will allow for new experimental regimes in macroscopic quantum physics and GW detection.

  18. Quantum Cavity Optomechanics with Phononic Bandgap Shielded Silicon Nitride Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, William Hvidtfelt Padkær

    pressure, andthe achievement of strong correlations between light at mechanics, manifested asponderomotive squeezing. e next step invariably seems to be the incorporationof cavity optomechanical systems in more complex constellations, in some sensemimicking what has already been achieved with atoms.......In this work, we report on the progress of bringing a cavity optomechanicalsystem “up to speed” for the later integration into a hybrid atomic-opticalmechanicalentanglement experiment. The optomechanical system in considerationconsists of a highly stressed stoichiometric silicon-nitride membrane placedbetween...

  19. Ultraviolet optomechanical crystal cavities with ultrasmall modal mass and high optomechanical coupling rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Yu, Zejie; Ma, Jingwen; Zhu, Bingqing; Tsang, Hon Ki; Sun, Xiankai

    2016-11-01

    Optomechanical crystal (OMC) cavities which exploit the simultaneous photonic and phononic bandgaps in periodic nanostructures have been utilized to colocalize, couple, and transduce optical and mechanical resonances for nonlinear interactions and precision measurements. The development of near-infrared OMC cavities has difficulty in maintaining a high optomechanical coupling rate when scaling to smaller mechanical modal mass because of the reduction of the spatial overlap between the optical and mechanical modes. Here, we explore OMC nanobeam cavities in gallium nitride operating at the ultraviolet wavelengths to overcome this problem. With a novel optimization strategy, we have successfully designed an OMC cavity, with a size of 3.83 × 0.17 × 0.13 μm3 and the mechanical modal mass of 22.83 fg, which possesses an optical mode resonating at the wavelength of 393.03 nm and the fundamental mechanical mode vibrating at 14.97 GHz. The radiation-limited optical Q factor, mechanical Q factor, and optomechanical coupling rate are 2.26 × 107, 1.30 × 104, and 1.26 MHz, respectively. Our design and optimization approach can also serve as the general guidelines for future development of OMC cavities with improved device performance.

  20. Cavity nano-optomechanics: a nanomechanical system in a high finesse optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Stapfner, Sebastian; Hunger, David; Paulitschke, Philipp; Reichel, Jakob; Karrai, Khaled; Weig, Eva M; 10.1117/12.705901

    2011-01-01

    The coupling of mechanical oscillators with light has seen a recent surge of interest, as recent reviews report.[1, 2] This coupling is enhanced when confining light in an optical cavity where the mechanical oscillator is integrated as back- mirror or movable wall. At the nano-scale, the optomechanical coupling increases further thanks to a smaller optomechanical interaction volume and reduced mass of the mechanical oscillator. In view of realizing such cavity nano- optomechanics experiments, a scheme was proposed where a sub-wavelength sized nanomechanical oscillator is coupled to a high finesse optical microcavity.[3] Here we present such an experiment involving a single nanomechanical rod precisely positioned into the confined mode of a miniature Fabry-P\\'erot cavity.[4] We describe the employed stabilized cavity set-up and related finesse measurements. We proceed characterizing the nanorod vibration properties using ultrasonic piezo-actuation methods. Using the optical cavity as a transducer of nanomechan...

  1. Optomechanical Entanglement Between an Ion and an Optical Cavity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.

    2016-04-01

    I study an optomechanical system in which the mechanical motion of a single trapped ion is coupled to a cavity field for the realization of a strongly quantum correlated two-mode system. I show that for large pump intensities the steady state photon number exhibits bistable behaviour. I further analyze the occurrence of normal mode splitting (NMS) due to mixing of the fluctuations of the cavity field and the fluctuations of the ion motion which indicates a coherent energy exchange. I also find that in the parameter regime where NMS exists, the steady state of the system shows continuous variable entanglement. Such a two-mode optomechanical system can be used for the realization of continuous variable quantum information interfaces and networks.

  2. Cavity optomechanics nano- and micromechanical resonators interacting with light

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenberg, Tobias; Marquardt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    During the last few years cavity-optomechanics has emerged as a new field of research. This highly interdisciplinary field studies the interaction between micro- and nanomechanical systems and light. Possible applications range from novel high-bandwidth mechanical sensing devices through the generation of squeezed optical or mechanical states to even tests of quantum theory itself. This is one of the first books in this relatively young field. it is aimed at scientists, engineers, and students who want to obtain a concise introduction to the state of the art in the field of cavity optomechanics. It is valuable to researchers in nanoscience, quantum optics, quantum information, gravitational wave detection and other cutting edge fields. Possible applications include biological sensing, frequency comb applications, silicon photonics etc. The technical content will be accessible to those who have familiarity with basic undergraduate physics.

  3. Phonon Routing in Integrated Optomechanical Cavity-waveguide Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-20

    strong coupling to arrays of cavity elements may also enable novel optomechani- cal metamaterials , where in combination with a spatially distributed phase...in moderate lattice sizes, the study of topo- logical phases and effective magnetic fields for photons and phonons [30–32]. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The...5, p. 031011, 2015. [32] M. Schmidt, S. Keler, V. Peano, O. Painter, and F. Mar- quardt, “Optomechanical creation of magnetic fields for photons on

  4. Optomechanical damping of a nanomembrane inside an optical ring cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Yilmaz, Arzu; Wolf, Philip; Schmidt, Dag; Eisele, Max; Zimmermann, Claus; Slama, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigate mechanical nanooscillators coupled to the light in an optical ring resonator made of dielectric mirrors. We identify an optomechanical damping mechanism that is fundamentally different to the well known cooling in standing wave cavities. While, in a standing wave cavity the mechanical oscillation shifts the resonance frequency of the cavity in a ring resonator the frequency does not change. Instead the position of the nodes is shifted with the mechanical excursion. We derive the damping rates and test the results experimentally with a silicon-nitride nanomembrane. It turns out that scattering from small imperfections of the dielectric mirror coatings has to be taken into account to explain the value of the measured damping rate. We extend our theoretical model and regard a second reflector in the cavity that captures the effects of mirror back scattering. This model can be used to also describe the situation of two membranes that both interact with the cavity fi...

  5. A chip-scale integrated cavity-electro-optomechanics platform

    CERN Document Server

    Winger, Martin; Alegre, Thiago P Mayer; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Meenehan, Seán; Cohen, Justin; Stobbe, Søren; Painter, Oskar

    2011-01-01

    We present an integrated optomechanical and electromechanical nanocavity, in which a common mechanical degree of freedom is coupled to an ultrahigh-Q photonic crystal defect cavity and an electrical circuit. The sys- tem allows for wide-range, fast electrical tuning of the optical nanocavity resonances, and for electrical control of optical radiation pressure back-action effects such as mechanical amplification (phonon lasing), cooling, and stiffening. These sort of integrated devices offer a new means to efficiently interconvert weak microwave and optical signals, and are expected to pave the way for a new class of micro-sensors utilizing optomechanical back-action for thermal noise reduction and low-noise optical read-out.

  6. Complex Dynamics of Nano-Mechanical Membrane in Cavity Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Akram, Muhammad Javed

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of a suspended nano-mechanical membrane subject to an optical driving field in cavity optomechanics is presented, which is confirmed through numerical simulations. In the presence of an optical field between its mirrors a high finesse nano-mechanical resonator acts as an oscillator driven by radiation pressure force. The periodic nature of the radiation pressure force makes the nano-mechanical membrane in the optomechanical system as kicked harmonic oscillator. Mathematically the physical system displays a stochastic web map that helps to understand several properties of the kicked membrane in classical phase space. We find that our web map is area preserving, and displays quasi-periodic symmetrical structures in phase space which we express as q-fold symmetry. It is shown that under appropriate control of certain parameters, namely the frequency ratio (q) and the kicking strength (K), the dynamics of kicked membrane exhibits chaotic dynamics. We provide the stability analysis by means of...

  7. Suppression of extraneous thermal noise in cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yi; Ni, Kang-Kuen; Kimble, H Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Extraneous thermal motion can limit displacement sensitivity and radiation pressure effects, such as optical cooling, in a cavity-optomechanical system. Here we present an active noise suppression scheme and its experimental implementation. The main challenge is to selectively sense and suppress extraneous thermal noise without affecting motion of the oscillator. Our solution is to monitor two modes of the optical cavity, each with different sensitivity to the oscillator's motion but similar sensitivity to the extraneous thermal motion. This information is used to imprint "anti-noise" onto the frequency of the incident laser field. In our system, based on a nano-mechanical membrane coupled to a Fabry-P\\'{e}rot cavity, simulation and experiment demonstrate that extraneous thermal noise can be selectively suppressed and that the associated limit on optical cooling can be reduced.

  8. Phonon mediated electromagnetically induced absorption in cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Kenan

    2013-01-01

    We predict the existence of the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in the double cavity configurations of the optomechanical systems (OMS). We discuss the origin of the EIA in OMS which exhibit the existence of an absorption peak within the transparency window. We provide analytical results for the width and the height of the EIA peak. The combination of the EIT and EIA is especially useful for photon switching applications. The EIA that we discuss is different from the one originally discovered by Lezama et al in atomic systems and can be understood in terms of the dynamics of three coupled oscillators (rather than two) under different conditions on the relaxation parameters.

  9. Floquet approach to bichromatically driven cavity-optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malz, Daniel; Nunnenkamp, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We develop a Floquet approach to solve time-periodic quantum Langevin equations in the steady state. We show that two-time correlation functions of system operators can be expanded in a Fourier series and that a generalized Wiener-Khinchin theorem relates the Fourier transform of their zeroth Fourier component to the measured spectrum. We apply our framework to bichromatically driven cavity optomechanical systems, a setting in which mechanical oscillators have recently been prepared in quantum-squeezed states. Our method provides an intuitive way to calculate the power spectral densities for time-periodic quantum Langevin equations in arbitrary rotating frames.

  10. Cavity optomechanics in photonic and phononic crystals: engineering the interaction of light and sound at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Matthew

    The dynamic back-action caused by electromagnetic forces (radiation pressure) in optical and microwave cavities is of growing interest. Back-action cooling, for example, is being pursued as a means of achieving the quantum ground state of macroscopic mechanical oscillators. Work in the optical domain has revolved around millimeter- or micrometer-scale structures using the radiation pressure force. By comparison, in microwave devices, low-loss superconducting structures have been used for gradient-force-mediated coupling to a nanomechanical oscillator of picogram mass. In this thesis, two different nanometer-scale structures that use combinations of gradient and radiation pressure optical forces are described theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. These structures merge the fields of cavity optomechanics and nanomechanics into nano-optomechanical systsms (NOMS). The first device, the “Zipper” optomechanical cavity, consists of a pair of doubly-clamped nanoscale beams separated by approximately 100 nanometers, each beam having a mass of 20 picograms and being patterned with a quasi-1D photonic crystal bandgap cavity. The optical mode of the coupled system is exquisitely sensitive to differential motion of the beams, producing optomechanical coupling right at the fundamental limit set by optical diffraction. The mechanical modes of the beam probed with a background sensitivity only a factor of 4 above the standard quantum limit, and the application of less than a milliwatt of optical power is shown to increase the mechanical rigidity of the system by almost an order of magnitude. The second device focuses on just one of the doubly-clamped nanoscale beams of the Zipper. We show that, in addition to a photonic bandgap cavity, the periodic patterning of the beam also produces a phononic bandgap cavity with localized mechanical modes having frequencies in the microwave regime. We call these photonic and phononic crystal bandgap cavities optomechanical crystals

  11. Optomechanic interaction in a corrugated phoxonic nanobeam cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudich, Mourad; El-Jallal, Said; Pennec, Yan; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Gomis-Bresco, Jordi; Navarro-Urrios, Daniel; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia M.; Martínez, Alejandro; Makhoute, Abdelkader

    2014-06-01

    The interaction between phonons and photons is investigated theoretically in a phoxonic cavity inside a corrugated nanobeam waveguide presenting band gaps for both electromagnetic and elastic waves. The structure is made by drilling periodic holes on a silicon nanobeam with lateral periodic stubs and the tapered cavity is constructed by changing gradually the geometrical parameters of both the holes and stubs. We show that this kind of cavity displays localized phonons and photons inside the gaps, which can enhance their interaction and also promotes the presence of many optical confined modes with high quality factor. Using the finite-element method, we demonstrate that with appropriate design of the tapering construction, one can control the cavity modes frequency without altering significantly the quality factor of the photonic modes. By changing the tapering rates over the lattice constants, we establish the possibility of shifting the phononic cavity modes frequency to place them inside the desired gap, which enhances their confinement and increases the mechanical quality factor while keeping the strength of the optomechanic coupling high. In our calculations, we take account of both mechanisms that contribute to the acousto-optic interaction, namely photoelastic and interface motion effects. We show that in our case, these two effects can contribute additively to give high coupling strength between phononic and photonic cavity modes. The calculations of the coupling coefficient which gives the phonon-photon coupling strength give values as high as 2 MHz while photonic cavity modes display quality factor of 105 and even values up to 3.4 MHz but with smaller photonic quality factors.

  12. Photothermal optomechanics in superfluid helium coupled to a fiber-based cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Kashkanova, A D; Brown, C D; Flowers-Jacobs, N E; Childress, L; Hoch, S W; Hohmann, L; Ott, K; Reichel, J; Harris, J G E

    2016-01-01

    Presented in this paper are measurements of an optomechanical device in which various acoustic modes of a sample of superfluid helium couple to a fiber-based optical cavity. In contrast with recent work on the paraxial acoustic mode confined by the cavity mirrors, we focus specifically on the acoustic modes associated with the helium surrounding the cavity. This paper provides a framework for understanding how the acoustic modes depend on device geometry. The acoustic modes are observed using the technique of optomechanically induced transparency/amplification. The optomechanical coupling to these modes is found to be predominantly photothermal.

  13. Quantum Cavity Optomechanics with Phononic Bandgap Shielded Silicon Nitride Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, William Hvidtfelt Padkær

    Cavity optomechanics, a field which has matured tremendously over the last decade,has conclusively reached the quantum regime. Noteworthy experimentalachievements include cooling of the vibrational motion of macroscopic objects tothe quantum ground state, the observation of shot noise of radiation...... two highly reflective mirrors, all of which are embedded in a helium flowcryostat. In order to reach truly quantum territory, severe shielding of the membranefrom the environment is required, as well as meticulous concern for auxiliarysources of noise, both from the laser and mirrors used.The purpose...... of this thesis is to document the development of the experimentfrom its initial stages to its final quantum enabled incarnation, as well as to providethe necessary theoretical machinery to interpret the experimental results. A strongemphasis is placed on the unique challenges posed by our unique monolithic...

  14. Single-photon multi-ports router based on the coupled cavity optomechanical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xun; Zhang, Wen-Zhao; Xiong, Biao; Zhou, Ling

    2016-12-22

    A scheme of single-photon multi-port router is put forward by coupling two optomechanical cavities with waveguides. It is shown that the coupled two optomechanical cavities can exhibit photon blockade effect, which is generated from interference of three mode interaction. A single-photon travel along the system is calculated. The results show that the single photon can be controlled in the multi-port system because of the radiation pressure, which should be useful for constructing quantum network.

  15. Tunable two-photon correlation in a double-cavity optomechanical system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bo Feng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Correlated photons are essential sources for quantum information processing. We propose a practical scheme to generate pairs of correlated photons in a controllable fashion from a double-cavity optomechanical system, where the variable optomechanical coupling strength makes it possible to tune the photon correlation at our will. The key operation is based on the repulsive or attractive interaction between the two photons intermediated by the mechanical resonator. The present protocol could provide a potential approach to coherent control of the photon correlation using the optomechanical cavity.

  16. Wide Stiffness Range Cavity Optomechanical Sensors for Atomic Force Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yuxiang; Aksyuk, Vladimir; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2012-01-01

    We report on progress in developing compact sensors for atomic force microscopy (AFM), in which the mechanical transducer is integrated with near-field optical readout on a single chip. The motion of a nanoscale, doubly-clamped cantilever was transduced by an adjacent high quality factor silicon microdisk cavity. In particular, we show that displacement sensitivity on the order of 1 fm/(Hz)^(1/2) can be achieved while the cantilever stiffness is varied over four orders of magnitude (\\approx 0.01 N/m to \\approx 290 N/m). The ability to transduce both very soft and very stiff cantilevers extends the domain of applicability of this technique, potentially ranging from interrogation of microbiological samples (soft cantilevers) to imaging with high resolution (stiff cantilevers). Along with mechanical frequencies (> 250 kHz) that are much higher than those used in conventional AFM probes of similar stiffness, these results suggest that our cavity optomechanical sensors may have application in a wide variety of hig...

  17. Parametric Optomechanical Oscillations in Two-dimensional Slot-type High-Q Photonic Crystal Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng J.; Stein A.; Li, Y.; Aras, M.S.; Shepard, K.L.; Wong, C.W.

    2012-05-22

    We experimentally demonstrate an optomechanical cavity based on an air-slot photonic crystal cavity with optical quality factor Q{sub o} = 4.2 x 10{sup 4} and a small modal volume of 0.05 cubic wavelengths. The optical mode is coupled with the in-plane mechanical modes with frequencies up to hundreds of MHz. The fundamental mechanical mode shows a frequency of 65 MHz and a mechanical quality factor of 376. The optical spring effect, optical damping, and amplification are observed with a large experimental optomechanical coupling rate g{sub om}/2{pi} of 154 GHz/nm, corresponding to a vacuum optomechanical coupling rate g*/2{pi} of 707 kHz. With sub-mW or less input power levels, the cavity exhibits strong parametric oscillations. The phase noise of the photonic crystal optomechanical oscillator is also measured.

  18. Quantum entanglement and teleportation in pulsed cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Sebastian G. [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Gravitational Physics, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Wieczorek, Witlef; Aspelmeyer, Markus [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Hammerer, Klemens [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Gravitational Physics, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Entangling a mechanical oscillator with an optical mode is an enticing and yet a very challenging goal in cavity optomechanics. Here we consider a pulsed scheme to create Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type entanglement between a traveling-wave light pulse and a mechanical oscillator. The entanglement can be verified unambiguously by a pump-probe sequence of pulses. In contrast to schemes that work in a steady-state regime under a continuous-wave drive, this protocol is not subject to stability requirements that normally limit the strength of achievable entanglement. We investigate the protocol's performance under realistic conditions, including mechanical decoherence, in full detail. We discuss the relevance of a high mechanical Qf product for entanglement creation and provide a quantitative statement on which magnitude of the Qf product is necessary for a successful realization of the scheme. We determine the optimal parameter regime for its operation and show it to work in current state-of-the-art systems.

  19. Ultrahigh-Q optomechanical crystal cavities fabricated in a CMOS foundry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevides, Rodrigo; Santos, Felipe G S; Luiz, Gustavo O; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Alegre, Thiago P Mayer

    2017-05-30

    Photonic crystals use periodic structures to create frequency regions where the optical wave propagation is forbidden, which allows the creation and integration of complex optical functionalities in small footprint devices. Such strategy has also been successfully applied to confine mechanical waves and to explore their interaction with light in the so-called optomechanical cavities. Because of their challenging design, these cavities are traditionally fabricated using dedicated high-resolution electron-beam lithography tools that are inherently slow, limiting this solution to small-scale or research applications. Here we show how to overcome this problem by using a deep-UV photolithography process to fabricate optomechanical crystals in a commercial CMOS foundry. We show that a careful design of the photonic crystals can withstand the limitations of the photolithography process, producing cavities with measured intrinsic optical quality factors as high as Q i  = (1.21 ± 0.02) × 10(6). Optomechanical crystals are also created using phononic crystals to tightly confine the GHz sound waves within the optical cavity, resulting in a measured vacuum optomechanical coupling rate of g 0 = 2π × (91 ± 4) kHz. Efficient sideband cooling and amplification are also demonstrated since these cavities are in the resolved sideband regime. Further improvements in the design and fabrication process suggest that commercial foundry-based optomechanical cavities could be used for quantum ground-state cooling.

  20. Time-Resolved Cavity Nano-Optomechanics in the 20-100 GHz range

    CERN Document Server

    Anguiano, S; Jusserand, B; Favero, I; Lamperti, F R; Lanco, L; Sagnes, I; Lemaître, A; Lanzillotti-Kimura, N D; Senellart, P; Fainstein, A

    2016-01-01

    Applications of cavity optomechanics span from gravitational wave detection to the study of quantum motion states in mesoscopic mechanical systems. The engineering of resonators supporting strongly interacting mechanical and optical modes is central to these developments. However, current technological and experimental approaches limit the accessible mechanical frequencies to a few GHz, imposing hard constraints on quantum mechanical studies. Here we demonstrate the optical control of 20-100~GHz mechanical modes confined in the three dimensions within semiconductor nano-optomechanical pillar cavities. We use a time-resolved transient optical reflectivity technique and access both the energy spectrum and dynamics of the mechanical modes at the picosecond timescale. A strong increase of the optomechanical coupling upon reducing the pillar size is observed together with unprecedent room temperature Q-frequency products above $10^{14}$. The measurements also reveal sideband generation in the optomechanical respon...

  1. Optomechanical oscillator pumped and probed by optically two isolated photonic crystal cavity systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Sumikura, Hisashi; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Takiguchi, Masato; Notomi, Masaya

    2016-11-28

    Optomechanical control of on-chip emitters is an important topic related to integrated all-optical circuits. However, there is neither a realization nor a suitable optomechanical structure for this control. The biggest obstacle is that the emission signal can hardly be distinguished from the pump light because of the several orders' power difference. In this study, we designed and experimentally verified an optomechanical oscillation system, in which a lumped mechanical oscillator connected two optically isolated pairs of coupled one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities. As a functional device, the two pairs of coupled cavities were respectively used as an optomechanical pump for the lumped oscillator (cavity pair II, wavelengths were designed to be within a 1.5 μm band) and a modulation target of the lumped oscillator (cavity pair I, wavelengths were designed to be within a 1.2 μm band). By conducting finite element method simulations, we found that the lumped-oscillator-supported configurations of both cavity pairs enhance the optomechanical interactions, especially for higher order optical modes, compared with their respective conventional side-clamped configurations. Besides the desired first-order in-plane antiphase mechanical mode, other mechanical modes of the lumped oscillator were investigated and found to possibly have optomechanical applications with a versatile degree of freedom. In experiments, the oscillator's RF spectra were probed using both cavity pairs I and II, and the results matched those of the simulations. Dynamic detuning of the optical spectrum of cavity pair I was then implemented with a pumped lumped oscillator. This was the first demonstration of an optomechanical lumped oscillator connecting two optically isolated pairs of coupled cavities, whose biggest advantage is that one cavity pair can be modulated with an lumped oscillator without interference from the pump light in the other cavity pair. Thus, the oscillator is a suitable

  2. Optomechanics in superfluid helium coupled to a fiber-based cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkanova, A. D.; Shkarin, A. B.; Brown, C. D.; Flowers-Jacobs, N. E.; Childress, L.; Hoch, S. W.; Hohmann, L.; Ott, K.; Reichel, J.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2017-03-01

    Presented in this paper are measurements of an optomechanical device in which various acoustic modes of a sample of superfluid helium couple to a fiber-based optical cavity. In contrast with recent work on the paraxial acoustic mode confined by the cavity mirrors (Kashkanova et al Nat. Phys. 2016 (https://doi.org/10.1038/NPHYS3900)), we focus specifically on the acoustic modes associated with the helium surrounding the cavity. This paper provides a framework for understanding how the acoustic modes depend on device geometry. The acoustic modes are observed using the technique of optomechanically induced transparency/amplification. The optomechanical coupling to these modes is found to be predominantly photothermal.

  3. Optomechanically induced transparency in multi-cavity optomechanical system with and without one two-level atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Amjad; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chang-Shui

    2016-06-28

    We analytically study the optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) in the N-cavity system with the Nth cavity driven by pump, probing laser fields and the 1st cavity coupled to mechanical oscillator. We also consider that one atom could be trapped in the ith cavity. Instead of only illustrating the OMIT in such a system, we are interested in how the number of OMIT windows is influenced by the cavities and the atom and what roles the atom could play in different cavities. In the resolved sideband regime, we find that, the number of cavities precisely determines the maximal number of OMIT windows. It is interesting that, when the two-level atom is trapped in the even-labeled cavity, the central absorptive peak (odd N) or dip (even N) is split and forms an extra OMIT window, but if the atom is trapped in the odd-labeled cavity, the central absorptive peak (odd N) or dip (even N) is only broadened and thus changes the width of the OMIT windows rather than induces an extra window.

  4. Design of optomechanical cavities and waveguides on a simultaneous bandgap phononic-photonic crystal slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Painter, Oskar

    2010-07-05

    In this paper we study and design quasi-2D optomechanical crystals, waveguides, and resonant cavities formed from patterned slabs. Two-dimensional periodicity allows for in-plane pseudo-bandgaps in frequency where resonant optical and mechanical excitations localized to the slab are forbidden. By tailoring the unit cell geometry, we show that it is possible to have a slab crystal with simultaneous optical and mechanical pseudo-bandgaps, and for which optical waveguiding is not compromised. We then use these crystals to design optomechanical cavities in which strongly interacting, co-localized photonic-phononic resonances occur. A resonant cavity structure formed by perturbing a ;;linear defect' waveguide of optical and acoustic waves in a silicon optomechanical crystal slab is shown to support an optical resonance at wavelength lambda(0) approximately 1.5 mum and a mechanical resonance of frequency omega(m)/2pi approximately 9.5 GHz. These resonances, due to the simultaneous pseudo-bandgap of the waveguide structure, are simulated to have optical and mechanical radiation-limited Q-factors greater than 10(7). The optomechanical coupling of the optical and acousticresonances in this cavity due to radiation pressure is also studied, with a quantum conversion rate, corresponding to the scattering rate of a single cavity photon via a single cavity phonon, calculated to be g/2pi = 292 kHz.

  5. Narrowing the filter-cavity bandwidth in gravitational-wave detectors via optomechanical interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yiqiu; Danilishin, Shtefan L; Zhao, Chunnong; Miao, Haixing; Korth, W Zach; Chen, Yanbei; Ward, Robert L; Blair, D G

    2014-10-10

    We propose using optomechanical interaction to narrow the bandwidth of filter cavities for achieving frequency-dependent squeezing in advanced gravitational-wave detectors, inspired by the idea of optomechanically induced transparency. This can allow us to achieve a cavity bandwidth on the order of 100 Hz using small-scale cavities. Additionally, in contrast to a passive Fabry-Pérot cavity, the resulting cavity bandwidth can be dynamically tuned, which is useful for adaptively optimizing the detector sensitivity when switching amongst different operational modes. The experimental challenge for its implementation is a stringent requirement for very low thermal noise of the mechanical oscillator, which would need a superb mechanical quality factor and a very low temperature. We consider one possible setup to relieve this requirement by using optical dilution to enhance the mechanical quality factor.

  6. High-mechanical-frequency characteristics of optomechanical crystal cavity with coupling waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhilei; Cui, Kaiyu; Bai, Guoren; Feng, Xue; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanical crystals have attracted great attention recently for their ability to realize strong photon-phonon interaction in cavity optomechanical systems. By far, the operation of cavity optomechanical systems with high mechanical frequency has to employ tapered fibres or one-sided waveguides with circulators to couple the light into and out of the cavities, which hinders their on-chip applications. Here, we demonstrate larger-centre-hole nanobeam structures with on-chip transmission-coupling waveguide. The measured mechanical frequency is up to 4.47 GHz, with a high mechanical Q-factor of 1.4 × 103 in the ambient environment. The corresponding optomechanical coupling rate is calculated and measured to be 836 kHz and 1.2 MHz, respectively, while the effective mass is estimated to be 136 fg. With the transmission waveguide coupled structure and a small footprint of 3.4 μm2, this simple cavity can be directly used as functional components or integrated with other on-chip devices in future practical applications. PMID:27686419

  7. Theory of noiseless phase-mixing amplification in a cavity optomechanical system

    CERN Document Server

    Ockeloen-Korppi, C F; Sillanpää, M A; Massel, F

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the ultimate limits imposed by quantum mechanics on amplification represents an important topic both on a fundamental level and from the perspective of potential applications. We propose here a novel setup for an optomechanical amplifier, constituted by a mechanical resonator dispersively coupled to an optomechanical cavity asymmetrically driven around both mechanical sidebands. We show that, on general grounds, the present amplifier operates in a novel regime-- which we here call phase-mixing amplification. At the same time, for a suitable choice of parameters, the amplifier proposed here operates as a phase-sensitive amplifier. Furthermore, we show that both configurations allow amplification below the standard quantum limit in a parameter range compatible with current experiments in microwave circuit optomechanics.

  8. Applications of High-Q Microresonators in Cavity Optomechanics and Nonlinear Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei C.

    Optical microresonators confining light to small volumes are indispensable for a great variety of studies and applications. This thesis is devoted to a study of cavity optomechanical and nonlinear optical phenomena in high-Q microresonators with different materials and structures. Based on that, it proposes and demonstrates several novel schemes and device platforms that exhibit great potential for various applications ranging from frequency metrology and quantum photonics, to information processing and sensing. The thesis starts with a demonstration of a high-frequency (above 1 GHz) regenerative optomechanical oscillator based on a 2-mum-radius high-Q silicon microdisk resonator in the silicon-on-insulator platform with an ultra-low threshold pump power at room temperature and atmosphere. It then continues to explore the cavity optomechanics in single-crystal lithium niobate. A compact lithium niobate microdisk optomechanical resonator with high optical and mechanical qualities, large optomechanical coupling, and high mechanical frequency is achieved, enabling the demonstration of regenerative oscillation in the ambience. Meanwhile, I propose and investigate a novel approach for single molecule detection that utilizes the optical spring effect in a high-Q coherent optomechanical oscillator to dramatically enhance the sensing resolution by orders of magnitude compared with conventional resonator-based approaches. In particular, a high-Q silica microsphere is employed to experimentally demonstrate the detection of single Bovine Serum Albumin proteins with a molecular weight of 66 kDalton at a signal-to-noise ratio of 16.8. On the other hand, the thesis focuses on the theoretical and experimental investigation of the generation of high-purity bright photon pairs in a silicon microdisk based on the cavity enhanced four-wave mixing. The device is able to produce multiple photon pairs at different wavelengths in the telecom band with a high spectral brightness of 6.24 x

  9. Entanglement of two hybrid optomechanical cavities composed of BEC atoms under Bell detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbali-Arani, M.; Ameri, V.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, firstly, we consider bipartite entanglement between each part of an optomechanical cavity composed of one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). We investigate atomic collision on the behaviour of the BEC in the week photon-atom coupling constant and use Bogoliubov approximation for the BEC. Secondly under above condition, we propose a scheme for entanglement swapping protocol which involves tripartite systems. In our investigation, we consider a scenario where BECs, moving mirrors, and optical cavity modes are given in a Gaussian state with a covariance matrix. By applying the Bell measurement to the output optical field modes, we show how the remote entanglement between two BECs, two moving mirrors, and BEC-mirror modes in different optomechanical cavity can be generated.

  10. Controllable optical response by modifying the gain and loss of a mechanical resonator and cavity mode in an optomechanical system

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yu-Long; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco; Liu, Yu-xi

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study a strongly-driven optomechanical system which consists of a passive optical cavity and an active mechanical resonator. When the optomechanical coupling strength is varied, phase transitions, which are similar those observed in $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric systems, are observed. We show that the optical transmission can be controlled by changing the gain of the mechanical resonator and loss of the optical cavity mode. Especially, we find that: (i) for balanced gain and loss, optical amplification and absorption can be tuned by changing the optomechanical coupling strength through a control field; (ii) for unbalanced gain and loss, even with a tiny mechanical gain, both optomechanically-induced transparency and anomalous dispersion can be observed around a critical point, which exhibits an ultra-long group delay. The time delay $\\tau$ can be optimized by regulating the optomechanical coupling strength through the control field and improved up to several orders of magnitude ($\\tau\\sim2$ $\\math...

  11. Cavity-Optomechanics with Spin-Orbit Coupled Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Yasir, Kashif Ammar

    2015-01-01

    Cavity-optomechanics, an exploitation of mechanical-effects of light to couple optical-field with mechanical-objects, has made remarkable progress. Besides, spin-orbit (SO)-coupling, interaction between spin of a quantum-particle and its momentum, has provided foundation to analyze various phenomena like spin-Hall effect and topological-insulators. However, SO-coupling and corresponding topological-features have not been examined in optical-cavity with one vibrational-mirror. Here we report cavity-optomechanics with SO-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate, inducing non-Abelian gauge-field in cavity. We ascertain the influences of SO-coupling and long-range atomic-interactions on low-temperature dynamics which can be experimentally measured by maneuvering area underneath density-noise spectrum. It is detected that not only optomechanical-coupling is modifying topological properties of atomic dressed-states but SO-coupling induced topological-effects are also enabling us to control effective-temperature of mechanic...

  12. Spin-orbit-coupling-induced backaction cooling in cavity optomechanics with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasir, Kashif Ammar; Zhuang, Lin; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2017-01-01

    We report a spin-orbit-coupling-induced backaction cooling in an optomechanical system, composed of a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in an optical cavity with one movable end mirror, by suppressing heating effects of quantum noises. The collective density excitations of the spin-orbit-coupling-mediated hyperfine states—serving as atomic oscillators equally coupled to the cavity field—trigger strongly driven atomic backaction. We find that the backaction not only revamps low-temperature dynamics of its own but also provides an opportunity to cool the mechanical mirror to its quantum-mechanical ground state. Further, we demonstrate that the strength of spin-orbit coupling also superintends dynamic structure factor and squeezes nonlinear quantum noises, like thermomechanical and photon shot noise, which enhances optomechanical features of the hybrid cavity beyond previous investigations. Our findings are testable in a realistic setup and enhance the functionality of cavity optomechanics with spin-orbit-coupled hyperfine states in the field of quantum optics and quantum computation.

  13. Laser Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Weijian; Ng, Kar Wei; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics explores the coupling between the optical field and the mechanical oscillation to induce cooling and regenerative oscillation in a mechanical oscillator. So far, optomechanics relies on the detuning between the cavity and an external pump laser, where the laser acts only as a power supply. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator that supports a mirror of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and the optical field, greatly enhancing the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we used an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror in a VCSEL, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity with > 550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micro-mechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical. This new scheme not only offers an efficient approach for high-...

  14. Analysis of optomechanical coupling in two-dimensional square lattice phoxonic crystal slab cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jallal, Said; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan; Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Laude, Vincent; Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Martínez, Alejandro; Escalante, José María; Makhoute, Abdelkader

    2013-11-01

    We theoretically investigate phonon-photon interaction in cavities created in a phoxonic crystal slab constituted by a two-dimensional (2D) square array of holes in a silicon membrane. The structure without defects provides 2D band gaps for both electromagnetic and elastic waves. We consider two types of cavities, namely, an L3 cavity (a row of three holes is removed) and a cross-shape cavity, which both possess highly confined phononic and photonic localized modes suitable for enhancing their interaction. In our theoretical study, we take into account two mechanisms that contribute to optomechanical interaction, namely, the photoelastic and the interface motion effects. We show that, depending on the considered pair of photonic and phononic modes, the two mechanisms can have similar or very different magnitudes, and their contributions can be either in or out of phase. We find out that only acoustic modes with a specific symmetry are allowed to couple with photonic cavity modes. The coupling strength is quantified by two different methods. In the first method, we compute a direct estimation of coupling rates by overlap integrals, while in the second one, we analyze the temporal modulation of the resonant photonic frequency by the phonon-induced acoustic vibrational motion during one acoustic period. Interestingly, we obtain high optomechanical interaction, with the coupling rate reaching more than 2.4 MHz for some specific phonon-photon pairs.

  15. Non-classical light generated by quantum-noise-driven cavity optomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Daniel W C; Botter, Thierry; Schreppler, Sydney; Purdy, Thomas P; Brahms, Nathan; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2012-08-23

    Optomechanical systems, in which light drives and is affected by the motion of a massive object, will comprise a new framework for nonlinear quantum optics, with applications ranging from the storage and transduction of quantum information to enhanced detection sensitivity in gravitational wave detectors. However, quantum optical effects in optomechanical systems have remained obscure, because their detection requires the object’s motion to be dominated by vacuum fluctuations in the optical radiation pressure; so far, direct observations have been stymied by technical and thermal noise. Here we report an implementation of cavity optomechanics using ultracold atoms in which the collective atomic motion is dominantly driven by quantum fluctuations in radiation pressure. The back-action of this motion onto the cavity light field produces ponderomotive squeezing. We detect this quantum phenomenon by measuring sub-shot-noise optical squeezing. Furthermore, the system acts as a low-power, high-gain, nonlinear parametric amplifier for optical fluctuations, demonstrating a gain of 20 dB with a pump corresponding to an average of only seven intracavity photons. These findings may pave the way for low-power quantum optical devices, surpassing quantum limits on position and force sensing, and the control and measurement of motion in quantum gases.

  16. Controllable optical response by modifying the gain and loss of a mechanical resonator and cavity mode in an optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Long; Wu, Rebing; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco; Liu, Yu-xi

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study a strongly driven optomechanical system which consists of a passive optical cavity and an active mechanical resonator. When the optomechanical coupling strength is varied, phase transitions, which are similar to those observed in PT -symmetric systems, are observed. We show that the optical transmission can be controlled by changing the gain of the mechanical resonator and loss of the optical cavity mode. Especially, we find that (i) for balanced gain and loss, optical amplification and absorption can be tuned by changing the optomechanical coupling strength through a control field; (ii) for unbalanced gain and loss, even with a tiny mechanical gain, both optomechanically induced transparency and anomalous dispersion can be observed around a critical point, which exhibits an ultralong group delay. The time delay τ can be optimized by regulating the optomechanical coupling strength through the control field, and it can be improved up to several orders of magnitude (τ ˜2 ms ) compared to that of conventional optomechanical systems (τ ˜1 μ s ). The presence of mechanical gain makes the group delay more robust to environmental perturbations. Our proposal provides a powerful platform to control light transport using a PT -symmetric-like optomechanical system.

  17. Tutorial: Opto-mechanical cooling by the back-action of cavity photons

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple classical analysis of light interacting with a Fabry-Perot cavity consisting of a fixed (dielectric) front mirror and a vibrating rear mirror. In the adiabatic approximation, the returning light exhibits sideband symmetry, which will go away once the photon lifetime becomes comparable to or longer than the oscillation period of the rear mirror. When the oscillation period is short compared to the cavity photon lifetime, one must approach the problem differently, treating the vibrating mirror as a scatterer which sends a fraction of the incident light into sideband frequencies. With proper detuning, the cavity's internal radiation pressure could either dampen or amplify the vibrations of the mirror; the former is the physical principle behind opto-mechanical cooling by the back-action of cavity photons.

  18. A scheme for detecting the atom-field coupling constant in the Dicke superradiation regime using hybrid cavity optomechanical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yueming; Liu, Bin; Lian, Jinling; Liang, Jiuqing

    2012-04-23

    We proposed a scheme for detecting the atom-field coupling constant in the Dicke superradiation regime based on a hybrid cavity optomechanical system assisted by an atomic gas. The critical behavior of the Dicke model was obtained analytically using the spin-coherent-state representation. Without regard to the dynamics of cavity field an analytical formula of one-to-one correspondence between movable mirror's steady position and atom-field coupling constant for a given number of atoms is obtained. Thus the atom-field coupling constant can be probed by measuring the movable mirror's steady position, which is another effect of the cavity optomechanics. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  19. Quantum aspects of cavity optomechanics with atomic ensembles and ensemble arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamper-Kurn, Dan

    2012-06-01

    While the motion of a many-atom ensemble of atoms interacting strongly with a single mode of an optical resonator can be devilishly complicated, under favorable conditions, the cavity can be made to interact with and to sense just one, or just a few, normal modes of the gaseous system. This leads to an atoms-based realization of cavity optomechanics, directly analogous to experiments in which one seeks to observe the motion of suspended mirrors, cantilevers, and membranes at the quantum limits of precision. I will discuss our progress toward demonstrating and understanding the distinctively quantum mechanical aspects of both the ``opto'' and ``mechanical'' portions of cavity optomechanical systems. Specifically, I will report on the observation of the ponderomotive squeezing of light by a mechanical oscillator, and of strong motional sideband asymmetry that demonstrates the quantization of collective atomic motion and quantifies the energy flux into the mechanical system due to quantum measurement backaction. I will conclude by describing our approach to realizing strong cavity coupling to a multi-mode mechanical system, specifically to an array of distinguishable mechanical oscillators. [4pt] The work reported in this talk was performed in collaboration with members of my research group, including Thierry Botter, Nathaniel Brahms, Daniel Brooks, Thomas Purdy and Sydney Schreppler, and was supported by the AFOSR and NSF.

  20. Cavity optomechanics with a nonlinear photonic-crystal nanomembrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makles, Kevin; Kuhn, Aurélien; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-ENS-CNRS, Case 74, 4 place Jussieu, F75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Antoni, Thomas [Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures LPN-CNRS, UPR-20, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis, France and Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-ENS-CNRS, Case 74, 4 place Jussieu, F75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Braive, Rémy [Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures LPN-CNRS, UPR-20, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis, France and Université Paris Diderot, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris, Cedex 13 (France); Sagnes, Isabelle; Robert-Philip, Isabelle [Laboratoire de Photonique et Nanostructures LPN-CNRS, UPR-20, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France)

    2014-12-04

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized a nanomembrane which could be used as a moving end mirror of a Fabry-Perot cavity. The high reflectivity and optimized mechanical properties of the membrane should allow us to demonstrate the mechanical ground state of the membrane. As any sub-micron mechanical resonator, our system demonstrates nonlinear dynamical effects. We characterize the mechanical response to a strong pump drive and observe a shift in the oscillation frequency and phase conjugation of the mechanical mode. Such nonlinear effects are expected to play a role in the quantum dynamics of the membrane as well.

  1. Optomechanics of Nanoparticles: Effect of Quantum Fluctuations in Levitating EM Field on Cavity-assisted and Cavity-less Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jazayeri, Amir M

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanics of nanoparticles purports to reach the quantum regime, but experimental evidence suggests otherwise. We believe that the discrepancy is due to the omission of the deleterious effects of the EM field levitating the particle. This letter focuses on quantum fluctuations in the levitating field. In a cavity-assisted system, they lead to fluctuations in the gradient force, and encourage escape of the particle. In a feedback system, they lead to the detector shot noise besides fluctuations in the gradient force and radiation pressure, and render the system very vulnerable to the thermal noise of the feedback circuit.

  2. Controlling the opto-mechanics of a cantilever in an interferometer via cavity loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schmidsfeld, A.; Reichling, M.

    2015-09-01

    In a non-contact atomic force microscope, based on interferometric cantilever displacement detection, the optical return loss of the system is tunable via the distance between the fiber end and the cantilever. We utilize this for tuning the interferometer from a predominant Michelson to a predominant Fabry-Pérot characteristics and introduce the Fabry-Pérot enhancement factor as a quantitative measure for multibeam interference in the cavity. This experimentally easily accessible and adjustable parameter provides a control of the opto-mechanical interaction between the cavity light field and the cantilever. The quantitative assessment of the light pressure acting on the cantilever oscillating in the cavity via the frequency shift allows an in-situ measurement of the cantilever stiffness with remarkable precision.

  3. Controlling the opto-mechanics of a cantilever in an interferometer via cavity loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidsfeld, A. von, E-mail: avonschm@uos.de; Reichling, M., E-mail: reichling@uos.de [Fachbereich Physik, Universität Osnabrück, Barbarastraße 7, 49076 Osnabrück (Germany)

    2015-09-21

    In a non-contact atomic force microscope, based on interferometric cantilever displacement detection, the optical return loss of the system is tunable via the distance between the fiber end and the cantilever. We utilize this for tuning the interferometer from a predominant Michelson to a predominant Fabry-Pérot characteristics and introduce the Fabry-Pérot enhancement factor as a quantitative measure for multibeam interference in the cavity. This experimentally easily accessible and adjustable parameter provides a control of the opto-mechanical interaction between the cavity light field and the cantilever. The quantitative assessment of the light pressure acting on the cantilever oscillating in the cavity via the frequency shift allows an in-situ measurement of the cantilever stiffness with remarkable precision.

  4. Piezoelectric tuning of narrowband perfect plasmonic absorbers via an optomechanic cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ao; Yang, Kecheng; Yu, Hongbin; Tan, Xiaochao; Li, Junyu; Zhou, Lun; Liu, Huan; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Alexander Yutong; Guo, Qiushi; Yi, Fei

    2016-06-15

    Optical antennas enable the control of light-matter interaction on the nanometer scale. Efficient on-chip electrical switching of plasmonic resonances is a crucial step toward the integration of optical antennas into practical optoelectronic circuits. We propose and numerically investigate the on-chip low-voltage linear electrical tuning of a narrowband optical antenna perfect absorber via a piezoelectric optomechanic cavity. Near unity absorption is realized by an array of gold nanostrip antennas separated from a membrane-based deformable backreflector by a small gap. A narrow linewidth of 33 nm at 2.58 μm is realized through the coupling between the plasmonic mode and photonic mode in the cavity-enhanced antenna structure. An aluminum nitride piezoelectric layer enabled efficient actuation of the backreflector and therefore changed the gap size, allowing for the tuning of the spectral absorption. The peak wavelength can be shifted linearly by 250 nm with 10 V of tuning voltage, and the tuning range is not limited by the pull-in effect. The polarization dependence of the nanostrip antenna coupled with the optomechanic cavity allows the use of our device as a voltage tunable polarization control device.

  5. Probing anharmonicity of a quantum oscillator in an optomechanical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latmiral, Ludovico; Armata, Federico; Genoni, Marco G.; Pikovski, Igor; Kim, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    We present a way of measuring with high precision the anharmonicity of a quantum oscillator coupled to an optical field via radiation pressure. Our protocol uses a sequence of pulsed interactions to perform a loop in the phase space of the mechanical oscillator, which is prepared in a thermal state. We show how the optical field acquires a phase depending on the anharmonicity. Remarkably, one only needs small initial cooling of the mechanical motion to probe even small anharmonicities. Finally, by applying tools from quantum estimation theory, we calculate the ultimate bound on the estimation precision posed by quantum mechanics and compare it with the precision obtainable with feasible measurements such as homodyne and heterodyne detection on the cavity field. In particular we demonstrate that homodyne detection is nearly optimal in the limit of a large number of photons of the field and we discuss the estimation precision of small anharmonicities in terms of its signal-to-noise ratio.

  6. Opto-mechanical measurement of micro-trap on atom chip via nonlinear cavity enhanced Raman scattering spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    High-gain resonant nonlinear Raman scattering on trapped cold atoms within a high-fineness ring optical cavity is simply explained under a nonlinear opto-mechanical mechanism, and a proposal using it to detect frequency of micro-trap on atom chip is presented. The enhancement of scattering spectrum is due to coherent Raman conversion between two different cavity modes mediated by collective vibrations of atoms through nonlinear opto-mechanical couplings. The physical conditions of this technique are roughly estimated on Rubidium atoms, and a simple quantum analysis as well as a multi-body semiclassical simulation on this nonlinear Raman process is conducted.

  7. A picogram- and nanometre-scale photonic-crystal optomechanical cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenfield, Matt; Camacho, Ryan; Chan, Jasper; Vahala, Kerry J; Painter, Oskar

    2009-05-28

    The dynamic back-action caused by electromagnetic forces (radiation pressure) in optical and microwave cavities is of growing interest. Back-action cooling, for example, is being pursued as a means of achieving the quantum ground state of macroscopic mechanical oscillators. Work in the optical domain has revolved around millimetre- or micrometre-scale structures using the radiation pressure force. By comparison, in microwave devices, low-loss superconducting structures have been used for gradient-force-mediated coupling to a nanomechanical oscillator of picogram mass. Here we describe measurements of an optical system consisting of a pair of specially patterned nanoscale beams in which optical and mechanical energies are simultaneously localized to a cubic-micron-scale volume, and for which large per-photon optical gradient forces are realized. The resulting scale of the per-photon force and the mass of the structure enable the exploration of cavity optomechanical regimes in which, for example, the mechanical rigidity of the structure is dominantly provided by the internal light field itself. In addition to precision measurement and sensitive force detection, nano-optomechanics may find application in reconfigurable and tunable photonic systems, light-based radio-frequency communication and the generation of giant optical nonlinearities for wavelength conversion and optical buffering.

  8. Non-linear mixing in coupled photonic crystal nanobeam cavities due to cross-coupling opto-mechanical mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.ramos@csic.es; Frank, Ian W.; Deotare, Parag B.; Bulu, Irfan; Lončar, Marko [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    We investigate the coupling between mechanical and optical modes supported by coupled, freestanding, photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. We show that localized cavity modes for a given gap between the nanobeams provide weak optomechanical coupling with out-of-plane mechanical modes. However, we show that the coupling can be significantly increased, more than an order of magnitude for the symmetric mechanical mode, due to optical resonances that arise from the interaction of the localized cavity modes with standing waves formed by the reflection from thesubstrate. Finally, amplification of motion for the symmetric mode has been observed and attributed to the strong optomechanical interaction of our hybrid system. The amplitude of these self-sustained oscillations is large enough to put the system into a non-linear oscillation regime where a mixing between the mechanical modes is experimentally observed and theoretically explained.

  9. Design of a quasi-2D photonic crystal optomechanical cavity with tunable, large $x^2$-coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaee, Mahmoud; Pfeifer, Hannes; Painter, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    We present the optical and mechanical design of a mechanically compliant quasi-two-dimensional photonic crystal cavity formed from thin-film silicon in which a pair of linear nanoscale slots are used to create two coupled high-$Q$ optical resonances. The optical cavity supermodes, whose frequencies are designed to lie in the $1500$~nm wavelength band, are shown to interact strongly with mechanical resonances of the structure whose frequencies range from a few MHz to a few GHz. Depending upon the symmetry of the mechanical modes and the symmetry of the slot sizes, we show that the optomechanical coupling between the optical supermodes can be either linear or quadratic in the mechanical displacement amplitude. Tuning of the nanoscale slot size is also shown to adjust the magnitude and sign of the cavity supermode splitting $2J$, enabling near-resonant motional scattering between the two optical supermodes and greatly enhancing the $x^2$-coupling strength. Specifically, for the fundamental flexural mode of the c...

  10. Position-squared coupling in a tunable photonic crystal optomechanical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Paraiso, Taofiq K; Zang, Leyun; Pfeifer, Hannes; Marquardt, Florian; Painter, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of a planar silicon photonic crystal cavity in which large position-squared optomechanical coupling is realized. The device consists of a double-slotted photonic crystal structure in which motion of a central beam mode couples to two high-Q optical modes localized around each slot. Electrostatic tuning of the structure is used to controllably hybridize the optical modes into supermodes which couple in a quadratic fashion to the motion of the beam. From independent measurements of the anti-crossing of the optical modes and of the optical spring effect, the position-squared vacuum coupling rate is measured to be as large as 245 Hz to the fundamental in-plane mechanical resonance of the structure at 8.7MHz, which in displacement units corresponds to a coupling coefficient of 1 THz/nm$^2$. This level of position-squared coupling is approximately five orders of magnitude larger than in conventional Fabry-Perot cavity systems.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of cavity creating mutations in an engineered leucine zipper and energetics of glycerol-induced coiled coil stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, E; Jelesarov, I

    2000-04-18

    Protein stability in vitro can be influenced either by introduction of mutations or by changes in the chemical composition of the solvent. Recently, we have characterized the thermodynamic stability and the rate of folding of the engineered dimeric leucine zipper A(2), which has a strengthened hydrophobic core [Dürr, E., Jelesarov, I., and Bosshard, H. R. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 870-880]. Here we report on the energetic consequences of a cavity introduced by Leu/Ala substitution at the tightly packed dimeric interface and how addition of 30% glycerol affects the folding thermodynamics of A(2) and the cavity mutants. Folding could be described by a two-state transition from two unfolded monomers to a coiled coil dimer. Removal of six methylene groups by Leu/Ala substitutions destabilized the dimeric coiled coil by 25 kJ mol(-1) at pH 3.5 and 25 degrees C in aqueous buffer. Destabilization was purely entropic at around room temperature and became increasingly enthalpic at elevated temperatures. Mutations were accompanied by a decrease of the unfolding heat capacity by 0.5 kJ K(-1) mol(-1). Addition of 30% glycerol increased the free energy of folding of A(2) and the cavity mutants by 5-10 kJ mol(-1) and lowered the unfolding heat capacity by 25% for A(2) and by 50% for the Leu/Ala mutants. The origin of the stabilizing effect of glycerol varied with temperature. Stabilization of the parent leucine zipper A(2) was enthalpic with an unfavorable entropic component between 0 and 100 degrees C. In the case of cavity mutants, glycerol induced enthalpic stabilization below 50 degrees C and entropic stabilization above 50 degrees C. The effect of glycerol could not be accounted for solely by the enthalpy and entropy of transfer or protein surface from water to glycerol/water mixture. We propose that in the presence of glycerol the folded coiled coil dimer is better packed and displays less intramolecular fluctuations, leading to enhanced enthalpic interactions and to an

  12. 腔光力学系统中的量子测量∗%Quantum measurement with cavity optomechanical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雪; 刘晓威; 张可烨; 袁春华; 张卫平

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanics originates from the research of interferometric detection of gravitational waves, and later it has become a fast-growing area of techniques and approaches ranging from the fields of atomic, molecular, and optical physics to nano-science and condensed matter physics as well. Recently, it focused on the exploration of operating mechanical oscillators deep in the quantum regime, with an interest ranging from quantum-classical interface tests to high-precision quantum metrology. In this paper, recent theoretical work of our group in the field of quantum measurement with cavity optomechanical systems is reviewed. We explore the quantum measurement theory and its applications with several unconventional cavity optomechanical schemes working in the quantum regime. This review covers the basics of quantum noises in the cavity optomechanical setups and the resulting standard quantum limit of precision displacement and force measurement. Three novel quantum measurement proposals based on the hybrid optomechanical system are introduced. First, we describe a quantum back-action insulated weak force sensor. It is realized by forming a quantum-mechanics-free subsystem with two optomechanical oscillators of reversed effective mass. Then we introduce a role-reversed atomic optomechanical system which enables the preparation and the quantum tomography of a variety of non-classical states of atoms. In this system, the cavity field acts as a mechanical oscillator driven by the radiation pressure force from an ultracold atomic field. In the end, we recommend a multimode optomechanical transducer that can detect intensities significantly below the single-photon level via adiabatic transfer of the microwave signal to the optical frequency domain. These proposals demonstrate the possible applications of optomechanical devices in understanding of quantum-classical crossover and in achieving quantum measurement limit.%腔光力学系统近年来迅猛发展,在精

  13. Strong optomechanical coupling in a slotted photonic crystal nanobeam cavity with an ultrahigh quality factor-to-mode volume ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of a one-dimensional silicon photonic crystal cavity in which a central slot is used to enhance the overlap between highly localized optical and mechanical modes. The optical mode has an extremely small mode volume of 0.017 $(\\lambda_{vac}/n)^3$, and an optomechanical vacuum coupling rate of 310 kHz is measured. With optical quality factors up to $1.2 \\cdot 10^5$, fabricated devices are in the resolved-sideband regime. The electric field has its maximum at the slot wall and couples to the in-plane breathing motion of the slot. The optomechanical coupling is thus dominated by the moving-boundary effect, which we simulate to be six times greater than the photoelastic effect, in contrast to most structures, where the photoelastic effect is often the primary coupling mechanism.

  14. A millikelvin all-fiber cavity optomechanical apparatus for merging with ultra-cold atoms in a hybrid quantum system

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Hai; Schwarz, Alexander; Wiesendanger, Roland; Christoph, Philipp; Wagner, Tobias; Bick, Andreas; Staarmann, Christina; Abeln, Benjamin; Sengstock, Klaus; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We describe the construction of an apparatus designed to realize a hybrid quantum system comprised of a cryogenically cooled mechanical oscillator and ultra-cold $^{87}$Rb atoms coupled via light. The outstanding feature of our instrument is an in-situ adjustable asymmetric all-fiber membrane-in-the-middle cavity located inside an ultra-high vacuum dilution refrigerator based cryostat. We show that Bose-Einstein condensates of $N=2\\times10^6$ atoms can be produced in less than 20 s and demonstrate a single photon optomechanical coupling strength of $g_0=2\\pi\\times9$ kHz employing a high-stress Si$_3$N$_4$ membrane with a mechanical quality factor $Q_{\\rm m}>10^7$ at a cavity set-up temperature of $T_{\\rm MiM}=480$ mK.

  15. Dissipative structures in an optomechanical cavity model with a microstructured oscillating end mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz-Rivas, J; Roldán, Eugenio; de Valcárcel, Germán J

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically consider the possibility of generating nonlinear transverse patterns in an optomechanical system in which the mechanical element is a microstructured oscillating end-mirrror consisting in an array of weakly-coupled micromirrors. While in the limit of large number of micro-mirrors we naturally recover the continuous model that we recently studied in [Ruiz-Rivas et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 033850 (2015)], we pay special numerical attention to the opposite limit, showing that the structures predicted with the continuous model can be observed for a number of micro-mirrors as low as ten or less. This opens new venues for experimental approaches to the subject.

  16. An optomechanical elevator: Transport of a Bloch oscillating Bose-Einstein condensate up and down an optical lattice by cavity sideband amplification and cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Venkatesh, B Prasanna; Goldwin, J

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the optomechanics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate interacting with the optical lattice inside a laser-pumped optical cavity and subject to a uniform bias force such as gravity. An atomic wave packet in a tilted lattice undergoes Bloch oscillations; in a cavity the backaction of the atoms on the light leads to a time-dependent modulation of the intracavity lattice at the Bloch frequency. When the Bloch frequency is on the order of the cavity damping rate we find transport of the atoms either up or down the lattice. The transport dynamics can be interpreted as a manifestation of dynamical backaction-induced sideband damping/amplification of the optomechanical Bloch oscillator. Depending on the sign of the pump-cavity detuning, atoms are transported either with or against the bias force accompanied by an up- or down-conversion of the frequency of the pump laser light. We also evaluate the prospects for using the optomechanical Bloch oscillator to make continuous measurements of forces by reading...

  17. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  18. An Optomechanical Elevator: Transport of a Bloch Oscillating Bose–Einstein Condensate up and down an Optical Lattice by Cavity Sideband Amplification and Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Prasanna Venkatesh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we give a new description, in terms of optomechanics, of previous work on the problem of an atomic Bose–Einstein condensate interacting with the optical lattice inside a laser-pumped optical cavity and subject to a bias force, such as gravity. An atomic wave packet in a tilted lattice undergoes Bloch oscillations; in a high-finesse optical cavity the backaction of the atoms on the light leads to a time-dependent modulation of the intracavity lattice depth at the Bloch frequency which can in turn transport the atoms up or down the lattice. In the optomechanical picture, the transport dynamics can be interpreted as a manifestation of dynamical backaction-induced sideband damping/amplification of the Bloch oscillator. Depending on the sign of the pump-cavity detuning, atoms are transported either with or against the bias force accompanied by an up- or down-conversion of the frequency of the pump laser light. We also evaluate the prospects for using the optomechanical Bloch oscillator to make continuous measurements of forces by reading out the Bloch frequency. In this context, we establish the significant result that the optical spring effect is absent and the Bloch frequency is not modified by the backaction.

  19. Thin film superfluid optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, Christopher G; McAuslan, David L; Sachkou, Yauhen; He, Xin; Bowen, Warwick P

    2016-01-01

    Excitations in superfluid helium represent attractive mechanical degrees of freedom for cavity optomechanics schemes. Here we numerically and analytically investigate the properties of optomechanical resonators formed by thin films of superfluid $^4$He covering micrometer-scale whispering gallery mode cavities. We predict that through proper optimization of the interaction between film and optical field, large optomechanical coupling rates $g_0>2\\pi \\times 100$ kHz and single photon cooperativities $C_0>10$ are achievable. Our analytical model reveals the unconventional behaviour of these thin films, such as thicker and heavier films exhibiting smaller effective mass and larger zero point motion. The optomechanical system outlined here provides access to unusual regimes such as $g_0>\\Omega_M$ and opens the prospect of laser cooling a liquid into its quantum ground state.

  20. Collapse-revival in entanglement and photon statistics: the interaction of a three-level atom with a two-mode quantized field in cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani Nadiki, M.; Tavassoly, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper the interaction of a three-level atom in V-configuration with a two-mode quantized field in cavity optomechanics is studied. To achieve the purpose, we first deduce the effective Hamiltonian and evaluate the explicit time-dependent form of the state vector of the whole system by choosing special initial conditions for atom, field and the oscillatory mirror. Interestingly, we can obtain the time evolution of atomic linear entropy, population inversion, quantum statistics and squeezing, both analytically and numerically. The results show that the entanglement between the atom and the subsystem of field and mirror, and all above-mentioned physical quantities can be appropriately controlled by the initial atom-field state condition, the parameters of cavity optomechanics as well as atom-field coupling strengths. In particular, the appearance of collapse-revival phenomenon in the entanglement and quantum photon statistics, also the full sub-Poissonian statistics in the two modes of field as well as in the mechanical mode of optomechanical system are noticeable features of the work.

  1. Recent progress in opto-mechanical design of cavity developed for the OSQAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macúchová, Karolina; Hošek, Jan; Němcová, Šárka; &šulc, Miroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2013-05-01

    Two optical methods are used in the laser-based experiment OSQAR at CERN for the search of axions and axion-like particles. The first method looks as light shining through the wall. The second one wants to measure the ultra-fine vacuum magnetic birefringence. Both methods have reached its attainable limits of sensitivity. Present work is focused on increasing the number of photons and their endurance time within the magnetic field using a laser cavity. Presented paper covers recent state of development of a prototype of a 1 meter long laser cavity which is the prerequisite of further development of the experiment.

  2. Quantum Theory of Continuum Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rakich, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We present the basic ingredients of continuum optomechanics, i.e. the suitable extension of cavity-optomechanical concepts to the interaction of photons and phonons in an extended waveguide. We introduce a real-space picture and argue which coupling terms may arise in leading order in the spatial derivatives. This picture allows us to discuss quantum noise, dissipation, and the correct boundary conditions at the waveguide entrance. The connections both to optomechanical arrays as well as to the theory of Brillouin scattering in waveguides are highlighted. We identify the 'strong coupling regime' of continuum optomechanics that may be accessible in future experiments.

  3. Two-Dimensional Phononic-Photonic Band Gap Optomechanical Crystal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.; Hill, Jeff T.; Meenehan, Seán; Chan, Jasper; Gröblacher, Simon; Painter, Oskar

    2014-04-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of an artificial crystal structure formed from a thin film of silicon that has a full phononic band gap for microwave X-band phonons and a two-dimensional pseudo-band gap for near-infrared photons. An engineered defect in the crystal structure is used to localize optical and mechanical resonances in the band gap of the planar crystal. Two-tone optical spectroscopy is used to characterize the cavity system, showing a large coupling (g0/2π≈220 kHz) between the fundamental optical cavity resonance at ωo/2π =195 THz and colocalized mechanical resonances at frequency ωm/2π ≈9.3 GHz.

  4. Ground-state cooling of a nanomechanical resonator via single-polariton optomechanics in a coupled quantum-dot-cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ben-yuan; Li, Gao-xiang

    2016-09-01

    We propose a rapid ground-state optomechanical cooling scheme in a hybrid system, where a two-level quantum dot (QD) is placed in a single-mode cavity and a nanomechanical resonator (NMR) is also coupled to the cavity via radiation pressure. The cavity is driven by a weak laser field while the QD is driven by another weak laser field. Due to the quantum destructive interference arisen from different transition channels induced by simultaneously driving the QD-cavity system in terms of the two different lasers, two-photon absorption for the cavity field can be effectively eliminated by performing an optimal quantum interference condition. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the QD-cavity system can be unbalancedly prepared in two single-polariton states with different eigenenergies. If the frequency of the NMR is tuned to be resonant with transition between two single-polariton states, it is found that a fast ground-state cooling for the NMR can also be achieved, even when the QD-cavity system is originally in the moderate-coupling regime. Thus the present ground-state cooling scheme for the NMR may be realized with currently available experimental technology.

  5. Active optomechanics through relaxation oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Princepe, Debora; Frateschi, Newton

    2014-01-01

    We propose an optomechanical laser based on III-V compounds which exhibits self-pulsation in the presence of a dissipative optomechanical coupling. In such a laser cavity, radiation pressure drives the mechanical degree of freedom and its back-action is caused by the mechanical modulation of the cavity loss rate. Our numerical analysis shows that even in a wideband gain material, such dissipative coupling couples the mechanical oscillation with the laser relaxation oscillations process. Laser self-pulsation is observed for mechanical frequencies below the laser relaxation oscillation frequency under sufficiently high optomechanical coupling factor.

  6. Generalized optomechanics and its applications quantum optical properties of generalized optomechanical system

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jin Jin

    2013-01-01

    A mechanical oscillator coupled to the optical field in a cavity is a typical cavity optomechanical system. In our textbook, we prepare to introduce the quantum optical properties of optomechanical system, i.e. linear and nonlinear effects. Some quantum optical devices based on optomechanical system are also presented in the monograph, such as the Kerr modulator, quantum optical transistor, optomechanical mass sensor, and so on. But most importantly, we extend the idea of typical optomechanical system to coupled mechanical resonator system and demonstrate that the combined two-level structure

  7. Nonlinear optomechanics with graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Airlia; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Wang, Ke; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    To date, studies of cavity optomechanics have been limited to exploiting the linear interactions between the light and mechanics. However, investigations of quantum signal transduction, quantum enhanced metrology and manybody physics with optomechanics each require strong, nonlinear interactions. Graphene nanomembranes are an exciting prospect for realizing such studies due to their inherently nonlinear nature and low mass. We fabricate large graphene nanomembranes and study their mechanical and optical properties. By using dark ground imaging techniques, we correlate their eigenmode shapes with the measured dissipation. We study their hysteretic response present even at low driving amplitudes, and their nonlinear dissipation. Finally, we discuss ongoing efforts to use these resonators for studies of quantum optomechanics and force sensing. This work is supported by the DARPA QuASAR program through a Grant from the ARO.

  8. Stimulated Cavity-Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Bahl, Gaurav; Tomes, Matthew; Carmon, Tal

    2011-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin interaction between sound and light, known to be the strongest optical nonlinearity common to all amorphous and crystalline dielectrics, has been widely studied in fibers and bulk materials but rarely in optical microresonators. The possibility of experimentally extending this principle to excite mechanical resonances in photonic microsystems, for sensing and frequency reference applications, has remained largely unexplored. The challenge lies in the fact that microresonators inherently have large free spectral range, while the phase matching considerations for the Brillouin process require optical modes of nearby frequencies but with different wavevectors. We rely on high-order transverse optical modes to relax this limitation. Here we report on the experimental excitation of mechanical resonances ranging from 49 to 1400 MHz by using forward Brillouin scattering. These natural mechanical resonances are excited in ~100 um silica microspheres, and are of a surface-acoustic whispering-galle...

  9. Response of a mechanical oscillator in an optomechanical cavity driven by a finite bandwidth squeezed vacuum excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Lotfipour, H.; Shahidani, S.; Roknizadeh, R.; M. H. Naderi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the displacement and momentum fluctuations spectra of the movable mirror in a standard optomechanical system driven by a finite bandwidth squeezed vacuum light accompanying a coherent laser field. Two cases in which the squeezed vacuum is generated by degenerated and non-degenerate parametric oscillators (DPO and NDPO) are considered. We find that for the case of finite bandwidth squeezed vacuum injection, the two spectra exhibit unique features, wh...

  10. Optomechanically induced transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Weis, S; Deleglise, S; Gavartin, E; Arcizet, O; Schliesser, A; Kippenberg, T J

    2010-01-01

    Coherent interaction of laser radiation with multilevel atoms and molecules can lead to quantum interference in the electronic excitation pathways. A prominent example observed in atomic three-level-systems is the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), in which a control laser induces a narrow spectral transparency window for a weak probe laser beam. The concomitant rapid variation of the refractive index in this spectral window can give rise to dramatic reduction of the group velocity of a propagating pulse of probe light. Dynamic control of EIT via the control laser enables even a complete stop, that is, storage, of probe light pulses in the atomic medium. Here, we demonstrate optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT)--formally equivalent to EIT--in a cavity optomechanical system operating in the resolved sideband regime. A control laser tuned to the lower motional sideband of the cavity resonance induces a dipole-like interaction of optical and mechanical degrees of freedom. Under...

  11. Linear Amplifier Model for Optomechanical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Botter, Thierry; Brahms, Nathan; Schreppler, Sydney; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2011-01-01

    We model optomechanical systems as linear optical amplifiers. This provides a unified treatment of diverse optomechanical phenomena. We emphasize, in particular, the relationship between ponderomotive squeezing and optomechanically induced transparency, two foci of current research. We characterize the amplifier response to quantum and deliberately applied fluctuations, both optical and mechanical. Further, we apply these results to establish quantum limits on external force sensing both on and off cavity resonance. We find that the maximum sensitivity attained on resonance constitutes an absolute upper limit, not surpassed when detuning off cavity resonance. The theory can be extended to a two-sided cavity with losses and limited detection efficiency.

  12. Optomechanical laser cooling with mechanical modulations

    OpenAIRE

    Bienert, Marc; Barberis-Blostein, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically study the laser cooling of cavity optomechanics when the mechanical resonance frequency and damping depend on time. In the regime of weak optomechanical coupling we extend the theory of laser cooling using an adiabatic approximation. We discuss the modifications of the cooling dynamics and compare it with numerical simulations in a wide range of modulation frequencies.

  13. Squeezed light in optomechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, G. I.; Taylor, M. A.; Hoff, Ulrich Busk

    2012-01-01

    Squeezed light enhanced optomechanical measurements are demonstrated in both intra-cavity and biological contexts, with respective enhancements of 1.0 and 2.7 dB. Quantum enhanced microrheology of the cytoplasm of a yeast cell is thereby realized.......Squeezed light enhanced optomechanical measurements are demonstrated in both intra-cavity and biological contexts, with respective enhancements of 1.0 and 2.7 dB. Quantum enhanced microrheology of the cytoplasm of a yeast cell is thereby realized....

  14. Dispersive interaction of a Bose-Einstein condensate with a movable mirror of an optomechanical cavity in the presence of laser phase noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalafi, A.; Naderi, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the dispersive interaction of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) trapped inside an optomechanical cavity with a moving end mirror in the presence of the laser phase noise (LPN) as well as the atomic collisions. We assume that the effective frequency of the optical mode is much greater than those of the mechanical and the Bogoliubov modes of the movable mirror and the BEC. In the adiabatic approximation where the damping rate of the cavity is faster than those of the other modes, the system behaves as an effective two-mode model in which the atomic and mechanical modes are coupled to each other through the mediation of the optical field by an effective coupling parameter. We show that in the effective two-mode model, the LPN appears as a classical stochastic pump term which drives the amplitude quadratures of the mechanical and the Bogoliubov modes. It is also shown that a strong stationary mirror-atom entanglement can be established just in the dispersive and Doppler regimes where the two modes come into resonance with each other and the effect of the LPN gets very small.

  15. Semiconductor Nanomembranes for Quantum Photonics: Quantum Light Sources and Optomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jin

    and optomechanical nanomembranes for cavity cooling experiments. For PC cavities, several important processes have been extensively optimized such as the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) dry etch, the release of the membranes and the post-cleaning of the samples. GaAs optomechanical nanomembranes with a world......-record mechanical Q-factor up to 1 million have been fabricated with two step selective wet etches. These optomechanical naonmembranes exhibit superb performances in cavity optomechanical cooling experiments in which a mechanical mode has been cooled from room temperature to 4 K. The interaction between single...

  16. A cavity-Cooper pair transistor scheme for investigating quantum optomechanics in the ultra-strong coupling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimberg, A. J.; Blencowe, M. P.; Armour, A. D.; Nation, P. D.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a scheme involving a Cooper pair transistor (CPT) embedded in a superconducting microwave cavity, where the CPT serves as a charge tunable quantum inductor to facilitate ultra-strong coupling between photons in the cavity and a nano- to meso-scale mechanical resonator. The mechanical resonator is capacitively coupled to the CPT, such that mechanical displacements of the resonator cause a shift in the CPT inductance and hence the cavity's resonant frequency. The amplification provided by the CPT is sufficient for the zero point motion of the mechanical resonator alone to cause a significant change in the cavity resonance. Conversely, a single photon in the cavity causes a shift in the mechanical resonator position on the order of its zero point motion. As a result, the cavity-Cooper pair transistor coupled to a mechanical resonator will be able to access a regime in which single photons can affect single phonons and vice versa. Realizing this ultra-strong coupling regime will facilitate the creation of non-classical states of the mechanical resonator, as well as the means to accurately characterize such states by measuring the cavity photon field.

  17. Optomechanical coupling between two optical cavities: cooling of a micro-mirror and parametric normal mode splitting

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Tarun; ManMohan,

    2011-01-01

    We propose a technique aimed at cooling a harmonically oscillating mirror mechanically coupled to another vibrating mirror to its quantum mechanical ground state. Our method involves optmechanical coupling between two optical cavities. We show that the cooling can be controlled by the mechanical coupling strength between the two movable mirrors, the phase difference between the mechanical modes of the two oscillating mirrors and the photon number in each cavity. We also show that both mechanical and optical cooling can be achieved by transferring energy from one cavity to the other. We also analyze the occurrence of normal-mode splitting (NMS). We find that a hybridization of the two oscillating mirrors with the fluctuations of the two driving optical fields occurs and leads to a splitting of the mechanical and optical fluctuation spectra.

  18. Photon-phonon transfer and ground state cooling in detuning optomechanical cavity%失谐力光系统中的光子-声子转换和基态冷却

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华俊; 米贤武

    2012-01-01

    研究由辐射压力引起的Fabry-Perot力光腔中的动力学行为.从力光系统的哈密顿量出发,探讨在失谐的条件下力光腔中的量子现象.引入散射矩阵方案来论证光子和声子以有效并且可逆的方式转换.这对于光学光子和微机械阵子之间的量子态的转变提供了一个可行的方案.光声转变预示着一种可行的量子光学器件.同时我们用量子郎之万方法和主方程方法这两种方法推导最终声子占有数来研究机械振子的基态冷却,并且对这两种方法进行了参数比较.得出在什么条件下哪种方法更实用.%Optomechanical dynamics induced by radiation pressure is investigated in Fabry-Perot cavity optomechanical system. We start from the Hamiltonian of the optomechanical system at the condition of detuned to study the quantum phenomenon in the optomechanical cavity. A scattering matrix formulation which demonstrates the converting photons to phonons in an efficient and reversible manner is introduced. This provides a feasible route towards quantum state transfer between optical photons and micromechanical resonators. The phonon-photon transfer maybe suggests a possible quantum optical device. Meanwhile, two methods which are quantum Langevin approximate and a master-equation approach are considered to investigate the ground state cooling, and we compare the two methods. Our results showed which scheme is practical under what conditions.

  19. A short walk through quantum optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meystre, Pierre [Department of Physics and College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona (United States)

    2013-03-15

    This paper gives a brief review of the basic physics of quantum optomechanics and provides an overview of some of its recent developments and current areas of focus. It first outlines the basic theory of cavity optomechanical cooling and gives a brief status report of the experimental state-of-the-art. It then turns to the deep quantum regime of operation of optomechanical oscillators and covers selected aspects of quantum state preparation, control and characterization, including mechanical squeezing and pulsed optomechanics. This is followed by a discussion of the ''bottom-up'' approach that exploits ultracold atomic samples instead of nanoscale systems. It concludes with an outlook that concentrates largely on the functionalization of quantum optomechanical systems and their promise in metrology applications. (copyright 2012 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Sensitivity of optical mass sensor enhanced by optomechanical coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yong, E-mail: hey@cczu.edu.cn [School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China)

    2015-03-23

    Optical mass sensors based on cavity optomechanics employ radiation pressure force to drive mechanical resonator whose mechanical susceptibility can be described by nonlinear optical transmission spectrum. In this paper, we present an optical mass sensor based on a two-cavity optomechanical system where the mechanical damping rate can be decreased by adjusting a pump power so that the mass sensitivity which depends on the mechanical quality factor has been enhanced greatly. Compared with that of an optical mass sensor based on single-cavity optomechanics, the mass sensitivity of the optical mass sensor is improved by three orders of magnitude. This is an approach to enhance the mass sensitivity by means of optomechanical coupling, which is suitable for all mass sensor based on cavity optomechanics. Finally, we illustrate the accurate measurement for the mass of a few chromosomes, which can be achieved based on the current experimental conditions.

  1. Feedback-enhanced sensitivity in optomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, Glen I.; Andersen, Ulrik L.; Knittel, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The intracavity power, and hence sensitivity, of optomechanical sensors is commonly limited by parametric instability. Here we characterize the degradation of sensitivity induced by parametric instability in a micron-scale cavity optomechanical system. Feedback via optomechanical transduction...... and electrical gradient force actuation is applied to suppress the parametric instability. As a result a 5.4-fold increase in mechanical motion transduction sensitivity is achieved to a final value of 1.9×10-18 mHz-1/2....

  2. Using reservoir-engineering to convert a coherent signal in optomechanics with small optomechanical cooperativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tao, E-mail: suiyueqiaoqiao@163.com [Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Ministry of Education, and College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); College of Physics, Tonghua Normal University, Tonghua 134000 (China); Wang, Tie [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Fu, Changbao [College of Physics, Tonghua Normal University, Tonghua 134000 (China); Su, Xuemei, E-mail: suxm@jlu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Ministry of Education, and College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2017-05-10

    Optomechanical dark mode plays a central role in effective mechanically-mediated conversion of two different cavity fields. In this paper, we present a more efficient method to utilize the dark mode to transfer a coherent signal. When an auxiliary cavity mode is exploited, two approaches are proposed to effectively eliminate the optomechanical bright mode, and only the optomechanical dark mode is left to facilitate state transfer. Even with small cooperativity and different losses for the two target modes, the internal cavity mode-conversion efficiency can also reach unity. - Highlights: • Reservoir-engineering is used for state conversion. • The optomechanical bright mode can be absolutely eliminated. • Small cooperativity and different losses are feasible for ideal conversion efficiency.

  3. High-Q optomechanical GaAs nanomembranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jin; Usami, K.; Naesby, A.;

    2011-01-01

    be incorporated in macroscopic optical cavities for quantum optomechanics experiments. We have measured the mechanical mode spectrum and spatial profiles and find good agreements with theory. Our work paves the way for optomechanical experiments with direct band gap semiconductors in which not only radiation...

  4. Phase-controlled Fano resonance by the nanoscale optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jian-Qi; Xia, Keyu; Dai, Zhi-Ping; Yang, Wen; Gong, Shangqing; Feng, Mang

    2014-01-01

    Observation of the Fano line shapes is essential to understand properties of the Fano resonance in different physical systems. We explore a tunable Fano resonance by tuning the phase shift in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) based on a single-mode nano-optomechanical cavity. The Fano resonance is resulted from the optomechanically induced transparency caused by a nano-mechanical resonator and can be tuned by applying an optomechanical MZI. By tuning the phase shift in one arm of the MZI, we can observe the periodically varying line shapes of the Fano resonance, which represents an elaborate manipulation of the Fano resonance in the nanoscale optomechanics.

  5. Ultrafast optomechanical pulse picking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfein, Nikolai; Holzberger, Simon; Pupeza, Ioachim

    2017-01-01

    State-of-the-art optical switches for coupling pulses into and/or out of resonators are based on either the electro-optic or the acousto-optic effect in transmissive elements. In high-power applications, the damage threshold and other nonlinear and thermal effects in these elements impede further improvements in pulse energy, duration, and average power. We propose a new optomechanical switching concept which is based solely on reflective elements and is suitable for switching times down to the ten-nanosecond range. To this end, an isolated section of a beam path is moved in a system comprising mirrors rotating at a high angular velocity and stationary imaging mirrors, without affecting the propagation of the beam thereafter. We discuss three variants of the concept and exemplify practical parameters for its application in regenerative amplifiers and stack-and-dump enhancement cavities. We find that optomechanical pulse picking has the potential to achieve switching rates of up to a few tens of kilohertz while supporting pulse energies of up to several joules.

  6. Enhanced optomechanical readout using optical coalescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genes, Claudiu; Xuereb, André; Pupillo, Guido;

    2013-01-01

    We present a scheme to strongly enhance the readout sensitivity of the squared displacement of a mobile scatterer placed in a Fabry-Pérot cavity. We investigate the largely unexplored regime of cavity electrodynamics in which a highly reflective element positioned between the end mirrors of a sym...... in this generic “optical coalescence” phenomenon gives rise to an enhanced frequency shift of the peaks of the cavity transmission that can be exploited in optomechanics....

  7. A microchip optomechanical accelerometer

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Alexander G; Blasius, Tim D; Lin, Qiang; Painter, Oskar

    2012-01-01

    The monitoring of accelerations is essential for a variety of applications ranging from inertial navigation to consumer electronics. The basic operation principle of an accelerometer is to measure the displacement of a flexibly mounted test mass; sensitive displacement measurement can be realized using capacitive, piezo-electric, tunnel-current, or optical methods. While optical readout provides superior displacement resolution and resilience to electromagnetic interference, current optical accelerometers either do not allow for chip-scale integration or require bulky test masses. Here we demonstrate an optomechanical accelerometer that employs ultra-sensitive all-optical displacement read-out using a planar photonic crystal cavity monolithically integrated with a nano-tethered test mass of high mechanical Q-factor. This device architecture allows for full on-chip integration and achieves a broadband acceleration resolution of 10 \\mu g/rt-Hz, a bandwidth greater than 20 kHz, and a dynamic range of 50 dB with ...

  8. Phase noise of self-sustained optomechanical oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, King Yan; Poot, Menno; Han, Xu; Tang, Hong X.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a theory that predicts the phase noise characteristics of self-sustained optomechanical oscillators. By treating the cavity optomechanical system as a feedback loop consisting of an optical cavity and a mechanical resonator, we analytically derive the transfer functions relating the amplitude/phase noise of all the relevant dynamical quantities from the quantum Langevin equations, and obtain a closed-form expressions for the phase noise spectral densities contributed ...

  9. Interactive optomechanical coupling with nonlinear polaritonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bobrovska, N; Liew, T C H; Kyriienko, O

    2016-01-01

    We study a system of interacting matter quasiparticles strongly coupled to photons inside an optomechanical cavity. The resulting normal modes of the system are represented by hybrid polaritonic quasiparticles, which acquire effective nonlinearity. Its strength is influenced by the presence of the mechanical mode and depends on the resonance frequency of the cavity. This leads to an interactive type of optomechanical coupling, being distinct from the previously studied dispersive and dissipative couplings in optomechanical systems. The emergent interactive coupling is shown to generate effective optical nonlinearity terms of high order, being quartic in the polariton number. We consider particular systems of exciton-polaritons and dipolaritons, and show that the induced effective optical nonlinearity due to the interactive coupling can exceed in magnitude the strength of Kerr nonlinear terms, such as those arising from polariton-polariton interactions. As applications, we show that the higher order terms give...

  10. Coherent optical propagation and ultrahigh resolution mass sensor based on photonic molecules optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Chen, Chang-Zhao; Li, Yang; Fang, Xian-Wen; Tang, Xu-Dong

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate the coherent optical propagation properties based on a photonic molecules optomechanics. With choosing a suitable detuning of the pump field from optomechanical cavity resonance, both the slow- and fast-light effect of the probe field appear in the system. The coupling strength of the two cavities play a key role, which affords a quantum channel and influences the width of the transparency window. Based on the photonic molecules optomechanical system, a high resolution mass sensor is also proposed. The mass of external nanoparticles deposited onto the cavity can be measured straightforward via tracking the mechanical resonance frequency shifts due to mass changes in the probe transmission spectrum. Compared with the single-cavity optomechanics mass sensors, the mass resolution is improved significantly due to the cavity-cavity coupling. The photonic molecules optomechanics provide a new platform for on-chip applications in quantum information processing and ultrahigh resolution sensor devices.

  11. Phonon Cooling by an Optomechanical Heat Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ying; Bariani, F; Meystre, P

    2015-11-27

    We propose and analyze theoretically a cavity optomechanical analog of a heat pump that uses a polariton fluid to cool mechanical modes coupled to a single precooled phonon mode via external modulation of the substrate of the mechanical resonator. This approach permits us to cool phonon modes of arbitrary frequencies not limited by the cavity-optical field detuning deep into the quantum regime from room temperature.

  12. Coherent coupling between radio frequency, optical, and acoustic waves in piezo-optomechanical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Krishna C; Davanço, Marcelo I; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-05-01

    Optomechanical cavities have been studied for applications ranging from sensing to quantum information science. Here, we develop a platform for nanoscale cavity optomechanical circuits in which optomechanical cavities supporting co-localized 1550 nm photons and 2.4 GHz phonons are combined with photonic and phononic waveguides. Working in GaAs facilitates manipulation of the localized mechanical mode either with a radio frequency (RF) field through the piezo-electric effect, which produces acoustic waves that are routed and coupled to the optomechanical cavity by phononic crystal waveguides, or optically through the strong photoelastic effect. Along with mechanical state preparation and sensitive readout, we use this to demonstrate an acoustic wave interference effect, similar to atomic coherent population trapping, in which RF-driven coherent mechanical motion is cancelled by optically-driven motion. Manipulating cavity optomechanical systems with equal facility through both photonic and phononic channels enables new architectures for signal transduction between the optical, electrical, and mechanical domains.

  13. Optomechanical systems engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kasunic, Keith J

    2015-01-01

    Covers the fundamental principles behind optomechanical design This book emphasizes a practical, systems-level overview of optomechanical engineering, showing throughout how the requirements on the optical system flow down to those on the optomechanical design. The author begins with an overview of optical engineering, including optical fundamentals as well as the fabrication and alignment of optical components such as lenses and mirrors. The concepts of optomechanical engineering are then applied to the design of optical systems, including the structural design of mechanical and optical co

  14. Synthesis of optical spring potentials in optomechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Slatyer, Harry J; Cho, Young-Wook; Buchler, Ben C; Lam, Ping Koy

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to tailor the potential experienced by a moveable end mirror in a cavity optomechanical system by specifying the spectral properties of the input field. We show that by engineering the power spectral density of the cavity input field a desired force function can be approximated, with the accuracy of the approximation limited only by the linewidth of the cavity. The very general technique presented here could have applications in many kinds of optomechanical systems, particularly those used for sensing and metrology. We demonstrate the method by applying it to improve the sensitivity of a particular gravity measurement.

  15. Nonlinear optomechanical paddle nanocavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kaviani, Hamidreza; Wu, Marcelo; Ghobadi, Roohollah; Barclay, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    A photonic crystal optomechanical system combining strong nonlinear optomechanical coupling, low effective mass and large optical mode spacing is introduced. This nanoscale "paddle nanocavity" device supports mechanical resonances with effective mass of 300--600 fg which couple nonlinearly to co-localized optical modes with a quadratic optomechanical coupling coefficient $g^{(2)} > 2\\pi\\times400$ MHz/nm$^2$, and a two phonon to single photon optomechanical coupling rate $\\Delta \\omega_0 > 2\\pi\\times 16$ Hz. This coupling relies on strong phonon-photon interactions in a structure whose optical mode spectrum is highly non--degenerate. Simulations indicate that nonlinear optomechanical readout of thermally driven motion in these devices should be observable for T $> 50 $ mK, and that measurement of phonon shot noise is achievable.

  16. Nano-optomechanical transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakich, Peter T; El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Su, Mehmet Fatih; Reinke, Charles; Camacho, Ryan; Wang, Zheng; Davids, Paul

    2013-12-03

    A nano-optomechanical transducer provides ultrabroadband coherent optomechanical transduction based on Mach-wave emission that uses enhanced photon-phonon coupling efficiencies by low impedance effective phononic medium, both electrostriction and radiation pressure to boost and tailor optomechanical forces, and highly dispersive electromagnetic modes that amplify both electrostriction and radiation pressure. The optomechanical transducer provides a large operating bandwidth and high efficiency while simultaneously having a small size and minimal power consumption, enabling a host of transformative phonon and signal processing capabilities. These capabilities include optomechanical transduction via pulsed phonon emission and up-conversion, broadband stimulated phonon emission and amplification, picosecond pulsed phonon lasers, broadband phononic modulators, and ultrahigh bandwidth true time delay and signal processing technologies.

  17. Absolute rotation detection by Coriolis force measurement using optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davuluri, Sankar; Li, Yong

    2016-10-01

    In this article, we present an application of the optomechanical cavities for absolute rotation detection. Two optomechanical cavities, one in each arm, are placed in a Michelson interferometer. The interferometer is placed on a rotating table and is moved with a uniform velocity of \\dot{\\bar{y}} with respect to the rotating table. The Coriolis force acting on the interferometer changes the length of the optomechanical cavity in one arm, while the length of the optomechanical cavity in the other arm is not changed. The phase shift corresponding to the change in the optomechanical cavity length is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of the absolute rotation. An analytic expression for the minimum detectable rotation rate corresponding to the standard quantum limit of measurable Coriolis force in the interferometer is derived. Squeezing technique is discussed to improve the rotation detection sensitivity by a factor of \\sqrt{{γ }m/{ω }m} at 0 K temperature, where {γ }m and {ω }m are the damping rate and angular frequency of the mechanical oscillator. The temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  18. SNARE zippering and synaptic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene C Prashad

    Full Text Available Synapses vary widely in the probability of neurotransmitter release. We tested the hypothesis that the zippered state of the trans-SNARE (Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor Attachment protein REceptor complex determines initial release probability. We tested this hypothesis at phasic and tonic synapses which differ by 100-1000-fold in neurotransmitter release probability. We injected, presynaptically, three Clostridial neurotoxins which bind and cleave at different sites on VAMP to determine whether these sites were occluded by the zippering of the SNARE complex or open to proteolytic attack. Under low stimulation conditions, the catalytic light-chain fragment of botulinum B (BoNT/B-LC inhibited evoked release at both phasic and tonic synapses and cleaved VAMP; however, neither BoNT/D-LC nor tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT-LC were effective in these conditions. The susceptibility of VAMP to only BoNT/B-LC indicated that SNARE complexes at both phasic and tonic synapses were partially zippered only at the N-terminal end to approximately the zero-layer with the C-terminal end exposed under resting state. Therefore, the existence of the same partially zippered state of the trans-SNARE complex at both phasic and tonic synapses indicates that release probability is not determined solely by the zippered state of the trans-SNARE complex at least to the zero-layer.

  19. Optomechanical proposal for monitoring microtubule mechanical vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzanjeh, Sh.; Salari, V.; Tuszynski, J. A.; Cifra, M.; Simon, C.

    2017-07-01

    Microtubules provide the mechanical force required for chromosome separation during mitosis. However, little is known about the dynamic (high-frequency) mechanical properties of microtubules. Here, we theoretically propose to control the vibrations of a doubly clamped microtubule by tip electrodes and to detect its motion via the optomechanical coupling between the vibrational modes of the microtubule and an optical cavity. In the presence of a red-detuned strong pump laser, this coupling leads to optomechanical-induced transparency of an optical probe field, which can be detected with state-of-the art technology. The center frequency and line width of the transparency peak give the resonance frequency and damping rate of the microtubule, respectively, while the height of the peak reveals information about the microtubule-cavity field coupling. Our method opens the new possibilities to gain information about the physical properties of microtubules, which will enhance our capability to design physical cancer treatment protocols as alternatives to chemotherapeutic drugs.

  20. 非线性光学腔中的相位调制光机械动力学%Phase Modulation Optomechanical Dynamics Induced by Radiation-pressure in Nonlinear Optical Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华俊; 米贤武

    2011-01-01

    研究了Fabry-Perot光学腔中包含一个光学参量放大器来增强腔场与机械振子之间的耦合的光机械动力学行为.在解析边带机制下用量子郎之万方程具体研究了振子的涨落光谱、光学多稳态行为、机械阻尼与修正共振频移和基态冷却,通过数值解讨论了辐射压力诱导机械振子和腔场的稳态振幅所展现的光学多稳态行为,同时也分析了辐射压力引起的修正共振频移和机械阻尼与参量增益、输入激光功率和参量相位这三个因素的关系.此外,随着调节泵浦场的参量相位,振子的涨落光谱呈现简正模式分裂.通过精确求解最终有效声子数论证了基态冷却.结果表明,机械振子的冷却由初始浴温度、机械品质因数和参量相位这个三个因素控制.参量相提供一个新的方法来操控非线性光机械动力学.%A cavity optomechanical system containing an optical parametric amplifier is investigated under resolved sideband regime, which enhances the coupling between the movable mirror and the cavity field. The radiation-pressure inducing the movable mirror and the steady-state amplitude of the cavity field displaying an optical multistable behavior are studied. The modification of mechanical frequency and mechanical damping rate are analyzed induced by radiation pressure, which will change with the change of parametric gain, input laser power and parametric phase. In addition, the fluctuation spectrum of the movable mirror is also analyzed presenting the normal mode splitting with modulating the parametric phase of the driving field. Moreover, an accurate scheme is used to calculate the final effective mean phonon number that demonstrates the ground state cooling. The results show that the cooling of the mirror is dominated by the initial bath temperature, high mechanical quality factor and parametric phase. The parametric phase shows a new way to control the dynamics of nonlinear optomechanical

  1. Optomechanical Quantum Correlation Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, T. P.; Grutter, K. E.; Davanco, M. I.; Srinivasan, K.; Taylor, J. M.

    We present an optomechanical approach for producing accurate thermometry over a wide temperature range using quantum Brownian motion. Optical measurements induce quantum correlations in an optomechanical system when quantum-limited intensity fluctuations of a probe laser drive mechanical motion. The size of the correlations in the weak probe limit are dictated by the scale of individual phonons. We have recently measured optomechanical quantum correlations in the cross correlation spectrum between the amplitude and phase fluctuations of a single probe laser interacting with a silicon nitride optomechanical crystal. These correlations are independent of thermally-induced Brownian motion. However, Brownian motion does simultaneously produce much larger correlation signals between other optical quadratures. A comparison of the size of thermally-induced correlations to quantum correlations allows us to absolutely calibrate Brownian motion thermometry to the mechanical energy quantization scale.

  2. Diamond nanobeam waveguide optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Khanaliloo, Behzad; Hryciw, Aaron C; Lake, David P; Kaviani, Hamidreza; Barclay, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Optomechanical devices sensitively transduce and actuate motion of nanomechanical structures using light, and are central to many recent fundamental studies and technological advances. Single--crystal diamond promises to improve the performance of optomechanical devices, while also providing opportunities to interface nanomechanics with diamond color center spins and related quantum technologies. Here we demonstrate measurement of diamond nanobeam resonators with a sensitivity of 9.5 fm/Hz^0.5 and bandwidth >120 nm through dissipative waveguide--optomechanical coupling. Nanobeams are fabricated from bulk single--crystal diamond using a scalable quasi--isotropic oxygen plasma undercut etching process, and support mechanical resonances with quality factor of 2.5 x 10^5 at room temperature, and 7.2 x 10^5 in cryogenic conditions (5K). Mechanical self--oscillations, resulting from interplay between optomechanical coupling and the photothermal response of nanobeams in a buckled state, are observed with amplitude e...

  3. Plasmonics: Photothermal optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruello, Pascal

    2016-11-01

    Radiation pressure is not the only way to push or pull matter and drive light-matter interactions. Optomechanical devices can now be driven thermoelastically and amplification with acoustic-laser-like behaviour has been observed.

  4. Hybrid quantum systems with ultracold spins and optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Airlia; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Wang, Ke; Date, Aditya; Schwab, Keith; Meystre, Pierre; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    Linear cavity optomechanics has enabled radiation pressure cooling and sensing of mechanical resonators at the quantum limits. However, exciting and unrealized avenues such as generating massive macroscopic nonclassical states, quantum signal transduction, and phonon-based manybody physics each require strong, nonlinear interactions. In our group, we are exploring three approaches to realizing strong optomechanical nonlinearities - i. using atomically thin graphene membranes, ii. coupling optomechanical systems with ultracold atomic spins, and iii. using microtoroidal optomechanical resonators strongly coupled to atoms trapped in their evanescent fields. We describe our progress in each of these efforts and discuss ongoing studies on various aspects of quantum enhanced metrology, nonequilibrium dynamics of open quantum systems and quantum transduction using these novel hybrid quantum systems. This work is supported by the DARPA QuASAR program through a Grant from the ARO.

  5. Design of tunable GHz-frequency optomechanical crystal resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeifer, Hannes; Zang, Leyun; Painter, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    We present a silicon optomechanical nanobeam design with a dynamically tunable acoustic mode at 10.2 GHz. The resonance frequency can be shifted by 90 kHz/V^2 with an on-chip capacitor that was optimized to exert forces up to 1 $\\mu$N at 10 V operation voltage. Optical resonance frequencies around 190 THz with Q factors up to $2.2 \\times 10^6$ place the structure in the well-resolved sideband regime with vacuum optomechanical coupling rates up to $g_0/2\\pi = 353$ kHz. Tuning can be used, for instance, to overcome variation in the device-to-device acoustic resonance frequency due to fabrication errors, paving the way for optomechanical circuits consisting of arrays of optomechanical cavities.

  6. Optomechanical response of a nonlinear mechanical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, Olga; Singh, Vibhor; Steele, Gary A.; Blanter, Ya. M.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate theoretically in detail the nonlinear effects in the response of an optical/microwave cavity coupled to a Duffing mechanical resonator. The cavity is driven by a laser at a red or blue mechanical subband, and a probe laser measures the reflection close to the cavity resonance. Under these conditions, we find that the cavity exhibits optomechanically induced reflection (OMIR) or absorption (OMIA) and investigate the optomechanical response in the limit of nonlinear driving of the mechanics. Similar to linear mechanical drive, in an overcoupled cavity the red sideband drive may lead to both OMIA and OMIR depending on the strength of the drive, whereas the blue sideband drive only leads to OMIR. The dynamics of the phase of the mechanical resonator leads to the difference between the shapes of the response of the cavity and the amplitude response of the driven Duffing oscillator, for example, at weak red sideband drive the OMIA dip has no inflection point. We also verify that mechanical nonlinearities beyond Duffing model have little effect on the size of the OMIA dip though they affect the width of the dip.

  7. Opto-mechanical design of a buckling cavity in a novel high-performance outside-plant robust field installable single-mode fibre connector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebraert, Evert; Van Erps, Jürgen; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    Fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) networks provide an ideal means to reach the goal the European Union has set to provide 50 % of the households with a broadband connection faster than 100 Mb/s. Deployment of FTTH networks, which is still costly today, could be significantly boosted by novel ferrule-less connectors which don't require highly skilled personnel and allow installation in the field. We propose a ferrule-less connector in which two single-mode fibres (SMFs) are aligned and maintain physical contact by ensuring that at least one fibre is in a buckled state. To this end, we design a cavity in which a fibre can buckle in a controlled way. Using finite element analysis simulations to investigate the shape of the formed buckle for various buckling cavity lengths, we show that it can be accurately approximated by a cosine function. In addition, the optical performance of a buckled SMF is investigated by bending loss calculations and simulations. We show a good agreement between the analytical and the simulated bending loss results for a G.652 fibre at a wavelength of 1550 nm. Buckling cavity lengths smaller than 20 mm should be avoided to keep the optical bending loss due to buckling below 0.1 dB. In this case the cavity height should at least be 2 mm to avoid mechanical confinement of the fibre.

  8. Ultrastrong optomechanics incorporating the dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, P. D.; Suh, J.; Blencowe, M. P.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a superconducting circuit comprising a dc superconducting quantum interference device with a mechanically compliant arm embedded in a coplanar microwave cavity that realizes an optomechanical system with a degenerate or nondegenerate parametric interaction generated via the dynamical Casimir effect. For experimentally feasible parameters, this setup is capable of reaching the single-photon ultrastrong-coupling regime while simultaneously possessing a parametric coupling strength approaching the renormalized cavity frequency. This opens up the possibility of observing the interplay between these two fundamental nonlinearities at the single-photon level.

  9. Optomechanics of Levitated Dielectric Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Zhang-qi; Li, Tongcang

    2013-01-01

    We review recent works on optomechanics of optically trapped microspheres and nanoparticles in vacuum, which provide an ideal system for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics and ultrasensitive force detection. An optically trapped particle in vacuum has an ultrahigh mechanical quality factor as it is well-isolated from the thermal environment. Its oscillation frequency can be tuned in real time by changing the power of the trapping laser. Furthermore, an optically trapped particle in vacuum may rotate freely, a unique property that does not exist in clamped mechanical oscillators. In this review, we will introduce the current status of optical trapping of dielectric particles in air and vacuum, Brownian motion of an optically trapped particle at room temperature, Feedback cooling and cavity cooling of the Brownian motion. We will also discuss about using optically trapped dielectric particles for studying macroscopic quantum mechanics and ultrasensitive force detection. Applications range from creating macr...

  10. Nested Trampoline Resonators for Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Weaver, Matthew J; Luna, Fernando; Buters, Frank M; Eerkens, Hedwig J; Welker, Gesa; Perock, Blaise; Heeck, Kier; de Man, Sven; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating novel trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) Si$_3$N$_4$ with a distributed bragg reflector (DBR) mirror. We construct a nested double resonator structure that generates approximately 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface, eliminating the strong mounting dependence of the quality factor observed with single resonators. With the consistency provided by this isolation scheme we reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400,000 at room temperature. In addition these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181,000 $\\pm$ 1,000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  11. Nonlinear opto-mechanical pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    A transparent material exhibits ultra-fast optical nonlinearity and is subject to optical pressure if irradiated by a laser beam. However, the effect of nonlinearity on optical pressure is often overlooked, even if a nonlinear optical pressure may be potentially employed in many applications, as optical manipulation, biophysics, cavity optomechanics, quantum optics, optical tractors, and is relevant in fundamental problems as the Abraham-Minkoswky dilemma, or the Casimir effect. Here we show that an ultra-fast nonlinear polarization gives indeed a contribution to the optical pressure that also is negative in certain spectral ranges; the theoretical analysis is confirmed by first-principles simulations. An order of magnitude estimate shows that the effect can be observable by measuring the deflection of a membrane made by graphene.

  12. Nested trampoline resonators for optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, M. J., E-mail: mweaver@physics.ucsb.edu; Pepper, B.; Luna, F.; Perock, B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Buters, F. M.; Eerkens, H. J.; Welker, G.; Heeck, K.; Man, S. de [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, Universiteit Leiden, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Bouwmeester, D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, Universiteit Leiden, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-01-18

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with a distributed Bragg reflector mirror. We design a nested double resonator structure with 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface at the inner resonator frequency, and we demonstrate up to 45 dB of isolation at lower frequencies in agreement with the design. We reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400 000 at room temperature. In addition, these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181 000 ± 1000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  13. Multimode circuit optomechanics near the quantum limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massel, Francesco; Cho, Sung Un; Pirkkalainen, Juha-Matti; Hakonen, Pertti J; Heikkilä, Tero T; Sillanpää, Mika A

    2012-01-01

    The coupling of distinct systems underlies nearly all physical phenomena. A basic instance is that of interacting harmonic oscillators, giving rise to, for example, the phonon eigenmodes in a lattice. Of particular importance are the interactions in hybrid quantum systems, which can combine the benefits of each part in quantum technologies. Here we investigate a hybrid optomechanical system having three degrees of freedom, consisting of a microwave cavity and two micromechanical beams with closely spaced frequencies around 32 MHz and no direct interaction. We record the first evidence of tripartite optomechanical mixing, implying that the eigenmodes are combinations of one photonic and two phononic modes. We identify an asymmetric dark mode having a long lifetime. Simultaneously, we operate the nearly macroscopic mechanical modes close to the motional quantum ground state, down to 1.8 thermal quanta, achieved by back-action cooling. These results constitute an important advance towards engineering of entangled motional states.

  14. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may pass these bacteria to a child through kissing, sampling the child's food, or sharing eating utensils. ... pass decay-causing bacteria to their children through kissing or sharing eating utensils. Symptoms of Cavities Whether ...

  15. Cavity spin optodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Brahms, N

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a large quantum spin coupled parametrically to an optical resonator is treated in analogy with the motion of a cantilever in cavity optomechanics. New spin optodynamic phenonmena are predicted, such as cavity-spin bistability, optodynamic spin-precession frequency shifts, coherent amplification and damping of spin, and the spin optodynamic squeezing of light.

  16. Optomechanical parameter estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Ang, Shan Zheng; Bowen, Warwick P; Tsang, Mankei

    2013-01-01

    We propose a statistical framework for the problem of parameter estimation from a noisy optomechanical system. The Cram\\'er-Rao lower bound on the estimation errors in the long-time limit is derived and compared with the errors of radiometer and expectation-maximization (EM) algorithms in the estimation of the force noise power. When applied to experimental data, the EM estimator is found to have the lowest error and follow the Cram\\'er-Rao bound most closely. With its ability to estimate most of the system parameters, the EM algorithm is envisioned to be useful for optomechanical sensing, atomic magnetometry, and classical or quantum system identification applications in general.

  17. Scattering zippers and their spectral theory

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    A scattering zipper is a system obtained by concatenation of scattering events with equal even number of incoming and out going channels. The associated scattering zipper operator is the unitary equivalent of Jacobi matrices with matrix entries and generalizes Blatter-Browne and Chalker-Coddington models and CMV matrices. Weyl discs are analyzed and used to prove a bijection between the set of semi-infinite scattering zipper operators and matrix valued probability measures on the unit circle. Sturm-Liouville oscillation theory is developed as a tool to calculate the spectra of finite and periodic scattering zipper operators.

  18. Hybrid confinement of optical and mechanical modes in a bullseye optomechanical resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Felipe G S; Luiz, Gustavo O; Benevides, Rodrigo S; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Alegre, Thiago P Mayer

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanical cavities have proven to be an exceptional tool to explore fundamental and technological aspects of the interaction between mechanical and optical waves. Such interactions strongly benefit from cavities with large optomechanical coupling, high mechanical and optical quality factors, and mechanical frequencies larger than the optical mode linewidth, the so called resolved sideband limit. Here we demonstrate a novel optomechanical cavity based on a disk with a radial mechanical bandgap. This design confines light and mechanical waves through distinct physical mechanisms which allows for independent control of the mechanical and optical properties. Our device design is not limited by unique material properties and could be easily adapted to allow large optomechanical coupling and high mechanical quality factors with other promising materials. Finally, our demonstration is based on devices fabricated on a commercial silicon photonics facility, demonstrating that our approach can be easily scalable.

  19. Optomechanical soft metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiangjun; He, Wei; Liu, Yifan; Xin, Fengxian; Lu, Tian Jian

    2017-06-01

    We present a new type of optomechanical soft metamaterials, which is different from conventional mechanical metamaterials, in that they are simple isotropic and homogenous materials without resorting to any complex nano/microstructures. This metamaterial is unique in the sense that its responses to uniaxial forcing can be tailored by programmed laser inputs to manifest different nonlinear constitutive behaviors, such as monotonic, S-shape, plateau, and non-monotonic snapping performance. To demonstrate the novel metamaterial, a thin sheet of soft material impinged by two counterpropagating lasers along its thickness direction and stretched by an in-plane tensile mechanical force is considered. A theoretical model is formulated to characterize the resulting optomechanical behavior of the thin sheet by combining the nonlinear elasticity theory of soft materials and the optical radiation stress theory. The optical radiation stresses predicted by the proposed model are validated by simulations based on the method of finite elements. Programmed optomechanical behaviors are subsequently explored using the validated model under different initial sheet thicknesses and different optical inputs, and the first- and second-order tangential stiffness of the metamaterial are used to plot the phase diagram of its nonlinear constitutive behaviors. The proposed optomechanical soft metamaterial shows great potential in biological medicine, microfluidic manipulation, and other fields.

  20. Optomechanical entanglement of a macroscopic oscillator by quantum feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, E.; Li, Fengzhi; Zhang, Xuefeng; Ma, Yonghong

    2016-07-01

    We propose a scheme to generate the case of macroscopic entanglement in the optomechanical system, which consist of Fabry-Perot cavity and a mechanical oscillator by applying a homodyne-mediated quantum feedback. We explore the effect of feedback on the entanglement in vacuum and coherent state, respectively. The results show that the introduction of quantum feedback can increase the entanglement effectively between the cavity mode and the oscillator mode.

  1. 强耦合光机械腔中的简正模式分裂和冷却%Normal mode splitting and cooling in strong coupling optomechanical cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华俊; 米贤武

    2011-01-01

    研究由辐射压力与驱动Fabry-Perot光学腔相耦合而产生的腔光机械动力学行为.通过量子朗之万方程具体研究了机械振子的涨落光谱、机械阻尼与共振频移和基态冷却.随着输入激光功率的增加,振子的涨落光谱呈现简正模式分裂的现象,并且数值模拟结果和实验结果相符合.同时推导了有效机械阻尼和共振频移.红移边带导致了机械模的冷却,蓝移边带引起了机械模的放大.此外,引入一种近似机制来研究振子的基态冷却,并且考虑在解析边带机制下简正模式分裂对机械振子冷却的影响.最后,数值讨论了初始浴温度、输入激光功率和机械品质因数这三个因素对机械振子冷却的影响.%A model describing optomechanical dynamics via radiation-pressure coupling with a driven optical cavity is investigated by a linearized quantum Langevin equation.The spectrum of the oscillator presents normal mode splitting with the increase of the input laser power in strong coupling regime and our results are in good agreement with the experimental results.The effective mechanical damping and the resonance frequency shift are derived.The redshifted sideband leads to the cooling of the mechanical oscillator,and the blueshifted motional sideband results in amplification.Furthermore,an approximate mechanism is introduced to analyze the cooling of the mechanical oscillator.Since both the normal mode splitting and cooling require working in the resolved sideband regime,whether the normal mode splitting influences the cooling of the mirror is considered.Meanwhile,we give three key factors influencing the cooling of mechanical oscillator,these being initial bath temperature,input laser power and mechanical quality factor.

  2. Normal mode splitting and cooling induced by radiation pressure in strong coupling optomechanical cavity%辐射压力诱导强耦合光机械腔中的简正模式分裂和冷却

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华俊; 米贤武

    2012-01-01

    A model describing optomechanical dynamics via radiation-pressure coupling with a driven optical cavity was investigated by a linearized quantum Langevin equation under resolved sideband regime.Both the movable mirror and output field present the normal mode splitting with increasing of the input laser power and the results approach the experiment very well.The effective mechanical damping and resonance frequency shift are derived.The redshift sideband leads to cooling of the mechanical oscillator and the blueshift motional sideband results in amplification.Furthermore,an approximation scheme is introduced to analyze cooling of the mechanical oscillator.Since both the normal mode splitting and cooling require working in the resolved sideband regime,whether the normal mode splitting influence cooling of the mirror is considered.Meanwhile,the key factors that dominate the ground state cooling are also discussed.%在解析边带机制下用量子郎之万方程研究一种由辐射压力与驱动Fabry-Perot光学腔相耦合而产生的光机械动力学行为.随着输入激光功率的增加,振子的涨落光谱呈现简正模式分裂的现象,并且结果和实验相符合.也推导了有效机械阻尼和共振频移.红移边带导致了机械模的冷却,蓝移边带引起了机械模的放大.此外,引入一种近似机制来研究振子的冷却.由于简正模式分裂和基态冷却都要求在解析边带机制下,这就需要考虑简正模式分裂是否会影响到振子的冷却.同时也讨论了操控基态冷却的关键因素.

  3. On-chip asymmetric microcavity optomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Soheil; Hudnut, Alexa W; Armani, Andrea M

    2016-12-26

    High quality factor (Q) optical resonators have enabled rapid growth in the field of cavity-enhanced, radiation pressure-induced optomechanics. However, because research has focused on axisymmetric devices, the observed regenerative excited mechanical modes are similar. In the present work, a strategy for fabricating high-Q whispering gallery mode microcavities with varying degrees of asymmetry is developed and demonstrated. Due to the combination of high optical Q and asymmetric device design, two previously unobserved modes, the asymmetric cantilever and asymmetric crown mode, are demonstrated with sub-mW thresholds for onset of oscillations. The experimental results are in good agreement with computational modeling predictions.

  4. An optical analog of quantum optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Lara, B M

    2014-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional array of nearest-neighbor coupled waveguides that is the optical analog of a quantum optomechanical system. We show that the quantum model predicts the appearance of effective column isolation, diagonal-coupling and other non-trivial couplings in the two-dimensional photonic lattice under a standard approximation from ion-trap cavity electrodynamics. We provide an approximate impulse function for the case of effective column isolation and compare it with exact numerical propagation in the photonic lattice.

  5. Dissipative optomechanics in a Michelson-Sagnac interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuereb, André; Schnabel, Roman; Hammerer, Klemens

    2011-11-18

    Dissipative optomechanics studies the coupling of the motion of an optical element to the decay rate of a cavity. We propose and theoretically explore a realization of this system in the optical domain, using a combined Michelson-Sagnac interferometer, which enables a strong and tunable dissipative coupling. Quantum interference in such a setup results in the suppression of the lower motional sideband, leading to strongly enhanced cooling in the non-sideband-resolved regime. With state-of-the-art parameters, ground-state cooling and low-power quantum-limited position transduction are both possible. The possibility of a strong, tunable dissipative coupling opens up a new route towards observation of such fundamental optomechanical effects as nonlinear dynamics. Beyond optomechanics, the suggested method can be readily transferred to other setups involving nonlinear media, atomic ensembles, or single atoms.

  6. Effective mass sensing using optomechanically induced transparency in microresonator system

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Yong-Pan; Cao, Cong; Mi, Si-Chen; Yang, Daquan; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and weighing the individual nanoparticles is an important approach to study the behavior and properties of single particles. Here we illustrate an effective mass sensing scheme using optomechanical resonator system. Based on the optomechanically induced transparency phenomenon, a Stokes field reference approach is used to sense the mass of the particle on the microresonator. The field intensity of the transmission field will be changed by the effect of the particle which avoids the limits of decay induced spectral width in the resonance shift detection. Exploiting the perturbation method, we theoretically evaluated the dynamical behavior of the system, and achieved the femtogram level mass sensing without the need for high cavity Q-value, and strong coupling strength in the optomechanically system.

  7. Dynamical chaos in chip-scale optomechanical oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiagui; Huang, Yongjun; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Jinghui; Liu, Jia-Ming; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Xia, Guangqiong; Wong, Chee Wei

    2016-01-01

    Chaos has revolutionized the field of nonlinear science and stimulated foundational studies from neural networks, extreme event statistics, to physics of electron transport. Recent studies in cavity optomechanics provide a new platform to uncover quintessential architectures of chaos generation and the underlying physics. Here we report the first generation of dynamical chaos in silicon optomechanical oscillators, enabled by the strong and coupled nonlinearities of Drude electron-hole plasma. Deterministic chaotic oscillation is achieved, and statistical and entropic characterization quantifies the complexity of chaos. The correlation dimension D2 is determined at ~ 1.67 for the chaotic attractor, along with a maximal Lyapunov exponent rate about 2.94*the fundamental optomechanical oscillation. The corresponding nonlinear dynamical maps demonstrate the plethora of subharmonics, bifurcations, and stable regimes, along with distinct transitional routes into chaotic states. The chaos generation in our mesoscopic...

  8. Diamond Integrated Optomechanical Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Rath, Patrik; Nebel, Christoph; Wild, Christoph; Pernice, Wolfram H P

    2013-01-01

    Diamond offers unique material advantages for the realization of micro- and nanomechanical resonators due to its high Young's modulus, compatibility with harsh environments and superior thermal properties. At the same time, the wide electronic bandgap of 5.45eV makes diamond a suitable material for integrated optics because of broadband transparency and the absence of free-carrier absorption commonly encountered in silicon photonics. Here we take advantage of both to engineer full-scale optomechanical circuits in diamond thin films. We show that polycrystalline diamond films fabricated by chemical vapour deposition provide a convenient waferscale substrate for the realization of high quality nanophotonic devices. Using free-standing nanomechanical resonators embedded in on-chip Mach-Zehnder interferometers, we demonstrate efficient optomechanical transduction via gradient optical forces. Fabricated diamond resonators reproducibly show high mechanical quality factors up to 11,200. Our low cost, wideband, carri...

  9. Postselected optomechanical superpositions

    CERN Document Server

    Pepper, Brian; Jeffrey, Evan; Simon, Christoph; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for achieving macroscopic quantum superpositions in optomechanical systems by using single photon postselection. This method relieves many of the challenges associated with previous optical schemes for measuring macroscopic superpositions, and only requires the devices to be in the weak coupling regime. It requires only small improvements on currently achievable device parameters, and allows observation of decoherence on a timescale unconstrained by the system's optical decay time. Prospects for observing novel decoherence mechanisms are also discussed.

  10. Thermal noise free opto-mechanics using strong optical springs

    CERN Document Server

    Page, Michael; Zhao, Chunnong; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Pan, Huang-Wei; Chao, Shiuh; Mitrofanov, Valery; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Thermal noise generally greatly exceeds quantum noise in optomechanical devices unless the mechanical frequency is very high or the thermodynamic temperature is very low. This paper addresses the design concept for a novel optomechanical device capable of ultrahigh quality factors with negligible thermal noise. The proposed system consists of a minimally supported millimeter scale pendulum mounted in a Double End-Mirror Sloshing (DEMS) cavity that is topologically equivalent to a Membrane-in-the-Middle (MIM) cavity. The radiation pressure inside the high-finesse cavity allows for high optical stiffness, cancellation of terms which lead to unwanted negative damping and suppression of quantum radiation pressure noise. We solve for the optical spring dynamics of the system using the Hamiltonian, find the noise spectral density and show that stable optical trapping is possible. We also assess various loss mechanisms, one of the most important being the acceleration loss due to the optical spring. We show that pra...

  11. Dynamical back-action effects in low loss optomechanical oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontin, Antonio; Prodi, Giovanni A. [INFN, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Application, Povo (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento, Povo (Italy); Bonaldi, Michele; Borrielli, Antonio [INFN, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Application, Povo (Italy); Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, Nanoscience-Trento-FBK Division, Povo (Italy); Marino, Francesco [INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); CNR-INO, Firenze (Italy); Marconi, Lorenzo [LENS, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bagolini, Alvise [Microtechnology Laboratory FBK-CMM, Povo (Italy); Pandraud, Gregory [DIMES Technology Center-TU Delft (Netherlands); Serra, Enrico [INFN, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Application, Povo (Italy); DIMES Technology Center-TU Delft (Netherlands); Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Computational Science (LISC), FBK-University of Trento, Povo (Italy); Marin, Francesco [INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); LENS, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    The problem of the stability of a cavity optomechanical system based on an oscillator having at the same time low optical and mechanical losses is addressed. As it is the aim to extend the use of optical squeezing as a tool for improving quantum limited displacement sensing at low frequency, a family of opto-mechanical devices designed to work at frequencies of about 100 kHz was developed. The devices actually meet the initial design goals, but new requirements have emerged from the analysis of their behavior in optical cavities, due to the interaction between the cavity locking system and the low order normal modes of the devices. (copyright 2014 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Multifunctional optomechanical dynamics in integrated silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan

    Light can generate forces on matter. The nature of these forces is electromagnetic force, or Lorentz force. The emergence and rapid progress of nanotechnology provided an unprecedented platform where the very feeble optical forces began to play significant roles. The interactions between light and matter in nanoscale has been the focus of almost a decade of active theoretical and experimental investigations, which are still ongoing and constitute a whole new burgeoning branch of nanotechnology, nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS). In such context, the general goal of my research is to generate, enhance and control optical forces on silicon photonics platforms, with a focus on developing new functionalities and demonstrating novel effects, which will potentially lead to a new class of silicon photonic devices for a broad spectrum of applications. In this dissertation, the concept of optical force and the general background of the NOMS research area are first introduced. The general goal of the silicon photonics research area and the research presented in this dissertation is then described. Subsequently, the fundamental theory for optical force is summarized. The different methods to calculate optical forces are enumerated and briefly reviewed. Integrated hybrid plasmonic waveguide (HPWG) devices have been successfully fabricated and the enhanced optical forces experimentally measured for the first time. All-optical amplification of RF signals has been successfully demonstrated. The optical force generated by one laser is used to mechanically change the optical path and hence the output power of another laser. In addition, completely optically tunable mechanical nonlinear behavior has been demonstrated for the first time and systematically studied. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities has been demonstrated with a "photon see-saw" device. This photon see-saw is a novel multicavity optomechanical device which consists of two photonic crystal

  13. Organization of 2012 Cavity Optomechanics Incubator Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    University of Queensland AUSTRALIA David McClelland Australian National University AUSTRALIA Michael Metcalfe Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. UNITED STATES...GERMANY Leopoldo Martin La Laguna University UNITED STATES Nergis Mavalvala Massachusetts Institute of Technology UNITED STATES David McAuslan...Lausanne SWITZERLAND David Vitali Universita di Camerino ITALY Ignacio Wilson-Rae TU Munich GERMANY huan yang Caltech UNITED STATES

  14. Unraveling the optomechanical nature of plasmonic trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Mestres, Pau; Quidant, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive and ultra accurate optical manipulation of nanometer objects has recently gained a growing interest as a powerful enabling tool in nanotechnology and biophysics. In this context, Self-Induced Back-Action (SIBA) trapping in nano-optical cavities has shown a unique potential for trapping and manipulating nanometer-sized objects under low optical intensities. Yet, the existence of the SIBA effect has that far only been evidenced indirectly through its enhanced trapping performances. By enhancing the optomechanical interaction between the nano-cavity and the trapped object, we show for the first time direct evidence of the self-reconfiguration of the optical potential. Our observations enable us gaining further understanding of the SIBA mechanism and determine the optimum conditions to boost the performances of SIBA-based nano-optical tweezers.

  15. Symmetry-breaking oscillations in membrane optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurl, C.; Alvermann, A.; Fehske, H.

    2016-12-01

    We study the classical dynamics of a membrane inside a cavity in the situation where this optomechanical system possesses a reflection symmetry. Symmetry breaking occurs through supercritical and subcritical pitchfork bifurcations of the static fixed-point solutions. Both bifurcations can be observed through variation of the laser-cavity detuning, which gives rise to a boomerang-like fixed-point pattern with hysteresis. The symmetry-breaking fixed points evolve into self-sustained oscillations when the laser intensity is increased. In addition to the analysis of the accompanying Hopf bifurcations we describe these oscillations at finite amplitudes with an ansatz that fully accounts for the frequency shift relative to the natural membrane frequency. We complete our study by following the route to chaos for the membrane dynamics.

  16. Optomechanics with LEGO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercioli, F; Tiribilli, B; Mannoni, A; Acciai, S

    1998-06-01

    The basic elements of a fairly complete optomechanical kit based on the use of LEGO are presented. Taking advantage of the great variety of standard LEGO elements, and adding a few custom components made of Plexiglas, we show how most of the mechanical parts of an optical setup can be built with little effort and at an extremely reduced cost. Several systems and experiments are presented, mainly in the fields of optical filtering and interferometry, to show that the proposed mounts are excellent for didactic purposes and often perfectly suitable even in applied research.

  17. $\\mathcal{PT}$-Symmetry-Breaking Chaos in Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Lü, Xin-You; Ma, Jin-Yong; Wu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry-breaking chaos in optomechanical system (OMS), which features an ultralow driving threshold. In principle, this chaos will emerge once a driving laser is applied to the cavity mode and lasts for a period of time. The driving strength is inversely proportional to the starting time of chaos. This originally comes from the dynamical enhancement of nonlinearity by field localization in $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry-breaking phase ($\\mathcal{PT}$BP). Moreover, this chaos is switchable by tuning the system parameters so that a $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry phase transition occurs. This work may fundamentally broaden the regimes of cavity optomechanics and nonlinear optics. It offers the prospect of exploring ultralow-power-laser triggered chaos and its potential applications in secret communication.

  18. Dissipative Optomechanics in a Michelson--Sagnac Interferometer

    OpenAIRE

    Xuereb, A.; Schnabel, R.; Hammerer, K.

    2011-01-01

    Dissipative optomechanics studies the coupling of the motion of an optical element to the decay rate of a cavity. We propose and theoretically explore a realization of this system in the optical domain, using a combined Michelson--Sagnac interferometer, which enables a strong and tunable dissipative coupling. Quantum interference in such a setup results in the suppression of the lower motional sideband, leading to strongly enhanced cooling in the non-sideband-resolved regime. With state-of-th...

  19. An Introduction to Quantum Optomechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Milburn, G J; Woolley, M J

    2011-01-01

    We provide an introduction to the description of mechanical systems in the quantum regime, and provide a review of the various types of micro-scale and nano-scale optomechanical and electromechanical systems...

  20. Dynamically creating tripartite resonance and dark modes in a multimode optomechanical system

    CERN Document Server

    Damskägg, E; Sillanpää, M A

    2016-01-01

    We study a multimode optomechanical system where two mechanical oscillators are coupled to an electromagnetic cavity. Previously it has been shown that if the mechanical resonances have nearly equal frequencies, one can make the oscillators to interact via the cavity by strong pumping with a coherent pump tone. One can view the interaction also as emergence of an electromagnetically dark mode which gets asymptotically decoupled from the cavity and has a linewidth much smaller than that of the bare cavity. The narrow linewidth and long lifetime of the dark mode could be advantageous for example in information storage and processing. Here we investigate the possibility to create dark modes dynamically using two pump tones. We show that if the mechanical frequencies are intrinsically different, one can bring the mechanical oscillators and the cavity on-resonance and thus create a dark mode by double sideband pumping of the cavity. We realize the scheme in a microwave optomechanical device employing two drum osci...

  1. Simulation of an optomechanical quantum memory in the nonlinear regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, R. Y.; Kiesewetter, S.; Reid, M. D.; Drummond, P. D.

    2017-07-01

    Optomechanical systems cooled to the quantum level provide a promising mechanism for a high-fidelity quantum memory that is faithful to a given temporal mode structure, and can be recovered synchronously. We carry out full, probabilistic quantum simulation of a quantum optomechanical memory, including nonlinear effects that are usually ignored. This is achieved using both the approximate truncated Wigner and the exact positive P phase-space representations. By considering the nonlinear quantum optomechanical Hamiltonian, our simulations allow us to probe the regime where the linearization approximation fails to hold. We show evidence for large spectral overlap between the quantum signal and the transfer field in typical optomechanical quantum memory experiments. Methods for eliminating this overlap to accurately recover the quantum signal are discussed. This allows us to give a complete model for the quantum storage of a coherent state. We treat the mode matching that is necessary to accurately retrieve the stored quantum state, by including the internal dynamics of the mechanical system as well as the optical system. We also include the finite switching time of the control transfer field. The fidelity for the storage of a coherent state is computed numerically using currently realistic experimental parameters in the electromechanical case. We find the expected fidelity is lower than required to demonstrate true quantum state transfers. Significant improvements in the quality factor of the cavity and mechanical systems will, however, increase the fidelity beyond the quantum threshold.

  2. Cooling a Harmonic Oscillator by Optomechanical Modification of Its Bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xunnong; Purdy, Thomas; Taylor, Jacob M.

    2017-06-01

    Optomechanical systems show tremendous promise for the high-sensitivity sensing of forces and modification of mechanical properties via light. For example, similar to neutral atoms and trapped ions, laser cooling of mechanical motion by radiation pressure can take single mechanical modes to their ground state. Conventional optomechanical cooling is able to introduce an additional damping channel to mechanical motion while keeping its thermal noise at the same level, and, as a consequence, the effective temperature of the mechanical mode is lowered. However, the ratio of the temperature to the quality factor remains roughly constant, preventing dramatic advances in quantum sensing using this approach. Here we propose an approach for simultaneously reducing the thermal load on a mechanical resonator while improving its quality factor. In essence, we use the optical interaction to dynamically modify the dominant damping mechanism, providing an optomechanically induced effect analogous to a phononic band gap. The mechanical mode of interest is assumed to be weakly coupled to its heat bath but strongly coupled to a second mechanical mode, which is cooled by radiation pressure coupling to a red-detuned cavity field. We also identify a realistic optomechanical design that has the potential to realize this novel cooling scheme.

  3. Optomechanics of random media

    CERN Document Server

    Gentilini, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Using light to control the movement of nano-structured objects is a great challenge. This challenge involves fields like optical tweezing, Casimir forces, integrated optics, bio-physics, and many others. Photonic "robots" could have uncountable applications. However, if the complexity of light-activated devices increases, structural disorder unavoidably occurs and, correspondingly, light scattering, diffusion and localization. Are optically-driven mechanical forces affected by disorder-induced effects? A possible hypothesis is that light scattering reduces the optomechanical interaction. Conversely, we show that disorder is a mechanism that radically enhances the mechanical effect of light. We determine the link between optical pressure and the light diffusion coefficient, and unveil that when the Thouless conductivity becomes smaller than the unity, at the so-called Anderson transition, optical forces and their statistical fluctuations reach a maximum. Recent advances in photonics demonstrate the possibility...

  4. Selectable linear or quadratic coupling in an optomechanical system

    CERN Document Server

    Xuereb, André

    2012-01-01

    There has been much interest recently in the analysis of optomechanical systems incorporating dielectric nano- or microspheres inside a cavity field. We analyse here the situation when one of the mirrors of the cavity itself is also allowed to move. We reveal that the interplay between the two oscillators yields a cross-coupling that results in, e.g., appreciable cooling and squeezing of the motion of the sphere, despite its nominal quadratic coupling. We also discuss a simple modification that would allow this cross-coupling to be removed at will, thereby yielding a purely quadratic coupling for the sphere.

  5. Synchronization in air-slot photonic crystal optomechanical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongjun; Wu, Jiagui; Flores, Jaime Gonzalo Flor; Yu, Mingbin; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Wen, Guangjun; Wong, Chee Wei

    2017-03-01

    In this Letter, we report observations for the optomechanical oscillator (OMO) synchronization in an air-slot photonic crystal (PhC) cavity driven by a single laser source. Two very-close mechanical modes are found in the air-slot PhC OMO cavity and can be locked to each other at drive powers above the threshold with different detunings. The improvement in phase noise (-70 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset) for the synchronized OMO is reported as well. The stable frequency tones obtained open a path toward reconfigurable synchronized oscillator networks.

  6. Giant Optomechanical Enhancement in the Presence of Gain and Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, H; Lv, Xin-You; Zhang, Jing; Nori, F

    2014-01-01

    The parity-time-symmetric structure was experimentally accessible very recently in coupled optical resonators with which, for normal or non-PT-symmetric cases, a phonon laser device had also been realized. Here we study cavity optomechanics of this system now with tunable gain-loss ratio. We find that nonlinear behaviors emerge for cavity-photon populations around balanced point, resulting giant enhancement of both optical pressure and phonon-lasing action. Potential applications range from enhancing mechanical cooling to designing highly-efficient phonon-laser amplifier.

  7. Nonclassical mechanical states in an optomechanical micromaser analogue

    OpenAIRE

    Nation, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    Here we show that quantum states of a mechanical oscillator can be generated in an optomechanical analogue of the micromaser, in absence of any atom-like subsystem, thus exhibiting single-atom masing effects in a system composed solely of oscillator components. In the regime where the single-photon coupling strength is on the order of the cavity decay rate, a cavity mode with at most a single-excitation present gives rise to sub-Poissonian oscillator limit-cycles that generate quantum feature...

  8. Measurement procedure for optomechanical hole plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Measurement procedure for optomechanical hole plate in connection with CIRP interlaboratory comparison on measuring machines.......Measurement procedure for optomechanical hole plate in connection with CIRP interlaboratory comparison on measuring machines....

  9. Torsional optomechanics of a levitated nonspherical nanoparticle

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thai M; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Robicheaux, F; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Li, Tongcang

    2016-01-01

    An optically levitated nanoparticle in vacuum is a paradigm optomechanical system for sensing and studying macroscopic quantum mechanics. While its center-of-mass motion has been investigated intensively, its torsional vibration has only been studied theoretically in limited cases. Here we report the first experimental observation of the torsional vibration of an optically levitated nonspherical nanoparticle in vacuum. We achieve this by utilizing the coupling between the spin angular momentum of photons and the torsional vibration of a nonspherical nanoparticle whose polarizability is a tensor. The torsional vibration frequency can be one order of magnitude higher than its center-of-mass motion frequency, which is promising for ground state cooling. With an ellipsoidal model, we propose a simple yet novel scheme to achieve ground state cooling of its torsional vibration with a linearly-polarized Gaussian cavity mode. A levitated nonspherical nanoparticle in vacuum will also be an ultrasensitive nanoscale tor...

  10. Nonlinear optomechanical measurement of mechanical motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brawley, G.A.; Vanner, M R; Larsen, Peter Emil

    2016-01-01

    Precision measurement of nonlinear observables is an important goal in all facets of quantum optics. This allows measurement-based non-classical state preparation, which has been applied to great success in various physical systems, and provides a route for quantum information processing...... with otherwise linear interactions. In cavity optomechanics much progress has been made using linear interactions and measurement, but observation of nonlinear mechanical degrees-of-freedom remains outstanding. Here we report the observation of displacement-squared thermal motion of a micro-mechanical resonator...... by exploiting the intrinsic nonlinearity of the radiation-pressure interaction. Using this measurement we generate bimodal mechanical states of motion with separations and feature sizes well below 100 pm. Future improvements to this approach will allow the preparation of quantum superposition states, which can...

  11. Classical Coupled Mode Theory of Optomechanical Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Khorasani, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Acousto-optic interaction in optomechanical crystals allows unidirectional control of elastic waves over optical waves. However, as a result of this nonlinear interaction, infinitely many optical modes are born. This article presents an exact formulaion of coupled mode theory for interaction between elastic Bloch wave waves and photonic Bloch waves moving in a phonotonic waveguide. In general, an optical wavefront is strongly diffracted by an elastic wave in frequency and wavevector, and thus infinite modes with different frequencies and wavevectors appear. We discuss resonance and mode conversion conditions, and present a rigorous method to derive coupling rates and mode profiles. We also find a conservation law which rules over total optical power from interacting individual modes. Modifications of the theory to phonotonic cavities are also discussed. We present application examples including switch, frequency shifter, and reflector.

  12. Theory of phase-mixing amplification in an optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockeloen-Korppi, C. F.; Heikkilä, T. T.; Sillanpää, M. A.; Massel, F.

    2017-09-01

    The investigation of the ultimate limits imposed by quantum mechanics on amplification represents an important topic both on a fundamental level and from the perspective of potential applications. We discuss here a novel regime for bosonic linear amplifiers—beside phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive amplification—which we term here phase-mixing amplification. Furthermore, we show that phase-mixing amplification can be realised in a cavity optomechanical setup, constituted by a mechanical resonator which is dispersively coupled to an optomechanical cavity asymmetrically driven around both mechanical sidebands. While, in general, this amplifier is phase-mixing, for a suitable choice of parameters, the amplifier proposed here operates as a phase-sensitive amplifier. We show that both configurations allow amplification with an added noise below the quantum limit of (phase-insensitive) amplification in a parameter range compatible with current experiments in microwave circuit optomechanics. In particular, we show that introducing phase-mixing amplification typically allows for a significant reduction of the added noise.

  13. Generalized nonreciprocity in an optomechanical circuit via synthetic magnetism and reservoir engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Kejie; Metelmann, Anja; Matheny, Mathew H; Marquardt, Florian; Clerk, Aashish A; Painter, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic magnetism has been used to control charge neutral excitations for applications ranging from classical beam steering to quantum simulation. In optomechanics, radiation-pressure-induced parametric coupling between optical (photon) and mechanical (phonon) excitations may be used to break time-reversal symmetry, providing the prerequisite for synthetic magnetism. Here we design and fabricate a silicon optomechanical circuit with both optical and mechanical connectivity between two optomechanical cavities. Driving the two cavities with phase-correlated laser light results in a synthetic magnetic flux, which in combination with dissipative coupling to the mechanical bath, leads to nonreciprocal transport of photons with 35dB of isolation. Additionally, optical pumping with blue-detuned light manifests as a particle non-conserving interaction between photons and phonons, resulting in directional optical amplification of 12dB in the isolator through direction. These results indicate the feasibility of utili...

  14. Coherent coupling between radio frequency, optical, and acoustic waves in piezo-optomechanical circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Balram, Krishna C; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of optical and mechanical modes in nanoscale optomechanical systems has been widely studied for applications ranging from sensing to quantum information science. Here, we develop a platform for cavity optomechanical circuits in which localized and interacting 1550 nm photons and 2.4 GHz phonons are combined with photonic and phononic waveguides. Working in GaAs facilitates manipulation of the localized mechanical mode either with a radio frequency field through the piezo-electric effect, or optically through the strong photoelastic effect. We use this to demonstrate a novel acoustic wave interference effect, analogous to coherent population trapping in atomic systems, in which the coherent mechanical motion induced by the electrical drive can be completely cancelled out by the optically-driven motion. The ability to manipulate cavity optomechanical systems with equal facility through either photonic or phononic channels enables new device and system architectures for signal transduction betwee...

  15. Single-molecule optomechanics in “picocavities”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Felix; Schmidt, Mikolaj K.; Dreismann, Alexander; Chikkaraddy, Rohit; Zhang, Yao; Demetriadou, Angela; Carnegie, Cloudy; Ohadi, Hamid; de Nijs, Bart; Esteban, Ruben; Aizpurua, Javier; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2016-11-01

    Trapping light with noble metal nanostructures overcomes the diffraction limit and can confine light to volumes typically on the order of 30 cubic nanometers. We found that individual atomic features inside the gap of a plasmonic nanoassembly can localize light to volumes well below 1 cubic nanometer (“picocavities”), enabling optical experiments on the atomic scale. These atomic features are dynamically formed and disassembled by laser irradiation. Although unstable at room temperature, picocavities can be stabilized at cryogenic temperatures, allowing single atomic cavities to be probed for many minutes. Unlike traditional optomechanical resonators, such extreme optical confinement yields a factor of 106 enhancement of optomechanical coupling between the picocavity field and vibrations of individual molecular bonds. This work sets the basis for developing nanoscale nonlinear quantum optics on the single-molecule level.

  16. Optomechanically induced transparency in a membrane-in-the-middle setup at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuza, M.; Biancofiore, C.; Bawaj, M.; Molinelli, C.; Galassi, M.; Natali, R.; Tombesi, P.; Di Giuseppe, G.; Vitali, D.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the analog of electromagnetically induced transparency in a room temperature cavity optomechanics setup formed by a thin semitransparent membrane within a Fabry-Pérot cavity. Due to destructive interference, a weak probe field is completely reflected by the cavity when the pump beam is resonant with the motional red sideband of the cavity. Under this condition we infer a significant slowing down of light of hundreds of microseconds, which is easily tuned by shifting the membrane along the cavity axis. We also observe the associated phenomenon of electromagnetically induced amplification which occurs due to constructive interference when the pump is resonant with the blue sideband.

  17. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Photons carry linear momentum and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, whereas transfer of angular momentum induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been used in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices, optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect have only been used in optical tweezers but remain unexplored in integrated photonics. We demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mechanical effect of photon's polarization degree of freedom and demonstrates its control in integrated photonic devices. Exploiting optical torque and optomechanical interaction with photon angular momentum can lead to torsional cavity optomechanics and optomechanical photon spin-orbit coupling, as well as applications such as optomechanical gyroscopes and torsional magnetometry.

  18. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  19. Hybrid confinement of optical and mechanical modes in a bullseye optomechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Felipe G S; Espinel, Yovanny A V; Luiz, Gustavo O; Benevides, Rodrigo S; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Mayer Alegre, Thiago P

    2017-01-23

    Optomechanical cavities have proven to be an exceptional tool to explore fundamental and applied aspects of the interaction between mechanical and optical waves. Here we demonstrate a novel optomechanical cavity based on a disk with a radial mechanical bandgap. This design confines light and mechanical waves through distinct physical mechanisms which allows for independent control of the mechanical and optical properties. Simulations foresee an optomechanical coupling rate g0 reaching 2π × 100 kHz for mechanical frequencies around 5 GHz as well as anchor loss suppression of 60 dB. Our device design is not limited by unique material properties and could be easily adapted to allow for large optomechanical coupling and high mechanical quality factors with other promising materials. Finally, our devices were fabricated in a commercial silicon photonics facility, demonstrating g0/2π = 23 kHz for mechanical modes with frequencies around 2 GHz and mechanical Q-factors as high as 2300 at room temperature, also showing that our approach can be easily scalable and useful as a new platform for multimode optomechanics.

  20. Towards collective optomechanics with nanomebranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nair, Bhagya

    2017-01-01

    High quality nanomechanical resonators exploiting the effects of electromagnetic radiation pressure have a broad range of applications ranging from metrology and sensing to information processing. The work presented in this thesis takes place in the context of optomechanics with integrated arrays...

  1. Quantum state transfer in optomechanical arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes Neto, G. D.; Andrade, F. M.; Montenegro, V.; Bose, S.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum state transfer between distant nodes is at the heart of quantum processing and quantum networking. Stimulated by this, we propose a scheme where one can achieve quantum state transfer with a high fidelity between sites in a cavity quantum optomechanical network. In our lattice, each individual site is composed of a localized mechanical mode which interacts with a laser-driven cavity mode via radiation pressure, while photons hop between neighboring sites. After diagonalization of the Hamiltonian of each cell, we show that the system can be reduced to an effective Hamiltonian of two decoupled bosonic chains, and therefore we can apply the well-known results in quantum state transfer together with an additional condition on the transfer times. In fact, we show that our transfer protocol works for any arbitrary joint quantum state of a mechanical and an optical mode. Finally, in order to analyze a more realistic scenario we take into account the effects of independent thermal reservoirs for each site. By solving the standard master equation within the Born-Markov approximation, we reassure both the effective model and the feasibility of our protocol.

  2. Degenerate parametric oscillation in quantum membrane optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Mónica; Sánchez Muñoz, Carlos; Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The promise of innovative applications has triggered the development of many modern technologies capable of exploiting quantum effects. But in addition to future applications, such quantum technologies have already provided us with the possibility of accessing quantum-mechanical scenarios that seemed unreachable just a few decades ago. With this spirit, in this work we show that modern optomechanical setups are mature enough to implement one of the most elusive models in the field of open system dynamics: degenerate parametric oscillation. Introduced in the eighties and motivated by its alleged implementability in nonlinear optical resonators, it rapidly became a paradigm for the study of dissipative phase transitions whose corresponding spontaneously broken symmetry is discrete. However, it was found that the intrinsic multimode nature of optical cavities makes it impossible to experimentally study the model all the way through its phase transition. In contrast, here we show that this long-awaited model can be implemented in the motion of a mechanical object dispersively coupled to the light contained in a cavity, when the latter is properly driven with multichromatic laser light. We focus on membranes as the mechanical element, showing that the main signatures of the degenerate parametric oscillation model can be studied in state-of-the-art setups, thus opening the possibility of analyzing spontaneous symmetry breaking and enhanced metrology in one of the cleanest dissipative phase transitions. In addition, the ideas put forward in this work would allow for the dissipative preparation of squeezed mechanical states.

  3. Quasi-two-dimensional optomechanical crystals with a complete phononic bandgap

    CERN Document Server

    Alegre, Thiago P Mayer; Winger, Martin; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    A fully planar two-dimensional optomechanical crystal formed in a silicon microchip is used to create a structure devoid of phonons in the GHz frequency range. A nanoscale photonic crystal cavity is placed inside the phononic bandgap crystal in order to probe the properties of the localized acoustic modes. By studying the trends in mechanical damping, mode density, and optomechanical coupling strength of the acoustic resonances over an array of structures with varying geometric properties, clear evidence of a complete phononic bandgap is shown.

  4. Photothermal self-oscillation and laser cooling of graphene optomechanical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Robert A; Storch, Isaac R; Adiga, Vivekananda P; Sakakibara, Reyu; Cipriany, Benjamin R; Ilic, B; Wang, Si Ping; Ong, Peijie; McEuen, Paul L; Parpia, Jeevak M; Craighead, Harold G

    2012-09-12

    By virtue of their low mass and stiffness, atomically thin mechanical resonators are attractive candidates for use in optomechanics. Here, we demonstrate photothermal back-action in a graphene mechanical resonator comprising one end of a Fabry-Perot cavity. As a demonstration of the utility of this effect, we show that a continuous wave laser can be used to cool a graphene vibrational mode or to power a graphene-based tunable frequency oscillator. Owing to graphene's high thermal conductivity and optical absorption, photothermal optomechanics is efficient in graphene and could ultimately enable laser cooling to the quantum ground state or applications such as photonic signal processing.

  5. Laser phase noise effects on the dynamics of optomechanical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Phelps, Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the influence of laser phase noise on the cooling and heating of a generic cavity optomechanical system. We derive the back-action damping and heating rates and the mechanical frequency shift of the radiation pressure-driven oscillating mirror, and derive the minimum phonon occupation number for small laser linewidths. We find that in practice laser phase noise does not pose serious limitations to ground state cooling. We then consider the effects of laser phase noise in a parametric cavity driving scheme that minimizes the back-action heating of one of the quadratures of the mechanical oscillator motion. Laser linewidths narrow compared to the decay rate of the cavity field will not pose any problems in an experimental setting, but broader linewidths limit the practicality of this back-action evasion method.

  6. Dissipative Optomechanics in a Michelson--Sagnac Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Xuereb, André; Hammerer, Klemens

    2011-01-01

    Dissipative optomechanics studies the coupling of the motion of an optical element to the decay rate of a quasi-resonant cavity. We propose and theoretically explore a realization of this system in the optical domain, using a combined Michelson--Sagnac interferometer, which enables a strong and tunable dissipative coupling in an optical setup. Quantum interference in such a setup results in the suppression of the lower motional sideband, leading to strongly enhanced cooling in the non-sideband-resolved regime. With state-of-the-art parameters, ground-state cooling and low-power quantum-limited position transduction are both possible.

  7. Nano-optomechanics with a levitated nanoparticle (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quidant, Romain; Mestres, Pau; Ricci, Francesco; Rica, Raul

    2016-09-01

    In this talk we first introduce the use of a levitated nanoparticle in vacuum as a nano-optomechanical system with unprecedented performances. Subsequently, we focus on our efforts in cooling its motion towards mechanical ground state at room temperature. In particular, we present an experiment that combines active parametric feedback cooling with passive resolved side band cooling. We first demonstrate systematic transfer of a single trapped nanoparticle from a load lock to the main vacuum chamber hosting a high-finesse optical cavity and report our latest advances in cooling.

  8. Moving boundary and photoelastic coupling in GaAs optomechanical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Balram, Krishna C; Lim, Ju Young; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, K

    2014-01-01

    Chip-based cavity optomechanical systems are being considered for applications in sensing, metrology, and quantum information science. Critical to their development is an understanding of how the optical and mechanical modes interact, quantified by the coupling rate $g_{0}$. Here, we develop GaAs optomechanical resonators and investigate the moving dielectric boundary and photoelastic contributions to $g_{0}$. First, we consider coupling between the fundamental radial breathing mechanical mode and a 1550 nm band optical whispering gallery mode in microdisks. For decreasing disk radius from $R=5$ $\\mu$m to $R=1$ $\\mu$m, simulations and measurements show that $g_{0}$ changes from being dominated by the moving boundary contribution to having an equal photoelastic contribution. Next, we design and demonstrate nanobeam optomechanical crystals in which a $2.5$ GHz mechanical breathing mode couples to a 1550 nm optical mode predominantly through the photoelastic effect. We show a significant (30 $\\%$) dependence of ...

  9. Single-photon transport through a waveguide coupling to a quadratic optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lei

    2017-07-01

    We study the coherent transport of a single photon, which propagates in a one-dimensional waveguide and is scattered by a quadratic optomechanical system. Our approach, which is based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, gives an analytical solution to describe the single-photon transmission and reflection properties. We analyze the transport spectra and find they are not only related to the optomechanical system's energy-level structure, but also dependent on the optomechanical system's inherent parameters. For the existence of atomic degrees of freedom, we get a Rabi-splitting-like or an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like spectrum, depending on the atom-cavity coupling strength. Here, we focus on the single-photon strong-coupling regime so that single-quantum effects could be seen.

  10. Surface Sensitive Microfluidic Optomechanical Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyu Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The microfluidic optomechanical resonator (uFOMR) based on a thin-walled glass capillary supports high Q-factor (>1000) mechanical modes in the presence of liquids. In this Letter, the sensitivity of the uFOMR to the surface change is studied by layer-by-layer removal of SiO2 molecules from the uFOMR inner surface using various concentrations of hydrofluoric acid solutions. A frequency downshift is observed with a sensitivity of 1.2 Hz/(pg/mm2), which translates to a surface density detection limit of 83 pg/mm2. This work opens a door to using the optomechanical mode for detection and characterization of molecules present near the resonator surface.

  11. Spatial confinement of acoustic and optical waves in stubbed slab structure as optomechanical resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Changsheng, E-mail: lcs135@163.com; Huang, Dan; Guo, Jierong

    2015-02-20

    We theoretically demonstrate that acoustic waves and optical waves can be spatially confined in the same micro-cavity by specially designed stubbed slab structure. The proposed structure presents both phononic and photonic band gaps from finite element calculation. The creation of cavity mode inside the band gap region provides strong localization of phonon and photon in the defect region. The practical parameters to inject cavity and work experimentally at telecommunication range are discussed. This structure can be precisely fabricated, hold promises to enhance acousto-optical interactions and design new applications as optomechanical resonator. - Highlights: • A resonator simultaneously supports acoustic and optical modes. • Strong spatial confinement and slow group velocity. • Potential to work as active optomechanical resonator.

  12. Dissipative optomechanics of a single-layer graphene in a microcavity

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Lin-Da; Liu, Yong-Chun; Yan, Meng-Yuan; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We study the optomechanical coupling of a single-layer graphene with a high-Q Fabry-P?erot microcavity in the membrane-in-the-middle configuration. In ordinary dissipative coupling systems, mechanical oscillators modulate the loss associated with the input coupling of the cavity mode; while in our system, the graphene oscillator couples dissipatively with the cavity mode through modulating its absorption loss. By analyzing the effects of the interband transition of a graphene suspended near the node of the cavity field, we obtain strong and tunable dissipative coupling without excessively reducing the optical quality factor. Finally, it is found that the exural mode of the graphene could be cooled down to its ground state in the present coupling system. This study provides new insights for graphene optomechanics in the visible range.

  13. Myelin architecture: zippering membranes tightly together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhti, Mostafa; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael

    2014-04-01

    Rapid nerve conduction requires the coating of axons by a tightly packed multilayered myelin membrane. In the central nervous system, myelin is formed from cellular processes that extend from oligodendrocytes and wrap in a spiral fashion around an axon, resulting in the close apposition of adjacent myelin membrane bilayers. In this review, we discuss the physical principles underlying the zippering of the plasma membrane of oligodendrocytes at the cytoplasmic and extracellular leaflet. We propose that the interaction of the myelin basic protein with the cytoplasmic leaflet of the myelin bilayer triggers its polymerization into a fibrous network that drives membrane zippering and protein extrusion. In contrast, the adhesion of the extracellular surfaces of myelin requires the down-regulation of repulsive components of the glycocalyx, in order to uncover weak and unspecific attractive forces that bring the extracellular surfaces into close contact. Unveiling the mechanisms of myelin membrane assembly at the cytoplasmic and extracelluar sites may help to understand how the myelin bilayers are disrupted and destabilized in the different demyelinating diseases.

  14. Nonlinear radiation pressure dynamics in an optomechanical crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Alex G; Ludwig, Max; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Chan, Jasper; Marquardt, Florian; Painter, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing a silicon nanobeam optomechanical crystal, we investigate the attractor diagram arising from the radiation pressure interaction between a localized optical cavity at $\\lambda = 1552$nm and a mechanical resonance at $\\omega/2\\pi = 3.72$GHz. At a temperature of $T \\approx 10$K, highly nonlinear driving of mechanical motion is observed via continuous wave optical pumping. Introduction of a time-dependent (modulated) optical pump is used to steer the system towards an otherwise inaccessible dynamically stable attractor in which mechanical self-oscillation occurs for an optical pump red-detuned from the cavity resonance. An analytical model incorporating thermo-optic effects due to optical absorption heating is developed, and found to accurately predict the measured device behavior.

  15. Optomechanical electromagnetically induced transparency in inverted atomic configurations: a comparative view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari Nejad, A.; Askari, H. R.; Baghshahi, H. R.

    2017-03-01

    We study electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), which is affected by cavity optomechanics in different atomic configurations (V and Λ ). The cavity mode is depicted as a probe field, and a classical driving field is applied to the atomic medium as the control laser in each system. Interaction between the cavity mode, atomic media and the oscillating mirror of the cavity can change the susceptibility of the atomic ensemble. Equations of motion demonstrate a system of nonlinear equations for each system. Nonlinearity of equations is a result of interaction between the cavity mode and atomic transitions. The equations are solved via a perturbation method. The results show two different aspects of atom-assisted optomechanics in V-type system: a common transparency window and an amplifying process in a transparency window that does not occur in the Λ configuration, notable as a considerable difference between the proposed systems. It is shown that classical field detuning leads to different changes in the susceptibility of both systems; other values of cavity detuning, except in the resonant case, can guarantee the occurrence of EIT in the system. For the initial value of the cavity field, a negative region appears in absorption spectrum of the V-type atomic ensemble. Meanwhile, the Λ configuration does not show a such process. According to our results, in the appearance of the transparency window, the position of movable mirror changes significantly.

  16. A 1D Optomechanical crystal with a complete phononic band gap

    CERN Document Server

    Gomis-Bresco, J; Oudich, M; El-Jallal, S; Griol, A; Puerto, D; Chavez, E; Pennec, Y; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Alzina, F; Martínez, A; Torres, C M Sotomayor

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed the boom of cavity optomechanics, which exploits the confinement and coupling of optical waves and mechanical vibrations at the nanoscale. Amongst the different physical implementations,optomechanical (OM) crystals built on semiconductor slabs are particularly interesting since they enable the integration and manipulation of multiple OM elements in a single chip and provide GHz phonons suitable for coherent phonon manipulation. Different demonstrations of coupling of infrared photons and GHz phonons in cavities created by inserting defects on OM crystals have been performed. However, the considered structures do not show a complete phononic bandgap at the frequencies of interest, which in principle should allow longer dephasing time, since acoustic leakage is minimized. In this work we demonstrate the excitation of acoustic modes in a 1D OM crystal properly designed to display a full phononic bandgap for acoustic modes at about 4 GHz. The confined phonons have an OM coupling rangin...

  17. Delaying or advancing higher-order sideband signals with active optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Yafeng; Qian, Jun; Li, Yong; Jing, H

    2016-01-01

    We study the gain-assisted light transmissions in optomechanical systems, especially the nonlinear higher-order sideband process. We find that: (i) in a single active cavity, the efficiency of the second-order process is considerably enhanced, and the accompanying group delay can surpass that of the probe field, which is unattainable for a lossy cavity (i.e. without any gain); (ii) in an active-passive compound system, the second-order process can be further enhanced by approaching to the gain-loss balance, and hundreds of microsecond of relative delay or advance are achievable between the probe and the second-order signal, indicating an active optomechanical modulator both in frequency and time domains.

  18. Signatures of nonlinear optomechanics and engineering of nonclassical mechanical steady states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkje, Kjetil

    2013-03-01

    Motivated by recent improvements in coupling strength between light and mechanical motion, we study the strong coupling regime of cavity optomechanics theoretically. We focus on the regime where the optomechanical coupling rate is still small compared to the mechanical resonance frequency, but where the mechanically induced Kerr nonlinearity is significant. The response of the system to an optical drive is characterized. The average photon number in the cavity as a function of drive detuning can feature several peaks due to multi-photon transitions. Furthermore, we show that by optically driving the system at multiple frequencies, multi-photon transitions can facilitate the engineering of nonclassical steady states of the mechanical oscillator. The author acknowledges financial support from The Danish Council for Independent Research under the Sapere Aude program.

  19. Pulsed excitation dynamics of an optomechanical crystal resonator near its quantum ground-state of motion

    CERN Document Server

    Meenehan, Sean M; MacCabe, Gregory S; Marsili, Francesco; Shaw, Matthew D; Painter, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    Using pulsed optical excitation and read-out along with single phonon counting techniques, we measure the transient back-action, heating, and damping dynamics of a nanoscale silicon optomechanical crystal cavity mounted in a dilution refrigerator at a base temperature of 11mK. In addition to observing a slow (~740ns) turn-on time for the optical-absorption-induced hot phonon bath, we measure for the 5.6GHz `breathing' acoustic mode of the cavity an initial phonon occupancy as low as 0.021 +- 0.007 (mode temperature = 70mK) and an intrinsic mechanical decay rate of 328 +- 14 Hz (mechanical Q-factor = 1.7x10^7). These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of using short pulsed measurements for a variety of quantum optomechanical applications despite the presence of steady-state optical heating.

  20. Quantum state reconstruction of an oscillator network in an optomechanical setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Darren W.; Tufarelli, Tommaso; Paternostro, Mauro; Ferraro, Alessandro

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a scheme to reconstruct an arbitrary quantum state of a mechanical oscillator network. We assume that a single element of the network is coupled to a cavity field via a linearized optomechanical interaction, the time dependence of which is controlled by a classical driving field. By designing a suitable interaction profile, we show how the statistics of an arbitrary mechanical quadrature can be encoded in the cavity field, which can then be measured. We discuss the important special case of Gaussian state reconstruction and study numerically the effectiveness of our scheme for a finite number of measurements. Finally, we speculate on possible routes to extend our ideas to the regime of single-photon optomechanics.

  1. Rayleigh scattering boosted multi-GHz displacement sensitivity in whispering gallery opto-mechanical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Tallur, Siddharth

    2013-01-01

    Finite photon lifetimes for light fields in an opto-mechanical cavity impose a bandwidth limit on displacement sensing at mechanical resonance frequencies beyond the loaded cavity photon decay rate. Opto-mechanical modulation efficiency can be enhanced via multi-GHz transduction techniques such as piezo-opto-mechanics at the cost of on-chip integration. In this paper, we present a novel high bandwidth displacement sense scheme employing Rayleigh scattering in photonic resonators. Using this technique in conjunction with on-chip electrostatic drive in silicon enables efficient modulation at frequencies up to 9.1GHz. Being independent of the drive mechanism, this scheme could readily be extended to piezo-opto-mechanical and all optical transduced systems.

  2. Flat Zipper-Unfolding Pairs for Platonic Solids

    CERN Document Server

    O'Rourke, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    We show that four of the five Platonic solids' surfaces may be cut open with a Hamiltonian path along edges and unfolded to a polygonal net each of which can "zipper-refold" to a flat doubly covered parallelogram, forming a rather compact representation of the surface. Thus these regular polyhedra have particular flat "zipper pairs." No such zipper pair exists for a dodecahedron, whose Hamiltonian unfoldings are "zip-rigid." This report is primarily an inventory of the possibilities, and raises more questions than it answers.

  3. Observation of optomechanical buckling transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Kemiktarak, U.; Fan, J.; Ragole, S.; Lawall, J.; Taylor, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    Correlated phases of matter provide long-term stability for systems as diverse as solids, magnets and potential exotic quantum materials. Mechanical systems, such as buckling transition spring switches, can have engineered, stable configurations whose dependence on a control variable is reminiscent of non-equilibrium phase transitions. In hybrid optomechanical systems, light and matter are strongly coupled, allowing engineering of rapid changes in the force landscape, storing and processing information, and ultimately probing and controlling behaviour at the quantum level. Here we report the observation of first- and second-order buckling transitions between stable mechanical states in an optomechanical system, in which full control of the nature of the transition is obtained by means of the laser power and detuning. The underlying multiwell confining potential we create is highly tunable, with a sub-nanometre distance between potential wells. Our results enable new applications in photonics and information technology, and may enable explorations of quantum phase transitions and macroscopic quantum tunnelling in mechanical systems.

  4. Leucine zipper transcription factor-like 1 expression in gastric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gastric cancer and its relationship to relative adhesion molecule ... Keywords: Leucine zipper transcription factor-like1 expression, Gastric cancer, Relative adhesion molecule, Protein ..... cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and recurrence [17].

  5. Strong optomechanical interactions in a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam

    CERN Document Server

    Leijssen, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanical systems can be used for sensitive detection of mechanical motion and to control mechanical resonators, down to the quantum level. The strength with which optical and mechanical degrees of freedom interact is defined by the photon-phonon coupling rate $g_0$, which is especially large in nanoscale systems. Here, we demonstrate an optomechanical system based on a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam, that combines subwavelength optical confinement with a low-mass mechanical mode. Analyzing the transduction of motion and effects of radiation pressure we find a coupling rate $g_0$/2{\\pi} = 11.5 MHz, exceeding previously reported values by an order of magnitude. Using this interaction we detect the resonator's motion with a noise imprecision below that at the standard quantum limit, even though the system has optical and mechanical quality factors smaller than $10^3$. The broad bandwidth is useful for application in miniature sensors, and for measurement-based control of the resonator's motional s...

  6. Dynamically creating tripartite resonance and dark modes in a multimode optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damskägg, Erno; Pirkkalainen, Juha-Matti; Sillanpää, Mika A.

    2016-10-01

    We study a multimode optomechanical system where two mechanical oscillators are coupled to an electromagnetic cavity. Previously it has been shown that if the mechanical resonances have nearly equal frequencies, one can make the oscillators to interact via the cavity by strong pumping with a coherent pump tone. One can view the interaction also as emergence of an electromagnetically dark mode which gets asymptotically decoupled from the cavity and has a linewidth much smaller than that of the bare cavity. The narrow linewidth and long lifetime of the dark mode could be advantageous, for example in information storage and processing. Here we investigate the possibility to create dark modes dynamically using two pump tones. We show that if the mechanical frequencies are intrinsically different, one can bring the mechanical oscillators and the cavity on-resonance and thus create a dark mode by double sideband pumping of the cavity. We realize the scheme in a microwave optomechanical device employing two drum oscillators with unmatched frequencies, {ω }1/2π =8.1 {MHz} and {ω }2/2π =14.2 {MHz}. We also observe a breakdown of the rotating-wave approximation, most pronounced in another device where the mechanical frequencies are close to each other.

  7. Nonclassical mechanical states in an optomechanical micromaser analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, P. D.

    2013-11-01

    Here we show that quantum states of a mechanical oscillator can be generated in an optomechanical analog of the micromaser in the absence of any atomlike subsystem, thus exhibiting single-atom masing effects in a system composed solely of oscillator components. In the regime where the single-photon coupling strength is on the order of the cavity decay rate, a cavity mode with at most a single-excitation present gives rise to sub-Poissonian oscillator limit-cycles that generate quantum features in the steady state just above the renormalized cavity resonance frequency and mechanical sidebands. The merger of multiple stable limit-cycles markedly reduces these nonclassical signatures. Varying the cavity-resonator coupling strength, corresponding to the micromaser pump parameter, reveals transitions for the oscillator phonon number that are the hallmark of a micromaser. The connection to the micromaser allows for a physical understanding of how nonclassical states arise in this system and how best to maximize these signatures for experimental observation.

  8. Quantum Optomechanics with Silicon Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    Mechanical resonators are the most basic and ubiquitous physical systems known. In on-chip form, they are used to process high frequency signals in every cell phone, television, and laptop. They have also been in the last few decades in different shapes and forms, a critical part of progress in quantum information sciences with kilogram scale mirrors for gravitational wave detection measuring motion at its quantum limits, and the motion of single ions being used to link qubits for quantum computation. Optomechanics is a field primarily concerned with coupling light to the motion of mechanical structures. This thesis contains descriptions of recent work with mechanical systems in the megahertz to gigahertz frequency range, formed by nanofabricating novel photonic/phononic structures on a silicon chip. These structures are designed to have both optical and mechanical resonances, and laser light is used to address and manipulate their motional degrees of freedom through radiation pressure forces. We laser cool these mechanical resonators to their ground states, and observe for the first time the quantum zero-point motion of a nanomechanical resonator. Conversely, we show that engineered mechanical resonances drastically modify the optical response of our structures, creating large effective optical nonlinearities not present in bulk silicon. We experimentally demonstrate aspects of these nonlinearities by proposing and observing ``electromagnetically induced transparency'' and light slowed down to 6 m/s, as well as wavelength conversion, and generation of nonclassical optical radiation. Finally, the application of optomechanics to longstanding problems in quantum and classical communications are proposed and investigated.

  9. Storage and retrieval of quantum information with a hybrid optomechanics-spin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhi-Bo; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Yang, Wan-Li; Feng, Mang

    2016-08-01

    We explore an efficient scheme for transferring the quantum state between an optomechanical cavity and an electron spin of diamond nitrogen-vacancy center. Assisted by a mechanical resonator, quantum information can be controllably stored (retrieved) into (from) the electron spin by adjusting the external field-induced detuning or coupling. Our scheme connects effectively the cavity photon and the electron spin and transfers quantum states between two regimes with large frequency difference. The experimental feasibility of our protocol is justified with accessible laboratory parameters.

  10. Optomechanical Dark State in a Dual-Species Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    景辉; D.S. Goldbaum

    2012-01-01

    We study cavity optomechanics of ultracold dual-species atomic mixtures with nonlinear collisions.Interspecies interactions provide a direct parametric coupling of fictitious mechanical elements which,through interfering with the intracavity optical field,leads to a switchable optically-dark state for either species.This demonstrates a matter-wave analog of recently observed mechanical wave mixing and quantum motional-state swapping,with applications in the construction of integrated phononic devices,and the cavity-enhanced detection of quantum degenerate atomic mixtures.

  11. A simple and tunable switch between slow- and fast-light in two signal modes with an optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Peng-Cheng; Yan, Lei-Lei; Chen, Gui-Bin; Li, Xiao-Wei; Zhan, You-Bang

    2016-12-01

    The control of slow and fast light propagation is a challenging task. Here, we theoretically study the dynamics of a driven optomechanical cavity coupled to a charged nanomechanical resonator (NR) via Coulomb interaction. We find that the tunable switch between slow- and fast-light for two signal modes can be observed from the output field by adjusting the laser-cavity detuning in this system. Moreover, the frequencies of two signal light can be tuned by Coulomb coupling strength. In comparison with previous schemes, the clear advantage of our scheme is that we can simply switch from fast- to slow-light in two signal modes by only adjusting the laser-cavity deturning from Δ ={ω1} to Δ =-{ω1} . The proposal may have potential application in optical router and quantum optomechanical memory.

  12. Nonlinear dynamics and chaos in an optomechanical beam

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro-Urrios, D; Colombano, M F; Garcia, P D; Sledzinska, M; Alzina, F; Griol, A; Martinez, A; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-01-01

    Optical non-linearities, such as thermo-optic effects and free-carrier-dispersion, are often considered as undesired effects in silicon-based resonators and, more specifically, optomechanical (OM) cavities, affecting the relative detuning between an optical resonance and the excitation laser. However, the interplay between such mechanisms could also enable unexpected physical phenomena to be used in new applications. In the present work, we exploit those non-linearities and their intercoupling with the mechanical degrees of freedom of a silicon OM nanobeam to unveil a rich set of fundamentally different complex dynamics. By smoothly changing the parameters of the excitation laser, namely its power and wavelength, we demonstrate accurate control for activating bi-dimensional and tetra-dimensional limit-cycles, a period doubling route and chaos. In addition, by scanning the laser parameters in opposite senses we demonstrate bistability and hysteresis between bi-dimensional and tetra-dimensional limit-cycles, be...

  13. CONTRIBUTIONS TO CLASSIFICATION ZIPPERS USED IN INDUSTRY FOOTWEAR AND LEATHER GOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALCOCI Marina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Now customary accessory companies of all leather garments, zipper began to enjoy popularity only after 80 years of its invention. The first is considered the inventor of the zipper Elias Howe. Essentially involves fashion, change, innovation, originality, creativity and is defined as a succession of trends or fads, short. Create fashionable leather confections from home means accepting a contract with the producer and / or consumer, showing a profit motivating all at the right time. Continuous which require the exercise involves creative skills of fashion design, leading to a wide range of products. Current zipper is composed of: slider, teeth, strips shooter stops. Currently there is possibility to customize shooters to customer requirements, and even to form their own zippers. The present work presents the classification criteria zippers. They are after construction fastener after destination zippers, after the role they fulfill zippers, after the presentation at the procurement zippers, after finishing module of the metallic elements, as visibility zipper in the product, by type of teeth, by nature material strip zipper, after the type of materials they are made pullers, after the nature of the materials they are made of sliders and stops after the oxidation of metal components after finishing module teeth after shaped zipper, after slider type, by mode of ornamentation zippers. Knowing appearance zippers, elements of which it is composed, and their classification criteria allow us to correlate the shape of the product and destination.

  14. Levitated Optomechanics for Fundamental Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muddassar; Bateman, James; Vovrosh, Jamie; Hempston, David; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-05-01

    Optomechanics with levitated nano- and microparticles is believed to form a platform for testing fundamental principles of quantum physics, as well as find applications in sensing. We will report on a new scheme to trap nanoparticles, which is based on a parabolic mirror with a numerical aperture of 1. Combined with achromatic focussing, the setup is a cheap and readily straightforward solution to trapping nanoparticles for further study. Here, we report on the latest progress made in experimentation with levitated nanoparticles; these include the trapping of 100 nm nanodiamonds (with NV-centres) down to 1 mbar as well as the trapping of 50 nm Silica spheres down to 10?4 mbar without any form of feedback cooling. We will also report on the progress to implement feedback stabilisation of the centre of mass motion of the trapped particle using digital electronics. Finally, we argue that such a stabilised particle trap can be the particle source for a nanoparticle matterwave interferometer. We will present our Talbot interferometer scheme, which holds promise to test the quantum superposition principle in the new mass range of 106 amu. EPSRC, John Templeton Foundation.

  15. Coherent Atom-Phonon Interaction through Mode Field Coupling in Hybrid Optomechanical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cotrufo, Michele; Verhagen, Ewold

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel type of optomechanical coupling which enables a tripartite interaction between a quantum emitter, an optical mode and a macroscopic mechanical oscillator. The interaction uses a mechanism we term mode field coupling: mechanical displacement modifies the spatial distribution of the optical mode field, which in turn modulates the atom-photon coupling rate. In properly designed multimode optomechanical systems, we can achieve situations in which mode field coupling is the only possible interaction pathway for the system. This enables, for example, swapping of a single excitation between emitter and phonon, creation of nonclassical states of motion and mechanical ground-state cooling in the bad-cavity regime. Importantly, the emitter-phonon coupling rate can be enhanced through an optical drive field, allowing active control of strong atom-phonon coupling for realistic experimental parameters.

  16. Acousto-Optic Modulation and Optoacoustic Gating in Piezo-Optomechanical Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balram, Krishna C.; Davanço, Marcelo I.; Ilic, B. Robert; Kyhm, Ji-Hoon; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic-wave devices provide a promising chip-scale platform for efficiently coupling radio frequency (rf) and optical fields. Here, we use an integrated piezo-optomechanical circuit platform that exploits both the piezoelectric and photoelastic coupling mechanisms to link 2.4-GHz rf waves to 194-THz (1550 nm) optical waves, through coupling to propagating and localized 2.4-GHz acoustic waves. We demonstrate acousto-optic modulation, resonant in both the optical and mechanical domains, in which waveforms encoded on the rf carrier are mapped to the optical field. We also show optoacoustic gating, in which the application of modulated optical pulses interferometrically gates the transmission of propagating acoustic pulses. The time-domain characteristics of this system under both pulsed rf and pulsed optical excitation are considered in the context of the different physical pathways involved in driving the acoustic waves, and modeled through the coupled mode equations of cavity optomechanics.

  17. GaAs-based air-slot photonic crystal nanocavity for optomechanical oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Masahiro

    2012-02-27

    We theoretically investigate an optomechanical structure consisting of two parallel GaAs membranes with an air-slot type photonic crystal nanocavity. The optical cavity has a quality factor of 4.8 × 106 at 1.52 μm and an extremely small modal volume of 0.015 of a cubic wavelength for the fundamental mode in a vacuum. The localized electric field near the air/dielectric-object boundary provides a large optomechanical coupling factor of ~990 GHz/nm. The fundamental mechanical mode resonance is 95 MHz and a quality factor is 83,800 at room temperature, nearly seven times higher than that for a similar Si-based structure. This high mechanical quality factor of a GaAs-based structure stems from low thermoelastic loss and leads to more effective optical control of nanomechanical oscillators.

  18. Acousto-optic and opto-acoustic modulation in piezo-optomechanical circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Balram, Krishna C; Ilic, B Robert; Kyhm, Ji-Hoon; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic wave devices provide a promising chip-scale platform for efficiently coupling radio frequency (RF) and optical fields. Here, we use an integrated piezo-optomechanical circuit platform that exploits both the piezoelectric and photoelastic coupling mechanisms to link 2.4 GHz RF waves to 194 THz (1550 nm) optical waves, through coupling to propagating and localized 2.4 GHz acoustic waves. We demonstrate acousto-optic modulation, resonant in both the optical and mechanical domains, in which waveforms encoded on the RF carrier are mapped to the optical field. We also show opto-acoustic modulation, in which the application of optical pulses gates the transmission of propagating acoustic waves. The time-domain characteristics of this system under both pulsed RF and pulsed optical excitation are considered in the context of the different physical pathways involved in driving the acoustic waves, and modeled through the coupled mode equations of cavity optomechanics.

  19. Optomechanical light storage in a silica microresonator

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Victor; Kuzyk, Mark C; Wang, Hailin

    2013-01-01

    Coherent inter-conversion between an optical and a mechanical excitation in an optomechanical resonator can be used for the storage of an optical pulse as an excitation in a mechanical oscillator. This optomechanical light storage is enabled by external writing and readout pulses at one mechanical frequency below the optical resonance. In this paper, we expand an earlier experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 133601 (2011)] on storing an optical pulse as a radial breathing mode in a silica microsphere. We show that the heterodyne beating between a readout pulse and the corresponding retrieved pulse features a periodic oscillation with a well-defined phase and with the beating period given by the mechanical frequency, demonstrating directly the coherent nature of the light storage process. The coherent inter-conversion accelerates with increasing optomechanical coupling rates, providing an effective mechanism for tailoring the temporal profile of the retrieved pulse. Experimental studies on both light stora...

  20. Electromagnetically induced transparency and slow light in two-mode optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Cheng; Cui, Yuanshun; Li, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate the mechanically mediated electromagnetically induced transparency in a two-mode cavity optomechanical system, where two cavity modes are coupled to a common mechanical resonator. When the two cavity modes are driven on their respective red sidebands by two pump beams, a transparency window appears in the probe transmission spectrum due to destructive interference. Under this situation the transmitted probe beam can be delayed as much as 4 us, which can be easily controlled by the power of the pump beams. In addition, we also investigate the amplification of the transmitted probe beam owing to constructive interference when one cavity is driven on its blue sideband while another one is driven on its red sideband.

  1. Enhancing the Bandwidth of Gravitational-Wave Detectors with Unstable Optomechanical Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Haixing; Ma, Yiqiu; Zhao, Chunnong; Chen, Yanbei

    2015-11-20

    Advanced interferometric gravitational-wave detectors use optical cavities to resonantly enhance their shot-noise-limited sensitivity. Because of positive dispersion of these cavities-signals at different frequencies pick up different phases, there is a tradeoff between the detector bandwidth and peak sensitivity, which is a universal feature for quantum measurement devices having resonant cavities. We consider embedding an active unstable filter inside the interferometer to compensate the phase, and using feedback control to stabilize the entire system. We show that this scheme in principle can enhance the bandwidth without sacrificing the peak sensitivity. However, the unstable filter under our current consideration is a cavity-assisted optomechanical device operating in the instability regime, and the thermal fluctuation of the mechanical oscillator puts a very stringent requirement on the environmental temperature and the mechanical quality factor.

  2. SNARE zippering is hindered by polyphenols in the neuron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yoosoo [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Hyun; Heo, Paul; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Jonghyeok; Jung, Young-Hun; Yoon, Keejung; Chung, Woo-Jae [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yeon-Kyun [Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Molecular Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Kweon, Dae-Hyuk, E-mail: dhkweon@skku.edu [Department of Genetic Engineering and Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Membrane fusion driven by SNARE complex is hindered by several polyphenols. • Distinctive inhibitory effect of each polyphenol on SNARE zippering in neuron was examined. • FRET between fluorescence protein-tagged SNAREs probed well SNARE zippering in PC12 cells. • Delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit N-terminal SNARE nucleation in Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner. • Myricetin inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transmembrane association of SNARE complex. - Abstract: Fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane in the neuron is mediated by soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. SNARE complex formation is a zippering-like process which initiates at the N-terminus and proceeds to the C-terminal membrane-proximal region. Previously, we showed that this zippering-like process is regulated by several polyphenols, leading to the arrest of membrane fusion and the inhibition of neuroexocytosis. In vitro studies using purified SNARE proteins reconstituted in liposomes revealed that each polyphenol uniquely regulates SNARE zippering. However, the unique regulatory effect of each polyphenol in cells has not yet been examined. In the present study, we observed SNARE zippering in neuronal PC12 cells by measuring the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) changes of a cyan fluorescence protein (CFP) and a yellow fluorescence protein (YFP) fused to the N-termini or C-termini of SNARE proteins. We show that delphinidin and cyanidin inhibit the initial N-terminal nucleation of SNARE complex formation in a Ca{sup 2+}-independent manner, while myricetin inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transmembrane domain association of the SNARE complex in the cell. This result explains how polyphenols exhibit botulinum neurotoxin-like activity in vivo.

  3. Reservoir-engineered entanglement in optomechanical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Dan; Clerk, Aashish A

    2013-06-21

    We show how strong steady-state entanglement can be achieved in a three-mode optomechanical system (or other parametrically coupled bosonic system) by effectively laser cooling a delocalized Bogoliubov mode. This approach allows one to surpass the bound on the maximum stationary intracavity entanglement possible with a coherent two-mode squeezing interaction. In particular, we find that optimizing the relative ratio of optomechanical couplings, rather than simply increasing their magnitudes, is essential for achieving strong entanglement. Unlike typical dissipative entanglement schemes, our results cannot be described by treating the effects of the entangling reservoir via a Linblad master equation.

  4. Structured detailed opto-mechanical tolerance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, P. C.

    2016-02-01

    Opto-mechanical tolerancing is a complex art, which is often reduced to inadequate tabled data of allowable tilts and decentres. During the process the respective roles of optical- and mechanical designers can become entangled and a source of conflict. A framework of principles is introduced to guide the design team through these murky waters. From these principles the development of a catalogue of models, practices and past precedents are proposed. An example is presented to serve as illustration. The final result is a model, of opto-mechanical tolerances, which allows a structured flow of tolerances into optical performance prediction.

  5. Optical and mechanical mode tuning in an optomechanical crystal with light-induced thermal effects

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro-Urrios, D; Capuj, N E; Alzina, F; Griol, A; Puerto, D; Martínez, A; Sotomayor-Torres, C M

    2016-01-01

    We report on the modification of the optical and mechanical properties of a silicon 1D optomechanical crystal cavity due to thermo-optic effects in a high phonon/photon population regime. The cavity heats up due to light absorption in a way that shifts the optical modes towards longer wavelengths and the mechanical modes to lower frequencies. By combining the experimental optical results with finite-difference time-domain simulations we establish a direct relation between the observed wavelength drift and the actual effective temperature increase of the cavity. By assuming that the Young's modulus decreases accordingly to the temperature increase, we find a good agreement between the mechanical mode drift predicted using a finite element method and the experimental one.

  6. Optomechanical self-oscillations in an anharmonic potential: engineering a nonclassical steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Manuel; Bruder, Christoph; Lörch, Niels

    2016-09-01

    We study self-oscillations of an optomechanical system, where coherent mechanical oscillations are induced by a driven optical or microwave cavity, for the case of an anharmonic mechanical oscillator potential. A semiclassical analytical model is developed to characterize the limit cycle for large mechanical amplitudes corresponding to a weak nonlinearity. As a result, we predict conditions to achieve subpoissonian phonon statistics in the steady state, indicating classically forbidden behavior. We compare with numerical simulations and find very good agreement. Our model is quite general and can be applied to other physical systems such as trapped ions or superconducting circuits.

  7. Microfabrication of large-area circular high-stress silicon nitride membranes for optomechanical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Serra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the integration of membrane resonators with more complex MEMS structures, we developed a general fabrication procedure for circular shape SiNx membranes using Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE. Large area and high-stress SiNx membranes were fabricated and used as optomechanical resonators in a Michelson interferometer, where Q values up to 1.3 × 106 were measured at cryogenic temperatures, and in a Fabry-Pérot cavity, where an optical finesse up to 50000 has been observed.

  8. Atom-membrane cooling and entanglement using cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genes, Claudiu; Ritsch, Helmut; Drewsen, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a hybrid optomechanical system composed of a micromechanical oscillator as a movable membrane and an atomic three-level ensemble within an optical cavity. We show that a suitably tailored cavity field response via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the atomic medium...

  9. Slot-Mode Optomechanical Crystals: A Versatile Platform for Multimode Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Grutter, Karen E; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate slot-mode optomechanical crystals, a class of device in which photonic and phononic crystal nanobeam resonators separated by a narrow slot are coupled through optomechanical interactions. In these geometries, nanobeam pairs are patterned so that a mechanical breathing mode is confined at the center of one beam, and a high quality factor (Qo>10^5) optical mode is confined in the slot between the beams. Here, we produce slot-mode devices in a stoichiometric Si3N4 platform, with optical modes in the 980 nm band, coupled to breathing mechanical modes at 3.4 GHz, 1.8 GHz, and 400 MHz. We exploit the high Si3N4 tensile stress to achieve slot widths down to 24 nm, which leads to enhanced optomechanical coupling, sufficient for the observation of optomechanical self-oscillations at all studied frequencies. We utilize the slot mode concept to develop multimode optomechanical systems with triple-beam geometries, in which two optical modes are coupled to a single mechanical mode, and two mechanical modes ...

  10. Retrieval of specimens in laparoscopy using reclosable zipper-type plastic bags: a simple, cheap, and useful method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A; Vázquez, J A; Valencia, S; Cueto, J

    1998-12-01

    Surgical specimens must often be extracted during laparoscopic surgery. Although the technologic advances in this field are amazing, simple measures may sometimes work even better than very sophisticated instruments. This is true of the reclosable plastic bags with zipper-type closure that we use for retrieving surgical specimens from the abdominal cavity in order to protect it as well as the abdominal wall. The bags are cheap, offer no problems for sterilization, are easy to obtain, and are available in many sizes. They are very simple to handle, making it easy to slip in the specimen and then extract it from the abdominal cavity. We describe our experience with these bags and a technique for manipulating them.

  11. Nanocavity optomechanical torque magnetometry and RF susceptometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Marcelo; Firdous, Tayyaba; Sani, Fatemeh Fani; Losby, Joseph E; Freeman, Mark R; Barclay, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Nanophotonic optomechanical devices allow observation of nanoscale vibrations with sensitivity that has dramatically advanced metrology of nanomechanical structures [1-9] and has the potential to similarly impact studies of nanoscale physical systems [10, 11]. Here we demonstrate this potential with a nanophotonic optomechanical torque magnetometer and radio-frequency (RF) magnetic susceptometer. Exquisite readout sensitivity provided by a nanocavity integrated within a torsional nanomechanical resonator enables observations of the unique net magnetization and RF driven responses of single mesoscopic magnetic structures in ambient conditions. The magnetic moment resolution is sufficient for observation of Barkhausen steps in the magnetic hysteresis of a lithographically-patterned permalloy island [12]. In addition, significantly enhanced RF susceptibility is found over narrow field ranges and attributed to thermally-assisted driven hopping of a magnetic vortex core between neighboring pinning sites [13]. The ...

  12. Optomechanical transducers for quantum information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Stannigel, K; Sørensen, A S; Lukin, M D; Zoller, P

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the implementation of optical quantum networks where the interface between stationary and photonic qubits is realized by optomechanical transducers [K. Stannigel et al., PRL 105, 220501 (2010)]. This approach does not rely on the optical properties of the qubit and thereby enables optical quantum communication applications for a wide range of solid-state spin- and charge-based systems. We present an effective description of such networks for many qubits and give a derivation of a state transfer protocol for long-distance quantum communication. We also describe how to mediate local on-chip interactions by means of the optomechanical transducers that can be used for entangling gates. We finally discuss experimental systems for the realization of our proposal.

  13. PT-Symmetric Optomechanically-Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, H; Özdemir, S K; Zhang, J; Lü, X -Y; Peng, B; Yang, L; Nori, F

    2014-01-01

    Optomechanically-induced transparency (OMIT) and the associated slow-light propagation provide the basis for storing photons in nanofabricated phononic devices. Here we study OMIT in parity-time (PT)-symmetric microresonators with a tunable gain-to-loss ratio. This system features a reversed, non-amplifying transparency: inverted-OMIT. When the gain-to-loss ratio is steered, the system exhibits a transition from the PT-symmetric phase to the broken-PT-symmetric phase. We show that by tuning the pump power at fixed gain-to-loss ratio or the gain-to-loss ratio at fixed pump power, one can switch from slow to fast light and vice versa. Moreover, the presence of PT-phase transition results in the reversal of the pump and gain dependence of transmission rates. These features provide new tools for controlling light propagation using optomechanical devices.

  14. Brillouin Optomechanics in Coupled Silicon Microcavities

    CERN Document Server

    Espinel, Yovanny A V; Luiz, Gustavo O; Alegre, Thiago P M; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous control of optical and mechanical waves has enabled a range of fundamental and technological breakthroughs, from the demonstration of ultra-stable frequency reference devices to the exploration of the quantum-classical boundaries in laser-cooling experiments. More recently, such an opto-mechanical interaction has been observed in integrated nano-waveguides and microcavities in the Brillouin regime, where short-wavelength mechanical modes scatters light at several GHz. Here we engineer coupled optical microcavities spectra to enable a low threshold excitation of mechanical travelling-wave modes through backward stimulated Brillouin scattering. Exploring the backward scattering we propose microcavity designs supporting super high frequency modes ($\\sim25$ GHz) an large optomechanical coupling rates ($g_0/2\\pi \\sim 50$ kHz).

  15. Nano-optomechanical Nonlinear Dielectric Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Karvounis, Artemios; MacDonald, Kevin F; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01

    By harnessing the resonant nature of localized electromagnetic modes in a nanostructured silicon membrane, an all-dielectric metamaterial can act as nonlinear medium at optical telecommunications wavelengths. We show that such metamaterials provide extremely large optomechanical nonlinearities, operating at intensities of only a few {\\mu}W per unit cell and modulation frequencies as high as 152 MHz, thereby offering a path to fast, lossless, compact and energy efficient all-optical metadevices.

  16. Advanced composite materials for optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweben, Carl

    2013-09-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) have been well established in optomechanical systems for several decades. The other three classes of composites; metal matrix composites (MMCs), ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), and carbon matrix composites (CAMCs) are making significant inroads. The latter include carbon/carbon (C/C) composites (CCCs). The success of composites has resulted in increasing use in consumer, industrial, scientific, and aerospace/defense optomechanical applications. Composites offer significant advantages over traditional materials, including high stiffnesses and strengths, near-zero and tailorable coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs), tailorable thermal conductivities (from very low to over twice that of copper), and low densities. In addition, they lack beryllium's toxicity problems. Some manufacturing processes allow parts consolidation, reducing machining and joining operations. At present, PMCs are the most widely used composites. Optomechanical applications date from the 1970s. The second High Energy Astrophysical Observatory spacecraft, placed in orbit in 1978, had an ultrahigh-modulus carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy (carbon/epoxy) optical bench metering structure. Since then, fibers and matrix materials have advanced significantly, and use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs) has increased steadily. Space system examples include the Hubble Space Telescope metering truss and instrument benches, Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), James Webb Space Telescope and many others. Use has spread to airborne applications, such as SOFIA. Perhaps the most impressive CFRP applications are the fifty-four 12m and twelve 7m moveable ground-based ALMA antennas. The other three classes of composites have a number of significant advantages over PMCs, including no moisture absorption or outgassing of organic compounds. CCC and CMC components have flown on a variety of spacecraft. MMCs have been used in space, aircraft, military and industrial

  17. Scanning Motion; Opto-Mechanical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Roger S.

    1988-11-01

    The field of electro-optics has grown enormously in the last 25 years. As a consequence, both optics and optical engineering have mushroomed. The mechanical engineer, during this period, has been patiently providing the necessary support technology to achieve precision instrument design. Within the last 5 years, the discipline of opto-mechanical engineering has been emerging as a driving force to channel information to the precision mechanical engineer. In an overview article, "Opto-Mechanical Instrument Design", one of the key subtopics is "Scanning Motion." This paper is about that subtopic, specifically directed to the precision mechanical engineer and his involvement with Mirror Scanning Motion Systems. The purpose of this paper is to inform the mechanical engineer as to the many considerations necessary during the design and development of a precision instrument. The logical starting point will be the fundamentals for opto-mechanical engineering as established by Dan Vukobratovich. The glossary at the end is an attempt to define many of the terms in his notes, plus any others that have arisen. These definitions are not for the physicist, electrical engineer, or mathematician, but for the mechanical engineer. The body of this paper covers over fifty papers which can be located by using the key words "mirror" and "scanning" and limiting the search to the past 5 years.

  18. A microscopic model for quantum optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kanupriya

    We study a microscopic model, the Mirror-Oscillator-Field (MOF) model proposed in [1], for describing optomechanical interactions. In contrast with the conventional approach where the mirror-field interaction is understood as arising from the radiation pressure of an optical field inducing the motion of the mirror's CoM, the MOF model incorporates the dynamics of the internal degrees of freedom of the mirror that couple to the optical field directly. Considering the mirror's internal and mechanical degrees of freedom as two separate degrees of freedom we derive the optomechanical properties of the coupled mirror and field system. The major advantage in this approach is that it provides a self-consistent treatment of the three relevant subsystems (the mirror's motion, its internal degrees of freedom and the field) including their back-actions on each other, thereby giving a more accurate account of the coupled internal and external dynamics. The optical and the mechanical properties of a mirror arising from its dynamical interaction with the field are obtained without imposing any boundary conditions on the field additionally, as is done in the conventional way. We find that our results agree with those from the boundary condition approach in the appropriate limits and more generally the model provides a framework within which one can study optomechanical elements with different internal structures and mechanical properties, which makes it suited for studying hybrid systems. Considering the quantum dynamics of the coupled subsystems we look at the entanglement between the mirror's motion and the field, showing that the internal degrees of the mirror, in the appropriate parameter regimes, can act as a means to coherently transfer quantum correlations between the field and the mechanics thus leading to a larger optomechanical entanglement. We then use the MOF model to study the entanglement between the motion of an atom and a field for the setup in [95] and find a

  19. Fiber-optic integration and efficient detection schemes for optomechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Justin D.

    With the advent of the laser in the year 1960, the field of optics experienced a renaissance from what was considered to be a dull, solved subject to an active area of development, with applications and discoveries which are yet to be exhausted 55 years later. Light is now nearly ubiquitous not only in cutting-edge research in physics, chemistry, and biology, but also in modern technology and infrastructure. One quality of light, that of the imparted radiation pressure force upon reflection from an object, has attracted intense interest from researchers seeking to precisely monitor and control the motional degrees of freedom of an object using light. These optomechanical interactions have inspired myriad proposals, ranging from quantum memories and transducers in quantum information networks to precision metrology of classical forces. Alongside advances in micro- and nano-fabrication, the burgeoning field of optomechanics has yielded a class of highly engineered systems designed to produce strong interactions between light and motion. Optomechanical crystals are one such system in which the patterning of periodic holes in thin dielectric films traps both light and sound waves to a micro-scale volume. These devices feature strong radiation pressure coupling between high-quality optical cavity modes and internal nanomechanical resonances. Whether for applications in the quantum or classical domain, the utility of optomechanical crystals hinges on the degree to which light radiating from the device, having interacted with mechanical motion, can be collected and detected in an experimental apparatus consisting of conventional optical components such as lenses and optical fibers. While several efficient methods of optical coupling exist to meet this task, most are unsuitable for the cryogenic or vacuum integration required for many applications. The first portion of this dissertation will detail the development of robust and efficient methods of optically coupling

  20. Perturbing Open Cavities: Anomalous Resonance Frequency Shifts in a Hybrid Cavity-Nanoantenna System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesink, Freek; Doeleman, Hugo M.; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A. Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-11-01

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics, and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here, we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a nontrivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing backaction via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems.

  1. Perturbing open cavities: Anomalous resonance frequency shifts in a hybrid cavity-nanoantenna system

    CERN Document Server

    Ruesink, Freek; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a non-trivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing back-action via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems.

  2. Thermalization properties at mK temperatures of a nanoscale optomechanical resonator with acoustic-bandgap shield

    CERN Document Server

    Meenehan, Sean M; Groeblacher, Simon; Hill, Jeff T; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Painter, Oskar

    2014-01-01

    Optical measurements of a nanoscale silicon optomechanical crystal cavity with a mechanical resonance frequency of 3.6GHz are performed at sub-kelvin temperatures. We infer optical-absorption-induced heating and damping of the mechanical resonator from measurements of phonon occupancy and motional sideband asymmetry. At the lowest probe power and lowest fridge temperature (10mK), the localized mechanical resonance is found to couple at a rate of 400Hz (Q=9x10^6) to a thermal bath of temperature 270mK. These measurements indicate that silicon optomechanical crystals cooled to millikelvin temperatures should be suitable for a variety of experiments involving coherent coupling between photons and phonons at the single quanta level.

  3. Controlled Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Fano Resonances in Hybrid BEC-Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Yasir, Kashif Ammar

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the controllability of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and Fano resonances in hybrid optomechanical system which is composed of cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) trapped inside high-finesse Fabry-P\\'erot cavity driven by a single mode optical field along the cavity axis and a transverse pump field. Here, transverse optical field is used to control the phenomenon of EIT in the output probe laser field. The output probe laser field can efficiently be amplified or attenuated depending on the strength of transverse optical field. Furthermore, we demonstrate the existence of Fano resonances in the output field spectra and discuss the controlled behavior of Fano resonances using transverse optical field. To observe this phenomena in laboratory, we suggest a certain set of experimental parameters.

  4. Optomechanical magnetometry with a macroscopic resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Changqiu; Sheridan, Eoin; McAuslan, David L; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Lam, Ping Koy; Zhang, Yundong; Bowen, Warwick P

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a centimeter-scale optomechanical magnetometer based on a crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator. The large size of the resonator allows high magnetic field sensitivity to be achieved in the hertz to kilohertz frequency range. A peak sensitivity of 131 pT per root Hz is reported, in a magnetically unshielded non-cryogenic environment and using optical power levels beneath 100 microWatt. Femtotesla range sensitivity may be possible in future devices with further optimization of laser noise and the physical structure of the resonator, allowing applications in high-performance magnetometry.

  5. Driven optomechanical systems for mechanical entanglement distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Paternostro, M; Li, Jie

    2012-01-01

    We consider the distribution of entanglement from a multi-mode optical driving source to a network of remote and independent optomechanical systems. By focusing on the tripartite case, we analyse the effects that the features of the optical input states have on the degree and sharing-structure of the distributed, fully mechanical, entanglement. This study, which is conducted looking at the mechanical steady-state, highlights the structure of the entanglement distributed among the nodes and determines the relative efficiency between bipartite and tripartite entanglement transfer. We discuss a few open points, some of which directed towards the bypassing of such limitations.

  6. Induced transparency in optomechanically coupled resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Zhenglu; Stace, Thomas M; Milburn, G J; Holmes, Catherine A

    2015-01-01

    In this work we theoretically investigate a hybrid system of two optomechanically coupled resonators, which exhibits induced transparency. This is realized by coupling an optical ring resonator to a toroid. In the semiclassical analyses, the system displays bistabilities, isolated branches (isolas) and self-sustained oscillation dynamics. Furthermore, we find that the induced transparency transparency window sensitively relies on the mechanical motion. Based on this fact, we show that the described system can be used as a weak force detector and the optimal sensitivity can beat the standard quantum limit without using feedback control or squeezing under available experimental conditions.

  7. Opto-mechanical door locking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Saurabh S.; Rodrigues, Vanessa M.; Patil, Ajeetkumar; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2015-09-01

    We present an Opto-mechanical Door Locking System which is an optical system that combines a simple combination of a coherent light source (Laser) and a photodiode based sensor with focus toward security applications. The basic construct of the KEY comprises a Laser source in a cylindrical enclosure that slides perfectly into the LOCK. The Laser is pulsed at a fixed encrypted frequency unique to that locking system. Transistor-transistor logic (TTL) circuitry is used to achieve encryption. The casing of the key is designed in such a way that it will power the pulsing laser only when the key is inserted in the slot provided for it. The Lock includes a photo-sensor that will convert the detected light intensity to a corresponding electrical signal by decrypting the frequency. The lock also consists of a circuit with a feedback system that will carry the digital information regarding the encryption frequency code. The information received from the sensor is matched with the stored code; if found a perfect match, a signal will be sent to the servo to unlock the mechanical lock or to carry out any other operation. This technique can be incorporated in security systems for residences and safe houses, and can easily replace all conventional locks which formerly used fixed patterns to unlock. The major advantage of this proposed optomechanical system over conventional ones is that it no longer relies on a solid/imprinted pattern to perform its task and hence makes it almost impossible to tamper with.

  8. Multimode optomechanical system in the quantum regime

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, William H P; Møller, Christoffer B; Polzik, Eugene S; Schliesser, Albert

    2016-01-01

    We realise a simple and robust optomechanical system with a multitude of long-lived ($Q>10^7$) mechanical modes in a phononic-bandgap shielded membrane resonator. An optical mode of a compact Fabry-Perot resonator detects these modes' motion with a measurement rate ($96~\\mathrm{kHz}$) that exceeds the mechanical decoherence rates already at moderate cryogenic temperatures ($10\\,\\mathrm{K}$). Reaching this quantum regime entails, i.~a., quantum measurement backaction exceeding thermal forces, and thus detectable optomechanical quantum correlations. In particular, we observe ponderomotive squeezing of the output light mediated by a multitude of mechanical resonator modes, with quantum noise suppression up to -2.4 dB (-3.6 dB if corrected for detection losses) and bandwidths $\\lesssim 90\\,\\mathrm{ kHz}$. The multi-mode nature of the employed membrane and Fabry-Perot resonators lends itself to hybrid entanglement schemes involving multiple electromagnetic, mechanical, and spin degrees of freedom.

  9. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in an Optomechanical System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Jing

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a form of induced transparency enabled by the large gradient force between one optical and two mechanical modes. We tune the frequency of the mechanical Happing mode into resonance with the mechanical breathing mode to obtain the internal mechanical coupling. Compared with all-photonic physical systems, the quantum optomechanical system exhibits a significantly longer lifetime.%School of Electronic and Optical Engineering,Nanjing University of Science and Technology,Nanjing 210094 We demonstrate a form of induced transparency enabled by the large gradient force between one optical and two mechanical modes.We tune the frequency of the mechanical flapping mode into resonance with the mechanical breathing mode to obtain the internal mechanical coupling.Compared with all-photonic physical systems,the quantum optomechanical system exhibits a significantly longer lifetime.Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT),which is based on destructive quantum interference,is an interesting phenomenon where a control laser induces a narrow spectral transparency window for a weak probe laser beam.When this generic EIT effect was first observed in an atomic gas,[1] its relevance in non-linear optics and optical (quantum) information processing was quickly recognized.In particular,the rapid variation of the refractive index concomitant with the opening of the transparency window gives rise to a dramatic reduction of the group velocity of a propagating optical pulse.[2,3

  10. Nonequilibrium quantum dynamics in optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Cheung, Hil F. H.; Shaffer, Airlia; Wang, Ke; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The thermalization dynamics of isolated quantum systems has so far been explored in the context of cold atomic systems containing a large number of particles and modes. Quantum optomechanical systems offer prospects of studying such dynamics in a qualitatively different regime - with few individually addressable modes amenable to continuous quantum measurement and thermalization times that vastly exceed those observed in cold atomic systems. We have experimentally realized a dynamical continuous phase transition in a quantum compatible nondegenerate mechanical parametric oscillator. This system is formally equivalent to the optical parametric amplifiers whose dynamics have been a subject of intense theoretical study. We experimentally verify its phase diagram and observe nonequilibrium behavior that was only theorized, but never directly observed, in the context of optical parametric amplifiers. We discuss prospects of using nonequilibrium protocols such as quenches in optomechanical systems to amplify weak nonclassical correlations and to realize macroscopic nonclassical states. This work was supported by the DARPA QuASAR program through a Grant from the ARO and the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium manybody dynamics.

  11. Influence of the valine zipper region on the structure and aggregation of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Natalie A; Reynolds, T Steele; Middaugh, C Russell; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2012-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major problem for biopharmaceuticals. While the control of aggregation is critically important for the future of protein pharmaceuticals, mechanisms of aggregate assembly, particularly the role that structure plays, are still poorly understood. Increasing evidence indicates that partially folded intermediates critically influence the aggregation pathway. We have previously reported the use of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) as a partially folded model system to investigate protein aggregation. This domain contains three regions with differing structural propensity: a N-terminal polybasic region, a central helical leucine zipper region, and a C-terminal extended valine zipper region. Additionally, a centrally positioned cysteine residue readily forms an intermolecular disulfide bond that reduces aggregation. Computational analysis of ATF5 predicts that the valine zipper region facilitates self-association. Here we test this hypothesis using a truncated mutant lacking the C-terminal valine zipper region. We compare the structure and aggregation of this mutant to the wild-type (WT) form under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Our data indicate that removal of this region results in a loss of α-helical structure in the leucine zipper and a change in the mechanism of self-association. The mutant form displays increased association at low temperature but improved resistance to thermally induced aggregation.

  12. SdAb heterodimer formation using leucine zippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ellen R.; Anderson, George P.; Brozozog-Lee, P. Audrey; Zabetakis, Dan

    2013-05-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAb) are variable domains cloned from camel, llama, or shark heavy chain only antibodies, and are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments. SdAb derived from immunized llamas are able to bind antigens with high affinity, and most are capable of refolding after heat or chemical denaturation to bind antigen again. We hypothesized that the ability to produce heterodimeric sdAb would enable reagents with the robust characteristics of component sdAb, but with dramatically improved overall affinity through increased avidity. Previously we had constructed multimeric sdAb by genetically linking sdAb that bind non-overlapping epitopes on the toxin, ricin. In this work we explored a more flexible approach; the construction of multivalent binding reagents using multimerization domains. We expressed anti-ricin sdAb that recognize different epitopes on the toxin as fusions with differently charged leucine zippers. When the initially produced homodimers are mixed the leucine zipper domains will pair to produce heterodimers. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to confirm heterodimer formation. Surface plasmon resonance, circular dichroism, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays, and fluid array assays were used to characterize the multimer constructs, and evaluate their utility in toxin detection.

  13. A leucine zipper motif essential for gating of hyperpolarization-activated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Silbernagel, Nicole; Marzian, Stefanie; Netter, Michael F; Rinné, Susanne; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Decher, Niels

    2012-11-23

    It is poorly understood how hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs) function. We have identified a leucine zipper in the S5 segment of HCNs, regulating hyperpolarization-activated and instantaneous current components. The leucine zipper is essential for HCN channel gating. The identification and functional characterization of the leucine zipper is an important step toward the understanding of HCN channel function. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are pacemakers in cardiac myocytes and neurons. Although their membrane topology closely resembles that of voltage-gated K(+) channels, the mechanism of their unique gating behavior in response to hyperpolarization is still poorly understood. We have identified a highly conserved leucine zipper motif in the S5 segment of HCN family members. In order to study the role of this motif for channel function, the leucine residues of the zipper were individually mutated to alanine, arginine, or glutamine residues. Leucine zipper mutants traffic to the plasma membrane, but the channels lose their sensitivity to open upon hyperpolarization. Thus, our data indicate that the leucine zipper is an important molecular determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. Residues of the leucine zipper interact with the adjacent S6 segment of the channel. This interaction is essential for voltage-dependent gating of the channel. The lower part of the leucine zipper, at the intracellular mouth of the channel, is important for stabilizing the closed state. Mutations at these sites increase current amplitudes or result in channels with deficient closing and increased min-P(o). Our data are further supported by homology models of the open and closed state of the HCN2 channel pore. Thus, we conclude that the leucine zipper of HCN channels is a major determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating.

  14. Fano resonances control and slow light with Bose-Einstein Condensate in a cavity setup

    CERN Document Server

    Akram, M Javed; Khan, M Miskeen; Saif, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the probe field transmission in an optomechanical cavity setup with Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC), where the standing wave that forms in the cavity results in an one-dimensional optical lattice potential. We report that in the presence of atom-atom interactions, the coupling of the cavity field with condensate (Bogoliubov mode), the cavity field fluctuations and the condensate fluctuations leads to the emergence of the tunable Fano resonances in the probe absorption spectrum. Within the experimental reach, based on analytical and numerical simulations, we find that the optomechanical system with BEC provides great flexibility to tune the Fano resonances, as the width of the resonance is controllable by the coupling field and additionally, with the atom-atom interaction. Moreover, Fano resonances are analyzed for the fluctuations of the cavity field and the fluctuations of the condensate with finite atomic two-body interaction, which shows an excellent compatibility with the origi...

  15. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jonathan Y. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Lu, Xiyuan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Lin, Qiang, E-mail: qiang.lin@rochester.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 10{sup 4} with mode volume ∼0.60(λ/n){sup 3} at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ∼10{sup 4} is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  16. Design and experimental demonstration of optomechanical paddle nanocavities

    CERN Document Server

    Healey, Chris; Wu, Marcelo; Khanaliloo, Behzad; Mitchell, Matthew; Hryciw, Aaron C; Barclay, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and initial characterization of a paddle nanocavity consisting of a suspended sub-picogram nanomechanical resonator optomechanically coupled to a photonic crystal nanocavity. The optical and mechanical properties of the paddle nanocavity can be systematically designed and optimized, and key characteristics including mechanical frequency easily tailored. Measurements under ambient conditions of a silicon paddle nanocavity demonstrate an optical mode with quality factor $Q_o$ ~ 6000 near 1550 nm, and optomechanical coupling to several mechanical resonances with frequencies $\\omega_m/2\\pi$ ~ 12-64 MHz, effective masses $m_\\text{eff}$ ~ 350-650 fg, and mechanical quality factors $Q_m$ ~ 44-327. Paddle nanocavities are promising for optomechanical sensing and nonlinear optomechanics experiments.

  17. Design and experimental demonstration of optomechanical paddle nanocavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Chris; Kaviani, Hamidreza; Wu, Marcelo; Khanaliloo, Behzad; Mitchell, Matthew; Hryciw, Aaron C.; Barclay, Paul E.

    2015-12-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and initial characterization of a paddle nanocavity consisting of a suspended sub-picogram nanomechanical resonator optomechanically coupled to a photonic crystal nanocavity. The optical and mechanical properties of the paddle nanocavity can be systematically designed and optimized, and the key characteristics including mechanical frequency can be easily tailored. Measurements under ambient conditions of a silicon paddle nanocavity demonstrate an optical mode with a quality factor Q o ˜ 6000 near 1550 nm and optomechanical coupling to several mechanical resonances with frequencies ω m / 2 π ˜ 12 - 64 MHz, effective masses m eff ˜ 350 - 650 fg, and mechanical quality factors Q m ˜ 44 - 327 . Paddle nanocavities are promising for optomechanical sensing and nonlinear optomechanics experiments.

  18. Optomechanically induced stochastic resonance and chaos transfer between optical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monifi, Faraz; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Liu, Yu-Xi; Bo, Fang; Nori, Franco; Yang, Lan

    2016-06-01

    Chaotic dynamics has been reported in many physical systems and has affected almost every field of science. Chaos involves hypersensitivity to the initial conditions of a system and introduces unpredictability into its output. Thus, it is often unwanted. Interestingly, the very same features make chaos a powerful tool to suppress decoherence, achieve secure communication and replace background noise in stochastic resonance—a counterintuitive concept that a system's ability to transfer information can be coherently amplified by adding noise. Here, we report the first demonstration of chaos-induced stochastic resonance in an optomechanical system, as well as the optomechanically mediated chaos transfer between two optical fields such that they follow the same route to chaos. These results will contribute to the understanding of nonlinear phenomena and chaos in optomechanical systems, and may find applications in the chaotic transfer of information and for improving the detection of otherwise undetectable signals in optomechanical systems.

  19. Nonreciprocity and magnetic-free isolation based on optomechanical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesink, Freek; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Alù, Andrea; Verhagen, Ewold

    2016-11-01

    Nonreciprocal components, such as isolators and circulators, provide highly desirable functionalities for optical circuitry. This motivates the active investigation of mechanisms that break reciprocity, and pose alternatives to magneto-optic effects in on-chip systems. In this work, we use optomechanical interactions to strongly break reciprocity in a compact system. We derive minimal requirements to create nonreciprocity in a wide class of systems that couple two optical modes to a mechanical mode, highlighting the importance of optically biasing the modes at a controlled phase difference. We realize these principles in a silica microtoroid optomechanical resonator and use quantitative heterodyne spectroscopy to demonstrate up to 10 dB optical isolation at telecom wavelengths. We show that nonreciprocal transmission is preserved for nondegenerate modes, and demonstrate nonreciprocal parametric amplification. These results open a route to exploiting various nonreciprocal effects in optomechanical systems in different electromagnetic and mechanical frequency regimes, including optomechanical metamaterials with topologically non-trivial properties.

  20. Optomechanical and Photothermal Interactions in Suspended Photonic Crystal Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Woolf, David N; Iwase, Eiji; Khan, Mughees; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Deotare, Parag; Bulu, Irfan; Johnson, Steven G; Capasso, Federico; Loncar, Marko

    2012-01-01

    We present here an optomechanical system fabricated with novel stress management techniques that allow us to suspend an ultrathin defect-free silicon photonic-crystal membrane above a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) substrate with a gap that is tunable to below 200 nm. Our devices are able to generate strong attractive and repulsive optical forces over a large surface area with simple in- and outcoupling and feature the strongest repulsive optomechanical coupling in any geometry to date (gOM/2{\\pi} ~ -65 GHz/nm). The interplay between the optomechanical and photo-thermal-mechanical dynamics is explored, and the latter is used to achieve cooling and amplification of the mechanical mode, demonstrating that our platform is well-suited for applications in low-power mass, force, and refractive index sensing as well as and optomechanical accelerometry.

  1. Optical wavelength conversion via optomechanical coupling in a silica resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Chunhua; Fiore, Victor; Kuzyk, Mark C.; Wang, Hailin [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Tian, Lin [University of California, Merced, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In an optomechanical resonator, an optically active mechanical mode can couple to any of the optical resonances via radiation pressure. This unique property can enable a remarkable phenomenon: conversion of optical fields via optomechanical coupling between vastly different wavelengths. Here we expand an earlier experimental study [Science 338, 1609 (2012)] on classical wavelength conversion of coherent optical fields by coupling two optical modes to a mechanical breathing mode in a silica resonator. Heterodyne detection of the converted optical fields shows that the wavelength conversion process is coherent and bidirectional. The conversion efficiency obtained features a distinct saturation behavior that arises from optomechanical impedance matching. A measurement of the coherent mechanical excitation involved in the wavelength conversion process also provides additional insight on the underlying optomechanical interactions. (copyright 2014 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Quadratic measurement and conditional state preparation in an optomechanical system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Brawley, George; Vanner, Michael A.; Bowen, Warwick P.;

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, quadratic measurement of mechanical motion in an optomechanical system. We use this nonlinear easurement to conditionally prepare classical non-Gaussian states of motion of a micro-mechanical oscillator.......We experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, quadratic measurement of mechanical motion in an optomechanical system. We use this nonlinear easurement to conditionally prepare classical non-Gaussian states of motion of a micro-mechanical oscillator....

  3. Cooling a harmonic oscillator by optomechanical modification of its bath

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xunnong; Purdy, Thomas; Taylor, Jacob M.

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanical systems show tremendous promise for high sensitivity sensing of forces and modification of mechanical properties via light. For example, similar to neutral atoms and trapped ions, laser cooling of mechanical motion by radiation pressure can take single mechanical modes to their ground state. Conventional optomechanical cooling is able to introduce additional damping channel to mechanical motion, while keeping its thermal noise at the same level, and as a consequence, the effect...

  4. A Monolithic Radiation-Pressure Driven, Low Phase Noise Silicon Nitride Opto-Mechanical Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Tallur, Siddharth; Bhave, Sunil A

    2011-01-01

    Cavity opto-mechanics enabled radiation pressure (RP) driven oscillators shown in the past offer an all optical Radio Frequency (RF) source without the need for external electrical feedback. However these oscillators require external tapered fiber or prism coupling and non-standard fabrication processes. In this work, we present a CMOS compatible fabrication process to design high optical quality factor opto-mechanical resonators in silicon nitride. The ring resonators designed in this process demonstrate low phase noise RP driven oscillations. Using integrated grating couplers and waveguide to couple light to the micro-resonator eliminates 1/f^3 and other higher order phase noise slopes at close-to-carrier frequencies present in previous demonstrations. We present an RP driven OMO operating at 41.97MHz with a signal power of -11dBm and phase noise of -85dBc/Hz at 1kHz offset with only 1/f^2 noise down to 10Hz offset from carrier.

  5. Optomechanical transduction of an integrated silicon cantilever probe using a microdisk resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Srinivasan, Kartik; Rakher, Matthew T; Davanco, Marcelo; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive transduction of the motion of a microscale cantilever is central to many applications in mass, force, magnetic resonance, and displacement sensing. Reducing cantilever size to nanoscale dimensions can improve the bandwidth and sensitivity of techniques like atomic force microscopy, but current optical transduction methods suffer when the cantilever is small compared to the achievable spot size. Here, we demonstrate sensitive optical transduction in a monolithic cavity-optomechanical system in which a sub-picogram silicon cantilever with a sharp probe tip is separated from a microdisk optical resonator by a nanoscale gap. High quality factor (Q ~ 10^5) microdisk optical modes transduce the cantilever's MHz frequency thermally-driven vibrations with a displacement sensitivity of ~ 4.4x10^-16 m\\sqrt[2]{Hz} and bandwidth > 1 GHz, and a dynamic range > 10^6 is estimated for a 1 s measurement. Optically-induced stiffening due to the strong optomechanical interaction is observed, and engineering of probe d...

  6. Single laser modulated drive and detection of a nano-optomechanical cantilever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Vincent T. K.; Diao, Zhu; Westwood-Bachman, Jocelyn N.; Freeman, Mark R.; Hiebert, Wayne K.

    2017-01-01

    To reduce the complexity in a nano-optomechanical system a pump and probe scheme using only a single input laser is used to both coherently pump and probe the nanomechanical device. The system operates similarly to the traditional two laser system, but instead of using a constant power to probe the device and a separate, modulated laser to drive it with an optical gradient force, a single laser is utilized for both functions. A model of the measurement scheme's response is developed which matches the experimental data obtained in the optomechanical Doppler regime and low cavity power limit. As such, the unconventional response still yields useful device information such as the resonant frequency of the device and its mechanical quality factor. The device is driven with low noise and its frequency is tracked using a phase-locked loop. This demonstrates its potential use for dynamic frequency measurements such as nanomechanical inertial mass loading. In such a system, the estimated mass resolution of the device is 6 zg and consistent with other detection methods.

  7. Single laser modulated drive and detection of a nano-optomechanical cantilever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent T. K. Sauer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To reduce the complexity in a nano-optomechanical system a pump and probe scheme using only a single input laser is used to both coherently pump and probe the nanomechanical device. The system operates similarly to the traditional two laser system, but instead of using a constant power to probe the device and a separate, modulated laser to drive it with an optical gradient force, a single laser is utilized for both functions. A model of the measurement scheme’s response is developed which matches the experimental data obtained in the optomechanical Doppler regime and low cavity power limit. As such, the unconventional response still yields useful device information such as the resonant frequency of the device and its mechanical quality factor. The device is driven with low noise and its frequency is tracked using a phase-locked loop. This demonstrates its potential use for dynamic frequency measurements such as nanomechanical inertial mass loading. In such a system, the estimated mass resolution of the device is 6 zg and consistent with other detection methods.

  8. Integrated optomechanical single-photon frequency shifter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Linran; Zou, Chang-Ling; Poot, Menno; Cheng, Risheng; Guo, Xiang; Han, Xu; Tang, Hong X.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to manipulate single photons is of critical importance for fundamental quantum optics studies and practical implementations of quantum communications. While extraordinary progresses have been made in controlling spatial, temporal, spin and orbit angular momentum degrees of freedom, frequency-domain control of single photons so far relies on nonlinear optical effects, which have faced obstacles such as noise photons, narrow bandwidth and demanding optical filtering. Here, we demonstrate the first integrated optomechanical single-photon frequency shifter with near-unity efficiency. A frequency shift up to 150 GHz at telecom wavelength is realized without measurable added noise and the preservation of quantum coherence is verified through quantum interference between twin photons of different colours. This single-photon frequency shifter will be invaluable for increasing the channel capacity of quantum communications and compensating frequency mismatch between quantum systems, paving the road towards a hybrid quantum network.

  9. A Leucine Zipper Motif Essential for Gating of Hyperpolarization-activated Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Silbernagel, Nicole; Marzian, Stefanie; Netter, Michael F.; Rinné, Susanne; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Decher, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are pacemakers in cardiac myocytes and neurons. Although their membrane topology closely resembles that of voltage-gated K+ channels, the mechanism of their unique gating behavior in response to hyperpolarization is still poorly understood. We have identified a highly conserved leucine zipper motif in the S5 segment of HCN family members. In order to study the role of this motif for channel function, the leucine residues of the zipper were individually mutated to alanine, arginine, or glutamine residues. Leucine zipper mutants traffic to the plasma membrane, but the channels lose their sensitivity to open upon hyperpolarization. Thus, our data indicate that the leucine zipper is an important molecular determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. Residues of the leucine zipper interact with the adjacent S6 segment of the channel. This interaction is essential for voltage-dependent gating of the channel. The lower part of the leucine zipper, at the intracellular mouth of the channel, is important for stabilizing the closed state. Mutations at these sites increase current amplitudes or result in channels with deficient closing and increased min-Po. Our data are further supported by homology models of the open and closed state of the HCN2 channel pore. Thus, we conclude that the leucine zipper of HCN channels is a major determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. PMID:23048023

  10. Nonlinear dynamics and millikelvin cavity-cooling of levitated nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, P Z G; Millen, J; Monteiro, T S; Barker, P F

    2015-01-01

    Optomechanical systems explore and exploit the coupling between light and the mechanical motion of matter. A nonlinear coupling offers access to rich new physics, in both the quantum and classical regimes. We investigate a dynamic, as opposed to the usually studied static, nonlinear optomechanical system, comprising of a nanosphere levitated and cooled in a hybrid electro-optical trap. An optical cavity offers readout of both linear-in-position and quadratic-in-position (nonlinear) light-matter coupling, whilst simultaneously cooling the nanosphere to millikelvin temperatures for indefinite periods of time in high vacuum. We observe cooling of the linear and non-linear motion, leading to a $10^5$ fold reduction in phonon number $n_p$, attaining final occupancies of $n_p = 100-1000$. This work puts cavity cooling of a levitated object to the quantum ground-state firmly within reach.

  11. Nonlinear Dynamics and Strong Cavity Cooling of Levitated Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, P. Z. G.; Aranas, E. B.; Millen, J.; Monteiro, T. S.; Barker, P. F.

    2016-10-01

    Optomechanical systems explore and exploit the coupling between light and the mechanical motion of macroscopic matter. A nonlinear coupling offers rich new physics, in both quantum and classical regimes. We investigate a dynamic, as opposed to the usually studied static, nonlinear optomechanical system, comprising a nanosphere levitated in a hybrid electro-optical trap. The cavity offers readout of both linear-in-position and quadratic-in-position (nonlinear) light-matter coupling, while simultaneously cooling the nanosphere, for indefinite periods of time and in high vacuum. We observe the cooling dynamics via both linear and nonlinear coupling. As the background gas pressure was lowered, we observed a greater than 1000-fold reduction in temperature before temperatures fell below readout sensitivity in the present setup. This Letter opens the way to strongly coupled quantum dynamics between a cavity and a nanoparticle largely decoupled from its environment.

  12. Robust entanglement between a movable mirror and atomic ensemble and entanglement transfer in coupled optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Dong-Yang; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2016-09-01

    We propose a scheme for the creation of robust entanglement between a movable mirror and atomic ensemble at the macroscopic level in coupled optomechanical system. We numerically simulate the degree of entanglement of the bipartite macroscopic entanglement and show that it depends on the coupling strength between the cavities and is robust with respect to the certain environment temperature. Inspiringly and surprisingly, according to the reported relation between the mechanical damping rate and the mechanical frequency of the movable mirror, the numerical simulation result shows that such bipartite macroscopic entanglement persists for environment temperature up to 170 K, which breaks the liquid nitrogen cooling and liquid helium cooling and largely lowers down the experiment cost. We also investigate the entanglement transfer based on this coupled system. The scheme can be used for the realization of quantum memories for continuous variable quantum information processing and quantum-limited displacement measurements.

  13. Robust entanglement between a movable mirror and atomic ensemble and entanglement transfer in coupled optomechanical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Dong-Yang; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2016-09-14

    We propose a scheme for the creation of robust entanglement between a movable mirror and atomic ensemble at the macroscopic level in coupled optomechanical system. We numerically simulate the degree of entanglement of the bipartite macroscopic entanglement and show that it depends on the coupling strength between the cavities and is robust with respect to the certain environment temperature. Inspiringly and surprisingly, according to the reported relation between the mechanical damping rate and the mechanical frequency of the movable mirror, the numerical simulation result shows that such bipartite macroscopic entanglement persists for environment temperature up to 170 K, which breaks the liquid nitrogen cooling and liquid helium cooling and largely lowers down the experiment cost. We also investigate the entanglement transfer based on this coupled system. The scheme can be used for the realization of quantum memories for continuous variable quantum information processing and quantum-limited displacement measurements.

  14. Degenerate optomechanical parametric oscillators: cooling in the vicinity of a critical point

    CERN Document Server

    Degenfeld-Schonburg, Peter; Hartmann, Michael J; Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Degenerate optomechanical parametric oscillators are optical resonators in which a mechanical degree of freedom is coupled to a cavity mode that is nonlinearly amplified via parametric down-conversion of an external pumping laser. Below a critical pumping power the down-converted field is purely quantum-mechanical, making the theoretical description of such systems very challenging. Here we introduce a theoretical approach that is capable of describing this regime, even at the critical point itself. We find that the down-converted field can induce significant mechanical cooling and identify the process responsible of this as a "cooling by heating" mechanism. Moreover, we show that, contrary to naive expectations and semi-classical predictions, cooling is not optimal at the critical point, where the photon number is largest. Our approach opens the possibility for analyzing further hybrid dissipative quantum systems in the vicinity of critical points.

  15. Adiabatic embedment of nanomechanical resonators in photonic microring cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Chi; Li, Mo; Rooks, Michael; Tang, Hong X

    2014-01-01

    We report a circuit cavity optomechanical system in which a nanomechanical resonator is adiabatically embedded inside an optical ring resonator with ultralow transition loss. The nanomechanical device forms part of the top layer of a horizontal silicon slot ring resonator, which enables dispersive coupling to the dielectric substrate via a tapered nanogap. Our measurements show nearly uncompromised optical quality factors (Q) after the release of the mechanical beam.

  16. A Zipper-Like On/Off-Switchable Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Songjun; Ge, Yi; Piletsky, Sergey A.; Turner, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    A zipper-like on/off-switchable molecularly imprinted polymer is reported. This unique imprinted polymer was composed of template-imprinted polymeric networks that incorporate zipper-like interactions between poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) and poly(2-acrylamide-2-methyl propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPS). This polymer showed marginal recognition ability towards the imprint species under low temperature conditions, due to the interpolymer interaction between PAAm and PAMPS, which inhibited access to the i...

  17. Syntheses and Self-assembling Behaviors of Pentagonal Conjugates of Tryptophane Zipper-Forming Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Kimizuka

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pentagonal conjugates of tryptophane zipper-forming peptide (CKTWTWTE with a pentaazacyclopentadecane core (Pentagonal-Gly-Trpzip and Pentagonal-Ala-Trpzip were synthesized and their self-assembling behaviors were investigated in water. Pentagonal-Gly-Trpzip self-assembled into nanofibers with the width of about 5 nm in neutral water (pH 7 via formation of tryptophane zipper, which irreversibly converted to nanoribbons by heating. In contrast, Pentagonal-Ala-Trpzip formed irregular aggregates in water.

  18. Coherent coupling of molecular resonators with a micro-cavity mode

    CERN Document Server

    Shalabney, Atef; Hutchison, James A; Pupillo, Guido; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Strong coupling is at the heart of optomechanics where it enables coherent quantum state transfer between light and micromechanical oscillators. Strongly coupled molecule-cavity systems have also revealed unique properties enabling even the control of chemical rates through the optical hybridization of the electronic states. Here we combine these notions to show that molecular vibrational modes of the electronic ground state can be coherently coupled with a micro-cavity mode at room temperature, given the low vibrational thermal occupation factors n_{\

  19. Giant enhancement of tunable optomechanical coupling via ultrarefractive medium

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Keyu

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the fundamental quantum behaviour of optomechanical resonators is of great interest recently but requires the realization of the strong coupling regime. We study the optical photon-phonon coupling of the so-called membrane in the middle (MITM) optomechanical system. Using coupled-mode theory we find that the optomechanical coupling is proportional to the electric susceptibility of the membrane. By considering the doping atoms or spins into the membrane and driving these appropriately we induce a tunable ultra-large refractive index without absorption which enhances the optomechanical coupling. Using this we predict an ultra-strong single-optical photon strong coupling with large quantum cooperativity for Er3+ dopants at low temperature, while Cr3+ in a Ruby membrane may display ultra-large quantum cooperativity at room temperature. Our scheme also can tune the strength of the coupling over a wide range and can also control whether the optomechanical force is attractive or repulsive. Our work opens a...

  20. Integrated tuning fork nanocavity optomechanical transducers with high $f_{M}Q_{M}$ product and stress-engineered frequency tuning

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, R; Davanco, M I; Ren, Y; Aksyuk, V; Liu, Y; Srinivasan, K

    2015-01-01

    Cavity optomechanical systems are being widely developed for precision force and displacement measurements. For nanomechanical transducers, there is usually a trade-off between the frequency ($f_{M}$) and quality factor ($Q_{M}$), which limits temporal resolution and sensitivity. Here, we present a monolithic cavity optomechanical transducer supporting both high $f_{M}$ and high $Q_{M}$. By replacing the common doubly-clamped, Si$_3$N$_4$ nanobeam with a tuning fork geometry, we demonstrate devices with the fundamental $f_{M}\\approx29$ MHz and $Q_{M}\\approx2.2$$\\times10^5$, corresponding to an $f_{M}Q_{M}$ product of 6.35$\\times10^{12}$ Hz, comparable to the highest values previously demonstrated for room temperature operation. This high $f_{M}Q_{M}$ product is partly achieved by engineering the stress of the tuning fork to be 3 times the residual film stress through clamp design, which results in an increase of $f_{M}$ up to 1.5 times. Simulations reveal that the tuning fork design simultaneously reduces the...

  1. Nano-optomechanical resonators in microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Fong, King Yan; Tang, Hong X

    2015-01-01

    Operation of nanomechanical devices in water environment has been challenging due to the strong viscous damping that greatly impedes the mechanical motion. Here we demonstrate an optomechanical micro-wheel resonator integrated in microfluidic system that supports low-loss optical resonances at near-visible wavelength with quality factor up to 1.5 million. The device can be operated in self-oscillation mode in air with low threshold power of 45 uW. The very high optical Q allows the observation of the thermal Brownian motion of the mechanical mode in both air and water environment with high signal-to-background ratio. A numerical model is developed to calculate the hydrodynamic effect on the device due to the surrounding water, which agrees well with the experimental results. With its very high resonance frequency (170 MHz) and small loaded mass (75 pg), the present device is estimated to have mass sensitivity of attogram level in liquid environment with bandwidth of 1 Hz.

  2. Classical and Quantum Theory of Photothermal Cavity Cooling of a Mechanical Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Restrepo, Juan; Ciuti, Cristiano; Favero, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Photothermal effects allow very efficient optomechanical coupling between mechanical degrees of freedom and photons. In the context of cavity cooling of a mechanical oscillator, the question of if the quantum ground state of the oscillator can be reached using photothermal back-action has been debated and remains an open question. Here we address this problem by complementary classical and quantum calculations. Both lead us to conclude that: first, the ground-state can indeed be reached using photothermal cavity cooling, second, it can be reached in a regime where the cavity detuning is small allowing a large amount of photons to enter the cavity.

  3. Nonreciprocity and magnetic-free isolation based on optomechanical interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ruesink, Freek; Alù, Andrea; Verhagen, Ewold

    2016-01-01

    Photonic nonreciprocal components, such as isolators and circulators, provide highly desirable functionalities for optical circuitry. This motivates the active investigation of mechanisms that break reciprocity, and pose alternatives to magneto-optic effects in on-chip systems. In this work, we use optomechanical interactions to strongly break reciprocity in a compact system. We derive minimal requirements to create nonreciprocity in a wide class of systems that couple two optical modes to a mechanical mode, highlighting the importance of optically biasing the modes at a controlled phase difference. We realize these principles in a silica microtoroid optomechanical resonator and use quantitative heterodyne spectroscopy to demonstrate up to 10 dB optical isolation at telecom wavelengths. We show that nonreciprocal transmission is preserved for nondegenerate modes, and demonstrate nonreciprocal parametric amplification. These results open a route to exploiting various nonreciprocal effects in optomechanical sys...

  4. Optomechanics based on angular momentum exchange between light and matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, H.; Bhattacharya, M.

    2016-08-01

    The subject of optomechanics involves interactions between optical and mechanical degrees of freedom, and is currently of great interest as an enabler of fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, as well as a platform for ultrasensitive measurement devices. The majority of optomechanical configurations rely on the exchange of linear momentum between light and matter. We will begin this tutorial with a brief description of such systems. Subsequently, we will introduce optomechanical systems based on angular momentum exchange. In this context, optical fields carrying polarization and orbital angular momentum will be considered, while for the mechanics, torsional and free rotational motion will be of relevance. Our overall aims will be to supply basic analyses of some of the existing theoretical proposals, to provide functional descriptions of some of the experiments conducted thus far, and to consider some directions for future research. We hope this tutorial will be useful to both theorists and experimentalists interested in the subject.

  5. Optomechanical interactions in non-Hermitian photonic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Schönleber, David W; El-Ganainy, Ramy

    2016-01-01

    We study optomechanical interactions in non-Hermitian photonic molecules that support two photonic states and one acoustic mode. The nonlinear steady-state solutions and their linear stability landscapes are investigated as a function of the system's parameters and excitation power levels. We also examine the temporal evolution of the system and uncover different regimes of nonlinear dynamics. Our analysis reveals several important results: 1) Parity-time ($\\mathcal{PT}$) symmetry is not necessarily the optimum choice for maximum optomechanical interaction. 2) Stable steady-state solutions are not always reached under continuous wave (CW) optical excitations. 3) Accounting for gain saturation effects can regulate the behavior of the otherwise unbounded oscillation amplitudes. Our study provides a deeper insight into the interplay between optical non-Hermiticity and optomechanical coupling and can thus pave the way for new device applications.

  6. Photoelastic coupling in gallium arsenide optomechanical disk resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, Christopher; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Andronico, Alessio; Ducci, Sara; Leo, Giuseppe; Favero, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the magnitude of the radiation pressure and electrostrictive stresses exerted by light confined inside GaAs semiconductor WGM optomechanical disk resonators, through analytical and numerical means, and find the electrostrictive force to be of prime importance. We investigate the geometric and photoelastic optomechanical coupling resulting respectively from the deformation of the disk boundary and from the strain-induced refractive index changes in the material, for various mechanical modes of the disks. Photoelastic optomechanical coupling is shown to be a predominant coupling mechanism for certain disk dimensions and mechanical modes, leading to total coupling g$_{om}$ and g$_0$ reaching respectively 3 THz/nm and 4 MHz. Finally, we point towards ways to maximize the photoelastic coupling in GaAs disk resonators, and we provide some upper bounds for its value in various geometries.

  7. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  8. Water in the Neck-Zipper Region of Kinesin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yan-Bin; PAN Zhang; ZHANG Hui; AN Li; KONG De-Xin; JI Qing

    2009-01-01

    Neck linker (NL) is one of the most important mechanical elements of kinesin motors. The zipping up process of the neck-zipper (NZ) formed by NL and the related secondary structure elements is one of the major parts of kinesin's power stroke. All the weak interactions that axe responsible for the formation of NZ are sensitive to or dependent on water. To investigate the role of water in the NZ region, a molecular dynamics (MD) model is set up with a crystal structure of kinesin 2KIN surrounded by a 10 A water layer, and minimization is performed to determine the positions of hydrogen atoms and other atoms. It is revealed that water molecules can assist the docking process of NL by forming hydrogen bonds at those positions where direct hydrogen bonding between the two sides of NZ is hindered and then acts as a constructive component of NZ at the docked state of NL. This result may improve the understanding of the mechanism for the docking of NL of kinesin wherein the function of water has not been comprehended sufficiently.

  9. Polyelectrolyte decomplexation via addition of salt: charge correlation driven zipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antila, Hanne S; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2014-03-20

    We report the first atomic scale studies of polyelectrolyte decomplexation. The complex between DNA and polylysine is shown to destabilize and spontaneously open in a gradual, reversible zipper-like mechanism driven by an increase in solution salt concentration. Divalent CaCl2 is significantly more effective than monovalent NaCl in destabilizing the complex due to charge correlations and water binding capability. The dissociation occurs accompanied by charge reversal in which charge correlations and ion binding chemistry play a key role. Our results are in agreement with experimental work on complex dissociation but in addition show the underlying microstructural correlations driving the behavior. Comparison of our full atomic level detail and dynamics results with theoretical works describing the PEs as charged, rigid rods reveals that although charge correlation involved theories provide qualitatively similar responses, considering also specific molecular chemistry and molecular level water contributions provides a more complete understanding of PE complex stability and dynamics. The findings may facilitate controlled release in gene delivery and more in general tuning of PE membrane permeability and mechanical characteristics through ionic strength.

  10. Glucocorticoid Induced Leucine Zipper inhibits apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, David; Strom, Joshua; Chen, Qin M., E-mail: qchen@email.arizona.edu

    2014-04-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an indispensable chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various forms of neoplasia such as lung, breast, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Cardiotoxicity is a major concern for patients receiving Dox therapy. Previous work from our laboratory indicated that glucocorticoids (GCs) alleviate Dox-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. Here we have found Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) to be a mediator of GC-induced cytoprotection. GILZ was found to be induced in cardiomyocytes by GC treatment. Knocking down of GILZ using siRNA resulted in cancelation of GC-induced cytoprotection against apoptosis by Dox treatment. Overexpressing GILZ by transfection was able to protect cells from apoptosis induced by Dox as measured by caspase activation, Annexin V binding and morphologic changes. Western blot analyses indicate that GILZ overexpression prevented cytochrome c release from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-3. When bcl-2 family proteins were examined, we found that GILZ overexpression causes induction of the pro-survival protein Bcl-xL. Since siRNA against Bcl-xL reverses GC induced cytoprotection, Bcl-xL induction represents an important event in GILZ-induced cytoprotection. Our data suggest that GILZ functions as a cytoprotective gene in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • Corticosteroids act as a cytoprotective agent in cardiomyocytes • Corticosteroids induce GILZ expression in cardiomyocytes • Elevated GILZ results in resistance against apoptosis induced by doxorubicin • GILZ induces Bcl-xL protein without inducing Bcl-xL mRNA.

  11. Optical wavelength conversion via optomechanical coupling in a silica resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Chunhua; Kuzyk, Mark C; Tian, Lin; Wang, Hailin

    2012-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of converting coherent optical fields between two different optical wavelengths by coupling two optical modes to a mechanical breathing mode in a silica resonator. The experiment is based on an itinerant approach, in which state-mapping from optical to mechanical and from mechanical to another optical state takes place simultaneously. In contrast to conventional nonlinear optical processes, optomechanical impedance matching as well as efficient optical input-output coupling, instead of phase-matching, plays a crucial role in optomechanics-based wavelength conversion.

  12. Reconfigurable long-range phonon dynamics in optomechanical arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Xuereb, André; Pupillo, Guido; Paternostro, Mauro; Dantan, Aurélien

    2013-01-01

    We investigate periodic optomechanical arrays as reconfigurable platforms for engineering the coupling between multiple mechanical and electromagnetic modes and for exploring many-body phonon dynamics. Exploiting structural resonances in the coupling between light fields and collective motional modes of the array, we show that tunable effective long-range interactions between mechanical modes can be achieved. This paves the way towards the implementation of controlled phononic walks and heat transfer on densely-connected graphs as well as the coherent transfer of excitations between distant elements of optomechanical arrays.

  13. Entanglement of movable mirror and cavity field enhanced by an optical parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai-yun, Zhang; Hu, Li; Gui-xia, Pan; Zong-qiang, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    A scheme to generate entanglement in a cavity optomechanical system filled with an optical parametric amplifier is proposed. With the help of the optical parametric amplifier, the stationary macroscopic entanglement between the movable mirror and the cavity field can be notably enhanced, and the entanglement increases when the parametric gain increases. Moreover, for a given parametric gain, the degree of entanglement of the cavity optomechanical system increases with increasing input laser power. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11247001), the Scientific Research Foundation of the Higher Education Institutions of Anhui Province, China (Grant No. KJ2012A083), and the Doctor (Master) Fund of Anhui University of Science and Technology, China.

  14. Gain-assisted superluminal light propagation through a Bose-Einstein condensate cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamide Kazemi, S.; Ghanbari, S.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of a probe laser field in a cavity optomechanical system with a Bose-Einstein condensate is studied. The transmission properties of the system are investigated and it is shown that the group velocity of the probe pulse field can be controlled by Rabi frequency of the pump laser field. The effect of the decay rate of the cavity photons on the group velocity is studied and it is demonstrated that for small values of the decay rates, the light propagation switches from subluminal to superluminal just by changing the Rabi frequency of the pump field. Then, the gain-assisted superluminal light propagation due to the cross-Kerr nonlinearity is established in cavity optomechanical system with a Bose-Einstein condensate. Such behavior can not appear in the pump-probe two-level atomic systems in the normal phase. We also find that the amplification is achieved without inversion in the population of the quantum energy levels.

  15. Axon tension regulates fasciculation/defasciculation through the control of axon shaft zippering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmít, Daniel; Fouquet, Coralie; Pincet, Frédéric; Zapotocky, Martin; Trembleau, Alain

    2017-01-01

    While axon fasciculation plays a key role in the development of neural networks, very little is known about its dynamics and the underlying biophysical mechanisms. In a model system composed of neurons grown ex vivo from explants of embryonic mouse olfactory epithelia, we observed that axons dynamically interact with each other through their shafts, leading to zippering and unzippering behavior that regulates their fasciculation. Taking advantage of this new preparation suitable for studying such interactions, we carried out a detailed biophysical analysis of zippering, occurring either spontaneously or induced by micromanipulations and pharmacological treatments. We show that zippering arises from the competition of axon-axon adhesion and mechanical tension in the axons, and provide the first quantification of the force of axon-axon adhesion. Furthermore, we introduce a biophysical model of the zippering dynamics, and we quantitatively relate the individual zipper properties to global characteristics of the developing axon network. Our study uncovers a new role of mechanical tension in neural development: the regulation of axon fasciculation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19907.001 PMID:28422009

  16. Differential activities of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Rama; Wang, Jian; Melters, Daniël; Pearce, David

    2007-12-14

    Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper protein (GILZ) is expressed in both epithelial and immune tissues and modulates a variety of cellular functions, including proliferation and epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity. A number of reports have described various GILZ activities, focusing on a single isoform with molecular mass of approximately 17 kDa, now termed GILZ1. In GILZ immunoblots using a newly developed antiserum, we detected multiple species in extracts from cultured kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that one of these represented a previously uncharacterized distinct isoform of GILZ, GILZ2. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to clone cDNAs corresponding to four isoforms, which, in addition to GILZ1 and GILZ2, included new isoforms GILZ3 and GILZ4. Heterologous expression of these four GILZ isoforms in cultured cells revealed striking functional differences. Notably, GILZ1 was the only isoform that significantly stimulated ENaC-mediated Na+ current in a kidney collecting duct cell line, although GILZ2 and GILZ3 also stimulated ENaC surface expression in HEK 293 cells. GILZ1 and GILZ3, and to a lesser extent GILZ2, inhibited ERK phosphorylation. Interestingly, GILZ4, which had no effect on either ENaC or ERK, potently suppressed cellular proliferation, as did GILZ1, but not GILZ2 or GILZ3. Finally, rat and mouse tissues all expressed multiple GILZ species but varied in the relative abundance of each. These data suggest that multiple GILZ isoforms are expressed in most cells and tissues and that these play distinct roles in regulating key cellular functions, including proliferation and ion transport. Furthermore, GILZ inhibition of ERK appears to play an essential role in stimulation of cell surface ENaC but not in inhibition of proliferation.

  17. Zippered release from polymer-gated carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mashat, Afnan

    2012-01-01

    A thermosensitive drug delivery system based on polymer-gated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that are loaded with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is herein reported. The development of carbon nanotubes for various biomedical applications is the research focus of many research groups and holds great promise. The major drawback of these materials is the toxicity that is associated with conjugated carbon systems. Functionalization of CNTs with polymers has proved very successful in lowering the toxicity and improving the pharmacokinetic profile. In this work, CNTs are coated with polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) via the "zipper effect" that provides both support and control over drug release. PEI/PVA provides excellent support to increase DOX loading on the nanocarrier. The system is controlled by changes in temperature due to the complexation (low temperature) and decomplexation (high temperature) of PEI and PVA via hydrogen bonding. The release of DOX was tested in three cell lines (Lung fibroblast (LF), Breast Adenocarcinoma (BA), and HeLa). It was further tested in primary cell lines (Human Dermal Fibroblast adult (HDFa) and Human Dermal Fibroblast neonatal (HDFn)). When the bonds between PEI and PVA are decomplexed at high temperature (≥40 °C), drug release was observed as verified by fluorescence microscopy. There was no drug release at room temperature (25 °C) and a slow release at normal body temperature (37 °C). This system represents a promising method for incorporating stimuli triggered polymer-gated CNTs in future controlled release applications. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Converting mid-infrared signals to near-infrared through optomechanical transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsalis, A.; Mesaritakis, C.; Bogris, A.; Syvridis, D.

    2015-01-01

    Mid-infrared silicon photonics emerge as the dominant technology to bridge photonics and electronics in multifunctional high-speed integrated chips. The transmission and processing of optical signals lying at the mid-infrared wavelength region is ideal for sensing, absorption-spectroscopy and free-space communications and the use of group IV materials becomes principally promising as the vehicle towards their realization. In parallel, optical forces originating from modes and cavities can reach to outstandingly large values when sizes drop into the nanoscale. In this work, we propose the exploitation of large gradient optical forces generated between suspended silicon beams and optomechanical transduction as a means of converting signals from the mid-infrared to the near-infrared region. A midinfrared signal is injected into the waveguide system so as to excite the fundamental symmetric mode. In the 2-5μm wavelength range, separation gaps in the 100nm order and waveguide widths ranging from 300-600nm, the mode is mostly guided in the air slot between the waveguides which maximizes the optomechanical coupling coefficient and optical force. The resulting attractive force deflects the waveguides and the deflection is linearly dependent on the midinfrared optical power. A simple read-out technique using 1.55μm signals with conventional waveguiding in the directional coupler formed by the two beams is analyzed. A positive conversion efficiency (index unconventional guiding in mid-infrared could be a key component towards multifunctional lab-on-a-chip devices.

  19. Coherent Quantum-Noise Cancellation for Optomechanical Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsang, Mankei

    2010-01-01

    Using a flowchart representation of quantum optomechanical dynamics, we design coherent quantum-noise-cancellation schemes that can eliminate the back-action noise induced by radiation pressure at all frequencies and thus overcome the standard quantum limit of force sensing. The proposed schemes can be regarded as novel examples of coherent feedforward quantum control.

  20. Resolving the mystery of milliwatt-threshold opto-mechanical self-oscillation in dual-nanoweb fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, J. R.; Noskov, R. E.; Sukhorukov, A. A.; Butsch, A.; Novoa, D.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2016-08-01

    It is interesting to pose the question: How best to design an optomechanical device, with no electronics, optical cavity, or laser gain, that will self-oscillate when pumped in a single pass with only a few mW of single-frequency laser power? One might begin with a mechanically resonant and highly compliant system offering very high optomechanical gain. Such a system, when pumped by single-frequency light, might self-oscillate at its resonant frequency. It is well-known, however, that this will occur only if the group velocity dispersion of the light is high enough so that phonons causing pump-to-Stokes conversion are sufficiently dissimilar to those causing pump-to-anti-Stokes conversion. Recently it was reported that two light-guiding membranes 20 μm wide, ˜500 nm thick and spaced by ˜500 nm, suspended inside a glass fiber capillary, oscillated spontaneously at its mechanical resonant frequency (˜6 MHz) when pumped with only a few mW of single-frequency light. This was surprising, since perfect Raman gain suppression would be expected. In detailed measurements, using an interferometric side-probing technique capable of resolving nanoweb movements as small as 10 pm, we map out the vibrations along the fiber and show that stimulated intermodal scattering to a higher-order optical mode frustrates gain suppression, permitting the structure to self-oscillate. A detailed theoretical analysis confirms this picture. This novel mechanism makes possible the design of single-pass optomechanical oscillators that require only a few mW of optical power, no electronics nor any optical resonator. The design could also be implemented in silicon or any other suitable material.

  1. Resolving the mystery of milliwatt-threshold opto-mechanical self-oscillation in dual-nanoweb fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Koehler

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It is interesting to pose the question: How best to design an optomechanical device, with no electronics, optical cavity, or laser gain, that will self-oscillate when pumped in a single pass with only a few mW of single-frequency laser power? One might begin with a mechanically resonant and highly compliant system offering very high optomechanical gain. Such a system, when pumped by single-frequency light, might self-oscillate at its resonant frequency. It is well-known, however, that this will occur only if the group velocity dispersion of the light is high enough so that phonons causing pump-to-Stokes conversion are sufficiently dissimilar to those causing pump-to-anti-Stokes conversion. Recently it was reported that two light-guiding membranes 20 μm wide, ∼500 nm thick and spaced by ∼500 nm, suspended inside a glass fiber capillary, oscillated spontaneously at its mechanical resonant frequency (∼6 MHz when pumped with only a few mW of single-frequency light. This was surprising, since perfect Raman gain suppression would be expected. In detailed measurements, using an interferometric side-probing technique capable of resolving nanoweb movements as small as 10 pm, we map out the vibrations along the fiber and show that stimulated intermodal scattering to a higher-order optical mode frustrates gain suppression, permitting the structure to self-oscillate. A detailed theoretical analysis confirms this picture. This novel mechanism makes possible the design of single-pass optomechanical oscillators that require only a few mW of optical power, no electronics nor any optical resonator. The design could also be implemented in silicon or any other suitable material.

  2. Enhancing a slow and weak optomechanical nonlinearity with delayed quantum feedback to implement a CPHASE gate

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhaoyou

    2016-01-01

    We show that the effective optical nonlinearity of a cavity optomechanical system can be used to implement quantum gates between propagating photons. By using quantum feedback, we can enhance a slow and small optical nonlinearity to generate a large nonlinear phase shift between two spatially separated temporal modes of a propagating electromagnetic field. This allows us to implement a CPHASE gate between the two modes. After presenting a semiclassical derivation of the operation of the gate, we verify the result by a full simulation of the state of the quantum field in the waveguide coupled to a cavity. To efficiently solve the Schr\\"odinger equation of the full system, we develop a matrix product state approach that keeps track of the entangled full quantum state of the coupled system. These simulations verify the operation of the gate in the weak coupling regime where the semiclassical approximation is valid. In addition, we observe a major reduction in gate fidelity as we approach the vacuum strong coupli...

  3. Bidimensional nano-optomechanics and topological backaction in a non-conservative radiation force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloppe, A; Verlot, P; Dupont-Ferrier, E; Siria, A; Poncharal, P; Bachelier, G; Vincent, P; Arcizet, O

    2014-11-01

    Optomechanics, which explores the fundamental coupling between light and mechanical motion, has made important advances in manipulating macroscopic mechanical oscillators down to the quantum level. However, dynamical effects related to the vectorial nature of the optomechanical interaction remain to be investigated. Here we study a nanowire with subwavelength dimensions coupled strongly to a tightly focused beam of light, enabling an ultrasensitive readout of the nanoresonator dynamics. We determine experimentally the vectorial structure of the optomechanical interaction and demonstrate that a bidimensional dynamical backaction governs the nanowire dynamics. Moreover, the spatial topology of the optomechanical interaction is responsible for novel canonical signatures of strong coupling between mechanical modes, which leads to a topological instability that underlies the non-conservative nature of the optomechanical interaction. These results have a universal character and illustrate the increased sensitivity of nanomechanical devices towards spatially varying interactions, opening fundamental perspectives in nanomechanics, optomechanics, ultrasensitive scanning force microscopy and nano-optics.

  4. ZipperCream-CG’ and ‘WhiteAcre-DG’: Two New Cream-type Southernpea Cultivars with Persistent Green Seed Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to incorporate genes conditioning a persistent green seed phenotype into ‘Zipper Cream’ and ‘White Acre’ type backgrounds were completed with the official release of the new southernpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) cultivars ZipperCream-CG and WhiteAcre-DG on 29 January 2008. ‘ZipperCream...

  5. Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical cavity with sub-recoil bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinder, J.; Keßler, H.; Georges, Ch.; Vargas, J.; Hemmerich, A.

    2016-12-01

    This article provides a brief synopsis of our recent work on the interaction of Bose-Einstein condensates with the light field inside an optical cavity exhibiting a bandwidth on the order of the recoil frequency. Three different coupling scenarios are discussed giving rise to different physical phenomena at the borderline between the fields of quantum optics and many-body physics. This includes sub-recoil opto-mechanical cooling, cavity-controlled matter wave superradiance and the emergence of a superradiant superfluid or a superradiant Mott insulating many-body phase in a self-organized intra-cavity optical lattice with retarded infinite range interactions.

  6. In-plane rotation of the doubly coupled photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tong; Tian, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Zou, Yongchao; Chau, Fook Siong; Deng, Jie; Zhou, Guangya

    2016-05-01

    In this letter, a nano-electro-mechanical-systems (NEMS) mechanism is proposed to drive the in-plane rotation of the doubly coupled photonic crystal (PhC) nanobeam cavities. The corresponding interactions between optical resonances and rotations are investigated. This is the first in-plane rotational tuning of the PhC cavities, which benefits from the flexible design of NEMS actuators. In experiments, more than 18 linewidths of the third order TE even mode corresponding to 0.037 mrad of the shrinking angle between the two nanobeam cavities are demonstrated; this study provides one more mechanical degree of freedom for the practical optomechanical interactions.

  7. Quantum optomechanical straight-twin engine

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Keye; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme to realize a quantum polariton heat engine in a hybrid microwave-opto-mechanical system. The engine transfers the heat obtained from the effective temperature difference between the microwave and optical cavity fields to the work extracted through the radiation pressure force. In our design a pair of polariton modes works alternately in the quantum Otto cycle, similar to a classical twin-cylinder four-stroke engine. And the other polariton is quasi-dark to suppress the dis...

  8. Strong optomechanical interactions in a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijssen, Rick; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-11-01

    Coupling between mechanical and optical degrees of freedom is strongly enhanced by using subwavelength optical mode profiles. We realize an optomechanical system based on a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam, which combines such highly confined optical fields with a low-mass mechanical mode. Analyzing the transduction of motion and effects of radiation pressure we find the system exhibits a photon-phonon coupling rate g0 /2π ≈ 11.5 MHz, exceeding previously reported values by an order of magnitude. We show that the large optomechanical interaction enables detecting thermal motion with detection noise below that at the standard quantum limit, even in broad bandwidth devices, important for both sensor applications as well as measurement-based quantum control.

  9. A 3D Printed Toolbox for Opto-Mechanical Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Torres, Juan; Valencia, Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present the development of a set of opto-mechanical components (a kinematic mount, a translation stage and an integrating sphere) that can be easily built using a 3D printer based on Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) and parts that can be found in any hardware store. Here we provide a brief description of the 3D models used and some details on the fabrication process. Moreover, with the help of three simple experimental setups, we evaluate the performance of the opto-mechanical components developed by doing a quantitative comparison with its commercial counterparts. Our results indicate that the components fabricated are highly customizable, low-cost, require a short time to be fabricated and surprisingly, offer a performance that compares favorably with respect to low-end commercial alternatives. PMID:28099494

  10. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Slow Light with Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Chan, Jasper; Eichenfield, Matt; Winger, Martin; Lin, Qiang; Hill, Jeffrey T; Chang, Darrick; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    Controlling the interaction between localized optical and mechanical excitations has recently become possible following advances in micro- and nano-fabrication techniques. To date, most experimental studies of optomechanics have focused on measurement and control of the mechanical subsystem through its interaction with optics, and have led to the experimental demonstration of dynamical back-action cooling and optical rigidity of the mechanical system. Converseley, the optical response of these systems is also modified in the presence of mechanical interactions, leading to strong nonlinear optical effects such as Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and parametric normal-mode splitting. In atomic systems, seminal experiments and proposals to slow and stop the propagation of light, and their applicability to modern optical networks, and future quantum networks, have thrust EIT to the forefront of experimental study during the last two decades. In a similar fashion, here we use the optomechanical nonli...

  11. Improving the optomechanical entanglement and cooling by photothermal force

    CERN Document Server

    Abdi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Cooling and Entanglement in optomechanical systems coupled through radiation pressure and photothermal force is studied. To develop the photothermal model, we derive an expression for deformation constant of the force. Exploiting linearized quantum Langevin equations we investigate dynamics of such systems. According to our analysis, in addition to separate action of radiation pressure and photothermal force, their cross correlation effect plays an important role in dynamics of the system. We also achieve an exact relation for the phonon number of the mechanical resonator in such systems, and then we derive an analytical expression for it at weak coupling limit. At strong coupling regime, we show that utilizing the photothermal pressure makes the ground state cooling more approachable. The effect of photothermal force on the optomechanical entanglement is investigated in detail. According to our exact numerical and approximate analytical studies, even though the photothermal force is naturally a dissipative f...

  12. Theory of optomechanics: Oscillator-field model of moving mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Galley, Chad R; Hu, B L

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a model for the kinematics and dynamics of optomechanics which describe the coupling between an optical field, here modeled by a massless scalar field, and the internal (e.g., determining its reflectivity) and mechanical (e.g., displacement) degrees of freedom of a moveable mirror. As opposed to implementing boundary conditions on the field we highlight the internal dynamics of the mirror which provides added flexibility to describe a variety of setups relevant to current experiments. The inclusion of the internal degrees of freedom in this model allows for a variety of optical activities of mirrors from those exhibiting broadband reflective properties to the cases where reflection is suppressed except for a narrow band centered around the characteristic frequency associated with the mirror's internal dynamics. After establishing the model and the reflective properties of the mirror we show how appropriate parameter choices lead to useful optomechanical models such as the well known B...

  13. Observation of optomechanical coupling in a microbottle resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Asano, Motoki; Chen, Weijian; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Ikuta, Rikizo; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Yang, Lan; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report optomechanical coupling, resolved sidebands and phonon lasing in a solid-core microbottle resonator fabricated on a single mode optical fiber. Mechanical modes with quality factors (Q_m) as high as 1.57*10^4 and 1.45*10^4 were observed, respectively, at the mechanical frequencies f_m=33.7 MHz and f_m=58.9 MHz. The maximum f_m*Q_m~0.85*10^12 Hz is close to the theoretical lower bound of 6*10^12 Hz needed to overcome thermal decoherence for resolved-sideband cooling of mechanical motion at room temperature, suggesting microbottle resonators as a possible platform for this endeavor. In addition to optomechanical effects, scatter-induced mode splitting and ringing phenomena, which are typical for high-quality optical resonances, were also observed in a microbottle resonator.

  14. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  15. 3D Printing of Protein Models in an Undergraduate Laboratory: Leucine Zippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate laboratory experiment is described that explores the structure/function relationship of protein domains, namely leucine zippers, through a molecular graphics computer program and physical models fabricated by 3D printing. By generating solvent accessible surfaces and color-coding hydrophobic, basic, and acidic amino…

  16. 'Zipbody' leucine zipper-fused Fab in E. coli in vitro and in vivo expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Fukui, Kansuke; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Hashimura, Dai; Miyake, Shiro; Hirakawa, Yuki; Yamasaki, Tomomi; Kojima, Takaaki; Nakano, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    A small antibody fragment, fragment of antigen binding (Fab), is favorable for various immunological assays. However, production efficiency of active Fab in microorganisms depends considerably on the clones. In this study, leucine zipper-peptide pairs that dimerize in parallel (ACID-p1 (LZA)/BASE-p1 (LZB) or c-Jun/c-Fos) were fused to the C-terminus of heavy chain (Hc, VH-CH1) and light chain (Lc, VL-CL), respectively, to accelerate the association of Hc and Lc to form Fab in Escherichia coli in vivo and in vitro expression systems. The leucine zipper-fused Fab named 'Zipbody' was constructed using anti-E. coli O157 monoclonal antibody obtained from mouse hybridoma and produced in both in vitro and in vivo expression systems in an active form, whereas Fab without the leucine zipper fusion was not. Similarly, Zipbody of rabbit monoclonal antibody produced in in vitro expression showed significant activity. The purified, mouse Zipbody produced in the E. coli strain Shuffle T7 Express had specificity toward the antigen; in bio-layer interferometry analysis, the KD value was measured to be 1.5-2.0 × 10(-8) M. These results indicate that leucine zipper fusion to Fab C-termini markedly enhances active Fab formation in E. coli.

  17. HapZipper: sharing HapMap populations just got easier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Pritam; Elhaik, Eran; Bader, Joel S

    2012-11-01

    The rapidly growing amount of genomic sequence data being generated and made publicly available necessitate the development of new data storage and archiving methods. The vast amount of data being shared and manipulated also create new challenges for network resources. Thus, developing advanced data compression techniques is becoming an integral part of data production and analysis. The HapMap project is one of the largest public resources of human single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), characterizing over 3 million SNPs genotyped in over 1000 individuals. The standard format and biological properties of HapMap data suggest that a dedicated genetic compression method can outperform generic compression tools. We propose a compression methodology for genetic data by introducing HapZipper, a lossless compression tool tailored to compress HapMap data beyond benchmarks defined by generic tools such as gzip, bzip2 and lzma. We demonstrate the usefulness of HapZipper by compressing HapMap 3 populations to <5% of their original sizes. HapZipper is freely downloadable from https://bitbucket.org/pchanda/hapzipper/downloads/HapZipper.tar.bz2.

  18. 3D Printing of Protein Models in an Undergraduate Laboratory: Leucine Zippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate laboratory experiment is described that explores the structure/function relationship of protein domains, namely leucine zippers, through a molecular graphics computer program and physical models fabricated by 3D printing. By generating solvent accessible surfaces and color-coding hydrophobic, basic, and acidic amino…

  19. Single-Photon Momentum Displacement in Resonator Array with Optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, T.; Li, Q.; Zhou, Lan; Song, L. J.

    2016-10-01

    We present the single-photon scattering in a resonator array system with optomechanical by solving the Lippmann-Schwinger equation iteratively. Up to the first order of the radiation pressure interaction, the single-photon transport is formulated as a three-channel scattering process. We calculate the scattering currents in different channels and obtain the transmission spectrum which shows a momentum displacement effect.

  20. New Developments of Broadband Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, A.; Zhao, D.; Linnartz, H.; Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, cavity enhanced spectroscopic techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), and broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS), have been widely employed as ultra-sensitive methods for the measurement of weak absorptions and in the real-time detection of trace species. In this contribution, we introduce two new cavity enhanced spectroscopic concepts: a) Optomechanical shutter modulated BBCEAS, a variant of BBCEAS capable of measuring optical absorption in pulsed systems with typically low duty cycles. In conventional BBCEAS applications, the latter substantially reduces the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), consequently also reducing the detection sensitivity. To overcome this, we incorporate a fast optomechanical shutter as a time gate, modulating the detection scheme of BBCEAS and increasing the effective duty cycle reaches a value close to unity. This extends the applications of BBCEAS into pulsed samples and also in time-resolved studies. b) Cavity enhanced self-absorption spectroscopy (CESAS), a new spectroscopic concept capable of studying light emitting matter (plasma, flames, combustion samples) simultaneously in absorption and emission. In CESAS, a sample (plasma, flame or combustion source) is located in an optically stable cavity consisting of two high reflectivity mirrors, and here it acts both as light source and absorbing medium. A high detection sensitivity of weak absorption is reached without the need of an external light source, such as a laser or broadband lamp. The performance is illustrated by the first CESAS result on a supersonically expanding hydrocarbon plasma. We expect CESAS to become a generally applicable analytical tool for real time and in situ diagnostics. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, W. Ubachs, H. Linnartz, J. Phys. Chem. A, {dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp310392n}, in press, 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, H. Linnartz Rev. Sci. Instrum. {84}(2), 021608 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao

  1. Synchronization of an optomechanical oscillator and thermal/free-carrier self-pulsing using optical comb forces

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro-Urrios, Daniel; Gomis-Bresco, Jordi; Alzina, Francesc; Griol, Amadeu; Martinez, Alejandro; Torres, Clivia M Sotomayor

    2014-01-01

    Optical forces can set tiny objects in states of self-sustained oscillation. When more than one oscillator comes into play, even a very weak interaction among them may lead to synchronization. This work reports a novel spontaneous synchronization process within an optomechanical crystal, which involves thermal/free-carrier self-pulsing and coherent mechanical motion. Both oscillating systems are driven and coupled by the optical energy stored in the cavity. Multiple frequency entrainment regions are observed as a result of the wide tuneability of the natural frequency of the thermal/free-carrier self-pulsing and the comb nature of the optical forces. All these features are observed at ambient conditions of pressure and temperature in a silicon compatible platform, which would allow their exploitation for advanced clocking applications or in artificial neural networks.

  2. Opto-mechanical assembly procurement for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    House, W; Simon, T

    1999-07-01

    A large number of the small optics procurements for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be in the form of completely assembled, tested, and cleaned subsystems. These subsystems will be integrated into the NIF at LLNL. To accomplish this task, the procurement packages will include, optical and mechanical drawings, acceptance test and cleanliness requirements. In January 1999, the first such integrated opto-mechanical assembly was received and evaluated at LLNL. With the successful completion of this important trial procurement, we were able to establish the viability of purchasing clean, ready to install, opto-mechanical assemblies from vendors within the optics industry. 32 vendors were chosen from our supplier database for quote, then five were chosen to purchase from. These five vendors represented a cross section of the optics industry. From a ''value'' catalog supplier (that did the whole job internally) to a partnership between three specialty companies, these vendors demonstrated they have the ingenuity and capability to deliver cost competitive, NIF-ready, opto- mechanical assemblies. This paper describes the vendor selection for this procurement, technical requirements including packaging, fabrication, coating, and cleanliness specifications, then testing and verification. It also gives real test results gathered from inspections performed at LLNL that show how our vendors scored on the various requirements. Keywords: Opto-Mechanical, assembly, NIF, packaging, shipping, specifications, procurement, MIL-STD-1246C, surface cleanliness

  3. Optomechanical THz detection with a sub-wavelength resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Belacel, Cherif; Barbieri, Stefano; Gacemi, Djamal; Favero, Ivan; Sirtori, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The terahertz spectral domain offers a myriad of applications spanning chemical spectroscopy, medicine, security and imaging [1], it has also recently become a playground for fundamental studies of light-matter interactions [2-6]. Terahertz science and technology could benefit from optomechanical approaches, which harness the interaction of light with miniature mechanical resonators [7,8]. So far, optomechanics has mostly focused on the optical and microwave domains, leading to new types of quantum experiments [9-11] and to the development of optical-microwave converters [12-14]. Here we propose and validate the concept of terahertz optomechanics, by coupling far-infrared photons to the mechanical degrees of freedom of the flexible part of a sub-wavelength split-ring resonator [15]. The resulting mechanical signal is read-out optically, allowing our semiconductor/metal device to operate as a compact and efficient terahertz detector with a noise equivalent power of 8 nW/Hz^0.5 and a linear dynamics over five d...

  4. High precision optomechanical assembly using threads as mechanical reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Bergeron, Guy; Cantin, Mario

    2016-09-01

    A convenient method to assemble optomechanical components is to use threaded interface. For example, lenses are often secured inside barrels using threaded rings. In other cases, multiple optical sub-assemblies such as lens barrels can be threaded to each other. Threads have the advantage to provide a simple assembly method, to be easy to manufacture, and to offer a compact mechanical design. On the other hand, threads are not considered to provide accurate centering between parts because of the assembly clearance between the inner and outer threads. For that reason, threads are often used in conjunction with precision cylindrical surfaces to limit the radial clearance between the parts to be centered. Therefore, tight manufacturing tolerances are needed on these pilot diameters, which affect the cost of the optical assembly. This paper presents a new optomechanical approach that uses threads as mechanical reference. This innovative method relies on geometric principles to auto-center parts to each other with a very low centering error that is usually less than 5 μm. The method allows to auto-center an optical group in a main barrel, to perform an axial adjustment of an optical group inside a main barrel, and to perform stacking of multiple barrels. In conjunction with the lens auto-centering method that also used threads as a mechanical reference, this novel solution opens new possibilities to realize a variety of different high precision optomechanical assemblies at lower cost.

  5. Temporary abdominal closure with zipper-mesh device for management of intra-abdominal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivaldo Massazo Utiyama

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to present our experience with scheduled reoperations in 15 patients with intra-abdominal sepsis. METHODS: we have applied a more effective technique consisting of temporary abdominal closure with a nylon mesh sheet containing a zipper. We performed reoperations in the operating room under general anesthesia at an average interval of 84 hours. The revision consisted of debridement of necrotic material and vigorous lavage of the involved peritoneal area. The mean age of patients was 38.7 years (range, 15 to 72 years; 11 patients were male, and four were female. RESULTS: forty percent of infections were due to necrotizing pancreatitis. Sixty percent were due to perforation of the intestinal viscus secondary to inflammation, vascular occlusion or trauma. We performed a total of 48 reoperations, an average of 3.2 surgeries per patient. The mesh-zipper device was left in place for an average of 13 days. An intestinal ostomy was present adjacent to the zipper in four patients and did not present a problem for patient management. Mortality was 26.6%. No fistulas resulted from this technique. When intra-abdominal disease was under control, the mesh-zipper device was removed, and the fascia was closed in all patients. In three patients, the wound was closed primarily, and in 12 it was allowed to close by secondary intent. Two patients developed hernia; one was incisional and one was in the drain incision. CONCLUSION: the planned reoperation for manual lavage and debridement of the abdomen through a nylon mesh-zipper combination was rapid, simple, and well-tolerated. It permitted effective management of severe septic peritonitis, easy wound care and primary closure of the abdominal wall.

  6. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  7. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S.; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics.

  8. Cavity Control and Cooling of Nanoparticles in High Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, James

    2016-05-01

    Levitated systems are a fascinating addition to the world of optically-controlled mechanical resonators. It is predicted that nanoparticles can be cooled to their c.o.m. ground state via the interaction with an optical cavity. By freeing the oscillator from clamping forces dissipation and decoherence is greatly reduced, leading to the potential to produce long-lived, macroscopically spread, mechanical quantum states, allowing tests of collapse models and any mass limit of quantum physics. Reaching the low pressures required to cavity-cool to the ground state has proved challenging. Our approach is to cavity cool a beam of nanoparticles in high vacuum. We can cool the c.o.m. motion of nanospheres, and control the rotation of nanorods, with the potential to produce cold, aligned nanostructures. Looking forward, we will utilize novel microcavities to enhance optomechanical cooling, preparing particles in a coherent beam ideally suited to ultra-high mass interferometry at 107 a.m.u.

  9. Cavity Cooling of Nanoparticles: Towards Matter-Wave experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, James; Kuhn, Stefan; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Levitated systems are a fascinating addition to the world of optically-controlled mechanical resonators. It is predicted that nanoparticles can be cooled to their c.o.m. ground state via the interaction with an optical cavity. By freeing the oscillator from clamping forces dissipation and decoherence is greatly reduced, leading to the potential to produce long-lived, macroscopically spread, mechanical quantum states, allowing tests of collapse models and any mass limit of quantum physics. Reaching the low pressures required to cavity-cool to the ground state has proved challenging. Our approach is to cavity cool a beam of nanoparticles in high vacuum. We can cool the c.o.m. motion of nanospheres a few hundred nanometers in size. Looking forward, we will utilize novel microcavities to enhance optomechanical cooling, preparing particles in a coherent beam ideally suited to ultra-high mass interferometry at 107 a.m.u.

  10. Optical cavity cooling of mechanical modes of a semiconductor nanomembrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usami, Koji; Naesby, A.; Bagci, Tolga

    2012-01-01

    . The resultant photo-induced rigidity is large and a mode temperature cooled from room temperature down to 4 K is realized with 50 μW of light and a cavity finesse of just 10. Thermal stress due to non-radiative relaxation of the electron–hole pairs is the primary cause of the cooling. We also analyse...... an alternative cooling mechanism that is a result of electronic stress via the deformation potential, and outline future directions for cavity optomechanics with optically active semiconductors.......-quality-factor and optically active semiconductor nanomembrane. The cooling is a result of electron–hole generation by cavity photons. Consequently, the cooling factor depends on the optical wavelength, varies drastically in the vicinity of the semiconductor bandgap, and follows the excitonic absorption behaviour...

  11. Coupled spin-light dynamics in cavity optomagnonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola Kusminskiy, Silvia; Tang, Hong X.; Marquardt, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Experiments during the past 2 years have shown strong resonant photon-magnon coupling in microwave cavities, while coupling in the optical regime was demonstrated very recently for the first time. Unlike with microwaves, the coupling in optical cavities is parametric, akin to optomechanical systems. This line of research promises to evolve into a new field of optomagnonics, aimed at the coherent manipulation of elementary magnetic excitations in solid-state systems by optical means. In this work we derive the microscopic optomagnonic Hamiltonian. In the linear regime the system reduces to the well-known optomechanical case, with remarkably large coupling. Going beyond that, we study the optically induced nonlinear classical dynamics of a macrospin. In the fast-cavity regime we obtain an effective equation of motion for the spin and show that the light field induces a dissipative term reminiscent of Gilbert damping. The induced dissipation coefficient, however, can change sign on the Bloch sphere, giving rise to self-sustained oscillations. When the full dynamics of the system is considered, the system can enter a chaotic regime by successive period doubling of the oscillations.

  12. Cavity-enhanced optical detection of carbon nanotube Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Stapfner, S; Hunger, D; Weig, E M; Reichel, J; Favero, I

    2012-01-01

    Optical cavities with small mode volume are well-suited to detect the vibration of sub-wavelength sized objects. Here we employ a fiber-based, high-finesse optical microcavity to detect the Brownian motion of a freely suspended carbon nanotube at room temperature under vacuum. The optical detection resolves deflections of the oscillating tube down to 50pm/Hz^1/2. A full vibrational spectrum of the carbon nanotube is obtained and confirmed by characterization of the same device in a scanning electron microscope. Our work successfully extends the principles of high-sensitivity optomechanical detection to molecular scale nanomechanical systems.

  13. Design strategies of opto-mechanical micro oscillators for the detection of the ponderomotive squeezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrielli, A.; Bonaldi, M.; Serra, E.; Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M.; Cataliotti, F. S.; Marin, F.; Marino, F.; Pontin, A.; Prodi, G. A.

    2013-05-01

    The interaction of the radiation pressure with micro-mechanical oscillators is earning a growing interest for its wide-range applications (including high sensitivity measurements of force and position) and for fundamental research (entanglement, ponderomotive squeezing, quantum non-demolition measurements). In this contribution we describe the fabrication of a family of opto-mechanical devices specifically designed to ease the detection of ponderomotive squeezing and of entanglement between macroscopic objects and light. These phenomena are not easily observed, due to the overwhelming effects of classical noise sources of thermal origin with respect to the weak quantum fluctuations of the radiation pressure. Therefore, a low thermal noise background is required, together with a weak interaction between the micro-mirror and this background (i.e. high mechanical quality factors). The device should also be capable to manage a relatively large amount of dissipated power at cryogenic temperatures, as the use of a laser with power up to a ten of mW can be useful to enhance radiation pressure effects. In the development of our opto-mechanical devices, we are exploring an approach focused on relatively thick silicon oscillators with high reflectivity coating. The relatively high mass is compensated by the capability to manage high power at low temperatures, owing to a favourable geometric factor (thicker connectors) and the excellent thermal conductivity of silicon crystals at cryogenic temperature. We have measured at cryogenic temperatures mechanical quality factors up to 105 in a micro-oscillator designed to reduce as much as possible the strain in the coating layer and the consequent energy dissipation. This design improves an approach applied in micro-mirror and micro-cantilevers, where the coated surface is reduced as much as possible to improve the quality factor. The deposition of the highly reflective coating layer has been carefully integrated in the

  14. Contributions of a Position Amino Acid Residues to the Conformational Stability of GCN4 Leucine Zipper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiang; ZENG Xian'gang; ZHOU Haimeng

    2006-01-01

    The stability of GCN4 leucine zipper and its four mutants in guanidine hydrochloride was detected to verify the contributions of different a position amino acid residues in polypeptide sequences to the forming and stability of parallel coiled coils. The changes of the circular dichroism spectra show that the displacement of the a position polar asparagine and the increase of asparagine in the GCN4 leucine zipper can reduce the α-helix content of the coiled coil structure. The mutants are less stable than the natural peptide in guanidine hydrochloride. The results show that the interaction between the polar asparagine contributes to the conformational stability of the coiled coil. Both the conformation and the number of polar residues in the coiled coil also affect the α-helix content and its resistance to the denaturant. The conclusions provide evidence describing the folding process of proteins including coiled coils in vivo.

  15. Cavity-assisted measurement and coherent control of collective atomic spin oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Kohler, Jonathan; Schreppler, Sydney; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous measurement and coherent control of the collective spin of an atomic ensemble undergoing Larmor precession in a high-finesse optical cavity. The coupling of the precessing spin oscillator to the cavity field yields phenomena similar to those observed in cavity optomechanics, including cavity amplification, damping, and optical spring shifts. These effects arise from autonomous optical feedback onto the atomic spin dynamics, conditioned by the cavity spectrum. We use this feedback to stabilize the spin in either its high- or low-energy state, where it achieves a steady-state temperature in equilibrium with measurement back-action. We measure the effective spin temperature from the asymmetry between the Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands and show that, for sufficiently large Larmor frequency, such a feedback-stabilized spin ensemble remains in a nearly pure quantum state, in spite of continuous interaction with the probe field.

  16. A novel experiment for coupling a Bose-Einstein condensate with two crossed cavity modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Julian; Morales, Andrea; Zupancic, Philip; Donner, Tobias; Esslinger, Tilman

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decade, combining cavity quantum electrodynamics and quantum gases made it possible to explore the coupling of quantized light fields to coherent matter waves, leading e.g. to new optomechanical phenomena and the realization of quantum phase transitions. Triggered by the interest to study setups with more complex cavity geometries, we built a novel, highly flexible experimental system for coupling a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) with optical cavities, which allows to switch the cavity setups by means of an interchangeable science platform. report on our latest results on coupling a Bose-Einstein condensate with two crossed cavity modes intersecting under an angle of 60°. The mirrors have been machined in a way to spatially approach them, thus obtaining maximum single atom coupling rates of several MHz. This setup will allow the study of self-ordered phases in different lattice shapes, such as hexagonal and triangular geometries.

  17. Precise Measurement of Laser Power using an Optomechanical System

    CERN Document Server

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Ballmer, Stefan; DeSalvo, Giulia; Sakata, Shihori; Nishida, Erina; Kawamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows a novel method to precisely measure the laser power using an optomechanical system. By measuring a mirror displacement caused by the reflection of an amplitude modulated laser beam, the number of photons in the incident continuous-wave laser can be precisely measured. We have demonstrated this principle by means of a prototype experiment uses a suspended 25 mg mirror as an mechanical oscillator coupled with the radiation pressure and a Michelson interferometer as the displacement sensor. A measurement of the laser power with an uncertainty of less than one percent (1 sigma) is achievable.

  18. Experimental exploration of the optomechanical attractor diagram and its dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Buters, Frank M; Heeck, Kier; Weaver, Matthew J; Pepper, Brian; de Man, Sven; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate experimental exploration of the attractor diagram of an optomechanical system where the optical forces compensate for the mechanical losses. In this case stable self-induced oscillations occur but only for specific mirror amplitudes and laser detunings. We demonstrate that we can amplify the mechanical mode to an amplitude 500 times larger than the thermal amplitude at 300K. The lack of unstable or chaotic motion allows us to manipulate our system into a non-trivial steady state and explore the dynamics of self-induced oscillations in great detail.

  19. Diamond electro-optomechanical resonators integrated in nanophotonic circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Rath, P; Diewald, S; Lewes-Malandrakis, G; Brink, D; Heidrich, N; Nebel, C; Pernice, W H P

    2014-01-01

    Diamond integrated photonic devices are promising candidates for emerging applications in nanophotonics and quantum optics. Here we demonstrate active modulation of diamond nanophotonic circuits by exploiting mechanical degrees of freedom in free-standing diamond electro-optomechanical resonators. We obtain high quality factors up to 9600, allowing us to read out the driven nanomechanical response with integrated optical interferometers with high sensitivity. We are able to excite higher order mechanical modes up to 115 MHz and observe the nanomechanical response also under ambient conditions.

  20. Integrated optomechanical structural optimization through coupling of sensitivity matrixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, M.; Moschetti, M.

    2016-07-01

    The design of astronomical instrument is growing in dimension and complexity following ELT class telescopes. The availability of new structural material like composite ones is asking for more robust and reliable designing numerical tools. This paper wants to show a new opto-mechanical optimization approach developed starting from a previously developed integrated design framework. The Idea is to reduce number of iteration in a multi- variable structural optimization taking advantage of the embedded sensitivity routines that are available both in FEA software and in raytracing ones. This approach provide reduced iteration number mainly in case of high number of structural variable parameters.

  1. Cavity cooling of an optically levitated nanoparticle

    CERN Document Server

    Kiesel, Nikolai; Delic, Uros; Grass, David; Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The ability to trap and to manipulate individual atoms is at the heart of current implementations of quantum simulations, quantum computing, and long-distance quantum communication. Controlling the motion of larger particles opens up yet new avenues for quantum science, both for the study of fundamental quantum phenomena in the context of matter wave interference, and for new sensing and transduction applications in the context of quantum optomechanics. Specifically, it has been suggested that cavity cooling of a single nanoparticle in high vacuum allows for the generation of quantum states of motion in a room-temperature environment as well as for unprecedented force sensitivity. Here, we take the first steps into this regime. We demonstrate cavity cooling of an optically levitated nanoparticle consisting of approximately 10e9 atoms. The particle is trapped at modest vacuum levels of a few millibar in the standing-wave field of an optical cavity and is cooled through coherent scattering into the modes of the...

  2. Cavity piezomechanical strong coupling and frequency conversion on an aluminum nitride chip

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-01-01

    Schemes to achieve strong coupling between mechanical modes of aluminum nitride microstructures and microwave cavity modes due to the piezoelectric effect are proposed. We show that the strong coupling regime is feasible for an on-chip aluminum nitride device that is either enclosed by a three-dimensional microwave cavity or integrated with a superconducting coplanar resonator. Combining with optomechanics, the piezomechanical strong coupling permits coherent conversion between microwave and optical modes with high efficiency. Hence, the piezomechanical system will be an efficient transducer for applications in hybrid quantum systems.

  3. Steady-state entanglement and normal-mode splitting in an atom-assisted optomechanical system with intensity-dependent coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Barzanjeh, Sh; Soltanolkotabi, M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study theoretically the bipartite and tripartite continuous variable entanglement as well as the normal-mode splitting in a single-atom cavity optomechanical system with intensity-dependent coupling. The system under consideration is formed by a Fabry-Perot cavity with a thin vibrating end mirror and a two-level atom in the Gaussian standing-wave of the cavity mode. We first derive the general form of Hamiltonian describing the tripartite intensity-dependent atom-field-mirror coupling due to the presence of cavity mode structure. We then restrict our treatment to the first vibrational sideband of the mechanical resonator and derive a novel form of tripartite atom-field-mirror Hamiltonian. We show that when the optical cavity is intensely driven one can generate bipartite entanglement between any pair of the tripartite system, and that, due to entanglement sharing, the atom-mirror entanglement is efficiently generated at the expense of optical-mechanical and optical-atom entanglement. We also...

  4. Optomechanical design of a field-deployable thermal weapon sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Marc-André; Desnoyers, Nichola; Bernier, Sophie; Bergeron, Alain; Doucet, Michel; Lagacé, François; Laou, Philips

    2007-09-01

    The use of uncooled infrared (IR) imaging technology in Thermal Weapon Sight (TWS) systems produces a unique tool that perfectly fulfills the all-weather, day-and-night vision demands in modern battlefields by significantly increasing the effectiveness and survivability of a dismounted soldier. The main advantage of IR imaging is that no illumination is required; therefore, observation can be accomplished in a passive mode. It is particularly well adapted for target detection even through smoke, dust, fog, haze, and other battlefield obscurants. In collaboration with the Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC Valcartier), INO engineering team developed, produced, and tested a rugged thermal weapon sight. An infrared channel provides for human detection at 800m and recognition at 200m. Technical system requirements included very low overall weight as well as the need to be field-deployable and user-friendly in harsh conditions. This paper describes the optomechanical design and focuses on the catadioptric-based system integration. The system requirements forced the optomechanical engineers to minimize weight while maintaining a sufficient level of rigidity in order to keep the tight optical tolerances. The optical system's main features are: a precision manual focus, a watertight vibration insulated front lens, a bolometer and two gold coated aluminum mirrors. Finite element analyses using ANSYS were performed to validate the subsystems performance. Some of the finite element computations were validated using different laboratory setups.

  5. Demonstration of Efficient Nonreciprocity in a Microwave Optomechanical Circuit*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, G. A.; Lecocq, F.; Cicak, K.; Simmonds, R. W.; Aumentado, J.; Teufel, J. D.

    2017-07-01

    The ability to engineer nonreciprocal interactions is an essential tool in modern communication technology as well as a powerful resource for building quantum networks. Aside from large reverse isolation, a nonreciprocal device suitable for applications must also have high efficiency (low insertion loss) and low output noise. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have shown that nonreciprocal behavior can be achieved in optomechanical systems, but performance in these last two attributes has been limited. Here, we demonstrate an efficient, frequency-converting microwave isolator based on the optomechanical interactions between electromagnetic fields and a mechanically compliant vacuum-gap capacitor. We achieve simultaneous reverse isolation of more than 20 dB and insertion loss less than 1.5 dB. We characterize the nonreciprocal noise performance of the device, observing that the residual thermal noise from the mechanical environments is routed solely to the input of the isolator. Our measurements show quantitative agreement with a general coupled-mode theory. Unlike conventional isolators and circulators, these compact nonreciprocal devices do not require a static magnetic field, and they allow for dynamic control of the direction of isolation. With these advantages, similar devices could enable programmable, high-efficiency connections between disparate nodes of quantum networks, even efficiently bridging the microwave and optical domains.

  6. Bidimensional nano-optomechanics and topological backaction in a non-conservative radiation force field

    CERN Document Server

    Gloppe, Arnaud; Dupont-Ferrier, Eva; Siria, Alessandro; Poncharal, Philippe; Bachelier, Guillaume; Vincent, Pascal; Arcizet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Optomechanics, which explores the fundamental coupling between light and mechanical motion, has made important advances in both exploring and manipulating macroscopic mechanical oscillators down to the quantum level. However, dynamical effects related to the vectorial nature of the optomechanical interaction remain to be investigated. Here we study a nanowire with sub-wavelength dimensions strongly coupled to a tightly focused beam of light, enabling ultrasensitive readout of the nanoresonators dynamics. We experimentally determine the vectorial structure of the optomechanical interaction and demonstrate that bidimensional dynamical backaction governs the nanowire dynamics. Moreover, the non-conservative topology of the optomechanical interaction is responsible for a novel canonical signature of strong coupling between the nanoresonator mechanical modes, leading to a topological instability. These results have a universal character and illustrate the increased sensitivity of nanomechanical devices towards top...

  7. Optimal control of the power adiabatic stroke of an optomechanical heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathaee, M.; Bahrampour, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the power adiabatic stroke of the Otto optomechanical heat engine introduced in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 150602 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.150602. We derive the maximum extractable work of both optomechanical normal modes in the minimum time while the system experiences quantum friction effects. We show that the total work done by the system in the power adiabatic stroke is optimized by a bang-bang control. The time duration of the power adiabatic stroke is of the order of the inverse of the effective optomechanical-coupling coefficient. The optimal phase-space trajectory of the Otto cycle for both optomechanical normal modes is also obtained.

  8. Diamond as a material for monolithically integrated optical and optomechanical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Rath, Patrik; Nebel, Christoph; Pernice, Wolfram H P

    2016-01-01

    Diamond provides superior optical and mechanical material properties, making it a prime candidate for the realization of integrated optomechanical circuits. Because diamond sub- strates have matured in size, efficient nanostructuring methods can be used to realize full-scale integrated devices. Here we review optical and mechanical resonators fab- ricated from polycrystalline as well as single crystalline diamond. We present relevant material properties with respect to implementing optomechanical devices and compare them with other material systems. We give an overview of diamond integrated optomechanical circuits and present the optical readout mechanism and the actuation via optical or electrostatic forces that have been implemented to date. By combining diamond nanophotonic circuits with superconducting nanowires single photons can be efficiently detected on such chips and we outline how future single photon optomechanical circuits can be realized on this platform.

  9. Bi-directional conversion between microwave and optical frequencies in a piezoelectric optomechanical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainsencher, Amit; Satzinger, K. J.; Peairs, G. A.; Cleland, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the principles of design, fabrication, and operation of a piezoelectric optomechanical crystal with which we demonstrate bi-directional conversion of energy between microwave and optical frequencies. The optomechanical crystal has an optical mode at 1523 nm co-located with a mechanical breathing mode at 3.8 GHz, with a measured optomechanical coupling strength gom/2π of 115 kHz. The breathing mode is driven and detected by curved interdigitated transducers that couple to a Lamb mode in suspended membranes on either end of the optomechanical crystal, allowing the external piezoelectric modulation of the optical signal as well as the converse, the detection of microwave electrical signals generated by a modulated optical signal. We compare measurements to theory where appropriate.

  10. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  11. Nano-optomechanical measurement in the photon counting regime

    CERN Document Server

    de Lépinay, Laure Mercier; Rohr, Sven; Gloppe, Arnaud; Kuhn, Aurélien; Verlot, Pierre; Dupont-Ferrier, Eva; Besga, Benjamin; Arcizet, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Optically measuring in the photon counting regime is a recurrent challenge in modern physics and a guarantee to develop weakly invasive probes. Here we investigate this idea on a hybrid nano-optomechanical system composed of a nanowire hybridized to a single Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) defect. The vibrations of the nanoresonator grant a spatial degree of freedom to the quantum emitter and the photon emission event can now vary in space and time. We investigate how the nanomotion is encoded on the detected photon statistics and explore their spatio-temporal correlation properties. This allows a quantitative measurement of the vibrations of the nanomechanical oscillator at unprecedentedly low light intensities in the photon counting regime when less than one photon is detected per oscillation period, where standard detectors are dark-noise-limited. These results have implications for probing weakly interacting nanoresonators, for low temperature experiments and for investigating single moving markers.

  12. High frequency nano-optomechanical disk resonators in liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Santos, E; Nguyen, D T; Hease, W; Lemaître, A; Ducci, S; Leo, G; Favero, I

    2015-01-01

    Vibrating nano- and micromechanical resonators have been the subject of research aiming at ultrasensitive mass sensors for mass spectrometry, chemical analysis and biomedical diagnosis. Unfortunately, their merits diminish dramatically in liquids due to dissipative mechanisms like viscosity and acoustic losses. A push towards faster and lighter miniaturized nanodevices would enable improved performances, provided dissipation was controlled and novel techniques were available to efficiently drive and read-out their minute displacement. Here we report on a nano-optomechanical approach to this problem using miniature semiconductor disks. These devices combine mechanical motion at high frequency above the GHz, ultra-low mass of a few picograms, and moderate dissipation in liquids. We show that high-sensitivity optical measurements allow to direct resolve their thermally driven Brownian vibrations, even in the most dissipative liquids. Thanks to this novel technique, we experimentally, numerically and analytically...

  13. Nonlinear dynamics and quantum entanglement in optomechanical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanglei; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2014-03-21

    To search for and exploit quantum manifestations of classical nonlinear dynamics is one of the most fundamental problems in physics. Using optomechanical systems as a paradigm, we address this problem from the perspective of quantum entanglement. We uncover strong fingerprints in the quantum entanglement of two common types of classical nonlinear dynamical behaviors: periodic oscillations and quasiperiodic motion. There is a transition from the former to the latter as an experimentally adjustable parameter is changed through a critical value. Accompanying this process, except for a small region about the critical value, the degree of quantum entanglement shows a trend of continuous increase. The time evolution of the entanglement measure, e.g., logarithmic negativity, exhibits a strong dependence on the nature of classical nonlinear dynamics, constituting its signature.

  14. Tests of quantum-gravity-induced nonlocality via optomechanical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenchia, Alessio; Benincasa, Dionigi M. T.; Liberati, Stefano; Marin, Francesco; Marino, Francesco; Ortolan, Antonello

    2017-01-01

    The nonrelativistic limit of nonlocal modifications to the Klein-Gordon operator is studied, and the experimental possibilities of casting stringent constraints on the nonlocality scale via planned and/or current optomechanical experiments are discussed. Details of the perturbative analysis and semianalytical simulations leading to the dynamic evolution of a quantum harmonic oscillator in the presence of nonlocality reported in [A. Belenchia, D. M. T. Benincasa, S. Liberati, F. Marin, F. Marino, and A. Ortolan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 161303 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.161303] are given, together with a comprehensive account of the experimental methodology with particular regard to sensitivity limitations related to thermal decoherence time and active cooling of the oscillator. Finally, a strategy for detecting nonlocality scales of the order of 10-22÷10-26 m by means of the spontaneous time-periodic squeezing of quantum-coherent states is provided.

  15. A 3D Printed Toolbox for Opto-Mechanical Components

    CERN Document Server

    Salazar-Serrano, L J; Torres, J P

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays is very common to find headlines in the media where it is stated that 3D printing is a technology called to change our lives in the near future. For many authors, we are living in times of a third industrial revolution. Howerver, we are currently in a stage of development where the use of 3D printing is advantageous over other manufacturing technologies only in rare scenarios. Fortunately, scientific research is one of them. Here we present the development of a set of opto-mechanical components that can be built easily using a 3D printer based on Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) and parts that can be found on any hardware store. The components of the set presented here are highly customizable, low-cost, require a short time to be fabricated and offer a performance that compares favorably with respect to low-end commercial alternatives.

  16. Optomechanical design of a prompt gamma reaction history diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Hans W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kaufman, Morris I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Malone, Robert M [NSTEC; Frogget, Brent C [NSTEC; Tunnell, Thomas W [NSTEC; Cox, Brian [NSTEC; Frayer, Daniel K [NSTEC; Ali, Zaheer [NSTEC; Stoeffl, Wolfgang [LLNL

    2009-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility and the Omega Laser Facility both have a need for measuring prompt gamma radiation as part of a nuclear diagnostic program. A new gamma-detection diagnostic using off-axis-parabolic mirrors has been built. Some new techniques were used in the design, construction, and tolerancing of this gamma ray diagnostic. Because of the wavelength requirement (250-700 nm), the optical element surface finishes were a key design consideration. The optical enclosure had to satisfy pressure safety concerns and shielding against electromagnetic interference induced by gammas and neutrons. Structural finite element analysis was needed to meet rigorous optical and safety requirements. The optomechanical design is presented. Alignment issues are also discussed.

  17. CARMENES. II: optical and opto-mechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, W.; Sánchez Carrasco, M. A.; Xu, W.; Cárdenas, M. C.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Becerril, S.; Feiz, C.; Ramón, A.; Dreizler, S.; Rohde, P.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Mandel, H.; Caballero, J. A.

    2012-09-01

    CARMENES is a fiber-fed high-resolution échelle spectrograph for the Calar Alto 3.5m telescope. The instrument is built by a German-Spanish consortium under the lead of the Landessternwarte Heidelberg. The search for planets around M dwarfs with a radial velocity accuracy of 1 m/s is the main focus of the planned science. Two channels, one for the visible, another for the near-infrared, will allow observations in the complete wavelength range from 550 to 1700 nm. To ensure the stability, the instrument is working in vacuum in a thermally controlled environment. The optical design of both channels of the instrument and the front-end, as well as the opto-mechanical design, are described.

  18. Opto-mechanical artificial eye with accommodative ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Taboada, José J; Del Águila-Carrasco, Antonio J; Marín-Franch, Iván; Bernal-Molina, Paula; Montés-Micó, Robert; López-Gil, Norberto

    2015-07-27

    The purpose of this study was to describe the design and characterization of a new opto-mechanical artificial eye (OMAE) with accommodative ability. The OMAE design is based on a second-pass configuration where a small source of light is used at the artificial retina plane. A lens whose focal length can be changed electronically was used to add the accommodation capability. The changes in the OMAE's aberrations with the lens focal length, which effectively changes the accommodative state of the OMAE, were measured with a commercial aberrometer. Changes in power and aberrations with room temperature were also measured. The OMAE's higher-order aberrations (HOAs) were similar to the ones of the human eye, including the rate at which fourth-order spherical aberration decreased with accommodation. The OMAE design proposed here is simple, and it can be implemented in an optical system to mimic the optics of the human eye.

  19. Dissipative Optomechanical Preparation of Macroscopic Quantum Superposition States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, M.; Degenfeld-Schonburg, P.; Sameti, M.; Navarrete-Benlloch, C.; Hartmann, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    The transition from quantum to classical physics remains an intensely debated question even though it has been investigated for more than a century. Further clarifications could be obtained by preparing macroscopic objects in spatial quantum superpositions and proposals for generating such states for nanomechanical devices either in a transient or a probabilistic fashion have been put forward. Here, we introduce a method to deterministically obtain spatial superpositions of arbitrary lifetime via dissipative state preparation. In our approach, we engineer a double-well potential for the motion of the mechanical element and drive it towards the ground state, which shows the desired spatial superposition, via optomechanical sideband cooling. We propose a specific implementation based on a superconducting circuit coupled to the mechanical motion of a lithium-decorated monolayer graphene sheet, introduce a method to verify the mechanical state by coupling it to a superconducting qubit, and discuss its prospects for testing collapse models for the quantum to classical transition.

  20. Quantum synchronization in an optomechanical system based on Lyapunov control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-06-01

    We extend the concepts of quantum complete synchronization and phase synchronization, which were proposed in A. Mari et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 103605 (2013)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.111.103605, to more widespread quantum generalized synchronization. Generalized synchronization can be considered a necessary condition or a more flexible derivative of complete synchronization, and its criterion and synchronization measure are proposed and analyzed in this paper. As examples, we consider two typical generalized synchronizations in a designed optomechanical system. Unlike the effort to construct a special coupling synchronization system, we purposefully design extra control fields based on Lyapunov control theory. We find that the Lyapunov function can adapt to more flexible control objectives, which is more suitable for generalized synchronization control, and the control fields can be achieved simply with a time-variant voltage. Finally, the existence of quantum entanglement in different generalized synchronizations is also discussed.

  1. Thermal Brillouin noise observed in silicon optomechanical waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Van Laer, Raphaël; Baets, Roel; Van Thourhout, Dries; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H

    2016-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering was recently observed in nanoscale silicon waveguides. Surprisingly, thermally-driven photon-phonon conversion in these structures had not yet been reported. Here, we inject an optical probe in a suspended silicon waveguide and measure its phase fluctuations at the output. We observe mechanical resonances around 8 GHz with a scattering efficiency of $10^{-5} \\, \\text{m}^{-1}$ and a signal-to-noise ratio of 2. The observations are in agreement with a theory of noise in these waveguides as well as with stimulated measurements. Our scheme may simplify measurements of mechanical signatures in nanoscale waveguides and is a step towards a better grasp of thermal noise in these new continuum optomechanical systems.

  2. Testing Quantum Gravity Induced Nonlocality via Optomechanical Quantum Oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenchia, Alessio; Benincasa, Dionigi M T; Liberati, Stefano; Marin, Francesco; Marino, Francesco; Ortolan, Antonello

    2016-04-22

    Several quantum gravity scenarios lead to physics below the Planck scale characterized by nonlocal, Lorentz invariant equations of motion. We show that such nonlocal effective field theories lead to a modified Schrödinger evolution in the nonrelativistic limit. In particular, the nonlocal evolution of optomechanical quantum oscillators is characterized by a spontaneous periodic squeezing that cannot be generated by environmental effects. We discuss constraints on the nonlocality obtained by past experiments, and show how future experiments (already under construction) will either see such effects or otherwise cast severe bounds on the nonlocality scale (well beyond the current limits set by the Large Hadron Collider). This paves the way for table top, high precision experiments on massive quantum objects as a promising new avenue for testing some quantum gravity phenomenology.

  3. Testing Quantum Gravity Induced Nonlocality via Optomechanical Quantum Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenchia, Alessio; Benincasa, Dionigi M. T.; Liberati, Stefano; Marin, Francesco; Marino, Francesco; Ortolan, Antonello

    2016-04-01

    Several quantum gravity scenarios lead to physics below the Planck scale characterized by nonlocal, Lorentz invariant equations of motion. We show that such nonlocal effective field theories lead to a modified Schrödinger evolution in the nonrelativistic limit. In particular, the nonlocal evolution of optomechanical quantum oscillators is characterized by a spontaneous periodic squeezing that cannot be generated by environmental effects. We discuss constraints on the nonlocality obtained by past experiments, and show how future experiments (already under construction) will either see such effects or otherwise cast severe bounds on the nonlocality scale (well beyond the current limits set by the Large Hadron Collider). This paves the way for table top, high precision experiments on massive quantum objects as a promising new avenue for testing some quantum gravity phenomenology.

  4. Dual leucine zipper kinase as a therapeutic target for neurodegenerative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Dana; Yang, Zhiyong; Welsbie, Derek

    2013-10-01

    Dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is a member of the mixed lineage kinase subfamily. Mixed lineage kinases are upstream MAP3Ks that activate the JNK pathway. DLK is primarily responsible for activating JNK and mediating the apoptotic stress response in various cell types, specifically neurons. Inhibition and knockdown of DLK has been demonstrated to have neuroprotective effects in cellular and animal models of Alzheimer's disease, glaucoma, Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative conditions. Several series of ATP-binding site inhibitors have been identified through profiling efforts providing launch points for future medicinal chemistry programs.

  5. Localization transition in the presence of cavity backaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojan, Katharina; Kraus, Rebecca; Fogarty, Thomás; Habibian, Hessam; Minguzzi, Anna; Morigi, Giovanna

    2016-07-01

    We study the localization transition of an atom confined by an external optical lattice in a high-finesse cavity. The atom-cavity coupling yields an effective secondary lattice potential, whose wavelength is incommensurate with the periodicity of the optical lattice. The cavity lattice can induce localization of the atomic wave function analogously to the Aubry-André localization transition. Starting from the master equation for the cavity and the atom we perform a mapping of the system dynamics to a Hubbard Hamiltonian, which can be reduced to the Harper's Hamiltonian in appropriate limits. We evaluate the phase diagram for the atom's ground state and show that the transition between extended and localized wave function is controlled by the strength of the cavity nonlinearity, which determines the size of the localized region and the behavior of the Lyapunov exponent. The Lyapunov exponent, in particular, exhibits resonancelike behavior in correspondence with the optomechanical resonances. Finally we discuss the experimental feasibility of these predictions.

  6. Atom-assisted quadrature squeezing of a mechanical oscillator inside a dispersive cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Asoka; Chauhan, Anil Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Measurement of position of a mesoscopic harmonic oscillator below standard quantum limit in cavity optomechanics has seen a growing interest in recent times. If the oscillator is suspended inside the cavity (with both the mirrors fixed) at a position where the cavity frequency becomes extremum (a membrane-in-the-middle setup), large squeezing can be achieved by conditional measurement of thermal photons; however the cavity decay degrades such squeezing. Here we propose an atom-cavity-oscillator hybrid scheme, in which the effect of cavity decay is eliminated via dispersive coupling of the cavity mode. The atom in Λ configuration is considered to be trapped on either side of the membrane inside the cavity. We show that a considerable amount of squeezing (far beyond the 3 dB limit) can be achieved that is not affected by spontaneous emission of the atom. The squeezing depends upon the initial preparation of the atomic states. Further, the external classical fields, that drive the atomic transition and the cavity mode, control the degree of squeezing and can also lead to a strong effective atom-oscillator coupling. Effect of thermal phonon bath on squeezing is studied in terms of the squeezing spectrum. The results are supported by the detailed analytical calculations.

  7. Comprehensive analysis of the homeodomain-leucine zipper IV transcription factor family in Cucumis sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rao; Liu, Wei; Li, Qiang; Li, Jing; Wang, Lina; Ren, Zhonghai

    2013-07-01

    The class IV homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip IV) proteins are plant-specific transcriptional factors known to play crucial roles in plant growth and development. In this study, 11 cucumber (Cucumis sativus) HD-Zip IV genes were identified in the version 2 cucumber genome and found to be distributed unevenly across the chromosomes. The CsHDZIV (Cucumis sativus homeodomain-leucine zipper IV) gene family is smaller than in other studied species (except for rice) because of the absence of gene duplication events. Phylogenetic analysis showed that HD-Zip IV genes from cucumber, Arabidopsis, tomato, cotton, maize, and rice could be classified into five subgroups. All CsHDZIV genes appear to be derived from a basic module containing 11 exons in the coding region. Two conserved motifs of 21 and 19 nucleotides were found in the 3'-untranslated regions of six CsHDZIV genes, suggesting that post-transcriptional regulation may play a role in regulation of CsHDZIV genes. In addition, 6 of 11 CsHDZIV genes were found to undergo alternative splicing events. Reverse transcription PCR analysis showed that all CsHDZIV genes (except one) were expressed and showed preferential expression in reproductive organs.

  8. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Reed, John C. [Program on Apoptosis, Cancer Center, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Pascual, Jaime, E-mail: pascual@burnham.org [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2007-04-01

    A leucine-zipper with properties as apoptotic regulator in the ER has been crystallized. X-ray data to 2.5 Å resolution were collected, molecular replacement solutions were identified and refinement has been started. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160–Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 Å resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22/P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 Å. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  9. The perennial ryegrass GenomeZipper: targeted use of genome resources for comparative grass genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Matthias; Martis, Mihaela; Asp, Torben; Mayer, Klaus F X; Lübberstedt, Thomas; Byrne, Stephen; Frei, Ursula; Studer, Bruno

    2013-02-01

    Whole-genome sequences established for model and major crop species constitute a key resource for advanced genomic research. For outbreeding forage and turf grass species like ryegrasses (Lolium spp.), such resources have yet to be developed. Here, we present a model of the perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) genome on the basis of conserved synteny to barley (Hordeum vulgare) and the model grass genome Brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon) as well as rice (Oryza sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). A transcriptome-based genetic linkage map of perennial ryegrass served as a scaffold to establish the chromosomal arrangement of syntenic genes from model grass species. This scaffold revealed a high degree of synteny and macrocollinearity and was then utilized to anchor a collection of perennial ryegrass genes in silico to their predicted genome positions. This resulted in the unambiguous assignment of 3,315 out of 8,876 previously unmapped genes to the respective chromosomes. In total, the GenomeZipper incorporates 4,035 conserved grass gene loci, which were used for the first genome-wide sequence divergence analysis between perennial ryegrass, barley, Brachypodium, rice, and sorghum. The perennial ryegrass GenomeZipper is an ordered, information-rich genome scaffold, facilitating map-based cloning and genome assembly in perennial ryegrass and closely related Poaceae species. It also represents a milestone in describing synteny between perennial ryegrass and fully sequenced model grass genomes, thereby increasing our understanding of genome organization and evolution in the most important temperate forage and turf grass species.

  10. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavities/tooth decay Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cavities are permanently damaged areas in the hard surface of your teeth ... into tiny openings or holes. Cavities, also called tooth decay or caries, are caused by a combination of ...

  11. The leucine zipper of NRL interacts with the CRX homeodomain. A possible mechanism of transcriptional synergy in rhodopsin regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitton, K P; Swain, P K; Chen, S; Xu, S; Zack, D J; Swaroop, A

    2000-09-22

    Photoreceptor-specific expression of rhodopsin is mediated by multiple cis-acting elements in the proximal promoter region. NRL (neural retina leucine zipper) and CRX (cone rod homeobox) proteins bind to the adjacent NRE and Ret-4 sites, respectively, within this region. Although NRL and CRX are each individually able to induce rhodopsin promoter activity, when expressed together they exhibit transcriptional synergy in rhodopsin promoter activation. Using the yeast two-hybrid method and glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays, we demonstrate that the leucine zipper of NRL can physically interact with CRX. Deletion analysis revealed that the CRX homeodomain (CRX-HD) plays an important role in the interaction with the NRL leucine zipper. Although binding with the CRX-HD alone was weak, a strong interaction was detected when flanking regions including the glutamine-rich and the basic regions that follow the HD were included. A reciprocal deletion analysis showed that the leucine zipper of NRL is required for interaction with CRX-HD. Two disease-causing mutations in CRX-HD (R41W and R90W) that exhibit reduced DNA binding and transcriptional synergy also decrease its interaction with NRL. These studies suggest novel possibilities for protein-protein interaction between two conserved DNA-binding motifs and imply that cross-talk among distinct regulatory pathways contributes to the establishment and maintenance of photoreceptor function.

  12. Charge-driven and reversible assembly of ultra-dense polymer brushers: Formation and antifouling properties of a zipper brush

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.; Meijer, G.; Keizer, de A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Kleijn, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated a new type of polymer brushes: the zipper brush. By adsorbing a diblock-copolymer with one charged block and one neutral block to an oppositely charged polyelectrolyte brush, a neutral polymer brush is formed on top of an almost neutral complex layer of polyelectrolytes. This neutral

  13. Backaction limits on self-sustained optomechanical oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Poot, M; Bagheri, M; Pernice, W H P; Tang, H X

    2012-01-01

    The maximum amplitude of mechanical oscillators coupled to optical cavities are studied both analytically and numerically. The optical backaction on the resonator enables self-sustained oscillations whose limit cycle is set by the dynamic range of the cavity. The maximum attainable amplitude and the phonon generation quantum efficiency of the backaction process are studied for both unresolved and resolved cavities. Quantum efficiencies far exceeding one are found in the resolved sideband regime where the amplitude is low. On the other hand the maximum amplitude is found in the unresolved system. Finally, the role of mechanical nonlinearities is addressed.

  14. An integrated low phase noise radiation-pressure-driven optomechanical oscillator chipset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xingsheng; Huang, Yongjun; Li, Ying; McMillan, James F; Zheng, Jiangjun; Huang, Shu-Wei; Hsieh, Pin-Chun; Gu, Tingyi; Wang, Di; Hati, Archita; Howe, David A; Wen, Guangjun; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Wong, Chee Wei

    2014-10-30

    High-quality frequency references are the cornerstones in position, navigation and timing applications of both scientific and commercial domains. Optomechanical oscillators, with direct coupling to continuous-wave light and non-material-limited f × Q product, are long regarded as a potential platform for frequency reference in radio-frequency-photonic architectures. However, one major challenge is the compatibility with standard CMOS fabrication processes while maintaining optomechanical high quality performance. Here we demonstrate the monolithic integration of photonic crystal optomechanical oscillators and on-chip high speed Ge detectors based on the silicon CMOS platform. With the generation of both high harmonics (up to 59 th order) and subharmonics (down to 1/4), our chipset provides multiple frequency tones for applications in both frequency multipliers and dividers. The phase noise is measured down to -125 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset at ~400 μW dropped-in powers, one of the lowest noise optomechanical oscillators to date and in room-temperature and atmospheric non-vacuum operating conditions. These characteristics enable optomechanical oscillators as a frequency reference platform for radio-frequency-photonic information processing.

  15. Ultracold bosons with cavity-mediated long-range interactions: A local mean-field analysis of the phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederle, Astrid E.; Morigi, Giovanna; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-09-01

    Ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices self-organize into a variety of structural and quantum phases when placed into a single-mode cavity and pumped by a laser. Cavity optomechanical effects induce an atom density modulation at the cavity-mode wavelength that competes with the optical lattice arrangement. Simultaneously short-range interactions via particle hopping promote superfluid order such that a variety of structural and quantum coherent phases can occur. We analyze the emerging phase diagram in two dimensions by means of an extended Bose-Hubbard model using a local mean-field approach combined with a superfluid cluster analysis. For commensurate ratios of the cavity and external lattice wavelengths, the Mott insulator-superfluid transition is modified by the appearance of charge density wave and supersolid phases, at which the atomic density supports the buildup of a cavity field. For incommensurate ratios, the optomechanical forces induce the formation of Bose-glass and superglass phases, namely, nonsuperfluid and superfluid phases, respectively, displaying quasiperiodic density modulations, which in addition can exhibit structural and superfluid stripe formation. The onset of such structures is constrained by the on-site interaction and is favorable at fractional densities. Experimental observables are identified and discussed.

  16. A hamiltonian replica exchange method for building protein-protein interfaces applied to a leucine zipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukier, Robert I

    2011-01-28

    Leucine zippers consist of alpha helical monomers dimerized (or oligomerized) into alpha superhelical structures known as coiled coils. Forming the correct interface of a dimer from its monomers requires an exploration of configuration space focused on the side chains of one monomer that must interdigitate with sites on the other monomer. The aim of this work is to generate good interfaces in short simulations starting from separated monomers. Methods are developed to accomplish this goal based on an extension of a previously introduced [Su and Cukier, J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 9595, (2009)] hamiltonian temperature replica exchange method (HTREM), which scales the hamiltonian in both potential and kinetic energies that was used for the simulation of dimer melting curves. The new method, HTREM_MS (MS designates mean square), focused on interface formation, adds restraints to the hamiltonians for all but the physical system, which is characterized by the normal molecular dynamics force field at the desired temperature. The restraints in the nonphysical systems serve to prevent the monomers from separating too far, and have the dual aims of enhancing the sampling of close in configurations and breaking unwanted correlations in the restrained systems. The method is applied to a 31-residue truncation of the 33-residue leucine zipper (GCN4-p1) of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. The monomers are initially separated by a distance that is beyond their capture length. HTREM simulations show that the monomers oscillate between dimerlike and monomerlike configurations, but do not form a stable interface. HTREM_MS simulations result in the dimer interface being faithfully reconstructed on a 2 ns time scale. A small number of systems (one physical and two restrained with modified potentials and higher effective temperatures) are sufficient. An in silico mutant that should not dimerize because it lacks charged residues that provide electrostatic stabilization of the dimer

  17. A Hamiltonian replica exchange method for building protein-protein interfaces applied to a leucine zipper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukier, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    Leucine zippers consist of alpha helical monomers dimerized (or oligomerized) into alpha superhelical structures known as coiled coils. Forming the correct interface of a dimer from its monomers requires an exploration of configuration space focused on the side chains of one monomer that must interdigitate with sites on the other monomer. The aim of this work is to generate good interfaces in short simulations starting from separated monomers. Methods are developed to accomplish this goal based on an extension of a previously introduced [Su and Cukier, J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 9595, (2009)] Hamiltonian temperature replica exchange method (HTREM), which scales the Hamiltonian in both potential and kinetic energies that was used for the simulation of dimer melting curves. The new method, HTREM_MS (MS designates mean square), focused on interface formation, adds restraints to the Hamiltonians for all but the physical system, which is characterized by the normal molecular dynamics force field at the desired temperature. The restraints in the nonphysical systems serve to prevent the monomers from separating too far, and have the dual aims of enhancing the sampling of close in configurations and breaking unwanted correlations in the restrained systems. The method is applied to a 31-residue truncation of the 33-residue leucine zipper (GCN4-p1) of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. The monomers are initially separated by a distance that is beyond their capture length. HTREM simulations show that the monomers oscillate between dimerlike and monomerlike configurations, but do not form a stable interface. HTREM_MS simulations result in the dimer interface being faithfully reconstructed on a 2 ns time scale. A small number of systems (one physical and two restrained with modified potentials and higher effective temperatures) are sufficient. An in silico mutant that should not dimerize because it lacks charged residues that provide electrostatic stabilization of the dimer

  18. The leucine zipper domains of the transcription factors GCN4 and c-Jun have ribonuclease activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav Nikolaev

    Full Text Available Basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP proteins are one of the largest transcription factor families that regulate a wide range of cellular functions. Owing to the stability of their coiled coil structure leucine zipper (LZ domains of bZIP factors are widely employed as dimerization motifs in protein engineering studies. In the course of one such study, the X-ray structure of the retro-version of the LZ moiety of yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 suggested that this retro-LZ may have ribonuclease activity. Here we show that not only the retro-LZ but also the authentic LZ of GCN4 has weak but distinct ribonuclease activity. The observed cleavage of RNA is unspecific, it is not suppressed by the ribonuclease A inhibitor RNasin and involves the breakage of 3',5'-phosphodiester bonds with formation of 2',3'-cyclic phosphates as the final products as demonstrated by HPLC/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Several mutants of the GCN4 leucine zipper are catalytically inactive, providing important negative controls and unequivocally associating the enzymatic activity with the peptide under study. The leucine zipper moiety of the human factor c-Jun as well as the entire c-Jun protein are also shown to catalyze degradation of RNA. The presented data, which was obtained in the test-tube experiments, adds GCN4 and c-Jun to the pool of proteins with multiple functions (also known as moonlighting proteins. If expressed in vivo, the endoribonuclease activity of these bZIP-containing factors may represent a direct coupling between transcription activation and controlled RNA turnover. As an additional result of this work, the retro-leucine zipper of GCN4 can be added to the list of functional retro-peptides.

  19. Flux-Rope Twist in Eruptive Flares and CMEs: Due to Zipper and Main-Phase Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, E. R.; Longcope, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    The nature of three-dimensional reconnection when a twisted flux tube erupts during an eruptive flare or coronal mass ejection is considered. The reconnection has two phases: first of all, 3D "zipper reconnection" propagates along the initial coronal arcade, parallel to the polarity inversion line (PIL); then subsequent quasi-2D "main-phase reconnection" in the low corona around a flux rope during its eruption produces coronal loops and chromospheric ribbons that propagate away from the PIL in a direction normal to it. One scenario starts with a sheared arcade: the zipper reconnection creates a twisted flux rope of roughly one turn (2π radians of twist), and then main-phase reconnection builds up the bulk of the erupting flux rope with a relatively uniform twist of a few turns. A second scenario starts with a pre-existing flux rope under the arcade. Here the zipper phase can create a core with many turns that depend on the ratio of the magnetic fluxes in the newly formed flare ribbons and the new flux rope. Main phase reconnection then adds a layer of roughly uniform twist to the twisted central core. Both phases and scenarios are modeled in a simple way that assumes the initial magnetic flux is fragmented along the PIL. The model uses conservation of magnetic helicity and flux, together with equipartition of magnetic helicity, to deduce the twist of the erupting flux rope in terms the geometry of the initial configuration. Interplanetary observations show some flux ropes have a fairly uniform twist, which could be produced when the zipper phase and any pre-existing flux rope possess small or moderate twist (up to one or two turns). Other interplanetary flux ropes have highly twisted cores (up to five turns), which could be produced when there is a pre-existing flux rope and an active zipper phase that creates substantial extra twist.

  20. Optomechanical Analogy for Toy Cosmology with Quantized Scale Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Smiga

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The simplest cosmology—the Friedmann–Robertson–Walker–Lemaître (FRW model— describes a spatially homogeneous and isotropic universe where the scale factor is the only dynamical parameter. Here we consider how quantized electromagnetic fields become entangled with the scale factor in a toy version of the FRW model. A system consisting of a photon, source, and detector is described in such a universe, and we find that the detection of a redshifted photon by the detector system constrains possible scale factor superpositions. Thus, measuring the redshift of the photon is equivalent to a weak measurement of the underlying cosmology. We also consider a potential optomechanical analogy system that would enable experimental exploration of these concepts. The analogy focuses on the effects of photon redshift measurement as a quantum back-action on metric variables, where the position of a movable mirror plays the role of the scale factor. By working in the rotating frame, an effective Hubble equation can be simulated with a simple free moving mirror.

  1. Optical and optomechanical ultralightweight C/SiC components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenburg, Ulrich; Pfrang, Wilhelm; Kutter, G. S.; Mueller, Claus E.; Kunkel, Bernd P.; Deyerler, Michael; Bauereisen, Stefan

    1999-11-01

    Optical and optomechanical structures based on silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics are becoming increasingly important for ultra- lightweight optical systems that must work in adverse environments. At IABG and Dornier Satellite Systems (DSS) in Munich, a special form of SiC ceramics carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiCR) has been developed partly under ESA and NASA contracts. C/SiCR is a light-weight, high- strength engineering material that features tunable mechanical and thermal properties. It offers exceptional design freedom due to its reduced brittleness and negligible volume shrinkage during processing in comparison to traditional, powder-based ceramics. Furthermore, its rapid fabrication process produces near-net-shape components using conventional NC machining/milling equipment and, thus, provides substantial schedule, cost, and risk savings. These characteristics allow C/SiCR to overcome many of the problems associated with more traditional optical materials. To date, C/SiCR has been used to produce ultra-lightweight mirrors and reflectors, antennas, optical benches, and monolithic and integrated reference structures for a variety of space and terrestrial applications. This paper describes the material properties, optical system and structural design aspects, the forming and manufacturing process including high-temperature joining technology, precision grinding and cladding techniques, and the performance results of a number of C/SiCR optical components we have built.

  2. Frida integral field unit opto-mechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Salvador; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Bringas, Vicente; Corrales, Adi; Espejo, Carlos; Lucero, Diana; Rodriguez, Alberto; Sánchez, Beatriz; Uribe, Jorge

    2012-09-01

    FRIDA (inFRared Imager and Dissector for the Adaptive optics system of the Gran Telescopio Canarias) has been designed as a cryogenic and diffraction limited instrument that will offer broad and narrow band imaging and integral field spectroscopy (IFS). Both, the imaging mode and IFS observing modes will use the same Teledyne 2Kx2K detector. This instrument will be installed at Nasmyth B station, behind the GTC Adaptive Optics system. FRIDA will provide the IFS mode using a 30 slices Integral Field Unit (IFU). This IFU design is based on University of Florida FISICA where the mirror block arrays are diamond turned on monolithic metal blocks. FRIDA IFU is conformed mainly by 3 mirror blocks with 30 spherical mirrors each. It also has a Schwarzschild relay based on two off axis spherical mirrors and an afocal system of two parabolic off axis mirrors. Including two insertion mirrors the IFU holds 96 metal mirrors. Each block or individual mirror is attached on its own mechanical mounting. In order to study beam interferences with mechanical parts, ghosts and scattered light, an iterative optical-mechanical modeling was developed. In this work this iterative modeling is described including pictures showing actual ray tracing on the opto-mechanical components.

  3. Electromagnetic coupling to centimeter-scale mechanical membrane resonators via RF cylindrical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis A.; Castelli, Alessandro R.; Delmas, William; Sharping, Jay E.; Chiao, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for the excitation of a mechanical oscillator via radiation pressure with a room-temperature system employing a relatively low-(Q) centimeter-size mechanical oscillator coupled to a relatively low-Q standard three-dimensional radio-frequency (RF) cavity resonator. We describe the forces giving rise to optomechanical coupling using the Maxwell stress tensor and show that nanometer-scale displacements are possible and experimentally observable. The experimental system is composed of a 35 mm diameter silicon nitride membrane sputtered with a 300 nm gold conducting film and attached to the end of a RF copper cylindrical cavity. The RF cavity is operated in its {{TE}}011 mode and amplitude modulated on resonance with the fundamental drum modes of the membrane. Membrane motion is monitored using an unbalanced, non-zero optical path difference, optically filtered Michelson interferometer capable of measuring sub-nanometer displacements.

  4. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio; Reed, John C; Pascual, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160-Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 A resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6(1)22/P6(5)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 A. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  5. Homeodomain leucine-zipper proteins and their role in synchronizing growth and development with the environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ronny Brandt; Marc Cabedo; Yakun Xie; Stephan Wenkel

    2014-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.) genome encodes for four distinct classes of homeodomain leucine-zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factors (HD-ZIPI to HD-ZIPIV), which are all organized in multi-gene families. HD-ZIP transcription factors act as sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are able to control the expression level of target genes. While HD-ZIPI and HD-ZIPII proteins are mainly associated with environmental responses, HD-ZIPIII and HD-ZIPIV are primarily known to act as patterning factors. Recent studies have challenged this view. It appears that several of the different HD-ZIP families interact genetically to align both morphogenesis and environmental responses, most likely by modulating phytohormone-signal-ing networks.

  6. Luminescent Europium(III) Coordination Zippers Linked with Thiophene-Based Bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Fushimi, Koji; Seki, Tomohiro; Ito, Hajime; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-09-19

    Novel Eu(III) coordination polymers [Eu(hfa)3 (dpt)]n (dpt: 2,5-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)thiophene) and [Eu(hfa)3 (dpedot)]n (dpedot: 2,5-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)ethylenedioxythiophene) with hydrogen-bonded zipper structures are reported. The coordination polymers are composed of Eu(III) ions, hexafluoroacetylacetonato ligands, and thiophene-based phosphine oxide bridges. The zig-zag orientation of single polymer chains induced the formation of densely packed coordination structures with multiple intermolecular interactions, resulting in thermal stability above 300 °C. They exhibit a high intrinsic emission quantum yield (ca. 80 %) due to their asymmetrical and low-vibrational coordination structures around Eu(III) ions. Furthermore, the characteristic alternative orientation of substituents also contributes to the dramatically high ligand-to-metal energy transfer efficiencies of up to 80 % in the solid state.

  7. Glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in immuno suppression: master regulator or bystander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppstädter, Jessica; Kiemer, Alexandra K.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) by glucocorticoids has been reported to be essential for their anti-inflammatory actions. At the same time, GILZ is actively downregulated under inflammatory conditions, resulting in an enhanced pro-inflammatory response. Two papers published in the recent past showed elevated GILZ expression in the late stage of an inflammation. Still, the manuscripts suggest seemingly contradictory roles of endogenous GILZ: one of them suggested compensatory actions by elevated corticosterone levels in GILZ knockout mice, while our own manuscript showed a distinct phenotype upon GILZ knockout in vivo. Herein, we discuss the role of GILZ in inflammation with a special focus on the influence of endogenous GILZ on macrophage responses and suggest a cell-type specific action of GILZ as an explanation for the conflicting results as presented in recent reports. PMID:26498359

  8. Host epithelial cell invasion by Campylobacter jejuni: trigger or zipper mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadhg eÓ Cróinín

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni, a spiral-shaped Gram-negative pathogen, is a highly frequent cause of gastrointestinal foodborne illness in humans worldwide. Clinical outcome of C. jejuni infections ranges from mild to severe diarrheal disease, and some other complications including reactive arthritis and Guillain–Barré syndrome. This review article highlights various C. jejuni pathogenicity factors, host cell determinants and proposed signaling mechanisms involved in human host cell invasion and their potential role in the development of C. jejuni-mediated disease. A model is presented which outlines the various important interactions of C. jejuni with the intestinal epithelium, and we discuss the pro’s and con’s for the zipper over the trigger mechanism of invasion. Future work should clarify the contradictory role of some previously identified factors, and should identify and characterize novel virulence determinants, which are crucial to provide fresh insights into the diversity of strategies employed by this pathogen to cause disease.

  9. Light-mediated cascaded locking of multiple nano-optomechanical oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Santos, Eduardo; Baker, Christophe; Goetschy, Arthur; Hease, William; Gomez, Carmen; Lemaître, Aristide; Leo, Giuseppe; Ciuti, Cristiano; Favero, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Collective phenomena emerging from non-linear interactions between multiple oscillators, such as synchronization and frequency locking, find applications in a wide variety of fields. Optomechanical resonators, which are intrinsically non-linear, combine the scientific assets of mechanical devices with the possibility of long distance controlled interactions enabled by travelling light. Here we demonstrate light-mediated frequency locking of three distant nano-optomechanical oscillators positioned in a cascaded configuration. The oscillators, integrated on a chip along a coupling waveguide, are optically driven with a single laser and oscillate at gigahertz frequency. Despite an initial frequency disorder of hundreds of kilohertz, the guided light locks them all with a clear transition in the optical output. The experimental results are described by Langevin equations, paving the way to scalable cascaded optomechanical configurations.

  10. Electro-Optomechanical Transduction & Quantum Hard-Sphere Model for Dissipative Rydberg-EIT Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Emil

    established the requirements for efficient performance, we turn to the question of optimization. We address this by developing a unifying equivalent-circuit formalism for electro-optomechanical transducers. This approach accommodates arbitrary linear circuits and integrates the novel optomechanical...... transduction functionality into the well-established framework of electrical engineering, thereby facilitating its implementation in potential applications such as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and radio astronomy. We consider such optomechanical sensing of weak electrical signals and discuss how......, thus capturing the dualistic particle-wave nature of light as it manifests itself in dissipative Rydberg-EIT media. Using this approach, we analyze the saturation behavior of the transmission through one-dimensional Rydberg-EIT media in the regime of non-perturbative single-polariton EIT-decay relevant...

  11. High-Q optomechanical circuits made from polished nanocrystalline diamond thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Ummethala, S; Lewes-Malandrakis, G; Brink, D; Nebel, C; Pernice, W H P

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate integrated optomechanical circuits with high mechanical quality factors prepared from nanocrystalline diamond thin films. Using chemomechanical polishing, the RMS surface roughness of as grown polycrystalline diamond films is reduced below 3nm to allow for the fabrication of high-quality nanophotonic circuits. By integrating free-standing nanomechanical resonators into integrated optical devices, efficient read-out of the thermomechanical motion of diamond resonators is achieved with on-chip Mach-Zehnder interferometers. Mechanical quality factors up to 28,800 are measured for four-fold clamped optomechanical resonators coupled to the evanescent near-field of nanophotonic waveguides. Our platform holds promise for large-scale integration of optomechanical circuits for on-chip metrology and sensing applications.

  12. Nonreciprocal conversion between microwave and optical photons in electro-optomechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xun-Wei; Chen, Ai-Xi; Liu, Yu-xi

    2015-01-01

    We propose to demonstrate nonreciprocal conversion between microwave photons and optical photons in an electro-optomechanical system where a microwave mode and an optical mode are coupled indirectly via two non-degenerate mechanical modes. The nonreciprocal conversion is obtained in the broken time-reversal symmetry regime, where the conversion of photons from one frequency to the other is enhanced for constructive quantum interference while the conversion in the reversal direction is suppressed due to destructive quantum interference. It is interesting that the nonreciprocal response between the microwave and optical modes in the electro-optomechanical system appears at two different frequencies with opposite directions. The proposal can be used to realize nonreciprocal conversion between photons of any two distinctive modes with different frequencies. Moreover, the electro-optomechanical system can also be used to construct a three-port circulator for three optical modes with distinctively different frequen...

  13. A Cysteine Zipper Stabilizes a Pre-Fusion F Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume B E Stewart-Jones

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines should contain minimal non-pathogen motifs to reduce potential off-target reactivity. We recently developed a vaccine antigen against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, which comprised the fusion (F glycoprotein stabilized in its pre-fusion trimeric conformation by "DS-Cav1" mutations and by an appended C-terminal trimerization motif or "foldon" from T4-bacteriophage fibritin. Here we investigate the creation of a cysteine zipper to allow for the removal of the phage foldon, while maintaining the immunogenicity of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen. Constructs without foldon yielded RSV F monomers, and enzymatic removal of the phage foldon from pre-fusion F trimers resulted in their dissociation into monomers. Because the native C terminus of the pre-fusion RSV F ectodomain encompasses a viral trimeric coiled-coil, we explored whether introduction of cysteine residues capable of forming inter-protomer disulfides might allow for stable trimers. Structural modeling indicated the introduced cysteines to form disulfide "rings", with each ring comprising a different set of inward facing residues of the coiled-coil. Three sets of rings could be placed within the native RSV F coiled-coil, and additional rings could be added by duplicating portions of the coiled-coil. High levels of neutralizing activity in mice, equivalent to that of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen, were elicited by a 4-ring stabilized RSV F trimer with no foldon. Structure-based alteration of a viral coiled-coil to create a cysteine zipper thus allows a phage trimerization motif to be removed from a candidate vaccine antigen.

  14. Mapping the conformational dynamics and pathways of spontaneous steric zipper Peptide oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Matthes

    Full Text Available The process of protein misfolding and self-assembly into various, polymorphic aggregates is associated with a number of important neurodegenerative diseases. Only recently, crystal structures of several short peptides have provided detailed structural insights into -sheet rich aggregates, known as amyloid fibrils. Knowledge about early events of the formation and interconversion of small oligomeric states, an inevitable step in the cascade of peptide self-assembly, however, remains still limited. We employ molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent to study the spontaneous aggregation process of steric zipper peptide segments from the tau protein and insulin in atomistic detail. Starting from separated chains with random conformations, we find a rapid formation of structurally heterogeneous, -sheet rich oligomers, emerging from multiple bimolecular association steps and diverse assembly pathways. Furthermore, our study provides evidence that aggregate intermediates as small as dimers can be kinetically trapped and thus affect the structural evolution of larger oligomers. Alternative aggregate structures are found for both peptide sequences in the different independent simulations, some of which feature characteristics of the known steric zipper conformation (e.g., -sheet bilayers with a dry interface. The final aggregates interconvert with topologically distinct oligomeric states exclusively via internal rearrangements. The peptide oligomerization was analyzed through the perspective of a minimal oligomer, i.e., the dimer. Thereby all observed multimeric aggregates can be consistently mapped onto a space of reduced dimensionality. This novel method of conformational mapping reveals heterogeneous association and reorganization dynamics that are governed by the characteristics of peptide sequence and oligomer size.

  15. Crab Cavity Development

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Burt, G; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC upgrade will use deflecting (or crab) cavities to compensate for geometric luminosity loss at low β* and non-zero crossing angle. A local scheme with crab cavity pairs across the IPs is used employing compact crab cavities at 400 MHz. Design of the cavities, the cryomodules and the RF system is well advanced. The LHC crab cavities will be validated initially with proton beam in the SPS.

  16. Cavity Optomechnics with 150nm-thick GaAs Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usami, K.; Melholt Nielsen, B.; Naesby, A.

    2010-01-01

    properties to name just a few. These extra properties may be found favorable to approach the quantum regime with optomechanical system. Investigating optonanomechanical properties of the semiconductor may also be beneficial for advancing already-mature optoelectrical, electrical, and electromechanical...... temperture of the mode is cooled down to 25K. We believe that the main cause of the cooling is neither the radiation pressure nor the photothermal effect given the relavant physical parameters. We will report the progress of the experiments aiming to reveal the underlying cavity cooling mechanism of the Ga...

  17. High-frequency and high-quality silicon carbide optomechanical microresonators

    OpenAIRE

    Xiyuan Lu; Lee, Jonathan Y.; Qiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) exhibits excellent material properties attractive for broad applications. We demonstrate the first SiC optomechanical microresonators that integrate high mechanical frequency, high mechanical quality, and high optical quality into a single device. The radial-breathing mechanical mode has a mechanical frequency up to 1.69 GHz with a mechanical Q around 5500 in atmosphere, which corresponds to a mechanical f-Q product as high as 9.47x10^12 Hz. The strong optomechanical cou...

  18. Realization of an optomechanical interface between ultracold atoms and a membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Camerer, Stephan; Jöckel, Andreas; Hunger, David; Hänsch, Theodor W; Treutlein, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    We have realized a hybrid optomechanical system by coupling ultracold atoms to a micromechanical membrane. The atoms are trapped in an optical lattice, which is formed by retro-reflection of a laser beam from the membrane surface. In this setup, the lattice laser light mediates an optomechanical coupling between membrane vibrations and atomic center-of-mass motion. We observe both the effect of the membrane vibrations onto the atoms as well as the backaction of the atomic motion onto the membrane. By coupling the membrane to laser-cooled atoms, we engineer the dissipation rate of the membrane. Our observations agree quantitatively with a simple model.

  19. Role of Optical Density of States in Two-mode Optomechanical Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Seunghwi

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical back-action cooling of phonons in optomechanical systems having one optical mode is well studied. Systems with two optical modes have the potential to reach significantly higher cooling rate through resonant enhancement of both pump and scattered light. Here we experimentally investigate the role of dual optical densities of states on optomechanical cooling, and the deviation from theory caused by thermal locking to the pump laser. Using this, we demonstrate a room temperature system operating very close to the strong coupling regime, where saturation of cooling is anticipated.

  20. Application of Optical Forces in Microphotonic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    wavelength of a semiconductor laser by mechanically modifying the optical cavity is an intriguing application of optomechanical devices. Alegre et al. [48...nanocavities," Applied Physics Letters 83, 4294-4296 (2003). [19]. J. Chan, M. Eichenfield, R. Camacho , and O. Painter, "Optical and mechanical...design of a "zipper" photonic crystaloptomechanical cavity," Opt. Express 17, 3802-3817 (2009). [20]. M. Eichenfield, R. Camacho , J. Chan, K. J. Vahala

  1. Canceling disorder-induced localization in nanophotonic cavity arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolov, Sergei; Yüce, Emre; Combrié, Sylvain; De Rossi, Alfredo; Mosk, Allard P

    2016-01-01

    Optical circuits containing high-Q photonic crystal nanocavities have been proposed for delay lines, optical memory storage, optomechanics and quantum communication. However, unavoidable fabrication disorder in nanophotonic structures causes scattering which leads to frequency detuning, signal attenuation, and eventually localizes optical modes which ruins the transmission properties of the whole system. Even state-of-the-art nanofabrication with random spatial variations of only $\\Delta x=1\\ \\rm{nm}$ can lead to resonance wavelength detunings of more than $\\Delta \\lambda =1\\ \\rm{nm}$. In this work, we present a new method to cancel disorder-induced localization of light in a system of coupled nanocavities. We use holographic laser-induced heating to tune individual cavities, introduce a thermal response matrix approach and as a result we observe fully hybridized resonances of three coupled nanocavities, indicating that the effect of the disorder has been canceled. Our method is scalable to large arrays and e...

  2. PRECISION MOTION SYSTEM FOR OPTO-MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT OF MICROELECTRONICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Dainiak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a structure of precision motion system built on the basis of a circular multi-coordinate synchronous segment motor and reconfigurable parallel kinematic mechanism. The multi-coordinate synchronous segment motor may have from two to six movable segments depending on the design, and number of the segments generally defines an internal mobility of the motor. A specific feature of the parallel kinematic mechanism consists in the possibility of its structure reconfiguration by serial connection of two neighboring rods with the help of free elements of their spherical joints into triangular circuits with one spherical hinge at the common vertex. As result of this, the controlled motion of motor movable segments is transformed into the complex spatial displacement of circular platform with number of degrees of freedom up to six inclusively.A mathematical model for solution of the kinematic problem in the investigated parallel mechanism has been offered in the paper. The model allows to calculate a position of movable segments of multi-coordinate synchronous motor depending on the desired position and orientation of the executive circular platform. The parametric definition of base point positions in the motor segments in time allows eventually to form algorithms of programmable motions.The paper substantiates ability to embed the developed motion system into projection unit of opto-mechanical equipment while preserving traditional configuration scheme. This provides the possibility of adaptive adjustment of optical elements during operation; it allows to adjust the optical elements when the geometry of projection system is changed due to deterioration. As result, main characteristics of projection system: resolution, depth of field and image contrast and distortion are maintained at the required level. The developed motion system can be used as a coordinate system of positioning, alignment and scanning in the assembly and other

  3. Integrated Modeling of Advanced Opto-Mechanical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Phillips, Charles J.; Orzewalla, Mathew A.

    2006-01-01

    The design of optical hardware for space applications is particularly challenging when developing high performance, novel systems that have no precedent. Integrated modeling and analysis of such opto-mechanical systems seeks to describe the end-to-end performance of the hardware using mission-relevant metrics. This multidisciplinary analysis might start with thermal disturbances from observation maneuvers, compute the system temperatures, compute the distorted positions and shapes of the hardware and compute the resulting optical performance. Dynamic disturbances such as reaction wheel imbalance or inertia imbalance of optical delay lines might be applied to a structural dynamic model and used in a guidance and control analysis. Mission-relevant science metrics might include wavefront quality, pointing error or imaging stability. Assembling a tool chain that can be both nimble and effective when scaled to the high fidelity models of detail design has been challenging. An integrated thermal, mechanical and optical analysis capability suitable for detail design has been developed and verified through experimental measurement. This capability was used in the design of flight-like breadboard hardware and development of a test apparatus that established both the level of performance of the hardware and the validity of the analysis. The analysis includes prediction of the thermal environment of the test chamber, detailed temperature distributions on the breadboard hardware, fine scale deformations of the optical elements, and computation of the wavefront quality using geometric optics. A battery of tests were conducted to assess the experiment data acquisition, measurement and control system and to establish the performance of the hardware design and accuracy of the integrated modeling. Thermal loads that represent operational observing maneuvers were imposed and the hardware optical performance was measured and compared to analytical predictions.

  4. Cold atoms as a coolant for levitated optomechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjit, Gambhir; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-01-01

    Optically trapped dielectric objects are well suited for reaching the quantum regime of their center of mass motion in an ultra-high vacuum environment. We show that ground state cooling of an optically trapped nanosphere is achievable when starting at room temperature, by sympathetic cooling of a cold atomic gas optically coupled to the nanoparticle. Unlike cavity cooling in the resolved sideband limit, this system requires only a modest cavity finesse and it allows the cooling to be turned off, permitting subsequent observation of strongly-coupled dynamics between the atoms and sphere. Nanospheres cooled to their quantum ground state could have applications in quantum information science or in precision sensing.

  5. Leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 (TGF-beta stimulated clone-22) markedly inhibits the anchorage-independent growth of salivary gland cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Satoshi; Kawamata, Hitoshi; Omotehara, Fumie; Uchida, Daisuke; Begum, Nasima-Mila; Yoshida, Hideo; Sato, Mitsunobu; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2002-01-01

    Several investigators have demonstrated that TGF-beta stimulated clone-22 (TSC-22) regulates cell growth and differentiation, and cell death. TSC-22 is a putative transcriptional regulator containing a leucine zipper-like structure and a nuclear export signal. We previously showed the cytoplasmic localization of TSC-22 and the nuclear translocation of TSC-22 concomitant with induction of apoptosis in salivary gland cancer cells. In the present study, we attempted to identify the active domain of TSC-22 protein that regulated the biological functions of TSC-22. We constructed three mammalian expression vectors, which could produce full length TSC-22 only in cytoplasm, the leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and the leucine zipper structure only in nucleus. Then, we transfected a salivary gland cancer cell line, HSG with these expression vectors, and investigated the growth profile of the transfectants. None of the TSC-22 constructs inhibited the monolayer growth and the anchorage-dependent colony formation of HSG cells. However, the leucine zipper structure of TSC-22 markedly inhibited the anchorage-independent colony formation of HSG cells (pway ANOVA). Full length TSC-22 also suppressed the anchorage-independent colony formation of HSG cells, although the effect of full length TSC-22 was much lower than those of the leucine zipper constructs. These observations suggest that the leucine zipper structure in TSC-22 protein is an active domain that negatively regulates the growth of salivary gland cancer cells.

  6. Experimental assesment of optical uncertainty components in the measurement of an optomechanical hole plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morace, Renata Erica; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    An investigation on the effect of imaging parameters such as the direction of illumination and the magnification of the objective in the optical coordinate measurements is described in this paper. An optomechanical hole plate with 5x5 holes was measured using various configurations of illuminatio...

  7. Uncertainty contributions due to different measurement strategies applied to optomechanical hole plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morace, Renate Erica; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    The work described in this paper deals with influence parameters in optical measurements, with particular respect to the choice of measurement strategy, which strongly affects the results of measurement. In this investigation, an optomechanical hole plate developed by DTU was measured with an opt...

  8. Optomechanically induced carrier-envelope-phase-dependent effects and their analytical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinyong; Gan, Jinghui; Guccione, Giovanni; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lü, Xinyou; Wu, Ying; Lam, Ping Koy

    2017-06-01

    To date, investigations of carrier-envelope-phase (CEP)-dependent effects have been limited to optical pulses with few cycles and high intensity and have not been reported for other types of pulses. Optomechanical systems are shown to have the potential to go beyond these limits. We present an approach using optomechanics to extend the concept of the traditional CEP in the few-cycle regime to mechanical pulses and develop a two-step model to give a physical insight. By adding an auxiliary continuous optical field, we show that a CEP-dependent effect appears even in the multicycle regime of mechanical pulses. We obtain the approximated analytical solutions providing full understanding for these optomechanically induced CEP-dependent effects. In addition, our findings show that one can draw on the optomechanical interaction to revive the CEP-dependent effects on optical pulses with an arbitrary number of cycles and without specific intensity requirements. The effects of CEP, broadly extended to encompass few- and multicycle optical and mechanical pulses, may stimulate a variety of applications in the preparation of a CEP-stabilized pulse, the generation of ultrasonic pulses with a desired shape, the linear manipulation of optical combs, and more.

  9. CIRP Interlaboratory Comparison of Coordinate Measuring Mechines using an Optomechanical Hole Plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik; Sobiecki, Rene; Morace, Renate Erica

    International pour l’Etude Scientifique des Techniques de Production Mécanique (CIRP). In the project, 15 research laboratories have been involved from 9 countries: Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA. A total of 24 CMMs were used to measure an optomechanical hole...

  10. An integrated low phase noise radiation-pressure-driven optomechanical oscillator chipset

    CERN Document Server

    Luan, X; Li, Y; McMillan, J F; Zheng, J; Huang, S -W; Hsieh, P -C; Gu, T; Wang, D; Hati, A; Howe, D A; Wen, G; Yu, M; Lo, G; Kwong, D -L; Wong, C W

    2014-01-01

    High-quality frequency references are the cornerstones in position, navigation and timing applications of both scientific and commercial domains. Optomechanical oscillators, with direct coupling to continuous-wave light and non-material-limited f Q product, are long regarded as a potential platform for frequency reference in radio-frequency-photonic architectures. However, one major challenge is the compatibility with standard CMOS fabrication processes while maintaining optomechanical high quality performance. Here we demonstrate the monolithic integration of photonic crystal optomechanical oscillators and on-chip high speed Ge detectors based on the silicon CMOS platform. With the generation of both high harmonics (up to 59th order) and subharmonics (down to 1/4), our chipset provides multiple frequency tones for applications in both frequency multipliers and dividers. The phase noise is measured down to -125 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset at ~ 400 {\\mu}W dropped-in powers, one of the lowest noise optomechanical o...

  11. Highly enhanced steady-state optomechanical entanglement via cross-Kerr nonlinearity

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Subhadeep

    2016-01-01

    We study steady-state optomechanical entanglement in presence of an additional cross-Kerr coupling between the optical and mechanical mode. We find that a significant enhancement of the steady-state entanglement can be achieved at a considerably lower driving power, which is also extremely robust with respect to system parameters and environmental temperature.

  12. CIRP Interlaboratory Comparison of Coordinate Measuring Machines using an Optomechanical Hole Plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Morace, Renata Erica

    International pour l'Etude Scientifique des Techniques de Production Mécanique (CIRP). In the project, 15 research laboratories have been involved from 9 countries: Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA. A total of 24 CMMs were used to measure an optomechanical hole...

  13. Application of zipper-fracturing of horizontal cluster wells in the Changning shale gas pilot zone, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Qian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available After several years of exploration practices in the Changning-Weiyuan national shale gas pilot zone, the industrial production has been achieved in a number of vertical and horizontal wells completed by SRV fracturing, and a series of independent shale gas reservoir stimulation technologies have come into being. Next, it is necessary to consider how to enhance the efficiency of fracturing by a factory-mode operation. This paper presents the deployment of Changning Well Pad A, the first cluster horizontal shale gas well group, and proposes the optimal design for the factory operation mode of this Pad according to the requirements of wellpad fracturing stimulation technologies and the mountainous landform in the Sichuan Basin. Accordingly, a zipper-fracturing mode was firstly adopted in the factory fracturing on wellpad. With the application of standardized field process, zipper operation, assembly line work, staggered placement of downhole fractures, and microseismic monitoring in real time, the speed of fracturing reached 3.16 stages a day on average, and the stimulated reservoir volume was maximized, which has fully revealed how the factory operation mode contributes to the large-scale SRV fracturing of horizontal shale gas cluster wells on wellpads in the aspect of speed and efficiency. Moreover, the fracturing process, operation mode, surface facilities and post-fracturing preliminary evaluation of the zipper-fracturing in the well group were examined comprehensively. It is concluded from the practice that the zipper-fracturing in the two wells enhanced the efficiency by 78% and stimulated reservoir volume by 50% compared with the single-well fracturing at the preliminary stage in this area.

  14. Salt bridges destabilize a leucine zipper designed for maximized ion pairing between helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Paul; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Jelesarov, Ilian; Marti, Daniel N; Warwicker, James; Bosshard, Hans Rudolf

    2002-03-05

    Interhelical salt bridges are common in leucine zippers and are thought to stabilize the coiled coil conformation. Here we present a detailed thermodynamic investigation of the designed, disulfide-linked leucine zipper AB(SS) whose high-resolution NMR structure shows six interhelical ion pairs between heptad positions g of one helix and e' of the other helix but no ion pairing within single helices. The average pK(a) value of the Glu side chain carboxyl groups of AB(SS) is slightly higher than the pK(a) of a freely accessible Glu in an unfolded peptide [Marti, D. N., Jelesarov, I., and Bosshard, H. R. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 12804-12818]. This indicates that the salt bridges are destabilizing, a prediction we now have confirmed by determining the pH +/- stability profile of AB(SS). Circular dichroism-monitored unfolding by urea and by heating and differential scanning calorimetry show that the coiled coil conformation is approximately 5 kJ/mol more stable when salt bridges are broken by protonation of the carboxyl side chains. Using guanidinium chloride as the denaturant, the increase in the free energy of unfolding on protonation of the carboxyl side chains is larger, approximately 17 kJ/mol. The discrepancy between urea and guanidinium chloride unfolding can be ascribed to the ionic nature of guanidinium chloride, which screens charge-charge interactions. This work demonstrates the difficulty of predicting the energetic contribution of salt bridges from structural data alone even in a case where the ion pairs are seen in high-resolution NMR structures. The reason is that the contribution to stability results from a fine balance between energetically favorable Coulombic attractions and unfavorable desolvation of charges and conformational constraints of the residues involved in ion pairing. The apparent discrepancy between the results presented here and mutational studies indicating stabilization by salt bridges is discussed and resolved. An explanation is

  15. Dawn of Cavity Spintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Can-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Merging the progress of spintronics with the advancement in cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity polaritons, a new field of Cavity Spintronics is forming, which connects some of the most exciting modern physics, such as quantum information and quantum optics, with one of the oldest science on the earth, the magnetism.

  16. Dielectric micro-resonator-based opto-mechanical systems for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amir Roushdy

    In recent years, whispering gallery mode (WGM), or morphology dependent optical resonances (MDR) of dielectric micro-resonators have attracted interest with proposed applications in a wide range of areas due to the high optical quality factors, Q, they can exhibit (reaching ~ 10. 9 for silica spheres). Micro-resonator WGMs have been used in applications that include those in spectroscopy, micro-cavity laser technology, optical communications (switching, filtering and multiplexing), sensors technologies and even chemical and biological sensing. The WGM of these dielectric micro-resonators are highly sensitive to morphological changes (such as the size, shape, or refractive index) of the resonance cavity and hence, can be tuned by causing a minute change in the physical condition of the surrounding. In this dissertation, we have been creating opto-mechanical systems, which at their most basic, are extraordinarily sensitive sensors. One of the ultimate goals of this dissertation is to develop sensors capable of detecting the extremely small electric field changes. To improve the performance of the sensors, we couple a polymer cantilever beam to a dielectric micro-resonator. The eventual use of such ultra sensitive electric filed sensors could include neural-machine interfaces for advanced prosthetics devices. The work presented here includes a basic analysis and experimental investigations of the electric field sensitivity and range of micro-resonators of several different materials and geometries followed by the electric field sensor design, testing, and characterization. Also, the effects of angular velocity on the WGM shifts of spherical micro-resonators are also investigated. The elastic deformation that is induced on a spinning resonator due to the centrifugal force may lead to a sufficient shift in the optical resonances and therefore interfering with its desirable operational sensor design. Furthermore, this principle could be used for the development of

  17. Supersonic flows over cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianwen FANG; Meng DING; Jin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of supersonic cold flows over cavities were investigated experimentally and numer-ically, and the effects of cavities of different sizes on super-sonic flow field were analyzed. The results indicate that the ratio of length to depth L/D within the range of 5-9 has little relevance to integral structures of cavity flow. The bevel angle of the rear wall does not alter the overall structure of the cavity flow within the range of 30°-60°, but it can exert obvious effect on the evolvement of shear layer and vortexes in cavities.

  18. Beam cavity interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, A

    2011-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the rf generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, rf feedback, and feed-forward are described. Examples of digital rf phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  19. Loss of dual leucine zipper kinase signaling is protective in animal models of neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pichon, Claire E; Meilandt, William J; Dominguez, Sara; Solanoy, Hilda; Lin, Han; Ngu, Hai; Gogineni, Alvin; Sengupta Ghosh, Arundhati; Jiang, Zhiyu; Lee, Seung-Hye; Maloney, Janice; Gandham, Vineela D; Pozniak, Christine D; Wang, Bei; Lee, Sebum; Siu, Michael; Patel, Snahel; Modrusan, Zora; Liu, Xingrong; Rudhard, York; Baca, Miriam; Gustafson, Amy; Kaminker, Josh; Carano, Richard A D; Huang, Eric J; Foreman, Oded; Weimer, Robby; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Lewcock, Joseph W

    2017-08-16

    Hallmarks of chronic neurodegenerative disease include progressive synaptic loss and neuronal cell death, yet the cellular pathways that underlie these processes remain largely undefined. We provide evidence that dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) is an essential regulator of the progressive neurodegeneration that occurs in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. We demonstrate that DLK/c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling was increased in mouse models and human patients with these disorders and that genetic deletion of DLK protected against axon degeneration, neuronal loss, and functional decline in vivo. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of DLK activity was sufficient to attenuate the neuronal stress response and to provide functional benefit even in the presence of ongoing disease. These findings demonstrate that pathological activation of DLK is a conserved mechanism that regulates neurodegeneration and suggest that DLK inhibition may be a potential approach to treat multiple neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  20. Transcriptional Regulation of Neural Retina Leucine Zipper (Nrl), a Photoreceptor Cell Fate Determinant*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana, Cynthia L.; Lawrence, Karen A.; Williams, Natecia L.; Tran, Nicholas M.; Peng, Guang-Hua; Chen, Shiming; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl) is a critical determinant of rod photoreceptor cell fate and a key regulator of rod differentiation. Nrl−/− rod precursors fail to turn on rod genes and instead differentiate as cones. Furthermore, NRL mutations in humans cause retinitis pigmentosa. Despite the developmental and clinical significance of this gene, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of Nrl itself. In this study, we sought to define the cis- and trans-acting factors responsible for initiation and maintenance of Nrl transcription in the mouse retina. Utilizing a quantitative mouse retinal explant electroporation assay, we discovered a phylogenetically conserved, 30-base pair region immediately upstream of the transcription start site that is required for Nrl promoter activity. This region contains binding sites for the retinal transcription factors CRX, OTX2, and RORβ, and point mutations in these sites completely abolish promoter activity in living retinas. Gel-shift experiments show that CRX, OTX2, and RORβ can bind to the critical region in vitro, whereas ChIP experiments demonstrate binding of CRX and OTX2 to the critical region in vivo. Thus, our results indicate that CRX, OTX2, and RORβ directly regulate Nrl transcription by binding to critical sites within the Nrl promoter. We propose a model in which Nrl expression is primarily initiated by OTX2 and RORβ and later maintained at high levels by CRX and RORβ. PMID:21865162

  1. Transcriptional regulation of neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl), a photoreceptor cell fate determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana, Cynthia L; Lawrence, Karen A; Williams, Natecia L; Tran, Nicholas M; Peng, Guang-Hua; Chen, Shiming; Corbo, Joseph C

    2011-10-21

    The transcription factor neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl) is a critical determinant of rod photoreceptor cell fate and a key regulator of rod differentiation. Nrl(-/-) rod precursors fail to turn on rod genes and instead differentiate as cones. Furthermore, NRL mutations in humans cause retinitis pigmentosa. Despite the developmental and clinical significance of this gene, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of Nrl itself. In this study, we sought to define the cis- and trans-acting factors responsible for initiation and maintenance of Nrl transcription in the mouse retina. Utilizing a quantitative mouse retinal explant electroporation assay, we discovered a phylogenetically conserved, 30-base pair region immediately upstream of the transcription start site that is required for Nrl promoter activity. This region contains binding sites for the retinal transcription factors CRX, OTX2, and RORβ, and point mutations in these sites completely abolish promoter activity in living retinas. Gel-shift experiments show that CRX, OTX2, and RORβ can bind to the critical region in vitro, whereas ChIP experiments demonstrate binding of CRX and OTX2 to the critical region in vivo. Thus, our results indicate that CRX, OTX2, and RORβ directly regulate Nrl transcription by binding to critical sites within the Nrl promoter. We propose a model in which Nrl expression is primarily initiated by OTX2 and RORβ and later maintained at high levels by CRX and RORβ.

  2. Two-state conformational equilibrium in the Par-4 leucine zipper domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Martin; Dutta, Kaushik; Libich, David S; Venugopal, Hariprasad; Claridge, Jolyon K; Gell, David A; Mackay, Joel P; Edwards, Patrick J B; Pascal, Steven M

    2010-08-15

    Prostate apoptosis response factor-4 (Par-4) is a pro-apoptotic and tumor-suppressive protein. A highly conserved heptad repeat sequence at the Par-4 C-terminus suggests the presence of a leucine zipper (LZ). This C-terminal region is essential for Par-4 self-association and interaction with various effector proteins. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to fully assign the chemical shift resonances of a peptide comprising the LZ domain of Par-4 at neutral pH. Further, we have investigated the properties of the Par-4 LZ domain and two point mutants under a variety of conditions using NMR, circular dichroism (CD), light scattering, and bioinformatics. Results indicate an environment-dependent conformational equilibrium between a partially ordered monomer (POM) and a predominantly coiled coil dimer (CCD). The combination of techniques used allows the time scales of the equilibrium to be probed and also helps to identify features of the amino acid sequence that may influence the equilibrium.

  3. The LINKS motif zippers trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthase assembly lines into a biosynthetic megacomplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Darren C; Wagner, Drew T; Meinke, Jessica L; Zogzas, Charles E; Gay, Glen R; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T

    2016-03-01

    Polyketides such as the clinically-valuable antibacterial agent mupirocin are constructed by architecturally-sophisticated assembly lines known as trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthases. Organelle-sized megacomplexes composed of several copies of trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthase assembly lines have been observed by others through transmission electron microscopy to be located at the Bacillus subtilis plasma membrane, where the synthesis and export of the antibacterial polyketide bacillaene takes place. In this work we analyze ten crystal structures of trans-acyltransferase polyketide synthases ketosynthase domains, seven of which are reported here for the first time, to characterize a motif capable of zippering assembly lines into a megacomplex. While each of the three-helix LINKS (Laterally-INteracting Ketosynthase Sequence) motifs is observed to similarly dock with a spatially-reversed copy of itself through hydrophobic and ionic interactions, the amino acid sequences of this motif are not conserved. Such a code is appropriate for mediating homotypic contacts between assembly lines to ensure the ordered self-assembly of a noncovalent, yet tightly-knit, enzymatic network. LINKS-mediated lateral interactions would also have the effect of bolstering the vertical association of the polypeptides that comprise a polyketide synthase assembly line. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bimodal control of dendritic and axonal growth by the dual leucine zipper kinase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying the separation of dendritic and axonal compartments is not only crucial for understanding the assembly of neural circuits, but also for developing strategies to correct defective dendrites or axons in diseases with subcellular precision. Previous studies have uncovered regulators dedicated to either dendritic or axonal growth. Here we investigate a novel regulatory mechanism that differentially directs dendritic and axonal growth within the same neuron in vivo. We find that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK signaling pathway in Drosophila, which consists of Highwire and Wallenda and controls axonal growth, regeneration, and degeneration, is also involved in dendritic growth in vivo. Highwire, an evolutionarily conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase, restrains axonal growth but acts as a positive regulator for dendritic growth in class IV dendritic arborization neurons in the larva. While both the axonal and dendritic functions of highwire require the DLK kinase Wallenda, these two functions diverge through two downstream transcription factors, Fos and Knot, which mediate the axonal and dendritic regulation, respectively. This study not only reveals a previously unknown function of the conserved DLK pathway in controlling dendrite development, but also provides a novel paradigm for understanding how neuronal compartmentalization and the diversity of neuronal morphology are achieved.

  5. A leucine zipper motif determines different functions in a DNA replication protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Viedma, D; Giraldo, R; Rivas, G; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Diaz-Orejas, R

    1996-01-01

    RepA is the replication initiator protein of the Pseudomonas plasmid pPS10 and is also able to autoregulate its own synthesis. Here we report a genetic and functional analysis of a leucine zipper-like (LZ) motif located at the N-terminus of RepA. It is shown that the LZ motif modulates the equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric forms of the protein and that monomers of RepA interact with sequences at the origin of replication, oriV, while dimers are required for interactions of RepA at the repA promoter. Further, different residues of the LZ motif are seen to have different functional roles. Leucines at the d positions of the putative alpha-helix are relevant in the formation of RepA dimers required for transcriptional autoregulation. They also modulate other RepA-RepA interactions that result in cooperative binding of protein monomers to the origin of replication. The residues at the b/f positions of the putative helix play no relevant role in RepA-RepA interactions. These residues do not affect RepA autoregulation but do influence replication, as demonstrated by mutants that, without affecting binding to oriV, either increase the host range of the plasmid or are inactive in replication. It is proposed that residues in b/f positions play a relevant role in interactions between RepA and host replication factors. Images PMID:8631313

  6. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  7. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  8. Robust entanglement between a movable mirror and a cavity field system with an optical parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Xianwu; Bai, Jiangxiang; Ke-hui, Song

    2013-06-01

    Robust entanglement created between an optical cavity field mode and a macroscopic vibrating mirror with an optical parametric amplifier is shown. Increasing the gain of the optical parametric amplifier makes the line of the logarithmic negativity E N move to the range of the larger detuning and higher temperature. Such optomechanical entanglement can be generated even at room temperature with current experimental parameters. Compared with other proposals, we have considered the one-to-one correspondence between the detuning and the input power, which is reasonable with the fact that the mean shift of the cavity frequency is determined by the radiation pressure which is related to the input power. Such consideration may be valuable to current experiments.

  9. Cavity-mediated coupling of mechanical oscillators limited by quantum backaction

    CERN Document Server

    Spethmann, Nicolas; Schreppler, Sydney; Buchmann, Lukas; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2015-01-01

    A complex quantum system can be constructed by coupling simple quantum elements to one another. For example, trapped-ion or superconducting quantum bits may be coupled by Coulomb interactions, mediated by the exchange of virtual photons. Alternatively quantum objects can be coupled by the exchange of real photons, particularly when driven within resonators that amplify interactions with a single electro-magnetic mode. However, in such an open system, the capacity of a coupling channel to convey quantum information or generate entanglement may be compromised. Here, we realize phase-coherent interactions between two spatially separated, near-ground-state mechanical oscillators within a driven optical cavity. We observe also the noise imparted by the optical coupling, which results in correlated mechanical fluctuations of the two oscillators. Achieving the quantum backaction dominated regime opens the door to numerous applications of cavity optomechanics with a complex mechanical system. Our results thereby illu...

  10. Trapping of a microsphere pendulum through cavity-enhanced optical forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Yuqiang; Chormaic, Sile Nic [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); M Ward, Jonathan [Photonics Centre, Tyndall National Institute, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Minogin, Vladimir G, E-mail: yuqiang.wu@tyndall.i [Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190 Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-01

    Optical forces resulting from evanescently coupled microcavities can produce remarkable mechanical effects on micro- and nanoscale systems. Excitation of the symmetric and antisymmetric modes of the interacting whispering gallery modes (WGM) leads to significant attractive and repulsive forces. Here, we propose a method to spatially trap a microspherical resonator pendulum via the optical forces produced by two simultaneously excited WGMs of a photonic molecule, comprising two microspherical cavities. We discuss how the cavity-enhanced optical force generated in the photonic molecule can create an optomechanical potential of about 5 eV deep and 10 pm wide, which can be used to trap the pendulum at any given equilibrium position by a simple choice of laser frequencies. This result presents opportunities for very precise all-optical self-alignment of microsystems. Frequency splitting of a co-resonant mode from two similar-sized microspheres was observed experimentally and the mechanical characteristics of a microsphere pendulum were also studied.

  11. Atom assisted cavity cooling of a micromechanical oscillator in the unresolved sideband regime

    CERN Document Server

    Sarma, Bijita

    2016-01-01

    The ground state cooling of a mechanical oscillator in an optomechanical cavity containing an ensemble of identical two-level ground-state atoms is studied in the highly unresolved-sideband regime. The system exhibits electromagnetically-induced transparency-like quantum interference effect. The mutual interaction with the cavity optical field gives rise to an indirect coupling between the atomic and mechanical modes. In presence of this interaction, the noise spectrum gets modified and leads to asymmetric cooling and heating rates. Using the quantum master equation, time evolution of the average phonon number is studied and it is observed that the average phonon occupancy in the mechanical resonator exhibits ground-state cooling.

  12. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  13. Enhanced Optomechanical Cooling at High-Order Exceptional Points

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, H; Lü, H; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    We study mechanical cooling in systems of coupled passive (lossy) and active (with gain) optical resonators. We find that for a driving laser which is red-detuned with respect to the cavity frequency, the supermode structure of the system is radically changed, featuring the emergence of genuine high-order exceptional points. This in turn leads to giant enhancement of both the mechanical damping and the spring stiffness, facilitating low-power mechanical cooling in the vicinity of gain-loss balance. This opens up new avenues of steering micromechanical devices with exceptional points beyond the lowest-order two.

  14. The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 is essential and sufficient for its caveolae-association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Zhuang [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Zou, Xinle [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Wang, Hongzhong; Lei, Jigang; Wu, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Liao, Kan, E-mail: kliao@sibs.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Laboratory of System Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2015-01-16

    Highlight: • The N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 determines caveolar association. • Different cellular localization of PTRF/cavin-1 influences its serine 389 and 391 phosphorylation state. • PTRF/cavin-1 regulates cell motility via its caveolar association. - Abstract: PTRF/cavin-1 is a protein of two lives. Its reported functions in ribosomal RNA synthesis and in caveolae formation happen in two different cellular locations: nucleus vs. plasma membrane. Here, we identified that the N-terminal leucine-zipper motif in PTRF/cavin-1 was essential for the protein to be associated with caveolae in plasma membrane. It could counteract the effect of nuclear localization sequence in the molecule (AA 235–251). Deletion of this leucine-zipper motif from PTRF/cavin-1 caused the mutant to be exclusively localized in nuclei. The fusion of this leucine-zipper motif with histone 2A, which is a nuclear protein, could induce the fusion protein to be exported from nucleus. Cell migration was greatly inhibited in PTRF/cavin-1{sup −/−} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The inhibited cell motility could only be rescued by exogenous cavin-1 but not the leucine-zipper motif deleted cavin-1 mutant. Plasma membrane dynamics is an important factor in cell motility control. Our results suggested that the membrane dynamics in cell migration is affected by caveolae associated PTRF/cavin-1.

  15. Dexamethasone inhibits repair of human airway epithelial cells mediated by glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyue Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucocorticoids (GCs are a first-line treatment for asthma for their anti-inflammatory effects, but they also hinder the repair of airway epithelial injury. The anti-inflammatory protein GC-induced leucine zipper (GILZ is reported to inhibit the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathway, which promotes the repair of airway epithelial cells around the damaged areas. We investigated whether the inhibition of airway epithelial repair imposed by the GC dexamethasone (DEX is mediated by GILZ. METHODS: We tested the effect of DEX on the expressions of GILZ mRNA and GILZ protein and the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway in human airway epithelial cells, via RT-PCR and Western blot. We further evaluated the role of GILZ in mediating the effect of DEX on the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway and in airway epithelium repair by utilizing small-interfering RNAs, MTT, CFSE labeling, wound-healing and cell migration assays. RESULTS: DEX increased GILZ mRNA and GILZ protein levels in a human airway epithelial cell line. Furthermore, DEX inhibited the phosphorylation of Raf-1, Mek1/2, Erk1/2 (components of the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway, proliferation and migration. However, the inhibitory effect of DEX was mitigated in cells when the GILZ gene was silenced. CONCLUSIONS: The inhibition of epithelial injury repair by DEX is mediated in part by activation of GILZ, which suppressed activation of the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway, proliferation and migration. Our study implicates the involvement of DEX in this process, and furthers our understanding of the dual role of GCs.

  16. Epidermal cell differentiation in cotton mediated by the homeodomain leucine zipper gene, GhHD-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walford, Sally-Ann; Wu, Yingru; Llewellyn, Danny J; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2012-08-01

    Gossypium hirsutum L. (cotton) fibres are specialized trichomes a few centimetres in length that grow from the seed coat. Few genes directly involved in the differentiation of these epidermal cells have been identified. These include GhMYB25-like and GhMYB25, two related MYB transcription factors that regulate fibre cell initiation and expansion. We have also identified a putative homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factor, GhHD-1, expressed in trichomes and early fibres that might play a role in cotton fibre initiation. Here, we characterize GhHD-1 homoeologues from tetraploid G. hirsutum and show, using reporter constructs and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), that they are expressed predominantly in epidermal tissues during early fibre development, and in other tissues bearing epidermal trichomes. Silencing of GhHD-1 reduced trichome formation and delayed the timing of fibre initiation. Constitutive overexpression of GhHD-1 increased the number of fibres initiating on the seed, but did not affect leaf trichomes. Expression of GhHD-1 in cotton silenced for different fibre MYBs suggest that in ovules it acts downstream of GhMYB25-like, but is unaffected in GhMYB25- or GhMYB109-silenced plants. Microarray analysis of silencing and overexpression lines of GhHD-1 indicated that it potentially regulates the levels of ethylene and reactive oxidation species (ROS) through a WRKY transcription factor and calcium-signalling pathway genes to activate downstream genes necessary for cell expansion and elongation. © 2012 CSIRO. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Humoral immune response to HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ in HTLV-1-infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enose-Akahata Yoshimi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infection can lead to development of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL or HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP in a subset of infected subjects. HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ gene has a critical role in HTLV-1 infectivity and the development of ATL and HAM/TSP. However, little is known about the immune response against HBZ in HTLV-1-infected individuals. In this study, we examined antibody responses against HBZ in serum/plasma samples from 436 subjects including HTLV-1 seronegative donors, asymptomatic carriers (AC, ATL, and HAM/TSP patients using the luciferase immunoprecipitation system. Results Immunoreactivity against HBZ was detected in subsets of all HTLV-1-infected individuals but the test did not discriminate between AC, ATL and HAM/TSP. However, the frequency of detection of HBZ-specific antibodies in the serum of ATL patients with the chronic subtype was higher than in ATL patients with the lymphomatous subtype. Antibody responses against HBZ were also detected in cerebrospinal fluid of HAM/TSP patients with anti-HBZ in serum. Antibody responses against HBZ did not correlate with proviral load and HBZ mRNA expression in HAM/TSP patients, but the presence of an HBZ-specific response was associated with reduced CD4+ T cell activation in HAM/TSP patients. Moreover, HBZ-specific antibody inhibited lymphoproliferation in the PBMC of HAM/TSP patients. Conclusions This is the first report demonstrating humoral immune response against HBZ associated with HTLV-I infection. Thus, a humoral immune response against HBZ might play a role in HTLV-1 infection.

  18. Distinct functions of the dual leucine zipper kinase depending on its subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallbach, Manuel; Duque Escobar, Jorge; Babaeikelishomi, Rohollah; Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Blume, Roland; Schröder, Sabine; Kruegel, Jenny; Maedler, Kathrin; Kluth, Oliver; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Miosge, Nicolai; Oetjen, Elke

    2016-04-01

    The dual leucine zipper kinase DLK induces β-cell apoptosis by inhibiting the transcriptional activity conferred by the β-cell protective transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein CREB. This action might contribute to β-cell loss and ultimately diabetes. Within its kinase domain DLK shares high homology with the mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 3, which is activated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and interleukin (IL)-1β, known prediabetic signals. In the present study, the regulation of DLK in β-cells by these cytokines was investigated. Both, TNFα and IL-1β induced the nuclear translocation of DLK. Mutations within a putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) prevented basal and cytokine-induced nuclear localization of DLK and binding to the importin receptor importin α, thereby demonstrating a functional NLS within DLK. DLK NLS mutants were catalytically active as they phosphorylated their down-stream kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase to the same extent as DLK wild-type but did neither inhibit CREB-dependent gene transcription nor transcription conferred by the promoter of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL-xL. In addition, the β-cell apoptosis-inducing effect of DLK was severely diminished by mutation of its NLS. In a murine model of prediabetes, enhanced nuclear DLK was found. These data demonstrate that DLK exerts distinct functions, depending on its subcellular localization and thus provide a novel level of regulating DLK action. Furthermore, the prevention of the nuclear localization of DLK as induced by prediabetic signals with consecutive suppression of β-cell apoptosis might constitute a novel target in the therapy of diabetes mellitus.

  19. Multiple electromagnetically induced transparency, slow and fast light in hybrid optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Akram, M Javed; Saif, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) of a weak probe field in hybrid optomechanics with a single three-level ($\\Lambda$-type) atomic system. We report that, in the presence of optomechanical coupling and two transition coupling parameters of three-level atom (TLA), there occurs three distinct multiple EIT windows in the probe absorption spectrum. Moreover, the switching of multiple windows into double and single EIT windows can be obtained by suitably tuning the system parameters. Furthermore, the probe transmission spectrum have been studied. Based on our analytical and numerical work, we explain the occurrence of slow and fast light (superluminal) regimes, and enhancement of superluminal behaviour in the probe field transmission. This work demonstrates great potential in multi-channel waveguide, fiber optics and classical communication networks, multi-channel quantum information processing, real quality imaging, cloaking devices and delay lines & ...

  20. Optomechanical Transduction and Characterization of a Silica Microsphere Pendulum via Evanescent Light

    CERN Document Server

    Madugani, Ramgopal; Ward, Jonathan M; Le, Vu H; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2015-01-01

    Transduction of the motion of a micron- or nano-sized object to an optical signal is essential for optomechanical systems. Here, we study the optical response of a cantilever-like, silica, microsphere pendulum, evanescently coupled to a ?ber taper. In this system, the optical coupling element also acts as the mechanical motion transducer and the pendulum's oscillations modulate the optical whispering gallery modes (WGMs) both dispersively and dissipatively. This unique mechanism leads to an experimentally-observable, asymmetric response function of the transduction spectrum. This phenomenon is explained by using coupled mode theory with Fourier transforms. The optomechanical transduction and its relation to the external coupling gap is experimentally investigated in depth and shows good agreement with the theory. A deep understanding of this mechanism is necessary in order to explore cooling and trapping of a micropendulum system.

  1. The Wide Integral Field Infrared Spectrograph (WIFIS): optomechanical design and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, R. Elliot; Moon, Dae-Sik; Sivanandam, Suresh; Ma, Ke; Henderson, Chuck; Blank, Basil; Chou, Chueh-Yi; Jarvis, Miranda; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-08-01

    We present the optomechanical design and development of the Wide Integral Field Infrared Spectrograph (WIFIS). WIFIS will provide an unrivalled integral field size of 20"×50" for a near-infrared (0.9-1.7 μm) integral-field spectrograph at the 2.3-meter Steward Bok telescope. Its main optomechanical system consists of two assemblies: a room-temperature bench housing the majority of the optical components and a cryostat for a field-flattening lens, thermal blocking filter, and detector. Two additional optical subsystems will provide calibration functionality, telescope guiding, and off-axis optical imaging. WIFIS will be a highly competitive instrument for seeing-limited astronomical investigations of the dynamics and chemistry of extended objects in the near-infrared wavebands. WIFIS is expected to be commissioned during the end of 2016 with scientific operations beginning in 2017.

  2. Strong Optomechanical Interaction in Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Crystal Nanocavities with Surface Acoustic Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzy-Rong; Lin, Chiang-Hsin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2015-09-08

    We propose dynamic modulation of a hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavity using monochromatic coherent acoustic phonons formed by ultrahigh-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to achieve strong optomechanical interaction. The crystal nanocavity used in this study consisted of a defective photonic crystal beam coupled to a metal surface with a nanoscale air gap in between and provided hybridization of a highly confined plasmonic-photonic mode with a high quality factor and deep subwavelength mode volume. Efficient photon-phonon interaction occurs in the air gap through the SAW perturbation of the metal surface, strongly coupling the optical and acoustic frequencies. As a result, a large modulation bandwidth and optical resonance wavelength shift for the crystal nanocavity are demonstrated at telecommunication wavelengths. The proposed SAW-based modulation within the hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavities beyond the diffraction limit provides opportunities for various applications in enhanced sound-light interaction and fast coherent acoustic control of optomechanical devices.

  3. High-frequency and high-quality silicon carbide optomechanical microresonators

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) exhibits excellent material properties attractive for broad applications. We demonstrate the first SiC optomechanical microresonators that integrate high mechanical frequency, high mechanical quality, and high optical quality into a single device. The radial-breathing mechanical mode has a mechanical frequency up to 1.69 GHz with a mechanical Q around 5500 in atmosphere, which corresponds to a mechanical f-Q product as high as 9.47x10^12 Hz. The strong optomechanical coupling allows us to efficiently excite and probe the coherent mechanical oscillation by optical waves. The demonstrated devices, in combination with the superior thermal property, chemical inertness, and defect characteristics of SiC, show great potential for applications in metrology, sensing, and quantum photonics, particularly in harsh environments that are challenging for other device platforms.

  4. Nonclassical correlation between optical and microwave photons in a hybrid electro-optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong; Chen, Xiang; Lin, Gongwei; Lin, Xiumin

    2016-10-01

    A scheme to correlate optical and microwave photons is proposed in a hybrid electro-optomechanical system, where mechanical resonator is coupled to both optical and microwave fields. Analytical and numerical simulation results show that the cross-correlation function between Stokes and anti-Stokes photons strongly violates the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, which confirms the nonclassical correlation between the optical and microwave photons. It is worth noting that the nonclassical photon pairs with vast different wavelengths, which may be useful for quantum communication, are generated under the experimentally accessible weak coupling limit rather than single-photon strong coupling regime. In addition, the protocol provides a possible route to combine the respective advantages of optical photons, microwave photons, and phonons in a hybrid electro-optomechanical system.

  5. Iterative solutions to the steady-state density matrix for optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, P. D.; Johansson, J. R.; Blencowe, M. P.; Rimberg, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a sparse matrix permutation from graph theory that gives stable incomplete lower-upper preconditioners necessary for iterative solutions to the steady-state density matrix for quantum optomechanical systems. This reordering is efficient, adding little overhead to the computation, and results in a marked reduction in both memory and runtime requirements compared to other solution methods, with performance gains increasing with system size. Either of these benchmarks can be tuned via the preconditioner accuracy and solution tolerance. This reordering optimizes the condition number of the approximate inverse and is the only method found to be stable at large Hilbert space dimensions. This allows for steady-state solutions to otherwise intractable quantum optomechanical systems.

  6. Iterative solutions to the steady state density matrix for optomechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nation, P D; Blencowe, M P; Rimberg, A J

    2014-01-01

    We present a sparse matrix permutation from graph theory that gives stable incomplete Lower-Upper (LU) preconditioners necessary for iterative solutions to the steady state density matrix for quantum optomechanical systems. This reordering is efficient, adding little overhead to the computation, and results in a marked reduction in both memory and runtime requirements compared to other solution methods, with performance gains increasing with system size. Either of these benchmarks can be tuned via the preconditioner accuracy and solution tolerance. This reordering optimizes the condition number of the approximate inverse, and is the only method found to be stable at large Hilbert space dimensions. This allows for steady state solutions to otherwise intractable quantum optomechanical systems.

  7. Optomechanical measurement of photon spin angular momentum and optical torque in integrated photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    He, Li; Li, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Photons carry linear momentum, and spin angular momentum when circularly or elliptically polarized. During light-matter interaction, transfer of linear momentum leads to optical forces, while angular momentum transfer induces optical torque. Optical forces including radiation pressure and gradient forces have long been utilized in optical tweezers and laser cooling. In nanophotonic devices optical forces can be significantly enhanced, leading to unprecedented optomechanical effects in both classical and quantum regimes. In contrast, to date, the angular momentum of light and the optical torque effect remain unexplored in integrated photonics. Here, we demonstrate the measurement of the spin angular momentum of photons propagating in a birefringent waveguide and the use of optical torque to actuate rotational motion of an optomechanical device. We show that the sign and magnitude of the optical torque are determined by the photon polarization states that are synthesized on the chip. Our study reveals the mecha...

  8. Modulation of anti-endotoxin property of Temporin L by minor amino acid substitution in identified phenylalanine zipper sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, Amit; Tripathi, Amit Kumar; Tandon, Anshika; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2016-11-01

    A 13-residue frog antimicrobial peptide Temporin L (TempL) possesses versatile antimicrobial activities and is considered a lead molecule for the development of new antimicrobial agents. To find out the amino acid sequences that influence the anti-microbial property of TempL, a phenylalanine zipper-like sequence was identified in it which was not reported earlier. Several alanine-substituted analogs and a scrambled peptide having the same composition of TempL were designed for evaluating the role of this motif. To investigate whether leucine residues instead of phenylalanine residues at 'a' and/or 'd' position(s) of the heptad repeat sequence could alter its antimicrobial property, several TempL analogs were synthesized after replacing these phenylalanine residues with leucine residues. Replacing phenylalanine residues with alanine residues in the phenylalanine zipper sequence significantly compromised the anti-endotoxin property of TempL. This is evident from the higher production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated rat bone-marrow-derived macrophage cells in the presence of its alanine-substituted analogs than TempL itself. However, replacement of these phenylalanine residues with leucine residues significantly augmented anti-endotoxin property of TempL. A single alanine-substituted TempL analog (F8A-TempL) showed significantly reduced cytotoxicity but retained the antibacterial activity of TempL, while the two single leucine-substituted analogs (F5L-TempL and F8L-TempL), although exhibiting lower cytotoxicity, were able to retain the antibacterial activity of the parent peptide. The results demonstrate how minor amino acid substitutions in the identified phenylalanine zipper sequence in TempL could yield analogs with better antibacterial and/or anti-endotoxin properties with their plausible mechanism of action.

  9. Integrated opto-mechanical optimization analysis of large-aperture primary mirror's support position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ding; Bo, Qi; Jiang, Bian

    2016-10-01

    Large mirror's support position plays a very important role in optical system's wave-front error. This paper took a Φ1.2m diameter primary mirror as an example and introduced the method of integrated opto-mechanical optimization analysis, then structure's parametric model in Proe, finite element's parametric model in Patran, structure analysis in Nastran and opto-mechanical coupling analysis in Sigfit were integrated as a fully automatic process in Isight by use of command streams and result documents produced by these soft wares. After the process was established and verified, automatic gradient searches of primary mirror's optimal support position were conducted using optimizer embedded in Isight. The optimization objective is the minimum of surface error's RMS and the optimization variables are support positions. New searches can easily be conducted repeatedly after mirror's model is modified in the structure parameter document. Because of the search process is fully automatic, manpower and computing time are greatly saved. This example also provides a good reference for problems in opto-mechanical fields.

  10. (DARPA) Optical Radiation Cooling and Heating In Integrated Devices: Circuit cavity optomechanics for cooling and amplification on a silicon chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-16

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0241 DARPA ) OPTICAL RADIATION COOLING AND HEATING IN INTEGRATED DEVICES Hong Tang YALE UNIV NEW HAVEN CT Final Report 07/21... DARPA ) OPTICAL RADIATION COOLING AND HEATING IN INTEGRATED DEVICES 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0297 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) DARPA ORCHID through AFOSR 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) AFOSR 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S

  11. Structural insight into maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) conformation and inhibition toward structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevari, Giulia; Re Depaolini, Stefania; Cucchi, Ulisse; Bertrand, Jay A; Casale, Elena; Perrera, Claudia; Forte, Barbara; Carpinelli, Patrizia; Felder, Eduard R

    2013-09-17

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is upregulated in several types of tumor, including breast, prostate, and brain tumors. Its expression is generally associated with cell survival, cell proliferation, and resistance to apoptosis. Therefore, the potential of MELK inhibitors as therapeutic agents is recently attracting considerable interest. Here we report the first structures of MELK in complex with AMP-PNP and with nanomolar inhibitors. Our studies shed light on the role of the MELK UBA domain, provide a characterization of the kinase active site, and identify key residues for achieving high potency, laying the groundwork for structure-based drug design efforts.

  12. Leucine zipper motif inspiration: a two-dimensional leucine Velcro-like array in peptide coordination polymers generates hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hermida, Sabina; Evangelio, Emi; Rubio-Martínez, Marta; Imaz, Inhar; Verdaguer, Albert; Juanhuix, Jordi; Maspoch, Daniel

    2017-08-29

    Here, we show that the well-known hydrophobic leucine (Leu) zipper motif (also known as the coiled-coil or Leu scissors motif), typically found in proteins, can be used as a source of inspiration in coordination polymers built from Leu-containing dipeptides or tripeptides. We demonstrate that this motif can be extended to form Velcro-like layers of Leu, and that the hydrophobicity of these layers is transferred to coordination polymers, thereby enabling the development of a new type of hydrophobic materials.

  13. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    One of the SPS acceleration cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). On the ceiling one sees the coaxial transmission line which feeds the power from the amplifier, located in a surface building above, to the upstream end of the cavity. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138, 8302397.

  14. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  15. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    One of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). The power that is fed into the upstream end of the cavity is extracted at the downstream end and sent into a dump load. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8011289, 8302397.

  16. High finesse optical fiber cavities: optimal alignment and robust stabilization (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Gallego, Jose; Ghosh, Sutapa; Alavi, Seyed; Alt, Wolfgang; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications. Some of the most promising areas of application of these optical micro-resonators with high finesse and small mode volume are in the field of quantum communication and information. The resonator-enhanced light-matter interaction, for instance, provide basis for the realization of efficient optical interfaces between stationary matter-based quantum nodes and flying single-photon qubits. To date fiber Fabry-Perot cavities have been successfully applied in experiments interfacing single photons with a wide range of quantum systems, including cold atoms, ions and solid state emitters as well as quantum optomechanical experiments. Here we address some important practical questions that arise during the experimental implementation of high finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: How can optimal fiber cavity alignment be achieved and how can the efficiency of coupling light from the optical fibers to the cavity mode and vice versa be characterized? How should optical fiber cavities be constructed and stabilized to fulfill their potential for miniaturization and integration into robust scientific and technological devices that can operate outside of dedicated laboratory environments in the future? The first two questions we answer with an analytic mode matching calculation that relates the alignment dependent fiber-to-cavity mode-matching efficiency to the easily measurable dip in the reflected light power at the cavity resonance. Our general analysis provides a simple recipe for the optimal alignment of fiber Fabry-Perot cavities and moreover for the first time explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes. The latter question we explore by investigating a novel, intrinsically rigid fiber cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal

  17. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  18. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  19. Growth hormone (GH)-independent dimerization of GH receptor by a leucine zipper results in constitutive activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behncken, S N; Billestrup, Nils; Brown, R;

    2000-01-01

    Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers of the gro......Growth hormone initiates signaling by inducing homodimerization of two GH receptors. Here, we have sought to determine whether constitutively active receptor can be created in the absence of the extracellular domain by substituting it with high affinity leucine zippers to create dimers...... proliferation after interleukin 3 withdrawal at a rate equal to maximally stimulated wild type GHR-expressing cells. Activation of STAT 5b was also observed in Fos-Jun-GHR-expressing cells at a level equal to that in chronically GH-treated GHR-expressing cells. Thus, forced dimerization of the transmembrane...... and cytoplasmic domains of the GHR in the absence of the extracellular domain can lead to the constitutive activation of known GH signaling end points, supporting the view that proximity of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) kinases is the essential element in signaling. Such constitutively active GH receptors may have...

  20. Plant transcription factors from the homeodomain-leucine zipper family I. Role in development and stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, María Florencia; Ribone, Pamela Anahí; Chan, Raquel Lía

    2017-05-01

    In front of stressful conditions plants display adaptation mechanisms leading to changes in their morphology, physiology, development and molecular composition. Transcription factors (TFs) play crucial roles in these complex adaptation processes. This work is focused in the homeodomain-leucine zipper I (HD-Zip I) family of TFs, unique to plants. First discovered in 1991, they were identified and isolated from monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants showing high structural similarity and diversified functions. These TFs have, besides the homeodomain and leucine zipper, conserved motifs in their carboxy-termini allowing the interaction with the basal machinery and with other regulatory proteins. The model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana has 17 HD-Zip I members; most of them regulated by external stimuli and hormones. These TFs are involved in key developmental processes like root and stem elongation, rosette leaves morphology determination, inflorescence stem branching, flowering and pollen hydration. Moreover, they are key players in responses to environmental stresses and illumination conditions. Several HD-Zip I encoding genes from different species were protected in patents because their overexpression or mutation generates improved agronomical phenotypes. Here we discuss many aspects about these TFs including structural features, biological functions and their utilization as biotechnological tools to improve crops. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(5):280-289, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  2. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  3. SPS RF cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. A power of up to 790 kW can be supplied to each giving a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities.

  4. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  5. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  6. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  7. Development of opto-mechanical tools and procedures for the new generation of RICH-detectors at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Laub, M; Ullaland, O

    2001-01-01

    This thesis is focused on development of opto-mechanical tools and procedures, which would contribute to the achievement of the best possible performance of new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. On the base of requirements, given by the physics objective of the LHCb detector, and an analysis of the detector opto-mechanical system, specifications of individual opto-mechanical components were determined. Spherical mirrors, planar mirrors and mirror adjustable mounts were the components of interest. Next, their parameters to be characterised were defined. Possible measurement methods were studied and relevant set ups based on suitable methods were developed. Meanwhile, available modern metrology technologies, like laser operated instruments or digital image processing, were applied with an attempt to innovate them and to increase their achievable performance limits. When applicable, the set ups were automated in order to make the measurements fast and reliable. An optical laboratory, devoted to the charac...

  8. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  9. Surface explosion cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Clanet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video on cavities created by explosions of firecrackers at the water free surface. We use three types of firecrackers containing 1, 1.3 and 5 g of flash powder. The firecrackers are held with their center at the surface of water in a cubic meter pool. The movies are recorded from the side with a high-speed video camera. Without confinement the explosion produces an hemispherical cavity. Right after the explosion this cavity grows isotropically, the bottom then stops while the sides continue to expand. In the next phase the bottom of the cavity accelerates backwards to the surface. During this phase the convergence of the flow creates a central jet that rises above the free surface. In the last part of the video the explosion is confined in a vertical open tube made of glass and of centimetric diameter. The explosion creates a cylindrical cavity that develops towards the free end of the tube. Depending on the charge, the cavity can either stop inside the tube or at its exit, but nev...

  10. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  11. Nano-scale optical actuation based on two-dimensional heterostructure photonic crystal cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tong; Zhou, Guangya; Chau, Fook Siong; Tian, Feng; Deng, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) actuators using electrostatic forces are facing the bottleneck of the electromagnetic interference which greatly degrades their performances. On the contrary, the hybrid circuits driven by optical gradient forces which are immune to the electromagnetic interference show prominent advantages in communication, quantum computation, and other application systems. In this paper we propose an optical actuator utilizing the optical gradient force generated by a hetero-structure photonic crystal cavity. This type of cavity has a longitudinal air-slot and characteristics of ultrahigh quality factor (Q) and ultra-small mode volume (V) which is capable of producing a much larger force compared with the waveguide-based structures. Due to the symmetry property, attractive optical gradient force is generated. Additionally, the optomechanical coefficient (gom) of this cavity is two orders of magnitude larger than that of the coupled nanobeam photonic crystal cavities. The 2D hetero-structure cavity, comb drives, folded beam suspensions and the displacement sensor compose the whole device. The cavity serves as the optical actuator whilst the butt-coupled waveguide acts as the displacement sensor which is theoretically proved to be insensitive to the temperature variations. As known, the thermo-optic effect prevails especially in the cavity-based structures. The butt-coupled waveguide can be used to decouple the thermal effect and the optoemchanical effect (OM) with the aid of comb drives. The results demonstrate that the proposed optical gradient force actuator show great potential in the future of all-optical reconfigurable circuits.

  12. Alanine zipper-like coiled-coil domains are necessary for homotypic dimerization of plant GAGA-factors in the nucleus and nucleolus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dierk Wanke

    Full Text Available GAGA-motif binding proteins control transcriptional activation or repression of homeotic genes. Interestingly, there are no sequence similarities between animal and plant proteins. Plant BBR/BPC-proteins can be classified into two distinct groups: Previous studies have elaborated on group I members only and so little is known about group II proteins. Here, we focused on the initial characterization of AtBPC6, a group II protein from Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparison of orthologous BBR/BPC sequences disclosed two conserved signatures besides the DNA binding domain. A first peptide signature is essential and sufficient to target AtBPC6-GFP to the nucleus and nucleolus. A second domain is predicted to form a zipper-like coiled-coil structure. This novel type of domain is similar to Leucine zippers, but contains invariant alanine residues with a heptad spacing of 7 amino acids. By yeast-2-hybrid and BiFC-assays we could show that this Alanine zipper domain is essential for homotypic dimerization of group II proteins in vivo. Interhelical salt bridges and charge-stabilized hydrogen bonds between acidic and basic residues of the two monomers are predicted to form an interaction domain, which does not follow the classical knobs-into-holes zipper model. FRET-FLIM analysis of GFP/RFP-hybrid fusion proteins validates the formation of parallel dimers in planta. Sequence comparison uncovered that this type of domain is not restricted to BBR/BPC proteins, but is found in all kingdoms.

  13. Regulation of MIR165/166 by class II and class III homeodomain leucine zipper proteins establishes leaf polarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merelo, Paz; Ram, Hathi; Caggiano, Monica Pia

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of plant leaves is their flattened shape. This shape depends on an antagonism between the genes that specify adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) tissue identity; however, the molecular nature of this antagonism remains poorly understood. Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD...

  14. Vacuum Energy Densities of a Field in a Cavity with a Mobile Boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Armata, Federico

    2014-01-01

    We consider the zero-point field fluctuations, and the related field energy densities, inside a one-dimensional and a three-dimensional cavity with a mobile wall. The mechanical degrees of freedom of the mobile wall are described quantum-mechanically and they are fully included in the overall system dynamics. In this optomechanical system, the field and the wall can interact with each other through the radiation pressure on the wall, given by the photons inside the cavity or even by vacuum fluctuations. We consider two cases: the 1D electromagnetic field and the 3D scalar field, and use the Green's functions formalism, that allows extension of the results obtained for the scalar field to the electromagnetic field. We show that the quantum fluctuations of the position of the cavity's mobile wall significantly affect the field energy density inside the cavity, in particular at the very proximity of the mobile wall. The dependence of this effect from the ultraviolet cut-off frequency, related to the plasma frequ...

  15. The Correlated Two-Photon Transport in a One-Dimensional Waveguide Coupling to a Hybrid Atom-Optomechanical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingyi; Zhang, Wenzhao; Li, Xun; Yan, Weibin; Zhou, Ling

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the two-photon transport properties inside one-dimensional waveguide side coupled to an atom-optomechanical system, aiming to control the two-photon transport by using the nonlinearity. By generalizing the scheme of Phys. Rev. A 90, 033832, we show that Kerr nonlinearity induced by the four-level atoms is remarkable and can make the photons antibunching, while the nonlinear interaction of optomechanical coupling participates in both the single photon and the two photon processes so that it can make the two photons exhibiting bunching and antibunching.

  16. The opto-mechanical design for GMOX: a next-generation instrument concept for Gemini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Stephen A.; Barkhouser, Robert; Robberto, Massimo; Ninkov, Zoran; Gennaro, Mario; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2016-08-01

    We present the opto-mechanical design of GMOX, the Gemini Multi-Object eXtra-wide-band spectrograph, a potential next-generation (Gen-4 #3) facility-class instrument for Gemini. GMOX is a wide-band, multi-object, spectrograph with spectral coverage spanning 350 nm to 2.4 um with a nominal resolving power of R 5000. Through the use of Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) technology, GMOX will be able to acquire spectra from hundreds of sources simultaneously, offering unparalleled flexibility in target selection. Utilizing this technology, GMOX can rapidly adapt individual slits to either seeing-limited or diffraction-limited conditions. The optical design splits the bandpass into three arms, blue, red, and near infrared, with the near-infrared arm being split into three channels covering the Y+J band, H band, and K band. A slit viewing camera in each arm provides imaging capability for target acquisition and fast-feedback for adaptive optics control with either ALTAIR (Gemini North) or GeMS (Gemini South). Mounted at the Cassegrain focus, GMOX is a large (1.3 m x 2.8 m x 2.0 m) complex instrument, with six dichroics, three DMDs (one per arm), five science cameras, and three acquisition cameras. Roughly half of these optics, including one DMD, operate at cryogenic temperature. To maximize stiffness and simplify assembly and alignment, the opto-mechanics are divided into three main sub-assemblies, including a near-infrared cryostat, each having sub-benches to facilitate ease of alignment and testing of the optics. In this paper we present the conceptual opto-mechanical design of GMOX, with an emphasis on the mounting strategy for the optics and the thermal design details related to the near-infrared cryostat.

  17. CIRP Interlaboratory Comparison of Coordinate Measuring Machines using an Optomechanical Hole Plate - Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Morace, Renata Erica

    2005-01-01

    An interlaboratory comparison on mechanical and optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) was organized by the Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM), Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management (IPL), Technical University of Denmark (DTU) and carried out within Collège International...... interferometers, 1 zerodur hole plate, 2 callipers, and 1 quartz standard. Out of the 23 measurement campaigns, 5 optical and 2 mechanical machines were not provided with establishment of traceability. The optomechanical hole plate is a suitable reference artefact providing traceability of CMMs, in particular...

  18. Limiting effects of geometrical and optical nonlinearities on the squeezing in optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djorwé, P. [Laboratory of Modelling and Simulation in Engineering, Biomimetics and Prototypes, Faculty of Science, University of Yaoundé I (Cameroon); Nana Engo, S.G., E-mail: nanaengo@gmail.com [Laboratory of Photonics, Faculty of Science, University of Ngaoundéré (Cameroon); Talla Mbé, J.H.; Woafo, P. [Laboratory of Modelling and Simulation in Engineering, Biomimetics and Prototypes, Faculty of Science, University of Yaoundé I (Cameroon)

    2013-08-01

    In recent experiments, the re-thermalization time of the mechanical resonator is stated as the limiting factor for quantum applications of optomechanical systems. To explain the origin of this limitation, an analytical nonlinear investigation supported by the recent successful experimental laser cooling parameters is carried out in this work. To this end, the effects of geometrical and the optical nonlinearities on the squeezing are studied and are in a good agreement with the experimental results. It appears that highly squeezed state are generated where these nonlinearities are minimized and that high nonlinearities are limiting factors to reach the quantum ground state.

  19. Large Volume, Optical and Opto-Mechanical Metrology Techniques for ISIM on JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimichael, Theo

    2015-01-01

    The final, flight build of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element of the James Webb Space Telescope is the culmination of years of work across many disciplines and partners. This paper covers the large volume, ambient, optical and opto-mechanical metrology techniques used to verify the mechanical integration of the flight instruments in ISIM, including optical pupil alignment. We present an overview of ISIM's integration and test program, which is in progress, with an emphasis on alignment and optical performance verification. This work is performed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in close collaboration with the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Mid-Infrared Instrument European Consortium.

  20. Optomechanical characterization of freestanding stretchable nanosheet based on polystyrene-polybutadiene-polystyrene copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Hayato; Sato, Nobutaka; Takeoka, Shinji; Sawada, Kazuaki; Fujie, Toshinori; Takahashi, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a stretchable freestanding ultrathin sheet based on a polystyrene-polybutadiene-polystyrene (SBS) copolymer with entropy-driven elasticity and evaluated its optomechanical properties. The freestanding SBS sheet had a thickness of 675 nm and a size of 10.4 × 10.4 mm2 on a through hole of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sheet. The measurement of the reflection spectra of the optical interference peaks of the stretched sheets revealed that the SBS nanosheet had a Poisson’s ratio of 0.5-0.68 for a 38% elastic strain, which is one order of magnitude greater than that of parylene.