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Sample records for optoelectronic tweezers oet

  1. Optoelectronic tweezers for medical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Clemens; Neale, Steven; Menachery, Anoop; Barrett, Mike; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) allows the spatial patterning of electric fields through selected illumination of a photoconductive surface. This enables the manipulation of micro particles and cells by creating non-uniform electrical fields that then produce dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. The DEP responses of cells differ and can produce negative or positive (repelled or attracted to areas of high electric field) forces. Therefore OET can be used to manipulate individual cells and separate different cell types from each other. Thus OET has many applications for medical diagnostics, demonstrated here with work towards diagnosing Human African Trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness.

  2. Electrodes for Microfluidic Integrated Optoelectronic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Wei Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on two types of electrodes that enable the integration of optoelectronic tweezers (OETs with multilayer poly(dimethylsilane- (PDMS- based microfluidic devices. Both types of electrodes, Au-mesh and single-walled carbon nanotube- (SWNT- embedded PDMS thin film, are optically transparent, electrically conductive, and can be mechanically deformed and provide interfaces to form strong covalent bonding between an OET device and PDMS through standard oxygen plasma treatment. Au-mesh electrodes provide high electrical conductivity and high transparency but are lack of flexibility and allow only small deformation. On the other hand, SWNT-embedded PDMS thin film electrodes provide not only electrical conductivity but also optical transparency and can undergo large mechanical deformation repeatedly without failure. This enables, for the first time, microfluidic integrated OET with on-chip valve and pump functions, which is a critical step for OET-based platforms to conduct more complex and multistep biological and biochemical analyses.

  3. Manipulating and assembling metallic beads with Optoelectronic Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuailong; Juvert, Joan; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Neale, Steven L.

    2016-09-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) or light-patterned dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been developed as a micromanipulation technology for controlling micro- and nano-particles with applications such as cell sorting and studying cell communications. Additionally, the capability of moving small objects accurately and assembling them into arbitrary 2D patterns also makes OET an attractive technology for microfabrication applications. In this work, we demonstrated the use of OET to manipulate conductive silver-coated Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microspheres (50 μm diameter) into tailored patterns. It was found that the microspheres could be moved at a max velocity of 3200 μm/s, corresponding to 4.2 nano-newton (10-9 N) DEP force, and also could be positioned with high accuracy via this DEP force. The underlying mechanism for this strong DEP force is shown by our simulations to be caused by a significant increase of the electric field close to the particles, due to the interaction between the field and the silver shells coating the microspheres. The associated increase in electrical gradient causes DEP forces that are much stronger than any previously reported for an OET device, which facilitates manipulation of the metallic microspheres efficiently without compromise in positioning accuracy and is important for applications on electronic component assembling and circuit construction.

  4. Phototransistor-based optoelectronic tweezers for dynamic cell manipulation in cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsan-yin; Ohta, Aaron T; Chiou, Pei-Yu; Jamshidi, Arash; Neale, Steven L; Wu, Ming C

    2010-01-21

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET), based on light-induced dielectrophoresis, has been shown as a versatile tool for parallel manipulation of micro-particles and cells (P. Y. Chiou, A. T. Ohta and M. C. Wu, Nature, 2005, 436, 370-372). However, the conventional OET device cannot operate in cell culture media or other high-conductivity physiological buffers due to the limited photoconductivity of amorphous silicon. In this paper, we report a new phototransistor-based OET (Ph-OET). Consisting of single-crystalline bipolar junction transistors, the Ph-OET has more than 500x higher photoconductivity than amorphous silicon. Efficient cell trapping of live HeLa and Jurkat cells in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) has been demonstrated using a digital light projector, with a cell transport speed of 33 microm/sec, indicating a force of 14.5 pN. Optical concentration of cells and real-time control of individually addressable cell arrays have also been realized. Precise control of separation between two cells has also been demonstrated. We envision a new platform for single cell studies using Ph-OET.

  5. Optoelectronic tweezers for the measurement of the relative stiffness of erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Steven L.; Mody, Nimesh; Selman, Colin; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we describe the first use of Optoelectronic Tweezers (OET), an optically controlled micromanipulation method, to measure the relative stiffness of erythrocytes in mice. Cell stiffness is an important measure of cell health and in the case of erythrocytes, the most elastic cells in the body, an increase in cell stiffness can indicate pathologies such as type II diabetes mellitus or hypertension (high blood pressure). OET uses a photoconductive device to convert an optical pattern into and electrical pattern. The electrical fields will create a dipole within any polarisable particles in the device, such as cells, and non-uniformities of the field can be used to place unequal forces onto each side of the dipole thus moving the particle. In areas of the device where there are no field gradients, areas of constant illumination, the force on each side of the dipole will be equal, keeping the cell stationary, but as there are opposing forces on each side of the cell it will be stretched. The force each cell will experience will differ slightly so the stretching will depend on the cells polarisability as well as its stiffness. Because of this a relative stiffness rather than absolute stiffness is measured. We show that with standard conditions (20Vpp, 1.5MHz, 10mSm-1 medium conductivity) the cell's diameter changes by around 10% for healthy mouse erythrocytes and we show that due to the low light intensities required for OET, relative to conventional optical tweezers, multiple cells can be measured simultaneously.

  6. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of COOH-Functionalized SWCNTs Trapped with Optoelectronic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OETs were used to trap and deposit aqueous dispersions of carboxylic-acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. Dark-field video microscopy was used to visualize the dynamics of the bundles both with and without virtual electrodes, showing rapid accumulation of carbon nanotubes when optical virtual electrodes are actuated. Raman microscopy was used to probe SWCNT materials following deposition onto metallic fiducial markers as well as during trapping. The local carbon nanotube concentration was observed to increase rapidly during trapping by more than an order of magnitude in less than one second due to localized optical dielectrophoresis forces. This combination of enrichment and spectroscopy with a single laser spot suggests a broad range of applications in physical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  7. Manipulation of microparticles and red blood cells using optoelectronic tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Verma; R Dasgupta; N Kumar; S Ahlawat; A Uppal; P K Gupta

    2014-02-01

    We report the development of an optoelectronic tweezers set-up which works by lightinduced dielectrophoresis mechanism to manipulate microparticles. We used thermal evaporation technique for coating the organic polymer, titanium oxide phthalocyanine (TiOPc), as a photoconductive layer on ITO-coated glass slide. Compare to the conventional optical tweezers, the technique requires optical power in W range and provides a manipulation area of a few mm2. The set-up was used to manipulate the polystyrene microspheres and red blood cells (RBCs). The RBCs could be attracted or repelled by varying the frequency of the applied AC bias.

  8. Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers for Single-Cell and Microparticle Manipulation across a Large Area in High Conductivity Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yajia; Mao, Yufei; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Chui, Chi On; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2016-03-04

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) has advanced within the past decade to become a promising tool for cell and microparticle manipulation. Its incompatibility with high conductivity media and limited throughput remain two major technical challenges. Here a novel manipulation concept and corresponding platform called Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers (SLOT) are proposed and demonstrated to tackle these challenges concurrently. The SLOT platform comprises a periodic array of optically tunable phototransistor traps above which randomly dispersed single cells and microparticles are self-aligned to and retained without light illumination. Light beam illumination on a phototransistor turns off the trap and releases the trapped cell, which is then transported downstream via a background flow. The cell trapping and releasing functions in SLOT are decoupled, which is a unique feature that enables SLOT's stepper-mode function to overcome the small field-of-view issue that all prior OET technologies encountered in manipulation with single-cell resolution across a large area. Massively parallel trapping of more than 100,000 microparticles has been demonstrated in high conductivity media. Even larger scale trapping and manipulation can be achieved by linearly scaling up the number of phototransistors and device area. Cells after manipulation on the SLOT platform maintain high cell viability and normal multi-day divisibility.

  9. Micromanipulation of InP lasers with optoelectronic tweezers for integration on a photonic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvert, Joan; Zhang, Shuailong; Eddie, Iain; Mitchell, Colin J; Reed, Graham T; Wilkinson, James S; Kelly, Anthony; Neale, Steven L

    2016-08-08

    The integration of light sources on a photonic platform is a key aspect of the fabrication of self-contained photonic circuits with a small footprint that does not have a definitive solution yet. Several approaches are being actively researched for this purpose. In this work we propose optoelectronic tweezers for the manipulation and integration of light sources on a photonic platform and report the positional and angular accuracy of the micromanipulation of standard Fabry-Pérot InP semiconductor laser die. These lasers are over three orders of magnitude bigger in volume than any previously assembled with optofluidic techniques and the fact that they are industry standard lasers makes them significantly more useful than previously assembled microdisk lasers. We measure the accuracy to be 2.5 ± 1.4 µm and 1.4 ± 0.4° and conclude that optoelectronic tweezers are a promising technique for the micromanipulation and integration of optoelectronic components in general and semiconductor lasers in particular.

  10. Numerical and Experimental Study of Optoelectronic Trapping on Iron-Doped Lithium Niobate Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Gazzetto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OET are a promising technique for the realization of reconfigurable systems suitable to trap and manipulate microparticles. In particular, dielectrophoretic (DEP forces produced by OET represent a valid alternative to micro-fabricated metal electrodes, as strong and spatially reconfigurable electrical fields can be induced in a photoconductive layer by means of light-driven phenomena. In this paper we report, and compare with the experimental data, the results obtained by analyzing the spatial configurations of the DEP-forces produced by a 532 nm laser beam, with Gaussian intensity distribution, impinging on a Fe-doped Lithium Niobate substrate. Furthermore, we also present a promising preliminary result for water-droplets trapping, which could open the way to the application of this technique to biological samples manipulation.

  11. 78 FR 11129 - Office of Engineering and Technology Seeks Comment on Updated OET-69 Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 73 Office of Engineering and Technology Seeks Comment on Updated OET-69 Software... Engineering and Technology (OET) announced the release of new software to perform interference analyses using... Office of Engineering and Technology (OET) announced the release of new software to perform interference...

  12. Tweezers controlled resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminski, Samuel; Carmon, Tal

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate trapping a microdroplet with an optical tweezer and then enabling it as a microresonator by bringing it close to a tapered fiber coupler. Our tweezers facilitated the tuning of the coupling from the under-coupled to the critically coupled regime with an optical Q of 12 million and microresonator size at the 85 mirons scale.

  13. Optical tweezers: wideband microrheology

    CERN Document Server

    Preece, Daryl; Tassieri, Manlio; Evans, R M L; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-01-01

    Microrheology is a branch of rheology having the same principles as conventional bulk rheology, but working on micron length scales and micro-litre volumes. Optical tweezers have been successfully used with Newtonian fluids for rheological purposes such as determining fluid viscosity. Conversely, when optical tweezers are used to measure the viscoelastic properties of complex fluids the results are either limited to the material's high-frequency response, discarding important information related to the low-frequency behavior, or they are supplemented by low-frequency measurements performed with different techniques, often without presenting an overlapping region of clear agreement between the sets of results. We present a simple experimental procedure to perform microrheological measurements over the widest frequency range possible with optical tweezers. A generalised Langevin equation is used to relate the frequency-dependent moduli of the complex fluid to the time-dependent trajectory of a probe particle as...

  14. Organic optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Wenping; Gong, Xiong; Zhan, Xiaowei; Fu, Hongbing; Bjornholm, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Written by internationally recognized experts in the field with academic as well as industrial experience, this book concisely yet systematically covers all aspects of the topic.The monograph focuses on the optoelectronic behavior of organic solids and their application in new optoelectronic devices. It covers organic electroluminescent materials and devices, organic photonics, materials and devices, as well as organic solids in photo absorption and energy conversion. Much emphasis is laid on the preparation of functional materials and the fabrication of devices, from materials synthesis a

  15. Physics of optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Timo A; Knöner, Gregor; Heckenberg, Norman R; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2007-01-01

    We outline the basic principles of optical tweezers as well as the fundamental theory underlying optical tweezers. The optical forces responsible for trapping result from the transfer of momentum from the trapping beam to the particle and are explained in terms of the momenta of incoming and reflected or refracted rays. We also consider the angular momentum flux of the beam in order to understand and explain optical torques. In order to provide a qualitative picture of the trapping, we treat the particle as a weak positive lens and the forces on the lens are shown. However, this representation does not provide quantitative results for the force. We, therefore, present results of applying exact electromagnetic theory to optical trapping. First, we consider a tightly focused laser beam. We give results for trapping of spherical particles and examine the limits of trappability in terms of type and size of the particles. We also study the effect of a particle on the beam. This exact solution reproduces the same qualitative effect as when treating the particle as a lens where changes in the convergence or divergence and in the direction of the trapping beam result in restoring forces acting on the particle. Finally, we review the fundamental theory of optical tweezers.

  16. STUDIES ON TiCl4/Mg (Oet)2/EB SUPPORTED CATALYSTS FOR PROPYLENE POLYMERIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Shijing; LU Honglan; ZHANG Minghui

    1990-01-01

    The supported catalysts for propylene polymerization were prepared by milling Mg (OEt)2 with EB (ethylbenzoate) and treating with TiCl4 solution. When TiCl4/(Mg (OEt)2/EB) (mol.) ratio was increased, decrease in contents of -OEt and Ti of the catalysts was observed, while the content of EB increased. It is proved by analyses of IR, X-ray and XPS that during co-milling Mg(OEt)2with EB no reactions have taken place. But after treatment with TiCl4 solution, Mg (OEt)2 converts into MgCl2 and EB coordinates on the resulting MgCl2 carrier, a surface complex forms.The activity of catalysts,isotacticityand vicosimetric molecular weight of polypropylene increase with the decrease of the content of ethoxyl group. The kinetic curves of propene polymerization obtained with present catalysts system display decay curves. It is found from the triad tacticity calculated from the expanded spectra of methyl carbon region that, ethoxyl group in catalyst has an effect on the configuration of polymer chain.

  17. Activity of B(OEt)3-MCM-41 catalyst in the MPV reduction of crotonaldehyde

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Burcu Uysal

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous silica materialMCM-41 was functionalized with boron tri-ethoxide (B(OEt)3) groups by the grafting method and denoted as `B(OEt)3-MCM-41’. With the use of TEM, X-ray diffraction, highresolution thermogravimetry (TGA) and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, it was shown that the initial hexagonal structure, the high specific surface area, and porosity are retained in the functionalized material. 29Si NMR- and 11B NMR- spectroscopies revealed that the surface of MCM-41 consists of boron alkoxide species. The Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley (MPV) reduction of crotonaldehyde to but-2-en-1-ol was conducted in the presence of B(OEt)3-MCM-41 catalyst. MPV reduction of crotonaldehyde also showed that functionalization leads to the creation of Lewis acidic sites. A combination of mesoporous structure with Lewis acidic properties makes the MCM-41 functionalized with boron tri-ethoxide groups, useful as solid Lewis acid catalysts.

  18. Interferometer Control of Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses progress in using spatial light modulators and interferometry to control the beam profile of an optical tweezers. The approach being developed is to use a spatial light modulator (SLM) to control the phase profile of the tweezers beam and to use a combination of the SLM and interferometry to control the intensity profile. The objective is to perform fine and calculable control of the moments and forces on a tip or tool to be used to manipulate and interrogate nanostructures. The performance of the SLM in generating multiple and independently controllable tweezers beams is also reported. Concurrent supporting research projects are mentioned and include tweezers beam scattering and neural-net processing of the interference patterns for control of the tweezers beams.

  19. Lipid Bilayer-Integrated Optoelectronic Tweezers for Nanoparticle Manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Wu, M. C. Nano Lett. 2009, 9, 2921−2925. (25) Cremer , P. S.; Boxer, S. G. J. Phys. Chem. B 1999, 103, 2554− 2559. (26) Groves, J. T. Science 1997... Martin , A.; Forster, R. J.; Keyes, T. E. Soft Matter 2012, 8, 8743. (33) Ba, H.; Rodríguez-Fernańdez, J.; Stefani, F. D.; Feldmann, J. Nano Lett. 2010

  20. A Mild and Highly Efficient Catalyst for Beckmann Rearrangement, BF3·OEt2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Na; Pi Hongjun; Liu Lifeng; Du Wenting; Deng Weiping

    2011-01-01

    BF3·OEt2 (Boron trifluoride etherate), an inexpensive and commercially easily available Lewis acid stoichiometrically employed for Beckamann rearrangement in general, was now found to efficiently catalyze Beckmann rearrangement of ketoximes into their corresponding amides (up to 99% yield) in anhydrous acetonitrile under reflux temperature.

  1. Nanowire Optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhihuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanowires have been used in a variety of passive and active optoelectronic devices including waveguides, photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs, lasers, sensors, and optical antennas. We review the optical properties of these nanowires in terms of absorption, guiding, and radiation of light, which may be termed light management. Analysis of the interaction of light with long cylindrical/hexagonal structures with subwavelength diameters identifies radial resonant modes, such as Leaky Mode Resonances, or Whispering Gallery modes. The two-dimensional treatment should incorporate axial variations in “volumetric modes,”which have so far been presented in terms of Fabry–Perot (FP, and helical resonance modes. We report on finite-difference timedomain (FDTD simulations with the aim of identifying the dependence of these modes on geometry (length, width, tapering, shape (cylindrical, hexagonal, core–shell versus core-only, and dielectric cores with semiconductor shells. This demonstrates how nanowires (NWs form excellent optical cavities without the need for top and bottommirrors. However, optically equivalent structures such as hexagonal and cylindrical wires can have very different optoelectronic properties meaning that light management alone does not sufficiently describe the observed enhancement in upward (absorption and downward transitions (emission of light inNWs; rather, the electronic transition rates should be considered. We discuss this “rate management” scheme showing its strong dimensional dependence, making a case for photonic integrated circuits (PICs that can take advantage of the confluence of the desirable optical and electronic properties of these nanostructures.

  2. Optical tweezers for medical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFratta, Christopher N

    2013-07-01

    Laser trapping by optical tweezers makes possible the spectroscopic analysis of single cells. Use of optical tweezers in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy has allowed cells to be identified as either healthy or cancerous. This combined technique is known as laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS), or Raman tweezers. The Raman spectra of cells are complex, since the technique probes nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids; but statistical analysis of these spectra makes possible differentiation of different classes of cells. In this article the recent development of LTRS is described along with two illustrative examples for potential application in cancer diagnostics. Techniques to expand the uses of LTRS and to improve the speed of LTRS are also suggested.

  3. On chip shapeable optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaut, C; Cluzel, B; Dellinger, J; Lalouat, L; Picard, E; Peyrade, D; Hadji, E; de Fornel, F

    2013-01-01

    Particles manipulation with optical forces is known as optical tweezing. While tweezing in free space with laser beams was established in the 1980s, integrating the optical tweezers on a chip is a challenging task. Recent experiments with plasmonic nanoantennas, microring resonators, and photonic crystal nanocavities have demonstrated optical trapping. However, the optical field of a tweezer made of a single microscopic resonator cannot be shaped. So far, this prevents from optically driven micromanipulations. Here we propose an alternative approach where the shape of the optical trap can be tuned by the wavelength in coupled nanobeam cavities. Using these shapeable tweezers, we present micromanipulation of polystyrene microspheres trapped on a silicon chip. These results show that coupled nanobeam cavities are versatile building blocks for optical near-field engineering. They open the way to much complex integrated tweezers using networks of coupled nanobeam cavities for particles or bio-objects manipulation at a larger scale.

  4. On chip shapeable optical tweezers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Renaut, C; Cluzel, B; Dellinger, J; Lalouat, L; Picard, E; Peyrade, D; Hadji, E; de Fornel, F

    2013-01-01

    Particles manipulation with optical forces is known as optical tweezing. While tweezing in free space with laser beams was established in the 1980s, integrating the optical tweezers on a chip is a challenging task...

  5. Multi-Beam Optical Tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Glückstad, Jesper; Eriksen, Rene Lynge; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2003-01-01

    A set of multi-beam electromagnetic tweezers is provided comprising a multi-beam generator for emission of a plurality of electromagnetic beams, at least some of the electromagnetic beams intersecting each other, or, having an individually controlled polarization whereby the position and/or angular orientation of a plurality of micro-objects may be individually controlled.A set of multi-beam electromagnetic tweezers is provided comprising a multi-beam generator for emission of a plurality of ...

  6. Introduction to Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Matthias D; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2017-01-01

    Thirty years after their invention by Arthur Ashkin and colleagues at Bell Labs in 1986 [1], optical tweezers (or traps) have become a versatile tool to address numerous biological problems. Put simply, an optical trap is a highly focused laser beam that is capable of holding and applying forces to micron-sized dielectric objects. However, their development over the last few decades has converted these tools from boutique instruments into highly versatile instruments of molecular biophysics. This introductory chapter intends to give a brief overview of the field, highlight some important scientific achievements, and demonstrate why optical traps have become a powerful tool in the biological sciences. We introduce a typical optical setup, describe the basic theoretical concepts of how trapping forces arise, and present the quantitative position and force measurement techniques that are most widely used today.

  7. Optical tweezers absolute calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Dutra, R S; Neto, P A Maia; Nussenzveig, H M

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past fifteen years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spo...

  8. Visual guide to optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Isaac C. D.; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2017-05-01

    It is common to introduce optical tweezers using either geometric optics for large particles or the Rayleigh approximation for very small particles. These approaches are successful at conveying the key ideas behind optical tweezers in their respective regimes. However, they are insufficient for modelling particles of intermediate size and large particles with small features. For this, a full field approach provides greater insight into the mechanisms involved in trapping. The advances in computational capability over the last decade have led to better modelling and understanding of optical tweezers. Problems that were previously difficult to model computationally can now be solved using a variety of methods on modern systems. These advances in computational power allow for full field solutions to be visualised, leading to increased understanding of the fields and behaviour in various scenarios. In this paper we describe the operation of optical tweezers using full field simulations calculated using the finite difference time domain method. We use these simulations to visually illustrate various situations relevant to optical tweezers, from the basic operation of optical tweezers, to engineered particles and evanescent fields.

  9. Characterization and photocatalytic study of tantalum oxide nanoparticles prepared by the hydrolysis of tantalum oxo-ethoxide Ta8(μ3-O2(μ-O8(μ-OEt6(OEt14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subia Ambreen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ta8(μ3-O2(μ-O8(μ-OEt6(OEt14 (1 was obtained by the controlled hydrolysis of tantalum ethoxide Ta(OEt5 in the presence of ammonia. Compound 1 is considered as the intermediate building block in the sol–gel polymerization of Ta(OEt5. Further hydrolysis of compound 1 yielded nanoparticles of Ta2O5, which were characterized by various techniques such as TGA-DTA-DSC, UV–vis DRS, XRD, SEM, TEM, particle size analyzer (DLS and the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET method. The band gap of the particles was calculated by using the Tauc plot. The photocatalytic activity of Ta2O5 nanoparticles was tested by the degradation of the organic dye rhodamine B.

  10. Characterization and photocatalytic study of tantalum oxide nanoparticles prepared by the hydrolysis of tantalum oxo-ethoxide Ta8(μ3-O)2(μ-O)8(μ-OEt)6(OEt)14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambreen, Subia; Pandey, N D; Mayer, Peter; Pandey, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Ta8(μ3-O)2(μ-O)8(μ-OEt)6(OEt)14 (1) was obtained by the controlled hydrolysis of tantalum ethoxide Ta(OEt)5 in the presence of ammonia. Compound 1 is considered as the intermediate building block in the sol-gel polymerization of Ta(OEt)5. Further hydrolysis of compound 1 yielded nanoparticles of Ta2O5, which were characterized by various techniques such as TGA-DTA-DSC, UV-vis DRS, XRD, SEM, TEM, particle size analyzer (DLS) and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. The band gap of the particles was calculated by using the Tauc plot. The photocatalytic activity of Ta2O5 nanoparticles was tested by the degradation of the organic dye rhodamine B.

  11. Optical Tweezer Assembly and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    An Optical Tweezer, as the name implies, is a useful tool for precision manipulation of micro and nano scale objects. Using the principle of electromagnetic radiation pressure, an optical tweezer employs a tightly focused laser beam to trap and position objects of various shapes and sizes. These devices can trap micrometer and nanometer sized objects. An exciting possibility for optical tweezers is its future potential to manipulate and assemble micro and nano sized sensors. A typical optical tweezer makes use of the following components: laser, mirrors, lenses, a high quality microscope, stage, Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera, TV monitor and Position Sensitive Detectors (PSDs). The laser wavelength employed is typically in the visible or infrared spectrum. The laser beam is directed via mirrors and lenses into the microscope. It is then tightly focused by a high magnification, high numerical aperture microscope objective into the sample slide, which is mounted on a translating stage. The sample slide contains a sealed, small volume of fluid that the objects are suspended in. The most common objects trapped by optical tweezers are dielectric spheres. When trapped, a sphere will literally snap into and center itself in the laser beam. The PSD s are mounted in such a way to receive the backscatter after the beam has passed through the trap. PSD s used with the Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) technique provide highly precise data. Most optical tweezers employ lasers with power levels ranging from 10 to 100 miliwatts. Typical forces exerted on trapped objects are in the pico-newton range. When PSDs are employed, object movement can be resolved on a nanometer scale in a time range of milliseconds. Such accuracy, however, can only by utilized by calibrating the optical tweezer. Fortunately, an optical tweezer can be modeled accurately as a simple spring. This allows Hook s Law to be used. My goal this summer at NASA Glenn Research Center is the assembly and

  12. Optical tweezers principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Philip; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Combining state-of-the-art research with a strong pedagogic approach, this text provides a detailed and complete guide to the theory, practice and applications of optical tweezers. In-depth derivation of the theory of optical trapping and numerical modelling of optical forces are supported by a complete step-by-step design and construction guide for building optical tweezers, with detailed tutorials on collecting and analysing data. Also included are comprehensive reviews of optical tweezers research in fields ranging from cell biology to quantum physics. Featuring numerous exercises and problems throughout, this is an ideal self-contained learning package for advanced lecture and laboratory courses, and an invaluable guide to practitioners wanting to enter the field of optical manipulation. The text is supplemented by www.opticaltweezers.org, a forum for discussion and a source of additional material including free-to-download, customisable research-grade software (OTS) for calculation of optical forces, dig...

  13. Coaxial Atomic Force Microscope Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, K A; Westervelt, R M

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate coaxial atomic force microscope (AFM) tweezers that can trap and place small objects using dielectrophoresis (DEP). An attractive force is generated at the tip of a coaxial AFM probe by applying a radio frequency voltage between the center conductor and a grounded shield; the origin of the force is found to be DEP by measuring the pull-off force vs. applied voltage. We show that the coaxial AFM tweezers (CAT) can perform three dimensional assembly by picking up a specified silica microsphere, imaging with the microsphere at the end of the tip, and placing it at a target destination.

  14. Multi-Beam Optical Tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A set of multi-beam electromagnetic tweezers is provided comprising a multi-beam generator for emission of a plurality of electromagnetic beams, at least some of the electromagnetic beams intersecting each other, or, having an individually controlled polarization whereby the position and/or angular...... orientation of a plurality of micro-objects may be individually controlled.A set of multi-beam electromagnetic tweezers is provided comprising a multi-beam generator for emission of a plurality of electromagnetic beams, at least some of the electromagnetic beams intersecting each other, or, having...

  15. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  16. Optical tweezers for confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, A.; Meyer zu Hörste, G.; Pilarczyk, G.; Monajembashi, S.; Uhl, V.; Greulich, K. O.

    2000-11-01

    In confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSMs), lasers can be used for image formation as well as tools for the manipulation of microscopic objects. In the latter case, in addition to the imaging lasers, the light of an extra laser has to be focused into the object plane of the CLSM, for example as optical tweezers. Imaging as well as trapping by optical tweezers can be done using the same objective lens. In this case, z-sectioning for 3D imaging shifts the optical tweezers with the focal plane of the objective along the optical axis, so that a trapped object remains positioned in the focal plane. Consequently, 3D imaging of trapped objects is impossible without further measures. We present an experimental set-up keeping the axial trapping position of the optical tweezers at its intended position whilst the focal plane can be axially shifted over a distance of about 15 μm. It is based on fast-moving correctional optics synchronized with the objective movement. First examples of application are the 3D imaging of chloroplasts of Elodea densa (Canadian waterweed) in a vigorous cytoplasmic streaming and the displacement of zymogen granules in pancreatic cancer cells (AR42 J).

  17. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Kris O.; McKellar, Thomas; Fekete, Julia; Rakonjac, Ana; Deb, Amita B.; Kjærgaard, Niels

    2013-01-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optical deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along the guide, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addres...

  18. Photonic Nanojet in Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Neves, Antonio Alvaro Ranha

    2015-01-01

    Photonic nanojets has been brought into attention ten years ago for potential application as ultramicroscopy technique, using its sub-wavelength resolution to enhance detection and interaction with matter. For these novel applications under development, optically trapping a sphere, acts as an ideal framework to employ these nanojets. In this case, the nanojet is generated by a highly focused incident beam contrary to the traditional plane wave. It inherits the advantage from optical trapping, with the microsphere in equilibrium on the beam propagation axis, and be positioned arbitrarily in space, especially for intracellular applications. Moreover, due to optical scattering forces, when in equilibrium, there is a shift of the sphere centre with respect to the beam focus. However, within the stable equilibrium of an optical tweezers configuration, it does not allow the formation of a photonic nanojet. To overcome this, a double optical tweezers, in an unorthodox configuration of two collinearly and co-propagat...

  19. An Examination of the Acceptability of OET to the Potential Nurses From College of Nursing, Kuantan, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jebunnesa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The growth of culturally and linguistically diverse population in Malaysia has led to many efforts to encourage or ensure that health care systems respond to the distinct needs of culturally and linguistically different patients by becoming “culturally competent”. So the implementation of OET will play an increasingly expedient role both in medication and in medical tourism. Occupational English Test is an English language proficiency test for health practitioners intending to check whether health practitioners have sufficient knowledge of English in job-related context. It is designed by Professor Tim Mc Namara under contact with Australian Federal Government and is used by Australia, New Zealand and Singapore. This study using a case study method intends to know the acceptability of OET in Malaysia. The objectives of this study are to assess Malaysian nurses’ performance in the existing OET writing test and to know their attitude towards the test. The cases are 31 nursing students from a reputed nursing college in Kuantan, Malaysia. The researcher administers some sample OET writing test questions on the cases at first so that they can have a clear idea about OET and after the test , she interviews 5 cases individually to know their view in detail. The researcher analyzes the result manually. From the test and especially from the interviews, it comes out that OET is very much acceptable to the nurses and though most them are not good in grammar, their performance in test is satisfactory on average because the task is associated with their job. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA

  20. Integrated silicon optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Horst

    2000-01-01

    'Integrated Silicon Optoelectronics'assembles optoelectronics and microelectronics The book concentrates on silicon as the major basis of modern semiconductor devices and circuits Starting from the basics of optical emission and absorption and from the device physics of photodetectors, the aspects of the integration of photodetectors in modern bipolar, CMOS, and BiCMOS technologies are discussed Detailed descriptions of fabrication technologies and applications of optoelectronic integrated circuits are included The book, furthermore, contains a review of the state of research on eagerly expected silicon light emitters In order to cover the topic of the book comprehensively, integrated waveguides, gratings, and optoelectronic power devices are included in addition Numerous elaborate illustrations promote an easy comprehension 'Integrated Silicon Optoelectronics'will be of value to engineers, physicists, and scientists in industry and at universities The book is also recommendable for graduate students speciali...

  1. Optoelectronics circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    2013-01-01

    Optoelectronics Circuits Manual covers the basic principles and characteristics of the best known types of optoelectronic devices, as well as the practical applications of many of these optoelectronic devices. The book describes LED display circuits and LED dot- and bar-graph circuits and discusses the applications of seven-segment displays, light-sensitive devices, optocouplers, and a variety of brightness control techniques. The text also tackles infrared light-beam alarms and multichannel remote control systems. The book provides practical user information and circuitry and illustrations.

  2. Integrated Silicon Optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Horst K

    2010-01-01

    Integrated Silicon Optoelectronics synthesizes topics from optoelectronics and microelectronics. The book concentrates on silicon as the major base of modern semiconductor devices and circuits. Starting from the basics of optical emission and absorption, as well as from the device physics of photodetectors, the aspects of the integration of photodetectors in modern bipolar, CMOS, and BiCMOS technologies are discussed. Detailed descriptions of fabrication technologies and applications of optoelectronic integrated circuits are included. The book, furthermore, contains a review of the newest state of research on eagerly anticipated silicon light emitters. In order to cover the topics comprehensively, also included are integrated waveguides, gratings, and optoelectronic power devices. Numerous elaborate illustrations facilitate and enhance comprehension. This extended edition will be of value to engineers, physicists, and scientists in industry and at universities. The book is also recommended to graduate student...

  3. Microcrystal manipulation with laser tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Armin, E-mail: armin.wagner@diamond.ac.uk; Duman, Ramona [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Stevens, Bob [Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham NG1 4BU (United Kingdom); Ward, Andy [Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Optical trapping has successfully been applied to select and mount microcrystals for subsequent X-ray diffraction experiments. X-ray crystallography is the method of choice to deduce atomic resolution structural information from macromolecules. In recent years, significant investments in structural genomics initiatives have been undertaken to automate all steps in X-ray crystallography from protein expression to structure solution. Robotic systems are widely used to prepare crystallization screens and change samples on synchrotron beamlines for macromolecular crystallography. The only remaining manual handling step is the transfer of the crystal from the mother liquor onto the crystal holder. Manual mounting is relatively straightforward for crystals with dimensions of >25 µm; however, this step is nontrivial for smaller crystals. The mounting of microcrystals is becoming increasingly important as advances in microfocus synchrotron beamlines now allow data collection from crystals with dimensions of only a few micrometres. To make optimal usage of these beamlines, new approaches have to be taken to facilitate and automate this last manual handling step. Optical tweezers, which are routinely used for the manipulation of micrometre-sized objects, have successfully been applied to sort and mount macromolecular crystals on newly designed crystal holders. Diffraction data from CPV type 1 polyhedrin microcrystals mounted with laser tweezers are presented.

  4. Molecular clips and tweezers hosting neutral guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardouin-Lerouge, Marie; Hudhomme, Piétrick; Sallé, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Intense current interest in supramolecular chemistry is devoted to the construction of molecular assemblies displaying controlled molecular motion associated to recognition. On this ground, molecular clips and tweezers have focused an increasing attention. This tutorial review points out the recent advances in the construction of always more sophisticated molecular clips and tweezers, illustrating their remarkably broad structural variety and focusing on their binding ability towards neutral guests. A particular attention is brought to recent findings in dynamic molecular tweezers whose recognition ability can be regulated by external stimuli. Porphyrin-based systems will not be covered here as this very active field has been recently reviewed.

  5. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, K O; McKellar, T; Fekete, J; Rakonjac, A; Deb, A B; Kjærgaard, N

    2014-04-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optic deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along it, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addressing individual sites in the channel. The deflectors are controlled using a multichannel direct digital synthesizer, which receives instructions on a submicrosecond time scale from a field-programmable gate array. Using the tweezer system, we demonstrate sequential binary splitting of an ultracold 87Rb cloud into 2(5) clouds.

  6. A DNA tweezer-actuated enzyme nanoreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minghui; Fu, Jinglin; Hejesen, Christian; Yang, Yuhe; Woodbury, Neal W; Gothelf, Kurt; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The functions of regulatory enzymes are essential to modulating cellular pathways. Here we report a tweezer-like DNA nanodevice to actuate the activity of an enzyme/cofactor pair. A dehydrogenase and NAD(+) cofactor are attached to different arms of the DNA tweezer structure and actuation of enzymatic function is achieved by switching the tweezers between open and closed states. The enzyme/cofactor pair is spatially separated in the open state with inhibited enzyme function, whereas in the closed state, enzyme is activated by the close proximity of the two molecules. The conformational state of the DNA tweezer is controlled by the addition of specific oligonucleotides that serve as the thermodynamic driver (fuel) to trigger the change. Using this approach, several cycles of externally controlled enzyme inhibition and activation are successfully demonstrated. This principle of responsive enzyme nanodevices may be used to regulate other types of enzymes and to introduce feedback or feed-forward control loops.

  7. Biaxial crystal-based optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.;

    2010-01-01

    We suggest an optical tweezer setup based on an optically biaxial crystal. To control movements of opaque particles, we use shifts. The results of experimental studies are reported which are concerned with this laser tweezer setup. We demonstrate a movement of microparticles of toner using...... a singular-optical trap, rotation of particles due to orbital angular momentum of the field, and converging or diverging of two different traps when changing transmission plane of polariser at the input of our polarisation interferometer....

  8. Biaxial crystal-based optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.

    2010-01-01

    We suggest an optical tweezer setup based on an optically biaxial crystal. To control movements of opaque particles, we use shifts. The results of experimental studies are reported which are concerned with this laser tweezer setup. We demonstrate a movement of microparticles of toner using...... a singular-optical trap, rotation of particles due to orbital angular momentum of the field, and converging or diverging of two different traps when changing transmission plane of polariser at the input of our polarisation interferometer....

  9. Characterising Conical Refraction Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Craig; Rafailov, Edik; McGloin, David

    2014-01-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focussing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focussing on the trap stiffness and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot but benefit from rotational control.

  10. An Examination of the Acceptability of OET to the Potential Nurses From College of Nursing, Kuantan, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    J Jebunnesa; Abdullah B Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The growth of culturally and linguistically diverse population in Malaysia has led to many efforts to encourage or ensure that health care systems respond to the distinct needs of culturally and linguistically different patients by becoming “culturally competent”. So the implementation of OET will play an increasingly expedient role both in medication and in medical tourism. Occupational English Test is an English language proficiency test for health practitioners intending to check whether ...

  11. Steps towards silicon optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Starovoytov, A

    1999-01-01

    nanostructure fabrication. Thus, this thesis makes a dual contribution to the chosen field: it summarises the present knowledge on the possibility of utilising optical properties of nanocrystalline silicon in silicon-based electronics, and it reports new results within the framework of the subject. The main conclusion is that due to its promising optoelectronic properties nanocrystalline silicon remains a prospective competitor for the cheapest and fastest microelectronics of the next century. This thesis addresses the issue of a potential future microelectronics technology, namely the possibility of utilising the optical properties of nanocrystalline silicon for optoelectronic circuits. The subject is subdivided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is an introduction. It formulates the oncoming problem for microelectronic development, explains the basics of Integrated Optoelectronics, introduces porous silicon as a new light-emitting material and gives a brief review of other competing light-emitting material syst...

  12. Optoelectronic Mounting Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Gene R. (Albuquerque, NM); Armendariz, Marcelino G. (Albuquerque, NM); Baca, Johnny R. F. (Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Robert P. (Albuquerque, NM); Carson, Richard F. (Albuquerque, NM); Chu, Dahwey (Albuquerque, NM); Duckett, III, Edwin B. (Albuquerque, NM); McCormick, Frederick B. (Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, David W. (Sandia Park, NM); Peterson, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM); Reber, Cathleen A. (Corrales, NM); Reysen, Bill H. (Lafayette, CO)

    2004-10-05

    An optoelectronic mounting structure is provided that may be used in conjunction with an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module. The mounting structure may be a flexible printed circuit board. Thermal vias or heat pipes in the head region may transmit heat from the mounting structure to the heat spreader. The heat spreader may provide mechanical rigidity or stiffness to the heat region. In another embodiment, an electrical contact and ground plane may pass along a surface of the head region so as to provide an electrical contact path to the optoelectronic devices and limit electromagnetic interference. In yet another embodiment, a window may be formed in the head region of the mounting structure so as to provide access to the heat spreader. Optoelectronic devices may be adapted to the heat spreader in such a manner that the devices are accessible through the window in the mounting structure.

  13. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  14. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2008-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  15. Semiconductor opto-electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, TS; Ellis, B

    1972-01-01

    Semiconductor Opto-Electronics focuses on opto-electronics, covering the basic physical phenomena and device behavior that arise from the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and electrons in a solid. The first nine chapters of this book are devoted to theoretical topics, discussing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with solids, dispersion theory and absorption processes, magneto-optical effects, and non-linear phenomena. Theories of photo-effects and photo-detectors are treated in detail, including the theories of radiation generation and the behavior of semiconductor lasers a

  16. Optoelectronic packaging: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, R.F.

    1993-09-01

    Optoelectronics and photonics hold great potential for high data-rate communication and computing. Wide using in computing applications was limited first by device technologies and now suffers due to the need for high-precision, mass-produced packaging. The use of phontons as a medium of communication and control implies a unique set of packaging constraints that was not present in traditional telecommunications applications. The state-of-the-art in optoelectronic packaging is now driven by microelectric techniques that have potential for low cost and high volume manufacturing.

  17. Nanotube electronics and optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaedon Avouris

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the many materials that have been proposed to supplement and, in the long run, possibly succeed Si as a basis for nanoelectronics, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have attracted the most attention. CNTs are quasi-one-dimensional materials with unique properties ideally suited for electronics. We briefly discuss the electrical and optical properties of CNTs and how they can be employed in electronics and optoelectronics. We focus on single CNT transistors, their fabrication, assembly, doping, electrical characteristics, and integration. We also address the possible use of CNTs in optoelectronic devices such as electroluminescent light emitters and photodetectors.

  18. Micro magnetic tweezers for nanomanipulation inside live cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. de Vries; G.E. Krenn; R. van Driel; J.S. Kanger

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the design, realization, and characterization of a multi-pole magnetic tweezers that enables us to maneuver small magnetic probes inside living cells. So far, magnetic tweezers can be divided into two categories: I), tweezers that allow the exertion of high forces but consist of o

  19. Micro Magnetic Tweezers for Nanomanipulation Inside Live Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Anthony H.B.; Krenn, Bea E.; Driel, van Roel; Kanger, Johannes S.

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the design, realization, and characterization of a multi-pole magnetic tweezers that enables us to maneuver small magnetic probes inside living cells. So far, magnetic tweezers can be divided into two categories: I), tweezers that allow the exertion of high forces but consist of o

  20. Theory of optical-tweezers forces near a plane interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutra, Rafael de Sousa; Neto, P. A. Maia; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Optical-tweezers experiments in molecular and cell biology often take place near the surface of the microscope slide that defines the bottom of the sample chamber. There, as elsewhere, force measurements require forcecalibrated tweezers. In bulk, one can calculate the tweezers force from first...

  1. Designing single-beam multitrapping acoustical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Glauber T

    2014-01-01

    The concept of a single-beam acoustical tweezer device which can simultaneously trap microparticles at different points is proposed and demonstrated through computational simulations. The device employs an ultrasound beam produced by a circular focused transducer operating at 1 MHz in water medium. The ultrasound beam exerts a radiation force that may tweeze suspended microparticles in the medium. Simulations show that the acoustical tweezer can simultaneously trap microparticles in the pre-focal zone along the beam axis, i.e. between the transducer surface and its geometric focus. As acoustical tweezers are fast becoming a key instrument in microparticle handling, the development of acoustic multitrapping concept may turn into a useful tool in engineering these devices.

  2. Quantum limited particle sensing in optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Tay, Jian Wei; Bowen, Warwick P

    2009-01-01

    Particle sensing in optical tweezers systems provides information on the position, velocity and force of the specimen particles. The conventional quadrant detection scheme is applied ubiquitously in optical tweezers experiments to quantify these parameters. In this paper we show that quadrant detection is non-optimal for particle sensing in optical tweezers and propose an alternative optimal particle sensing scheme based on spatial homodyne detection. A formalism for particle sensing in terms of transverse spatial modes is developed and numerical simulations of the efficacy of both quadrant and spatial homodyne detection are shown. We demonstrate that an order of magnitude improvement in particle sensing sensitivity can be achieved using spatial homodyne over quadrant detection.

  3. Manipulation of inclusions with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škarabot, Miha

    In this chapter the basic techniques and underlaying concepts of trapping and manipulation of microparticles in liquid crystal (LC) systems are presented. The laser trapping in LCs is extremely efficient and it is based on different principles than laser trapping in isotropic solvents. In addition to conventional laser trapping, the laser light can reorient LC molecules and at high powers also heat the LC in isotropic phase. Due to these optical and thermal effects of laser tweezers on LC different trapping mechanisms are possible at different rate of laser power and all are presented qualitatively and quantitatively by measuring the trapping forces. Besides trapping and manipulation of single inclusions, laser tweezers are also used for assisted self-assembly of variety of periodic 2D and 3D colloidal structures, while most of them can not be assembled without help of laser tweezers. The concepts and different techniques of laser assisted assembly are presented.

  4. Photonics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    DARPA NNI/NNCO BRI (2D Materials & Devices Beyond Graphene – planning phase) LRIR PIs Szep – RY: PICS Quantum Information...vertically from plasmonic filters into Si CMOS image sensor diodes via PMMA dielectric and SiNx vertical light couplers - •Designed and implemented signal...model) gernot.pomrenke@afosr.af.mil Future: Metasurfaces/ Meta Photonics, Quantum Integrated Nanophotonics, Ultra Low Power, Graphene Optoelectronics

  5. Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaccorso, F.; Z. Sun; Hasan, T.; Ferrari, A. C.

    2010-01-01

    The richness of optical and electronic properties of graphene attracts enormous interest. Graphene has high mobility and optical transparency, in addition to flexibility, robustness and environmental stability. So far, the main focus has been on fundamental physics and electronic devices. However, we believe its true potential to be in photonics and optoelectronics, where the combination of its unique optical and electronic properties can be fully exploited, even in the absence of a bandgap, ...

  6. Rotation of microscopic propellers in laser tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galajda, Peter; Ormos, Pal [Institute of Biophysics, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, PO Box 521, H-6701 (Hungary)

    2002-04-01

    Particles of helical shape trapped in laser tweezers are rotated by light, independently of its polarization state. Light scattering by such propeller-like particles generates the momentum to drive the rotation. The efficiency of the rotation depends on the geometry of the particles. We used photopolymerization of light curing resins to create micrometre-size rotors with different shapes. The rotation of such particles was studied: the effect of shape and size on the rotation, as well as on the stability of the position in the laser tweezers.

  7. Origin and Future of Plasmonic Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jer-Shing; Yang, Ya-Tang

    2015-06-12

    Plasmonic optical tweezers can overcome the diffraction limits of conventional optical tweezers and enable the trapping of nanoscale objects. Extension of the trapping and manipulation of nanoscale objects with nanometer position precision opens up unprecedented opportunities for applications in the fields of biology, chemistry and statistical and atomic physics. Potential applications include direct molecular manipulation, lab-on-a-chip applications for viruses and vesicles and the study of nanoscale transport. This paper reviews the recent research progress and development bottlenecks and provides an overview of possible future directions in this field.

  8. Origin and Future of Plasmonic Optical Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jer-Shing Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic optical tweezers can overcome the diffraction limits of conventional optical tweezers and enable the trapping of nanoscale objects. Extension of the trapping and manipulation of nanoscale objects with nanometer position precision opens up unprecedented opportunities for applications in the fields of biology, chemistry and statistical and atomic physics. Potential applications include direct molecular manipulation, lab-on-a-chip applications for viruses and vesicles and the study of nanoscale transport. This paper reviews the recent research progress and development bottlenecks and provides an overview of possible future directions in this field.

  9. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Mølmer, Klaus;

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits...... quantum computing....

  10. An optical tweezer for complex plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schablinski, Jan; Wieben, Frank; Block, Dietmar [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstrasse 17-19, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    This paper describes the experimental realization of an optical trap for microparticles levitating in the plasma sheath. Single particles can be trapped in a laser beam comparable to optical tweezers known from colloidal suspensions. The trapping mechanism is discussed and two applications of the system are shown.

  11. Propylene Polymerization by TiCl4 Supported onMg(OEt)2 Activating with Ethanol/CO2 System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the preparation of catalyst for propylene polymerization, the Mg(OEt)2 supportwas activated with ethanol/CO2 system followed by solidification, and treated with TiCl4 inthe presence of ethylbenzoate as an internal donor(ID). The chemical compositions of the ac-tivated support and the prepared catalyst were examined in detail. During the dissolution ofMg(OEt)2 support in ethanol medium with CO2 bubbling, the structure of support changedto magnesium hydrocarbyl carbonate, (CH3CH2O)2-xMg (O (C=O) OCH2CH3)x(x=1,2).The content of carbonated CO2 in the activated support was dependent on the heat treatmentin the solidification of support. In the preparation procedure of polymerization catalyst, theactivated support was treated with TiCl4 so that the structure of support was converted toMgCl2 with the incorporation of ID. The polymerization behavior of the pre-pared catalystwas also studied in the presence of phenyltriethoxysilane as an external donor.

  12. Evaluación del Sistema de Bibliotecas de la Organización para Estudios Tropicales (OET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Aguilar Zumbado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se muestran los principales resultados del Trabajo Final de Graduación titulado "Diagnóstico del Sistema de Bibliotecas de la Organización para Estudios Tropicales (OET, periodo 2013: Propuesta para el mejoramiento de sus servicios y productos de información", el cual formó parte esencial del proyecto de investigación " Propuesta de diseño de servicios y productos virtuales especializados en el campo de la biodiversidad ", inscrito en la Escuela de Bibliotecología y Ciencias de la Información de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Esta investigación es de tipo cuantitativo y se define como descriptiva. Se realizó un diagnóstico para conocer el perfil de las personas usuarias del sistema de bibliotecas de la OET, así como sus necesidades de información, por medio de seis cuestionarios dirigidos a diferentes poblaciones usuarias del sistema. El periodo de estudio fue de marzo a julio del 2013. Entre los principales resultados se aprecia que el Sistema de Bibliotecas es de gran importancia para la comunidad científica al que está dirigido; sin embargo, sus servicios y productos requieren de una mayor proyección en el área para poder aprovechar la riqueza documental que alberga en sus cuatro bibliotecas.

  13. Resource Letter: LBOT-1: Laser-based optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Matthew J.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on optical tweezers, also known as laser-based, gradient-force optical traps. Journal articles and books are cited for the following main topics: general papers on optical tweezers, trapping instrument design, optical detection methods, optical trapping theory, mechanical measurements, single molecule studies, and sections on biological motors, cellular measurements and additional applications of optical tweezers. PMID:16971965

  14. Resource Letter: LBOT-1: Laser-based optical tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Matthew J.; Block, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on optical tweezers, also known as laser-based, gradient-force optical traps. Journal articles and books are cited for the following main topics: general papers on optical tweezers, trapping instrument design, optical detection methods, optical trapping theory, mechanical measurements, single molecule studies, and sections on biological motors, cellular measurements and additional applications of optical tweezers.

  15. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, Charles R. P., E-mail: c.r.p.courtney@bath.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath (United Kingdom); Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Cochran, Sandy [Institute of Medical Science and Technology, University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-14

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-μm-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers.

  16. Materials for optoelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiang, Joseph John; Smigelski, Jr., Paul Michael

    2015-01-27

    Energy efficient optoelectronic devices include an electroluminescent layer containing a polymer made up of structural units of formula I and II; ##STR00001## wherein R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently C.sub.22-44 hydrocarbyl, C.sub.22-44 hydrocarbyl containing one or more S, N, O, P, or Si atoms, oxaalkylaryl, or a combination thereof; R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 are independently H, C.sub.1-44 hydrocarbyl or C.sub.1-44 hydrocarbyl containing one or more S, N, O, P, or Si atoms, or R.sup.3 and R.sup.4, taken together, form a C.sub.2-10 monocyclic or bicyclic ring containing up to three S, N, O, P, or Si heteroatoms; and X is S, Se, or a combination thereof.

  17. Integrated terahertz optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guozhen; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-11-01

    Currently, terahertz (THz) optical systems are based on bulky free-space optics. This is due to the lack of a common platform onto which different THz components, e.g., source, waveguide, modulator and detector, can be monolithically integrated. With the development of THz quantum cascade laser (QCL), it has been realized that the QCL chip may be such a platform for integrated THz photonics. Here, we report our recent works where the THz QCL is integrated with passive or optoelectronic components. They are: 1) integrated graphene modulator with THz QCL achieving 100% modulation depth and fast speed; 2) phase-locked THz QCL with integrated plasmonic waveguide and subwavelength antennas realizing dynamically widely tunable polarizations.

  18. Probing the Casimir force with optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Ether, D S; Umrath, S; Martinez, D; Ayala, Y; Pontes, B; Araújo, G R de S; Frases, S; Ingold, G -L; Rosa, F S S; Viana, N B; Nussenzveig, H M; Neto, P A Maia

    2015-01-01

    We propose to use optical tweezers to probe the Casimir interaction between microspheres inside a liquid medium for geometric aspect ratios far beyond the validity of the widely employed proximity force approximation. This setup has the potential for revealing unprecedented features associated to the non-trivial role of the spherical curvatures. For a proof of concept, we measure femtonewton double layer forces between polystyrene microspheres at distances above $400$ nm by employing very soft optical tweezers, with stiffness of the order of fractions of a fN/nm. As a future application, we propose to tune the Casimir interaction between a metallic and a polystyrene microsphere in saline solution from attraction to repulsion by varying the salt concentration. With those materials, the screened Casimir interaction may have a larger magnitude than the unscreened one. This line of investigation has the potential for bringing together different fields including classical and quantum optics, statistical physics an...

  19. Exploring unconventional capabilities of holographic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, R. J.; Pagliusi, P.; Provenzano, C.; Cipparrone, G.

    2011-06-01

    We report an investigation of manipulation and trapping capabilities of polarization holographic tweezers. A polarization gradient connected with a modulation of the ellipticity shows an optical force related to the polarization of the light that can influence optically isotropic particles. While in the case of birefringent particles an unconventional trapping in circularly polarized fringes is observed. A liquid crystal emulsion has been adopted to investigate the capabilities of the holographic tweezers. The unusual trapping observed for rotating bipolar nematic droplets has suggested the involvement of the lift hydrodynamic force responsible of the Magnus effect, originating from the peculiar optical force field. We show that the Magnus force which is ignored in the common approach can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  20. Universal Axial Fluctuations in Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, Marco; Ritort, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Optical tweezers allow the measurement of fluctuations at the nano-scale, in particular fluctuations in the end-to-end distance in single molecules. Fluctuation spectra can yield valuable information, but they can easily be contaminated by instrumental effects. We identify axial fluctuations, i.e. fluctuations of the trapped beads in the direction of light propagation, as one of these instrumental effects. Remarkably, axial fluctuations occur on a characteristic timescale similar to that of conformational (folding) transitions, which may lead to misinterpretation of the experimental results. We show that a precise measurement of the effect of force on both axial and conformational fluctuations is crucial to disentangle them. Our results on axial fluctuations are captured by a simple and general formula valid for all optical tweezers setups and provide experimentalists with a general strategy to distinguish axial fluctuations from conformational transitions.

  1. Power spectrum analysis for optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, K.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    2004-01-01

    the Lorentzian provides. This is achieved using old and new theory for Brownian motion in an incompressible fluid, and new results for a popular photodetection system. The trap and photodetection system are then calibrated simultaneously in a manner that makes optical tweezers a tool of precision for force......The force exerted by an optical trap on a dielectric bead in a fluid is often found by fitting a Lorentzian to the power spectrum of Brownian motion of the bead in the trap. We present explicit functions of the experimental power spectrum that give the values of the parameters fitted, including...... obtain perfect fits and calibrate tweezers with less than 1% error when the trapping force is not too strong. Relatively strong traps have power spectra that cannot be fitted properly with any Lorentzian, we find. This underscores the need for better understanding of the power spectrum than...

  2. Fractal zone plate beam based optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shubo; Zhang, Xinyu; Ma, Wenzhuo; Tao, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate optical manipulation with an optical beam generated by a fractral zone plate (FZP). The experimental results show that the FZP beam can simultaneously trap multiple particles positioned in different focal planes of the FZP beam, owing to the multiple foci and self-reconstruction property of the FZP beam. The FZP beam can also be used to construct three-dimensional optical tweezers for potential applications. PMID:27678305

  3. New approaches in the design of magnetic tweezers-current magnetic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessalova, Valentina; Perov, Nikolai; Rodionova, Valeria

    2016-10-01

    The main advantages of the magnetic tweezers are the low price and simplicity of use. However the range of their application is reduced due to shortcomings like, for example, the remanent induction of the core and interaction between ferromagnetic cores. We present the new design of magnetic tweezers-Current Magnetic Tweezers (CMT) that allow particle manipulation by means of the magnetic field generated by the electric currents flowing through the non-magnetic wires. Arranging wires in different geometric shapes allows the particle movement either in two or three dimensions. Forces acting on the magnetic particles with the magnetic moment of 2·10-11 A m2 at distances up to 1 mm had been experimentally measured. It is established that a current of about 1 A at a 1 mm distance generates force of (approximately) 3 pN which is consistent with theoretical estimates.

  4. Custom-Made Microspheres for Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannasch, Anita; Abdosamadi, Mohammad K; Ramaiya, Avin; De, Suman; Ferro, Valentina; Sonnberger, Aaron; Schäffer, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Due to their high position and force sensitivity and the ability to remotely apply forces and torques, optical tweezers are widely used in diverse fields, such as biology, material science, and physics. Often, small dielectric particles are trapped and used as probes, which for experimental convenience are mostly spherical and composed of silica or polystyrene. The optical properties of these materials together with the microsphere size determine the trapping efficiency, and the position and force resolution. However, using only a single, homogeneous, isotropic, and unstructured material limits the range of trapping properties and thereby the applications of optical tweezers. Here, we show how custom-made microspheres composed of coated high-refractive-index materials-titania and nanodiamonds-and birefringent, liquid crystals extend the range and combination of desired trapping properties. These custom-made microspheres either enable the generation of high forces, a high force or time resolution, or the applications of torques. Custom-made probes expand the range of possible experiments and approaches broadening the scope and applicability of optical tweezers.

  5. Setting up of holographic optical tweezer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepak K.; Tata, B. V. R.; Ravindran, T. R.

    2017-05-01

    Optical tweezers use tightly focused laser beams to hold and move microscopic objects in a solvent. However, many applications require simultaneous control over multitude of particles, positioning them in 3D space at desired locations with desired symmetry, which is made possible by the use of holographic optical tweezers using the technique of beam shaping and holography. We have designed and developed a holographic optical tweezer set-up using a phase only liquid crystal, reflective spatial light modulator. We employ the technique of phase modulation to modulate the phase of the beam by generating holograms using Random Superposition (RS) and weighted Gerchberg Saxton algorithm (WGS) algorithm for generating desired patterns of light at the trapping plane. A 4×4 array of beams with square symmetry was generated using WGS algorithm and trapped polystyrene particles of size 1.2 micron in a 4×4 two dimensional array. There were uniformity issues among the trap intensities, as we move away from the zeroth order spot. This was corrected by taking into account diffraction effects due to the pixelated nature of SLM modulating the intensity of the trap spots and the ghost order suppression by spatial disorder.

  6. Deformable paper origami optoelectronic devices

    KAUST Repository

    He, Jr-Hau

    2017-01-19

    Deformable optoelectronic devices are provided, including photodetectors, photodiodes, and photovoltaic cells. The devices can be made on a variety of paper substrates, and can include a plurality of fold segments in the paper substrate creating a deformable pattern. Thin electrode layers and semiconductor nanowire layers can be attached to the substrate, creating the optoelectronic device. The devices can be highly deformable, e.g. capable of undergoing strains of 500% or more, bending angles of 25° or more, and/or twist angles of 270° or more. Methods of making the deformable optoelectronic devices and methods of using, e.g. as a photodetector, are also provided.

  7. Tweezer dexterity aptitude of dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundergan, William P; Soderstrom, Elizabeth J; Chambers, David W

    2007-08-01

    The rationale for using the Perceptual Ability Test (PAT) as a component in admissions decisions for dental schools is that candidates vary in an underlying aptitude that is predictive of degree of success in technique course performance and perhaps in clinical performance. There have been periodic attempts to identify tests that more directly measure manual dexterity aptitude that would supplement the predictive power of admissions decisions. Previous research has demonstrated that a commercially available "speeded" tweezer dexterity test (Johnson O'Connor Test #32022) is not associated with performance in dental school or dental practice. Our research investigated both Test #32022 and Test #18 that measure both speed and accuracy as potential predictors of dental school performance in technical and clinical courses. This article reports the results of a longitudinal, comparative study of tweezer dexterity scores for students at the University of the Pacific School of Dentistry during their first and last quarters in school. The goals of the study were to 1) evaluate the correlation between beginning students' scores on two different types of tweezer dexterity tests; 2) compare dental students' scores to normative data for the general population; 3) determine the effect of a dental curriculum on students' performance on Test #18; and 4) evaluate the two tests as potential dental school admission screening instruments in comparison to the PAT. Fifty first-quarter students were tested from a class of 134. Forty-nine of these students were retested on Test #18 during their final quarter. The predictor value of the initial scores for the two dexterity tests was assessed for seven outcome measures reflecting student technique performance. Analysis showed a significant correlation (r=0.318, ptests. The difference between the norm mean (41.58) and the dental student mean for Test #18 (40.42) was not significant (p>0.05). The correlation between the first and final

  8. Displacement and Force Measurements with Quadrant Photodetector in Optical Tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭红莲; 刘春香; 李兆霖; 段建发; 韩学海; 程丙英; 张道中

    2003-01-01

    A technique of displacement and force measurements with a photodiode quadrant detector in an optical tweezers system is presented. The stiffness of optical trap is calibrated and the leukemia cell membrane tension is measured.The results show that the optical tweezers combined with the quadrant detector is a very useful tool for detecting the displacement and force with a millisecond-order response.

  9. Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-14

    structures that consist of a sheet of graphene and a plasma substrate such as a metal, a doped semiconductor, or another graphene layer. Using these...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0032 Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics Kuang-Hsiung Wu National Chiao Tung University Final Report 04/14/2017...DATES COVERED (From - To) 18 Apr 2013 to 17 Apr 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  10. Reconfigurable Integrated Optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Soref

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated optics today is based upon chips of Si and InP. The future of this chip industry is probably contained in the thrust towards optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs and photonic integrated circuits (PICs manufactured in a high-volume foundry. We believe that reconfigurable OEICs and PICs, known as ROEICs and RPICs, constitute the ultimate embodiment of integrated photonics. This paper shows that any ROEIC-on-a-chip can be decomposed into photonic modules, some of them fixed and some of them changeable in function. Reconfiguration is provided by electrical control signals to the electro-optical building blocks. We illustrate these modules in detail and discuss 3D ROEIC chips for the highest-performance signal processing. We present examples of our module theory for RPIC optical lattice filters already constructed, and we propose new ROEICs for directed optical logic, large-scale matrix switching, and 2D beamsteering of a phased-array microwave antenna. In general, large-scale-integrated ROEICs will enable significant applications in computing, quantum computing, communications, learning, imaging, telepresence, sensing, RF/microwave photonics, information storage, cryptography, and data mining.

  11. Optical Tweezers Array and Nimble Tweezers Probe Generated by Spatial- Light Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Jassemnejad, Baha; Seibel, Robin E.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    An optical tweezers is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center as a visiblelight interface between ubiquitous laser technologies and the interrogation, visualization, manufacture, control, and energization of nanostructures such as silicon carbide (SiC) nanotubes. The tweezers uses one or more focused laser beams to hold micrometer-sized particles called tools (sometimes called tips in atomic-force-microscope terminology). A strongly focused laser beam has an associated light-pressure gradient that is strong enough to pull small particles to the focus, in spite of the oppositely directed scattering force; "optical tweezers" is the common term for this effect. The objective is to use the tools to create carefully shaped secondary traps to hold and assemble nanostructures that may contain from tens to hundreds of atoms. The interaction between a tool and the nanostructures is to be monitored optically as is done with scanning probe microscopes. One of the initial efforts has been to create, shape, and control multiple tweezers beams. To this end, a programmable spatial-light modulator (SLM) has been used to modify the phase of a laser beam at up to 480 by 480 points. One program creates multiple, independently controllable tweezer beams whose shapes can be tailored by making the SLM an adaptive mirror in an interferometer (ref. 1). The beams leave the SLM at different angles, and an optical Fourier transform maps these beams to different positions in the focal plane of a microscope objective. The following figure shows two arrays of multiple beams created in this manner. The patterns displayed above the beam array control the intensity-to-phase transformation required in programming the SLM. Three of the seven beams displayed can be used as independently controllable beams.

  12. Micromechanics of Dipolar Chains Using Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Eric M.; Gast, Alice P.

    1999-01-01

    Here we present our initial study of the micromechanical properties of dipolar chains and columns in a magnetorheological (MR) suspension. Using dual-trap optical tweezers, we are able to directly measure the deformation of the dipolar chains parallel and perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. We observe the field dependence of the mechanical properties such as resistance to deformation, chain reorganization, and rupturing of the chains. These forms of energy dissipation are important for understanding and tuning the yield stress and rheological behavior of an MR suspension.

  13. Ge-on-Si optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jifeng, E-mail: Jifeng.Liu@Dartmouth.edu [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Camacho-Aguilera, Rodolfo; Bessette, Jonathan T.; Sun, Xiaochen [Microphotonics Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wang Xiaoxin [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Cai Yan; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Michel, Jurgen [Microphotonics Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Electronic-photonic synergy has become an increasingly clear solution to enhance the bandwidth and improve the energy efficiency of information systems. Monolithic integration of optoelectronic devices is the ideal solution for large-scale electronic-photonic synergy. Due to its pseudo-direct gap behavior in optoelectronic properties and compatibility with Si electronics, epitaxial Ge-on-Si has become an attractive solution for monolithic optoelectronics. In this paper we will review recent progress in Ge-on-Si optoelectronics, including photodetectors, electroabsorption modulators, and lasers. The performance of these devices has been enhanced by band-engineering such as tensile strain and n-type doping, which transforms Ge towards a direct gap material. Selective growth reduces defect density and facilitates monolithic integration at the same time. Ge-on-Si photodetectors have approached or exceeded the performance of their III-V counterparts, with bandwidth-efficiency product > 30 GHz for p-i-n photodiodes and bandwidth-gain product > 340 GHz for avalanche photodiodes. Enhanced Franz-Keldysh effect in tensile-strained Ge offers ultralow energy photonic modulation with < 30 fJ/bit energy consumption and > 100 GHz intrinsic bandwidth. Room temperature optically-pumped lasing as well as electroluminescence has also been achieved from the direct gap transition of band-engineered Ge-on-Si waveguides. These results indicate that band-engineered Ge-on-Si is promising to achieve monolithic active optoelectronic devices on a Si platform.

  14. An introduction to optoelectronic sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Tajani, Antonella; Cutolo, Antonello

    2009-01-01

    This invaluable book offers a comprehensive overview of the technologies and applications of optoelectronic sensors. Based on the R&D experience of more than 70 engineers and scientists, highly representative of the Italian academic and industrial community in this area, this book provides a broad and accurate description of the state-of-the-art optoelectronic technologies for sensing. The most innovative approaches, such as the use of photonic crystals, squeezed states of light and microresonators for sensing, are considered. Application areas range from environment to medicine and healthcare

  15. Heterometallic Ti(IV)-Ru(II) and Ti(IV)-Re(I) sulfato complexes containing the Kläui tripodal ligand [(eta5-C5H5)Co{P(O)(OEt)2}3]-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiao-Yi; Sung, Herman H Y; Zhang, Qian-Feng; Williams, Ian D; Leung, Wa-Hung

    2010-06-28

    Treatment of [(L(OEt))(2)Ti(2)(mu-O)(2)(mu-SO(4))] (L(OEt)(-) = [(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))Co{P(O)(OEt)(2)}(3)](-)) with [Ru(H)(Cl)(CO)(PPh(3))(3)] and Ag(OTf) (OTf(-) = triflate) in the presence of Na(2)CO(3) gave the Ti(IV)-Ru(II) complex [(L(OEt))(2)Ti(2)(mu-O)(3)(mu(3)-SO(4))Ru(CO)(PPh(3))(2)] (2) whereas that with [Re(CO)(5)(OTf)] afforded the Ti(IV)-Re(I) complex [H(L(OEt))(2)Ti(2)(mu-O)(3)(mu-SO(4))Re(CO)(3)(H(2)O)] (3). The crystal structures of complexes 2.HOTf and [3.2/3(Et(3)NHOTf).5/12(H(2)O)](3) have been determined. Complex 2 consists of an adamantane-like Ti(2)RuSO(6) core, in which the {Ru(II)(PPh(3))(2)(CO)} moiety is facially coordinated to a tridentate-O,O',O''(sulfate) [(L(OEt))(2)Ti(2)(mu-O)(3)(mu(3)-SO(4))](2-) metalloligand. The anion [(L(OEt))(2)Ti(2)(mu-O)(3)(mu-SO(4))Re(CO)(3)(H(2)O)](-) in 3 can be viewed as consisting of a fac-{Re(I)(CO)(3)} fragment coordinated with one aqua ligand and a bidentate-O,O'-[(L(OEt))(2)Ti(2)(mu-O)(3)(mu-SO(4))](2-) metalloligand.

  16. Computational toolbox for optical tweezers in geometrical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Callegari, Agnese; Gököz, A Burak; Volpe, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers have found widespread application in many fields, from physics to biology. Here, we explain in detail how optical forces and torques can be described within the geometrical optics approximation and we show that this approximation provides reliable results in agreement with experiments for particles whose characteristic dimensions are larger than the wavelength of the trapping light. Furthermore, we provide an object-oriented software package implemented in MatLab for the calculation of optical forces and torques in the geometrical optics regime: \\texttt{OTGO - Optical Tweezers in Geometrical Optics}. We provide all source codes for \\texttt{OTGO} as well as the documentation and code examples -- e.g., standard optical tweezers, optical tweezers with elongated particle, windmill effect, Kramers transitions between two optical traps -- necessary to enable users to effectively employ it in their research and teaching.

  17. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Kotsifaki, Domna G; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dep...

  18. Pulse laser assisted optical tweezers for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Tadao; Maeda, Saki; Honda, Ayae

    2012-01-01

    Optical tweezers which enables to trap micron to nanometer sized objects by radiation pressure force is utilized for manipulation of particles under a microscope and for measurement of forces between biomolecules. Weak force of optical tweezers causes some limitations such as particle adhesion or steric barrier like lipid membrane in a cell prevent further movement of objects. For biomedical applications we need to overcome these difficulties. We have developed a technique to exert strong instantaneous force by use of a pulse laser beam and to assist conventional optical tweezers. A pulse laser beam has huge instantaneous laser power of more than 1000 times as strong as a conventional continuous-wave laser beam so that the instantaneous force is strong enough to break chemical bonding and molecular force between objects and obstacles. We derive suitable pulse duration for pulse assist of optical tweezers and demonstrate particle manipulation in difficult situations through an experiment of particle removal from sticky surface of glass substrate.

  19. Manipulation on human red blood cells with femtosecond optical tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zhou; Haifeng Yang; Jianke Di; Enlan Zhao

    2008-01-01

    Different types of femtosecond optical tweezers have become a powerful tool in the modern biological field. However, how to control the irregular targets, including biological cells, using femtosecond optical tweezers remains to be explored. In this study, human red blood cells (hRBCs) are manipulated with femtosecond optical tweezers, and their states under different laser powers are investigated. The results indicate that optical potential traps only can capture the edge of hRBCs under the laser power from 1.4 to 2.8 mW, while it can make hRBCs turn over with the laser power more than 2.8 roW. It is suggested that femtosecond optical tweezers could not only manipulate biological cells, but also subtly control its states by adjusting the laser power.

  20. Simple Optoelectronic Feedback in Microwave Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of stabilizing microwave and millimeter-wave oscillators calls for the use of feedback in optoelectronic delay lines characterized by high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). The method would extend the applicability of optoelectronic feedback beyond the previously reported class of optoelectronic oscillators that comprise two-port electronic amplifiers in closed loops with high-Q feedback circuits.

  1. An optoelectronic fuel level sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashkina, T. I.; Badeeva, E. A.; Badeev, A. V.; Savochkina, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    The block and schematic construction diagrams of a new optoelectronic fuel level sensor are considered. The operating principle of the sensor is based on registering the intensity value of the optical path reflected from the mirror, located on the reservoir bottom.

  2. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Charles R. P.; Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Cochran, Sandy; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chambe...

  3. Miniaturized Optical Tweezers Through Fiber-End Microfabrication

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo

    2014-07-30

    Optical tweezers represent a powerful tool for a variety of applications both in biology and in physics, and their miniaturization and full integration is of great interest so as to reduce size (towards portable systems), and to minimize the required intervention from the operator. Optical fibers represent a natural solution to achieve this goal, and here we review the realization of single-fiber optical tweezers able to create a purely optical three-dimensional trap. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.

  4. Optical manipulation of lipid and polymer nanotubes with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Joseph E.; Kishore, Rani; Pfefferkorn, Candace; Wells, Jeffrey; Helmerson, Kristian; Howell, Peter; Vreeland, Wyatt; Forry, Samuel; Locascio, Laurie; Reyes-Hernandez, Darwin; Gaitan, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Using optical tweezers and microfluidics, we stretch either the lipid or polymer membranes of liposomes or polymersomes, respectively, into long nanotubes. The membranes can be grabbed directly with the optical tweezers to produce sub-micron diameter tubes that are several hundred microns in length. We can stretch tubes up to a centimeter in length, limited only by the travel of our microscope stage. We also demonstrate the cross linking of a pulled polymer nanotube.

  5. Optical tweezers for studying taxis in parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Fontes, A.; Stahl, C. V.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Ayres, D. C.; Almeida, D. B.; Farias, P. M. A.; Santos, B. S.; Santos-Mallet, J.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Giorgio, S.; Feder, D.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-04-01

    In this work we present a methodology to measure force strengths and directions of living parasites with an optical tweezers setup. These measurements were used to study the parasites chemotaxis in real time. We observed behavior and measured the force of: (i) Leishmania amazonensis in the presence of two glucose gradients; (ii) Trypanosoma cruzi in the vicinity of the digestive system walls, and (iii) Trypanosoma rangeli in the vicinity of salivary glands as a function of distance. Our results clearly show a chemotactic behavior in every case. This methodology can be used to study any type of taxis, such as chemotaxis, osmotaxis, thermotaxis, phototaxis, of any kind of living microorganisms. These studies can help us to understand the microorganism sensory systems and their response function to these gradients.

  6. Local electric field measurements by optical tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pesce

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a new technique to measure direction and amplitude of electric fields generated by microelectrodes embedded in polar liquid environment, as often used in microfluidic devices. The method is based on optical tweezers which act as sensitive force transducer while a trapped charged microsphere behaves as a probe. When an electric field is applied the particles moves from its equilibrium position and finishes in a new equilibrium position where electric and optical forces are balanced. A trapped bead is moved to explore the electric field in a wide region around the microelectrodes. In such way maps of electric fields with high spatial resolution can be reconstructed even for complex electrode geometries where numerical simulation approaches can fail. Experimental results are compared with calculations based on finite element analysis simulation.

  7. Single Bessel tractor-beam tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Mitri, F G

    2014-01-01

    The tractor behavior of a zero-order Bessel acoustic beam acting on a fluid sphere, and emanating from a finite circular aperture (as opposed to waves of infinite extent) is demonstrated theoretically. Conditions for an attractive force acting in opposite direction of the radiating waves, determined by the choice of the beam's half-cone angle, the size of the radiator, and its distance from a fluid sphere, are established and discussed. Numerical predictions for the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit energy density and cross-sectional surface, are provided using a partial-wave expansion method stemming from the acoustic scattering. The results suggest a simple and reliable analysis for the design of Bessel beam acoustical tweezers and tractor beam devices.

  8. Power spectrum analysis for optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, K.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted by an optical trap on a dielectric bead in a fluid is often found by fitting a Lorentzian to the power spectrum of Brownian motion of the bead in the trap. We present explicit functions of the experimental power spectrum that give the values of the parameters fitted, including...... error bars and correlations, for the best such chi(2) fit in a given frequency range. We use these functions to determine the information content of various parts of the power spectrum, and find, at odds with lore, much information at relatively high frequencies. Applying the method to real data, we...... the Lorentzian provides. This is achieved using old and new theory for Brownian motion in an incompressible fluid, and new results for a popular photodetection system. The trap and photodetection system are then calibrated simultaneously in a manner that makes optical tweezers a tool of precision for force...

  9. Optical tweezer manipulation for atom tetris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Lee, Woojun; Ahn, Jaewook

    2017-04-01

    Atoms can be individually captured and guided by light through optical dipole-trapping. However, applying this to many atoms simultaneously has been difficult due to the low inertia of atoms. Recently dynamically-controlled laser beams achieved such demonstrations, enabling a bottom-up approach to form arbitrary atom lattices, deterministic atom loading, atom-sorting, and even single-atom-level machinery. Here we report the latest improvements of the single-atom-level dynamic holographic optical tweezers. With the hardware and software upgrades to be explained in the text, the overall performance has improved to form arbitrary 2D lattices of a size about N=20, with success probability exceeding 50%.

  10. Introduction to Optical Tweezers: Background, System Designs, and Commercial Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mameren, Joost; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heller, Iddo

    2018-01-01

    Optical tweezers are a means to manipulate objects with light. With the technique, microscopically small objects can be held and steered, while forces on the trapped objects can be accurately measured and exerted. Optical tweezers can typically obtain a nanometer spatial resolution, a picoNewton force resolution, and a millisecond time resolution, which makes them excellently suited to study biological processes from the single-cell down to the single-molecule level. In this chapter, we will provide an introduction on the use of optical tweezers in single-molecule approaches. We will introduce the basic principles and methodology involved in optical trapping, force calibration, and force measurements. Next we describe the components of an optical tweezers setup and their experimental relevance in single-molecule approaches. Finally, we provide a concise overview of commercial optical tweezers systems. Commercial systems are becoming increasingly available and provide access to single-molecule optical tweezers experiments without the need for a thorough background in physics.

  11. Eukaryotic membrane tethers revisited using magnetic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosu, Basarab G.; Sun, Mingzhai; Marga, Françoise; Grandbois, Michel; Forgacs, Gabor

    2007-06-01

    Membrane nanotubes, under physiological conditions, typically form en masse. We employed magnetic tweezers (MTW) to extract tethers from human brain tumor cells and compared their biophysical properties with tethers extracted after disruption of the cytoskeleton and from a strongly differing cell type, Chinese hamster ovary cells. In this method, the constant force produced with the MTW is transduced to cells through super-paramagnetic beads attached to the cell membrane. Multiple sudden jumps in bead velocity were manifest in the recorded bead displacement-time profiles. These discrete events were interpreted as successive ruptures of individual tethers. Observation with scanning electron microscopy supported the simultaneous existence of multiple tethers. The physical characteristics, in particular, the number and viscoelastic properties of the extracted tethers were determined from the analytic fit to bead trajectories, provided by a standard model of viscoelasticity. Comparison of tethers formed with MTW and atomic force microscopy (AFM), a technique where the cantilever-force transducer is moved at constant velocity, revealed significant differences in the two methods of tether formation. Our findings imply that extreme care must be used to interpret the outcome of tether pulling experiments performed with single molecular techniques (MTW, AFM, optical tweezers, etc). First, the different methods may be testing distinct membrane structures with distinct properties. Second, as soon as a true cell membrane (as opposed to that of a vesicle) can attach to a substrate, upon pulling on it, multiple nonspecific membrane tethers may be generated. Therefore, under physiological conditions, distinguishing between tethers formed through specific and nonspecific interactions is highly nontrivial if at all possible.

  12. Telemedicine optoelectronic biomedical data processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosolovska, Vita V.

    2010-08-01

    The telemedicine optoelectronic biomedical data processing system is created to share medical information for the control of health rights and timely and rapid response to crisis. The system includes the main blocks: bioprocessor, analog-digital converter biomedical images, optoelectronic module for image processing, optoelectronic module for parallel recording and storage of biomedical imaging and matrix screen display of biomedical images. Rated temporal characteristics of the blocks defined by a particular triggering optoelectronic couple in analog-digital converters and time imaging for matrix screen. The element base for hardware implementation of the developed matrix screen is integrated optoelectronic couples produced by selective epitaxy.

  13. Mid-infrared Semiconductor Optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Krier, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    The practical realisation of optoelectronic devices operating in the 2–10 µm (mid-infrared) wavelength range offers potential applications in a variety of areas from environmental gas monitoring around oil rigs and landfill sites to the detection of pharmaceuticals, particularly narcotics. In addition, an atmospheric transmission window exists between 3 µm and 5 µm that enables free-space optical communications, thermal imaging applications and the development of infrared measures for "homeland security". Consequently, the mid-infrared is very attractive for the development of sensitive optical sensor instrumentation. Unfortunately, the nature of the likely applications dictates stringent requirements in terms of laser operation, miniaturisation and cost that are difficult to meet. Many of the necessary improvements are linked to a better ability to fabricate and to understand the optoelectronic properties of suitable high-quality epitaxial materials and device structures. Substantial progress in these m...

  14. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  15. Optoelectronic Oscillators for Communication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeira, Bruno; Figueiredo, José

    We introduce and report recent developments on a novel five port optoelectronic voltage controlled oscillator consisting of a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) optical-waveguide integrated with a laser diode. The RTD-based optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) has both optical and electrical input and output ports, with the fifth port allowing voltage control. The RTD-OEO locks to reference radio-frequency (RF) sources by either optical or electrical injection locking techniques allowing remote synchronization, eliminating the need of impedance matching between traditional RF oscillators. RTD-OEO functions include generation, amplification and distribution of RF carriers, clock recovery, carrier recovery, modulation and demodulation and frequency synthesis. Self-injection locking operation modes, where small portions of the output electrical/optical signals are fed back into the electrical/optical input ports, are also proposed. The self-phase locked loop configuration can give rise to low-noise high-stable oscillations, not limited by the RF source performance and with no need of external optoelectronic conversion.

  16. Nanofabrication of Hybrid Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibos, Alan Michael

    The material requirements for optoelectronic devices can vary dramatically depending on the application. Often disparate material systems need to be combined to allow for full device functionality. At the nanometer scale, this can often be challenging because of the inherent chemical and structural incompatibilities of nanofabrication. This dissertation concerns the integration of seemingly dissimilar materials into hybrid optoelectronic devices for photovoltaic, plasmonic, and photonic applications. First, we show that combining a single strip of conjugated polymer and inorganic nanowire can yield a nanoscale solar cell, and modeling of optical absorption and exciton diffusion in this device can provide insight into the efficiency of charge separation. Second, we use an on-chip nanowire light emitting diode to pump a colloidal quantum dot coupled to a silver waveguide. The resulting device is an electro-optic single plasmon source. Finally, we transfer diamond waveguides onto near-field avalanche photodiodes fabricated from GaAs. Embedded in the diamond waveguides are nitrogen vacancy color centers, and the mapping of emission from these single-photon sources is demonstrated using our on-chip detectors, eliminating the need for external photodetectors on an optical table. These studies show the promise of hybrid optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale with applications in alternative energy, optical communication, and quantum optics.

  17. Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De

    Raman scattering is an inelastic collision between the vibrating molecules inside the sample and the incident photons. During this process, energy exchange takes place between the photon and the scattering molecule. By measuring the energy change of the photon, the molecular vibration mode can be probed. The vibrational spectrum contains valuable information about the disposition of atomic nuclei and chemical bonds within a molecule, the chemical compositions and the interactions between the molecule and its surroundings. In this dissertation, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) technique is applied for the analysis of biological cells and human cells at single cell level. In LTRS, an individual cell is trapped in aqueous medium with laser tweezers, and Raman scattering spectra from the trapped cell are recorded in real-time. The Raman spectra of these cells can be used to reveal the dynamical processes of cell growth, cell response to environment changes, and can be used as the finger print for the identification of a bacterial cell species. Several biophysical experiments were carried out using LTRS: (1) the dynamic germination process of individual spores of Bacillus thuringiensis was detected via Ca-DPA, a spore-specific biomarker molecule; (2) inactivation and killing of Bacillus subtilis spores by microwave irradiation and wet heat were studied at single cell level; (3) the heat shock activation process of single B. subtilis spores were analyzed, in which the reversible transition from glass-like state at low temperature to liquid-like state at high temperature in spore was revealed at the molecular level; (4) the kinetic processes of bacterial cell lysis of E. coli by lysozyme and by temperature induction of lambda phage were detected real-time; (5) the fixation and rehydration of human platelets were quantitatively evaluated and characterized with Raman spectroscopy method, which provided a rapid way to quantify the quality of freeze-dried therapeutic

  18. Transition-Metal-Free Cross-Coupling of Indium Organometallics with Chromene and Isochroman Acetals Mediated by BF3·OEt2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Negrete, José M; Pérez Sestelo, José; Sarandeses, Luis A

    2016-09-02

    A transition-metal-free coupling of triorganoindium reagents with benzopyranyl acetals mediated by a Lewis acid has been developed. The reaction of R3In with chromene and isochroman acetals in the presence of BF3·OEt2 afforded 2-substituted chromenes and 1-substituted isochromans, respectively, in good yields. The reactions proceed with a variety of triorganoindium reagents (aryl, heteroaryl, alkynyl, alkenyl, alkyl) using only 50 mol % of the organometallic, thus demonstrating the efficiency of these species. Preliminary mechanistic studies indicate the formation of an oxocarbenium ion intermediate in the presence of the Lewis acid.

  19. Design and Synthesis of Chiral Molecular Tweezers Based on Deoxycholic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A series of new chiral molecular tweezers have been designed and synthesized by using deoxycholic acid as spacer and aromatic amines as arms.Instead of using toxic phosgene,the triphosgene was employed in synthesis of the molecular tweezers receptors.These chiral molecular tweezers showed good enantioselectivity for D-amino acid methyl esters.

  20. Constructing Dual Beam Optical Tweezers for Undergraduate Biophysics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudelin, Brian; West-Coates, Devon; Del'Etoile, Jon; Grotzke, Eric; Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Optical tweezing, or trapping, is a modern physics technique which allows us to use the radiation pressure from laser beams to trap micron sized particles. Optical tweezers are commonly used in graduate level biophysics research but seldom used at the undergraduate level. Our goal is to construct a dual beam optical tweezers for future undergraduate biophysical research. Dual beam optical tweezers use two counter propagating laser beams to provide a stronger trap. In this study we discuss how the assembly of the dual beam optical tweezers is done through three main phases. The first phase was to construct a custom compressed air system to isolate the optical table from the vibrations from its surroundings so that we can measure pico-newton scale forces that are observed in biological systems. In addition, the biomaterial flow system was designed with a flow cell to trap biomolecules by combining several undergraduate semester projects. During the second phase we set up the optics to image and display the inside of the flow cell. Currently we are in the process of aligning the laser to create an effective trap and developing the software to control the data collection. This optical tweezers set up will enable us to study potential cancer drug interactions with DNA at the single molecule level and will be a powerful tool in promoting interdisciplinary research at the undergraduate level.

  1. High-resolution optical tweezers for single-molecule manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinming; Ma, Lu; Zhang, Yongli

    2013-09-01

    Forces hold everything together and determine its structure and dynamics. In particular, tiny forces of 1-100 piconewtons govern the structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules. These forces enable folding, assembly, conformational fluctuations, or directional movements of biomacromolecules over sub-nanometer to micron distances. Optical tweezers have become a revolutionary tool to probe the forces, structures, and dynamics associated with biomacromolecules at a single-molecule level with unprecedented resolution. In this review, we introduce the basic principles of optical tweezers and their latest applications in studies of protein folding and molecular motors. We describe the folding dynamics of two strong coiled coil proteins, the GCN4-derived protein pIL and the SNARE complex. Both complexes show multiple folding intermediates and pathways. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes translocate DNA to remodel chromatin structures. The detailed DNA translocation properties of such molecular motors have recently been characterized by optical tweezers, which are reviewed here. Finally, several future developments and applications of optical tweezers are discussed. These past and future applications demonstrate the unique advantages of high-resolution optical tweezers in quantitatively characterizing complex multi-scale dynamics of biomacromolecules.

  2. Progress of Si-based Optoelectronic Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ying-cai; FU Guang-sheng; WANG Ying-long; SHANG Yong

    2004-01-01

    Si-based optoelectronics is becoming a very active research area due to its potential applications to optical communications. One of the major goals of this study is to realize ali-Si optoelectronic integrated circuit. This is due to the fact that Si- based optoelectronic technology can be compatible with Si microelectronic technology. If Si-based optoelectronic devices and integrated circuits can be achieved,it will lead to a new informational technological revolution. In the article, the current developments of this exciting field are mainly reviewed in the recent years. The involved contents are the realization of various Si-based optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes,optical waveguides devices, Si photonic bandgap crystals,and Si laser,etc. Finally, the developed tendency of all-Si optoelectronic integrated technology are predicted in the near future.

  3. Traceable assembly of microparts using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Dae; Hwang, Sun-Uk; Lee, Yong-Gu

    2012-10-01

    Assembly of components with a size in the order of tens of micrometers or less is difficult because the gravitational forces become smaller than weak forces such as capillary, electrostatic and van der Waals forces. As such, the picked-up components commonly adhere to the manipulator, making the release operation troublesome, and the repeatable supply of components cannot be guaranteed because the magazining and bunkering scheme available in conventional scale assembly cannot be extended to these small objects. Moreover, there are also no effective ways known to deliver the finalized assembly externally. In this paper, we present the manipulation and assembly of microparts using optical tweezers, which by nature do not have stiction problems. Techniques allowing bunkering and finalizing the assembly for exporting are also presented. Finally, we demonstrate an exemplary microassembly formed by assembling two microparts: a movable microring and a microrod fixed on a glass substrate. We believe this traceable microassembly to be an important step forward for micro- and nano-manufacturing.

  4. Lasers and optoelectronics fundamentals, devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Maini, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    With emphasis on the physical and engineering principles, this book provides a comprehensive and highly accessible treatment of modern lasers and optoelectronics. Divided into four parts, it explains laser fundamentals, types of lasers, laser electronics & optoelectronics, and laser applications, covering each of the topics in their entirety, from basic fundamentals to advanced concepts. Key features include: exploration of technological and application-related aspects of lasers and optoelectronics, detailing both existing and emerging applications in industry, medical diag

  5. Optical tweezers force measurements to study parasites chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Fontes, A.; Almeida, D. B.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Ayres, D. C.; Giorgio, S.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we propose a methodology to study microorganisms chemotaxis in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. Forces involved in the movement of unicellular parasites are very small, in the femto-pico-Newton range, about the same order of magnitude of the forces generated in an Optical Tweezers. We applied this methodology to investigate the Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) and Trypanossoma cruzi (T. cruzi) under distinct situations.

  6. Theory and practice of simulation of optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Ann A. M.; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Lenton, Isaac C. D.; Gibson, Lachlan J.; Kashchuk, Anatolii V.; Zhang, Shu; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2017-07-01

    Computational modelling has made many useful contributions to the field of optical tweezers. One aspect in which it can be applied is the simulation of the dynamics of particles in optical tweezers. This can be useful for systems with many degrees of freedom, and for the simulation of experiments. While modelling of the optical force is a prerequisite for simulation of the motion of particles in optical traps, non-optical forces must also be included; the most important are usually Brownian motion and viscous drag. We discuss some applications and examples of such simulations. We review the theory and practical principles of simulation of optical tweezers, including the choice of method of calculation of optical force, numerical solution of the equations of motion of the particle, and finish with a discussion of a range of open problems.

  7. Graded-index optical fiber tweezers with long manipulation length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuan; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qun-Feng; Wu, Yu; Rao, Yunjiang; Peng, Gang-Ding; Lang, Jinyi; Zhang, Ke

    2014-10-20

    Long manipulation length is critical for optical fiber tweezers to enhance the flexibility of non-contact trapping. In this paper a long manipulation distance of more than 40 μm is demonstrated experimentally by the graded-index fiber (GIF) tweezers, which is fabricated by chemically etching a GIF taper with a large cone angle of 58°. The long manipulation distance is obtained by introducing an air cavity between the lead-in single mode fiber and the GIF as well as by adjusting the laser power in the existence of a constant background flow. The influence of the cavity length and the GIF length on the light distribution and the focusing length of the GIF taper is investigated numerically, which is helpful for optimizing the parameters to perform stable optical trapping. This kind of optical fiber tweezers has advantages including low-cost, easy-to-fabricate and easy-to-use.

  8. Mechanisms of HCV NS3 helicase monitored by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    As one of the essential enzymes for viral genome replication, the hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase is one of the best characterized RNA helicases to date in understanding the mechanistic cycles in a helicase-catalyzed strand separation reaction. Recently, single-molecule studies on NS3, in particular the use of optical tweezers with sub-base pair spatial resolution, have allowed people to examine the potential elementary steps of NS3 in unwinding the double-stranded RNA fueled by ATP binding and hydrolysis. In this chapter, I detail the essential technical elements involved in conducting a high-resolution optical tweezers study of NS3 helicase, starting from the purification of the recombinant helicase protein from E. coli to setting up a high-resolution single-molecule experiment using optical tweezers.

  9. Small Molecule Organic Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Nathan

    Organic optoelectronics include a class of devices synthesized from carbon containing 'small molecule' thin films without long range order crystalline or polymer structure. Novel properties such as low modulus and flexibility as well as excellent device performance such as photon emission approaching 100% internal quantum efficiency have accelerated research in this area substantially. While optoelectronic organic light emitting devices have already realized commercial application, challenges to obtain extended lifetime for the high energy visible spectrum and the ability to reproduce natural white light with a simple architecture have limited the value of this technology for some display and lighting applications. In this research, novel materials discovered from a systematic analysis of empirical device data are shown to produce high quality white light through combination of monomer and excimer emission from a single molecule: platinum(II) bis(methyl-imidazolyl)toluene chloride (Pt-17). Illumination quality achieved Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.31, y = 0.38) and color rendering index (CRI) > 75. Further optimization of a device containing Pt-17 resulted in a maximum forward viewing power efficiency of 37.8 lm/W on a plain glass substrate. In addition, accelerated aging tests suggest high energy blue emission from a halogen-free cyclometalated platinum complex could demonstrate degradation rates comparable to known stable emitters. Finally, a buckling based metrology is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of small molecule organic thin films towards understanding the deposition kinetics responsible for an elastic modulus that is both temperature and thickness dependent. These results could contribute to the viability of organic electronic technology in potentially flexible display and lighting applications. The results also provide insight to organic film growth kinetics responsible for optical

  10. A novel single fiber optical tweezers based on GIMMF: simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Tang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhihai

    2017-04-01

    We propose a novel single fiber optical tweezers based on a graded-index multimode fiber (GIMMF), whose length is arbitrary (when the length is larger than 5mm). The optical fiber tweezers based on GIMMFs can propagate larger light field intensity and trap particles easily. The optical fiber tweezers based on precise length GIMMF had been achieved. In this paper, the optical fiber tweezers applies the GIMMF with arbitrary length, which ensure the fabrication of the optical tweezers based on the GIMMF simple, convenient and repeatability.

  11. El hombre que se equivocaba de conversación. A propósito de las notas sobre Wittgenstein de Oets Kolk Bouwsma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecantos, Antonio

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Conversations with Oets Kolk Bouwsma are a highly impressive text for making sense of Wittgenstein's ideas in his last years, especially about moral affairs and the nature of ethics. One of the major topics of these conversations is perhaps whether philosophy is a form of life and a language game or, on the contrary, the crack of other forms of life and language games. This question is narrowly related to the problem of the place of ethics in the second Wittgenstein. Probably, ethics is not to be interpreted as a game, but as a certain kind of crack of certain kinds of games.

    Las conversaciones con Oets Kolk Bouwsma son una muestra muy instructiva de algunas de las ideas de Wittgenstein en sus últimos años, en particular sobre asuntos morales. A mi parecer, el tema de si la filosofía es una forma de vida y un juego de lenguaje o si, por el contrario, consiste en una quiebra de otras formas de vida y juegos de lenguaje aparece reiteradamente en las conversaciones. Esta cuestión se halla estrechamente relacionada con el lugar de la moral o la ética en el último Wittgenstein. Probablemente, la moral no haya de ser entendida como un juego, sino como cierta forma de ruptura de ciertos tipos de juegos.

  12. Una experiencia de colaboración entre la OET y la EBCI: la información común denominador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Vargas Bolaños

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo sistematiza la experiencia colaborativa entre dos instituciones especializadas, como son la Escuela de Bibliotecología y Ciencias de la Información (EBCI de la Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR y la Organización de Estudios Tropicales (OET. La experiencia se realizó en el marco del convenio de colaboración firmando entre ambas entidades, y se desarrolla por medio de proyectos de investigación inscritos en la UCR durante los años 2012 al 2014. En esta experiencia participan docentes y estudiantes de la EBCI, así como los profesionales que laboran en el área de Manejo de la Información de la OET. El resultado más importante de esta experiencia ha sido obtener un mecanismo que permite el intercambio de experiencias, la transferencia de conocimiento y la cooperación horizontal entre ambas organizaciones, lo cual podemos replicar con otra instancia interna o externa a la Universidad.

  13. HoloHands: Kinect Control of Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Craig; McDougall, Craig; McGloin, David

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of applications for holographic manipulation techniques has sparked the development of more accessible control interfaces. Here, we describe a holographic optical tweezers experiment that is controlled by gestures which are detected by a Microsoft Kinect. We demonstrate that this technique can be used to calibrate the tweezers using the Stokes Drag method and compare this to automated calibrations. We also show that multiple particle manipulation can be handled. This is a promising new line of research for gesture-based control that could find applications in a wide variety of experimental situations.

  14. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  15. Active-passive calibration of optical tweezers in viscoelastic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Mario; Richardson, Andrew C; S Reihani, S Nader

    2010-01-01

    In order to use optical tweezers as a force measuring tool inside a viscoelastic medium such as the cytoplasm of a living cell, it is crucial to perform an exact force calibration within the complex medium. This is a nontrivial task, as many of the physical characteristics of the medium and probe......, e.g., viscosity, elasticity, shape, and density, are often unknown. Here, we suggest how to calibrate single beam optical tweezers in a complex viscoelastic environment. At the same time, we determine viscoelastic characteristics such as friction retardation spectrum and elastic moduli of the medium...

  16. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  17. Airy acoustical-sheet spinner tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-09-01

    The Airy acoustical beam exhibits parabolic propagation and spatial acceleration, meaning that the propagation bending angle continuously increases before the beam trajectory reaches a critical angle where it decays after a propagation distance, without applying any external bending force. As such, it is of particular importance to investigate its properties from the standpoint of acoustical radiation force, spin torque, and particle dynamics theories, in the development of novel particle sorting techniques and acoustically mediated clearing systems. This work investigates these effects on a two-dimensional (2D) circular absorptive structure placed in the field of a nonparaxial Airy "acoustical-sheet" (i.e., finite beam in 2D), for potential applications in surface acoustic waves and acousto-fluidics. Based on the characteristics of the acoustic field, the beam is capable of manipulating the circular cylindrical fluid cross-section and guides it along a transverse or parabolic trajectory. This feature of Airy acoustical beams could lead to a unique characteristic in single-beam acoustical tweezers related to acoustical sieving, filtering, and removal of particles and cells from a section of a small channel. The analysis developed here is based on the description of the nonparaxial Airy beam using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane waves in close association with the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates. The numerical results demonstrate the ability of the nonparaxial Airy acoustical-sheet beam to pull, propel, or accelerate a particle along a parabolic trajectory, in addition to particle confinement in the transverse direction of wave propagation. Negative or positive radiation force and spin torque causing rotation in the clockwise or the anticlockwise direction can occur depending on the nondimensional parameter ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the radius) and the location of the cylinder in the beam. Applications in

  18. Choosing the best molecular precursor to prepare Li4Ti5O12 by the sol-gel method using (1)H NMR: evidence of [Ti3(OEt)13](-) in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Herbosa, Gabriel; Aparicio, Mario; Mosa, Jadra; Cuevas, José V; Torroba, Tomás

    2016-09-21

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy at 400 MHz in toluene-d8 of evaporated mixtures of lithium ethoxide and titanium(iv) isopropoxide in ethanol, used to prepare the spinel Li4Ti5O12 by the sol-gel method, may help clarify why the atomic ratio 5Li : 5Ti and not 4Li : 5Ti is the right choice to obtain the pure phase when performing hydrolysis at room temperature. The mixtures xLiOEt/yTi(OPr(i))4 in ethanol undergo alcohol exchange at room temperature, and the evaporated residues contain double lithium-titanium ethoxide [LiTi3(OEt)13] rather than simple mixtures of single metal alkoxides; this is of great relevance to truly understanding the chemistry and structural changes in the sol-gel process. Detailed inspection of the (1)H and (13)C VT NMR spectra of mixtures with different Li/Ti atomic ratios unequivocally shows the formation of [LiTi3(OEt)13] in a solution at low temperature. The methylene signals of free lithium ethoxide and Li[Ti3(OEt)13] coalesce at 20 °C when the atomic ratio is 5 : 5; however, the same coalescence is only observed above 60 °C when the atomic ratio is 4 : 5. We suggest that the highest chemical equivalence observed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy achieved through chemical exchange of ethoxide groups involves the highest microscopic structural homogeneity of the sol precursor and will lead to the best gel after hydrolysis. Variable temperature (1)H NMR spectra at 400 MHz of variable molar ratios of LiOEt/Ti(OPr(i))4 are discussed to understand the structural features of the sol precursor. While the precursor with the atomic ratio 5Li : 5Ti shows no signal of free LiOEt at 20 °C, both 4Li : 5Ti and 7Li : 5Ti show free LiOEt at 20 °C in their (1)H NMR spectra, indicating that the molar ratio 5Li : 5Ti gives the maximum rate of chemical exchange. DFT calculations have been performed to support the structure of the anion [Ti3(OEt)13](-) at room temperature.

  19. Optoelectronic Applications of Colloidal Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Zhang, Nanzhu; Brenneman, Kimber; Wu, Tsai Chin; Jung, Hyeson; Biswas, Sushmita; Sen, Banani; Reinhardt, Kitt; Liao, Sicheng; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    This chapter highlights recent optoelectronic applications of colloidal quantum dots (QDs). In recent years, many colloidal QD-based optoelectronic devices, and device concepts have been proposed and studied. Many of these device concepts build on traditional optoelectronic device concepts. Increasingly, many new optoelectronic device concepts have been based on the use of biomolecule QD complexes. In this chapter, both types of structures are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on new optoelectronic device concepts that incorporate DNA-based aptamers in biomolecule QD complexes. Not only are the extensions of traditional devices and concepts realizable, such as QD-based photo detectors, displays, photoluminescent and photovoltaic devices, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), photovoltaic devices, and solar cells, but new devices concepts such a biomolecule-based molecular sensors possible. This chapter highlights a number of such novel QD-based devices and device concepts.

  20. Organic optoelectronics:materials,devices and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi; CUI Tian-hong

    2005-01-01

    The interest in organic materials for optoelectronic devices has been growing rapidly in the last two decades. This growth has been propelled by the exciting advances in organic thin films for displays, low-cost electronic circuits, etc. An increasing number of products employing organic electronic devices have become commercialized, which has stimulated the age of organic optoelectronics. This paper reviews the recent progress in organic optoelectronic technology. First, organic light emitting electroluminescent materials are introduced. Next, the three kinds of most important organic optoelectronic devices are summarized, including light emitting diode, organic photovoltaic cell, and photodetectors. The various applications of these devices are also reviewed and discussed in detail. Finally, the market and future development of optoelectronic devices are also demonstrated.

  1. Wrapped optoelectronic devices and methods for making same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curran, Seamus; Dias, Sampath; Alley, Nigel; Haldar, Amrita; Yambem, Soniya Devi; Kang-Shyang, Liao; Chaudhari, Prajakta

    2017-07-11

    In various embodiments, optoelectronic devices are described herein. The optoelectronic device may include an optoelectronic cell arranged so as to wrap around a central axis wherein the cell includes a first conductive layer, a semi-conductive layer disposed over and in electrical communication with the first conductive layer, and a second conductive layer disposed over and in electrical communication with the semi-conductive layer. In various embodiments, methods for making optoelectronic devices are described herein. The methods may include forming an optoelectronic cell while flat and wrapping the optoelectronic cell around a central axis. The optoelectronic devices may be photovoltaic devices. Alternatively, the optoelectronic devices may be organic light emitting diodes.

  2. Torsional sensing of small-molecule binding using magnetic tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipfert, J.; Klijnhout, S.; Dekker, N.H.

    2010-01-01

    DNA-binding small molecules are widespread in the cell and heavily used in biological applications. Here, we use magnetic tweezers, which control the force and torque applied to single DNAs, to study three small molecules: ethidium bromide (EtBr), a well-known intercalator; netropsin, a minor-groove

  3. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsifaki, D. G.; Kandyla, M.; Lagoudakis, P. G.

    2016-05-01

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects.

  4. Magnetic Forces and DNA Mechanics in Multiplexed Magnetic Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vlaminck, I.; Henighan, T.; Van Loenhout, M.T.J.; Burnham, D.R.; Dekker, C.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers (MT) are a powerful tool for the study of DNA-enzyme interactions. Both the magnet-based manipulation and the camera-based detection used in MT are well suited for multiplexed measurements. Here, we systematically address challenges related to scaling of multiplexed magnetic

  5. Plasmon enhanced optical tweezers with gold-coated black silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsifaki, D G; Kandyla, M; Lagoudakis, P G

    2016-05-19

    Plasmonic optical tweezers are a ubiquitous tool for the precise manipulation of nanoparticles and biomolecules at low photon flux, while femtosecond-laser optical tweezers can probe the nonlinear optical properties of the trapped species with applications in biological diagnostics. In order to adopt plasmonic optical tweezers in real-world applications, it is essential to develop large-scale fabrication processes without compromising the trapping efficiency. Here, we develop a novel platform for continuous wave (CW) and femtosecond plasmonic optical tweezers, based on gold-coated black silicon. In contrast with traditional lithographic methods, the fabrication method relies on simple, single-step, maskless tabletop laser processing of silicon in water that facilitates scalability. Gold-coated black silicon supports repeatable trapping efficiencies comparable to the highest ones reported to date. From a more fundamental aspect, a plasmon-mediated efficiency enhancement is a resonant effect, and therefore, dependent on the wavelength of the trapping beam. Surprisingly, a wavelength characterization of plasmon-enhanced trapping efficiencies has evaded the literature. Here, we exploit the repeatability of the recorded trapping efficiency, offered by the gold-coated black silicon platform, and perform a wavelength-dependent characterization of the trapping process, revealing the resonant character of the trapping efficiency maxima. Gold-coated black silicon is a promising platform for large-scale parallel trapping applications that will broaden the range of optical manipulation in nanoengineering, biology, and the study of collective biophotonic effects.

  6. Accurate measurement of microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McLaren, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that matter may be trapped by optical fields with high intensity gradients. Once trapped, it is then possible to manipulate microscopic particles using such optical fields, in so-called optical tweezers. Such optical trapping...

  7. Transparent Electrodes for Efficient Optoelectronics

    KAUST Repository

    Morales-Masis, Monica

    2017-03-30

    With the development of new generations of optoelectronic devices that combine high performance and novel functionalities (e.g., flexibility/bendability, adaptability, semi or full transparency), several classes of transparent electrodes have been developed in recent years. These range from optimized transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), which are historically the most commonly used transparent electrodes, to new electrodes made from nano- and 2D materials (e.g., metal nanowire networks and graphene), and to hybrid electrodes that integrate TCOs or dielectrics with nanowires, metal grids, or ultrathin metal films. Here, the most relevant transparent electrodes developed to date are introduced, their fundamental properties are described, and their materials are classified according to specific application requirements in high efficiency solar cells and flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). This information serves as a guideline for selecting and developing appropriate transparent electrodes according to intended application requirements and functionality.

  8. Optoelectronics of Molecules and Polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Moliton, André

    2006-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices are being developed at an extraordinary rate. Organic light emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices and electro-optical modulators are pivotal to the future of displays, photosensors and solar cells, and communication technologies. This book details the theories underlying the relevant mechanisms in organic materials and covers, at a basic level, how the organic components are made. The first part of this book introduces the fundamental theories used to detail ordered solids and localised energy levels. The methods used to determine energy levels in perfectly ordered molecular and macromolecular systems are discussed, making sure that the effects of quasi-particles are not missed. The function of excitons and their transfer between two molecules are studied, and the problems associated with interfaces and charge injection into resistive media are presented. The second part details technological aspects such as the fabrication of devices based on organic materials by dry etching. The princ...

  9. Unraveling chromatin structure using magnetic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, John

    2010-03-01

    The compact, yet dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in regulating gene expression. Although the static structure of chromatin fibers has been studied extensively, the controversy about the higher order folding remains. The compaction of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin has been implicated in the regulation of all DNA processes. To understand the relation between gene regulation and chromatin structure it is essential to uncover the mechanisms by which chromatin fibers fold and unfold. We used magnetic tweezers to probe the mechanical properties of individual nucleosomes and chromatin fibers consisting of a single, well-defined array of 25 nucleosomes. From these studies five major features appeared upon forced extension of chromatin fibers: the elastic stretching of chromatin's higher order structure, the breaking of internucleosomal contacts, unwrapping of the first turn of DNA, unwrapping of the second turn of DNA, and the dissociation of histone octamers. These events occur sequentially at the increasing force. Neighboring nucleosomes stabilize DNA folding into a nucleosome relative to isolated nucleosomes. When an array of nucleosomes is folded into a 30 nm fiber, representing the first level of chromatin condensation, the fiber stretched like a Hookian spring at forces up to 4 pN. Together with a nucleosome-nucleosome stacking energy of 14 kT this points to a solenoid as the underlying topology of the 30 nm fiber. Surprisingly, linker histones do not affect the length or stiffness of the fibers, but stabilize fiber folding up to forces of 7 pN. The stiffness of the folded chromatin fiber points at histone tails that mediate nucleosome stacking. Fibers with a nucleosome repeat length of 167 bp instead of 197 bp are significantly stiffer, consistent with a two-start helical arrangement. The extensive thermal breathing of the chromatin fiber that is a consequence of the observed high compliance provides a structural basis for understanding the

  10. Scanning probe and optical tweezer investigations of biomolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigby-Singleton, Shellie

    2002-07-01

    A complex array of intermolecular forces controls the interactions between and within biological molecules. The desire to empirically explore the fundamental forces has led to the development of several biophysical techniques. Of these, the atomic force microscope (AFM) and the optical tweezers have been employed throughout this thesis to monitor the intermolecular forces involved in biomolecular interactions. The AFM is a well-established force sensing technique capable of measuring biomolecular interactions at a single molecule level. However, its versatility has not been extrapolated to the investigation of a drug-enzyme complex. The energy landscape for the force induced dissociation of the DHFR-methotrexate complex was studied. Revealing an energy barrier to dissociation located {approx}0.3 nm from the bound state. Unfortunately, the AFM has a limited range of accessible loading rates and in order to profile the complete energy landscape alternative force sensing instrumentation should be considered, for example the BFP and optical tweezers. Thus, this thesis outlines the development and construction an optical trap capable of measuring intermolecular forces between biomolecules at the single molecule level. To demonstrate the force sensing abilities of the optical set up, proof of principle measurements were performed which investigate the interactions between proteins and polymer surfaces subjected to varying degrees of argon plasma treatment. Complementary data was gained from measurements performed independently by the AFM. Changes in polymer resistance to proteins as a response to changes in polymer surface chemistry were detected utilising both AFM and optical tweezers measurements. Finally, the AFM and optical tweezers were employed as ultrasensitive biosensors. Single molecule investigations of the antibody-antigen interaction between the cardiac troponin I marker and its complementary antibody, reveals the impact therapeutic concentrations of heparin

  11. Development and biological applications of optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chang'an

    Optical tweezers is a three-dimensional manipulation tool that employs a gradient force that originates from the single highly focused laser beam. Raman spectroscopy is a molecular analytical tool that can give a highly unique "fingerprint" for each substance by measuring the unique vibrations of its molecules. The combination of these two optical techniques offers a new tool for the manipulation and identification of single biological cells and microscopic particles. In this thesis, we designed and implemented a Laser-Tweezers-Raman-Spectroscopy (LTRS) system, also called the Raman-tweezers, for the simultaneous capture and analysis of both biological particles and non-biological particles. We show that microparticles can be conveniently captured at the focus of a laser beam and the Raman spectra of trapped particles can be acquired with high quality. The LTRS system overcomes the intrinsic Brownian motion and cell motility of microparticles in solution and provides a promising tool for in situ identifying suspicious agents. In order to increase the signal to noise ratio, several schemes were employed in LTRS system to reduce the blank noise and the fluorescence signal coming from analytes and the surrounding background. These techniques include near-infrared excitation, optical levitation, confocal microscopy, and frequency-shifted Raman difference. The LTRS system has been applied for the study in cell biology at the single cell level. With the built Raman-tweezers system, we studied the dynamic physiological processes of single living cells, including cell cycle, the transcription and translation of recombinant protein in transgenic yeast cells and the T cell activation. We also studied cell damage and associated biochemical processes in optical traps, UV radiations, and evaluated heating by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. These studies show that the Raman-tweezers system is feasible to provide rapid and reliable diagnosis of cellular disorders and can be

  12. Acoustical and optical radiation pressure and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jean-Louis; Marchiano, Régis; Baresch, Diego

    2017-07-01

    Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and position micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the radiation pressure scales as the field intensity divided by the speed of propagation of the wave. However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. In this paper, we propose a historical review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical and optical radiation pressures, from the expression of the force to the development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  13. A Step-by-step Guide to the Realisation of Advanced Optical Tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Pesce, Giuseppe; Marago, Onofrio M; Jones, Philip H; Gigain, Sylvain; Sasso, Antonio; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of Arthur Ashkin, optical tweezers have become an indispensable tool for contactless manipulation of micro- and nanoparticles. Nowadays optical tweezers are employed in a myriad of applications demonstrating the importance of these tools. While the basic principle of optical tweezers is the use of a strongly focused laser beam to trap and manipulate particles, ever more complex experimental set-ups are required in order to perform novel and challenging experiments. With this article, we provide a detailed step- by-step guide for the construction of advanced optical manipulation systems. First, we explain how to build a single-beam optical tweezers on a home-made microscope and how to calibrate it. Improving on this design, we realize a holographic optical tweezers, which can manipulate independently multiple particles and generate more sophisticated wavefronts such as Laguerre-Gaussian beams. Finally, we explain how to implement a speckle optical tweezers, which permit one to employ ...

  14. Progress on the optoelectronic functional organic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Organic crystals constructed by pi-conjugated molecules have been paid great attention to in the field of organic optoelectronic materials. The superiorities of these organic crystal materials, such as high thermal stability, highly ordered structure, and high carrier mobility over the amorphous thin film ma-terials, make them attractive candidates for optoelectronic devices. Single crystal with definite struc-ture provides a model to investigate the basic interactions between the molecules (supramolecular interaction), and the relationship between molecular stacking modes and optoelectronic performance (luminescence and carrier mobility). Through modulating molecular arrangement in organic crystal, the luminescence efficiency of organic crystal has exceeded 80% and carrier mobility has been up to the level of 10 cm2·V?1·s?1. Amplified stimulated emission phenomena have been observed in many crys-tals. In this paper, we will emphatically introduce the progress in optoelectronic functional organic crystals and some correlative principle.

  15. Opto-Electronic Oscillator and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental results of a new class of microwave oscillators called opto-electronic oscillators (OEO). We discuss techniques of achieving high stability single mode operation and demonstrate the applications of OEO in photonic communication systems.

  16. Progress on the optoelectronic functional organic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huan; XIE ZengQi; Ma YuGuang; Shen JiaCong

    2007-01-01

    Organic crystals constructed by pi-conjugated molecules have been paid great attention to in the field of organic optoelectronic materials. The superiorities of these organic crystal materials, such as high thermal stability, highly ordered structure, and high carrier mobility over the amorphous thin film materials, make them attractive candidates for optoelectronic devices. Single crystal with definite structure provides a model to investigate the basic interactions between the molecules (supramolecular interaction), and the relationship between molecular stacking modes and optoelectronic performance (luminescence and carrier mobility). Through modulating molecular arrangement in organic crystal, the luminescence efficiency of organic crystal has exceeded 80% and carrier mobility has been up to the level of 10 cm2·V-1·s-1. Amplified stimulated emission phenomena have been observed in many crystals. In this paper, we will emphatically introduce the progress in optoelectronic functional organic crystals and some correlative principle.

  17. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.E.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given.

  18. Metal oxides for optoelectronic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinge; Marks, Tobin J; Facchetti, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Metal oxides (MOs) are the most abundant materials in the Earth's crust and are ingredients in traditional ceramics. MO semiconductors are strikingly different from conventional inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and III-V compounds with respect to materials design concepts, electronic structure, charge transport mechanisms, defect states, thin-film processing and optoelectronic properties, thereby enabling both conventional and completely new functions. Recently, remarkable advances in MO semiconductors for electronics have been achieved, including the discovery and characterization of new transparent conducting oxides, realization of p-type along with traditional n-type MO semiconductors for transistors, p-n junctions and complementary circuits, formulations for printing MO electronics and, most importantly, commercialization of amorphous oxide semiconductors for flat panel displays. This Review surveys the uniqueness and universality of MOs versus other unconventional electronic materials in terms of materials chemistry and physics, electronic characteristics, thin-film fabrication strategies and selected applications in thin-film transistors, solar cells, diodes and memories.

  19. Metal oxides for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinge; Marks, Tobin J.; Facchetti, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Metal oxides (MOs) are the most abundant materials in the Earth's crust and are ingredients in traditional ceramics. MO semiconductors are strikingly different from conventional inorganic semiconductors such as silicon and III-V compounds with respect to materials design concepts, electronic structure, charge transport mechanisms, defect states, thin-film processing and optoelectronic properties, thereby enabling both conventional and completely new functions. Recently, remarkable advances in MO semiconductors for electronics have been achieved, including the discovery and characterization of new transparent conducting oxides, realization of p-type along with traditional n-type MO semiconductors for transistors, p-n junctions and complementary circuits, formulations for printing MO electronics and, most importantly, commercialization of amorphous oxide semiconductors for flat panel displays. This Review surveys the uniqueness and universality of MOs versus other unconventional electronic materials in terms of materials chemistry and physics, electronic characteristics, thin-film fabrication strategies and selected applications in thin-film transistors, solar cells, diodes and memories.

  20. Metamaterial mirrors in optoelectronic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Esfandyarpour, Majid

    2014-06-22

    The phase reversal that occurs when light is reflected from a metallic mirror produces a standing wave with reduced intensity near the reflective surface. This effect is highly undesirable in optoelectronic devices that use metal films as both electrical contacts and optical mirrors, because it dictates a minimum spacing between the metal and the underlying active semiconductor layers, therefore posing a fundamental limit to the overall thickness of the device. Here, we show that this challenge can be circumvented by using a metamaterial mirror whose reflection phase is tunable from that of a perfect electric mirror († = €) to that of a perfect magnetic mirror († = 0). This tunability in reflection phase can also be exploited to optimize the standing wave profile in planar devices to maximize light-matter interaction. Specifically, we show that light absorption and photocurrent generation in a sub-100 nm active semiconductor layer of a model solar cell can be enhanced by ∼20% over a broad spectral band. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  1. Simultaneous calibration of optical tweezers spring constant and position detector response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Antoine; Perronet, Karen; Dulin, David; Villing, André; Bouyer, Philippe; Visscher, Koen; Westbrook, Nathalie

    2010-12-06

    We demonstrate a fast and direct calibration method for systems using a single laser for optical tweezers and particle position detection. The method takes direct advantage of back-focal-plane interferometry measuring not an absolute but a differential position, i.e. the position of the trapped particle relative to the center of the optical tweezers. Therefore, a fast step-wise motion of the optical tweezers yields the impulse response of the trapped particle. Calibration parameters such as the detector's spatial and temporal response and the spring constant of the optical tweezers then follow readily from fitting the measured impulse response.

  2. Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbock, L J; Otto, O; Skarstam, D R; Jahn, S; Chimerel, C; Gornall, J L; Keyser, U F, E-mail: ufk20@cam.ac.u [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-17

    We combine for the first time optical tweezer experiments with the resistive pulse technique based on capillaries. Quartz glass capillaries are pulled into a conical shape with tip diameters as small as 27 nm. Here, we discuss the translocation of {lambda}-phage DNA which is driven by an electrophoretic force through the nanocapillary. The resulting change in ionic current indicates the folding state of single {lambda}-phage DNA molecules. Our flow cell design allows for the straightforward incorporation of optical tweezers. We show that a DNA molecule attached to an optically trapped colloid is pulled into a capillary by electrophoretic forces. The detected electrophoretic force is in good agreement with measurements in solid-state nanopores.

  3. Studying the mechanical responses of proteins using magnetic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaodan; Zeng, Xiangjun; Lu, Chen; Yan, Jie

    2017-10-01

    The mechanical stability of proteins has been extensively studied using AFM as a single-molecule force spectroscopy method. While this has led to many important results, these studies have been mainly limited to fast unfolding at a high-force regime due to the rapid mechanical drift in most AFM stretching experiments. Therefore, there is a gap between the knowledge obtained at a high-force regime and the mechanical properties of proteins at a lower force regime which is often more physiologically relevant. Recent studies have demonstrated that this gap can be addressed by stretching single protein molecules using magnetic tweezers, due to the excellent mechanical stability this technology offers. Here we review magnetic tweezers technology and its current application in studies of the force-dependent stability and interactions of proteins.

  4. A guide to magnetic tweezers and their applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupa Sarkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic force spectroscopy is a rapidly developing single molecule technique that found numerous applications at the interface of physics and biology. Since the invention of the first magnetic tweezers, a number of modifications were incorporated into the approach that helped relieve the limitations of the original design and amplified its strengths. Inventive molecular biology solutions further advanced the technique by expanding its possible applications. In its present form, the method can be applied to single molecules and live cells without resorting to intense sample irradiation, can be easily multiplexed, accommodates multiple DNAs, displays impressive resolution, and allows a remarkable ease in stretching and twisting macromolecules. In this review, we describe the architecture of magnetic tweezers, key requirements to the experimental design and analysis of data, and outline several applications of the method that illustrate its versatility.

  5. A guide to magnetic tweezers and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Rupa; Rybenkov, Valentin

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic force spectroscopy is a rapidly developing single molecule technique that found numerous applications at the interface of physics and biology. Since the invention of the first magnetic tweezers, a number of modifications were incorporated into the approach that helped relieve the limitations of the original design and amplified its strengths. Inventive molecular biology solutions further advanced the technique by expanding its possible applications. In its present form, the method can be applied to single molecules and live cells without resorting to intense sample irradiation, can be easily multiplexed, accommodates multiple DNAs, displays impressive resolution, and allows a remarkable ease in stretching and twisting macromolecules. In this review, we describe the architecture of magnetic tweezers, key requirements to the experimental design and analysis of data, and outline several applications of the method that illustrate its versatility.

  6. Determination of motility forces on isolated chromosomes with laser tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibzadeh, Nima; Stilgoe, Alexander B; Bui, Ann A M; Rocha, Yesenia; Cruz, Gladys M; Loke, Vince; Shi, Linda Z; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W

    2014-10-31

    Quantitative determination of the motility forces of chromosomes during cell division is fundamental to understanding a process that is universal among eukaryotic organisms. Using an optical tweezers system, isolated mammalian chromosomes were held in a 1064 nm laser trap. The minimum force required to move a single chromosome was determined to be ≈ 0.8-5 pN. The maximum transverse trapping efficiency of the isolated chromosomes was calculated as ≈ 0.01-0.02. These results confirm theoretical force calculations of ≈ 0.1-12 pN to move a chromosome on the mitotic or meiotic spindle. The verification of these results was carried out by calibration of the optical tweezers when trapping microspheres with a diameter of 4.5-15 µm in media with 1-7 cP viscosity. The results of the chromosome and microsphere trapping experiments agree with optical models developed to simulate trapping of cylindrical and spherical specimens.

  7. Nanoscopy of bacterial cells immobilized by holographic optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Robin; Wolfson, Deanna L; Spahn, Christoph; Heilemann, Mike; Schüttpelz, Mark; Huser, Thomas

    2016-12-13

    Imaging non-adherent cells by super-resolution far-field fluorescence microscopy is currently not possible because of their rapid movement while in suspension. Holographic optical tweezers (HOTs) enable the ability to freely control the number and position of optical traps, thus facilitating the unrestricted manipulation of cells in a volume around the focal plane. Here we show that immobilizing non-adherent cells by optical tweezers is sufficient to achieve optical resolution well below the diffraction limit using localization microscopy. Individual cells can be oriented arbitrarily but preferably either horizontally or vertically relative to the microscope's image plane, enabling access to sample sections that are impossible to achieve with conventional sample preparation and immobilization. This opens up new opportunities to super-resolve the nanoscale organization of chromosomal DNA in individual bacterial cells.

  8. Trapping red blood cells in living animals using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Min-Cheng; Wei, Xun-Bin; Zhou, Jin-Hua; Wang, Zi-Qiang; Li, Yin-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The recent development of non-invasive imaging techniques has enabled the visualization of molecular events underlying cellular processes in live cells. Although microscopic objects can be readily manipulated at the cellular level, additional physiological insight is likely to be gained by manipulation of cells in vivo, which has not been achieved so far. Here we use infrared optical tweezers to trap and manipulate red blood cells within subdermal capillaries in living mice. We realize a non-contact micro-operation that results in the clearing of a blocked microvessel. Furthermore, we estimate the optical trap stiffness in the capillary. Our work expands the application of optical tweezers to the study of live cell dynamics in animals.

  9. Construction of an optical tweezer for nanometer scale rheology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Raghu; Sharath Ananthamurthy

    2005-10-01

    The optical tweezer is a versatile set-up that can be employed in a wide variety of studies investigating the microscopic properties of materials. In particular, this set-up has in recent times been gainfully employed in probing rheological properties of materials that exhibit viscoelasticity. These measurements can provide data at the micro and nanometer scales, not normally accessible by rheometers that are used for measurements on bulk samples. In this work we describe a single laser beam optical tweezer set-up, which is built around an inverted open microscope. The trapped polystyrene particle bead's deviation from the trap potential minimum is monitored by laser back-scattering technique and the bead position measured by a quadrant photodiode detector. Additionally, a provision is made for video microscopic studies on dispersed beads using a CCD camera. A single particle microrheological experiment that can be performed using the set-up is described with relevant calculations.

  10. Dynamic array generation and pattern formation for optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, P.C.; Glückstad, J.

    2000-01-01

    The generalised phase contrast approach is used for the generation of optical arrays of arbitrary beam shape, suitable for applications in optical tweezers for the manipulation of biological specimens. This approach offers numerous advantages over current techniques involving the use of computer......-generated holograms or diffractive optical elements. We demonstrate a low-loss system for generating intensity patterns suitable for the trapping and manipulation of small particles or specimens....

  11. Electromagnetic tweezers with independent force and torque control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chang; Lionberger, Troy A.; Wiener, Diane M.; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers are powerful tools to manipulate and study the mechanical properties of biological molecules and living cells. In this paper we present a novel, bona fide electromagnetic tweezer (EMT) setup that allows independent control of the force and torque applied via micrometer-sized magnetic beads to a molecule under study. We implemented this EMT by combining a single solenoid that generates force (f-EMT) with a set of four solenoids arranged into a symmetric quadrupole to generate torque (τ-EMT). To demonstrate the capability of the tweezers, we attached optically asymmetric Janus beads to single, tethered DNA molecules. We show that tension in the piconewton force range can be applied to single DNA molecules and the molecule can simultaneously be twisted with torques in the piconewton-nanometer range. Furthermore, the EMT allows the two components to be independently controlled. At various force levels applied to the Janus bead, the trap torsional stiffness can be continuously changed simply by varying the current magnitude applied to the τ-EMT. The flexible and independent control of force and torque by the EMT makes it an ideal tool for a range of measurements where tensional and torsional properties need to be studied simultaneously on a molecular or cellular level.

  12. Axial Optical Traps: A New Direction for Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehoshua, Samuel; Pollari, Russell; Milstein, Joshua N

    2015-06-16

    Optical tweezers have revolutionized our understanding of the microscopic world. Axial optical tweezers, which apply force to a surface-tethered molecule by directly moving either the trap or the stage along the laser beam axis, offer several potential benefits when studying a range of novel biophysical phenomena. This geometry, although it is conceptually straightforward, suffers from aberrations that result in variation of the trap stiffness when the distance between the microscope coverslip and the trap focus is being changed. Many standard techniques, such as back-focal-plane interferometry, are difficult to employ in this geometry due to back-scattered light between the bead and the coverslip, whereas the noise inherent in a surface-tethered assay can severely limit the resolution of an experiment. Because of these complications, precision force spectroscopy measurements have adapted alternative geometries such as the highly successful dumbbell traps. In recent years, however, most of the difficulties inherent in constructing a precision axial optical tweezers have been solved. This review article aims to inform the reader about recent progress in axial optical trapping, as well as the potential for these devices to perform innovative biophysical measurements. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Toward optical-tweezers-based force microscopy for airborne microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Rory M; Burnham, Daniel R; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-12-20

    Optical tweezers have found widespread application in biological and colloidal physics for the measurement of pN forces over nanometer to micrometer length scales. Similar aerosol-phase measurements of interparticle force have not been reported in spite of the potential to better resolve particle coagulation kinetics. Various refractive index mismatches in the beam path as well as the need to explicitly account for gravity and inertial particle motion provide a number of challenges that must be overcome to make such measurements tractable. In this regard, we demonstrate schemes by which the particle position and trap stiffness may be unambiguously measured using bright-field microscopy with resolution comparable with analogous condensed-phase measurements. Moreover, some of the challenges of working with highly dynamic aqueous particles are introduced and exploited to observe size-dependent phenomena in aerosol optical tweezers. Notably, when combined with cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, this provides a unique opportunity to explore trapping forces over a continuum of particle size and refractive index. It is expected that the methods developed will provide a basis for the measurement of pairwise interaction forces in aerosol optical tweezers while providing a probe of fundamental airborne particle trapping dynamics.

  14. Theory of optical-tweezers forces near a plane interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, R. S.; Neto, P. A. Maia; Nussenzveig, H. M.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    2016-11-01

    Optical-tweezers experiments in molecular and cell biology often take place near the surface of the microscope slide that defines the bottom of the sample chamber. There, as elsewhere, force measurements require force-calibrated tweezers. In bulk, one can calculate the tweezers force from first principles, as recently demonstrated. Near the surface of the microscope slide, this absolute calibration method fails because it does not account for reverberations from the slide of the laser beam scattered by the trapped microsphere. Nor does it account for evanescent waves arising from total internal reflection of wide-angle components of the strongly focused beam. In the present work we account for both of these phenomena. We employ Weyl's angular spectrum representation of spherical waves in terms of real and complex rays and derive a fast-converging recursive series of multiple reflections that describes the reverberations, including also evanescent waves. Numerical simulations for typical setup parameters evaluate these effects on the optical force and trap stiffness, with emphasis on axial trapping. Results are in good agreement with available experimental data. Thus, absolute calibration now applies to all situations encountered in practice.

  15. Optoelectronic microdevices for combined phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Menyaev, Yulian A.; Hamaev, V. A.; Antropov, G. M.; Waner, Milton

    2000-03-01

    In photomedicine in some of cases radiation delivery to local zones through optical fibers can be changed for the direct placing of tiny optical sources like semiconductor microlasers or light diodes in required zones of ears, nostrils, larynx, nasopharynx cochlea or alimentary tract. Our study accentuates the creation of optoelectronic microdevices for local phototherapy and functional imaging by using reflected light. Phototherapeutic micromodule consist of the light source, microprocessor and miniature optics with different kind of power supply: from autonomous with built-in batteries to remote supply by using pulsed magnetic field and supersmall coils. The developed prototype photomodule has size (phi) 8X16 mm and work duration with built-in battery and light diode up several hours at the average power from several tenths of mW to few mW. Preliminary clinical tests developed physiotherapeutic micrimodules in stomatology for treating the inflammation and in otolaryngology for treating tonsillitis and otitis are presented. The developed implanted electro- optical sources with typical size (phi) 4X0,8 mm and with remote supply were used for optical stimulation of photosensitive retina structure and electrostimulation of visual nerve. In this scheme the superminiature coil with 30 electrical integrated levels was used. Such devices were implanted in eyes of 175 patients with different vision problems during clinical trials in Institute of Eye's Surgery in Moscow. For functional imaging of skin layered structure LED arrays coupled photodiodes arrays were developed. The possibilities of this device for study drug diffusion and visualization small veins are discussed.

  16. Design and synthesis of novel chiral molecular tweezers based on deoxycholic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Gang Zhao; Xing Li Liu; Yi Zhong

    2008-01-01

    A novel type of chiral molecular tweezers has been designed and synthesized by using deoxycholic acid as backbone and ethanoyl and the chiral unsymmetrical urea unit as arms. Their structures were characterized by 1H NMR, IR, MS spectra and elemental analysis. These molecular tweezers showed good binding ability for neutral molecules and chiral molecules.

  17. Design and Synthesis of Novel Molecular Tweezers Derived from Chenodeoxycholic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Gang ZHAO; Qi Ming MU; Shu Hua CHEN

    2004-01-01

    A novel type of chiral molecular tweezers has been designed and synthesized by using chenodeoxy cholic acid as spacer and the aromatic compounds as arm. Their structures were characterized by 1HNMR, IR, MS spectra and elemental analysis. These chiral molecular tweezers showed good enantioselectivity for D-amino acid methyl esters.

  18. Design and synthesis of novel tweezer anion receptors based on deoxycholic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Li Liu; Zhi Gang Zhao; Shu Hua Chen

    2007-01-01

    A novel type of molecular tweezer receptors based on deoxycholic acid has been designed and synthesized and their binding properties were examined by UV-vis spectral titration. These molecular tweezers showed a high selectivity toward F- over Cl-,Br-, I-, AcO-, H2PO4-.

  19. Bragg diffraction from sub-micron particles isolated by optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yuan, E-mail: ygao0709@anl.gov; Harder, Ross; Southworth, Stephen; Guest, Jeffrey; Ocola, Leonidas; Young, Linda [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Scherer, Norbert; Yan, Zijie [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Pelton, Matthew [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, MD 21250 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We describe an apparatus using dynamic holographic optical tweezers which is capable of trapping and aligning a single micron scale anisotropic ZnO particle for x-ray Bragg diffraction experiments. The optical tweezers demonstrate enough stability to perform coherent x-ray diffraction imaging.

  20. Linear microrheology with optical tweezers of living cells 'is not an option'!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassieri, Manlio

    2015-08-07

    Optical tweezers have been successfully adopted as exceptionally sensitive transducers for microrheology studies of complex fluids. Despite the general trend, in this article I explain why a similar approach should not be adopted for microrheology studies of living cells. This conclusion is acheived on the basis of statistical mechanics principles that indicate the unsuitability of optical tweezers for such purpose.

  1. Perovskite Materials: Solar Cell and Optoelectronic Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bin [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid organometallic trihalide perovskites are promising candidates in the applications for next-generation, high-performance, low-cost optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaics, light emitting diodes, and photodetectors. Particularly, the solar cells based on this type of materials have reached 22% lab scale power conversion efficiency in only about seven years, comparable to the other thin film photovoltaic technologies. Hybrid perovskite materials not only exhibit superior optoelectronic properties, but also show many interesting physical properties such as ion migration and defect physics, which may allow the exploration of more device functionalities. In this article, the fundamental understanding of the interrelationships between crystal structure, electronic structure, and material properties is discussed. Various chemical synthesis and processing methods for superior device performance in solar cells and optoelectronic devices are reviewed.

  2. Contemporary optoelectronics materials, metamaterials and device applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhoivanov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a collection of extended contributions on the physics and application of optoelectronic materials and metamaterials.   The book is divided into three parts, respectively covering materials, metamaterials and optoelectronic devices.  Individual chapters cover topics including phonon-polariton interaction, semiconductor and nonlinear organic materials, metallic, dielectric and gyrotropic metamaterials, singular optics, parity-time symmetry, nonlinear plasmonics, microstructured optical fibers, passive nonlinear shaping of ultrashort pulses, and pulse-preserving supercontinuum generation. The book contains both experimental and theoretical studies, and each contribution is a self-contained exposition of a particular topic, featuring an extensive reference list.  The book will be a useful resource for graduate and postgraduate students, researchers and engineers involved in optoelectronics/photonics, quantum electronics, optics, and adjacent areas of science and technology.

  3. A new method for the chemoselective reduction of aldehydes and ketones using boron tri-isopropoxide, B(OPr)3: Comparison with boron tri-ethoxide, B(OEt)3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Burcu Uysal; Birsen S Oksal

    2011-09-01

    A chemoselective Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley reduction process of various aliphatic and allylic ,-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones is described. This chemoselective reduction is catalysed by boron triisopropoxide B(OPr)3. Kinetics of reduction of aldehydes and ketones to corresponding alcohols were also examined and rate constant of each carbonyl compounds were measured. Rate constant and reduction yield of each carbonyl compounds in the presence of B(OPr)3 were compared with those in the presence of B(OEt)3. The alcohols that are the reduction product were analysed by GC-MS. The rate constants and alcohol yields were found to be higher with B(OEt)3 than with B(OPr)3. The mechanism proposed involves a six-membered transition state in which both the alcohol and the carbonyl are coordinated to the same boron centre of a boron alkoxide catalyst.

  4. Electromagnetic Theory for Microwaves and Optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Keqian

    2007-01-01

    This book is a first year graduate text on electromagnetic fields and waves. At the same time it serves as a useful reference for researchers and engineers in the areas of microwaves and optoelectronics. Following the presentation of the physical and mathematical foundations of electromagnetic theory, the book discusses the field analysis of electromagnetic waves confined in material boundaries, or so-called guided waves, electromagnetic waves in the dispersive media and anisotropic media, Gaussian beams and scalar diffraction theory. The theories and methods presented in the book are foundations of wireless engineering, microwave and millimeter wave techniques, optoelectronics and optical fiber communication.

  5. Electrochemical synthesis, structural characterization, and decomposition of rhenium oxoethoxide, Re4O4(OEt)12. Ligand influence on the structure and bonding in the high-valent tetranuclear planar rhenium alkoxide clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonova, Olesya A; Jansson, Kjell; Kessler, Vadim G; Sundberg, Margareta; Baranov, Alexei I; Shevelkov, Andrei V; Drobot, Dmitrii V; Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A

    2008-02-18

    Anodic oxidation of rhenium in ethanol in the presence of LiCl as a conductive additive results with high yield in formation of a new oxoethoxide cluster, Re(4)O(4)(OEt)(12). The structure of the planar centrosymmetric metal-oxygen core of this molecule is composed of four edge-sharing Re(V)O(6) octahedra. Eight electrons are available for the formation of metal-metal bonds indicated by five relatively short Re-Re distances within the Re 4-rhombus, a "planar butterfly" type cluster. The theoretical calculations are indicating relatively low contribution of metal-metal bonding in the stability of the core. The stability of the +V-oxidation state, unusual for rhenium alkoxides can be at least partially attributed to the size effects in the packing of ligands. The X-ray powder study indicates that treatment of Re(4)O(4)(OEt)(12). in ambient atmosphere rapidly transforms it into a mixed-valence derivative Re(4)O(6)(OEt)(10) with a structure related to the earlier investigated cluster Re(4)O(6)(O(i)Pr)(10). Thermal decomposition of the latter rhenium oxoethoxide results in reduction to rhenium metal at as low temperatures as 380 degrees C, producing aggregates of metal nanoparticles with the average size of 3 nm.

  6. A simple optical tweezers for trapping polystyrene particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiddiq, Minarni; Nasir, Zulfa; Yogasari, Dwiyana

    2013-09-01

    Optical tweezers is an optical trap. For decades, it has become an optical tool that can trap and manipulate any particle from the very small size like DNA to the big one like bacteria. The trapping force comes from the radiation pressure of laser light which is focused to a group of particles. Optical tweezers has been used in many research areas such as atomic physics, medical physics, biophysics, and chemistry. Here, a simple optical tweezers has been constructed using a modified Leybold laboratory optical microscope. The ocular lens of the microscope has been removed for laser light and digital camera accesses. A laser light from a Coherent diode laser with wavelength λ = 830 nm and power 50 mW is sent through an immersion oil objective lens with magnification 100 × and NA 1.25 to a cell made from microscope slides containing polystyrene particles. Polystyrene particles with size 3 μm and 10 μm are used. A CMOS Thorlabs camera type DCC1545M with USB Interface and Thorlabs camera lens 35 mm are connected to a desktop and used to monitor the trapping and measure the stiffness of the trap. The camera is accompanied by camera software which makes able for the user to capture and save images. The images are analyzed using ImageJ and Scion macro. The polystyrene particles have been trapped successfully. The stiffness of the trap depends on the size of the particles and the power of the laser. The stiffness increases linearly with power and decreases as the particle size larger.

  7. Interferometer-Controlled Optical Tweezers Constructed for Nanotechnology and Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to control microparticles was developed in-house at the NASA Glenn Research Center in support of the nanotechnology project under NASA's Aerospace Propulsion and Power Base Research Program. A prototype interferometer-controlled optical tweezers was constructed to manipulate scanning probe microscope (SPM) tips. A laser beam passed through a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and a microscope objective then produced an optical trap from the coaxial beams. The trap levitated and generated the coarse motion of a 10-mm polystyrene sphere used to simulate a SPM tip. The interference between the beams provided fine control of the forces and moments on the sphere. The interferometer included a piezoelectric-scanned mirror to modulate the interference pattern. The 10-mm sphere was observed to oscillate about 1 mm as the mirror and fringe pattern oscillated. The prototype tweezers proved the feasibility of constructing a more sophisticated interferometer tweezers to hold and manipulate SPM tips. The SPM tips are intended to interrogate and manipulate nanostructures. A more powerful laser will be used to generate multiple traps to hold nanostructures and SPM tips. The vibrating mirror in the interferometer will be replaced with a spatial light modulator. The modulator will allow the optical phase distribution in one leg of the interferometer to be programmed independently at 640 by 480 points for detailed control of the forces and moments. The interference patterns will be monitored to measure the motion of the SPM tips. Neuralnetwork technology will provide fast analysis of the interference patterns for diagnostic purposes and for local or remote feedback control of the tips. This effort also requires theoretical and modeling support in the form of scattering calculations for twin coherent beams from nonspherical particles.

  8. pH microprobe manipulated in microchannels using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Gavin S.; Klauke, Norbert; Monaghan, Paul; Padgett, Miles J.; Cooper, Jon

    2005-03-01

    SNARF-1 fluorochrome was used to functionalize 3μm diameter latex spheres making them sensitive to the pH of their environment, manifested as a change in their fluorescence. The fluorescence emission at 580nm was excited using a filtered xenon arc lamp at 515nm. A solution of functionalized latex spheres was placed between gold microelectrodes in a microfluidic channel. Optical tweezers were used to trap and manipulate the spheres in the vicinity of the microelectrodes, to map out the pH profile in the electrolyte solution, induced by passing 20 microsecond transient current pulses through the microelectrodes.

  9. Translation and manipulation of silicon nanomembranes using holographic optical tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oehrlein Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We demonstrate the use of holographic optical tweezers for trapping and manipulating silicon nanomembranes. These macroscopic free-standing sheets of single-crystalline silicon are attractive for use in next-generation flexible electronics. We achieve three-dimensional control by attaching a functionalized silica bead to the silicon surface, enabling non-contact trapping and manipulation of planar structures with high aspect ratios (high lateral size to thickness. Using as few as one trap and trapping powers as low as several hundred milliwatts, silicon nanomembranes can be rotated and translated in a solution over large distances.

  10. Optical Fiber Tweezers Fabricated by Guided Wave Photo-Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita S. Rodrigues Ribeiro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the use of guided wave photo-polymerization for the fabrication of novel polymeric micro tips for optical trapping is demonstrated. It is shown that the selective excitation of linear polarized modes, during the fabrication process, has a direct impact on the shape of the resulting micro structures. Tips are fabricated with modes LP02 and LP21 and their shapes and output intensity distribution are compared. The application of the micro structures as optical tweezers is demonstrated with the manipulation of yeast cells.

  11. Measuring Molecular Forces Using Calibrated Optical Tweezers in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Adam G; Goldman, Yale E

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been instrumental in uncovering the mechanisms motor proteins use to generate and react to force. While optical traps have primarily been applied to purified, in vitro systems, emerging methods enable measurements in living cells where the actively fluctuating, viscoelastic environment and varying refractive index complicate calibration of the instrument. Here, we describe techniques to calibrate optical traps in living cells using the forced response to sinusoidal oscillations and spontaneous fluctuations, and to measure the forces exerted by endogenous ensembles of kinesin and dynein motor proteins as they transport cargoes in the cell.

  12. Stretching Submicron Biomolecules with Constant-Force Axial Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Fan; Blab, Gerhard A.; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2009-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become powerful tools to manipulate biomolecular systems, but are increasingly difficult to use when the size of the molecules is optical manipulation protocol that makes this length scale accessible by stretching the molecule in the axial direction of the laser beam, thus avoiding limiting artifacts from steric hindrances from the microscope coverslip and other surface effects. The molecule is held under constant mechanical tension by a combination of optical gradient forces and backscattering forces, eliminating the need for electronic feedback. We demonstrate the utility of this method through a measurement of the force-extension relationship of a 1298 bp ds-DNA molecule. PMID:19486692

  13. Optical lock-in particle tracking in optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Michael A; Bowen, Warwick P

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a lock-in particle tracking scheme in optical tweezers based on stroboscopic modulation of an illuminating optical field. This scheme is found to evade low frequency noise sources while otherwise producing an equivalent position measurement to continuous measurement. This was demonstrated, and found to yield on average 20dB of noise suppression in the frequency range 10-5000 Hz, where low frequency laser noise and electronic noise was significant, and 35 dB of noise suppression in the range 550-710 kHz where laser relaxation oscillations introduced laser noise. The setup is simple, and compatible with any trapping optics.

  14. Optical tweezers studies of transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisica, Ana; Grill, Stephan W

    2017-03-01

    Transcription is the first step in the expression of genetic information and it is carried out by large macromolecular enzymes called RNA polymerases. Transcription has been studied for many years and with a myriad of experimental techniques, ranging from bulk studies to high-resolution transcript sequencing. In this review, we emphasise the advantages of using single-molecule techniques, particularly optical tweezers, to study transcription dynamics. We give an overview of the latest results in the single-molecule transcription field, focusing on transcription by eukaryotic RNA polymerases. Finally, we evaluate recent quantitative models that describe the biophysics of RNA polymerase translocation and backtracking dynamics.

  15. Optoelectronic line transmission an introduction to fibre optics

    CERN Document Server

    Tricker, Raymond L

    2013-01-01

    Optoelectronic Line Transmission: An Introduction to Fibre Optics presents a basic introduction as well as a background reference manual on fiber optic transmission. The book discusses the basic principles of optical line transmission; the advantages and disadvantages of optical fibers and optoelectronic signalling; the practical applications of optoelectronics; and the future of optoelectronics. The text also describes the theories of optical line transmission; fibers and cables for optical transmission; transmitters including light-emitting diodes and lasers; and receivers including photodi

  16. Photoemission from optoelectronic materials and their nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Ghatak, Kamakhya Prasad; Bhattacharya, Sitangshu

    2009-01-01

    This monograph investigates photoemission from optoelectronic materials and their nanostructures. It contains open-ended research problems which form an integral part of the text and are useful for graduate courses as well as aspiring Ph.D.'s and researchers..

  17. Trends in optoelectronic perimeter security sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw; Ciurapinski, Wiesław M.; Zyczkowski, Marek

    2007-10-01

    New trends in development of optoelectronic and radar systems with mixed technologies for detection, identification and visualization for critical infrastructure protection are presented. Network-based communication as well as new algorithms of intelligent vision surveillance and image fusion is described.

  18. Using optoelectronic sensors in the system PROTEUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Piszczek, M.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of optoelectronic devices for human protection in rescue activity. The system consists of an ground robots with predicted sensor. The multisensor construction of the system ensures significant improvement of security of using on-situ like chemical or explosive sensors. The article show a various scenario of use for individual sensor in system PROTEUS.

  19. Polymer optoelectronic structures for retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Vini; Narayan, K S

    2014-01-01

    This commentary highlights the effectiveness of optoelectronic properties of polymer semiconductors based on recent results emerging from our laboratory, where these materials are explored as artificial receptors for interfacing with the visual systems. Organic semiconductors based polymer layers in contact with physiological media exhibit interesting photophysical features, which mimic certain natural photoreceptors, including those in the retina. The availability of such optoelectronic materials opens up a gateway to utilize these structures as neuronal interfaces for stimulating retinal ganglion cells. In a recently reported work entitled "A polymer optoelectronic interface provides visual cues to a blind retina," we utilized a specific configuration of a polymer semiconductor device structure to elicit neuronal activity in a blind retina upon photoexcitation. The elicited neuronal signals were found to have several features that followed the optoelectronic response of the polymer film. More importantly, the polymer-induced retinal response resembled the natural response of the retina to photoexcitation. These observations open up a promising material alternative for artificial retina applications.

  20. GaAs optoelectronic neuron arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven; Grot, Annette; Luo, Jiafu; Psaltis, Demetri

    1993-01-01

    A simple optoelectronic circuit integrated monolithically in GaAs to implement sigmoidal neuron responses is presented. The circuit integrates a light-emitting diode with one or two transistors and one or two photodetectors. The design considerations for building arrays with densities of up to 10,000/sq cm are discussed.

  1. Label-free free-solution nanoaperture optical tweezers for single molecule protein studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, Ahmed A; Kotnala, Abhay; Wheaton, Skyler; Gelfand, Ryan M; Rajashekara, Yashaswini; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-07-21

    Nanoaperture optical tweezers are emerging as useful label-free, free-solution tools for the detection and identification of biological molecules and their interactions at the single molecule level. Nanoaperture optical tweezers provide a low-cost, scalable, straight-forward, high-speed and highly sensitive (SNR ∼ 33) platform to observe real-time dynamics and to quantify binding kinetics of protein-small molecule interactions without the need to use tethers or labeling. Such nanoaperture-based optical tweezers, which are 1000 times more efficient than conventional optical tweezers, have been used to trap and isolate single DNA molecules and to study proteins like p53, which has been claimed to be in mutant form for 75% of human cancers. More recently, nanoaperture optical tweezers have been used to probe the low-frequency (in the single digit wavenumber range) Raman active modes of single nanoparticles and proteins. Here we review recent developments in the field of nanoaperture optical tweezers and how they have been applied to protein-antibody interactions, protein-small molecule interactions including single molecule binding kinetics, and protein-DNA interactions. In addition, recent works on the integration of nanoaperture optical tweezers at the tip of optical fiber and in microfluidic environments are presented.

  2. Invited article: a review of haptic optical tweezers for an interactive microworld exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacoret, Cécile; Régnier, Stéphane

    2013-08-01

    This paper is the first review of haptic optical tweezers, a new technique which associates force feedback teleoperation with optical tweezers. This technique allows users to explore the microworld by sensing and exerting picoNewton-scale forces with trapped microspheres. Haptic optical tweezers also allow improved dexterity of micromanipulation and micro-assembly. One of the challenges of this technique is to sense and magnify picoNewton-scale forces by a factor of 10(12) to enable human operators to perceive interactions that they have never experienced before, such as adhesion phenomena, extremely low inertia, and high frequency dynamics of extremely small objects. The design of optical tweezers for high quality haptic feedback is challenging, given the requirements for very high sensitivity and dynamic stability. The concept, design process, and specification of optical tweezers reviewed here are focused on those intended for haptic teleoperation. In this paper, two new specific designs as well as the current state-of-the-art are presented. Moreover, the remaining important issues are identified for further developments. The initial results obtained are promising and demonstrate that optical tweezers have a significant potential for haptic exploration of the microworld. Haptic optical tweezers will become an invaluable tool for force feedback micromanipulation of biological samples and nano- and micro-assembly parts.

  3. Use of optical tweezers to probe epithelial mechanosensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cellular mechanosensation mechanisms have been implicated in a variety of disease states. Specifically in renal tubules, the primary cilium and associated mechanosensitive ion channels are hypothesized to play a role in water and salt homeostasis, with relevant disease states including polycystic kidney disease and hypertension. Previous experiments investigating ciliary-mediated cellular mechanosensation have used either fluid flow chambers or micropipetting to elicit a biological response. The interpretation of these experiments in terms of the ``ciliary hypothesis'' has been difficult due the spatially distributed nature of the mechanical disturbance-several competing hypotheses regarding possible roles of primary cilium, glycocalyx, microvilli, cell junctions, and actin cytoskeleton exist. I report initial data using optical tweezers to manipulate individual primary cilia in an attempt to elicit a mechanotransduction response-specifically, the release of intracellular calcium. The advantage of using laser tweezers over previous work is that the applied disturbance is highly localized. I find that stimulation of a primary cilium elicits a response, while stimulation of the apical surface membrane does not. These results lend support to the hypothesis that the primary cilium mediates transduction of mechanical strain into a biochemical response in renal epithelia.

  4. Precision assembly of complex cellular microenvironments using holographic optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Glen R; Britchford, Emily; Upton, Thomas; Ware, James; Gibson, Graham M; Devaud, Yannick; Ehrbar, Martin; Padgett, Miles; Allen, Stephanie; Buttery, Lee D; Shakesheff, Kevin

    2015-02-26

    The accurate study of cellular microenvironments is limited by the lack of technologies that can manipulate cells in 3D at a sufficiently small length scale. The ability to build and manipulate multicellular microscopic structures will facilitate a more detailed understanding of cellular function in fields such as developmental and stem cell biology. We present a holographic optical tweezers based technology to accurately generate bespoke cellular micro-architectures. Using embryonic stem cells, 3D structures of varying geometries were created and stabilized using hydrogels and cell-cell adhesion methods. Control of chemical microenvironments was achieved by the temporal release of specific factors from polymer microparticles positioned within these constructs. Complex co-culture micro-environmental analogues were also generated to reproduce structures found within adult stem cell niches. The application of holographic optical tweezers-based micromanipulation will enable novel insights into biological microenvironments by allowing researchers to form complex architectures with sub-micron precision of cells, matrices and molecules.

  5. Multiplying optical tweezers force using a micro-lever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Lin, Chin-Te; Liu, Yi-Jui; Hwang, Jiann-Lih; Chung, Tien-Tung; Baldeck, Patrice L

    2011-10-10

    This study presents a photo-driven micro-lever fabricated to multiply optical forces using the two-photon polymerization 3D-microfabrication technique. The micro-lever is a second class lever comprising an optical trapping sphere, a beam, and a pivot. A micro-spring is placed between the short and long arms to characterize the induced force. This design enables precise manipulation of the micro-lever by optical tweezers at the micron scale. Under optical dragging, the sphere placed on the lever beam moves, resulting in torque that induces related force on the spring. The optical force applied at the sphere is approximately 100 to 300 pN, with a laser power of 100 to 300 mW. In this study, the optical tweezers drives the micro-lever successfully. The relationship between the optical force and the spring constant can be determined by using the principle of leverage. The arm ratio design developed in this study multiplies the applied optical force by 9. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation of spring property.

  6. Nanomanipulation of single RNA molecules by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, William; Wan, Gorby; Tenenbaum, Scott A; Li, Pan T X

    2014-08-20

    A large portion of the human genome is transcribed but not translated. In this post genomic era, regulatory functions of RNA have been shown to be increasingly important. As RNA function often depends on its ability to adopt alternative structures, it is difficult to predict RNA three-dimensional structures directly from sequence. Single-molecule approaches show potentials to solve the problem of RNA structural polymorphism by monitoring molecular structures one molecule at a time. This work presents a method to precisely manipulate the folding and structure of single RNA molecules using optical tweezers. First, methods to synthesize molecules suitable for single-molecule mechanical work are described. Next, various calibration procedures to ensure the proper operations of the optical tweezers are discussed. Next, various experiments are explained. To demonstrate the utility of the technique, results of mechanically unfolding RNA hairpins and a single RNA kissing complex are used as evidence. In these examples, the nanomanipulation technique was used to study folding of each structural domain, including secondary and tertiary, independently. Lastly, the limitations and future applications of the method are discussed.

  7. Controlled three-dimensional manipulation of vanadium oxide nanotubes with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pozos, Jose Luis; Lee, Woei Ming; Vera-Robles, Liliana Irais; Campero, Antonio; Dholakia, Kishan

    2008-12-01

    We present a direct nanotube-microsphere tagging technique for the controlled three-dimensional (3D) manipulation and transportation of vanadium oxide nanotubes (VOx-NTs) with optical tweezers. The high scattering and absorptive nature of the VOx-NTs preclude the 3D optical trapping of such nanostructures. VOx-NTs are adhered to 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane functionalized silica microspheres, which act as handles for indirectly manipulating and transporting the nanotubes in three dimensions with optical tweezers. The optical tweezers can also operate as optical scissors that can remove the dielectric handles and trim these nanotubes. This technique may be extended to the optical manipulation of nanotubes of any material.

  8. Materials for optoelectronic devices, OEICs and photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schloetterer, H.; Quillec, M.; Greene, P.D.; Bertolotti, M. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the contributors in this volume is to give a current overview on the basic properties of nonlinear optical materials for optoelectronics and integrated optics. They provide a cross-linkage between different materials (III-V, II-VI, Si-Ge, etc.), various sample dimensions (from bulk crystals to quantum dots), and a range of techniques from growth (LPE to MOMBE) and for processing from surface passivation to ion beams. Major growth techniques and materials are discussed, including the sophisticated technologies required to exploit the exciting properties of low dimensional semiconductors. These proceedings will prove an invaluable guide to the current state of optoelectronic materials development, as well as indicating the growth techniques that will be in use around the year 2000.

  9. Glass-Forming Organic Semiconductors for Optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aušra TOMKEVIČIENĖ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic electronics and optoelectronics are newly emerging fields of science and technology that cover chemistry, physics, and materials science. Electronic and optoelectronic devices using organic materials are attractive because of the materials characteristics, potentially low cost, and capability of large-area, flexible device fabrication. Such devices as OLEDs, OPVs, and OFETs involve charge transport as a main process in their operation processes, and therefore, require high-performance charge-transporting materials. This review article focuses on charge-transporting materials for use in OLEDs, OPVs, and OFETs. We have tried to arrange the charge-transporting materials in order by classifying them on the basis of their molecular structures. Molecular design concepts for charge-transporting materials and their charge-transport properties are discussed.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.4.767

  10. Terahertz optoelectronics with surface plasmon polariton diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Raj K; Genov, Dentcho A

    2014-05-09

    The field of plasmonics has experience a renaissance in recent years by providing a large variety of new physical effects and applications. Surface plasmon polaritons, i.e. the collective electron oscillations at the interface of a metal/semiconductor and a dielectric, may bridge the gap between electronic and photonic devices, provided a fast switching mechanism is identified. Here, we demonstrate a surface plasmon-polariton diode (SPPD) an optoelectronic switch that can operate at exceedingly large signal modulation rates. The SPPD uses heavily doped p-n junction where surface plasmon polaritons propagate at the interface between n and p-type GaAs and can be switched by an external voltage. The devices can operate at transmission modulation higher than 98% and depending on the doping and applied voltage can achieve switching rates of up to 1 THz. The proposed switch is compatible with the current semiconductor fabrication techniques and could lead to nanoscale semiconductor-based optoelectronics.

  11. Performance Evaluation of an Integrated Optoelectronic Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vera-Marquina

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the optical and electrical characterization of an integrated optoelectronic receiver. The receiver is composed of a photodiode and a transimpedance amplifier, both fabricated in silicon technology using a 0.8 μm BiCMOS process. The total area occupied by the photodiode is of 10,000 μm2. In a first step, the generated photocurrent of the photodiode is measured for the wavelengths of 780 nm and 830 nm at different levels of optical power. In a second step, the responsivity and quantum efficiency parameters of the photodiode are computed. Finally, an electrical measurement including the transimpedance amplifier is achieved. A potential application for this optoelectronic receiver is on the first optical communications window.

  12. Optoelectronic Devices Advanced Simulation and Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Piprek, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices transform electrical signals into optical signals and vice versa by utilizing the sophisticated interaction of electrons and light within micro- and nano-scale semiconductor structures. Advanced software tools for design and analysis of such devices have been developed in recent years. However, the large variety of materials, devices, physical mechanisms, and modeling approaches often makes it difficult to select appropriate theoretical models or software packages. This book presents a review of devices and advanced simulation approaches written by leading researchers and software developers. It is intended for scientists and device engineers in optoelectronics, who are interested in using advanced software tools. Each chapter includes the theoretical background as well as practical simulation results that help to better understand internal device physics. The software packages used in the book are available to the public, on a commercial or noncommercial basis, so that the interested r...

  13. TweezPal - Optical tweezers analysis and calibration software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Natan

    2010-11-01

    Optical tweezers, a powerful tool for optical trapping, micromanipulation and force transduction, have in recent years become a standard technique commonly used in many research laboratories and university courses. Knowledge about the optical force acting on a trapped object can be gained only after a calibration procedure which has to be performed (by an expert) for each type of trapped objects. In this paper we present TweezPal, a user-friendly, standalone Windows software tool for optical tweezers analysis and calibration. Using TweezPal, the procedure can be performed in a matter of minutes even by non-expert users. The calibration is based on the Brownian motion of a particle trapped in a stationary optical trap, which is being monitored using video or photodiode detection. The particle trajectory is imported into the software which instantly calculates position histogram, trapping potential, stiffness and anisotropy. Program summaryProgram title: TweezPal Catalogue identifier: AEGR_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 44 891 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 792 653 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Borland Delphi Computer: Any PC running Microsoft Windows Operating system: Windows 95, 98, 2000, XP, Vista, 7 RAM: 12 Mbytes Classification: 3, 4.14, 18, 23 Nature of problem: Quick, robust and user-friendly calibration and analysis of optical tweezers. The optical trap is calibrated from the trajectory of a trapped particle undergoing Brownian motion in a stationary optical trap (input data) using two methods. Solution method: Elimination of the experimental drift in position data. Direct calculation of the trap stiffness from the positional

  14. Multi-material optoelectronic fiber devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorin, F.; Yan, Wei; Volpi, Marco; Page, Alexis G.; Nguyen Dang, Tung; Qu, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The recent ability to integrate materials with different optical and optoelectronic properties in prescribed architectures within flexible fibers is enabling novel opportunities for advanced optical probes, functional surfaces and smart textiles. In particular, the thermal drawing process has known a series of breakthroughs in recent years that have expanded the range of materials and architectures that can be engineered within uniform fibers. Of particular interest in this presentation will be optoelectronic fibers that integrate semiconductors electrically addressed by conducting materials. These long, thin and flexible fibers can intercept optical radiation, localize and inform on a beam direction, detect its wavelength and even harness its energy. They hence constitute ideal candidates for applications such as remote and distributed sensing, large-area optical-detection arrays, energy harvesting and storage, innovative health care solutions, and functional fabrics. To improve performance and device complexity, tremendous progresses have been made in terms of the integrated semiconductor architectures, evolving from large fiber solid-core, to sub-hundred nanometer thin-films, nano-filaments and even nanospheres. To bridge the gap between the optoelectronic fiber concept and practical applications however, we still need to improve device performance and integration. In this presentation we will describe the materials and processing approaches to realize optoelectronic fibers, as well as give a few examples of demonstrated systems for imaging as well as light and chemical sensing. We will then discuss paths towards practical applications focusing on two main points: fiber connectivity, and improving the semiconductor microstructure by developing scalable approaches to make fiber-integrated single-crystal nanowire based devices.

  15. Optical nanofiber integrated into an optical tweezers for particle probing and manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Frawley, Mary C; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Sile Nic

    2014-01-01

    We present an integrated platform for particle manipulation consisting of a combined optical nanofiber and optical tweezers system. Individual silica microspheres were introduced to the nanofiber at arbitrary points using the optical tweezers, thereby producing pronounced dips in the fiber transmission. We show that such consistent and reversible transmission modulations depend on both particle and fiber diameter, and may be used as a reference point for in-situ nanofiber or particle size calibration. Particle arrays can be released from the optical tweezers onto the nanofiber and are propelled along the fiber length via guided light. We also demonstrate how the optical tweezers can be used to create a "particle jet" to feed a supply of microspheres to the nanofiber surface, forming a particle conveyor belt. This integrated optical platform provides a method for selective evanescent field manipulation of micron-sized particles and may facilitate studies of optical binding and light-particle interaction dynami...

  16. Experimental research and analysis of three-finger micro-tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wen-hao; XING Hao

    2005-01-01

    A new type of three-finger micro-tweezer driven by electro-static force was developed for stable manipulation and assembly of micro devices. The whole system consists of micro-tweezers and a specially designed high frequency AC power supply. The free end of the fingers closes and opens with the increase and decrease of the voltage. The tweezers can grasp and manipulate micro objects at size from 30~100 μm. A quantitative simulation method based on boundarx element method(BEM) and equation of energy conservation is introduced to analyze the non-linear behaviors of the tweezer closure. The simulation results agree well with the experimental data.

  17. Efficient loading of a single neutral atom into an optical microscopic tweezer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何军; 刘贝; 刁文婷; 王杰英; 靳刚; 王军民

    2015-01-01

    A single atom in a magneto–optical trap (MOT) with trap size (hundreds of micrometers) can be transferred into an optical microscopic tweezer with a probability of∼100%. The ability to transfer a single atom into two traps back and forth allows us to study the loading process. The loading probability is found to be insensitive to the geometric overlap of the MOT and the tweezer. It is therefore possible to perform simultaneously loading of a single atom into all sites of the tweezer array for many qubits. In particular, we present a simulation of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays of an optical microscopic tweezer. We find the same qualitative behavior for all of the trap parameters.

  18. Construction of force measuring optical tweezers instrumentation and investigations of biophysical properties of bacterial adhesion organelles

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Optical tweezers are a technique in which microscopic-sized particles, including living cells and bacteria, can be non-intrusively trapped with high accuracy solely using focused light. The technique has therefore become a powerful tool in the field of biophysics. Optical tweezers thereby provide outstanding manipulation possibilities of cells as well as semi-transparent materials, both non-invasively and non-destructively, in biological systems. In addition, optical tweezers can measure minute forces (< 10-12 N), probe molecular interactions and their energy landscapes, and apply both static and dynamic forces in biological systems in a controlled manner. The assessment of intermolecular forces with force measuring optical tweezers, and thereby the biomechanical structure of biological objects, has therefore considerably facilitated our understanding of interactions and structures of biological systems. Adhesive bacterial organelles, so called pili, mediate adhesion to host cells and are therefore crucial...

  19. Efficient loading of a single neutral atom into an optical microscopic tweezer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun; Liu, Bei; Diao, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jie-Ying; Jin, Gang; Wang, Jun-Min

    2015-04-01

    A single atom in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) with trap size (hundreds of micrometers) can be transferred into an optical microscopic tweezer with a probability of ~ 100%. The ability to transfer a single atom into two traps back and forth allows us to study the loading process. The loading probability is found to be insensitive to the geometric overlap of the MOT and the tweezer. It is therefore possible to perform simultaneously loading of a single atom into all sites of the tweezer array for many qubits. In particular, we present a simulation of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays of an optical microscopic tweezer. We find the same qualitative behavior for all of the trap parameters. Project supported by the National Major Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921601) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61205215, 11274213, and 61475091).

  20. Application of BP neural networks in non-linearity correction of optical tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziqiang WANG; Yinmei LI; Liren LOU; Henghua WEI; Zhong WANG

    2008-01-01

    The back-propagation (BP) neural network is proposed to correct nonlinearity and optimize the force measurement and calibration of an optical tweezer sys-tem. Considering the low convergence rate of the BP algo-rithm, the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm is used to improve the BP network. The proposed method is experimentally studied for force calibration in a typical optical tweezer system using hydromechanics. The result shows that with the nonlinear correction using BP net-works, the range of force measurement of an optical tweezer system is enlarged by 30% and the precision is also improved compared with the polynomial fitting method. It is demonstrated that nonlinear correction by the neural network method effectively improves the per-formance of optical tweezers without adding or changing the measuring system.

  1. Flocking multiple microparticles with automatically controlled optical tweezers: solutions and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyao; Wang, Can; Lou, Yunjiang

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an efficient approach to achieve microparticles flocking with robotics and optical tweezers technologies. All particles trapped by optical tweezers can be automatically moved toward a predefined region without collision. The main contribution of this paper lies in the proposal of several solutions to the flocking manipulation of microparticles in microenvironments. First, a simple flocking controller is proposed to generate the desired positions and velocities for particles' movement. Second, a velocity saturation method is implemented to prevent the desired velocities from exceeding a safe limit. Third, a two-layer control architecture is proposed for the motion control of optical tweezers. This architecture can help make many robotic manipulations achievable under microenvironments. The proposed approach with these solutions can be applied to many bioapplications especially in cell engineering and biomedicine. Experiments on yeast cells with a robot-tweezers system are finally performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  2. Microrheology with Optical Tweezers of gel-like materials 'is not an option'!

    CERN Document Server

    Tassieri, Manlio

    2015-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been successfully adopted as exceptionally sensitive transducers for microrheology studies of complex 'fluids'. Despite the general trend, a similar approach cannot be adopted for microrheology studies of 'gel-like' materials, e.g. living cells.

  3. Intriguing Optoelectronic Properties of Metal Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Joseph S; Christians, Jeffrey A; Kamat, Prashant V

    2016-11-09

    A new chapter in the long and distinguished history of perovskites is being written with the breakthrough success of metal halide perovskites (MHPs) as solution-processed photovoltaic (PV) absorbers. The current surge in MHP research has largely arisen out of their rapid progress in PV devices; however, these materials are potentially suitable for a diverse array of optoelectronic applications. Like oxide perovskites, MHPs have ABX3 stoichiometry, where A and B are cations and X is a halide anion. Here, the underlying physical and photophysical properties of inorganic (A = inorganic) and hybrid organic-inorganic (A = organic) MHPs are reviewed with an eye toward their potential application in emerging optoelectronic technologies. Significant attention is given to the prototypical compound methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) due to the preponderance of experimental and theoretical studies surrounding this material. We also discuss other salient MHP systems, including 2-dimensional compounds, where relevant. More specifically, this review is a critical account of the interrelation between MHP electronic structure, absorption, emission, carrier dynamics and transport, and other relevant photophysical processes that have propelled these materials to the forefront of modern optoelectronics research.

  4. Exceptional Optoelectronic Properties of Hydrogenated Bilayer Silicene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Huang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Silicon is arguably the best electronic material, but it is not a good optoelectronic material. By employing first-principles calculations and the cluster-expansion approach, we discover that hydrogenated bilayer silicene (BS shows promising potential as a new kind of optoelectronic material. Most significantly, hydrogenation converts the intrinsic BS, a strongly indirect semiconductor, into a direct-gap semiconductor with a widely tunable band gap. At low hydrogen concentrations, four ground states of single- and double-sided hydrogenated BS are characterized by dipole-allowed direct (or quasidirect band gaps in the desirable range from 1 to 1.5 eV, suitable for solar applications. At high hydrogen concentrations, three well-ordered double-sided hydrogenated BS structures exhibit direct (or quasidirect band gaps in the color range of red, green, and blue, affording white light-emitting diodes. Our findings open opportunities to search for new silicon-based light-absorption and light-emitting materials for earth-abundant, high-efficiency, optoelectronic applications.

  5. Optical tweezers for free-solution label-free single bio-molecule studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnala, Abhay; Al-Balushi, Ahmed A.; Gordon, Reuven

    2014-09-01

    Nanoaperture based trapping has developed as a significant tool among the various optical tweezer systems for trapping of very small particles down to the single nanometer range. The double nanohole aperture based trap provides a method for efficient, highly-sensitive, label-free, low-cost, free-solution single molecule trapping and detection. We use the double nanohole tweezer to understand biomolecular phenomena like protein unfolding, binding, structural conformation of DNA, protein-DNA interactions, and protein small molecule interactions.

  6. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  7. Optical tweezers formed by pure phase pupil filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wei; You, Chenglong; Wang, Mei; Yun, Maojin

    2013-09-01

    The focusing properties of vector beams have attracted great attention and quickly became the subject of extensive worldwide research due to their applications in lithography, optical storage, microscopy, material processing, and optical trapping. Focusing properties of the radially polarized beam and generalized cylindrical vector beams in high numerical aperture system with designed pure phase filter are analyzed in detail by using vector Debye diffraction theory. By utilizing diffractive optical element to partly change the polarization of vector beams, the energy density of light field in the vicinity of focus is studied by the numerical analysis. Numerical simulation result shows that optical bubbles can be obtained by changing the composition and polarization of the incident beams. At last, optical tweezers are constituted by two optical bubbles around the focus.

  8. Dynamic properties of bacterial pili measured by optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Fallman, Erik; Schedin, Staffan; Jass, Jana; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2014-01-01

    The ability of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to cause urinary tract infections is dependent on their ability to colonize the uroepithelium. Infecting bacteria ascend the urethra to the bladder and then kidneys by attaching to the uroepithelial cells via the differential expression of adhesins. P pili are associated with pyelonephritis, the more severe infection of the kidneys. In order to find means to treat pyelonephritis, it is therefore of interest to investigate the properties P pili. The mechanical behavior of individual P pili of uropathogenic Escherichia coli has recently been investigated using optical tweezers. P pili, whose main part constitutes the PapA rod, composed of ~1000 PapA subunits in a helical arrangement, are distributed over the bacterial surface and mediate adhesion to host cells. We have earlier studied P pili regarding its stretching/elongation properties where we have found and characterized three different elongation regions, of which one constitute an unfolding of the quate...

  9. Microrheology of concentrated DNA solutions using optical tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun S Rajkumar; B M Jaffar Ali

    2008-06-01

    Semiflexible biopolymers play a vital role in shaping cellular structure and rigidity. In this work, we report the determination of microrheological properties of concentrated, double-stranded calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) solutions using passive, laser-scattering based particle-tracking methodology. From power spectral analysis, we obtain dynamic shear moduli of the polymer solutions stretching over three decades of frequency (100–103 Hz) and over concentration ranges spanning from very dilute to concentrated regime. We also study the effects of altered ionic strength and denaturation on the shear modulus. Our results indicate that (CT-DNA) exhibits predominantly elastic behaviour in the concentration range we probed. From the measurements of the plateau shear modulus, p, we conclude that DNA generally behaves like a semiflexible polymer in a good solvent even at low ionic strength. We have thus demonstrated application of passive microrheological method using optical tweezers to DNA solutions. Further extensions of the technique and its applications are discussed.

  10. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U. [Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Heinrich-Heine University, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45 deg., smaller angles give a full 2{pi} phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  11. Investigating collagen self-assembly with optical tweezers microrheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Nancy; Shayegan, Marjan; Altindal, Tuba

    Collagen is the fundamental structural protein in vertebrates. Assembled from individual triple-helical proteins to make strong fibres, collagen is a beautiful example of a hierarchical self-assembling system. Using optical tweezers to perform microrheology measurements, we explore the dynamics of interactions between collagens responsible for their self-assembly and examine the development of heterogeneous mechanics during assembly into fibrillar gels. Telopeptides, short non-helical regions that flank the triple helix, have long been known to facilitate fibril self-assembly. We find that their removal not only slows down fibril nucleation but also results in a significant frequency-dependent reduction in the elastic modulus of collagens in solution. We interpret these results in terms of a model in which telopeptides facilitate transient intermolecular interactions, which enhance network connectivity in solution and lead to more rapid assembly in fibril-forming conditions. Current address: Department of Physics, McGill University.

  12. Speckle Optical Tweezers: Micromanipulation with Random Light Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Volpe, Giorgio; Callegari, Agnese; Volpe, Giovanni; Gigan, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Current optical manipulation techniques rely on carefully engineered setups and samples. Although similar conditions are routinely met in research laboratories, it is still a challenge to manipulate microparticles when the environment is not well controlled and known a priori, since optical imperfections and scattering limit the applicability of this technique to real-life situations, such as in biomedical or microfluidic applications. Nonetheless, scattering of coherent light by disordered structures gives rise to speckles, random diffraction patterns with well-defined statistical properties. Here, we experimentally demonstrate how speckle fields can become a versatile tool to efficiently perform fundamental optical manipulation tasks such as trapping, guiding and sorting. We anticipate that the simplicity of these "speckle optical tweezers" will greatly broaden the perspectives of optical manipulation for real-life applications.

  13. Two-laser optical tweezers with a blinking beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamperska, Weronika; Masajada, Jan; Drobczyński, Sławomir; Gusin, Paweł

    2017-07-01

    We report on a two-laser holographic optical tweezers setup and present its two major advantages over single-laser one. First, the trap stiffness of a weak trapping beam can be measured with a considerable accuracy. Second, a novel method of examining local viscosity of fluid is proposed. Both measurements are performed based on forcing the oscillations of a microscopic polystyrene bead placed between two optical traps. The two beams are generated by separate laser sources and therefore their trapping power can vary. Moreover, a stronger trap 'blinks', modulated by an electronic shutter. The blinking frequency can be precisely adjusted to the experimental conditions, which results in high accuracy of the measurements.

  14. Novedosa pinza lumínica New light tweezer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bernstein

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta la primera pinza adaptada a la novedosa tecnología lumínica, mediante diodo ultrabrillante, sin cables ni fibra óptica, a fin de lograr la adecuada iluminación de cavidades oscuras de difícil acceso, y que gracias a su cobertura aislante y su punta libre, permite la cauterización bajo buena iluminación de vasos sangrantes distales, sin lesionar sitios de apoyo accidental de sus ramas.Introducing the first tweezer adjusted to the newest lighting technology though ultra-bright diode, without cables nor optical fiber to obtain the proper illumination of dark and hard acces caves, and thanks to its insulating cover, and its free point allows the cauterization under good illumination of bloody vasels without injurying sites of accidental supports of its branches.

  15. Computer simulation of the collision frequency of two particles in optical tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Sheng-Hua; Li Yin-Mei; Lou Li-Ren; Sun Zhi-Wei

    2005-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been successfully used in the study of colloid science. In most applications people are concerned with the behaviour of a single particle held in the optical tweezers. Recently, the ability of the optical tweezers to simultaneously hold two particles has been used to determine the stability ratio of colloidal dispersion. This new development stimulates the efforts to explore the characteristics of a two-particle system in the optical tweezers.An infinite spherical potential well has been used to estimate the collision frequency for two particles in the optical trap based on a Monte Carlo simulation. In this article, a more reasonable harmonic potential, commonly accepted for the optical tweezers, is adopted in a Monte Carlo simulation of the collision frequency. The effect of hydrodynamic interaction of particles in the trap is also considered. The simulation results based on this improved model show quantitatively that the collision frequency drops down sharply at first and then decreases slowly as the distance between the two particles increases. The simulation also shows how the collision frequency is related to the stiffness of the optical tweezers.

  16. Investigation of inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers for 3D manipulation and force sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxiang; Yu, Miao

    2009-08-03

    Optical tweezers provide a versatile tool in biological and physical researches. Optical tweezers based on optical fibers are more flexible and ready to be integrated when compared with those based on microscope objectives. In this paper, the three-dimensional (3D) trapping ability of an inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers is demonstrated. The trapping efficiency with respect to displacement is experimentally calibrated along two dimensions. The system is studied numerically using a modified ray-optics model. The spring constants obtained in the experiment are predicted by simulations. It is found both experimentally and numerically that there is a critical value for the fiber inclination angle to retain the 3D trapping ability. The inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers are demonstrated to be more robust to z-axis misalignment than the counter-propagating fiber optical tweezers, which is a special case of th former when the fiber inclination angle is 90 masculine. This inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers can serve as both a manipulator and a force sensor in integrated systems, such as microfluidic systems and lab-on-a-chip systems.

  17. MatLab program for precision calibration of optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2004-06-01

    Optical tweezers are used as force transducers in many types of experiments. The force they exert in a given experiment is known only after a calibration. Computer codes that calibrate optical tweezers with high precision and reliability in the ( x, y)-plane orthogonal to the laser beam axis were written in MatLab (MathWorks Inc.) and are presented here. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number of factors that affect this power spectrum. First, cross-talk between channels in 2D position measurements is tested for, and eliminated if detected. Then, the Lorentzian power spectrum that results from the Einstein-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck theory, is fitted to the low-frequency part of the experimental spectrum in order to obtain an initial guess for parameters to be fitted. Finally, a more complete theory is fitted, a theory that optionally accounts for the frequency dependence of the hydrodynamic drag force and hydrodynamic interaction with a nearby cover slip, for effects of finite sampling frequency (aliasing), for effects of anti-aliasing filters in the data acquisition electronics, and for unintended "virtual" filtering caused by the position detection system. Each of these effects can be left out or included as the user prefers, with user-defined parameters. Several tests are applied to the experimental data during calibration to ensure that the data comply with the theory used for their interpretation: Independence of x- and y-coordinates, Hooke's law, exponential distribution of power spectral values, uncorrelated Gaussian scatter of residual values. Results are given with statistical errors and covariance matrix. Program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier: ADTV Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland. Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV Computer for

  18. Quantum Transport and Optoelectronics in Gapped Graphene Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 Aug 2011 to 31 Jul 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE QUANTUM TRANSPORT AND OPTOELECTRONICS IN GAPPED GRAPHENE...nanodevices. To achieve this we will combine optoelectronic and plasmonic device structures with atomically seamless electrical contacts. The devices will...be based on fully band gap engineered bilayer graphene and graphene nanoribbons, resulting in all-carbon nanoelectronic devices with optoelectronic

  19. Automated multi-parametric sorting of micron-sized particles via multi-trap laser tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputa, Daniel S.

    The capabilities of laser tweezers have rapidly expanded since the first demonstration by Ashkin and co-workers in 1970 of the ability to trap particles using optical energy. Laser tweezers have been used to measure piconewton forces in many biological and material science application, sort bacteria, measure DNA bond strength, and even perform microsurgery. The laser tweezers system developed for this dissertation foreshadows the next generation of laser tweezer systems that provide automated particle sorted based upon multiple criteria. Many laser tweezer sorting applications today entail the operator sorting cells from a bulk sample, one by one. This dissertation demonstrates the technologies of pattern recognition and image processing that allow for an entire microscope slide to be sorted without any operator intervention. We already live in an automated world where the cars we drive are built by machines instead of humans. The technology is there, and the only factors limiting the advancements of fully automated biological instrumentation is the lack of developers with the appropriate knowledge sets. This dissertation introduces the concept of sorting particles via a multi-parametric approach where several parameters such as size, fluorescence, and Raman spectra are used as sorting criteria. Since the advent of laser tweezers, several groups have demonstrated the ability to sort cells and other particle by size, or by fluorescence, or by any other parameter, but to our knowledge there does not exist a laser tweezer sorting system that can sort particles based upon multiple parameters. Sorting via a single parameter can be a severe limitation as the method lacks the robustness and class specificity that exists when sorting based upon multiple parameters. Simply put, it makes more sense to determine the worth of a baseball card by considering it's condition as well as it's age, rather then solely upon its condition. By adding another parameter such as the name of

  20. Focused Ion Beam Technology for Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reithmaier, J. P.; Bach, L.; Forchel, A.

    2003-08-01

    High-resolution proximity free lithography was developed using InP as anorganic resist for ion beam exposure. InP is very sensitive on ion beam irradiation and show a highly nonlinear dose dependence with a contrast function comparable to organic electron beam resists. In combination with implantation induced quantum well intermixing this new lithographic technique based on focused ion beams is used to realize high performance nano patterned optoelectronic devices like complex coupled distributed feedback (DFB) and distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers.

  1. Graphene optoelectronics synthesis, characterization, properties, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    bin M Yusoff, Abdul Rashid

    2014-01-01

    This first book on emerging applications for this innovative material gives an up-to-date account of the many opportunities graphene offers high-end optoelectronics.The text focuses on potential as well as already realized applications, discussing metallic and passive components, such as transparent conductors and smart windows, as well as high-frequency devices, spintronics, photonics, and terahertz devices. Also included are sections on the fundamental properties, synthesis, and characterization of graphene. With its unique coverage, this book will be welcomed by materials scientists, solid-

  2. Organic ferroelectric opto-electronic memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Asadi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Memory is a prerequisite for many electronic devices. Organic non-volatile memory devices based on ferroelectricity are a promising approach towards the development of a low-cost memory technology based on a simple cross-bar array. In this review article we discuss the latest developments in this area with a focus on the most promising opto-electronic device concept, i.e., bistable rectifying diodes. The integration of these diodes into larger memory arrays is discussed. Through a clever design of the electrodes we demonstrate light emitting diodes with integrated built-in switches that can be applied in signage applications.

  3. Statistical conjugated polymers comprising optoelectronically distinct units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinger, Jon; Sun, Jing; Gao, Dong; Karl, Dominik; Seferos, Dwight S

    2013-03-12

    Poly(3-heptylselenophene)-stat-poly(3-hexylthiophene) is synthesized and characterized in terms of its crystallinity and performance in an organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell. Despite the random distribution of units along the polymer main chain, the material is semi-crystalline, as demonstrated by differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray diffraction. Thin-film absorption suggests an increased compatibility than seen with 3-hexylselenophene monomer. Optoelectronic properties are an average of the two homopolymers, and OPV performance is enhanced by a broadened absorption profile and a favorable morphology.

  4. System of Optoelectronic Sensors for Breath Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczyk Janusz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an integrated laser absorption system as a potential tool for breath analysis for clinical diagnostics, online therapy monitoring and metabolic disorder control. The sensors operate basing on cavity enhanced spectroscopy and multi-pass spectroscopy supported by wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The aspects concerning selection of operational spectral range and minimization of interference are also discussed. Tests results of the constructed devices collected with reference samples of biomarkers are also presented. The obtained data provide an opportunity to analyse applicability of optoelectronic sensors in medical screening.

  5. In-situ nanochemistry for optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Jin

    This thesis describes recent results on simple methods to arrange nanosize objects such as semiconductor nanocrystals, noble metal nanoparticles, and upconversion nanophosphors by means of top-down processes. Specific focus is directed towards approaches to produce predefined patterns of various nanostructure materials using optical lithography for direct writing of films for optoelectronic and electronic devices. To obtain photo-patternability, the nanostructure materials [for example semiconductor nanocrystals (CdSe, CdTe, PbSe), metallic nanoparticles (Ag), upconversion nanophosphors (Er3+/Yb 3+ or Tm3+/Yb3+ co-doped NaYF4 ), and transparent conducting oxide nanoparticles (ITO, ZnO)] were functionalized by incorporation of the functional ligand t-butoxycarbonyl (t-BOC) which has an acid-labile moiety. The t-BOC group undergoes a cleavage, when subjected to UV irradiation in the presence of a photo acid generator (PAG) to releases isobutene and carbon dioxide. Depending on the need of the application, either the exposed regions (negative pattern) or the non-exposed regions (positive pattern) could be developed from the exposed films by appropriate solvent selection. The photo exposed regions of the film are rendered hydrophilic due to the degradation of the t-BOC, the un-exposed regions remain hydrophobic. This solubility change in the QDs is the basis of their patternablity. The un-exposed regions can be removed to obtain the negative pattern by washing with hydrophobic solvents, whereas the exposed regions can be selectively removed to obtain positive pattern by washing with hydrophilic solvents. This change in the surface chemistry results in the ability to photo-pattern the various nanostructure materials where desired for a number of optoelectronic device geometries. We demonstrate that the ultimate resolution (linewidth and spacing) of this technique is below submicron. Details on technological aspects concerning nanoparticle patterning as well as practical

  6. Monolithically integrated optoelectronic down-converter (MIOD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoi, Efrim L.; Venus, G. B.; Khazan, A. A.; Gorfinkel, Vera B.; Kompa, Guenter; Avrutin, Evgenii A.; Thayne, Iain G.; Barrow, David A.; Marsh, John H.

    1995-06-01

    Optoelectronic down-conversion of very high-frequency amplitude-modulated signals using a semiconductor laser simultaneously as a local oscillator and a mixer is proposed. Three possible constructions of a monolithically integrated down-converter are considered theoretically: a four-terminal semiconductor laser with dual pumping current/modal gain control, and both a passively mode-locked and a passively Q-switched semiconductor laser monolithically integrated with an electroabsorption or pumping current modulator. Experimental verification of the feasibility of the concept of down conversion in a laser diode is presented.

  7. Coherent optoelectronics with single quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zrenner, A; Ester, P; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, S; Huebner, M C; Lackmann, L; Stufler, S [Universitaet Paderborn, Department Physik, Warburger Strasse 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany); Bichler, M [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: zrenner@mail.upb.de

    2008-11-12

    The optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots are in many respects similar to those of atoms. Since quantum dots can be defined by state-of-the-art semiconductor technologies, they exhibit long-term stability and allow for well-controlled and efficient interactions with both optical and electrical fields. Resonant ps excitation of single quantum dot photodiodes leads to new classes of coherent optoelectronic functions and devices, which exhibit precise state preparation, phase-sensitive optical manipulations and the control of quantum states by electrical fields.

  8. Coherent optoelectronics with single quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrenner, A.; Ester, P.; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, S.; Hübner, M. C.; Lackmann, L.; Stufler, S.; Bichler, M.

    2008-11-01

    The optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots are in many respects similar to those of atoms. Since quantum dots can be defined by state-of-the-art semiconductor technologies, they exhibit long-term stability and allow for well-controlled and efficient interactions with both optical and electrical fields. Resonant ps excitation of single quantum dot photodiodes leads to new classes of coherent optoelectronic functions and devices, which exhibit precise state preparation, phase-sensitive optical manipulations and the control of quantum states by electrical fields.

  9. Colloidal quantum dots as optoelectronic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, Milana; Yamanaka, Takayuki; Sun, Ke; Li, Yang; Yang, Jianyong; Ramadurai, Dinakar; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    2007-02-01

    Novel optoelectronic systems based on ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals are addressed in this paper. Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots and related quantum-wire structures have been characterized optically; these optical measurements include those made on self-assembled monolayers of DNA molecules terminated on one end with a common substrate and on the other end with TiO II quantum dots. The electronic properties of these structures are modeled and compared with experiment. The characterization and application of ensembles of colloidal quantum dots with molecular interconnects are considered. The chemically-directed assembly of ensembles of colloidal quantum dots with biomolecular interconnects is demonstrated with quantum dot densities in excess of 10 +17 cm -3. A number of novel photodetectors have been designed based on the combined use of double-barrier quantum-well injectors, colloidal quantum dots, and conductive polymers. Optoelectronic devices including photodetectors and solar cells based on threedimensional ensembles of quantum dots are considered along with underlying phenomena such as miniband formation and the robustness of minibands to displacements of quantum dots in the ensemble.

  10. Pole movement in electronic and optoelectronic oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Pal, S.; Biswas, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    An RLC circuit with poles on the left half of the complex frequency plane is capable of executing transient oscillations. During this period, energy conversion from potential to kinetic and from kinetic to potential continuously goes on, until the stored energy is lost in dissipation through the resistance. On the other hand, in an electronic or opto-electronic oscillator with an embedded RLC circuit, the poles are forcibly placed on the right-half plane (RHP) and as far as practicable away from the imaginary axis in order to help the growth of oscillation as quickly as possible. And ultimately, it is imagined that, like the case of an ideal linear harmonic oscillator, the poles are frozen on the imaginary axis so that the oscillation neither grows nor decays. The authors feel that this act of holding the poles right on the imaginary axis is a theoretical conjecture in a soft or hard self-excited oscillator. In this article, a detailed discussion on pole movement in an electronic and opto-electronic oscillator is carried out from the basic concept. A new analytical method for estimating the time-dependent part of the pole is introduced here.

  11. Reconfigurable Optical Interconnections Using Dynamic Optoelectronic Holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Elmar

    1988-04-01

    Increasing complexity and processing speed of electronic circuits and a high device density have led to serious problems in electrical interconnections. Their limitations arise from their signal transmission capacity. power consumption. crosstalk. and reliability. Optical links may solve such problems by offering high data rates of several gigabits per second. large fanouts of up to 100 loads. good reliability and less power expenditure. Optical fibers, integrated optical waveguides or free-space transmission links may be applicable. For the free-space links, lenses. mirrors and holograms can be used to guide the light waves. In this paper, reconfigurable optical interconnection schemes are proposed and described which are based on optoelectronic holograms. Their interference patterns can be changed dynamically. To establish connections as free-space links, the light beams emitted from even hundreds of light sources are imaged onto an array of small dynamic holograms. Their interference patterns are optically and electronically controllable. These holograms diffract and focus each of the incident light beams individually onto the receiving photo-diodes. By changing the hologram interference patterns dynamically. an optical switch is obtained. It renders the establishment of reconfigurable optical interconnections. As optoelectronic holograms very-high-resolution spatial light modulators are proposed.

  12. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  13. Fiber optical tweezers for microscale and nanoscale particle manipulation and force sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxiang

    2011-12-01

    Optical tweezers have been an important tool in biology and physics for studying single molecules and colloidal systems. Most of current optical tweezers are built with microscope objectives, which are: i) expensive, ii) bulky and hard to integrate, iii) sensitive to environmental fluctuations, iv) limited in terms of working distances from the substrate, and v) rigid with the requirements on the substrate (transparent substrate made with glass and with a fixed thickness). These limitations of objective-based optical tweezers prevent them from being miniaturized. Fiber optical tweezers can provide a solution for cost reduction and miniaturization, and these optical tweezers can be potentially used in microfluidic systems. However, the existing fiber optical tweezers have the following limitations: i) low trapping efficiency due to weakly focused beams, ii) lack of the ability to control the positions of multiple particles simultaneously, and iii) limited functionalities. The overall objective of this dissertation work is to further the fundamental understanding of fiber optical tweezers through experimental study and modeling, and to develop novel fiber optical tweezers systems to enhance the capability and functionalities of fiber optical tweezers as microscale and nanoscale manipulators/sensors. The contributions of this dissertation work are summarized as follows. i) An enhanced understanding of the inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers (DFOTs) system has been achieved. Stable three dimensional (3D) optical trapping of a single micron-sized particle has been experimentally demonstrated. This is the first time that the trapping efficiency has been calibrated and the stiffness of the trap has been obtained in the experiments, which has been carried out by using two methods: the drag force method and power spectrum analysis. Such calibration enables the system to be used as a picoNewton-level force sensor in addition to a particle manipulator. The influence of

  14. Optoelectronic sensors for subsea oil and gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    McStay, D.; Shiach, G.; Nolan, A.; McAvoy, S.

    2007-07-01

    The potential for optoelectronic sensor technology to provide the monitoring and control systems required for advanced subsea hydrocarbon production management is described. The utilisation of optoelectronic sensor technology to produce a new class of subsea Christmas Tree with in-built enhanced production monitoring and control systems as well as effective environmental monitoring systems is reported.

  15. Functionalization of Semiconductor Nanomaterials for Optoelectronic Devices And Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-04

    alternative for single quarter wavelength coating. Previous investigations on Ta2O5 include corrosion protection coating, electrochromic devices ...Functionalization of semiconductor nanomaterials for optoelectronic devices and components 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0136 5c. PROGRAM...Distribution A 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES None 14. ABSTRACT Various semiconductor nanomaterials were functionalized for optoelectronic devices , such

  16. Multiple Quantum Well (MQW) Devices For Monolithic Integrated Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Thomas H.

    1988-05-01

    Semiconductor MQWs represent a new technology for opto-electronics. These MQWs have an electroabsorption effect approximately 50 times larger than conventional semiconductors. They are compatible with existing source and detector material systems and produce devices that are compact and high speed, which makes them useful for monolithic integrated optoelectronic devices.

  17. Bulky melamine-based Zn-porphyrin tweezer as a CD probe of molecular chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Ana G; Vantomme, Ghislaine; Negrón-Abril, Yashira L; Lubian, Elisa; Saielli, Giacomo; Menegazzo, Ileana; Cordero, Roselynn; Proni, Gloria; Nakanishi, Koji; Carofiglio, Tommaso; Berova, Nina

    2011-10-01

    The transfer of chirality from a guest molecule to an achiral host is the subject of significant interest especially when, upon chiral induction, the chiroptical response of the host/guest complex can effectively report the absolute configuration (AC) of the guest. For more than a decade, dimeric metalloporphyrin hosts (tweezers) have been successfully applied as chirality probes for determination of the AC for a wide variety of chiral synthetic compounds and natural products. The objective of this study is to investigate the utility of a new class of melamine-bridged Zn-porphyrin tweezers as sensitive AC reporters. A combined approach based on an experimental CD analysis and a theoretical prediction of the prevailing interporphyrin helicity demonstrates that these tweezers display favorable properties for chiral recognition. Herein, we discuss the application of the melamine-bridged tweezer to the chiral recognition of a diverse set of chiral guests, such as 1,2-diamines, α-amino-esters and amides, secondary alcohols, and 1,2-amino-alcohols. The bulky periphery and the presence of a rigid porphyrin linkage lead, in some cases, to a more enhanced CD sensitivity than that reported earlier with other tweezers.

  18. Numerical study of the properties of optical vortex array laser tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun-Fu; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2013-11-01

    Chu et al. constructed a kind of Ince-Gaussian modes (IGM)-based vortex array laser beams consisting of p x p embedded optical vortexes from Ince-Gaussian modes, IG(e)(p,p) modes [Opt. Express 16, 19934 (2008)]. Such an IGM-based vortex array laser beams maintains its vortex array profile during both propagation and focusing, and is applicable to optical tweezers. This study uses the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method to study the properties of the IGM-based vortex array laser tweezers while it traps dielectric particles. This study calculates the resultant force exerted on the spherical dielectric particles of different sizes situated at the IGM-based vortex array laser beam waist. Numerical results show that the number of trapping spots of a structure light (i.e. IGM-based vortex laser beam), is depended on the relation between the trapped particle size and the structure light beam size. While the trapped particle is small comparing to the beam size of the IGM-based vortex array laser beams, the IGM-based vortex array laser beams tweezers are suitable for multiple traps. Conversely, the tweezers is suitable for single traps. The results of this study is useful to the future development of the vortex array laser tweezers applications.

  19. Automatic real time evaluation of red blood cell elasticity by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Diógenes S; Silva, Diego C N; Williams, Ajoke J; Bezerra, Marcos A C; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E

    2015-05-01

    Optical tweezers have been used to trap, manipulate, and measure individual cell properties. In this work, we show that the association of a computer controlled optical tweezers system with image processing techniques allows rapid and reproducible evaluation of cell deformability. In particular, the deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) plays a key role in the transport of oxygen through the blood microcirculation. The automatic measurement processes consisted of three steps: acquisition, segmentation of images, and measurement of the elasticity of the cells. An optical tweezers system was setup on an upright microscope equipped with a CCD camera and a motorized XYZ stage, computer controlled by a Labview platform. On the optical tweezers setup, the deformation of the captured RBC was obtained by moving the motorized stage. The automatic real-time homemade system was evaluated by measuring RBCs elasticity from normal donors and patients with sickle cell anemia. Approximately 150 erythrocytes were examined, and the elasticity values obtained by using the developed system were compared to the values measured by two experts. With the automatic system, there was a significant time reduction (60×) of the erythrocytes elasticity evaluation. Automated system can help to expand the applications of optical tweezers in hematology and hemotherapy.

  20. Mapping force of interaction between PLGA nanoparticle with cell membrane using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhajed, Suyash; Gu, Ling; Homayoni, Homa; Nguyen, Kytai; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-03-01

    Drug delivery using magnetic (Fe 3 O4) Poly Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA) nanoparticles is finding increasing usage in therapeutic applications due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility and targeted localization. Since optical tweezers allow non-contact, highly sensitive force measurement, we utilized optical tweezers for studying interaction forces between the Fe 3 O4 -PLGA nanoparticles with prostate cancer PC3 cells. Presence of Fe 3 O4 within the PLGA shell allowed efficient trapping of these nanoparticles in near-IR optical tweezers. The conglomerated PLGA nanoparticles could be dispersed by use of the optical tweezers. Calibration of trapping stiffness as a function of laser beam power was carried out using equipartition theorem method, where the mean square displacement was measured with high precision using time-lapse fluorescence imaging of the nanoparticles. After the trapped PLGA nanoparticle was brought in close vicinity of the PC3 cell membrane, displacement of the nanoparticle from trap center was measured as a function of time. In short time scale (30 sec) , whiletheforceofinteractionwaswithin 0.2 pN , theforceincreasedbeyond 1 pNatlongertimescales (~ 10 min). We will present the results of the time-varying force of interactions between PLGA nanoparticles with PC3 cells using optical tweezers.

  1. Inactivation of Spores of Bacillus Species by Wet Heat: Studies on Single Spores Using Laser Tweezers Taman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    germination using phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and optical tweezers, Nature Protocols , (04 2011): . doi: 05/11...multiple individual spores [ Nature Protocols , 6, 625 (2011)]. (1e) We developed a multiple-trap laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) array for

  2. tweezercalib 2.0: Faster version of MatLab package for precise calibration of optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Martin; Tolic-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    We present a vectorized version of the MatLab (MathWorks Inc) package tweezercalib for calibration of optical tweezers with precision. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number...

  3. Introduction to the new journal: Frontiers of Optoelectronics in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bingkun ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    @@ China, together with the world, has made enormous achievements in the field of optoelectronics in recent years and is still now undergoing the processes of rapid advancement.Chinese Researchers have devoted themselves to finding out ways to solve the problems in optoelectronics, and have made substantial progress theoretically and experimentally.Thus, a platform is needed on which researchers could share their new findings and technological advances in the field of optoelectronics and related disciplines with colleagues around the world.The new launched journal, Frontiers of Optoelectronics in China, aims to serve such a platform that provides a way for scientists all over the world to share the ideas and technologies in the field of optoelectronics.

  4. Improved antireflection coated microspheres for biological applications of optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Valentina; Sonnberger, Aaron; Abdosamadi, Mohammad K.; McDonald, Craig; Schäffer, Erik; McGloin, David

    2016-09-01

    The success of optical tweezers in cellular biology1 is in part due to the wide range of forces that can be applied, from femto- to hundreds of pico-Newtons; nevertheless extending the range of applicable forces to the nanoNewton regime opens access to a new set of phenomena that currently lie beyond optical manipulation. A successful approach to overcome the conventional limits on trapping forces involves the optimization of the trapped probes. Jannasch et al.2 demonstrated that an anti-reflective shell of nanoporous titanium dioxide (aTiO2, nshell = 1.75) on a core particle made out of titanium dioxide in the anatase phase (cTiO2, ncore = 2.3) results in trappable microspheres capable to reach forces above 1 nN. Here we present how the technique can be further improved by coating the high refractive index microspheres with an additional anti-reflective shell made out of silica (SiO2). This external shell not only improves the trap stability for microspheres of different sizes, but also enables the use of functionalization techniques already established for commercial silica beads in biological experiments. We are also investigating the use of these new microspheres as probes to measure adhesion forces between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) in effector T-Cells and will present preliminary results comparing standard and high-index beads.

  5. Toward automated formation of microsphere arrangements using multiplexed optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Keshav; Bollavaram, Manasa; Banerjee, Ashis G.

    2016-09-01

    Optical tweezers offer certain advantages such as multiplexing using a programmable spatial light modulator, flexibility in the choice of the manipulated object and the manipulation medium, precise control, easy object release, and minimal object damage. However, automated manipulation of multiple objects in parallel, which is essential for efficient and reliable formation of micro-scale assembly structures, poses a difficult challenge. There are two primary research issues in addressing this challenge. First, the presence of stochastic Langevin force giving rise to Brownian motion requires motion control for all the manipulated objects at fast rates of several Hz. Second, the object dynamics is non-linear and even difficult to represent analytically due to the interaction of multiple optical traps that are manipulating neighboring objects. As a result, automated controllers have not been realized for tens of objects, particularly with three dimensional motions with guaranteed collision avoidances. In this paper, we model the effect of interacting optical traps on microspheres with significant Brownian motions in stationary fluid media, and develop simplified state-space representations. These representations are used to design a model predictive controller to coordinate the motions of several spheres in real time. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the utility of the controller in automatically forming desired arrangements of varying configurations starting with randomly dispersed microspheres.

  6. Rheological properties of cells measured by optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Yareni A; Pontes, Bruno; Ether, Diney S; Pires, Luis B; Araujo, Glauber R; Frases, Susana; Romão, Luciana F; Farina, Marcos; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Viana, Nathan B; Nussenzveig, H Moysés

    2016-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of cells have been investigated by a variety of techniques. However, the experimental data reported in literature for viscoelastic moduli differ by up to three orders of magnitude. This has been attributed to differences in techniques and models for cell response as well as to the natural variability of cells. In this work we develop and apply a new methodology based on optical tweezers to investigate the rheological behavior of fibroblasts, neurons and astrocytes in the frequency range from 1Hz to 35Hz, determining the storage and loss moduli of their membrane-cortex complex. To avoid distortions associated with cell probing techniques, we use a previously developed method that takes into account the influence of under bead cell thickness and bead immersion. These two parameters were carefully measured for the three cell types used. Employing the soft glass rheology model, we obtain the scaling exponent and the Young's modulus for each cell type. The obtained viscoelastic moduli are in the order of Pa. Among the three cell types, astrocytes have the lowest elastic modulus, while neurons and fibroblasts exhibit a more solid-like behavior. Although some discrepancies with previous results remain and may be inevitable in view of natural variability, the methodology developed in this work allows us to explore the viscoelastic behavior of the membrane-cortex complex of different cell types as well as to compare their viscous and elastic moduli, obtained under identical and well-defined experimental conditions, relating them to the cell functions.

  7. Accurate measurement of microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Forbes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that matter may be trapped by optical fields with high intensity gradients. Once trapped, it is then possible to manipulate microscopic particles using such optical fields, in so-called optical tweezers. Such optical trapping and tweezing systems have found widespread application across diverse fields in science, from applied biology to fundamental physics. In this article we outline the design and construction of an optical trapping and tweezing system, and show how the resulting interaction of the laser light with microscopic particles may be understood in terms of the transfer of linear and angular momentum of light. We demonstrate experimentally the use of our optical tweezing configuration for the measurement of microscopic forces and torques. In particular, we make use of digital holography to create so-called vortex laser beams, capable of transferring orbital angular momentum to particles. The use of such novel laser beams in an optical trapping and tweezing set-up allows for the control of biological species at the single-cell level.

  8. Exclusion-Zone Dynamics Explored with Microfluidics and Optical Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István N. Huszár

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The exclusion zone (EZ is a boundary region devoid of macromolecules and microscopic particles formed spontaneously in the vicinity of hydrophilic surfaces. The exact mechanisms behind this remarkable phenomenon are still not fully understood and are debated. We measured the short- and long-time-scale kinetics of EZ formation around a Nafion gel embedded in specially designed microfluidic devices. The time-dependent kinetics of EZ formation follow a power law with an exponent of 0.6 that is strikingly close to the value of 0.5 expected for a diffusion-driven process. By using optical tweezers we show that exclusion forces, which are estimated to fall in the sub-pN regime, persist within the fully-developed EZ, suggesting that EZ formation is not a quasi-static but rather an irreversible process. Accordingly, the EZ-forming capacity of the Nafion gel could be exhausted with time, on a scale of hours in the presence of 1 mM Na2HPO4. EZ formation may thus be a non-equilibrium thermodynamic cross-effect coupled to a diffusion-driven transport process. Such phenomena might be particularly important in the living cell by providing mechanical cues within the complex cytoplasmic environment.

  9. Characterization of periodic cavitation in an optical tweezer

    CERN Document Server

    Carmona-Sosa, Viridiana; Quinto-Su, Pedro A

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic vapor explosions or cavitation bubbles can be generated periodically in an optical tweezer with a microparticle that partially absorbs at the trapping laser wavelength. In this work we correlate the size of the cavitation bubbles with the cycle frequency for microparticles with a diameter of 3 $\\mu$m. We use high speed video recording to measure the maximum bubble sizes and a fast photodiode to collect the trapping laser light scattered by both the particle and the transient bubble. We find an inverse relation between maximum bubble size and cycle frequency, consistent with a longer displacement of the microbead induced by larger bubbles and hence a longer time back to the waist. More than $94 \\%$ of the measured maximum bubble radiuses are in the range between 2 and 6 $\\mu$m, while the same percentage of the measured frequencies are between 10 and 200 Hz. The width of the scattered light signal for both particle and bubble during cavitation is proportional to the predicted lifetime for a spherica...

  10. Fiber based optical tweezers for simultaneous in situ force exertion and measurements in a 3D polyacrylamide gel compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M; Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-07-01

    Optical tweezers play an important role in biological applications. However, it is difficult for traditional optical tweezers based on objective lenses to work in a three-dimensional (3D) solid far away from the substrate. In this work, we develop a fiber based optical trapping system, namely inclined dual fiber optical tweezers, that can simultaneously apply and measure forces both in water and in a 3D polyacrylamide gel matrix. In addition, we demonstrate in situ, non-invasive characterization of local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide gel by measurements on an embedded bead. The fiber optical tweezers measurements agree well with those of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The inclined dual fiber optical tweezers provide a promising and versatile tool for cell mechanics study in 3D environments.

  11. Temperature-dependent conformations of a membrane supported zinc porphyrin tweezer by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widom, Julia R; Lee, Wonbae; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Molinski, Tadeusz F; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Marcus, Andrew H

    2013-07-25

    We studied the equilibrium conformations of a zinc porphyrin tweezer composed of two carboxylphenyl-functionalized zinc tetraphenyl porphyrin subunits connected by a 1,4-butyndiol spacer, which was suspended inside the amphiphilic regions of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) liposomes. By combining phase-modulation two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D FS) with linear absorbance and fluorimetry, we determined that the zinc porphyrin tweezer adopts a mixture of folded and extended conformations in the membrane. By fitting an exciton-coupling model to a series of data sets recorded over a range of temperatures (17-85 °C) and at different laser center wavelengths, we determined that the folded form of the tweezer is stabilized by a favorable change in the entropy of the local membrane environment. Our results provide insights toward understanding the balance of thermodynamic factors that govern molecular assembly in membranes.

  12. Hong-Ou-Mandel atom interferometry in tunnel-coupled optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Brian; Kaufman, Adam; Reynolds, Collin; Wall, Michael; Foss-Feig, Michael; Hazzard, Kaden; Rey, Ana Maria; Regal, Cindy

    2014-05-01

    We present recent work in which we demonstrate near-complete control over all the internal and external degrees of freedom of laser-cooled 87Rb atoms trapped in sub-micron optical tweezers. Utilizing this control for two atoms in two optical tweezers, we implement a massive-particle analog of the Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer where atom tunneling plays the role of the photon beamsplitter. The interferometer is used to probe the effect of atomic indistinguishability on the two-atom dynamics for a variety of initial conditions. These experiments demonstrate the viability of the optical tweezer platform for bottom-up generation of low-entropy quantum systems and pave the way toward the direct observation of quantum dynamics in more complex finite-sized systems.

  13. Thermal gradient induced tweezers for the manipulation of particles and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajie; Cong, Hengji; Loo, Fong-Chuen; Kang, Zhiwen; Tang, Minghui; Zhang, Haixi; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Kong, Siu-Kai; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2016-11-01

    Optical tweezers are a well-established tool for manipulating small objects. However, their integration with microfluidic devices often requires an objective lens. More importantly, trapping of non-transparent or optically sensitive targets is particularly challenging for optical tweezers. Here, for the first time, we present a photon-free trapping technique based on electro-thermally induced forces. We demonstrate that thermal-gradient-induced thermophoresis and thermal convection can lead to trapping of polystyrene spheres and live cells. While the subject of thermophoresis, particularly in the micro- and nano-scale, still remains to be fully explored, our experimental results have provided a reasonable explanation for the trapping effect. The so-called thermal tweezers, which can be readily fabricated by femtosecond laser writing, operate with low input power density and are highly versatile in terms of device configuration, thus rendering high potential for integration with microfluidic devices as well as lab-on-a-chip systems.

  14. Optical disassembly of cellular clusters by tunable tug-of-war tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Bezryadina, Anna; Chen, Joseph C; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms underlie many persistent infections, posing major hurdles in antibiotic treatment. Here, we design and demonstrate tug-of-war optical tweezers that can facilitate assessment of cell-cell adhesion - a key contributing factor to biofilm development, thanks to the combined actions of optical scattering and gradient forces. With a customized optical landscape distinct from that of conventional tweezers, not only can such tug-of-war tweezers stably trap and stretch a rod-shaped bacterium in the observing plane, but, more importantly, they can also impose a tunable lateral force that pulls apart cellular clusters without any tethering or mechanical movement. As a proof of principle, we examined a Sinorhizobium meliloti strain that forms robust biofilms and found that the strength of intercellular adhesion depends on the growth medium. This technique may herald new photonic tools for optical manipulation and biofilm study, as well as other biological applications.

  15. Optical disassembly of cellular clusters by tunable ‘tug-of-war’ tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadina, Anna S; Preece, Daryl C; Chen, Joseph C; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms underlie many persistent infections, posing major hurdles in antibiotic treatment. Here we design and demonstrate ‘tug-of-war’ optical tweezers that can facilitate the assessment of cell–cell adhesion—a key contributing factor to biofilm development, thanks to the combined actions of optical scattering and gradient forces. With a customized optical landscape distinct from that of conventional tweezers, not only can such ‘tug-of-war’ tweezers stably trap and stretch a rod-shaped bacterium in the observing plane, but, more importantly, they can also impose a tunable lateral force that pulls apart cellular clusters without any tethering or mechanical movement. As a proof of principle, we examined a Sinorhizobium meliloti strain that forms robust biofilms and found that the strength of intercellular adhesion depends on the growth medium. This technique may herald new photonic tools for optical manipulation and biofilm study, as well as other biological applications. PMID:27818838

  16. Manipulation of cells with laser microbeam scissors and optical tweezers: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Karl Otto

    2017-02-01

    The use of laser microbeams and optical tweezers in a wide field of biological applications from genomic to immunology is discussed. Microperforation is used to introduce a well-defined amount of molecules into cells for genetic engineering and optical imaging. The microwelding of two cells induced by a laser microbeam combines their genetic outfit. Microdissection allows specific regions of genomes to be isolated from a whole set of chromosomes. Handling the cells with optical tweezers supports investigation on the attack of immune systems against diseased or cancerous cells. With the help of laser microbeams, heart infarction can be simulated, and optical tweezers support studies on the heartbeat. Finally, laser microbeams are used to induce DNA damage in living cells for studies on cancer and ageing.

  17. A high-speed magnetic tweezer beyond 10,000 frames per second

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdorp, Bob M.; Tabrizi, Shawn J.; Dittmore, Andrew; Saleh, Omar A.

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic tweezer is a single-molecule instrument that can apply a constant force to a biomolecule over a range of extensions, and is therefore an ideal tool to study biomolecules and their interactions. However, the video-based tracking inherent to most magnetic single-molecule instruments has traditionally limited the instrumental resolution to a few nanometers, above the length scale of single DNA base-pairs. Here we have introduced superluminescent diode illumination and high-speed camera detection to the magnetic tweezer, with graphics processing unit-accelerated particle tracking for high-speed analysis of video files. We have demonstrated the ability of the high-speed magnetic tweezer to resolve particle position to within 1 Å at 100 Hz, and to measure the extension of a 1566 bp DNA with 1 nm precision at 100 Hz in the presence of thermal noise.

  18. Optical disassembly of cellular clusters by tunable 'tug-of-war' tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadina, Anna S; Preece, Daryl C; Chen, Joseph C; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms underlie many persistent infections, posing major hurdles in antibiotic treatment. Here we design and demonstrate 'tug-of-war' optical tweezers that can facilitate the assessment of cell-cell adhesion-a key contributing factor to biofilm development, thanks to the combined actions of optical scattering and gradient forces. With a customized optical landscape distinct from that of conventional tweezers, not only can such 'tug-of-war' tweezers stably trap and stretch a rod-shaped bacterium in the observing plane, but, more importantly, they can also impose a tunable lateral force that pulls apart cellular clusters without any tethering or mechanical movement. As a proof of principle, we examined a Sinorhizobium meliloti strain that forms robust biofilms and found that the strength of intercellular adhesion depends on the growth medium. This technique may herald new photonic tools for optical manipulation and biofilm study, as well as other biological applications.

  19. Implantable optoelectronic probes for in vivo optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseri, Ege; Kuzum, Duygu

    2017-06-01

    More than a decade has passed since optics and genetics came together and lead to the emerging technologies of optogenetics. The advent of light-sensitive opsins made it possible to optically trigger the neurons into activation or inhibition by using visible light. The importance of spatiotemporally isolating a segment of a neural network and controlling nervous signaling in a precise manner has driven neuroscience researchers and engineers to invest great efforts in designing high precision in vivo implantable devices. These efforts have focused on delivery of sufficient power to deep brain regions, while monitoring neural activity with high resolution and fidelity. In this review, we report the progress made in the field of hybrid optoelectronic neural interfaces that combine optical stimulation with electrophysiological recordings. Different approaches that incorporate optical or electrical components on implantable devices are discussed in detail. Advantages of various different designs as well as practical and fundamental limitations are summarized to illuminate the future of neurotechnology development.

  20. Optoelectronic date acquisition system based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Liu, Chunyang; Song, De; Tong, Zhiguo; Liu, Xiangqing

    2015-11-01

    An optoelectronic date acquisition system is designed based on FPGA. FPGA chip that is EP1C3T144C8 of Cyclone devices from Altera corporation is used as the centre of logic control, XTP2046 chip is used as A/D converter, host computer that communicates with the date acquisition system through RS-232 serial communication interface are used as display device and photo resistance is used as photo sensor. We use Verilog HDL to write logic control code about FPGA. It is proved that timing sequence is correct through the simulation of ModelSim. Test results indicate that this system meets the design requirement, has fast response and stable operation by actual hardware circuit test.

  1. Electroactive and Optoelectronically Active Graphene Nanofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin

    As an atomic-scale-thick two-dimensional material, graphene has emerged as one of the most miracle materials and has generated intensive interest in physics, chemistry and even biology in the last decade [1, 2]. Nanoscale engineering and functionalization of graphene is a crucial step for many...... applications ranging from catalysis, electronic devices, sensors to advanced energy conversion and storage [3]. This talk highlights our recent studies on electroactive and optoelectronically active graphene ultrathin films for chemical sensors and energy technology. The presentation includes a general theme...... for functionalization of graphene nanosheets, followed by showing several case studies. Our systems cover redox-active nanoparticles, electroactive supramolecular ensembles and redox enzymes which are integrated with graphene nanosheets as building blocks for the construction of functional thin films or graphene papers....

  2. Optoelectronic properties of natural cyanin dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzolari, A; Varsano, D; Ruini, A; Catellani, A; Tel-Vered, R; Yildiz, H B; Ovits, O; Willner, I

    2009-07-30

    An integrated theoretical/experimental study of the natural cyanin dye is presented in terms of its structural and optoelectronic properties for different gas-phase and prototypical device configurations. Our microscopic analysis reveals the impact of hydration and hydroxylation reactions, as well as of the attached sugar, on ground and optically excited states, and it illustrates the visible-light harvesting capability of the dye. Our optical experiments at different and controlled pH concentrations allow for a direct comparison with theoretical results. We analyze the many different contributions to photocurrent of the various portions of a prototypical device and, as a proof of principle, we propose the addition of specific ligands to control the increase of the photocurrent yield in the cyanin-based electrochemical device.

  3. Nanoscale selective area epitaxy for optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elarde, V. C.; Coleman, J. J.

    Self-assembled quantum dots have been heavily researched in recent years because of the potential applications to quantum electronic and optoelectronic devices they present. The non-uniformity and random ordering resulting from the self-assembly processes, however, are detrimental to potential applications, prohibiting the type of engineering control necessary for complex systems. The work presented in this document has sought to overcome the limitations of self-assembly by combining selective area epitaxy via MOCVD with high-resolution electron beam lithography to achieve lateral control over semiconductor structures at the nanometer scale. Two different structures are presented. The first is patterned quantum dots which improve on the uniformity and order of similar self-assembled quantum dots. The second is an entirely novel structure, the nanopore active layer, which demonstrates the potential for this process to extend beyond the constraints of self-assembly. Experimental and theoretical results for both structures are presented.

  4. Seeing smells: development of an optoelectronic nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth S. Suslick

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of an array of chemically-responsive dyes on a porous membrane and in its use as a general sensor for odors and volatile organic compounds (VOCs is reviewed. These colorimetric sensor arrays (CSA act as an "optoelectronic nose" by using an array of multiple dyes whose color changes are based on the full range of intermolecular interactions. The CSA is digitally imaged before and after exposure and the resulting difference map provides a digital fingerprint for any VOC or mixture of odorants. The result is an enormous increase in discriminatory power among odorants compared to prior electronic nose technologies. For the detection of biologically important analytes, including amines, carboxylic acids, and thiols, high sensitivities (ppbv have been demonstrated. The array is essentially non-responsive to changes in humidity due to the hydrophobicity of the dyes and membrane.

  5. Optoelectronic circuits in nanometer CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Atef, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the newest implementations of integrated photodiodes fabricated in nanometer standard CMOS technologies. It also includes the required fundamentals, the state-of-the-art, and the design of high-performance laser drivers, transimpedance amplifiers, equalizers, and limiting amplifiers fabricated in nanometer CMOS technologies. This book shows the newest results for the performance of integrated optical receivers, laser drivers, modulator drivers and optical sensors in nanometer standard CMOS technologies. Nanometer CMOS technologies rapidly advanced, enabling the implementation of integrated optical receivers for high data rates of several Giga-bits per second and of high-pixel count optical imagers and sensors. In particular, low cost silicon CMOS optoelectronic integrated circuits became very attractive because they can be extensively applied to short-distance optical communications, such as local area network, chip-to-chip and board-to-board interconnects as well as to imaging and medical...

  6. Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics for sensor applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czaplewski, David A.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Olsson, Roy H., III; Bogart, Gregory R. (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Krishnamoorthy, Uma; Warren, Mial E.; Carr, Dustin Wade (Symphony Acoustics, Rio Rancho, NM); Okandan, Murat; Peterson, Kenneth Allen

    2008-01-01

    This work utilized advanced engineering in several fields to find solutions to the challenges presented by the integration of MEMS/NEMS with optoelectronics to realize a compact sensor system, comprised of a microfabricated sensor, VCSEL, and photodiode. By utilizing microfabrication techniques in the realization of the MEMS/NEMS component, the VCSEL and the photodiode, the system would be small in size and require less power than a macro-sized component. The work focused on two technologies, accelerometers and microphones, leveraged from other LDRD programs. The first technology was the nano-g accelerometer using a nanophotonic motion detection system (67023). This accelerometer had measured sensitivity of approximately 10 nano-g. The Integrated NEMS and optoelectronics LDRD supported the nano-g accelerometer LDRD by providing advanced designs for the accelerometers, packaging, and a detection scheme to encapsulate the accelerometer, furthering the testing capabilities beyond bench-top tests. A fully packaged and tested die was never realized, but significant packaging issues were addressed and many resolved. The second technology supported by this work was the ultrasensitive directional microphone arrays for military operations in urban terrain and future combat systems (93518). This application utilized a diffraction-based sensing technique with different optical component placement and a different detection scheme from the nano-g accelerometer. The Integrated NEMS LDRD supported the microphone array LDRD by providing custom designs, VCSELs, and measurement techniques to accelerometers that were fabricated from the same operational principles as the microphones, but contain proof masses for acceleration transduction. These devices were packaged at the end of the work.

  7. Mechanical and electrical properties of red blood cells using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, A.; Barjas Castro, M. L.; Brandão, M. M.; Fernandes, H. P.; Thomaz, A. A.; Huruta, R. R.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Barbosa, L. C.; Costa, F. F.; Saad, S. T. O.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-04-01

    Optical tweezers are a very sensitive tool, based on photon momentum transfer, for individual, cell by cell, manipulation and measurements, which can be applied to obtain important properties of erythrocytes for clinical and research purposes. Mechanical and electrical properties of erythrocytes are critical parameters for stored cells in transfusion centers, immunohematological tests performed in transfusional routines and in blood diseases. In this work, we showed methods, based on optical tweezers, to study red blood cells and applied them to measure apparent overall elasticity, apparent membrane viscosity, zeta potential, thickness of the double layer of electrical charges and adhesion in red blood cells.

  8. Exact theory of optical tweezers and its application to absolute calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutra, Rafael de Sousa; Viana, Nathan B.; Maia Neto, Paulo A.

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become a powerful tool for basic and applied research in cell biology. Here, we describe an experimentally verified theory for the trapping forces generated by optical tweezers based on first principles that allows absolute calibration. For pedagogical reasons, the steps...... that led to the development of the theory over the past 15 years are outlined. The results are applicable to a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Protocols...

  9. Shape deformations of giant unilamellar vesicles with a laser tweezer array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Poole, Cory; Bradford, Peter; English, Doug

    2004-10-01

    Vesicles are phospholipid bilayers that form a surface enclosing a volume of water or solution. They are of importance as model systems to study cells, as well as having practical applications such as containers for performing nanochemistry and facilitating drug delivery. Their properties have been studied for decades. Using a holographic laser tweezer array (LTA), which converts a single laser beam into many laser tweezer points, we stretch the vesicles in controlled ways from several points at once, measuring each force applied. Here, we present data on shape deformations of simple, spherical vesicles and on membrane fracture.

  10. Observing Nanometre Scale Particles with Light Scattering for Manipulation Using Optical Tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jin-Hua; Qu Lian-Jie; Yao Kun; ZHONG Min-Cheng; LI Yin-Mei

    2008-01-01

    Nanometre-scale particles can be manipulated using optical tweezers,but cannot be directly observed.We Drasent a simple method that nanoparticles can be directly observed using optical tweezers combined with dark field microscopy.A laser beam perpendicular to a tightly focused laser beam for trap illuminates specimen and does not enter objective,nanoparticles in focal plane all can be directly observed in dark field because of light scattering.It is implemented that the polystyrene beads of diameter 100nm can be directly observed and trapped.

  11. Near-field enhanced optical tweezers utilizing femtosecond-laser nanostructured substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Kotsifaki, Domna G; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence of plasmonic-enhanced optical tweezers, of polystyrene beads in deionized water in the vicinity of metal-coated nanostructures. The optical tweezers operate with a continuous wave (CW) near-infrared laser. We employ a Cu/Au bilayer that significantly improves dissipation of heat generated by the trapping laser beam and avoid de-trapping from heat convection currents. We investigate the improvement of the optical trapping force, the effective trapping quality factor, and observe an exponential distance dependence of the trapping force from the nanostructures, expected from the evanescent plasmon field.

  12. Single and dual fiber nano-tip optical tweezers: trapping and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Decombe, Jean-Baptiste; Fick, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    An original optical tweezers using one or two chemically etched fiber nano-tips is developed. We demonstrate optical trapping of 1 micrometer polystyrene spheres at optical powers down to 2 mW. Harmonic trap potentials were found in the case of dual fiber tweezers by analyzing the trapped particle position fluctuations. The trap stiffness was deduced using three different models. Consistent values of up to 1 fN/nm were found. The stiffness linearly decreases with decreasing light intensity and increasing fiber tip-to-tip distance.

  13. Near-field enhanced optical tweezers utilizing femtosecond-laser nanostructured substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsifaki, D. G., E-mail: dkotsif@eie.gr; Kandyla, M. [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48 Vasileos Constantinou Avenue, 11635 Athens (Greece); Lagoudakis, P. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-23

    We present experimental evidence of plasmonic-enhanced optical tweezers, of polystyrene beads in deionized water in the vicinity of metal-coated nanostructures. The optical tweezers operate with a continuous wave near-infrared laser. We employ a Cu/Au bilayer that significantly improves dissipation of heat generated by the trapping laser beam and avoid de-trapping from heat convection currents. We investigate the improvement of the optical trapping force and the effective trapping quality factor, and observe an exponential distance dependence of the trapping force from the nanostructures, indicative of evanescent plasmonic enhancement.

  14. Single and dual fiber nano-tip optical tweezers: trapping and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decombe, Jean-Baptiste; Huant, Serge; Fick, Jochen

    2013-12-16

    An original optical tweezers using one or two chemically etched fiber nano-tips is developed. We demonstrate optical trapping of 1 micrometer polystyrene spheres at optical powers down to 2 mW. Harmonic trap potentials were found in the case of dual fiber tweezers by analyzing the trapped particle position fluctuations. The trap stiffness was deduced using three different models. Consistent values of up to 1 fN/nm were found. The stiffness linearly decreases with decreasing light intensity and increasing fiber tip-to-tip distance.

  15. Characterisation of coated aerosols using optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. H.; Ward, A.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Thin organic films are believed to form naturally on the surface of aerosols [1,2] and influence aerosol properties. Cloud condensation nuclei formation and chemical reactions such as aerosol oxidation are effected by the presence of thin films [3]. There is a requirement to characterise the physical properties of both the core aerosol and its organic film in order to fully understand the contribution of coated aerosols to the indirect effect. Two complementary techniques have been used to study the oxidation of thin organic films on the surface of aerosols; laser optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry. Micron sized polystyrene beads coated in oleic acid have been trapped in air using two counter propagating laser beams. Polystyrene beads are used as a proxy for solid aerosol. The trapped aerosol is illuminated with a white LED over a broadband wavelength range and the scattered light collected to produce a Mie spectrum [4]. Analysis of the Mie spectrum results in determination of the core polystyrene bead radius, the oleic acid film thickness and refractive index dispersion of the core and shell [5]. A flow of ozone gas can then be introduced into the aerosol environment to oxidise the thin film of oleic acid and the reaction followed by monitoring the changes in the Mie spectrum. The results demonstrate complete removal of the oleic acid film. We conclude that the use of a counter propagating optical trap combined with white light Mie spectroscopy can be used to study a range of organic films on different types of aerosols and their oxidation reactions. Neutron reflectometry has been used as a complementary technique to study the oxidation of monolayer films at the air-water interface in order to gain information on reaction kinetics. The oxidation of an oleic acid film at the air-water interface by the common tropospheric oxidant ozone has been studied using a Langmuir trough. Results indicate complete removal of the oleic acid film with ozone in agreement

  16. Dynamic properties of bacterial pili measured by optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallman, Erik G.; Andersson, Magnus J.; Schedin, Staffan S.; Jass, Jana; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2004-10-01

    The ability of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to cause urinary tract infections is dependent on their ability to colonize the uroepithelium. Infecting bacteria ascend the urethra to the bladder and then kidneys by attaching to the uroepithelial cells via the differential expression of adhesins. P pili are associated with pyelonephritis, the more severe infection of the kidneys. In order to find means to treat pyelonephritis, it is therefore of interest to investigate the properties P pili. The mechanical behavior of individual P pili of uropathogenic Escherichia coli has recently been investigated using optical tweezers. P pili, whose main part constitutes the PapA rod, composed of ~1000 PapA subunits in a helical arrangement, are distributed over the bacterial surface and mediate adhesion to host cells. We have earlier studied P pili regarding its stretching/elongation properties where we have found and characterized three different elongation regions, of which one constitute an unfolding of the quaternary (helical) structure of the PapA rod. It was shown that this unfolding takes place at an elongation independent force of 27 +/- 2 pN. We have also recently performed studies on its folding properties and shown that the unfolding/folding of the PapA rod is completely reversible. Here we present a study of the dynamical properties of the PapA rod. We show, among other things, that the unfolding force increases and that the folding force decreases with the speed of unfolding and folding respectively. Moreover, the PapA rod can be folded-unfolded a significant number of times without loosing its characteristics, a phenomenon that is believed to be important for the bacterium to keep close contact to the host tissue and consequently helps the bacterium to colonize the host tissue.

  17. Substrate-dependent cell elasticity measured by optical tweezers indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Ndoye, Fatou; Coceano, Giovanna; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, cell elasticity has been widely investigated as a potential label free indicator for cellular alteration in different diseases, cancer included. Cell elasticity can be locally measured by pulling membrane tethers, stretching or indenting the cell using optical tweezers. In this paper, we propose a simple approach to perform cell indentation at pN forces by axially moving the cell against a trapped microbead. The elastic modulus is calculated using the Hertz-model. Besides the axial component, the setup also allows us to examine the lateral cell-bead interaction. This technique has been applied to measure the local elasticity of HBL-100 cells, an immortalized human cell line, originally derived from the milk of a woman with no evidence of breast cancer lesions. In addition, we have studied the influence of substrate stiffness on cell elasticity by performing experiments on cells cultured on two substrates, bare and collagen-coated, having different stiffness. The mean value of the cell elastic modulus measured during indentation was 26±9 Pa for the bare substrate, while for the collagen-coated substrate it diminished to 19±7 Pa. The same trend was obtained for the elastic modulus measured during the retraction of the cell: 23±10 Pa and 13±7 Pa, respectively. These results show the cells adapt their stiffness to that of the substrate and demonstrate the potential of this setup for low-force probing of modifications to cell mechanics induced by the surrounding environment (e.g. extracellular matrix or other cells).

  18. Synthesis of novel amide functionalized 2H-chromene derivatives by Ritter amidation of primary alcohol using HBF4·OEt2 as a mild and versatile reagent and evaluation of their antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnakar Reddy, K; Poornachandra, Y; Jitender Dev, G; Mallareddy, G; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh B; Kumar, C Ganesh; Narsaiah, B

    2015-08-01

    A series of novel amide functionalized 2H-chromene derivatives 3 were prepared starting from ethyl-2-hydroxy-2-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-chromene-3-carboxylate 1 via sodium borohydride reduction followed by Ritter amidation using HBF4·OEt2 as a mild and versatile reagent. All the products 3 were screened for antimicrobial activity against various Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungal strain. The promising derivatives such as 3f, 3g, 3k, 3l, 3m, 3n and 3o were further screened for minimum bactericidal concentration and bio-film inhibition activity and identified the potential ones. Among all the promising, compound 3g was more potent for antimicrobial, MBC and anti bio-film activities. The structure verses activity relationship of 3g revealed that the presence of two bromine atoms at sixth and R position promotes high activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of Nb2O5@C core-shell nanorods and Nb2O5nanorods by reacting Nb(OEt5via RAPET (reaction under autogenic pressure at elevated temperatures technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George PP

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe reaction of pentaethoxy niobate, Nb(OEt5, at elevated temperature (800 °C under autogenic pressure provides a chemical route to niobium oxide nanorods coated with amorphous carbon. This synthetic approach yielded nanocrystalline particles of Nb2O5@C. As prepared Nb2O5@C core-shell nanorods is annealed under air at 500 °C for 3 h (removing the carbon coating results in neat Nb2O5nanorods. According to the TEM measurements, the Nb2O5crystals exhibit particle sizes between 25 nm and 100 nm, and the Nb2O5crystals display rod-like shapes without any indication of an amorphous character. The optical band gap of the Nb2O5nanorods was determined by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS and was found to be 3.8 eV.

  20. Integral optoelectronic switch based on DMOS-transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Politanskyy L. F.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of optoelectronic couples photodiodes-DMOS-transistor are studied in the paper. There was developed a mathematical model of volt-ampere characteristic of the given optoelectronic couple which allows to determine interrelation of its electric parameters with constructive and electrophysical parameters of photodiodes and DMOS-transistors. There was suggested a construction of integral optoelectronic switch, based on DMOS-transistors on the silicon with dielectric insulation structures (SDIS. Possible is the optic control of executive devices, connected both to the source and drain circuits of the switching transistor.

  1. Magnetometer Based on Optoelectronic Microwave Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Lute; Strekalov, Dmitry; Matsko, Andrey

    2005-01-01

    proposed instrument, intended mainly for use as a magnetometer, would include an optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) stabilized by an atomic cell that could play the role of a magnetically tunable microwave filter. The microwave frequency would vary with the magnetic field in the cell, thereby providing an indication of the magnetic field. The proposed magnetometer would offer a combination of high accuracy and high sensitivity, characterized by flux densities of less than a picotesla. In comparison with prior magnetometers, the proposed magnetometer could, in principle, be constructed as a compact, lightweight instrument: It could fit into a package of about 10 by 10 by 10 cm and would have a mass <0.5 kg. As described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, an OEO is a hybrid of photonic and electronic components that generates highly spectrally pure microwave radiation, and optical radiation modulated by the microwave radiation, through direct conversion between laser light and microwave radiation in an optoelectronic feedback loop. As used here, "atomic cell" signifies a cell containing a vapor, the constituent atoms of which can be made to undergo transitions between quantum states, denoted hyperfine levels, when excited by light in a suitable wavelength range. The laser light must be in this range. The energy difference between the hyperfine levels defines the microwave frequency. In the proposed instrument (see figure), light from a laser would be introduced into an electro-optical modulator (EOM). Amplitude-modulated light from the exit port of the EOM would pass through a fiber-optic splitter having two output branches. The light in one branch would be sent through an atomic cell to a photodiode. The light in the other branch would constitute the microwave-modulated optical output. Part of the light leaving the atomic cell could also be used to stabilize the laser at a frequency in the vicinity of the desired hyperfine or other quantum transition. The

  2. Optoelectronic Infrastructure for RF/Optical Phased Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optoelectronic integrated holds the key to higher performance, reduced mass and radiation-hard space systems. A special need is increased flexibility of phased...

  3. Device-packaging method and apparatus for optoelectronic circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zortman, William A.; Henry, Michael David; Jarecki, Jr., Robert L.

    2017-04-25

    An optoelectronic device package and a method for its fabrication are provided. The device package includes a lid die and an active die that is sealed or sealable to the lid die and in which one or more optical waveguides are integrally defined. The active die includes one or more active device regions, i.e. integral optoelectronic devices or etched cavities for placement of discrete optoelectronic devices. Optical waveguides terminate at active device regions so that they can be coupled to them. Slots are defined in peripheral parts of the active dies. At least some of the slots are aligned with the ends of integral optical waveguides so that optical fibers or optoelectronic devices inserted in the slots can optically couple to the waveguides.

  4. Opto-electronic devices from block copolymers and their oligomers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents research activities towards the development of polymer materials and devices for optoelectronics, An approach to controlling the conjugation length and transferring the luminescence properties of organic molecules to polymers through black copolymers containing well-defined conju

  5. Optoelectronic Infrastructure for RF/Optical Phased Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optoelectronic integrated circuits offer radiation-hard solutions for satellite systems with much improved SWPB (size, weight, power and bandwidth). The phased array...

  6. Automated transportation of single cells using robot-tweezer manipulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Songyu; Sun, Dong

    2011-08-01

    Manipulation of biological cells becomes increasingly important in biomedical engineering to address challenge issues in cell-cell interaction, drug discovery, and tissue engineering. Significant demand for both accuracy and productivity in cell manipulation highlights the need for automated cell transportation with integrated robotics and micro/nano manipulation technologies. Optical tweezers, which use highly focused low-power laser beams to trap and manipulate particles at micro/nanoscale, have emerged as an essential tool for manipulating single cells. In this article, we propose to use a robot-tweezer manipulation system to solve the problem of automatic transportation of biological cells, where optical tweezers function as special robot end effectors. Dynamics equation of the cell in optical tweezers is analyzed. A closed-loop controller is designed for transporting and positioning cells. Experiments are performed on live cells to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in effective cell positioning. Copyright © 2011 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular tweezers modulate 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Rose, Rolf; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Bartel, Maria; Ramirez-Anguita, Juan Manuel; Dutt, Som; Wilch, Constanze; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Schrader, Thomas; Ottmann, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has recently emerged as a promising way to modulate protein functions, but devising molecules that will interact with a protein in the desired manner is difficult as many competing interactions exist in a biological environment (with solvents, salts or different sites for the target biomolecule). We now show that lysine-specific molecular tweezers bind to a 14-3-3 adapter protein and modulate its interaction with partner proteins. The tweezers inhibit binding between the 14-3-3 protein and two partner proteins--a phosphorylated (C-Raf) protein and an unphosphorylated one (ExoS)--in a concentration-dependent manner. Protein crystallography shows that this effect arises from the binding of the tweezers to a single surface-exposed lysine (Lys214) of the 14-3-3 protein in the proximity of its central channel, which normally binds the partner proteins. A combination of structural analysis and computer simulations provides rules for the tweezers' binding preferences, thus allowing us to predict their influence on this type of protein-protein interactions.

  8. Optical tweezers in concentrated colloidal dispersions : Manipulating and imaging individual particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Dirk Leo Joep

    2004-01-01

    Using a laser beam that is focused down to a diffraction-limited spot, particles with a size ranging from several nanometers up to tens of micrometers can be trapped and manipulated. This technique, known as "optical tweezers" or "optical trapping", has been used in a wide variety of (interdisciplin

  9. Actin and myosin regulate cytoplasm stiffness in plant cells: a study using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Honing, Hannie S; de Ruijter, Norbert C A; Emons, Anne Mie C; Ketelaar, Tijs

    2010-01-01

    Here, we produced cytoplasmic protrusions with optical tweezers in mature BY-2 suspension cultured cells to study the parameters involved in the movement of actin filaments during changes in cytoplasmic organization and to determine whether stiffness is an actin-related property of plant cytoplasm. Optical tweezers were used to create cytoplasmic protrusions resembling cytoplasmic strands. Simultaneously, the behavior of the actin cytoskeleton was imaged. After actin filament depolymerization, less force was needed to create cytoplasmic protrusions. During treatment with the myosin ATPase inhibitor 2,3-butanedione monoxime, more trapping force was needed to create and maintain cytoplasmic protrusions. Thus, the presence of actin filaments and, even more so, the deactivation of a 2,3-butanedione monoxime-sensitive factor, probably myosin, stiffens the cytoplasm. During 2,3-butanedione monoxime treatment, none of the tweezer-formed protrusions contained filamentous actin, showing that a 2,3-butanedione monoxime-sensitive factor, probably myosin, is responsible for the movement of actin filaments, and implying that myosin serves as a static cross-linker of actin filaments when its motor function is inhibited. The presence of actin filaments does not delay the collapse of cytoplasmic protrusions after tweezer release. Myosin-based reorganization of the existing actin cytoskeleton could be the basis for new cytoplasmic strand formation, and thus the production of an organized cytoarchitecture.

  10. Optical tweezers in concentrated colloidal dispersions : Manipulating and imaging individual particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Dirk Leo Joep

    2004-01-01

    Using a laser beam that is focused down to a diffraction-limited spot, particles with a size ranging from several nanometers up to tens of micrometers can be trapped and manipulated. This technique, known as "optical tweezers" or "optical trapping", has been used in a wide variety of

  11. Measurements of displacement and trapping force on micron-sized particles in optical tweezers system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭红莲; 姚新程; 李兆霖; 程丙英; 韩学海; 张道中

    2002-01-01

    A high-stability optical tweezers equipped with a high-precision measurement system of displacement and force is set up. The results show that this combination can be used to carry out quantitative measurements of small displacements and forces for micron-sized spheres. The precision of measurements has reached nanometers and piconewtons, respectively.

  12. Research Advances: Nanoscale Molecular Tweezers; Cinnamon as Pesticide?; Recently Identified Dietary Sources of Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2004-12-01

    This Report from Other Journals surveys articles of interest to chemists that have been recently published in other science journals. Topics surveyed include reports that receptors have been designed to act as molecular tweezers; cinnamon has potential in the fight against mosquitoes; and high levels of antioxidants are found in some surprising foods. See Featured Molecules .

  13. High-refractive index particles in counter-propagating optical tweezers - manipulation and forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, Astrid van der

    2006-01-01

    With a tightly focused single laser beam, also called optical tweezers, particles of a few nanometers up to several micrometers in size can be trapped and manipulated in 3D. The size, shape and refractive index of such colloidal particles are of influence on the optical forces exerted on them in the

  14. Multifunctional single beam acoustic tweezer for non-invasive cell/organism manipulation and tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kwok Ho; Li, Ying; Li, Yang; Lim, Hae Gyun; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, Koping Kirk

    2016-11-01

    Non-contact precise manipulation of single microparticles, cells, and organisms has attracted considerable interest in biophysics and biomedical engineering. Similar to optical tweezers, acoustic tweezers have been proposed to be capable of manipulating microparticles and even cells. Although there have been concerted efforts to develop tools for non-contact manipulation, no alternative to complex, unifunctional tweezer has yet been found. Here we report a simple, low-cost, multifunctional single beam acoustic tweezer (SBAT) that is capable of manipulating an individual micrometer scale non-spherical cell at Rayleigh regime and even a single millimeter scale organism at Mie regime, and imaging tissue as well. We experimentally demonstrate that the SBAT with an ultralow f-number (f# = focal length/aperture size) could manipulate an individual red blood cell and a single 1.6 mm-diameter fertilized Zebrafish egg, respectively. Besides, in vitro rat aorta images were collected successfully at dynamic foci in which the lumen and the outer surface of the aorta could be clearly seen. With the ultralow f-number, the SBAT offers the combination of large acoustic radiation force and narrow beam width, leading to strong trapping and high-resolution imaging capabilities. These attributes enable the feasibility of using a single acoustic device to perform non-invasive multi-functions simultaneously for biomedical and biophysical applications.

  15. Force spectroscopy with dual-trap optical tweezers: molecular stiffness measurements and coupled fluctuations analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Ritort, F

    2012-11-07

    Dual-trap optical tweezers are often used in high-resolution measurements in single-molecule biophysics. Such measurements can be hindered by the presence of extraneous noise sources, the most prominent of which is the coupling of fluctuations along different spatial directions, which may affect any optical tweezers setup. In this article, we analyze, both from the theoretical and the experimental points of view, the most common source for these couplings in dual-trap optical-tweezers setups: the misalignment of traps and tether. We give criteria to distinguish different kinds of misalignment, to estimate their quantitative relevance and to include them in the data analysis. The experimental data is obtained in a, to our knowledge, novel dual-trap optical-tweezers setup that directly measures forces. In the case in which misalignment is negligible, we provide a method to measure the stiffness of traps and tether based on variance analysis. This method can be seen as a calibration technique valid beyond the linear trap region. Our analysis is then employed to measure the persistence length of dsDNA tethers of three different lengths spanning two orders of magnitude. The effective persistence length of such tethers is shown to decrease with the contour length, in accordance with previous studies. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Optical tweezers with fluorescence detection for temperature-dependent microrheological measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shundo, Atsuomi; Hori, Koichiro; Penaloza, David P; Tanaka, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a setup of optical tweezers, capable of carrying out temperature-dependent rheological measurements of soft materials. In our setup, the particle displacement is detected by imaging a bright spot due to fluorescence emitted from a dye-labeled particle against a dark background onto a quadrant photodiode. This setup has a relatively wide space around the sample that allows us to further accessorize the optical tweezers by a temperature control unit. The applicability of the setup was examined on the basis of the rheological measurements using a typical viscoelastic system, namely a worm-like micelle solution. The temperature and frequency dependences of the local viscoelastic functions of the worm-like micelle solution obtained by this setup were in good accordance with those obtained by a conventional oscillatory rheometer, confirming the capability of the optical tweezers as a tool for the local rheological measurements of soft materials. Since the optical tweezers measurements only require a tiny amount of sample (~40 μL), the rheological measurements using our setup should be useful for soft materials of which the available amount is limited.

  17. Recent Advances in Biological Single-Molecule Applications of Optical Tweezers and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashemi Shabestari, M; Meijering, A E C; Roos, W H; Wuite, G J L; Peterman, E J G

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, single-molecule techniques have evolved into robust tools to study many fundamental biological processes. The combination of optical tweezers with fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics provides a powerful single-molecule manipulation and visualization technique that

  18. Interrogating biology with force: single molecule high-resolution measurements with optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S

    2013-09-17

    Single molecule force spectroscopy methods, such as optical and magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy, have opened up the possibility to study biological processes regulated by force, dynamics of structural conformations of proteins and nucleic acids, and load-dependent kinetics of molecular interactions. Among the various tools available today, optical tweezers have recently seen great progress in terms of spatial resolution, which now allows the measurement of atomic-scale conformational changes, and temporal resolution, which has reached the limit of the microsecond-scale relaxation times of biological molecules bound to a force probe. Here, we review different strategies and experimental configurations recently developed to apply and measure force using optical tweezers. We present the latest progress that has pushed optical tweezers' spatial and temporal resolution down to today's values, discussing the experimental variables and constraints that are influencing measurement resolution and how these can be optimized depending on the biological molecule under study. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Optoelectronic Device Integration in Silicon (OpSIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    Delaware in the development of fundamental design tools and methodologies for optoelectronic devices in silicon photonics. We proposed to develop...THIS PAGE U 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 302-831-4241 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std . Z39.18 Adobe...10-1-0439 Prime Award Institution: University of Washington Subaward Institution: University of Delaware Title: Optoelectronic Device

  20. Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingwu [Chelmsford, MA; Li, Wenguang [Andover, MA; Jiang, Hua [Methuen, MA

    2012-01-03

    An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

  1. Metal-dielectric hybrid surfaces as integrated optoelectronic interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimhan, Vijay K.; Hymel, Thomas M.; Lai, Ruby A.; Cui, Yi

    2017-01-03

    An optoelectronic device has a hybrid metal-dielectric optoelectronic interface including an array of nanoscale dielectric resonant elements (e.g., nanopillars), and a metal film disposed between the dielectric resonant elements and below a top surface of the resonant elements such that the dielectric resonant elements protrude through the metal film. The device may also include an anti-reflection coating. The device may further include a metal film layer on each of the dielectric resonant elements.

  2. Hybrid optoelectronic device with multiple bistable outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costazo-Caso, Pablo A.; Jin, Yiye; Gelh, Michael; Granieri, Sergio; Siahmakoun, Azad

    2011-01-01

    Optoelectronic circuits which exhibit optical and electrical bistability with hysteresis behavior are proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The systems are based on semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA), bipolar junction transistors (BJT), PIN photodiodes (PD) and laser diodes externally modulated with integrated electro-absorption modulators (LD-EAM). The device operates based on two independent phenomena leading to both electrical bistability and optical bistability. The electrical bistability is due to the series connection of two p-i-n structures (SOA, BJT, PD or LD) in reverse bias. The optical bistability is consequence of the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) in the multi-quantum well (MQW) structure in the intrinsic region of the device. This effect produces the optical modulation of the transmitted light through the SOA (or reflected from the PD). Finally, because the optical transmission of the SOA (in reverse bias) and the reflected light from the PD are so small, a LD-EAM modulated by the voltage across these devices are employed to obtain a higher output optical power. Experiments show that the maximum switching frequency is in MHz range and the rise/fall times lower than 1 us. The temporal response is mainly limited by the electrical capacitance of the devices and the parasitic inductances of the connecting wires. The effects of these components can be reduced in current integration technologies.

  3. Colloidal quantum dot materials for infrared optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinze, Ebuka S.; Nyirjesy, Gabrielle; Cheng, Yan; Palmquist, Nathan; Thon, Susanna M.

    2015-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are an attractive material for optoelectronic applications because they combine flexible, low-cost solution-phase synthesis and processing with the potential for novel functionality arising from their nanostructure. Specifically, the bandgap of films composed of arrays of CQDs can be tuned via the quantum confinement effect for tailored spectral utilization. PbS-based CQDs can be tuned throughout the near and mid-infrared wavelengths and are a promising materials system for photovoltaic devices that harvest non-visible solar radiation. The performance of CQD solar cells is currently limited by an absorption-extraction compromise, whereby photon absorption lengths in the near infrared spectral regime exceed minority carrier diffusion lengths in the bulk films. Several light trapping strategies for overcoming this compromise and increasing the efficiency of infrared energy harvesting will be reviewed. A thin-film interference technique for creating multi-colored and transparent solar cells will be presented, and a discussion of designing plasmonic nanomaterials based on earth-abundant materials for integration into CQD solar cells is developed. The results indicate that it should be possible to achieve high absorption and color-tunability in a scalable nanomaterials system.

  4. Terahertz biochip based on optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ja-Yu; Chen, Li-Jin; Kao, Tzeng-Fu; Chang, Hsu-Hao; Liu, An-Shyi; Yu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Ruey-Beei; Liu, Wei-Sheng; Chyi, Jen-Inn; Pan, Ci-Ling; Tsai, Ming-Cheng; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2005-10-01

    The accurate detection of minute amounts of chemical and biological substances has been a major goal in bioanalytical technology throughout the twentieth century. Fluorescence dye labeling detection remains the effective analysis method, but it modifies the surroundings of molecules and lowering the precision of detection. An alternative label free detecting tool with little disturbance of target molecules is highly desired. Theoretical calculations and experiments have demonstrated that many biomolecules have intrinsic resonance due to vibration or rotation level transitions, allowing terahertz (THz)-probing technique as a potential tool for the label-free and noninvasive detection of biomolecules. In this paper, we first ever combined the THz optoelectronic technique with biochip technology to realize THz biosensing. By transferring the edge-coupled photonic transmitter into a thin glass substrate and by integrating with a polyethylene based biochip channel, near field THz detection of the biomolecules is demonstrated. By directly acquiring the absorption micro-spectrum in the THz range, different boiomecules can then be identified according to their THz fingerprints. For preliminary studies, the capability to identity different illicit drug powders is successfully demonstrated. This novel biochip sensing system has the advantages including label-free detection, high selectivity, high sensitivity, ease for sample preparation, and ease to parallel integrate with other biochip functionality modules. Our demonstrated detection capability allows specifying various illicit drug powders with weight of nano-gram, which also enables rapid identification with minute amounts of other important molecules including DNA, biochemical agents in terrorism warfare, explosives, viruses, and toxics.

  5. Assessment of dental plaque by optoelectronic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda-Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Bortun, Cristina Maria; Levai, Mihaela-Codrina; Topala, Florin Ionel; Crǎciunescu, Emanuela Lidia; Cojocariu, Andreea Codruta; Duma, Virgil Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of dental biofilm follows specific mechanisms of initial colonization on the surface, microcolony formation, development of organized three dimensional community structures, and detachment from the surface. The structure of the plaque biofilm might restrict the penetration of antimicrobial agents, while bacteria on a surface grow slowly and display a novel phenotype; the consequence of the latter is a reduced sensitivity to inhibitors. The aim of this study was to evaluate with different optoelectronic methods the morphological characteristics of the dental biofilm. The study was performed on samples from 25 patients aged between 18 and 35 years. The methods used in this study were Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) working at 870 nm for in vivo evaluations and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for validations. For each patient a sample of dental biofilm was obtained directly from the vestibular surface of the teeth's. SD-OCT produced C- and B-scans that were used to generate three dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the sample. The results were compared with SEM evaluations. The biofilm network was dramatically destroyed after the professional dental cleaning. OCT noninvasive methods can act as a valuable tool for the 3D characterization of dental biofilms.

  6. Emissive polymeric materials for optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiang, Joseph John; Chichak, Kelly Scott; Cella, James Anthony; Lewis, Larry Neil; Janora, Kevin Henry

    2011-07-05

    Polymers including at least one structural unit derived from a compound of formula I or including at least one pendant group of formula II may be used in optoelectronic devices ##STR00001## wherein R.sup.1, R.sup.3, R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are independently hydrogen, alkyl, alkoxy, oxaalkyl, alkylaryl, aryl, arylalkyl, heteroaryl, substituted alkyl; substituted alkoxy, substituted oxaalkyl, substituted alkylaryl, substituted aryl, substituted arylalkyl, or substituted heteroaryl; R.sup.1a is hydrogen or alkyl; R.sup.2 is alkylene, substituted alkylene, oxaalkylene, CO, or CO.sub.2; R.sup.2a is alkylene; R.sup.5 is independently at each occurrence hydrogen, alkyl, alkylaryl, aryl, arylalkyl, alkoxy, carboxy, substituted alkyl; substituted alkylaryl, substituted aryl, substituted arylalkyl, or substituted alkoxy, X is halo, triflate, --B(OR.sup.1a).sub.2, or ##STR00002## located at the 2, 5- or 2, 7-positions; and L is derived from phenylpyridine, tolylpyridine, benzothienylpyridine, phenylisoquinoline, dibenzoquinozaline, fluorenylpyridine, ketopyrrole, 2-(1-naphthyl)benzoxazole)), 2-phenylbenzoxazole, 2-phenylbenzothiazole, coumarin, thienylpyridine, phenylpyridine, benzothienylpyridine, 3-methoxy-2-phenylpyridine, thienylpyridine, phenylimine, vinylpyridine, pyridylnaphthalene, pyridylpyrrole, pyridylimidazole, phenylindole, derivatives thereof or combinations thereof.

  7. Single carbon-nanotube photonics and optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yuichiro K.

    2015-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have unique optical properties as a result of their one-dimensional structure. Not only do they exhibit strong polarization for both absorption and emission, large exciton binding energies allow for room-temperature excitonic luminescence. Furthermore, their emission is in the telecom-wavelengths and they can be directly synthesized on silicon substrates, providing new opportunities for nanoscale photonics and optoelectronics. Here we discuss the use of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes for generation, manipulation, and detection of light on a chip. Their emission properties can be controlled by coupling to silicon photonic structures such as photonic crystal microcavities and microdisk resonators. Simultaneous photoluminescence and photocurrent measurements show that excitons can dissociate spontaneously, enabling photodetection at low bias voltages despite the large binding energies. More recently, we have found that alternating gate-voltages can generate optical pulse trains from individual nanotubes. Ultimately, these results may be combined to achieve further control over photons at the nanoscale. Work supported by KAKENHI, The Canon Foundation, The Asahi Glass Foundation, and JSPS Open Partnership Joint Projects, as well as the Nanotechnology Platform and Photon Frontier Network Program of MEXT, Japan.

  8. Colloidal nanorod heterostructures for photovoltaics and optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Moonsub

    2017-05-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) synthesized in versatile, easy-to-process solutions are opening up exciting prospects in multiple areas, especially in biomedical imaging, photovoltaics, solid-state lighting and displays. The success of most of these prospects relies on high-quality heterostructures that improve optical properties. In particular, the core/shell heterostructure with a type I straddling band offset has been indispensable but the applicability is often limited to those exploiting only photoluminescence. QDs and their heterostructures can also be made with anisotropic shapes that allow access to essentially an unlimited number of combinations of size, shape and composition. Structures that allow enhancement of optical properties and physical accessibility for carrier injection/extraction simultaneously can open up new and exciting prospects in photovoltaics and optoelectronics. This topical review focuses on nanorod-based colloidal semiconductor heterostructures. Two-component, type II staggered band offset nanorod heterostructures capable of efficiently separating photoinduced charges are first discussed. Double heterojunction nanorods that contain three different phases are then considered with respect to their novelty and potential as emissive materials in light-emitting diodes. We conclude with an outlook on the possibility of developing colloidal nanorods that contain epitaxial interfaces beyond the conventional semiconductor heterojunctions.

  9. Oscillating optical tweezer-based 3-D confocal microrheometer for investigating the intracellular micromechanics and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, H. D.; Rickter, E. A.; Pu, C.; Latinovic, O.; Kumar, A.; Mengistu, M.; Lowe-Krentz, L.; Chien, S.

    2005-08-01

    Mechanical properties of living biological cells are important for cells to maintain their shapes, support mechanical stresses and move through tissue matrix. The use of optical tweezers to measure micromechanical properties of cells has recently made significant progresses. This paper presents a new approach, the oscillating optical tweezer cytorheometer (OOTC), which takes advantage of the coherent detection of harmonically modulated particle motions by a lock-in amplifier to increase sensitivity, temporal resolution and simplicity. We demonstrate that OOTC can measure the dynamic mechanical modulus in the frequency range of 0.1-6,000 Hz at a rate as fast as 1 data point per second with submicron spatial resolution. More importantly, OOTC is capable of distinguishing the intrinsic non-random temporal variations from random fluctuations due to Brownian motion; this capability, not achievable by conventional approaches, is particular useful because living systems are highly dynamic and often exhibit non-thermal, rhythmic behavior in a broad time scale from a fraction of a second to hours or days. Although OOTC is effective in measuring the intracellular micromechanical properties, unless we can visualize the cytoskeleton in situ, the mechanical property data would only be as informative as that of "Blind men and the Elephant". To solve this problem, we take two steps, the first, to use of fluorescent imaging to identify the granular structures trapped by optical tweezers, and second, to integrate OOTC with 3-D confocal microscopy so we can take simultaneous, in situ measurements of the micromechanics and intracellular structure in living cells. In this paper, we discuss examples of applying the oscillating tweezer-based cytorheometer for investigating cultured bovine endothelial cells, the identification of caveolae as some of the granular structures in the cell as well as our approach to integrate optical tweezers with a spinning disk confocal microscope.

  10. Fullerene recognition with molecular tweezers made up of efficient buckybowls: a dispersion-corrected DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josa, Daniela; Rodríguez-Otero, Jesús; Cabaleiro-Lago, Enrique M

    2015-05-28

    In 2007, Sygula and co-workers introduced a novel type of molecular tweezers with buckybowl pincers that have attracted the substantial interest of researchers due to their ideal architecture for recognizing fullerenes by concave-convex π∙∙∙π interactions (A. Sygula et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 3842). Although in recent years some modifications have been performed on these original molecular tweezers to improve their ability for catching fullerenes, very few improvements were achieved to date. For that reason, in the present work a series of molecular tweezers have been devised and their supramolecular complexes with C60 studied at the B97-D2/TZVP//SCC-DFTB-D and B97-D2/TZVP levels. Three different strategies have been tested: (1) changing the corannulene pincers to other buckybowls, (2) replacing the tetrabenzocyclooctatetraene tether by a buckybowl, and (3) adding methyl groups on the molecular tweezers. According to the results, all the three approaches are effective, in such a way that a combination of the three strategies results in buckycatchers with complexation energies (with C60) up to 2.6 times larger than that of the original buckycatcher, reaching almost -100 kcal mol(-1). The B97-D2/TZVP//SCC-DFTB-D approach can be a rapid screening tool for testing new molecular tweezers. However, since this approach does not reproduce correctly the deformation energy and this energy represents an important contribution to the total complexation energy of complexes, subsequent higher-level re-optimization is compulsory to achieve reliable results (the full B97-D2/TZVP level is used herein). This re-optimization could be superfluous when quite rigid buckycatchers are studied.

  11. The supramolecular design of low-dimensional carbon nano-hybrids encoding a polyoxometalate-bis-pyrene tweezer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modugno, Gloria; Syrgiannis, Zois; Bonasera, Aurelio; Carraro, Mauro; Giancane, Gabriele; Valli, Ludovico; Bonchio, Marcella; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-05-18

    A novel bis-pyrene tweezer anchored on a rigid polyoxometalate scaffold fosters a unique interplay of hydrophobic and electrostatic supramolecular interactions, to shape carbon nanostructures (CNSs)-based extended architectures.

  12. Tracking of Single Quantum Dot Labeled EcoRV Sliding along DNA Manipulated by Double Optical Tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Biebricher, Andreas; Wende, Wolfgang; Escudé, Christophe; Pingoud, Alfred; Desbiolles, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy provides a powerful method to directly observe single enzymes moving along a DNA held in an extended conformation. In this work, we present results from single EcoRV enzymes labeled with quantum dots which interact with DNA manipulated by double optical tweezers. The application of quantum dots facilitated accurate enzyme tracking without photobleaching whereas the tweezers allowed us to precisely control the DNA extension. The labeling did not affect the biochemical a...

  13. Laser cooling a neutral atom to the three-dimensional vibrational ground state of an optical tweezer

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, Adam M; Regal, Cindy A

    2012-01-01

    We report three-dimensional ground state cooling of a single neutral atom in an optical tweezer. After employing Raman sideband cooling for 33 ms, we measure via sideband spectroscopy a three-dimensional ground state occupation of ~90%. Ground state neutral atoms in optical tweezers will be instrumental in numerous quantum logic applications and for nanophotonic interfaces that require a versatile platform for storing, moving, and manipulating ultracold single neutral atoms.

  14. Single-molecule force spectroscopy using the NanoTracker optical tweezers platform: from design to application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, A; van Mameren, J; Ragona, S

    2009-08-01

    Since the development of detection and analysis techniques for optical tweezers setups, there has been an ever-increasing interest in optical tweezers as a quantitative method, shifting its applications from a pure manipulation tool towards the investigation of motions and forces. With the capability of manipulation and detection of forces of a few hundred picoNewtons down to a fraction of a picoNewton, optical tweezers are perfectly suitable for the investigation of single molecules. Accordingly, the technique has been extensively used for the biophysical characterization of biomolecules, ranging from the mechanical and elastic properties of biological polymers to the dynamics associated with enzymatic activity and protein motility. Here, the use of state-of-the-art optical tweezers on the elasticity of single DNA molecules is presented, highlighting the possibilities this technique offers for the investigation of protein-DNA interaction, but also for other single molecule applications. Technical in nature, design aspects of the NanoTracker optical tweezers setup are addressed, presenting the recent advances in the development of optical tweezers, ranging from noise reduction to detection and calibration methodology.

  15. Optoelectronic implementation of multilayer perceptron and Hopfield neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, Andrzej W.; Olszewski, Mikolaj K.; Wolinski, Tomasz R.

    2004-11-01

    In this paper we present an optoelectronic implementation of two networks based on multilayer perceptron and the Hopfield neural network. We propose two different methods to solve a problem of lack of negative optical signals that are necessary for connections between layers of perceptron as well as within the Hopfield network structure. The first method applied for construction of multilayer perceptron was based on division of signals into two channels and next to use both of them independently as positive and negative signals. The second one, applied for implementation of the Hopfield model, was based on adding of constant value for elements of matrix weight. Both methods of compensation of lack negative optical signals were tested experimentally as optoelectronic models of multilayer perceptron and Hopfield neural network. Special configurations of optical fiber cables and liquid crystal multicell plates were used. In conclusion, possible applications of the optoelectronic neural networks are briefly discussed.

  16. History of modern optics ad optoelectronics development in China

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Shouyun

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of memoir papers on the development of modern and contemporary optics and optoelectronics in China from the 18th to 20th centuries. The papers were written by famous scientists in China, including members of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Engineering, sharing their experience in different fields of optics and optoelectronics development. This is a unique book in understanding the natural science history of optics and optoelectronics. It gives you the general idea about how the western optical science spread to China in the 17th to 18th century; the cradle of the contemporary optics in China; Birth, development and application of lasers in China; high energy and high power lasers for laser antiballistic missile and laser nuclear fusion; development of Chinese optical communication and optical information storage; laser and infrared optics research for space science; development of Chinese optical instruments, etc.

  17. Practical opto-electronics an illustrated guide for the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Protopopov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This book explains how to create opto-electronic systems in a most efficient way, avoiding typical mistakes. It covers light detection techniques, imaging, interferometry, spectroscopy, modulation-demodulation, heterodyning, beam steering, and many other topics common to laboratory applications. The focus is made on self-explanatory figures rather than on words. The book guides the reader through the entire process of creating problem-specific opto-electronic systems, starting from optical source, through beam transportation optical arrangement, to photodetector and data acquisition system. The relevant basics of beam propagation and computer-based raytracing routines are also explained, and sample codes are listed. the book teaches important know-how and practical tricks that are never disclosed in scientific publications.  The book can become the reader's personal adviser in the world of opto-electronics and navigator in the ocean of the market of optical components and systems. Succinct, well-illustrate...

  18. Measurement of particle motion in optical tweezers embedded in a Sagnac interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Galinskiy, Ivan; Salgado, Israel Rebolledo; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Mehlig, Bernhard; Hanstorp, Dag

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed a counterpropagating optical tweezers setup embedded in a Sagnac interferometer in order to increase the sensitivity of position tracking for particles in the geometrical optics regime. The enhancement of the position determination using a Sagnac interferometer has previously been described theoretically by Taylor et al. [Journal of Optics 13, 044014 (2011)] for Rayleigh-regime particles trapped in an antinode of a standing wave. We have extended their theory to a case of arbitrarily-sized particles trapped with orthogonally-polarized counterpropagating beams. The working distance of the setup was sufficiently long to optically induce particle oscillations orthogonally to the axis of the tweezers with an auxiliary laser beam. Using these oscillations as a reference, we have experimentally shown that Sagnac-enhanced back focal plane interferometry is capable of providing an improvement of more than 5 times in the signal-to-background ratio, corresponding to a more than 30-fold improvement o...

  19. Probing the mechanics of the complete DNA transcription cycle in real-time using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Christoph G; Cross, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a DNA-dependent motor protein that links ribonucleotide polymerization to force generation and DNA translocation through its active site, i.e., mechanical work. Single-molecule studies using optical tweezers have allowed researchers to probe the load-dependent ribonucleotide incorporation rate and processivity of both single-subunit viral and multisubunit prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNAPs engaged in transcription elongation. A single-molecule method is described here, which allows the complete transcription cycle (i.e., promoter binding, initiation, elongation and termination) to be followed in real-time using dual-trap optical tweezers and a unique "three-bead" geometry. This single-molecule transcription assay can be used to probe the mechanics of both stationary and moving RNAP-DNA complexes engaged in different stages of transcription.

  20. Probing the structural dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids with optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Dustin B; Woodside, Michael T

    2015-10-01

    Conformational changes are an essential feature of most molecular processes in biology. Optical tweezers have emerged as a powerful tool for probing conformational dynamics at the single-molecule level because of their high resolution and sensitivity, opening new windows on phenomena ranging from folding and ligand binding to enzyme function, molecular machines, and protein aggregation. By measuring conformational changes induced in a molecule by forces applied by optical tweezers, new insight has been gained into the relationship between dynamics and function. We discuss recent advances from studies of how structure forms in proteins and RNA, including non-native structures, fluctuations in disordered proteins, and interactions with chaperones assisting native folding. We also review the development of assays probing the dynamics of complex protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein assemblies that reveal the dynamic interactions between biomolecular machines and their substrates.

  1. Raman sorting and identification of single living micro-organisms with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changan; Chen, De; Li, Yong-Qing

    2005-07-01

    We report on a novel technique for sorting and identification of single biological cells and food-borne bacteria based on laser tweezers and Raman spectroscopy (LTRS). With this technique, biological cells of different physiological states in a sample chamber were identified by their Raman spectral signatures and then they were selectively manipulated into a clean collection chamber with optical tweezers through a microchannel. As an example, we sorted the live and dead yeast cells into the collection chamber and validated this with a standard staining technique. We also demonstrated that bacteria existing in spoiled foods could be discriminated from a variety of food particles based on their characteristic Raman spectra and then isolated with laser manipulation. This label-free LTRS sorting technique may find broad applications in microbiology and rapid examination of food-borne diseases.

  2. Design of Fresnel Lens-Type Multi-Trapping Acoustic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Lin Tu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, acoustic tweezers which use beam forming performed by a Fresnel zone plate are proposed. The performance has been demonstrated by finite element analysis, including the acoustic intensity, acoustic pressure, acoustic potential energy, gradient force, and particle distribution. The acoustic tweezers use an ultrasound beam produced by a lead zirconate titanate (PZT transducer operating at 2.4 MHz and 100 Vpeak-to-peak in a water medium. The design of the Fresnel lens (zone plate is based on air reflection, acoustic impedance matching, and the Fresnel half-wave band (FHWB theory. This acoustic Fresnel lens can produce gradient force and acoustic potential wells that allow the capture and manipulation of single particles or clusters of particles. Simulation results strongly indicate a good trapping ability, for particles under 150 µm in diameter, in the minimum energy location. This can be useful for cell or microorganism manipulation.

  3. Neural Network for Image-to-Image Control of Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Weiland, Kenneth E.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2004-01-01

    A method is discussed for using neural networks to control optical tweezers. Neural-net outputs are combined with scaling and tiling to generate 480 by 480-pixel control patterns for a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM can be combined in various ways with a microscope to create movable tweezers traps with controllable profiles. The neural nets are intended to respond to scattered light from carbon and silicon carbide nanotube sensors. The nanotube sensors are to be held by the traps for manipulation and calibration. Scaling and tiling allow the 100 by 100-pixel maximum resolution of the neural-net software to be applied in stages to exploit the full 480 by 480-pixel resolution of the SLM. One of these stages is intended to create sensitive null detectors for detecting variations in the scattered light from the nanotube sensors.

  4. An improved optical tweezers assay for measuring the force generation of single kinesin molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Matthew P; Rao, Lu; Gennerich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Numerous microtubule-associated molecular motors, including several kinesins and cytoplasmic dynein, produce opposing forces that regulate spindle and chromosome positioning during mitosis. The motility and force generation of these motors are therefore critical to normal cell division, and dysfunction of these processes may contribute to human disease. Optical tweezers provide a powerful method for studying the nanometer motility and piconewton force generation of single motor proteins in vitro. Using kinesin-1 as a prototype, we present a set of step-by-step, optimized protocols for expressing a kinesin construct (K560-GFP) in Escherichia coli, purifying it, and studying its force generation in an optical tweezers microscope. We also provide detailed instructions on proper alignment and calibration of an optical trapping microscope. These methods provide a foundation for a variety of similar experiments.

  5. Single-Molecule Protein Folding Experiments Using High-Precision Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Junyi; Rebane, Aleksander A; Ma, Lu; Zhang, Yongli

    2017-01-01

    How proteins fold from linear chains of amino acids to delicate three-dimensional structures remains a fundamental biological problem. Single-molecule manipulation based on high-resolution optical tweezers (OT) provides a powerful approach to study protein folding with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. In this method, a single protein or protein complex is tethered between two beads confined in optical traps and pulled. Protein unfolding induced by the mechanical force is counteracted by the spontaneous folding of the protein, reaching a dynamic equilibrium at a characteristic force and rate. The transition is monitored by the accompanying extension change of the protein and used to derive conformations and energies of folding intermediates and their associated transition kinetics. Here, we provide general strategies and detailed protocols to study folding of proteins and protein complexes using optical tweezers, including sample preparation, DNA-protein conjugation and methods of data analysis to extract folding energies and rates from the single-molecule measurements.

  6. An Optical Tweezers Platform for Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy in Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jacob; Kamenetska, Maria; Ganim, Ziad

    2017-10-03

    Observation at the single molecule level has been a revolutionary tool for molecular biophysics and materials science, but single molecule studies of solution-phase chemistry are less widespread. In this work we develop an experimental platform for solution-phase single molecule force spectroscopy in organic solvents. This optical-tweezer-based platform was designed for broad chemical applicability and utilizes optically trapped core-shell microspheres, synthetic polymer tethers, and click chemistry linkages formed in situ. We have observed stable optical trapping of the core-shell microspheres in ten different solvents, and single molecule link formation in four different solvents. These experiments demonstrate how to use optical tweezers for single molecule force application in the study of solution-phase chemistry.

  7. Exact Theory of Optical Tweezers and Its Application to Absolute Calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, Rafael S; Viana, Nathan B; Neto, Paulo A Maia; Nussenzveig, H Moysés

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become a powerful tool for basic and applied research in cell biology. Here, we describe an experimentally verified theory for the trapping forces generated by optical tweezers based on first principles that allows absolute calibration. For pedagogical reasons, the steps that led to the development of the theory over the past 15 years are outlined. The results are applicable to a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Protocols for implementing absolute calibration are given, explaining how to measure all required experimental parameters, and including a link to an applet for stiffness calculations.

  8. Design of a high-quality optical conjugate structure in optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunguang; An, Ran; Zhang, Chengwei; Lei, Hai; Hu, Xiaodong; Li, Hongbin; Hu, Xiaotang

    2015-02-20

    We propose an approach to realize a high-quality optical conjugate of a piezo-driven mirror (PM) in optical tweezers. Misalignments between the optical beam and the steering center of the PM are analyzed mathematically. The decentrations in different directions cause different changes, either a position change of the conjugate plane or a spot variation of the beam during PM steering. On the other hand, these misalignment-introduced problems provide the information to check the assembling errors. Thus a wanted conjugate plane of the PM can be effectively and precisely achieved according to the detection signals. This approach is also available to deal with multifactor coupling error. At the end, the procedure for error analysis is given by testing homebuilt optical tweezers.

  9. Optical Nanofiber Integrated into Optical Tweezers for In Situ Fiber Probing and Optical Binding Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gusachenko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Precise control of particle positioning is desirable in many optical propulsion and sorting applications. Here, we develop an integrated platform for particle manipulation consisting of a combined optical nanofiber and optical tweezers system. We show that consistent and reversible transmission modulations arise when individual silica microspheres are introduced to the nanofiber surface using the optical tweezers. The observed transmission changes depend on both particle and fiber diameter and can be used as a reference point for in situ nanofiber or particle size measurement. Thence, we combine scanning electron microscope (SEM size measurements with nanofiber transmission data to provide calibration for particle-based fiber assessment. This integrated optical platform provides a method for selective evanescent field manipulation of micron-sized particles and facilitates studies of optical binding and light-particle interaction dynamics.

  10. High-Resolution "Fleezers": Dual-Trap Optical Tweezers Combined with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Kevin D; Comstock, Matthew J; Chemla, Yann R

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in optical tweezers have greatly expanded their measurement capabilities. A new generation of hybrid instrument that combines nanomechanical manipulation with fluorescence detection-fluorescence optical tweezers, or "fleezers"-is providing a powerful approach to study complex macromolecular dynamics. Here, we describe a combined high-resolution optical trap/confocal fluorescence microscope that can simultaneously detect sub-nanometer displacements, sub-piconewton forces, and single-molecule fluorescence signals. The primary technical challenge to these hybrid instruments is how to combine both measurement modalities without sacrificing the sensitivity of either one. We present general design principles to overcome this challenge and provide detailed, step-by-step instructions to implement them in the construction and alignment of the instrument. Lastly, we present a set of protocols to perform a simple, proof-of-principle experiment that highlights the instrument capabilities.

  11. Observation of a single-beam gradient force acoustical trap for elastic particles: acoustical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Baresch, Diego; Marchiano, Régis

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate matter precisely is critical for the study and development of a large variety of systems. Optical tweezers are excellent tools to handle particles ranging in size from a few micrometers to hundreds of nanometers but become inefficient and damaging on larger objects. We demonstrate for the first reported time the trapping of elastic particles by the large gradient force of a single acoustical beam in three dimensions. We show that at equal power, acoustical forces overtake by 8 orders of magnitude that of optical ones on macroscopic objects. Acoustical tweezers can push, pull and accurately control both the position of the particle and the forces exerted under damage-free conditions. The large spectrum of frequencies covered by coherent ultrasonic sources will provide a wide variety of manipulation possibilities from macro- to microscopic length scales. We believe our observations improve the prospects for wider use of non-contact manipulation in biology, biophysics, microfluidics and...

  12. Organic component vapor pressures and hygroscopicities of aqueous aerosol measured by optical tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Chen; Stewart, David J.; Reid, Jonathan P; Zhang, Yun Hong; Ohm, Peter; Dutcher, Cari S.; Clegg, Simon L.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopic response of aerosol and the particle-to-gas partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds are crucial for providing more accurate descriptions of the compositional and size distributions of atmospheric aerosol. Concurrent measurements of particle size and composition (inferred from refractive index) are reported here using optical tweezers to isolate and probe individual aerosol droplets over extended timeframes. The measurements are shown to allow accurate re...

  13. Optical tweezers and surface plasmon resonance combination system based on the high numerical aperture lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xuchen; Zhang, Bei; Lan, Guoqiang; Wang, Yiqiao; Liu, Shugang

    2015-11-01

    Biology and medicine sample measurement takes an important role in the microscopic optical technology. Optical tweezer has the advantage of accurate capture and non-pollution of the sample. The SPR(surface plasmon resonance) sensor has so many advantages include high sensitivity, fast measurement, less consumption of sample and label-free detection of biological sample that the SPR sensing technique has been used for surface topography, analysis of biochemical and immune, drug screening and environmental monitoring. If they combine, they will play an important role in the biological, chemical and other subjects. The system we propose use the multi-axis cage system, by using the methods of reflection and transmiss ion to improve the space utilization. The SPR system and optical tweezer were builtup and combined in one system. The cage of multi-axis system gives full play to its accuracy, simplicity and flexibility. The size of the system is 20 * 15 * 40 cm3 and thus the sample can be replaced to switch between the optical tweezers system and the SPR system in the small space. It means that we get the refractive index of the sample and control the particle in the same system. In order to control the revolving stage, get the picture and achieve the data stored automatically, we write a LabVIEW procedure. Then according to the data from the back focal plane calculate the refractive index of the sample. By changing the slide we can trap the particle as optical tweezer, which makes us measurement and trap the sample at the same time.

  14. Time-shared optical tweezers with a microlens array for dynamic microbead arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Wakida, Shin-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic arrays of microbeads and cells offer great flexibility and potential as platforms for sensing and manipulation applications in various scientific fields, especially biology and medicine. Here, we present a simple method for assembling and manipulating dense dynamic arrays based on time-shared scanning optical tweezers with a microlens array. Three typical examples, including the dynamic and simultaneous bonding of microbeads in real-time, are demonstrated. The optical design and the hardware setup for our approach are also described.

  15. Light-induced rotations of chiral birefringent microparticles in optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, M. G.; Mazzulla, A.; Pagliusi, P.; Magazzù, A.; Hernandez, R. J.; Provenzano, C.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Maragò, O. M.; Cipparrone, G.

    2016-01-01

    We study the rotational dynamics of solid chiral and birefringent microparticles induced by elliptically polarized laser light in optical tweezers. We find that both reflection of left circularly polarized light and residual linear retardance affect the particle dynamics. The degree of ellipticity of laser light needed to induce rotations is found. The experimental results are compared with analytical calculations of the transfer of angular moment from elliptically polarized light to chiral birefringent particles. PMID:27601200

  16. A feasibility study of in vivo applications of single beam acoustic tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying, E-mail: yli582@usc.edu; Lee, Changyang; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk [NIH Transducer Resource Center and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1111 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    Tools that are capable of manipulating micro-sized objects have been widely used in such fields as physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Several devices, including optical tweezers, atomic force microscope, micro-pipette aspirator, and standing surface wave type acoustic tweezers have been studied to satisfy this need. However, none of them has been demonstrated to be suitable for in vivo and clinical studies. Single beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT) is a technology that uses highly focused acoustic beam to trap particles toward the beam focus. Its feasibility was first theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by Lee and Shung several years ago. Since then, much effort has been devoted to improving this technology. At present, the tool is capable of trapping a microparticle as small as 1 μm, as well as a single red blood cell. Although in comparing to other microparticles manipulating technologies, SBAT has advantages of providing stronger trapping force and deeper penetration depth in tissues, and producing less tissue damage, its potential for in vivo applications has yet been explored. It is worth noting that ultrasound has been used as a diagnostic tool for over 50 years and no known major adverse effects have been observed at the diagnostic energy level. This paper reports the results of an initial attempt to assess the feasibility of single beam acoustic tweezers to trap microparticles in vivo inside of a blood vessel. The acoustic intensity of SBAT under the trapping conditions that were utilized was measured. The mechanical index and thermal index at the focus of acoustic beam were found to be 0.48 and 0.044, respectively, which meet the standard of commercial diagnostic ultrasound system.

  17. High bandgap III-V alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo; Wanlass, Mark

    2017-01-10

    High bandgap alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics are disclosed. An exemplary optoelectronic device may include a substrate, at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer, and a step-grade buffer between the substrate and at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer. The buffer may begin with a layer that is substantially lattice matched to GaAs, and may then incrementally increase the lattice constant in each sequential layer until a predetermined lattice constant of Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP is reached.

  18. A class of fascinating optoelectronic materials: Triarylboron compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Triarylboron compounds are significant optoelectronic materials due to their excellent emissive and electron-transport properties,and could be applied in organic light-emitting diodes as emissive and/or electron-transport layers.Triarylboron compounds have vacant pπ orbital and have received increasing interest as fluoride ion and cyanide ion sensors utilizing specific Lewis acid-base interaction.This review summarizes their structural characteristics,optical properties and applications in chemosensors for anions and optoelectronic devices developed in recent years and discusses the problems and prospects.

  19. Research on optical multistage butterfly interconnection and optoelectronic logic operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, De-Gui; Wang, Na-Xin; He, Li-Ming; Xu, Mai; Liang, Guo-Dong; Zheng, Jie

    We briefly study butterfly interconnection construction and propose an experimental approach to implementing multistage butterfly interconnection networks by using a special interconnection grating with the reflection ladder structure and liquid crystal light valves (LCLVs), and implementing the optical butterfly interconnections and primary optical digital logic operations. With this foundation, we analyse and discuss the features of the approach by computer simulations. In terms of our theoretical analyses, we improve the ring-circuit approach, based on the reflection ladder structure gratings, into a more suitable form based on transmission gratings, and we substitute the LCLVs with optoelectronic switches. Finally we give the experimental results of both the transmission grating and optoelectronic switches.

  20. Magnetic and optoelectronic properties of gold nanocluster-thiophene assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Lohrman, Jessica; Ren, Shenqiang

    2014-07-07

    Nanohybrids consisting of Au nanocluster and polythiophene nanowire assemblies exhibit unique thermal-responsive optical behaviors and charge-transfer controlled magnetic and optoelectronic properties. The ultrasmall Au nanocluster enhanced photoabsorption and conductivity effectively improves the photocurrent of nanohybrid based photovoltaics, leading to an increase of power conversion efficiency by 14 % under AM 1.5 illumination. In addition, nanohybrids exhibit electric field controlled spin resonance and magnetic field sensing behaviors, which open up the potential of charge-transfer complex system where the magnetism and optoelectronics interact.

  1. A reconfigurable optoelectronic interconnect technology for multi-processor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y.C.; Cheng, J. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for High Technology Materials; Zolper, J.C.; Klem, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a new optical interconnect architecture and the integrated optoelectronic circuit technology for implementing a parallel, reconfigurable, multiprocessor network. The technology consists of monolithic array`s of optoelectronic switches that integrate vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with three-terminal heterojunction phototransistors, which effectively combined the functions of an optical transceiver and an optical spatial routing switch. These switches have demonstrated optical switching at 200 Mb/s, and electrical-to-optical data conversion at > 500 Mb/s, with a small-signal electrical-to-optical modulation bandwidth of {approximately} 4 GHz.

  2. High bandgap III-V alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo; Wanlass, Mark

    2017-01-10

    High bandgap alloys for high efficiency optoelectronics are disclosed. An exemplary optoelectronic device may include a substrate, at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer, and a step-grade buffer between the substrate and at least one Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP layer. The buffer may begin with a layer that is substantially lattice matched to GaAs, and may then incrementally increase the lattice constant in each sequential layer until a predetermined lattice constant of Al.sub.1-xIn.sub.xP is reached.

  3. Applications of HTSC films in hybrid optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuna, Davor

    1992-03-01

    An overview is given of potential applications of high-Tc superconductors (HTSC) in the context of hybrid optoelectronic technology. The main requirements are described for the in situ growth of epitaxial YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) (YBCO) films on SrTiO3 and discuss the properties of YBCO layers grown on Si and GaAs substrates with intermediate, conducting indium-tin-oxide buffer layers. The performances of the microbridge and the meander type of HTSC bolometer are compared, and several concepts are discussed that may become relevant for future hybrid optoelectronic technology.

  4. Optoelectronic devices, plasmonics, and photonics with topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politano, Antonio; Viti, Leonardo; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2017-03-01

    Topological insulators are innovative materials with semiconducting bulk together with surface states forming a Dirac cone, which ensure metallic conduction in the surface plane. Therefore, topological insulators represent an ideal platform for optoelectronics and photonics. The recent progress of science and technology based on topological insulators enables the exploitation of their huge application capabilities. Here, we review the recent achievements of optoelectronics, photonics, and plasmonics with topological insulators. Plasmonic devices and photodetectors based on topological insulators in a wide energy range, from terahertz to the ultraviolet, promise outstanding impact. Furthermore, the peculiarities, the range of applications, and the challenges of the emerging fields of topological photonics and thermo-plasmonics are discussed.

  5. Stable optical trapping and sensitive characterization of nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; Ling, Dong-xiong; Ling, Lin; Li, William; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-01-01

    Optical manipulation and label-free characterization of nanoscale structures open up new possibilities for assembly and control of nanodevices and biomolecules. Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped particle, but is generally less effective for individual nanoparticles. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints. PMID:28211526

  6. [Analysis of astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma using laser tweezers raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Sun, Mei-Juan; Liu, Jun-Xian; Deng, Yang-Ge; Mo, Yu-Xiang; Tao, Zhan-Hua

    2012-09-01

    In the present paper, a method was established based on laser tweezer Raman spectroscopy for rapid quantification of astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma cells. First, the Raman spectra of astaxanthin standard solution with different concentrations were determined and the standard curve for astaxanthin with the peak intensity at 1 520 cm- was plotted; And then the Phaffia yeast cells cultivated in different nitrogen source and carbon source medium were divided into two parts, one for the detection of Raman spectra, and the other for the determination of ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry; Finally the relationship between the two methods was analyzed. The correlation coefficient of standard curve for astaxanthin is 0.998 3. Comparing laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy method with traditional ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry in analyzing the content of astaxanthin in unit mass Phaffia rhodozyma and the yield of astaxanthin in unit volume fermentation broth of Phaffia rhodozyma, the authors found that the data obtained have good linear relationship. And the correlation coefficients are 0.917 7 and 0.905 4, respectively. Therefore, both methods have almost the same effect of measuement. But laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy method is more efficient in the quantitative analysis of astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma cells.

  7. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  8. Dynamic Simulation of Trapping and Controlled Rotation of a Microscale Rod Driven by Line Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghshenas-Jaryani, Mahdi; Bowling, Alan; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2013-03-01

    Since the invention of optical tweezers, several biological and engineering applications, especially in micro-nanofluid, have been developed. For example, development of optically driven micromotors, which has an important role in microfluidic applications, has vastly been considered. Despite extensive experimental studies in this field, there is a lack of theoretical work that can verify and analyze these observations. This work develops a dynamic model to simulate trapping and controlled rotation of a microscale rod under influence of the optical trapping forces. The laser beam, used in line optical tweezers with a varying trap's length, was modeled based on a ray-optics approach. Herein, the effects of viscosity of the surrounding fluid (water), gravity, and buoyancy were included in the proposed model. The predicted results are in overall agreement with the experimental observation, which make the theoretical model be a viable tool for investigating the dynamic behavior of small size objects manipulated by optical tweezers in fluid environments. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. MCB-1148541.

  9. Stable optical trapping and sensitive characterization of nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-Ying; Ling, Dong-Xiong; Ling, Lin; Li, William; Li, Yong-Qing

    2017-02-01

    Optical manipulation and label-free characterization of nanoscale structures open up new possibilities for assembly and control of nanodevices and biomolecules. Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped particle, but is generally less effective for individual nanoparticles. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  10. Recent Advances in Biological Single-Molecule Applications of Optical Tweezers and Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Shabestari, M; Meijering, A E C; Roos, W H; Wuite, G J L; Peterman, E J G

    2017-01-01

    Over the past two decades, single-molecule techniques have evolved into robust tools to study many fundamental biological processes. The combination of optical tweezers with fluorescence microscopy and microfluidics provides a powerful single-molecule manipulation and visualization technique that has found widespread application in biology. In this combined approach, the spatial (~nm) and temporal (~ms) resolution, as well as the force scale (~pN) accessible to optical tweezers is complemented with the power of fluorescence microscopy. Thereby, it provides information on the local presence, identity, spatial dynamics, and conformational dynamics of single biomolecules. Together, these techniques allow comprehensive studies of, among others, molecular motors, protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, biomolecular conformational changes, and mechanotransduction pathways. In this chapter, recent applications of fluorescence microscopy in combination with optical trapping are discussed. After an introductory section, we provide a description of instrumentation together with the current capabilities and limitations of the approaches. Next we summarize recent studies that applied this combination of techniques in biological systems and highlight some representative biological assays to mark the exquisite opportunities that optical tweezers combined with fluorescence microscopy provide. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitation of malaria parasite-erythrocyte cell-cell interactions using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Alex J; Theron, Michel; Tiffert, Teresa; Lew, Virgilio L; Cicuta, Pietro; Rayner, Julian C

    2014-08-19

    Erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites is an essential step for parasite survival and hence the pathogenesis of malaria. Invasion has been studied intensively, but our cellular understanding has been limited by the fact that it occurs very rapidly: invasion is generally complete within 1 min, and shortly thereafter the merozoites, at least in in vitro culture, lose their invasive capacity. The rapid nature of the process, and hence the narrow time window in which measurements can be taken, have limited the tools available to quantitate invasion. Here we employ optical tweezers to study individual invasion events for what we believe is the first time, showing that newly released P. falciparum merozoites, delivered via optical tweezers to a target erythrocyte, retain their ability to invade. Even spent merozoites, which had lost the ability to invade, retain the ability to adhere to erythrocytes, and furthermore can still induce transient local membrane deformations in the erythrocyte membrane. We use this technology to measure the strength of the adhesive force between merozoites and erythrocytes, and to probe the cellular mode of action of known invasion inhibitory treatments. These data add to our understanding of the erythrocyte-merozoite interactions that occur during invasion, and demonstrate the power of optical tweezers technologies in unraveling the blood-stage biology of malaria. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurements of liposome biomechanical properties by combining line optical tweezers and dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyratou, Ellas; Cunaj, Efrosini; Tsigaridas, George; Mourelatou, Elena A; Demetzos, Costas; Serafetinides, Alexander A; Makropoulou, Mersini

    2014-12-09

    Abstract Liposomes are well-known cell simulators and are currently studied as drug delivery systems, for a targeted delivery of higher drug concentrations, in specific cells. Novel biophotonic techniques for manipulation and characterization of liposomes have been developed; among which are optical tweezers. In our work, we demonstrate a novel use of line optical tweezers to manipulate and cause liposome deformations. Optical forces induce tension on liposomes, which are stretched along the line optical trap. The method of dielectrophoresis, combined with optical tweezers, was used to measure the exerted optical forces. As a consequence, in the case of reversible liposome deformations, the value of the shear and bending moduli of liposomes was calculated. We anticipate that the selective manipulation of liposomes will help us toward a better understanding of the cellular-liposome interactions. Studying the biomechanical properties of liposomes will provide an insight into the mechanical behavior of individual living cells, which have recently been implicated in many aspects of human physiology and patho-physiology. The biomechanical properties of cells (i.e. deformability, stiffness and elasticity) can be useful biomarkers for various disease processes and changes of the cell state.

  13. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loenhout, Marijn T J; De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Flebus, Benedetta; den Blanken, Johan F; Zweifel, Ludovit P; Hooning, Koen M; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; Dekker, Cees

    2013-01-01

    The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  14. How should the optical tweezers experiment be used to characterize the red blood cell membrane mechanics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigüenza, Julien; Mendez, Simon; Nicoud, Franck

    2017-05-03

    Stretching red blood cells using optical tweezers is a way to characterize the mechanical properties of their membrane by measuring the size of the cell in the direction of the stretching (axial diameter) and perpendicularly (transverse diameter). Recently, such data have been used in numerous publications to validate solvers dedicated to the computation of red blood cell dynamics under flow. In the present study, different mechanical models are used to simulate the stretching of red blood cells by optical tweezers. Results first show that the mechanical moduli of the membranes have to be adjusted as a function of the model used. In addition, by assessing the area dilation of the cells, the axial and transverse diameters measured in optical tweezers experiments are found to be insufficient to discriminate between models relevant to red blood cells or not. At last, it is shown that other quantities such as the height or the profile of the cell should be preferred for validation purposes since they are more sensitive to the membrane model.

  15. Probing DNA-DNA Interactions with a Combination of Quadruple-Trap Optical Tweezers and Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Ineke; King, Graeme A; Heller, Iddo; Biebricher, Andreas S; Peterman, Erwin J G; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2017-01-01

    DNA metabolism and DNA compaction in vivo involve frequent interactions of remote DNA segments, mediated by proteins. In order to gain insight into such interactions, quadruple-trap optical tweezers have been developed. This technique provides an unprecedented degree of control through the ability to independently manipulate two DNA molecules in three dimensions. In this way, discrete regions of different DNA molecules can be brought into contact with one another, with a well-defined spatial configuration. At the same time, the tension and extension of the DNA molecules can be monitored. Furthermore, combining quadruple-trap optical tweezers with microfluidics makes fast buffer exchange possible, which is important for in situ generation of the dual DNA-protein constructs needed for these kinds of experiments. In this way, processes such as protein-mediated inter-DNA bridging can be studied with unprecedented control. This chapter provides a step-by-step description of how to perform a dual DNA manipulation experiment using combined quadruple-trap optical tweezers and microfluidics.

  16. Raman Tweezers as a Diagnostic Tool of Hemoglobin-Related Blood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rusciano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the development of a Raman Tweezers system for detecting hemoglobin-related blood disorders at a single cell level. The study demonstrates that the molecular fingerprint insight provided by Raman analysis holds great promise for distinguishing between healthy and diseased cells in the field of biomedicine. Herein a Raman Tweezers system has been applied to investigate the effects of thalassemia, a blood disease quite diffuse in the Mediterranean Sea region. By resonant excitation of hemoglobin Raman bands, we examined the oxygenation capability of normal, alpha- and beta-thalassemic erythrocytes. A reduction of this fundamental red blood cell function, particularly severe for beta-thalassemia, has been found. Raman spectroscopy was also used to draw hemoglobin distribution inside single erythrocytes; the results confirmed the characteristic anomaly (target shape, occurring in thalassemia and some other blood disorders. The success of resonance Raman spectroscopy for thalassemia detection reported in this review provide an interesting starting point to explore the application of a Raman Tweezers system in the analysis of several blood disorders.

  17. Grating-flanked plasmonic coaxial apertures for efficient fiber optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Amr A E; Sheikhoelislami, Sassan; Gastelum, Steven; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-09-05

    Subwavelength plasmonic apertures have been foundational for direct optical manipulation of nanoscale specimens including sub-100 nm polymeric beads, metallic nanoparticles and proteins. While most plasmonic traps result in two-dimensional localization, three-dimensional manipulation has been demonstrated by integrating a plasmonic aperture on an optical fiber tip. However, such 3D traps are usually inefficient since the optical mode of the fiber and the subwavelength aperture only weakly couple. In this paper we design more efficient optical-fiber-based plasmonic tweezers combining a coaxial plasmonic aperture with a plasmonic grating coupler at the fiber tip facet. Using full-field finite difference time domain analysis, we optimize the grating design for both gold and silver fiber-based coaxial tweezers such that the optical transmission through the apertures is maximized. With the optimized grating, we show that the maximum transmission efficiency increases from 2.5% to 19.6% and from 1.48% to 16.7% for the gold and silver structures respectively. To evaluate their performance as optical tweezers, we calculate the optical forces and the corresponding trapping potential on dielectric particles interacting with the apertures. We demonstrate that the enahncement in the transmission translates into an equivalent increase in the optical forces. Consequently, the optical power required to achieve stable optical trapping is significantly reduced allowing for efficient localization and 3D manipulation of sub-30 nm dielectric particles.

  18. 77 FR 65713 - Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Optoelectronic Devices for Fiber Optic Communications, Components Thereof, and Products... Singapore; and Avago Technologies U.S. Inc. of San Jose, California. Letters supplementing the complaint... the United States after importation of certain optoelectronic devices for fiber optic...

  19. Reaction of (CP(2)asterisk-lnH)(2) (ln=Y, La) and CP(2)asterisk-Y(2-C(6)H(4)CH(2)NMe(2)) with esters and amides and molecular-structure of [CP(2)asterisk-Y(mu- ocme=chc(oet)o)](2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelman, B.J; Wierda, F.; Meetsma, A.; Teuben, J.H

    1995-01-01

    The activation of esters and amides by (Cp(2)*LnH)(2) [Ln = Y (1a), Ln = La (1b), Cp*=C(5)Me] and Cp(2)*Y(2-C(6)H(4)CH(2)NMe(2)) (2) is described. Compounds 1a and 1b react with ethyl acetate to form Cp(2)*YOEt (3a) and Cp(2)*LaOEt (30). With 1a and ethyl benzoate a 1:1 mixture of 3a and

  20. Physicochemical Properties of Glycine-Based Ionic Liquid [QuatGly-OEt][EtOSO3] (2-Ethoxy-1-ethyl-1,1-dimethyl-2-oxoethanaminium ethyl sulfate and Its Binary Mixtures with Poly(ethylene glycol (Mw = 200 at Various Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Wen Kuo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This work includes specific basic characterization of synthesized glycine-based Ionic Liquid (IL [QuatGly-OEt][EtOSO3] by NMR, elementary analysis and water content. Thermophysical properties such as density, ρ, viscosity, η, refractive index, n, and conductivity, κ, for the binary mixture of [QuatGly-OEt][EtOSO3] with poly(ethylene glycol (PEG [Mw = 200] are measured over the whole composition range. The temperature dependence of density and dynamic viscosity for neat [QuatGly-OEt][EtOSO3] and its binary mixture can be described by an empirical polynomial equation and by the Vogel-Tammann-Fucher (VTF equation, respectively. The thermal expansion coefficient of the ILs is ascertained using the experimental density results, and the excess volume expansivity is evaluated. The negative values of excess molar volume for the mixture indicate the ion-dipole interactions and packing between IL and PEG oligomer. The results of binary excess property (VmE and deviations (Δη, ∆xn, ∆Фn, ∆xR, and ∆ФR are discussed in terms of molecular interactions and molecular structures in the binary mixture.

  1. Parallel optical interconnects - Implementation of optoelectronics in multiprocessor architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frietman, E. E. E.; Dekker, L.; van Nifterick, W.; Jongeling, T. J. M.

    1990-03-01

    Optoelectronic logic element circuitries are described which can be used for the implementation of a wide variety of interconnection schemes. Particular attention is given to the design, construction, and application of an electrooptic communication system (EOCS) using dedicated free space multiple data distributors and integrated optically writable input buffer arrays with fully parallel access. Some experimental results obtained on the complete EOCS are presented.

  2. Opto-electronic properties of charged conjugated molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fratiloiu, S.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to provide fundamental insight into the nature and opto-electronic properties of charge carriers on conjugated oligomers and polymers. Electronic structure, optical absorption properties and distribution of charge carriers along the chains of different conjugated materials

  3. Advances in wide bandgap SiC for optoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Argyraki, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has played a key role in power electronics thanks to its unique physical properties like wide bandgap, high breakdown field, etc. During the past decade, SiC is also becoming more and more active in optoelectronics thanks to the progress in materials growth and nanofabrication...

  4. Optoelectronic Correlator Architecture for Shift Invariant Target Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Monjur, Mehjabin S; Tripathi, Renu; Donoghue, John; Shahriar, M S

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present theoretical details and the underlying architecture of a hybrid optoelectronic correlator that correlates images using SLMs, detectors and VLSI chips. The proposed architecture bypasses the nonlinear material such as photorefractive polymer film by using detectors instead, and the phase information is yet conserved by the interference of plane waves with the images.

  5. Intersatellite communications optoelectronics research at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A review is presented of current optoelectronics research and development at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for high-power, high-bandwidth laser transmitters; high-bandwidth, high-sensitivity optical receivers; pointing, acquisition, and tracking components; and experimental and theoretical system modeling at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Program hardware and space flight opportunities are presented.

  6. Simultaneous Thermoelectric and Optoelectronic Characterization of Individual Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, François; Song, Erdong; Li, Qiming; Swartzentruber, Brian; Martinez, Julio A; Wang, George T

    2015-12-01

    Semiconducting nanowires have been explored for a number of applications in optoelectronics such as photodetectors and solar cells. Currently, there is ample interest in identifying the mechanisms that lead to photoresponse in nanowires in order to improve and optimize performance. However, distinguishing among the different mechanisms, including photovoltaic, photothermoelectric, photoemission, bolometric, and photoconductive, is often difficult using purely optoelectronic measurements. In this work, we present an approach for performing combined and simultaneous thermoelectric and optoelectronic measurements on the same individual nanowire. We apply the approach to GaN/AlGaN core/shell and GaN/AlGaN/GaN core/shell/shell nanowires and demonstrate the photothermoelectric nature of the photocurrent observed at the electrical contacts at zero bias, for above- and below-bandgap illumination. Furthermore, the approach allows for the experimental determination of the temperature rise due to laser illumination, which is often obtained indirectly through modeling. We also show that under bias, both above- and below-bandgap illumination leads to a photoresponse in the channel with signatures of persistent photoconductivity due to photogating. Finally, we reveal the concomitant presence of photothermoelectric and photogating phenomena at the contacts in scanning photocurrent microscopy under bias by using their different temporal response. Our approach is applicable to a broad range of nanomaterials to elucidate their fundamental optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties.

  7. Magnetometer Based on the Opto-Electronic Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsko, Andrey B.; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute

    2005-01-01

    We theoretically propose and discuss properties of two schemes of an all-optical self-oscillating magnetometer based on an opto-electronic oscillator stabilized with an atomic vapor cell. Proof of the principle DC magnetic field measurements characterized with 2 x 10(exp -7) G sensitivity and 1 - 1000 mG dynamic range in one of the schemes are demonstrated.

  8. New Results with the Opto-Electronic Oscillators (OEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, S.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    A new class of oscillators based on photonic devices is presented. These opto-electronic oscillators (OEOs) generate microwave oscillation by converting continuous energy from a light source using a feedback circuit which includes a delay element, an electro-optic switch, and a photodetctor.

  9. Stabilizing an optoelectronic microwave oscillator with photonic filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, D.; Aveline, D.; Yu, N.; Thompson, R.; Matsko, A. B.; Maleki, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper compares methods of active stabilization of an optoelectronic microwave oscillator (OEO) based on insertion of a source of optical group delay into an OEO loop. The performance of an OEO stabilized with either a high- optical cavity or an atomic cell is analyzed. We show that the elements play a role of narrow-band microwave filters improving an OEO stability.

  10. Thirty Gigahertz Optoelectronic Mixing in Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Alberto; Mzali, Sana; Mazellier, Jean-Paul; Bezencenet, Odile; Larat, Christian; Molin, Stephanie; Morvan, Loïc; Legagneux, Pierre; Dolfi, Daniel; Dlubak, Bruno; Seneor, Pierre; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia

    2016-05-11

    The remarkable properties of graphene, such as broadband optical absorption, high carrier mobility, and short photogenerated carrier lifetime, are particularly attractive for high-frequency optoelectronic devices operating at 1.55 μm telecom wavelength. Moreover, the possibility to transfer graphene on a silicon substrate using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible process opens the ability to integrate electronics and optics on a single cost-effective chip. Here, we report an optoelectronic mixer based on chemical vapor-deposited graphene transferred on an oxidized silicon substrate. Our device consists in a coplanar waveguide that integrates a graphene channel, passivated with an atomic layer-deposited Al2O3 film. With this new structure, 30 GHz optoelectronic mixing in commercially available graphene is demonstrated for the first time. In particular, using a 30 GHz intensity-modulated optical signal and a 29.9 GHz electrical signal, we show frequency downconversion to 100 MHz. These results open promising perspectives in the domain of optoelectronics for radar and radio-communication systems.

  11. Determining the structure-mechanics relationships of dense microtubule networks with confocal microscopy and magnetic tweezers-based microrheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yali; Valentine, Megan T

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential in maintaining the shape, strength, and organization of cells. Its spatiotemporal organization is fundamental for numerous dynamic biological processes, and mechanical stress within the MT cytoskeleton provides an important signaling mechanism in mitosis and neural development. This raises important questions about the relationships between structure and mechanics in complex MT structures. In vitro, reconstituted cytoskeletal networks provide a minimal model of cell mechanics while also providing a testing ground for the fundamental polymer physics of stiff polymer gels. Here, we describe our development and implementation of a broad tool kit to study structure-mechanics relationships in reconstituted MT networks, including protocols for the assembly of entangled and cross-linked MT networks, fluorescence imaging, microstructure characterization, construction and calibration of magnetic tweezers devices, and mechanical data collection and analysis. In particular, we present the design and assembly of three neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnetic tweezers devices optimized for use with MT networks: (1) high-force magnetic tweezers devices that enable the application of nano-Newton forces and possible meso- to macroscale materials characterization; (2) ring-shaped NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers devices that enable oscillatory microrheology measurements; and (3) portable magnetic tweezers devices that enable direct visualization of microscale deformation in soft materials under applied force.

  12. Fluorinated porphyrin tweezer: a powerful reporter of absolute configuration for erythro and threo diols, amino alcohols, and diamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyong; Tanasova, Marina; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak

    2008-02-13

    A general and sensitive nonempirical protocol to determine the absolute configurations of erythro and threo diols, amino alcohols, and diamines is reported. Binding of diols to the porphyrin tweezer system is greatly enhanced by increasing the Lewis acidity of the metalloporphyrin. Supramolecular complexes formed between the porphyrin tweezer host and chiral substrates exhibited exciton-coupled bisignate CD spectra with predictable signs based on the substituents on the chiral center. The working model suggests that the observed helicity of the porphyrin tweezer is dictated via steric differentiation experienced by the porphyrin ring bound to each chiral center. A variety of erythro and threo substrates were investigated to verify this chiroptical method. Their absolute configurations were unequivocally determined, and thus a general mnemonic is provided for the assignment of chirality.

  13. Battlefield Lasers and Opto-electronics Systems (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Maini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last four decades or so, there has been an explosive growth in commercial, industrial, medical, scientific, technological, and above all, military usage of laser devices and systems. In fact, lasers have influenced every conceivable area of application during this period. While the expansion of non-military application spectrum of lasers is primarily driven by emergence of a large number of laser wavelengths followed by ever increasing power levels and reducing price tags at which those wavelengths could be generated, the military applications of lasers and related electro-optic devices have grown mainly because of technological maturity of the lasers that were born in the late 1960's and the early 1970's. Lasers have been used in various military applications since the early days of development that followed the invention of this magical device. There has been large scale proliferation of lasers and opto-electronic devices and systems for applications like range finding, target designation, target acquisition and tracking, precision guided munitions, etc. during 1970's and 1980's. These devices continue to improve in performance and find increased acceptance and usage in the contemporary battlefield scenario. Technological advances in optics, opto-electronics, and electronics, leading to more rugged, reliable, compact and efficient laser devices are largely responsible for making these indispensable in modern warfare. Past one decade or so has seen emergence of some new potential areas of usage. Some of these areas include rapid growth in the usage of lasers and opto-electronics devices and systems for electrooptic countermeasure (EOCM applications, test and evaluation systems that can perform online functionality checks on military opto-electronics systems and also their interoperability. In this paper, an overview of the current and emerging military applications of lasers and opto-electronics systems has been given with an outline

  14. Power spectrum analysis for optical tweezers. II: Laser wavelength dependence of parasitic filtering, and how to achieve high bandwidth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Peterman, Erwin J G; Weber, Tom

    2006-01-01

    In a typical optical tweezers detection system, the position of a trapped object is determined from laser light impinging on a quadrant photodiode. When the laser is infrared and the photodiode is of silicon, they can act together as an unintended low-pass filter. This parasicit effect is due...... this detection system of optical tweezers a bandwidth, accuracy, and precision that are limited only by the data acquisition board's bandwidth and bandpass ripples, here 96.7 kHz and 0.005 dB, respectively. ©2006 American Institute of Physics...

  15. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shuxun; Wang Xiaolin; Sun Dong [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Cheng Jinping; Han Cheng, Shuk [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Kong, Chi-Wing [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Li, Ronald A. [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Center of Cardiovascular Research, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  16. Effect of Surface Layer on Electromechanical Stability of Tweezers and Cantilevers Fabricated from Conductive Cylindrical Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keivani, Maryam; Koochi, Ali; Sedighi, Hamid M.; Abadyan, Mohamadreza; Farrokhabadi, Amin; Shahedin, Abed Moheb

    2016-12-01

    Herein, the impact of surface layer on the stability of nanoscale tweezers and cantilevers fabricated from nanowires with cylindrical cross section is studied. A modified continuum based on the Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity is applied for incorporating the presence of surface layer. Considering the cylindrical geometry of the nanowire, the presence of the Coulomb attraction and dispersion forces are incorporated in the derived formulations. Three different approaches, i.e. numerical differential quadrature method (DQM), an approximated homotopy perturbation method (HPM) and developing lumped parameter model (LPM) have been employed to solve the governing equations. The impact of surface layer on the instability of the system is demonstrated.

  17. Measurement of the total optical angular momentum transfer in optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, S; Knoener, G; Nieminen, T A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H; Heckenberg, Norman R.; Knoener, Gregor; Nieminen, Timo A.; Parkin, Simon; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2006-01-01

    We describe a way to determine the total angular momentum, both spin and orbital, transferred to a particle trapped in optical tweezers. As an example an LG02 mode of a laser beam with varying degrees of circular polarisation is used to trap and rotate an elongated particle with a well defined geometry. The method successfully estimates the total optical torque applied to the particle. For this technique, there is no need to measure the viscous drag on the particle, as it is an optical measurement. Therefore, knowledge of the particle's size and shape, as well as the fluid's viscosity, is not required.

  18. Fast acoustic tweezers for the two-dimensional manipulation of individual particles in microfluidic channels

    CERN Document Server

    Tran, S B Q; Thibault, Pierre; 10.1063/1.4751348

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device that implements standing surface acoustic waves in order to handle single cells, droplets, and generally particles. The particles are moved in a very controlled manner by the two-dimensional drifting of a standing wave array, using a slight frequency modulation of two ultrasound emitters around their resonance. These acoustic tweezers allow any type of motion at velocities up to few 10mm/s, while the device transparency is adapted for optical studies. The possibility of automation provides a critical step in the development of lab-on-a-chip cell sorters and it should find applications in biology, chemistry, and engineering domains.

  19. Measuring stall forces in vivo with optical tweezers through light momentum changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, J.; Farré, A.; López-Quesada, C.; Fernández, X.; Martín-Badosa, E.; Montes-Usategui, M.

    2011-10-01

    The stall forces of processive molecular motors have been widely studied previously in vitro. Even so, in vivo experiments are required for determining the actual performance of each molecular motor in its natural environment. We report the direct measurement of light momentum changes in single beam optical tweezers as a suitable technique for measuring forces inside living cells, where few alternatives exist. The simplicity of this method, which does not require force calibration for each trapped object, makes it convenient for measuring the forces involved in fast dynamic biological processes such us intracellular traffic. Here we present some measurements of the stall force of processive molecular motors inside living Allium cepa cells.

  20. Optical Tweezers Analysis of Double-Stranded DNA Denaturation in the Presence of Urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunli; Li, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Urea is a kind of denaturant prone to form hydrogen bonds with the electronegative centers of the nitrogenous bases, threatening the stability of hydrogen bonds between DNA base pairs. In this paper, the stability and stiffness of DNA double helix influenced by urea are investigated at single-molecule level using optical tweezers. Experimental results show that DNA's double helix stability and stiffness both decrease with increasing urea concentration. In addition, the re-forming of ruptured hydrogen bonds between the base pairs is blocked by urea as the tension on DNA is released.

  1. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuxun; Cheng, Jinping; Kong, Chi-Wing; Wang, Xiaolin; Han Cheng, Shuk; Li, Ronald A.; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  2. Synthesis and Anion Recognition of Novel Molecular Tweezer Receptors Based on Carbonyl Thiosemicarbazide for Fluoride Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI,Wei; ZHANG,You-Ming; WEI,Tai-Bao

    2008-01-01

    Three title compounds have been designed and synthesized in high yields as novel anion receptors, which show a higher selectivity for F- than other halide ions. The binding properties for fluoride ions of the receptors have been examined by UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy, indicating that a 1 : 1 stoichiometry complex is formed between the receptors and fluoride ions through hydrogen bonding interactions in DMSO solution. In addition, because these receptors have more binding points, they have better binding properties for anions than the molecular tweezer receptors based on thiourea we reported last time.

  3. Measurement of Breaking Force of Fluorescence Labelled Microtubules with Optical Tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-Xiang; GUO Hong-Lian; XU Chun-Hua; YUAN Ming; LI Znao-Lin; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Under illumination of excitation light, the force that can make fluorescent dye-labelled microtubules break up is measured by using dual-beam optical tweezers. It is found that this force is about several piconewtons, which is two orders of magnitude smaller than that without fluorescence label. Microtubules can be elongated about 20% and the increase of the tensile force is nonlinear with the microtubule elongation. Some qualitative explanations are given for the mechanisms about the breakup and elongation of microtubules exposed to excitation light.

  4. The Cryptococcus neoformans capsule: lessons from the use of optical tweezers and other biophysical tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno ePontes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients. The main virulence factor of C. neoformans is the polysaccharide capsule; however, many fundamental aspects of capsule structure and function remain poorly understood. Recently, important capsule properties were uncovered using optical tweezers and other biophysical techniques, including dynamic and static light scattering, zeta potential and viscosity analyses. This review provides an overview of the latest findings in this emerging field, explaining the impact of these findings on our understanding of C. neoformans biology and resistance to host immune defenses.

  5. Rotation of single live mammalian cells using dynamic holographic optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Cao; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Chan, Samantha; Shetty, Rishabh M.; Smith, Dean; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2017-05-01

    We report on a method for rotating single mammalian cells about an axis perpendicular to the optical system axis through the imaging plane using dynamic holographic optical tweezers (HOTs). Two optical traps are created on the opposite edges of a mammalian cell and are continuously transitioned through the imaging plane along the circumference of the cell in opposite directions, thus providing the torque to rotate the cell in a controlled fashion. The method enables a complete 360° rotation of live single mammalian cells with spherical or near-to spherical shape in 3D space, and represents a useful tool suitable for the single cell analysis field, including tomographic imaging.

  6. Investigation of Polarization-Dependent Optical Force in Optical Tweezers using Generalized Lorenz-Mie Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Jai-Min

    2015-01-01

    In vectorial diffraction theory, tight focusing of a linearly polarized laser beam produces an anisotropic field distribution around the focal plane. We present a numerical investigation of the electromagnetic field distribution of a focused beam in terms of the input beam polarization state and the associated effects on the trap stiffness asymmetry of optical tweezers. We also explore the symmetry change of a polarization-dependent optical force due to the electromagnetic field redistribution by the presence of dielectric spheres of selected diameters ranging from the Rayleigh scattering regime to the Mie scattering regime.

  7. The Cryptococcus neoformans capsule: lessons from the use of optical tweezers and other biophysical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Bruno; Frases, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients. The main virulence factor of C. neoformans is the polysaccharide capsule; however, many fundamental aspects of capsule structure and function remain poorly understood. Recently, important capsule properties were uncovered using optical tweezers and other biophysical techniques, including dynamic and static light scattering, zeta potential and viscosity analysis. This review provides an overview of the latest findings in this emerging field, explaining the impact of these findings on our understanding of C. neoformans biology and resistance to host immune defenses.

  8. Probing single processive molecular motors with high-speed optical tweezers and fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, L.; Pavone, F. S.; Capitanio, M.

    2017-02-01

    Here we present development of optical techniques for the study of single processive myosin motors based on the combination of high-speed optical tweezers force spectroscopy and single molecule fluorescence imaging. Ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy1 is applied to study the dependence of single chemo-mechanical steps of processive myosin motors on the applied load. On the other hand, single molecule localization through FIONA (Fluorescence Imaging with One Nanometer Accuracy)2, 3 is applied to in vitro motility assay to measure parameters such as the runlength, velocity and step size of single myosin V motors, labeled with Quantum Dots, under unloaded conditions.

  9. Control of polarization-induced stiffness asymmetry in highly focused optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    So, Jinmyoung

    2015-01-01

    Optical tweezers that utilize a highly focused, linearly polarized laser beam are shown to exhibit strong stiffness asymmetry, which originates from the anisotropic field distribution in the transverse plane. We present an experimental demonstration in which the degree of stiffness asymmetry is controlled by using the polarization state of the trapping beam as a tuning knob. Theoretical support for the experimental observations is provided based on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory, which is revised to encompass the general polarization state of a trapping beam.

  10. Raman tweezers spectroscopy study of free radical induced oxidative stress leading to eryptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkur, Surekha; Bankapur, Aseefhali; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2016-11-01

    Raman tweezers spectroscopy study of effect of free radicals was carried out on erythrocytes. We prepared hydroxyl radicals using Fenton reaction (which yields hydroxyl radicals). Raman spectra were acquired from single, trapped erythrocytes after supplementing with these free radicals. The changes in the Raman bands such as 1211 cm-1, 1224 cm-1, 1375 cm-1 indicate deoxygenation of red blood cells (RBCs). Our study shows that free radicals can induce oxidative stress on erythrocytes. The changes in the Raman spectra as well as shape of erythrocytes indicate that oxidative stress can trigger eryptosis in erythrocytes.

  11. Data on force-dependent structural changes of chromatin fibers measured with magnetic tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Tso Chien

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The compaction of chromatin fibers regulates the accessibility of embedded DNA, highly associated with transcriptional activities [1]. Single molecule force spectroscopy has revealed the great details of the structural changes of chromatin fibers in the presence of external exerted force [2–7]. However, most of the studies focus on a specific force regime [2,3,8,9]. The data here show force-extension (FE traces of chromatin fibers as measured with magnetic tweezers, covering the force regime from 0 pN to 27 pN. Those traces provide information for further studies at varied force regimes.

  12. Widrow-cellular neural network and optoelectronic implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Abdullah

    A new type of optoelectronic cellular neural network has been developed by providing the capability of coefficients adjusment of cellular neural network (CNN) using Widrow based perceptron learning algorithm. The new supervised cellular neural network is called Widrow-CNN. Despite the unsupervised CNN, the proposed learning algorithm allows to use the Widrow-CNN for various image processing applications easily. Also, the capability of CNN for image processing and feature extraction has been improved using basic joint transform correlation architecture. This hardware application presents high speed processing capability compared to digital applications. The optoelectronic Widrow-CNN has been tested for classic CNN feature extraction problems. It yields the best results even in case of hard feature extraction problems such as diagonal line detection and vertical line determination.

  13. Pulse-train solutions and excitability in an optoelectronic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, D. P.; Callan, K. E.; Gauthier, D. J.; Schöll, E.

    2011-11-01

    We study an optoelectronic time-delay oscillator with bandpass filtering for different values of the filter bandwidth. Our experiments show novel pulse-train solutions with pulse widths that can be controlled over a three-order-of-magnitude range, with a minimum pulse width of ~150 ps. The equations governing the dynamics of our optoelectronic oscillator are similar to the FitzHugh-Nagumo model from neurodynamics with delayed feedback in the excitable and oscillatory regimes. Using a nullclines analysis, we derive an analytical proportionality between pulse width and the low-frequency cutoff of the bandpass filter, which is in agreement with experiments and numerical simulations. Furthermore, the nullclines help to describe the shape of the waveforms.

  14. Electronics and optoelectronics of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing Hua; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Kis, Andras; Coleman, Jonathan N; Strano, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    The remarkable properties of graphene have renewed interest in inorganic, two-dimensional materials with unique electronic and optical attributes. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are layered materials with strong in-plane bonding and weak out-of-plane interactions enabling exfoliation into two-dimensional layers of single unit cell thickness. Although TMDCs have been studied for decades, recent advances in nanoscale materials characterization and device fabrication have opened up new opportunities for two-dimensional layers of thin TMDCs in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. TMDCs such as MoS(2), MoSe(2), WS(2) and WSe(2) have sizable bandgaps that change from indirect to direct in single layers, allowing applications such as transistors, photodetectors and electroluminescent devices. We review the historical development of TMDCs, methods for preparing atomically thin layers, their electronic and optical properties, and prospects for future advances in electronics and optoelectronics.

  15. Wide bandgap III-nitride nanomembranes for optoelectronic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Hyun; Yuan, Ge; Chen, Danti; Xiong, Kanglin; Song, Jie; Leung, Benjamin; Han, Jung

    2014-08-13

    Single crystalline nanomembranes (NMs) represent a new embodiment of semiconductors having a two-dimensional flexural character with comparable crystalline perfection and optoelectronic efficacy. In this Letter, we demonstrate the preparation of GaN NMs with a freestanding thickness between 90 to 300 nm. Large-area (>5 × 5 mm(2)) GaN NMs can be routinely obtained using a procedure of conductivity-selective electrochemical etching. GaN NM is atomically flat and possesses an optical quality similar to that from bulk GaN. A light-emitting optical heterostructure NM consisting of p-GaN/InGaN quantum wells/GaN is prepared by epitaxy, undercutting etching, and layer transfer. Bright blue light emission from this heterostructure validates the concept of NM-based optoelectronics and points to potentials in flexible applications and heterogeneous integration.

  16. D-π-A conjugated molecules for optoelectronic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Lee, Kwang-Sup

    2015-06-01

    Dipolar chromophores consisting of electron donor (D) and electron acceptor (A) groups connected through a conjugated π-bridge have been actively studied and integrated in optoelectronic and electronic devices. Generally, such π-conjugated molecules provide substantial delocalization of π-electrons over the molecules. Here, a brief overview of recent research on D-π-A dipolar chromophores including their syntheses and several promising applications is reported, especially in nonlinear optical devices and organic photovoltaics. Structure/property relationships are discussed in order to exploit the potentials by tuning the π-electron density, polarizability, and HOMO-LUMO band gap of the chromophores. Some of the examples may well set the stage for chip-scale integration of optoelectronics as well as the realization of an important array of new device technologies. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Flexible and Stretchable Optoelectronic Devices using Silver Nanowires and Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanleem; Kim, Meeree; Kim, Ikjoon; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have accompanied the emergence of a great interest in flexible or/and stretchable devices for new applications in wearable and futuristic technology, including human-interface devices, robotic skin, and biometric devices, and in optoelectronic devices. Especially, new nanodimensional materials enable flexibility or stretchability to be brought based on their dimensionality. Here, the emerging field of flexible devices is briefly introduced using silver nanowires and graphene, which are famous nanomaterials for the use of transparent conductive electrodes, as examples, and their unique functions originating from the intrinsic property of these nanomaterials are highlighted. It is thought that this work will evoke more interest and idea exchanges in this emerging field and hopefully can trigger a breakthrough on a new type of optoelectronics and optogenetic devices in the near future. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Research and Development of Electronic and Optoelectronic Materials in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王占国

    2000-01-01

    A review on the research and development of electronic and optoelectronic materials in China, including the main scientific activities in this field, is presented. The state-of-the-arts and prospects of the electronic and optoelectronic materials in China are briefly introduced, such as those of silicon crystals, compound semiconductors, synthetic crystals, especially nonlinear optical crystals and rare-earth permanent magnets materials, etc. , with a greater emphasis on Chinese scientist's contributions to the frontier area of nanomaterials and nanostructures in the past few years. A new concept of the trip chemistry proposed by Dr. Liu Zhongfan from Peking University has also been described. Finally the possible research grants and the national policy to support the scientific research have been discussed.

  19. Organic semiconductors as candidates for advanced optoelectronic devices:

    OpenAIRE

    Bratina, Gvido; Hudej, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Organic semiconductors are gaining an increasing attention due to their promise of novel optoelectronic devices. The main attraction of these materials stems from their potential integration with flexible materials, which would result in ultrathin flexible multicolor displays. Basic electronic properties of typical representatives of organic semiconductors are reviewed. The operation of a light-emitting device based on organic semiconductors is fundamentally different from its inorganic count...

  20. Adaptive Optoelectronic Eyes: Hybrid Sensor/Processor Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-13

    J.  Lange , C. von der Malsburg, R. P. Würtz, and W. Konen, “Distortion Invariant Object Recognition Adaptive Optoelectronic Eyes: Hybrid Sensor...Meeting, Dallas, Texas, (November, 1998). 17.  G. Sáry, G. Kovács, K. Köteles, G.  Benedek , J. Fiser, and I. Biederman, “Selectivity Variations in Monkey

  1. Indium phosphide nanowires and their applications in optoelectronic devices

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Group IIIA phosphide nanocrystalline semiconductors are of great interest among the important inorganic materials because of their large direct band gaps and fundamental physical properties. Their physical properties are exploited for various potential applications in high-speed digital circuits, microwave and optoelectronic devices. Compared to II–VI and I–VII semiconductors, the IIIA phosphides have a high degree of covalent bonding, a less ionic character and larger exciton diameters. In t...

  2. Opto-electronics on Single Nanowire Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    An important goal for nanoscale opto-electronics is the transfer of single electron spin states into single photon polarization states (and vice versa), thereby interfacing quantum transport and quantum optics. Such an interface enables new experiments in the field of quantum information processing. Single and entangled photon-pair generation can be used for quantum cryptography. Furthermore, photons can be used in the readout of a quantum computer based on electron spins. Semiconducting nano...

  3. Accurate manufacturing and production of optoelectronic parts and modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Tapio; Karioja, Pentti; Keraenen, Kimmo; Kopola, Harri K.; Malinen, Jouko; Ollila, Jyrki

    1998-12-01

    The trends in optoelectronic products are towards higher integration level of optics, electronics and mechanics. It means smaller dimensions and tighter packaging density. The precisions in component manufacturing and accuracies in module assemblings typically are in 10 to 50 micrometer range. Due to demands of the production in series of tens of thousands it means new type of know-how in production and assembling technologies.

  4. The Cellulose Nanofibers for Optoelectronic Conversion and Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose widely exists in plant tissues. Due to the large pores between the cellulose units, the regular paper is nontransparent that cannot be used in the optoelectronic devices. But some chemical and physical methods such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO oxidation can be used to improve the pores scale between the cellulose units to reach nanometer level. The cellulose nanofibers (CNFs have good mechanical strength, flexibility, thermostability, and low thermal expansion. The paper made of these nanofibers represent a kind of novel nanostructured material with ultrahigh transparency, ultrahigh haze, conductivity, biodegradable, reproducible, low pollution, environment friendly and so on. These advantages make the novel nanostructured paper apply in the optoelectronic device possible, such as electronics energy storage devices. This kind of paper is considered most likely to replace traditional materials like plastics and glass, which is attracting widespread attention, and the related research has also been reported. The purpose of this paper is to review CNFs which are applied in optoelectronic conversion and energy storage.

  5. Optoelectronics-related competence building in Japanese and Western firms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kumiko

    1992-05-01

    In this paper, an analysis is made of how different firms in Japan and the West have developed competence related to optoelectronics on the basis of their previous experience and corporate strategies. The sample consists of a set of seven Japanese and four Western firms in the industrial, consumer electronics and materials sectors. Optoelectronics is divided into subfields including optical communications systems, optical fibers, optoelectronic key components, liquid crystal displays, optical disks, and others. The relative strengths and weaknesses of companies in the various subfields are determined using the INSPEC database, from 1976 to 1989. Parallel data are analyzed using OTAF U.S. patent statistics and the two sets of data are compared. The statistical analysis from the database is summarized for firms in each subfield in the form of an intra-firm technology index (IFTI), a new technique introduced to assess the revealed technology advantage of firms. The quantitative evaluation is complemented by results from intensive interviews with the management and scientists of the firms involved. The findings show that there is a marked variation in the way firms' technological trajectories have evolved giving rise to strength in some and weakness in other subfields for the different companies, which are related to their accumulated core competencies, previous core business activities, organizational, marketing, and competitive factors.

  6. Optoelectronic and nonlinear optical processes in low dimensional semiconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Singh

    2006-11-01

    Spatial confinement of quantum excitations on their characteristic wavelength scale in low dimensional materials offers unique possibilities to engineer the electronic structure and thereby control their physical properties by way of simple manipulation of geometrical parameters. This has led to an overwhelming interest in quasi-zero dimensional semiconductors or quantum dots as tunable materials for multitude of exciting applications in optoelectronic and nonlinear optical devices and quantum information processing. Large nonlinear optical response and high luminescence quantum yield expected in these systems is a consequence of huge enhancement of transition probabilities ensuing from quantum confinement. High quantum efficiency of photoluminescence, however, is not usually realized in the case of bare semiconductor nanoparticles owing to the presence of surface states. In this talk, I will focus on the role of quantum confinement and surface states in ascertaining nonlinear optical and optoelectronic properties of II–VI semiconductor quantum dots and their nanocomposites. I will also discuss the influence of nonlinear optical processes on their optoelectronic characteristics.

  7. Low -Dimensional Halide Perovskites and Their Advanced Optoelectronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Yang, Xiaokun; Deng, Hui; Qiao, Keke; Farooq, Umar; Ishaq, Muhammad; Yi, Fei; Liu, Huan; Tang, Jiang; Song, Haisheng

    2017-07-01

    Metal halide perovskites are crystalline materials originally developed out of scientific curiosity. They have shown great potential as active materials in optoelectronic applications. In the last 6 years, their certified photovoltaic efficiencies have reached 22.1%. Compared to bulk halide perovskites, low-dimensional ones exhibited novel physical properties. The photoluminescence quantum yields of perovskite quantum dots are close to 100%. The external quantum efficiencies and current efficiencies of perovskite quantum dot light-emitting diodes have reached 8% and 43 cd A-1, respectively, and their nanowire lasers show ultralow-threshold room-temperature lasing with emission tunability and ease of synthesis. Perovskite nanowire photodetectors reached a responsivity of 10 A W-1 and a specific normalized detectivity of the order of 1012 Jones. Different from most reported reviews focusing on photovoltaic applications, we summarize the rapid progress in the study of low-dimensional perovskite materials, as well as their promising applications in optoelectronic devices. In particular, we review the wide tunability of fabrication methods and the state-of-the-art research outputs of low-dimensional perovskite optoelectronic devices. Finally, the anticipated challenges and potential for this exciting research are proposed.

  8. Patterning of conjugated polymers for organic optoelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Youyong; Zhang, Fan; Feng, Xinliang

    2011-05-23

    Conjugated polymers have been attracting more and more attention because they possess various novel electrical, magnetical, and optical properties, which render them useful in modern organic optoelectronic devices. Due to their organic nature, conjugated polymers are light-weight and can be fabricated into flexible appliances. Significant research efforts have been devoted to developing new organic materials to make them competitive with their conventional inorganic counterparts. It is foreseeable that when large-scale industrial manufacture of the devices made from organic conjugated polymers is feasible, they would be much cheaper and have more functions. On one hand, in order to improve the performance of organic optoelectronic devices, it is essential to tune their surface morphologies by techniques such as patterning. On the other hand, patterning is the routine requirement for device processing. In this review, the recent progress in the patterning of conjugated polymers for high-performance optoelectronic devices is summarized. Patterning based on the bottom-up and top-down methods are introduced. Emerging new patterning strategies and future trends for conventional patterning techniques are discussed.

  9. Design, fabrication, and testing of an optoelectronic interface connectorized module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Jeffrey T.; Grzybowski, Richard R.; Rubino, Robert A.; Newman, Leon A.; Fields, Christopher V.; DiDomenico, John A.; Donofrio, Andrew J.

    1994-10-01

    As efforts to include fiber optic technology in aircraft flight control electronics have progressed, the need has arisen for a compact optoelectronic interface with an integral multipin optical connector. The United Technologies Research Center optoelectronic Connectorized Module (CM) was designed and built to satisfy this need. This paper will discuss the background, design, fabrication and testing of a completed Connectorized Module. The prototype CM is a four channel speed sensor interface that incorporates established ceramic multichip module (MCM-C) technology with optical emitters and detectors and a multipin fiber optic connector. This combination of technologies yields a compact and rugged interface module. In addition, the CM removes optical fibers, and their associated difficult to repair pigtails, from within the electronic control box. The CM achieves this because: it contains all necessary optoelectronic circuitry, has integral electrical and optical connectors, and is mounted directly on the electronic control box wall, not on an internal circuit board. Although this CM is a speed sensor interface, the flexible nature of MCM-C technology will enable a wide variety of sensor and data communication interfaces to be implemented.

  10. Web-Enabled Optoelectronic Particle-Fallout Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineberger, Lewis P.

    2008-01-01

    A Web-enabled optoelectronic particle- fallout monitor has been developed as a prototype of future such instruments that (l) would be installed in multiple locations for which assurance of cleanliness is required and (2) could be interrogated and controlled in nearly real time by multiple remote users. Like prior particle-fallout monitors, this instrument provides a measure of particles that accumulate on a surface as an indication of the quantity of airborne particulate contaminants. The design of this instrument reflects requirements to: Reduce the cost and complexity of its optoelectronic sensory subsystem relative to those of prior optoelectronic particle fallout monitors while maintaining or improving capabilities; Use existing network and office computers for distributed display and control; Derive electric power for the instrument from a computer network, a wall outlet, or a battery; Provide for Web-based retrieval and analysis of measurement data and of a file containing such ancillary data as a log of command attempts at remote units; and Use the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) for maximum performance and minimal network overhead.

  11. A novel single fiber optical tweezers based on light-induced thermal effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhihai; Liang, Peibo; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2015-07-01

    We present and demonstrate a novel single fiber optical tweezers which can trap and launch (clean) a target polystyrene (PS) microsphere (diameter~10μm) with independent control by using two wavelengths beams: 980nm and 1480nm. We employ 980nm laser beam to trap the target PS microsphere by molding the fiber tip into a special tapered-shape; and we employ 1480nm laser beam to launch the trapped PS microsphere with a certain velocity by using the thermophoresis force generated from the thermal effect due to the high absorption of the 1480nm laser beams in water. When the launching force is smaller than the trapping force, the PS microsphere will be trapped near the fiber tip, and the launching force will blow away other PS microspheres in the workspace realizing the cleaning function; When the launching force is larger than the trapping force, the trapped PS microsphere will be launched away from the fiber tip with a certain velocity and towards a certain direction, realizing the launching function. This PS microsphere launching and cleaning functions expanded new features of single fiber optical tweezers, providing for the possibility of more practical applications in the micro manipulation research fields.

  12. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  13. Optical Tweezers Studies on Notch: Single-molecule Interaction Strength is Independent of Ligand Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shergill, Bhupinder; Meloty-Kapella, Laurence; Musse, Abdiwahab A.; Weinmaster, Gerry; Botvinick, Elliot

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Notch signaling controls diverse cellular processes critical to development and disease. Cell surface ligands bind Notch on neighboring cells yet require endocytosis to activate signaling. The role ligand endocytosis plays in Notch activation has not been established. Here we integrate optical tweezers with cell biological and biochemical methods to test the prevailing model that ligand endocytosis facilitates recycling to enhance ligand interactions with Notch necessary to trigger signaling. Specifically, single-molecule measurements indicate that interference of ligand endocytosis and/or recycling does not alter the force required to rupture bonds formed between cells expressing the Notch ligand Delta-like1 (Dll1) and laser-trapped Notch1-beads. Together, our analyses eliminate roles for ligand endocytosis and recycling in Dll1-Notch1 interactions, and indicate that recycling indirectly affects signaling by regulating the accumulation of cell-surface ligand. Importantly, our study demonstrates the utility of optical tweezers to test a role for ligand endocytosis in generating cell-mediated mechanical force. PMID:22658935

  14. A modular system architecture for agile assembly of nanocomponents using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balijepalli, Arvind; LeBrun, Thomas; Gagnon, Cedric; Lee, Yong-Gu; Dagalakis, Nicholas

    2005-09-01

    In order to realize the flexibility optical trapping offers as a nanoassembly tool, we need to develop natural and intuitive interfaces to assemble large quantities of nanocomponents quickly and cheaply. We propose a system to create such an interface that is scalable, inter-changeable and modular. Several prototypes are described, starting with simple interfaces that control a single trap in the optical tweezers instrument using a 3-dimensional Phantom haptic device. A networkbased approach is adopted early on, and a modular prototype is then described in detail. In such a design, individual modules developed on different platforms work independently and communicate with each other through a common language interface using the Neutral Messaging Language (NML) communication protocol. A natural user interface is implemented that can be used to create and manipulate traps interactively like in a CAD program. Modules such as image processing and automatic assembly are also added to help simplify routine assembly tasks. Drawing on lessons learned from the prototypes, a new system specification is formulated to better integrate the modules. Finally, conclusions are drawn on the overall viability and future of network-based systems for nanoassembly using optical tweezers.

  15. Application of optical tweezers and excimer laser to study protoplast fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantawang, Titirat; Samipak, Sompid; Limtrakul, Jumras; Chattham, Nattaporn

    2015-07-01

    Protoplast fusion is a physical phenomenon that two protoplasts come in contact and fuse together. Doing so, it is possible to combine specific genes from one protoplast to another during fusion such as drought resistance and disease resistance. There are a few possible methods to induce protoplast fusion, for example, electrofusion and chemical fusion. In this study, chemical fusion was performed with laser applied as an external force to enhance rate of fusion and observed under a microscope. Optical tweezers (1064 nm with 100X objective N.A. 1.3) and excimer laser (308 nm LMU-40X-UVB objective) were set with a Nikon Ti-U inverted microscope. Samples were prepared by soaking in hypertonic solution in order to induce cell plasmolysis. Elodea Canadensis and Allium cepa plasmolysed leaves were cut and observed under microscope. Concentration of solution was varied to induce difference turgor pressures on protoplasts pushing at cell wall. Free protoplasts in solution were trapped by optical tweezers to study the effect of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution. PEG was diluted by Ca+ solution during the process to induced protoplast cell contact and fusion. Possibility of protoplast fusion by excimer laser was investigated and found possible. Here we report a novel tool for plant cell fusion using excimer laser. Plant growth after cell fusion is currently conducted.

  16. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  17. A study of red blood cell deformability in diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Thomas J.; Richards, Christopher J.; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh; Jones, Philip H.

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) in which high blood sugar levels cause swelling, leaking and occlusions in the blood vessels of the retina, often resulting in a loss of sight. The microvascular system requires red blood cells (RBCs) to undergo significant cellular deformation in order to pass through vessels whose diameters are significantly smaller than their own. There is evidence to suggest that DM impairs the deformability of RBCs, and this loss of deformability has been associated with diabetic kidney disease (or nephropathy) - another microvascular complication of DM. However, it remains unclear whether reduced deformability of RBCs correlates with the presence of DR. Here we present an investigation into the deformability of RBCs in patients with diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers. To extract a value for the deformability of RBCs we use a dual-trap optical tweezers set-up to stretch individual RBCs. RBCs are trapped directly (i.e. without micro-bead handles), so rotate to assume a `side-on' orientation. Video microscopy is used to record the deformation events, and shape analysis software is used to determine parameters such as initial and maximum RBC length, allowing us to calculate the deformability for each RBC. A small decrease in deformability of diabetes cells subject to this stretching protocol is observed when compared to control cells. We also report on initial results on three dimensional imaging of individual RBCs using defocussing microscopy.

  18. Design of hybrid optical tweezers system for controlled three-dimensional micromanipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Tsutsui, Shogo; Kitajima, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) micro/nano-manipulation using optical tweezers is a significant technique for various scientific fields ranging from biology to nanotechnology. For the dynamic handling of multiple/individual micro-objects in a true 3D working space, we present an improved hybrid optical tweezers system consisting of two multibeam techniques. These two techniques include the generalized phase contrast method with a spatial light modulator and the time-shared scanning method with a two-axis steering mirror and an electrically focus-tunable lens. Unlike our previously reported system that could only handle micro-objects in a two and half dimensional working space, the present system has high versatility for controlled manipulation of multiple micro-objects in a true 3D working space. The controlled rotation of five beads forming a pentagon, that of four beads forming a tetrahedron about arbitrary axes, and the fully automated assembly and subsequent 3D translation of micro-bead arrays are successfully demonstrated as part of the 3D manipulation experiment.

  19. New approaches in the design of magnetic tweezers–current magnetic tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessalova, Valentina [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1-2, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Perov, Nikolai [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1-2, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14, 236004 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Rodionova, Valeria [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14, 236004 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology ' MISiS' , Leninsky Prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    The main advantages of the magnetic tweezers are the low price and simplicity of use. However the range of their application is reduced due to shortcomings like, for example, the remanent induction of the core and interaction between ferromagnetic cores. We present the new design of magnetic tweezers–Current Magnetic Tweezers (CMT) that allow particle manipulation by means of the magnetic field generated by the electric currents flowing through the non-magnetic wires. Arranging wires in different geometric shapes allows the particle movement either in two or three dimensions. Forces acting on the magnetic particles with the magnetic moment of 2·10{sup −11} A m{sup 2} at distances up to 1 mm had been experimentally measured. It is established that a current of about 1 A at a 1 mm distance generates force of (approximately) 3 pN which is consistent with theoretical estimates. - Highlights: • We suggest the idea and the results of the test the prototype based on 3 wire's system that allows manipulation of nanoparticles on XY plane.

  20. The Measurement of Displacement and Optical Force in Multi-Optical Tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Lin; GUO Hong-Lian; HUANG Lu; QU E; LI Zhao-Lin; LI Zhi-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    We set up a system of multiple optical tweezers based on a spatial light modulator, and measured the displacement and optical force of the trapped particles simultaneously. All of the trapped particles can be clearly imaged in three dimensions by several CCDs. The displacement is obtained by calculating the gray weighted centroid in the trapped particle's image. The stiffness of the trapped particles in the optical traps is measured by oscillating the sample stage in a triangular wave based on Stokes fluid dynamics. The optical force of each trapped particle can be calculated by the measured displacement and stiffness.%We set up a system of multiple optical tweezers based on a spatial light modulator,and measured the displacement and optical force of the trapped particles simultaneously.All of the trapped particles can be clearly imaged in three dimensions by several CCDs.The displacement is obtained by calculating the gray weighted centroid in the trapped particle's image.The stiffness of the trapped particles in the optical traps is measured by oscillating the sample stage in a triangular wave based on Stokes fluid dynamics.The optical force of each trapped particle can be calculated by the measured displacement and stiffness.

  1. Chemotaxis study using optical tweezers to observe the strength and directionality of forces of Leishmania amazonensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Ayres, Diana C.; Giorgio, Selma; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-08-01

    The displacements of a dielectric microspheres trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) can be used as a force transducer for mechanical measurements in life sciences. This system can measure forces on the 50 femto Newtons to 200 pico Newtons range, of the same order of magnitude of a typical forces induced by flagellar motion. The process in which living microorganisms search for food and run away from poison chemicals is known is chemotaxy. Optical tweezers can be used to obtain a better understanding of chemotaxy by observing the force response of the microorganism when placed in a gradient of attractors and or repelling chemicals. This report shows such observations for the protozoa Leishmania amazomenzis, responsible for the leishmaniasis, a serious tropical disease. We used a quadrant detector to monitor the movement of the protozoa for different chemicals gradient. This way we have been able to observe both the force strength and its directionality. The characterization of the chemotaxis of these parasites can help to understand the infection mechanics and improve the diagnosis and the treatments employed for this disease.

  2. Anion-π aromatic neutral tweezers complexes: are they stable in polar solvents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lozano, Marta; Otero, Nicolás; Hermida-Ramón, Jose M; Estévez, Carlos M; Mandado, Marcos

    2011-03-17

    The impact of the solvent environment on the stabilization of the complexes formed by fluorine (T-F) and cyanide (T-CN) substituted tweezers with halide anions has been investigated theoretically. The study was carried out using computational methodologies based on density functional theory (DFT) and symmetry adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). Interaction energies were obtained at the M05-2X/6-31+G* level. The obtained results show a large stability of the complexes in solvents with large dielectric constant and prove the suitability of these molecular tweezers as potential hosts for anion recognition in solution. A detailed analysis of the effects of the solvent on the electron withdrawing ability of the substituents and its influence on the complex stability has been performed. In particular, the interaction energy in solution was split up into intermonomer and solvent-complex terms. In turn, the intermonomer interaction energy was partitioned into electrostatic, exchange, and polarization terms. Polar resonance structures in T-CN complexes are favored by polar solvents, giving rise to a stabilization of the intermonomer interaction, the opposite is found for T-F complexes. The solvent-complex energy increases with the polarity of the solvent in T-CN complexes, nonetheless the energy reaches a maximum and then decreases slowly in T-F complexes. An electron density analysis was also performed before and after complexation, providing an explanation to the trends followed by the interaction energies and their different components in solution.

  3. Understanding local forces in electrophoretic ink systems: utilizing optical tweezers to explore electrophoretic display devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, David L.; Dickinson, Mark R.; Smith, N.; Gleeson, Helen F.

    2016-09-01

    Optical tweezers can be used as a valuable tool to characterize electrophoretic display (EPD) systems. EPDs are ubiquitous with e-readers and are becoming a commonplace technology where reflective, low-power displays are required; yet the physics of some features crucial to their operation remains poorly defined. We utilize optical tweezers as a tool to understand the motion of charged ink particles within the devices and show that the response of optically trapped electrophoretic particles can be used to characterize electric fields within these devices. This technique for mapping the force can be compared to simulations of the electric field in our devices, thus demonstrating that the electric field itself is the sole governor of the particle motion in an individual-particle regime. By studying the individual-particle response to the electric field, we can then begin to characterize particle motion in `real' systems with many particles. Combining optical tweezing with particle tracking techniques, we can investigate deviations in many particle systems from the single-particle case.

  4. Holographic optical tweezers-based in vivo manipulations in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörner, Florian; Meissner, Robert; Polali, Sruthi; Pfeiffer, Jana; Betz, Timo; Denz, Cornelia; Raz, Erez

    2017-02-06

    Understanding embryonic development requires the characterization of the forces and the mechanical features that shape cells and tissues within the organism. In addition, experimental application of forces on cells and altering cell and organelle shape allows determining the role such forces play in morphogenesis. Here, we present a holographic optical tweezers-based new microscopic platform for in vivo applications in the context of a developing vertebrate embryo that unlike currently used setups allows simultaneous trapping of multiple objects and rapid comparisons of viscoelastic properties in different locations. This non-invasive technique facilitates a dynamic analysis of mechanical properties of cells and tissues without intervening with embryonic development. We demonstrate the application of this platform for manipulating organelle shape and for characterizing the mechanobiological properties of cells in live zebrafish embryos. The method of holographic optical tweezers as described here is of general interest and can be easily transferred to studying a range of developmental processes in zebrafish, thereby establishing a versatile platform for similar investigations in other organisms. Fluorescent beads injected into zebrafish embryos at 1-cell stage are maintained within the embryos and do not affect their development as observed in the presented 1-day old embryo. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Optical tweezers as a new biomedical tool to measure zeta potential of stored red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego C N Silva

    Full Text Available During storage, red blood cells (RBCs for transfusion purposes suffer progressive deterioration. Sialylated glycoproteins of the RBC membrane are responsible for a negatively charged surface which creates a repulsive electrical zeta potential. These charges help prevent the interaction between RBCs and other cells, and especially among each RBCs. Reports in the literature have stated that RBCs sialylated glycoproteins can be sensitive to enzymes released by leukocyte degranulation. Thus, the aim of this study was, by using an optical tweezers as a biomedical tool, to measure the zeta potential in standard RBCs units and in leukocyte reduced RBC units (collected in CPD-SAGM during storage. Optical tweezers is a sensitive tool that uses light for measuring cell biophysical properties which are important for clinical and research purposes. This is the first study to analyze RBCs membrane charges during storage. In addition, we herein also measured the elasticity of RBCs also collected in CPD-SAGM. In conclusion, the zeta potential decreased 42% and cells were 134% less deformable at the end of storage. The zeta potential from leukodepleted units had a similar profile when compared to units stored without leukoreduction, indicating that leukocyte lyses were not responsible for the zeta potential decay. Flow cytometry measurements of reactive oxygen species suggested that this decay is due to membrane oxidative damages. These results show that measurements of zeta potentials provide new insights about RBCs storage lesion for transfusion purposes.

  6. Non-spherical gold nanoparticles trapped in optical tweezers: shape matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Karásek, Vítězslav; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-04-06

    We present the results of a theoretical analysis focused on three-dimensional optical trapping of non-spherical gold nanoparticles using a tightly focused laser beam (i.e. optical tweezers). We investigate how the wavelength of the trapping beam enhances trapping stiffness and determines the stable orientation of nonspherical nanoparticles in the optical trap which reveals the optimal trapping wavelength. We consider nanoparticles with diameters being between 20 nm and 254 nm illuminated by a highly focused laser beam at wavelength 1064 nm and compare our results based on the coupled-dipole method with published theoretical and experimental data. We demonstrate that by considering the non-spherical morphology of the nanoparticle we can explain the experimentally observed three-dimensional trapping of plasmonic nanoparticles with size higher than 170 nm. These results will contribute to a better understanding of the trapping and alignment of real metal nanoparticles in optical tweezers and their applications as optically controllable nanosources of heat or probes of weak forces and torques.

  7. Gamma globulins-induced interaction between two red blood cells: forces measurement with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Muravyov, Alexei; Semenov, Alexei; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander; Lyubin, Eugeny; Fedyanin, Andrey

    2017-03-01

    The protein contribution to the red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is studied using the in-house made two-channeled optical tweezers. The cells interaction was characterized using two forces: the force required for separating two cells (FD - disaggregating force) and the force required for holding them from their spontaneous aggregation (FA - aggregating force). The gamma globulin solutions with/without albumin were used to induce the RBC aggregation. The strong interaction (3-10 pN) between the cells was measured within the contact formed using optical tweezers. We found that FD becomes stronger as the gamma globulin concentration increases, while the addition of albumin to the solution led to the significant (few fold) enhancement of the cells interaction forces. However, despite of the strong interaction between the cells their spontaneous overlapping was not observed, unlike the case in plasma, where the cells did increase their overlapping surface, when attached with small interacting surface and released from optical traps. This work in addition to our previous work with model solutions of fibrinogen allows us to conclude that the synergy of blood components is one of the most important features that contribute to the reversible RBC aggregation.

  8. Probing mechanical properties of Jurkat cells under the effect of ART using oscillating optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Khakshour

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoid leukemia is a common type of blood cancer and chemotherapy is the initial treatment of choice. Quantifying the effect of a chemotherapeutic drug at the cellular level plays an important role in the process of the treatment. In this study, an oscillating optical tweezer was employed to characterize the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of Jurkat cells exposed to the chemotherapeutic agent, artesunate (ART. A motion equation for a bead bound to a cell was applied to describe the mechanical characteristics of the cell cytoskeleton. By comparing between the modeling results and experimental results from the optical tweezer, the stiffness and viscosity of the Jurkat cells before and after the ART treatment were obtained. The results demonstrate a weak power-law dependency of cell stiffness with frequency. Furthermore, the stiffness and viscosity were increased after the treatment. Therefore, the cytoskeleton cell stiffness as the well as power-law coefficient can provide a useful insight into the chemo-mechanical relationship of drug treated cancer cells and may serve as another tool for evaluating therapeutic performance quantitatively.

  9. In Vivo Quantification of Peroxisome Tethering to Chloroplasts in Tobacco Epidermal Cells Using Optical Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongbo; Metz, Jeremy; Teanby, Nick A; Ward, Andy D; Botchway, Stanley W; Coles, Benjamin; Pollard, Mark R; Sparkes, Imogen

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are highly motile organelles that display a range of motions within a short time frame. In static snapshots, they can be juxtaposed to chloroplasts, which has led to the hypothesis that they are physically interacting. Here, using optical tweezers, we tested the dynamic physical interaction in vivo. Using near-infrared optical tweezers combined with TIRF microscopy, we were able to trap peroxisomes and approximate the forces involved in chloroplast association in vivo in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and observed weaker tethering to additional unknown structures within the cell. We show that chloroplasts and peroxisomes are physically tethered through peroxules, a poorly described structure in plant cells. We suggest that peroxules have a novel role in maintaining peroxisome-organelle interactions in the dynamic environment. This could be important for fatty acid mobilization and photorespiration through the interaction with oil bodies and chloroplasts, highlighting a fundamentally important role for organelle interactions for essential biochemistry and physiological processes. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. A toolbox for generating single-stranded DNA in optical tweezers experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelli, Andrea; Hoekstra, Tjalle P; Farge, Geraldine; Gross, Peter; Peterman, Erwin J G; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2013-09-01

    Essential genomic transactions such as DNA-damage repair and DNA replication take place on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or require specific single-stranded/double-stranded DNA (ssDNA/dsDNA) junctions (SDSJ). A significant challenge in single-molecule studies of DNA-protein interactions using optical trapping is the design and generation of appropriate DNA templates. In contrast to dsDNA, only a limited toolbox is available for the generation of ssDNA constructs for optical tweezers experiments. Here, we present several kinds of DNA templates suitable for single-molecule experiments requiring segments of ssDNA of several kilobases in length. These different biotinylated dsDNA templates can be tethered between optically trapped microspheres and can, by the subsequent use of force-induced DNA melting, be converted into partial or complete ssDNA molecules. We systematically investigated the time scale and efficiency of force-induced melting at different ionic strengths for DNA molecules of different sequences and lengths. Furthermore, we quantified the impact of microspheres of different sizes on the lifetime of ssDNA tethers in optical tweezers experiments. Together, these experiments provide deeper insights into the variables that impact the production of ssDNA for single molecules studies and represent a starting point for further optimization of DNA templates that permit the investigation of protein binding and kinetics on ssDNA. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Crosstalk elimination in the detection of dual-beam optical tweezers by spatial filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Dino; Oddershede, Lene B., E-mail: oddershede@nbi.dk [Niels Bohr Institute (NBI), University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Reihani, S. Nader S. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, 11369-9161 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In dual-beam optical tweezers, the accuracy of position and force measurements is often compromised by crosstalk between the two detected signals, this crosstalk leading to systematic and significant errors on the measured forces and distances. This is true both for dual-beam optical traps where the splitting of the two traps is done by polarization optics and for dual optical traps constructed by other methods, e.g., holographic tweezers. If the two traps are orthogonally polarized, most often crosstalk is minimized by inserting polarization optics in front of the detector; however, this method is not perfect because of the de-polarization of the trapping beam introduced by the required high numerical aperture optics. Here we present a simple and easy-to-implement method to efficiently eliminate crosstalk. The method is based on spatial filtering by simply inserting a pinhole at the correct position and is highly compatible with standard back focal plane photodiode based detection of position and force. Our spatial filtering method reduces crosstalk up to five times better than polarization filtering alone. The effectiveness is dependent on pinhole size and distance between the traps and is here quantified experimentally and reproduced by theoretical modeling. The method here proposed will improve the accuracy of force-distance measurements, e.g., of single molecules, performed by dual-beam optical traps and hence give much more scientific value for the experimental efforts.

  12. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Huguet, J M; Ritort, F

    2013-04-01

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  13. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Huguet, J. M. [Small Biosystems Lab, Dept. de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ritort, F. [Small Biosystems Lab, Dept. de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ciber-BBN de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  14. Natural user interface as a supplement of the holographic Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomori, Zoltan; Kanka, Jan; Kesa, Peter; Jakl, Petr; Sery, Mojmir; Bernatova, Silvie; Antalik, Marian; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-09-01

    Holographic Raman tweezers (HRT) manipulates with microobjects by controlling the positions of multiple optical traps via the mouse or joystick. Several attempts have appeared recently to exploit touch tablets, 2D cameras or Kinect game console instead. We proposed a multimodal "Natural User Interface" (NUI) approach integrating hands tracking, gestures recognition, eye tracking and speech recognition. For this purpose we exploited "Leap Motion" and "MyGaze" low-cost sensors and a simple speech recognition program "Tazti". We developed own NUI software which processes signals from the sensors and sends the control commands to HRT which subsequently controls the positions of trapping beams, micropositioning stage and the acquisition system of Raman spectra. System allows various modes of operation proper for specific tasks. Virtual tools (called "pin" and "tweezers") serving for the manipulation with particles are displayed on the transparent "overlay" window above the live camera image. Eye tracker identifies the position of the observed particle and uses it for the autofocus. Laser trap manipulation navigated by the dominant hand can be combined with the gestures recognition of the secondary hand. Speech commands recognition is useful if both hands are busy. Proposed methods make manual control of HRT more efficient and they are also a good platform for its future semi-automated and fully automated work.

  15. Binding mechanism of PicoGreen to DNA characterized by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Schellenberg, Helene; Walhorn, Volker; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescent dyes are broadly used in many biotechnological applications to detect and visualize DNA molecules. However, their binding to DNA alters the structural and nanomechanical properties of DNA and, thus, interferes with associated biological processes. In this work we employed magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the binding of PicoGreen to DNA at room temperature in a concentration-dependent manner. PicoGreen is an ultrasensitive quinolinium nucleic acid stain exhibiting hardly any background signal from unbound dye molecules. By means of stretching and overwinding single, torsionally constrained, nick-free double-stranded DNA molecules, we acquired force-extension and supercoiling curves which allow quantifying DNA contour length, persistence length and other thermodynamical binding parameters, respectively. The results of our magnetic tweezers single-molecule binding study were well supported through analyzing the fluorescent spectra of stained DNA. On the basis of our work, we could identify a concentration-dependent bimodal binding behavior, where, apparently, PicoGreen associates to DNA as an intercalator and minor-groove binder simultaneously.

  16. Comparison of a high-speed camera and a quadrant detector for measuring displacements in optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, S.; Leach, J.; Gibson, G.; Padgett, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    We compare the performance of a high-speed camera and a quadrant detector for measuring the displacement of micron-sized particles in optical tweezers. For trapping powers up to 100 mW, the standard deviation of the particle displacements measured by the two techniques shows excellent agreement. This comparison also provides a method for calibrating one technique against the other.

  17. NAP1-Assisted Nucleosome Assembly on DNA Measured in Real Time by Single-Molecule Magnetic Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.; Smitshuijzen, J.S.J.; Lusser, A.; Dekker, C.

    2012-01-01

    While many proteins are involved in the assembly and (re)positioning of nucleosomes, the dynamics of protein-assisted nucleosome formation are not well understood. We study NAP1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) assisted nucleosome formation at the single-molecule level using magnetic tweezers. This m

  18. Rapid and efficient synthesis of new chiral aromatic amide molecular tweezers under solvent-free conditions using microwave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Xiang Zhao; Zhi Gang Zhao; Xing Li Liu; Xiu Ming Wu

    2009-01-01

    An efficient and simple method for the synthesis of new chiral aromatic amide molecular tweezers by irradiation with microwave under solvent-free conditions has been developed.Its main advantages are short reaction times.good conversions and the environmentally friendly nature of the process.

  19. NAP1-Assisted Nucleosome Assembly on DNA Measured in Real Time by Single-Molecule Magnetic Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.; Smitshuijzen, J.S.J.; Lusser, A.; Dekker, C.

    2012-01-01

    While many proteins are involved in the assembly and (re)positioning of nucleosomes, the dynamics of protein-assisted nucleosome formation are not well understood. We study NAP1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) assisted nucleosome formation at the single-molecule level using magnetic tweezers. This

  20. Assessment of red blood cell deformability in type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy by dual optical tweezers stretching technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Smart, Thomas; Nobre-Cardoso, João; Richards, Christopher; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Tufail, Adnan; Shima, David; Jones, Phil H; Pavesio, Carlos

    2016-03-15

    A pilot cross sectional study was conducted to investigate the role of red blood cells (RBC) deformability in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) without and with diabetic retinopathy (DR) using a dual optical tweezers stretching technique. A dual optical tweezers was made by splitting and recombining a single Nd:YAG laser beam. RBCs were trapped directly (i.e., without microbead handles) in the dual optical tweezers where they were observed to adopt a "side-on" orientation. RBC initial and final lengths after stretching were measured by digital video microscopy, and a Deformability index (DI) calculated. Blood from 8 healthy controls, 5 T2DM and 7 DR patients with respective mean age of 52.4 yrs, 51.6 yrs and 52 yrs was analysed. Initial average length of RBCs for control group was 8.45 ± 0.25 μm, 8.68 ± 0.49 μm for DM RBCs and 8.82 ± 0.32 μm for DR RBCs (p optical tweezers method can hence be reliably used to assess RBC deformability.

  1. Reaction of (CP(2)asterisk-lnH)(2) (ln=Y, La) and CP(2)asterisk-Y(2-C(6)H(4)CH(2)NMe(2)) with esters and amides and molecular-structure of [CP(2)asterisk-Y(mu- ocme=chc(oet)o)](2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelman, B.J; Wierda, F.; Meetsma, A.; Teuben, J.H

    1995-01-01

    The activation of esters and amides by (Cp(2)*LnH)(2) [Ln = Y (1a), Ln = La (1b), Cp*=C(5)Me] and Cp(2)*Y(2-C(6)H(4)CH(2)NMe(2)) (2) is described. Compounds 1a and 1b react with ethyl acetate to form Cp(2)*YOEt (3a) and Cp(2)*LaOEt (30). With 1a and ethyl benzoate a 1:1 mixture of 3a and Cp(2)*YOCH(

  2. Optoelectronic sensor device for monitoring ethanol concentration in winemaking applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Márquez, F.; Vázquez, J.; Úbeda, J.; Rodríguez-Rey, J.; Sánchez-Rojas, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    The supervision of key variables such as sugar, alcohol, released CO2 and microbiological evolution in fermenting grape must is of great importance in the winemaking industry. However, the fermentation kinetics is assessed by monitoring the evolution of the density as it varies during a fermentation, since density is an indicator of the total amount of sugars, ethanol and glycerol. Even so, supervising the fermentation process is an awkward and non-comprehensive task, especially in wine cellars where production rates are massive, and enologists usually measure the density of the extracted samples from each fermentation tank manually twice a day. This work aims at the design of a fast, low-cost, portable and reliable optoelectronic sensor for measuring ethanol concentration in fermenting grape must samples. Different sets of model solutions, which contain ethanol, fructose, glucose, glycerol dissolved in water and emulate the grape must composition at different stages of the fermentation, were prepared both for calibration and validation. The absorption characteristics of these model solutions were analyzed by a commercial spectrophotometer in the NIR region, in order to identify key wavelengths from which valuable information regarding the sample composition can be extracted. Finally, a customized optoelectronic prototype based on absorbance measurements at two wavelengths belonging to the NIR region was designed, fabricated and successfully tested. The system, whose optoelectronics is reduced after a thorough analysis to only two LED lamps and their corresponding paired photodiodes operating at 1.2 and 1.3 μm respectively, calculates the ethanol content by a multiple linear regression.

  3. Acousto-optic collinear filter with optoelectronic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantsevich, S. N.; Balakshy, V. I.; Kuznetsov, Yu. I.

    2017-04-01

    A spectral optoelectronic system combining a collinear acousto-optic cell fabricated of calcium molybdate single crystal and a positive electronic feedback is proposed first and examined theoretically and experimentally. The feedback signal is formed at the cell output due to the optical heterodyning effect with the use of an unconventional regime of cell operation. It is shown that the feedback enables controlling spectral characteristics of the acousto-optic cell, resulting in enhancing the spectral resolution and the accuracy of optical wavelength determination. In the experiment, maximal filter passband narrowing was as great as 37 times.

  4. Antenna-enhanced optoelectronic probing of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauser, Nina; Hartmann, Nicolai; Hofmann, Matthias S; Janik, Julia; Högele, Alexander; Hartschuh, Achim

    2014-07-09

    We report on the first antenna-enhanced optoelectronic microscopy studies on nanoscale devices. By coupling the emission and excitation to a scanning optical antenna, we are able to locally enhance the electroluminescence and photocurrent along a carbon nanotube device. We show that the emission source of the electroluminescence can be pointlike with a spatial extension below 20 nm. Topographic and antenna-enhanced photocurrent measurements reveal that the emission takes place at the location of highest local electric field indicating that the mechanism behind the emission is the radiative decay of excitons created via impact excitation.

  5. Optoelectronics Devices Based on Zinc Oxide Thin Films and Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Optoelectronics devices based on ZnO thin films and nanostructures are discussed in this dissertation. A ZnO homojunction LED was demonstrated. Sb-doped p-type ZnO and Ga-doped n-type ZnO on Si (100) substrate were used for the LED device. After achieving ohmic contacts on both types of ZnO, the device showed rectifying current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Under forward bias, the device successfully showed ultraviolet emissions. The emission properties were analyzed and the emission was con...

  6. Wonder of nanotechnology quantum optoelectronic devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Razeghi, Manijeh; von Klitzing, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    When you look closely, Nature is nanotechnology at its finest. From a single cell, a factory all by itself, to complex systems, such as the nervous system or the human eye, each is composed of specialized nanostructures that exist to perform a specific function. This same beauty can be mirrored when we interact with the tiny physical world that is the realm of quantum mechanics.The Wonder of Nanotechnology: Quantum Optoelectronic Devices and Applications, edited by Manijeh Razeghi, Leo Esaki, and Klaus von Klitzing focuses on the application of nanotechnology to modern semiconductor optoelectr

  7. Optoelectronic set for measuring reflectance spectrum of living human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryko, Lukasz; Zajac, Andrzej; Gilewski, Marian; Kulesza, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    In the paper the authors present the developed optoelectronic set for measuring spectral reflectance of living human skin. The basic elements of the set are: the illuminator consists of the LED illuminator emitting a uniform distribution of spectral irradiance in the exposed field, the semispherical measuring chamber and the spectrometer which measures spectrum of reflected radiation. Measured radiation is from spectral range of tissue optical window (from 600 nm to 1000 nm). Knowledge about the reflectance spectrum of the patient skin allows adjusting spectral and energetic parameters of the radiation used in biostimulation treatment. The developed set also enables the repeatable exposures of patients in the Low Level Laser Therapy procedures.

  8. Conjugated polymers and their use in optoelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Tobin J.; Guo, Xugang; Zhou, Nanjia; Chang, Robert P. H.; Drees, Martin; Facchetti, Antonio

    2016-10-18

    The present invention relates to certain polymeric compounds and their use as organic semiconductors in organic and hybrid optical, optoelectronic, and/or electronic devices such as photovoltaic cells, light emitting diodes, light emitting transistors, and field effect transistors. The present compounds can provide improved device performance, for example, as measured by power conversion efficiency, fill factor, open circuit voltage, field-effect mobility, on/off current ratios, and/or air stability when used in photovoltaic cells or transistors. The present compounds can have good solubility in common solvents enabling device fabrication via solution processes.

  9. WDM module research within the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Mahmoud; Koteles, Emil S.; Delage, Andre; Chatenoud, F.; Templeton, Ian M.; Champion, Garth; He, Jian Jun; Wang, Weijian; Dion, Michael M.; Barber, Richard A.

    1995-02-01

    We report on the design, growth, fabrication, and characterization of monolithic wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) modules produced within the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium. The transmitter module includes multiple, discrete wavelength, distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diodes monolithically integrated with waveguide combiners fabricated using an InGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The wavelength demultiplexer unit is based on a Rowland circle grating spectrometer monolithically integrated with a metal- semiconductor-metal (MSM) detector array fabricated on an InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The epitaxial layer wafers for both transmitter and receiver modules were grown in single molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) runs.

  10. Graphene and Two-Dimensional Materials for Optoelectronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bablich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews optoelectronic devices based on graphene and related two-dimensional (2D materials. The review includes basic considerations of process technology, including demonstrations of 2D heterostructure growth, and comments on the scalability and manufacturability of the growth methods. We then assess the potential of graphene-based transparent conducting electrodes. A major part of the review describes photodetectors based on lateral graphene p-n junctions and Schottky diodes. Finally, the progress in vertical devices made from 2D/3D heterojunctions, as well as all-2D heterostructures is discussed.

  11. Neuromorphic opto-electronic integrated circuits for optical signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeira, B.; Javaloyes, J.; Balle, S.; Piro, O.; Avó, R.; Figueiredo, J. M. L.

    2014-08-01

    The ability to produce narrow optical pulses has been extensively investigated in laser systems with promising applications in photonics such as clock recovery, pulse reshaping, and recently in photonics artificial neural networks using spiking signal processing. Here, we investigate a neuromorphic opto-electronic integrated circuit (NOEIC) comprising a semiconductor laser driven by a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) photo-detector operating at telecommunication (1550 nm) wavelengths capable of excitable spiking signal generation in response to optical and electrical control signals. The RTD-NOEIC mimics biologically inspired neuronal phenomena and possesses high-speed response and potential for monolithic integration for optical signal processing applications.

  12. Preparation for Ultra High Pure Indium Metal for Optoelectronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashwat V. Joshi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultra high pure Indium metal is extensively used in optoelectronic devices. Indium and its alloys become potential candidates in aerospace, defense and communication sectors. Purification of Indium has been done by Instrolec-200 Refiner followed by Directional Melting/ Freezing and Solidification Systems. Major targeted impurities are Metallic impurities Ag, Al, As, Bi, Ca, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Mg, Pb, Sb, Si, Sn, and Zn. Purified Indium is characterized by analytical techniques Inductively Coupled Plasma- Optical Emission Spectrophotometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma- Mass Spectrometry.

  13. Electrical and optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaoming

    Electrical and optoelectronic properties of bulk semiconductor materials have been extensively explored in last century. However, when reduced to one-dimensional and two-dimensional, many semiconductors start to show unique electrical and optoelectronic behaviors. In this dissertation, electrical and optoelectronic properties of one-dimensional (nanowires) and two-dimensional semiconductor materials are investigated by various techniques, including scanning photocurrent microscopy, scanning Kelvin probe microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and finite-element simulations. In our work, gate-tunable photocurrent in ZnO nanowires has been observed under optical excitation in the visible regime, which originates from the nanowire/substrate interface states. This gate tunability in the visible regime can be used to enhance the photon absorption efficiency, and suppress the undesirable visible-light photodetection in ZnO-based solar cells. The power conversion efficiency of CuInSe2/CdS core-shell nanowire solar cells has been investigated. The highest power conversion efficiency per unit area/volume is achieved with core diameter of 50 nm and the thinnest shell thickness. The existence of the optimal geometrical parameters is due to a combined effect of optical resonances and carrier transport/dynamics. Significant current crowding in two-dimensional black phosphorus field-effect transistors has been found, which has been significantly underestimated by the commonly used transmission-line model. This current crowding can lead to Joule heating close to the contacts. New van der Waals metal-semiconductor junctions have been mechanically constructed and systematically studied. The photocurrent on junction area has been demonstrated to originate from the photothermal effect rather than the photovoltaic effect. Our findings suggest that a reasonable control of interface/surface state properties can enable new and beneficial functionalities in nanostructures. We

  14. Quantum dot rolled-up microtube optoelectronic integrated circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Sishir; Frost, Thomas; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2013-05-15

    A rolled-up microtube optoelectronic integrated circuit operating as a phototransceiver is demonstrated. The microtube is made of a InGaAs/GaAs strained bilayer with InAs self-organized quantum dots inserted in the GaAs layer. The phototransceiver consists of an optically pumped microtube laser and a microtube photoconductive detector connected by an a-Si/SiO2 waveguide. The loss in the waveguide and responsivity of the entire phototransceiver circuit are 7.96 dB/cm and 34 mA/W, respectively.

  15. III-V compound SC for optoelectronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Mokkapati

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available III-V compound semiconductors (SC have played a crucial role in the development of optoelectronic devices for a broad range of applications. Major applications of InP or GaAs based III-V compound SC are devices for optical fiber communications, infrared and visible LEDs/LDs and high efficiency solar cells. GaN based compounds are extremely important for short wavelength light emitters used in solid state lighting systems. We review the important device applications of various III-V compound SC materials.

  16. Optoelectronics, a global telecom carrier’s perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Batten, J

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarises the current approaches to high speed optical transmission design. Cable & Wireless operates a large global optical transmission network, with the main purpose of serving the bandwidth market and of providing connectivity for its Internet Protocol data networks. In long haul spans, dense wavelength division multiplexed systems with aggregate capacities of 1 Tbit/s per fibre are deployed. The increase in bandwidth requirement is driving the need for more complex technologies that deliver a jump in system capacity. Emerging optoelectronic technologies are discussed, with particular focus on 40 Gb/s per wavelength transmission and optical wavelength switching.

  17. Electronic and optoelectronic nano-devices based on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarselli, M; Castrucci, P; De Crescenzi, M

    2012-08-08

    The discovery and understanding of nanoscale phenomena and the assembly of nanostructures into different devices are among the most promising fields of material science research. In this scenario, carbon nanostructures have a special role since, in having only one chemical element, they allow physical properties to be calculated with high precision for comparison with experiment. Carbon nanostructures, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in particular, have such remarkable electronic and structural properties that they are used as active building blocks for a large variety of nanoscale devices. We review here the latest advances in research involving carbon nanotubes as active components in electronic and optoelectronic nano-devices. Opportunities for future research are also identified.

  18. Optoelectronic analysis of multijunction wire array solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Wire arrays have demonstrated promising photovoltaic performance as single junction solar cells and are well suited to defect mitigation in heteroepitaxy. These attributes can combine in tandem wire array solar cells, potentially leading to high efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate initial growths of GaAs on Si_(0.9)Ge_(0.1) structures and investigate III-V on Si_(1-x)Ge_x device design with an analytical model and optoelectronic simulations. We consider Si_(0.1)Ge_(0.9) wires coated with a GaA...

  19. Energy Landscape of Alginate-Epimerase Interactions Assessed by Optical Tweezers and Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armend Gazmeno Håti

    Full Text Available Mannuronan C-5 epimerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze epimerization of alginates at the polymer level. This group of enzymes thus enables the tailor-making of various alginate residue sequences to attain various functional properties, e.g. viscosity, gelation and ion binding. Here, the interactions between epimerases AlgE4 and AlgE6 and alginate substrates as well as epimerization products were determined. The interactions of the various epimerase-polysaccharide pairs were determined over an extended range of force loading rates by the combined use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. When studying systems that in nature are not subjected to external forces the access to observations obtained at low loading rates, as provided by optical tweezers, is a great advantage since the low loading rate region for these systems reflect the properties of the rate limiting energy barrier. The AlgE epimerases have a modular structure comprising both A and R modules, and the role of each of these modules in the epimerization process were examined through studies of the A- module of AlgE6, AlgE6A. Dynamic strength spectra obtained through combination of atomic force microscopy and the optical tweezers revealed the existence of two energy barriers in the alginate-epimerase complexes, of which one was not revealed in previous AFM based studies of these complexes. Furthermore, based on these spectra estimates of the locations of energy transition states (xβ, lifetimes in the absence of external perturbation (τ0 and free energies (ΔG# were determined for the different epimerase-alginate complexes. This is the first determination of ΔG# for these complexes. The values determined were up to 8 kBT for the outer barrier, and smaller values for the inner barriers. The size of the free energies determined are consistent with the interpretation that the enzyme and substrate are thus not tightly locked at all times but are able to relocate

  20. Energy Landscape of Alginate-Epimerase Interactions Assessed by Optical Tweezers and Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håti, Armend Gazmeno; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Sletmoen, Marit

    2015-01-01

    Mannuronan C-5 epimerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze epimerization of alginates at the polymer level. This group of enzymes thus enables the tailor-making of various alginate residue sequences to attain various functional properties, e.g. viscosity, gelation and ion binding. Here, the interactions between epimerases AlgE4 and AlgE6 and alginate substrates as well as epimerization products were determined. The interactions of the various epimerase-polysaccharide pairs were determined over an extended range of force loading rates by the combined use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. When studying systems that in nature are not subjected to external forces the access to observations obtained at low loading rates, as provided by optical tweezers, is a great advantage since the low loading rate region for these systems reflect the properties of the rate limiting energy barrier. The AlgE epimerases have a modular structure comprising both A and R modules, and the role of each of these modules in the epimerization process were examined through studies of the A- module of AlgE6, AlgE6A. Dynamic strength spectra obtained through combination of atomic force microscopy and the optical tweezers revealed the existence of two energy barriers in the alginate-epimerase complexes, of which one was not revealed in previous AFM based studies of these complexes. Furthermore, based on these spectra estimates of the locations of energy transition states (xβ), lifetimes in the absence of external perturbation (τ0) and free energies (ΔG#) were determined for the different epimerase-alginate complexes. This is the first determination of ΔG# for these complexes. The values determined were up to 8 kBT for the outer barrier, and smaller values for the inner barriers. The size of the free energies determined are consistent with the interpretation that the enzyme and substrate are thus not tightly locked at all times but are able to relocate. Together with the

  1. Energy Landscape of Alginate-Epimerase Interactions Assessed by Optical Tweezers and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håti, Armend Gazmeno; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Sletmoen, Marit

    2015-01-01

    Mannuronan C-5 epimerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze epimerization of alginates at the polymer level. This group of enzymes thus enables the tailor-making of various alginate residue sequences to attain various functional properties, e.g. viscosity, gelation and ion binding. Here, the interactions between epimerases AlgE4 and AlgE6 and alginate substrates as well as epimerization products were determined. The interactions of the various epimerase–polysaccharide pairs were determined over an extended range of force loading rates by the combined use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. When studying systems that in nature are not subjected to external forces the access to observations obtained at low loading rates, as provided by optical tweezers, is a great advantage since the low loading rate region for these systems reflect the properties of the rate limiting energy barrier. The AlgE epimerases have a modular structure comprising both A and R modules, and the role of each of these modules in the epimerization process were examined through studies of the A- module of AlgE6, AlgE6A. Dynamic strength spectra obtained through combination of atomic force microscopy and the optical tweezers revealed the existence of two energy barriers in the alginate-epimerase complexes, of which one was not revealed in previous AFM based studies of these complexes. Furthermore, based on these spectra estimates of the locations of energy transition states (xβ), lifetimes in the absence of external perturbation (τ0) and free energies (ΔG#) were determined for the different epimerase–alginate complexes. This is the first determination of ΔG# for these complexes. The values determined were up to 8 kBT for the outer barrier, and smaller values for the inner barriers. The size of the free energies determined are consistent with the interpretation that the enzyme and substrate are thus not tightly locked at all times but are able to relocate. Together with the

  2. Optoelectronic leak detection system for monitoring subsea structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodie, D.,; Costello, L.; McStay, D.

    2010-04-01

    Leak detection and monitoring on subsea structures is an area of increasing interest for the detection and monitoring of production and control fluids for the oil and gas industry. Current techniques such as capacitive (dielectric) based measurement or passive acoustic systems have limitations and we report here an optoelectronic solution based upon fluorescence spectroscopy to provide a permanent monitoring solution. We report here a new class of optoelectronic subsea sensor for permanent, real time monitoring of hydrocarbon production systems. The system is capable of detecting small leaks of production or hydraulic fluid (ppm levels) over distances of 4-5 meters in a subsea environment. Ideally systems designed for such applications should be capable of working at depths of up to 3000m unattended for periods of 20+ years. The system uses advanced single emitter LED technology to meet the challenges of lifetime, power consumption, spatial coverage and delivery of a cost effective solution. The system is designed for permanent deployment on Christmas tree (XT), subsea processing systems (SPS) and associated equipment to provide enhanced leak detection capability.

  3. Enhanced fabrication process of zinc oxide nanowires for optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Núñez, C., E-mail: carlos.garcia@uam.es [Grupo de Electrónica y Semiconductores, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pau, J.L.; Ruíz, E.; García Marín, A.; García, B.J.; Piqueras, J. [Grupo de Electrónica y Semiconductores, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Shen, G.; Wilbert, D.S.; Kim, S.M.; Kung, P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) based ultraviolet (UV) sensors have been fabricated using different assembly techniques to form functional structures, aiming at the improvement of the performance of NW-based sensors for optoelectronic applications. NWs with diameters and lengths varying between 90–870 nm and 2–20 μm, respectively, were synthesized by controlling the growth conditions in a chemical vapor transport system. Optical properties of NWs were studied by means of transmission spectroscopy. Electrical properties of single ZnO NW-based sensors were analyzed in dark and under UV illumination (at photon wavelength of λ < 370 nm) as a function of the NW diameter. Results of the study indicate that reduction of the NW diameter below 200 nm leads to an improvement of the photocurrent (at λ < 370 nm) up to 10{sup 2} μA and a decrease of the decay time around 150 s. These enhancements may help to improve the performance of ZnO-based optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • ZnO nanowires (NWs) with diameters 90–870 nm were grown by chemical vapor transport. • ZnO NWs showed strong absorption in the UV range. • Different assembly techniques were tested for preparing ZnO NW-based UV sensors. • Sensor photoresponses were around 10{sup 3} A/W. • Reducing NW diameter below 200 nm improved sensor photosensitivity.

  4. Ultrasensitive optoelectronic sensors for nitrogen oxides and explosives detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtas, J.; Bielecki, Z.; Stacewicz, T.; Mikolajczyk, J.

    2013-01-01

    The article describes application of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) for detection of nitrogen oxides and vapours of explosives. The oxides are important greenhouse gases that are of large influence on environment, living organisms and human health. These compounds are also markers of some human diseases as well as they are emitted by commonly used explosives. Therefore sensitive nitrogen oxides sensors are of great importance for many applications, e. g. for environment protection (air monitoring), for medicine investigation (analyzing of exhaled air) and finally for explosives detection. In the Institute of Optoelectronics MUT different types of optoelectronic sensors employing CEAS were developed. They were designed to measure trace concentration of nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, and nitrous oxide. The sensors provide opportunity for simultaneous measurement of these gases concentration at ppb level. Their sensitivity is comparable with sensitivities of instruments based on other methods, e.g. gas chromatography or mass spectrometry. Our sensors were used for some explosives detection as well. The experiment showed that the sensors provide possibility to detect explosive devices consisting of nitroglycerine, ammonium nitrate, TNT, PETN, RDX and HMX.

  5. Optoelectronic scanning system upgrade by energy center localization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Fuentes, W.; Sergiyenko, O.; Rodriguez-Quiñonez, J. C.; Rivas-López, M.; Hernández-Balbuena, D.; Básaca-Preciado, L. C.; Lindner, L.; González-Navarro, F. F.

    2016-11-01

    A problem of upgrading an optoelectronic scanning system with digital post-processing of the signal based on adequate methods of energy center localization is considered. An improved dynamic triangulation analysis technique is proposed by an example of industrial infrastructure damage detection. A modification of our previously published method aimed at searching for the energy center of an optoelectronic signal is described. Application of the artificial intelligence algorithm of compensation for the error of determining the angular coordinate in calculating the spatial coordinate through dynamic triangulation is demonstrated. Five energy center localization methods are developed and tested to select the best method. After implementation of these methods, digital compensation for the measurement error, and statistical data analysis, a non-parametric behavior of the data is identified. The Wilcoxon signed rank test is applied to improve the result further. For optical scanning systems, it is necessary to detect a light emitter mounted on the infrastructure being investigated to calculate its spatial coordinate by the energy center localization method.

  6. Growing perovskite into polymers for easy-processable optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Sofia; Colella, Silvia; Listorti, Andrea; Roiati, Vittoria; Liscio, Andrea; Palermo, Vincenzo; Rizzo, Aurora; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Here we conceive an innovative nanocomposite to endow hybrid perovskites with the easy processability of polymers, providing a tool to control film quality and material crystallinity. We verify that the employed semiconducting polymer, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), controls the self-assembly of CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) crystalline domains and favors the deposition of a very smooth and homogenous layer in one straightforward step. This idea offers a new paradigm for the implementation of polymer/perovskite nanocomposites towards versatile optoelectronic devices combined with the feasibility of mass production. As a proof-of-concept we propose the application of such nanocomposite in polymer solar cell architecture, demonstrating a power conversion efficiency up to 3%, to date the highest reported for MEH-PPV. On-purpose designed polymers are expected to suit the nanocomposite properties for the integration in diverse optoelectronic devices via facile processing condition.

  7. Laser applications in the electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Kunihiko

    1999-07-01

    This paper explains current status and technological trends in laser materials processing applications in electronics and optoelectronics industry in Japan. Various laser equipment based on solid state lasers or gas lasers such as excimer lasers or CO2 lasers has been developed and applied in manufacturing electronic and optoelectronic devices to meet the strong demands for advanced device manufacturing technologies for high-performance, lightweight, low power-consumption portable digital electronic appliances, cellular mobile phones, personal computers, etc. Representative applications of solid-state lasers are, opaque and clear defects repairing of photomasks for LSIs and LCDs, trimming of thick-film chip resistors and low resistance metal resistors, laser cutting and drilling of thin films for high-pin count semiconductor CSP packages, laser patterning of thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells, and laser welding of electronic components such as hard-disk head suspensions, optical modules, miniature relays and lithium ion batteries. Compact and highly efficient diode- pumped and Q-switched solid-state lasers in second or third harmonic operation mode are now being increasingly incorporated in various laser equipment for fine material processing. Representative applications of excimer lasers are, sub-quarter micron design-rule LSI lithography and low- temperature annealing of poly-silicon TFT LCD.

  8. Impact of optical antennas on active optoelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Mohseni, Hooman

    2014-10-07

    Remarkable progress has been made in the fabrication and characterization of optical antennas that are integrated with optoelectronic devices. Herein, we describe the fundamental reasons for and experimental evidence of the dramatic improvements that can be achieved by enhancing the light-matter interaction via an optical antenna in both photon-emitting and -detecting devices. In addition, integration of optical antennas with optoelectronic devices can lead to the realization of highly compact multifunctional platforms for future integrated photonics, such as low-cost lab-on-chip systems. In this review paper, we further focus on the effect of optical antennas on the detectivity of infrared photodetectors. One particular finding is that the antenna can have a dual effect on the specific detectivity, while it can elevate light absorption efficiency of sub-wavelength detectors, it can potentially increase the noise of the detectors due to the enhanced spontaneous emission rate. In particular, we predict that the detectivity of interband photon detectors can be negatively affected by the presence of optical antennas across a wide wavelength region covering visible to long wavelength infrared bands. In contrast, the detectivity of intersubband detectors could be generally improved with a properly designed optical antenna.

  9. Bioinspired Transparent Laminated Composite Film for Flexible Green Optoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daewon; Lim, Young-Woo; Im, Hyeon-Gyun; Jeong, Seonju; Ji, Sangyoon; Kim, Yong Ho; Choi, Gwang-Mun; Park, Jang-Ung; Lee, Jung-Yong; Jin, Jungho; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2017-07-19

    Herein, we report a new version of a bioinspired chitin nanofiber (ChNF) transparent laminated composite film (HCLaminate) made of siloxane hybrid materials (hybrimers) reinforced with ChNFs, which mimics the nanofiber-matrix structure of hierarchical biocomposites. Our HCLaminate is produced via vacuum bag compressing and subsequent UV-curing of the matrix resin-impregnated ChNF transparent paper (ChNF paper). It is worthwhile to note that this new type of ChNF-based transparent substrate film retains the strengths of the original ChNF paper and compensates for ChNF paper's drawbacks as a flexible transparent substrate. As a result, compared with high-performance synthetic plastic films, such as poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(ether sulfone), poly(ethylene naphthalate), and polyimide, our HCLaminate is characterized to exhibit extremely smooth surface topography, outstanding optical clarity, high elastic modulus, high dimensional stability, etc. To prove our HCLaminate as a substrate film, we use it to fabricate flexible perovskite solar cells and a touch-screen panel. As far as we know, this work is the first to demonstrate flexible optoelectronics, such as flexible perovskite solar cells and a touch-screen panel, actually fabricated on a composite film made of ChNF. Given its desirable macroscopic properties, we envision our HCLaminate being utilized as a transparent substrate film for flexible green optoelectronics.

  10. Laser hyperdoping silicon for enhanced infrared optoelectronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrender, Jeffrey M.

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification have attracted interest for decades as a method to achieve impurity concentrations in silicon orders of magnitude above the equilibrium solubility limit. The incorporation of sulfur into silicon using this technique led to the observation of strong broadband infrared absorption in the resulting material. This observation, combined with interest in impurity band optoelectronic device concepts, has resulted in renewed interest in laser techniques for achieving high impurity concentrations. In this paper, I review the literature that led to the present understanding of laser hyperdoping and provide a summary of the optical and optoelectronic measurements made on sulfur hyperdoped silicon to date. I mention recent work exploring transition metal impurities and discuss how considerations discovered in early solidification and later rapid solidification work inform our approaches to kinetically trapping such impurities. I also provide a simplified picture of how a laser hyperdoping process is typically carried out, as an entry point for an experimentalist seeking to fabricate such layers.

  11. Prediction of Silicon-Based Layered Structures for Optoelectronic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Ma, Yanming; Gong, Xingao; Xiang, Hongjun; CCMG Team

    2015-03-01

    A method based on the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is presented to design quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) materials. With this development, various single-layer and bi-layer materials in C, Si, Ge, Sn, and Pb were predicted. A new Si bi-layer structure is found to have a much-favored energy than the previously widely accepted configuration. Both single-layer and bi-layer Si materials have small band gaps, limiting their usages in optoelectronic applications. Hydrogenation has therefore been used to tune the electronic and optical properties of Si layers. We discover two hydrogenated materials of layered Si8H2andSi6H2 possessing quasi-direct band gaps of 0.75 eV and 1.59 eV, respectively. Their potential applications for light emitting diode and photovoltaics are proposed and discussed. Our study opened up the possibility of hydrogenated Si layered materials as next-generation optoelectronic devices.

  12. Microfluidic optoelectronic sensor for salivary diagnostics of stomach cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, Yael; Sonkusale, Sameer R

    2015-05-15

    We present a microfluidic optoelectronic sensor for saliva diagnostics with a potential application for non-invasive early diagnosis of stomach cancer. Stomach cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. The primary identified cause is infection by a gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori. These bacteria secrete the enzyme urease that converts urea into carbon dioxide (CO2) and ammonia (NH3), leading to their elevated levels in breath and body fluids. The proposed optoelectronic sensor will detect clinically relevant levels of CO2 and NH3 in saliva that can potentially be used for early diagnosis of stomach cancer. The sensor is composed of the embedded in a microfluidic device array of microwells filled with ion-exchange polymer microbeads doped with various organic dyes. The optical response of this unique highly diverse sensor is monitored over a broad spectrum, which provides a platform for cross-reactive sensitivity and allows detection of CO2 and NH3 in saliva at ppm levels.

  13. Development of an optoelectronic holographic platform for otolaryngology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Ellery; Dobrev, Ivo; Bapat, Nikhil; Flores, Jorge Mauricio; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John; Cheng, Jeffery Tao; Scarpino, Chris; Ravicz, Michael

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we present advances on our development of an optoelectronic holographic computing platform with the ability to quantitatively measure full-field-of-view nanometer-scale movements of the tympanic membrane (TM). These measurements can facilitate otologists' ability to study and diagnose hearing disorders in humans. The holographic platform consists of a laser delivery system and an otoscope. The control software, called LaserView, is written in Visual C++ and handles communication and synchronization between hardware components. It provides a user-friendly interface to allow viewing of holographic images with several tools to automate holography-related tasks and facilitate hardware communication. The software uses a series of concurrent threads to acquire images, control the hardware, and display quantitative holographic data at video rates and in two modes of operation: optoelectronic holography and lensless digital holography. The holographic platform has been used to perform experiments on several live and post-mortem specimens, and is to be deployed in a medical research environment with future developments leading to its eventual clinical use.

  14. Coupled Optoelectronic Oscillators:. Application to Low-Jitter Pulse Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, N.; Tu, M.; Maleki, L.

    2002-04-01

    Actively mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber lasers (EDFL) have been studied for generating stable ultra-fast pulses ( 5 GHz) [1,2]. These devices can be compact and environmentally stable, quite suitable for fiber-based high-data-rate communications and optical ultra-fast analog-to-digital conversions (ADC) [3]. The pulse-to-pulse jitter of an EDFL-based pulse generator will be ultimately limited by the phase noise of the mode-locking microwave source (typically electronic frequency synthesizers). On the other hand, opto-electronic oscillators (OEO) using fibers have been demonstrated to generate ultra-low phase noise microwaves at 10 GHz and higher [4]. The overall phase noise of an OEO can be much lower than commercially available synthesizers at the offset-frequency range above 100 Hz. Clearly, ultra-low jitter pulses can be generated by taking advantage of the low phase noise of OEOs. In this paper, we report the progress in developing a new low-jitter pulse generator by combing the two technologies. In our approach, the optical oscillator (mode-locked EDFL) and the microwave oscillator (OEO) are coupled through a common Mach-Zehnder (MZ) modulator, thus named coupled opto-electronic oscillator (COEO) [5]. Based on the results of previous OEO study, we can expect a 10 GHz pulse train with jitters less than 10 fs.

  15. Photonics and optoelectronics of two-dimensional materials beyond graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponraj, Joice Sophia; Xu, Zai-Quan; Chander Dhanabalan, Sathish; Mu, Haoran; Wang, Yusheng; Yuan, Jian; Li, Pengfei; Thakur, Siddharatha; Ashrafi, Mursal; Mccoubrey, Kenneth; Zhang, Yupeng; Li, Shaojuan; Zhang, Han; Bao, Qiaoliang

    2016-11-01

    Apart from conventional materials, the study of two-dimensional (2D) materials has emerged as a significant field of study for a variety of applications. Graphene-like 2D materials are important elements of potential optoelectronics applications due to their exceptional electronic and optical properties. The processing of these materials towards the realization of devices has been one of the main motivations for the recent development of photonics and optoelectronics. The recent progress in photonic devices based on graphene-like 2D materials, especially topological insulators (TIs) and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) with the methodology level discussions from the viewpoint of state-of-the-art designs in device geometry and materials are detailed in this review. We have started the article with an overview of the electronic properties and continued by highlighting their linear and nonlinear optical properties. The production of TIs and TMDs by different methods is detailed. The following main applications focused towards device fabrication are elaborated: (1) photodetectors, (2) photovoltaic devices, (3) light-emitting devices, (4) flexible devices and (5) laser applications. The possibility of employing these 2D materials in different fields is also suggested based on their properties in the prospective part. This review will not only greatly complement the detailed knowledge of the device physics of these materials, but also provide contemporary perception for the researchers who wish to consider these materials for various applications by following the path of graphene.

  16. Optoelectronic polarimeter controlled by a graphical user interface of Matlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardy, J. M.; Jimenez, C. J.; Torres, R.

    2017-01-01

    We show the design and implementation of an optical polarimeter using electronic control. The polarimeter has a software with a graphical user interface (GUI) that controls the optoelectronic setup and captures the optical intensity measurement, and finally, this software evaluates the Stokes vector of a state of polarization (SOP) by means of the synchronous detection of optical waves. The proposed optoelectronic polarimeter can determine the Stokes vector of a SOP in a rapid and efficient way. Using the polarimeter proposed in this paper, the students will be able to observe (in an optical bench) and understand the different interactions of the SOP when the optical waves pass through to the linear polarizers and retarder waves plates. The polarimeter prototype could be used as a main tool for the students in order to learn the theory and experimental aspects of the SOP for optical waves via the Stokes vector measurement. The proposed polarimeter controlled by a GUI of Matlab is more attractive and suitable to teach and to learn the polarization of optical waves.

  17. Micro-particle manipulation by single beam acoustic tweezers based on hydrothermal PZT thick film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benpeng Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Single-beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT, used in laboratory-on-a-chip (LOC device has promising implications for an individual micro-particle contactless manipulation. In this study, a freestanding hydrothermal PZT thick film with excellent piezoelectric property (d33 = 270pC/N and kt = 0.51 was employed for SBAT applications and a press-focusing technology was introduced. The obtained SBAT, acting at an operational frequency of 50MHz, a low f-number (∼0.9, demonstrated the capability to trap and manipulate a micro-particle sized 10μm in the distilled water. These results suggest that such a device has great potential as a manipulator for a wide range of biomedical and chemical science applications.

  18. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yogesha; Sarbari Bhattacharya; M K Rabinal; Sharath Ananthamurthy

    2012-08-01

    Understanding and characterizing microbial activity reduction in the presence of antimicrobial agents can help in the design and manufacture of antimicrobial drugs. We demonstrate the use of an optical tweezer setup in recording the changes in bacterial activity with time, induced by the presence of foreign bodies in a bacterial suspension. This is achieved by monitoring the fluctuations of an optically trapped polystyrene bead immersed in it. Examining the changes in the fluctuation pattern of the bead with time provides an accurate characterization of the reduction in the microbial activity. Here, we report on the effect of addition of silver nanoparticles on bacterial cultures of Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We observe a decrease in the bacterial activity with time for the investigated bacterial samples. This method in our opinion, enables one to track changes in bacterial activity levels as a function of time of contact with the antibacterial agent with greater efficacy than traditional cell counting methods.

  19. Surface modes of a sessile water drop: An optical tweezer based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shankar; Sharma, Prerna; Bhattacharya, S.

    2007-11-01

    A high-precision method to study the dynamics of two-fluid interfaces using an optical tweezer and a phase-sensitive detection technique are described. The disturbances set up at the interface are studied by analyzing the motion of an optically trapped particle in the bulk of the fluid, i.e., away from the interface. The usefulness of the technique is demonstrated for the well-known problem of a horizontally vibrated sessile liquid drop. The vibrational modes of the liquid drop excited by sinusoidally vibrating the support in a horizontal plane appear as resonances in the motion of the trapped particle. The nature of the resonance is studied in detail by measuring the real part, the imaginary part, and the phase response of the motion of the particle as a function of the "effective" size of the liquid drop. Excellent quantitative agreement with the theoretically predicted values of the eigenfrequencies and damping of the surface modes is obtained.

  20. Inferring kinetic pathways, rates, and force dependence from nonprocessive optical tweezers experiments: a maximum likelihood approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafut, Bennett; Visscher, Koen

    2008-10-01

    Optical tweezers experiments allow us to probe the role of force and mechanical work in a variety of biochemical processes. However, observable states do not usually correspond in a one-to-one fashion with the internal state of an enzyme or enzyme-substrate complex. Different kinetic pathways yield different distributions for the dwells in the observable states. Furthermore, the dwell-time distribution will be dependent upon force, and upon where in the biochemical pathway force acts. I will present a maximum-likelihood method for identifying rate constants and the locations of force-dependent transitions in transcription initiation by T7 RNA Polymerase. This method is generalizable to systems with more complicated kinetic pathways in which there are two observable states (e.g. bound and unbound) and an irreversible final transition.