WorldWideScience

Sample records for optimizing suicide prevention

  1. Preventing suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, William H

    2010-03-01

    About 35,000 people commit suicide every year in the United States. Almost all are seriously, but treatably, mentally ill. Most come to the attention of a physician, in an emergency room, primary practice setting, or psychiatric hospital or office, during the days, weeks or months before they die. Since 1995, suicide has been the second most commonly reported of all Joint Commission hospital sentinel events (not just psychiatric events). Suicide is involved in the majority of psychiatric malpractice lawsuits. It takes life from patients, parents from children, children from families, and valuable people from society. Suicide is a terrible way to lose a relative or friend, leaving much greater damage than most natural or accidental death. This paper discusses four points to be considered by those who want to improve this situation: 1) Suicide is rarely "voluntary" in any clinical sense of the term; 2) A great many suicides are preventable once a clinician becomes involved; 3) Suicide is worth preventing; 4) There are practical approaches to prevention that work.

  2. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Suicide Prevention We Can All Prevent Suicide Mental Health & Suicide Prevention Glossary Stories of Hope and Recovery Get Involved Participate Social Media Hub Promote National Suicide Prevention Month Providers & Professionals ...

  3. Optimizing Online Suicide Prevention: A Search Engine-Based Tailored Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Florian; Scherr, Sebastian

    2016-10-14

    Search engines are increasingly used to seek suicide-related information online, which can serve both harmful and helpful purposes. Google acknowledges this fact and presents a suicide-prevention result for particular search terms. Unfortunately, the result is only presented to a limited number of visitors. Hence, Google is missing the opportunity to provide help to vulnerable people. We propose a two-step approach to a tailored optimization: First, research will identify the risk factors. Second, search engines will reweight algorithms according to the risk factors. In this study, we show that the query share of the search term "poisoning" on Google shows substantial peaks corresponding to peaks in actual suicidal behavior. Accordingly, thresholds for showing the suicide-prevention result should be set to the lowest levels during the spring, on Sundays and Mondays, on New Year's Day, and on Saturdays following Thanksgiving. Search engines can help to save lives globally by utilizing a more tailored approach to suicide prevention.

  4. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiatives Best Practices Our Network Media Resources National Suicide Prevention Lifeline We can all help prevent suicide. ... About The Lifeline Anyone could be struggling with suicide. Find more specific resources below. I'm Struggling ...

  5. Prevention of suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is a major public health problem in India, probably even bigger than in the West. Suicidal behavior is the best conceptualized as a multifaceted complex problem involving social factors and mental illnesses. Broadly, there are two approaches to suicide prevention; population preventive strategies and high-risk preventive strategies. Population preventive strategies include reducing availability of means for suicide, education of primary care physicians, influencing media portrayal of suicidal behavior, education of the public, telephone helplines, and addressing economic issues associated with suicidal behavior. High-risk preventive strategy includes identifying individuals with high risk of committing suicide, intensively treating mental illness if present, and providing psychosocial support. Thus, prevention requires a multipronged effort with collaboration from various sectors including mental health professionals, social justice department, and macroeconomic policy makers.

  6. [Depression and suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2007-09-01

    Suicide is a major public health problem and the number of suicide victims has exceeded 30,000 a year since 1998 in Japan. The rates of depression are extremely high in suicide victims. Social and environmental factors, such as the slow recovery of Japanese economy, could have a strong effect on depression and suicide, especially in middle-aged men. To reduce the number of suicide victims, we need to use both population-based and high-risk approaches, targeting individuals with high psychological and socioeconomic risks of suicide, especially depressed patients. On the other hand, the role of antidepressants in suicide prevention is a major question given the high prevalence of both depression and depression-related suicidality. Because treatment and prevention of suicide are complex and encompass many factors, success will need multi-sector collaboration.

  7. Can Access to Data Prevent Army Suicides?: Identifying Optimal Response Strategies for Army Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchand, Rajeev; Kelly, Theresa

    2016-06-20

    Over the past decade, the U.S. Army has invested significant resources in its efforts to prevent suicide and respond to a well-documented increase in suicides among active-duty soldiers. Among the efforts under way is a program to develop an information system that provides leaders with data on individual- and unit-level suicide risk factors and could serve as the basis for prevention and intervention activities. One shortfall of this approach is the lack of guidance on how Army leaders should interpret and use this information. To address this gap, RAND Arroyo Center convened a group of experts to reach consensus on recommended actions for leaders who are informed that an individual soldier exhibits a risk factor for suicide or that their unit exhibits an atypically high prevalence of suicide risk factors or a concerning trend of suicidality. The experts generally agreed that information on suicide risk indicators could be useful to unit leaders if they also received guidance on appropriate actions from behavioral health providers-and central to any response is the need to keep information about individual soldiers confidential. At the unit level, data on atypically high-risk behaviors should prompt a "root cause" analysis to discern whether the heightened prevalence is a reflection of actual behaviors or can be explained by other factors. The experts concluded that unit-level suicide trend data have limited utility for leader action because suicide is a relatively rare event and because individuals assigned to a unit change over time. The results of the exercise led to several recommendations on the use of data in response planning for Army leaders and directions for future research.

  8. Settings for Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more about suicide prevention in particular settings. American Indian/Alaska Native Settings Behavioral Health Care Inpatient Mental Health Outpatient Mental Health Substance Abuse Treatment Colleges and Universities Communities Crisis Centers/ ...

  9. Optimizing Suicide Prevention Programs and Their Implementation in Europe (OSPI Europe: an evidence-based multi-level approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Margaret

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide and non-fatal suicidal behaviour are significant public health issues in Europe requiring effective preventive interventions. However, the evidence for effective preventive strategies is scarce. The protocol of a European research project to develop an optimized evidence based program for suicide prevention is presented. Method The groundwork for this research has been established by a regional community based intervention for suicide prevention that focuses on improving awareness and care for depression performed within the European Alliance Against Depression (EAAD. The EAAD intervention consists of (1 training sessions and practice support for primary care physicians,(2 public relations activities and mass media campaigns, (3 training sessions for community facilitators who serve as gatekeepers for depressed and suicidal persons in the community and treatment and (4 outreach and support for high risk and self-help groups (e.g. helplines. The intervention has been shown to be effective in reducing suicidal behaviour in an earlier study, the Nuremberg Alliance Against Depression. In the context of the current research project described in this paper (OSPI-Europe the EAAD model is enhanced by other evidence based interventions and implemented simultaneously and in standardised way in four regions in Ireland, Portugal, Hungary and Germany. The enhanced intervention will be evaluated using a prospective controlled design with the primary outcomes being composite suicidal acts (fatal and non-fatal, and with intermediate outcomes being the effect of training programs, changes in public attitudes, guideline-consistent media reporting. In addition an analysis of the economic costs and consequences will be undertaken, while a process evaluation will monitor implementation of the interventions within the different regions with varying organisational and healthcare contexts. Discussion This multi-centre research seeks to

  10. Optimizing suicide prevention programs and their implementation in Europe (OSPI-Europe): An evidence-based multi-level approach

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegerl, Ulrich

    2009-11-23

    Abstract Background Suicide and non-fatal suicidal behaviour are significant public health issues in Europe requiring effective preventive interventions. However, the evidence for effective preventive strategies is scarce. The protocol of a European research project to develop an optimized evidence based program for suicide prevention is presented. Method The groundwork for this research has been established by a regional community based intervention for suicide prevention that focuses on improving awareness and care for depression performed within the European Alliance Against Depression (EAAD). The EAAD intervention consists of (1) training sessions and practice support for primary care physicians,(2) public relations activities and mass media campaigns, (3) training sessions for community facilitators who serve as gatekeepers for depressed and suicidal persons in the community and treatment and (4) outreach and support for high risk and self-help groups (e.g. helplines). The intervention has been shown to be effective in reducing suicidal behaviour in an earlier study, the Nuremberg Alliance Against Depression. In the context of the current research project described in this paper (OSPI-Europe) the EAAD model is enhanced by other evidence based interventions and implemented simultaneously and in standardised way in four regions in Ireland, Portugal, Hungary and Germany. The enhanced intervention will be evaluated using a prospective controlled design with the primary outcomes being composite suicidal acts (fatal and non-fatal), and with intermediate outcomes being the effect of training programs, changes in public attitudes, guideline-consistent media reporting. In addition an analysis of the economic costs and consequences will be undertaken, while a process evaluation will monitor implementation of the interventions within the different regions with varying organisational and healthcare contexts. Discussion This multi-centre research seeks to overcome major

  11. Optimizing suicide prevention programs and their implementation in Europe (OSPI Europe): an evidence-based multi-level approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegerl, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Suicide and non-fatal suicidal behaviour are significant public health issues in Europe requiring effective preventive interventions. However, the evidence for effective preventive strategies is scarce. The protocol of a European research project to develop an optimized evidence based program for suicide prevention is presented. METHOD: The groundwork for this research has been established by a regional community based intervention for suicide prevention that focuses on improving awareness and care for depression performed within the European Alliance Against Depression (EAAD). The EAAD intervention consists of (1) training sessions and practice support for primary care physicians,(2) public relations activities and mass media campaigns, (3) training sessions for community facilitators who serve as gatekeepers for depressed and suicidal persons in the community and treatment and (4) outreach and support for high risk and self-help groups (e.g. helplines). The intervention has been shown to be effective in reducing suicidal behaviour in an earlier study, the Nuremberg Alliance Against Depression. In the context of the current research project described in this paper (OSPI-Europe) the EAAD model is enhanced by other evidence based interventions and implemented simultaneously and in standardised way in four regions in Ireland, Portugal, Hungary and Germany. The enhanced intervention will be evaluated using a prospective controlled design with the primary outcomes being composite suicidal acts (fatal and non-fatal), and with intermediate outcomes being the effect of training programs, changes in public attitudes, guideline-consistent media reporting. In addition an analysis of the economic costs and consequences will be undertaken, while a process evaluation will monitor implementation of the interventions within the different regions with varying organisational and healthcare contexts. DISCUSSION: This multi-centre research seeks to overcome major

  12. [Clinical psychiatry and suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    People do not commit suicide all of a sudden. There is a suicidal process where negative life events are there in the beginning, and social support and help-seeking behavior play an important role in impeding the progress of the process. Mental disturbance would be deeply associated with the suicidal process around the final stage, thinking of the fact that approximately 90% of the suicides suffered from mental disorders at the time of suicide. In considering the strategies for suicide prevention, there are two perspectives: a community model and a medical model. A community model is thought to be related mainly to the first half of the suicidal process and a medical model to the latter half. It is an ideal that both community and medical approaches are put into practice simultaneously. However, if resources available for suicide prevention are limited, a medical-model approach would be more efficient and should be given priority. Starting from a medical model and considering treatment and social resources necessary for suicidal people, the range of suicide prevention activities would be expand more efficiently than starting from a community-model approach. Clinical psychiatry plays a greatly important role in preventing suicide. It is found that approximately 20% of seriously injured suicide attempters were diagnosed as adjustment disorder in Japan, which means that even the mildly depressed can commit suicide. Therefore, no one can take a hands-off approach to suicidality as long as he/she works in the field of clinical psychiatry. It is earnestly desired to detect and treat properly the suicidal patients, but there is no perfect method. It would be helpful to pay attention to patients' personality development, stress-coping style and present suicidal ideation. Besides, as suicide prevention is not completed only in a consulting room, it is important for psychiatrists to look for teamwork.

  13. Suicide and Suicide Prevention: Greek versus Biblical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kalman J.

    1992-01-01

    Compares suicide in Greek tragedy and Hebrew Bible, concentrating on life situations portrayed in two sets of narratives promoting or preventing suicide. Notes frequency of suicides in Greek tragedy and infrequency of suicides in Bible. Compares stories of Narcissus and Jonah in attempt to pinpoint what is suicide-promoting in Greek narratives and…

  14. Suicide methods in Asia: implications in suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang; Chen, Ying-Yeh; Yip, Paul S F

    2012-04-01

    As the largest continent in the World, Asia accounts for about 60% of World suicides. Preventing suicide by restricting access to suicide methods is one of the few evidence-based suicide prevention strategies. However, there has been a lack of systematic exploration of suicide methods in Asian countries. To amend this shortage, the current review examines the leading suicide methods in different Asian countries, their trend, their age- and sex- specific characteristics, and their implications for suicide prevention. In total, 42 articles with leading suicide methods data in 17 Asian countries/regions were retrieved. The epidemiologic characteristics and recent trends of common suicide methods reflect specific socio-cultural, economic, and religious situations in the region. Common suicide methods shift with the introduction of technologies and constructions, and have specific age- or sex-characteristics that may render the restriction of suicide methods not equally effective for all sex and age sub-groups. Charcoal burning, pesticide poisoning, native plant poisoning, self-immolation, and jumping are all prominent examples. In the information society, suicide prevention that focuses on suicide methods must monitor and control the innovation and spread of knowledge and practices of suicide "technologies". It may be more cost-effective to design safety into technologies as a way of suicide prevention while there is no rash of suicides yet by the new technologies. Further research on suicide methods is important for public health approaches to suicide prevention with sensitivity to socio-cultural, economic, and religious factors in different countries.

  15. Suicide and Its Prevention on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a significant issue facing higher education institutions. Many campuses are involved in a variety of procedures, programs, and initiatives that seek to reduce or prevent suicide and the impact of suicide-related behavior. This article offers examples of campus prevention efforts, important resources on suicide prevention for college…

  16. Suicide Methods in Asia: Implications in Suicide Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. F. Yip

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As the largest continent in the World, Asia accounts for about 60% of World suicides. Preventing suicide by restricting access to suicide methods is one of the few evidence-based suicide prevention strategies. However, there has been a lack of systematic exploration of suicide methods in Asian countries. To amend this shortage, the current review examines the leading suicide methods in different Asian countries, their trend, their age- and sex- specific characteristics, and their implications for suicide prevention. In total, 42 articles with leading suicide methods data in 17 Asian countries/regions were retrieved. The epidemiologic characteristics and recent trends of common suicide methods reflect specific socio-cultural, economic, and religious situations in the region. Common suicide methods shift with the introduction of technologies and constructions, and have specific age- or sex-characteristics that may render the restriction of suicide methods not equally effective for all sex and age sub-groups. Charcoal burning, pesticide poisoning, native plant poisoning, self-immolation, and jumping are all prominent examples. In the information society, suicide prevention that focuses on suicide methods must monitor and control the innovation and spread of knowledge and practices of suicide “technologies”. It may be more cost-effective to design safety into technologies as a way of suicide prevention while there is no rash of suicides yet by the new technologies. Further research on suicide methods is important for public health approaches to suicide prevention with sensitivity to socio-cultural, economic, and religious factors in different countries.

  17. Suicide Methods in Asia: Implications in Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang; Chen, Ying-Yeh; Yip, Paul S. F.

    2012-01-01

    As the largest continent in the World, Asia accounts for about 60% of World suicides. Preventing suicide by restricting access to suicide methods is one of the few evidence-based suicide prevention strategies. However, there has been a lack of systematic exploration of suicide methods in Asian countries. To amend this shortage, the current review examines the leading suicide methods in different Asian countries, their trend, their age- and sex- specific characteristics, and their implications for suicide prevention. In total, 42 articles with leading suicide methods data in 17 Asian countries/regions were retrieved. The epidemiologic characteristics and recent trends of common suicide methods reflect specific socio-cultural, economic, and religious situations in the region. Common suicide methods shift with the introduction of technologies and constructions, and have specific age- or sex-characteristics that may render the restriction of suicide methods not equally effective for all sex and age sub-groups. Charcoal burning, pesticide poisoning, native plant poisoning, self-immolation, and jumping are all prominent examples. In the information society, suicide prevention that focuses on suicide methods must monitor and control the innovation and spread of knowledge and practices of suicide “technologies”. It may be more cost-effective to design safety into technologies as a way of suicide prevention while there is no rash of suicides yet by the new technologies. Further research on suicide methods is important for public health approaches to suicide prevention with sensitivity to socio-cultural, economic, and religious factors in different countries. PMID:22690187

  18. Can Access to Data Prevent Army Suicides Identifying Optimal Response Strategies for Army Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    there is also emerging evidence that head trauma/ traumatic brain injury, psychological factors (e.g., hopelessness, problem-solving defi- cits...panel in the second and third 4 Expert-Identified Risk Factors for Suicide Risk Agitation Behavior change Childhood experiences Confusion about duty...thus, that the shared information will ultimately have deleteri- ous effects . Because nine experts agreed that this information should be shared up

  19. Suicide and its prevention in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaga, Makiko; Takeshima, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2009-04-01

    Japan is one of the countries with high suicide rate. In this article, number and rate of suicide, comparison between countries, causes of death, occupations of the people who commit suicide and geographical distribution of suicide victims in Japan were explained. Influential reports by the media and by the appeal of the internet were added. Then history and trends of suicide prevention after World War II, especially after the sudden increase of number of suicide in 1998 were described. Establishment and its meaning of Basic Act on Suicide Countermeasures and Comprehensive Suicide Prevention Initiative along with Suicide Prevention Center were commented. Tasks and Measures for suicide prevention now and in the coming years were discussed.

  20. Suicide Prevention with Diverse College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadick, Richard; Akhter, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Because of a dearth of experience in preventing suicide in diverse student populations, Pace University developed a multicultural suicide prevention kit. This article details the process used to develop the kit. The rationale for approaching suicide prevention in a culturally competent manner is presented, and methods used to gain culture-specific…

  1. Suicide Prevention with Diverse College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadick, Richard; Akhter, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Because of a dearth of experience in preventing suicide in diverse student populations, Pace University developed a multicultural suicide prevention kit. This article details the process used to develop the kit. The rationale for approaching suicide prevention in a culturally competent manner is presented, and methods used to gain culture-specific…

  2. The Ethics of Suicide and Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; Leenaars, Antoon A.

    1996-01-01

    Debates the question of suicide as a defensible choice, particularly for the terminally ill, examining the relevance of such issues as the mortality, rationality, and dynamics of the suicidal act, and the legitimacy of physician-assisted suicide. Contrasting perspectives are articulated by two prominent suicidologists as a spur to the reader's…

  3. Suicide Prevention Strategies for Improving Population Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Holly C; Wyman, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    Suicide is a public health problem that accounts for more than 1 million deaths annually worldwide. This article addresses evidence-based and promising youth suicide prevention approaches at the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels. Coordinated, developmentally timed, evidence-based suicide prevention approaches at all intervention levels are likely to reduce youth suicide. For most youth who die by suicide, there are opportunities for intervention before imminent risk develops. Current research in suicide prevention points to the value of investing in "upstream" universal interventions that build skills and resilience as well as policies that enable access to care and protection from lethal means.

  4. Nursing students′ attitude toward suicide prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Nebhinani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preventing suicide depends upon different health professionals′ knowledge regarding suicide, attitude toward suicide attempters, skills to assess and manage suicidal risk. Objectives: This study was aimed to assess the attitude of nursing students toward suicide prevention. Materials and Methods: 308 nursing students were recruited from the two institutions through total enumeration method. Attitude toward suicide prevention scale was administered. Study design was cross-sectional. Results: Majority were single females, from urban locality, who were pursuing BSc Nursing with the mean age of 20 years. Only minority had previous exposure to suicide prevention programs or workshops. Nearly half of the subjects had positive attitude toward working with suicidal patients. Again half of the subjects considered unemployment and poverty as main causes of suicide and were quite hopeless about it and they also perceived that most of the suicidal people would not reveal their suicidal plans to others. Conclusions: Merely half of the students had positive attitude toward working with suicidal patients. Hence, there is strong need to organize more educational and training programs on suicide prevention so that these budding health professionals could be more equipped and trained to manage these suicidal patients.

  5. [Expected direction of Japan's suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    The development of Japan's suicide prevention after 1998 can be broken down into three phases. Firstly, some local governments started suicide prevention activities under the support of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (1998-2005). Secondly, the government organized a liaison committee of related ministries and agencies for comprehensive suicide prevention measures (2005-2006). Thirdly, the passage of the Basic Act on Suicide Countermeasures raised great change (2006-). The Basic Act says suicide countermeasures should be implemented as a society-wide effort and the government established the Comprehensive Suicide Prevention Initiative (CSPI) in June 2007 under the Basic Act. In Japan, the number of suicides increased dramatically in 1998. This has led the society to treat the increase as the result of socio-economic problems and high-risk group approach hasn't been paid enough attention. The issue confronting us is to focus on more effective measures, including high-risk group approach.

  6. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  7. Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA's Veteran Health Administration, in support of the Open Data Initiative, is providing the Veterans Affairs Suicide Prevention Synthetic Dataset (VASPSD). The...

  8. [From the Competence Network on Depression and Suicidality to the German Depression Foundation. National and international prevention of suicidal behaviour and optimizing health care through using of E‑Mental-Health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegerl, Ulrich; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Heinz, Ines

    2016-04-01

    Depression is a very common, severe, socio-economically highly relevant disorder and the main cause for approximately 10,000 suicides in Germany annually. There is capital room for improvement and optimization of the care for depressed patients, as effective and evidence-based treatment options are available. However, they are only used optimally by a minority of the people affected due to huge diagnostic and therapeutic deficits. The "Compentence Network on Depression and Suicidality" provided several evidence-based concepts to improve care for patients affected by depression and to prevent suicidal behaviour. Especially the four-level intervention approach of the Alliances Against Depression has been successfully adapted and implemented by more than 100 regions within Europe and globally as well. The infrastructure of the Competence Network could be efficiently sustained throughout the establishment of the German Depression Foundation and the European Alliance against Depression. Since 2014, all research activities have been extended nationally and internationally by the establishment of a Depression Research Centre with a special focus on various E‑Mental-Health-projects.

  9. Suicide prevention: a proposed national strategy for South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dysfunctional problem-solving skills. Suicidal ... verbal or non-verbal behavioural cues that indicate the suicidal .... Promoting skills development on how to support and assist suicidal ... can play an essential role in the prevention of suicidal.

  10. Lithium and suicide prevention in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benard, V; Vaiva, G; Masson, M; Geoffroy, P A

    2016-06-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe and recurrent psychiatric disorder. The severity of prognosis in BD is mainly linked to the high rate of suicide in this population. Indeed, patients with BD commit suicide 20 to 30 times more frequently than the general population, and half of the BD population with an early age of onset have a history of suicide attempt. International therapeutic guidelines recommend lithium (Li) as the first-line treatment in BD for its prophylactic action on depressive or manic episodes. In addition, Li is the only mood stabilizer that has demonstrated efficacy in suicide prevention. This effect of Li is unfortunately often unknown to psychiatrists. Thus, this review aims to highlight evidence about the preventive action of Li on suicide in BD populations. We conducted a literature search between April 1968 and August 2014 in PubMed database using the following terms: "lithium" AND "suicide" OR "suicidality" OR "suicide attempt". As confirmed by a recent meta-analysis, many studies show that Li has a significant effect on the reduction of suicide attempts and deaths by suicide in comparison to antidepressants or other mood-stabilisers in BD populations. Studies have demonstrated that long-term treatment with Li reduces suicide attempts by about 10% and deaths by suicide by about 20%. The combination of Li and an antidepressant could reduce suicidal behaviours by reducing suicidal ideation prior to depressive symptoms. It appears crucial for Li efficacy in suicide prevention to maintain the Li blood concentrations in the efficient therapeutic zone and to instate long-term Li treatment. The "impulsive-aggressive" endophenotype is associated with suicide in BD. The specific action of Li on the 5-HT serotoninergic system could explain the specific anti-suicidal effects of Li via the modulation of impulsiveness and aggressiveness. Furthermore, genetic variants of the glycogen synthase kinase 3α/β (GSK3α and β; proteins inhibited by Li) seem to

  11. Crucial elements in suicide prevention strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Ways of conceptualizing suicide prevention are reviewed briefly, and the preventive model: Universal, Selected, and Indicated prevention (USI) is chosen as the structure for the literature review, and the discussion. Universal preventive interventions are directed toward entire population......; selective interventions are directed toward individuals who are at greater risk for suicidal behaviour; and indicated preventions are targeted at individuals who have already begun self-destructive behaviour. On the universal prevention level, an overview of the literature is presented with focus...... on restrictions in firearms and carbon monoxide gas. At the selective prevention level, a review of risk of suicide in homelessness and schizophrenia and risk factors for suicide in schizophrenia is conducted and possible interventions are mentioned together with the evidence for their effect. Suicide rate...

  12. Crucial elements in suicide prevention strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete

    2011-01-01

    on restrictions in firearms and carbon monoxide gas. At the selective prevention level, a review of risk of suicide in homelessness and schizophrenia and risk factors for suicide in schizophrenia is conducted and possible interventions are mentioned together with the evidence for their effect. Suicide rate...... with regard to prevention at the universal, the selected and the indicated level and clinical and research implications are outlined....

  13. Suicide Prevention in the Pacific War (WWII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Peter T.

    1991-01-01

    During war against Japan, there were two facets of U.S. program to prevent suicide among the Japanese: research component in Foreign Morale Analysis Division of Office of War Information and a suicide prevention program itself put into effect toward the end of the war in battles of Saipan and Okinawa and undertaken by U.S. GIs. (Author/NB)

  14. Preventing suicide: a resource for the family

    OpenAIRE

    Barrero Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The family can play an important role in the prevention of suicide if it is capable of aiding the mental health care services in the early detection and management of family members at risk. In order to attain this goal, the whole family should be informed in how to prevent suicide.

  15. Preventing Suicide in Prisons, Part I Recommendations fromthe International Association for Suicide Prevention Task Force on Suicide in Prisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konrad, N.; Daigle, M.S.; Daniel, A.E.; Dear, G.E.; Frottier, P.; Hayes, L.M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Liebling, A.; Sarchiapone, M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. In 2000 the Department of Mental Health of the World Health Organization (WHO) published a guide named Preventing Suicide. A Resource for Prison Officers as part of the WHO worldwide initiative for the prevention of suicide. In 2007 there are new epidemiological data on prison suicide, a

  16. Preventing Suicide in Prisons, Part I Recommendations fromthe International Association for Suicide Prevention Task Force on Suicide in Prisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konrad, N.; Daigle, M.S.; Daniel, A.E.; Dear, G.E.; Frottier, P.; Hayes, L.M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Liebling, A.; Sarchiapone, M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. In 2000 the Department of Mental Health of the World Health Organization (WHO) published a guide named Preventing Suicide. A Resource for Prison Officers as part of the WHO worldwide initiative for the prevention of suicide. In 2007 there are new epidemiological data on prison suicide, a m

  17. Preventing Suicide in Prisons, Part I Recommendations fromthe International Association for Suicide Prevention Task Force on Suicide in Prisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konrad, N.; Daigle, M.S.; Daniel, A.E.; Dear, G.E.; Frottier, P.; Hayes, L.M.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Liebling, A.; Sarchiapone, M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. In 2000 the Department of Mental Health of the World Health Organization (WHO) published a guide named Preventing Suicide. A Resource for Prison Officers as part of the WHO worldwide initiative for the prevention of suicide. In 2007 there are new epidemiological data on prison suicide, a m

  18. Suicide Prevention for LGBT Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Bradley; Oxendine, Symphony; Taub, Deborah J.; Robertson, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Extensive media coverage of the suicide deaths of several gay and lesbian youth has highlighted lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth as a population at-risk for suicide. In addition, it has caused colleges and universities to address mental health and suicide behavior among this very diverse college population. One issue that…

  19. Suicide Prevention for LGBT Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Bradley; Oxendine, Symphony; Taub, Deborah J.; Robertson, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Extensive media coverage of the suicide deaths of several gay and lesbian youth has highlighted lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth as a population at-risk for suicide. In addition, it has caused colleges and universities to address mental health and suicide behavior among this very diverse college population. One issue that…

  20. Suicide in Japan: present condition and prevention measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiho, Yamashita; Tohru, Takizawa; Shinji, Sakamoto; Manabu, Taguchi; Yuka, Takenoshita; Eriko, Tanaka; Ikuko, Sugawara; Naoki, Watanabe

    2005-01-01

    This article introduces the reader to present conditions and suicide prevention measures in Japan. The suicide rate has increased gradually since the early 1990s, reaching a postwar peak in 1998. The number of suicides has remained at about 30,000 every year since 1998. Middle-aged (55-59 years) and elderly men have especially high suicide rates. In 2002, The Council of Learned People on Measures Against Suicides (organized by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare) released its report on national suicide prevention strategies. Although national suicide prevention strategies have just begun to be established, some prefectures or regions have undertaken unique suicide prevention measures.

  1. Suicide prevention through means restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knipe, Duleeka W.; Chang, Shu-Sen; Dawson, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    .3 to 14.3 per 100,000. The decline in pesticide suicides during this same period was larger than for overall suicides: from 8.5 to 4.2 per 100,000, a 50% reduction. This was accompanied by a smaller concurrent rise in non-pesticide suicide mortality with a 2% increase (9.9 to 10.1 per 100,000). In 2015...

  2. Suicide Risk Protocols: Addressing the Needs of High Risk Youths Identified through Suicide Prevention Efforts and in Clinical Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbron, Nicole; Goldston, David; Walrath, Christine; Rodi, Michael; McKeon, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Several agencies have emphasized the importance of establishing clear protocols or procedures to address the needs of youths who are identified as suicidal through suicide prevention programs or in emergency department settings. What constitutes optimal guidelines for developing and implementing such protocols, however, is unclear. At the request…

  3. National pathways for suicide prevention and health services research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedani, Brian K; Vannoy, Steven

    2014-09-01

    In 2012, the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's Research Prioritization Task Force (RPTF) released a series of Aspirational Goals (AGs) to decrease suicide deaths and attempts. The RPTF asked experts to summarize what was known about particular AGs and to propose research pathways that would help reach them. This manuscript describes what is known about the benefits of access to health care (AG8) and continuity of care (AG9) for individuals at risk for suicide. Research pathways are proposed to address limitations in current knowledge, particularly in U.S. healthcare-based research. Using a three-step process, the expert panel reviewed available literature from electronic databases. For two AGs, the experts summarized the current state of knowledge, determined breakthroughs needed to advance the field, and developed a series of research pathways to achieve prevention goals. Several components of healthcare provision have been found to be associated with reduced suicide ideation, and in some cases they mitigated suicide deaths. Randomized trials are needed to provide more definitive evidence. Breakthroughs that support more comprehensive patient data collection (e.g., real-time surveillance, death record linkage, and patient registries) would facilitate the steps needed to establish research infrastructure so that various interventions could be tested efficiently within various systems of care. Short-term research should examine strategies within the current healthcare systems, and long-term research should investigate models that redesign the health system to prioritize suicide prevention. Evidence exists to support optimism regarding future suicide prevention, but knowledge is limited. Future research is needed on U.S. healthcare services and system enhancements to determine which of these approaches can provide empirical evidence for reducing suicide. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Preventing Suicides: Who's at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol or other substance abuse Family history of suicide Family violence, including physical and/or sexual abuse Firearms ... to kill yourself Talking about death, dying, or suicide Self-destructive behavior, such as drug abuse Family members and friends of members of the military ...

  5. The Esperance primary prevention of suicide project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaven, Janine; Kisely, Stephen

    2002-10-01

    Suicide has been a major community concern in Esperance, a geographically isolated port on the south coast of Western Australia. To evaluate the effect of three evidence-based initiatives for the primary prevention of suicide: (i) providing suicide awareness sessions for staff members in health, education and social services; (ii) limiting the sale of over the counter analgesics (aspirin and paracetamol) to packets containing less than the minimum lethal dose; and (iii) implementing Commonwealth media guidelines in the reporting of suicides by media. Changes in knowledge, awareness, attitudes, comfort and use, before and after each intervention were assessed using standardized instruments and pro forma derived from previous work, such as the Youth Suicide Prevention Training Manual and Suicide Intervention Beliefs Scale. Percentage changes in the number of retail outlets selling over the counter analgesics to less than potentially lethal quantities (less than 8 g of paracetamol or aspirin) were also measured. Media representatives were interviewed to gain their perceptions of Commonwealth Guidelines for the reporting of suicide, and encouraged to consult the project team before reporting suicide related issues. The baseline survey illustrated that mental health staff and general practitioners were more aware of suicide issues, risk factors for suicide and awareness of professional and ethical responses than staff from other services, and were more willing to raise the issue with a person at risk. Thirty-three subjects participated in suicide awareness training of whom 21 (66%) returned questionnaires. There were significant increases in awareness of suicide-related issues and risk factors, as well as reported levels of knowledge of professional and ethical responses and comfort, competence and confidence levels when assisting a person at risk. Only three media representatives were aware of the Commonwealth Health Department Guidelines for reporting suicide and only

  6. Suicide Prevention: does it work?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    2016-03-05

    Mar 5, 2016 ... psychosis or substance abuse disorder), a prior suicide attempt, family history of a mental disorder or .... such as lithium maintenance therapy in manic-depressive ..... bipolar manic-depressive disorders. J. Clin Psychiatry.

  7. County council politicians' attitudes toward suicide and suicide prevention: a qualitative cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knizek, Birthe Loa; Hjelmeland, Heidi; Skruibis, Paulius; Fartacek, Reinhold; Fekete, Sandor; Gailiene, Danute; Osvath, Peter; Renberg, Ellinor Salander; Rohrer, Rudolf R

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare county council politicians' attitudes toward suicide and suicide prevention in five European countries. A questionnaire was distributed and here the responses to the open-ended questions are analyzed qualitatively. Considerable differences were found in what the politicians in the five countries believed to be the most important causes of suicide and how suicide can be prevented. There were also differences in to what degree the politicians revealed a judgmental attitude toward suicide, which seemed to be related to the magnitude of the problem in the respective countries. A certain implicit inconsistency in the logic directing the politicians' responses was found when their views on causes to suicide and suicide prevention strategies were compared. The responses indicate a need for increased consciousness and knowledge about suicide and suicide prevention among politicians in all the five countries. This is important since they are responsible for initiating and funding suicide preventive efforts.

  8. National Office of Suicide Prevention Annual Report 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health

    2007-01-01

    National Office of Suicide Prevention Annual Report 2006 Suicidal behaviour is a major public health problem in Ireland. In particular it is a significant cause of death among young men aged 18 â?" 35, while overall suicide rates in Ireland are lower than the EU average, youth suicide rates are fifth highest. Risk factors for suicide include depression, schizophrenia and alcohol but suicide trends over time in many countries are influenced by major social changes especially those which re...

  9. Restrictions in means for suicide: an effective tool in preventing suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Qin, Ping; Helweg-Larsen, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Restriction of means for suicide is an important part of suicide preventive strategies in different countries. The effect on method-specific suicide rate and overall suicide rate of restrictions on availability of carbon monoxide, barbiturates, and dextropropoxyphene was examined. From 1970 to 2000...

  10. Railway suicide in Belgium 1998-2009: incidence and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriessen, Karl; Krysinska, Karolina

    2012-01-01

    Belgium is a country with a high suicide rate (19.1/100,000 in 2004), and railway suicide poses a substantial safety and public health problem. This problem was addressed by the Suicide Prevention Unit of Infrabel (Manager of the Belgian Railway Infrastructure), which collects relevant data and implements a prevention program. To present data on fatal and nonfatal suicidal behavior on the Belgian railway network, including monthly and regional distribution and identification of hotspots; and to present the Infrabel suicide prevention program. Analysis of Infrabel data on railway suicide (1998-2009) and comparison with data on suicide in Belgium. A total of 1,092 railway suicides (1998-2009) and 557 suicide attempts (2003-2009) in Belgium (fatality rate of 54%) were studied. Monthly fluctuations were observed, with the majority of suicides occurring in Flanders, followed by Wallonia and Brussels. We identified 34 hotspots accounting for 35% of cases, mostly in Flanders. In 2004 railway suicide accounted for 5.3% of all suicides in Belgium (railway suicide rate of 1.03/100,000). Such a major human and economic loss warrants implementation of prevention measures. Infrabel has initiated a comprehensive suicide prevention program which focuses mainly on safeguarding the suicide hotspots.

  11. The Significance of Nico Speijer's Suicide: How and When Should Suicide Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekstra, Rene F. W.

    1986-01-01

    Recounts the suicide of Nico Speijer, the "grand old man" of suicidology in the Netherlands. Contends that his case is related to ethical issues in suicide prevention. Offers a set of criteria by which to decide when suicide should not necessarily be prevented, nor its helpers punished by law. (Author/ABB)

  12. Attitudes and Perceptions of Suicide and Suicide Prevention Messages for Asian Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyata Thapa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the context of suicidal behaviors is critical for effective suicide prevention strategies. Although suicide is an important topic for Asian Americans, there is limited information about what Asian Americans’ attitudes are towards suicide and their perceptions about the effectiveness of prevention efforts. These questions are critical to examine to provide foundational knowledge for determining how best to intervene. In this study, Asian American (n = 87 and White (n = 87 participants completed self-report indexes on their knowledge of depression and suicide (e.g., estimates of suicide rates, coping attitudes (e.g., help-seeking and suicide prevention attitudes (e.g., usefulness of PSAs. The results indicate that in comparison to Whites, Asian Americans perceived suicidal behavior to be more common, perceived a stronger link between depression and suicide, less frequently endorsed help-seeking strategies, and reported more concern or distress after viewing a suicide prevention PSA. These preliminary results also suggest the possibility of cultural differences in perceptions of suicide prevention messages. The implications of these findings are discussed with a focus on providing recommendations for exploring suicide prevention efforts for Asian Americans.

  13. [Suicide Prevention and Mental Health Measures for Japanese University Students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Masaru; Koyama, Shihomi; Senoo, Akiko; Kawahara, Hiroko; Shimizu, Yukito

    2016-01-01

    According to the nationwide survey of the National University students in Japan, the annual suicide rate in 2012 was 15.7 per 100,000 undergraduate students. In many universities, suicide prevention is an important issue regarding mental health measures, and each university is actively examining this. The current situation concerning measures for suicide prevention in the Japanese National Universities was investigated in 2009. In 2010, the "college student's suicide prevention measures guideline, 2010" was established based on the results of this investigation. This guideline refers to the basic philosophy of suicide prevention in Chapter 1, risk factors for suicide in Chapter 2, and systems and activities for suicide prevention in Chapter 3. The Health Service Center, Okayama University plays central roles in mental health and suicide prevention measures on the Medical Campus. The primary prevention includes a mini-lecture on mental health, classes on mental health, and periodic workshops and lectures for freshmen. The secondary prevention includes interviews with students with mental health disorders by a psychiatrist during periodic health check-ups and introducing them to a hospital outside the university. The tertiary prevention includes support for students taking a leave of absence to return to school, periodic consultation with such students with mental disorders, and postvention following a suicide. We believe that for mental health measures on the university campus, it is important to efficiently make use of limited resources, and that these efforts will eventually lead to suicide prevention.

  14. Perceived Stressors of Suicide and Potential Prevention Strategies for Suicide among Youths in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jin Kuan; van Schalkwyk, Gertina J.; Chan, Andrea Huan Wen

    2015-01-01

    The suicide rate among youths in Malaysia has increased over the years, giving rise to considerable public concern. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe potential stressors of suicide and suicide prevention strategies as perceived by youths in Malaysia aged 15-25 years. A qualitative approach was adopted and 625 students from…

  15. The Etiology of Suicide: Perceptions of Prevention Center Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, James R.; Subich, Linda Mezydlo

    1993-01-01

    Results of random sampling of suicide prevention center directors suggests that etiological models of suicidal behavior emphasizing environmental stress and/or prepotent vulnerability are most commonly held perceptions of causes of suicide. Category that included both stress and predisposition models was advocated by 37.5 percent of respondents…

  16. Teen Depression and Suicide: Effective Prevention and Intervention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Teen depression and suicidal behaviors are intricately intertwined, with untreated depression being a leading cause of adolescent suicide. Most depressed or suicidal teens tend to show warning signs and possess specific risk factors. A key component to preventing teen depression is for adults to remain aware of such warning signs and risk factors…

  17. Teen Depression and Suicide: Effective Prevention and Intervention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Teen depression and suicidal behaviors are intricately intertwined, with untreated depression being a leading cause of adolescent suicide. Most depressed or suicidal teens tend to show warning signs and possess specific risk factors. A key component to preventing teen depression is for adults to remain aware of such warning signs and risk factors…

  18. [State of suicide and effective efforts in suicide prevention in psychiatric hospitals and clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orui, Masatsugu; Hirokawa, Seiko; Akazawa, Masato; Tachimori, Hisateru; Kawano, Kenji; Mori, Takao; Akita, Hiroya; Takeshima, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Although factors related to suicide are complicated, mental health disorders are an important risk factor. It is anticipated that suicide prevention measures will be implemented from the perspective of improved psychiatric medicine. No national-scale study has been carried out in Japan on the state of psychiatric medicine and its influence on suicide since 2000. Moreover, many efforts not intended for suicide prevention have been shown to be effective for this purpose. Here, we conducted surveys to obtain basic data on suicide prevention and improvements in mental health care among 1,728 psychiatric hospitals and clinics in Japan in 2010. The incidence of suicide in psychiatric hospitals and clinics from January to December 2009 was estimated to be 100.5 for outpatients and 154.5 for inpatients per 100,000 patients. Regarding the duration from consultation to suicide, 87% of outpatients committed suicide less than one month following their last consultation. Moreover, approximately two-thirds of patients had undergone consultations for more than one year. A number of suicides in psychiatric hospitals and clinics occurred while patients were continuously undergoing treatment. Efforts shown to be effective in suicide prevention included risk assessment with multiple medical staff (i.e., doctors and nurses), a 24-hour crisis line, and a follow-up system for discontinued outpatients. We expect that the results of this survey will aid in the implementation of effective suicide prevention in psychiatric medicine.

  19. Crisis Phones - Suicide Prevention Versus Suggestion/Contagion Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    There has been no systematic work on the short- or long-term impact of the installation of crisis phones on suicides from bridges. The present study addresses this issue. Data refer to 219 suicides from 1954 through 2013 on the Skyway Bridge in St. Petersburg, Florida. Six crisis phones with signs were installed in July 1999. In the first decade after installation, the phones were used by 27 suicidal persons and credited with preventing 26 or 2.6 suicides a year. However, the net suicide count increased from 48 in the 13 years before installation of phones to 106 the following 13 years or by 4.5 additional suicides/year (t =3.512, p < .001). Although the phones prevented some suicides, there was a net increase after installation. The findings are interpreted with reference to suggestion/contagion effects including the emergence of a controversial bridge suicide blog.

  20. Social media and suicide prevention: findings from a stakeholder survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jo; Rodrigues, Maria; Fisher, Steve; Bailey, Eleanor; Herrman, Helen

    2015-02-25

    Suicide is a leading cause of death, particularly among young adults. The rapid growth of social media and its heavy use by young adults presents new challenges and opportunities for suicide prevention. Social media sites are commonly used for communicating about suicide-related behavior with others, which raises the possibility of using social media to help prevent suicide. However, the use of social media varies widely between different suicide prevention advocates. The role this type of intervention should play in a community's overall suicide prevention strategy remains a matter of debate. Explore the ways in which stakeholders use social media for suicide prevention and assess their views about the potential utility of social media as a suicide prevention tool. A 12-week stakeholder consultation that involved the online administration and completion of surveys by 10 individuals who conduct research about suicide and social media, 13 organizations that use social media for suicide prevention purposes, and 64 users of social media. Social media was seen as a useful means of delivering a range of suicide prevention activities. Respondents reported that the key benefits of social media were the opportunity to obtain emotional support from others, to express one's feelings, to talk to others with similar problems, and to provide help to others. The social media site believed to hold most potential for delivering suicide prevention activities was Facebook. There were concerns about potential risks of social media, but respondents felt the potential benefits outweighed the risks. Social media was recognized by different types of stakeholders as holding potential for delivering suicide prevention activities. More research is required to establish the efficacy and safety of potential social media-based interventions and ethical standards and protocols to ensure that such interventions are delivered safely need to be developed and implemented.

  1. The Role of Religious Leaders in Suicide Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsushi Hirono

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine American and Japanese clergy’s perception of their role in the prevention of suicide. The research questions are as follows: (a How do clergy in the United States and Japan perceive suicide? (b Do they see suicide differently? and (c How do they envision the role of suicide prevention? The hypotheses are as follows: (a Christian clergy think that suicide is an unacceptable “sin”; (b Buddhist clergy are more accepting of suicide than Christian clergy; (c there are role differences related to suicide prevention in the Japanese and American religious communities; and (d American and Japanese religious leaders have a different view of their obligations related to suicide prevention. The investigator sent 400 anonymous mail surveys, respectively, to New York and Tokyo. The surveys asked about the clergy’s personal beliefs and the Church’s role in suicide prevention. The investigator analyzed the responses using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The major findings are that many American Christian clergy consider suicide to be a sin, but that “God’s love is available for people who committed suicide.” Many Japanese Buddhist clergy think how one dies is not the most important issue.

  2. A suicide prevention advisory group at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, David; Lewis, Philip

    2010-05-01

    During a 15-month period, there were seven suicides among patients who were in active treatment or who had been seen recently by providers in the Department of Psychiatry of Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. As a result, a Suicide Prevention Advisory Group (SPAG) was formed to identify possible causes and make recommendations aimed at improving the identification and treatment of suicidal patients. The group made 11 specific recommendations. No known suicides occurred during the 22 months after the implementation of the Suicide Prevention Advisory Group's recommendations.

  3. [Suicide prevention strategies around the world and in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshitomo

    2011-01-01

    "Prevention of suicide: Guidelines for the formulation and implementation of national strategies" was published by the United Nations and the World Health Organization in 1996. It emphasizes the importance of each country developing suicide prevention strategies in accordance with its own socio-cultural characteristics. Finland is known as one of the countries that successfully reduced its suicide rate. The medical model, which detects mental disorders at an early stage and starts appropriate psychiatric treatments, should be closely integrated with the community model, which educates the general public with accurate information on mental disorders and suicide prevention. Suicide prevention strategies should be conducted on a long-term basis. The author describes some considerations on current suicide prevention activities in Japan, and compares them against UN/WHO guidelines and national activities in Finland.

  4. Preventing plane-assisted suicides through the lessons of research on homicide and suicide-homicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Timothy R; Sher, Leo

    2016-08-01

    The Germanwings 9525 incident drew significant attention to the 'plane-assisted suicide' construct, yet little scientific literature exists on this topic. This paper reviews the available literature and applies lessons from the suicide-homicide and men's mental health literature to better understand this construct from a scientific perspective. A systematic review of the relevant clinical literature was undertaken. Multiple lines of evidence suggests the applicability and relevance of suicide-homicide research and men's mental health to the plane-assisted suicide phenomenon. Plane-assisted suicides occur within an overwhelmingly male, middle aged population who, in addition to suicide, commit large scale acts of murder. Issues of divorce, separation, and threats to masculinity appear integral to an effective prevention program. Further research in the understanding of plane-assisted suicide as a product of neuropsychiatric disorder may advance such prevention efforts and have the opportunity to reduce the loss of life in future tragedies.

  5. Suicide Prevention in the Dot Com Era: Technological Aspects of a University Suicide Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jessica; VanDeusen, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Western Michigan University's Suicide Prevention Program utilizes multiple technological components, including an online training course, a Web site, and 2 social networking Web site profiles, as integral aspects of a comprehensive program. This article discusses the development, maintenance, use, and impact of the technological aspects of this…

  6. [Suicide prevention in Japan in contrast to overseas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshitomo

    2012-01-01

    In 1996, the United Nations (UN) and the World Health Organization (WHO) published guidelines for developing suicide prevention measures at national level. In Japan, the Basic Act on Suicide Prevention was promulgated in June 2006 and a Comprehensive Suicide Measures Framework was formulated in June 2007, which announced that suicide prevention is an official concern and that entire societies should be engaged in such suicide prevention efforts. One of the fundamental principles moving forward is to place emphasis on coordination between medical and community models of care. The medical model is based on the notion that mental disorders that could lead to suicide should be diagnosed at earlier stages and addressed through appropriate psychiatric treatment. The community model, which concerns awareness activities that emphasize earlier detection and attentive social support, is also important. Implementing policies with a long-term perspective that maintain close linkages between these models is a critical strategy for suicide prevention. This presentation investigates the current conditions and issues around Japanese suicide prevention with reference to the UN/WHO guidelines for suicide prevention, and compares the situation to that in other countries.

  7. Establishing Standards for the Assessment of Suicide Risk among Callers to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Thomas; Kalafat, John; Draper, John; Stokes, Heather; Knudson, Marshall; Berman, Alan L.; McKeon, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline was launched in January 2005. Lifeline, supported by a federal grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, consists of a network of more than 120 crisis centers located in communities across the country that are committed to suicide prevention. Lifeline's Certification and…

  8. Self-reported suicidal behavior and attitudes toward suicide and suicide prevention among psychology students in Ghana, Uganda, and Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmeland, Heidi; Akotia, Charity S; Owens, Vicki; Knizek, Birthe L; Nordvik, Hilmar; Schroeder, Rose; Kinyanda, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Self-reported suicidal behavior and attitudes toward suicide in psychology students are reported and compared in Ghana, Uganda, and Norway. Small differences only were found in own suicidal behavior. However, experience of suicidal behavior in the surroundings was more common in Uganda than in Ghana and Norway. Although differences were found between the three countries in attitudes toward suicide, which emphasizes the need for culture-sensitive research and prevention, many of the differences were not as big as expected. The most pronounced difference was that the Norwegian students were more reluctant to take a stand on these questions compared to their African counterparts. Some differences were also found between the two African countries. The implications of the results for suicide prevention in Africa are discussed.

  9. Mental Health Workers’ Views About Their Suicide Prevention Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Ross

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AimMental Health workers bear responsibility for preventing suicide in their client group. Survey studies have indicated that staff can be seriously adversely affected when a client suicides. The aim of the current study is to describe and evaluate the effects on mental health (MH workers of their ongoing role in managing suicidal behaviours and to identify the thoughts and feelings associated with this role.MethodA survey was administered to 135 MH workers via an on-line self-report vehicle. The survey comprised standardised measures of anxiety and burnout as well as a questionnaire developed for this study concerning perceptions and attitudes to suicide and suicide prevention.ResultsFactor analysis of 12 retained items of the questionnaire identified three factors: 1 preventability beliefs (beliefs about suicide being always and/or permanently preventable; 2 associated distress (stress/anxiety about managing suicidal behaviour; and 3 the prevention role (covering views about personal roles and responsibilities in preventing suicidal behaviours. Analysis of these factors found that many MH workers experience an elevation of stress/anxiety in relation to their role in managing suicidal behaviours. This distress was associated with the emotional exhaustion component of burnout. Measures showed adverse responses were higher for outpatient than inpatient workers; for those who had received generic training in suicide prevention: and for those who had experienced a workplace related client suicide.ConclusionThere is a need for the development of appropriate self-care strategies to alleviate stress in MH workers exposed to suicide.

  10. Prevention of suicide and attempted suicide in Denmark. Epidemiological studies of suicide and intervention studies in selected risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordentoft, Merete

    2007-11-01

    The suicide rates in Denmark have been declining during the last two decades. The decline was relatively larger among women than among men. All age groups experienced a decline except the very young with stable rates and the very old with increasing rates. The Universal, Selective, Indicated (USI) model recommended by Institute of Medicine was used as a framework for the thesis. Universal preventive interventions are directed toward the entire population; selective interventions are directed toward individuals who are at greater risk for suicidal behaviour; and indicated preventions are targeted at individuals who have already begun self-destructive behaviour. At the universal level, a review was carried out to highlight the association between availability of methods for suicide and suicide rate. There were mostly studies of firearms, and the conclusion of the review was that there was clear indication of restricted access to lethal means was associated with decline in suicide with that specific method, and in many cases also with overall suicide mortality. Restricting access is especially important for methods with high case fatality rate. Our own study indicated a beneficial effect on suicide rates of restrictions in access to barbiturates, dextropropoxyphen, domestic gas and car exhaust with high content of carbon monoxide. Although a range of other factors in the society might also be of importance, it was concluded that restrictions in access to dangerous means for suicide were likely to play an important role in reducing suicide rates in Denmark, especially for women. At the selective level, there are several important risk groups such as psychiatric patients, persons with alcohol and drug abuse, persons with newly diagnosed severe physical illness, all who previously attempted suicide, and groups of homeless, institutionalized, prisoners and other socially excluded persons. The thesis focused on homeless persons and psychiatric patients, especially patients

  11. The Impact of Knowledge of Suicide Prevention and Work Experience among Clinical Staff on Attitudes towards Working with Suicidal Patients and Suicide Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga-Lill Ramberg

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Suicide-preventive training has shown to influence attitudes. This study aimed at investigating what impact other factors than knowledge might have on attitudes towards work with suicidal patients and suicide prevention. In 2007, 500 health-care staff working in a psychiatric clinic in Stockholm received a questionnaire with items concerning work with suicidal patients to which 358 (71.6% responded. A set of attitude items were tested using structural equation modelling (LISREL. Three models were found to be satisfactory valid and reliable: Job clarity, Job confidence and Attitudes towards prevention. These were then used in regression analyses as dependent variables with predictors such as experience of work with suicidal patients, perceived sufficient training, age and gender. Perceived sufficient training was consistently the most important predictor for all three attitude concepts (p < 0.01, β = 0.559 for Job clarity; p < 0.01, β = 0.53 for Job confidence; p < 0.01, β = 0.191 for Attitudes towards prevention. Age was another significant predictor for Job clarity (p < 0.05, β = 0.134, as was experience of patient suicide for Job confidence (p < 0.05, β = 0.137. It is concluded that providing suicide preventive education is likely to improve attitudes towards the prevention of suicide, clarity and confidence regarding their role in the care for suicidal patients. These improvements may contribute to the prevention of suicide in health care settings.

  12. Suicide and attempted suicide: epidemiological surveillance as a crucial means of a local suicide prevention project in Trento's Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Wilma Angela; Della Rosa, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    The World Health Organization identifies suicide among the top 10 causes of death in many countries with an overall mortality rate of 16 per 100,000 inhabitants. Furthermore suicide attempts present a frequency 4-10 times greater than the suicidal events, representing also one of the main risk factors to lead to recurrent attempts of suicide. In 2008 the Autonomous Province of Trento launched a suicide prevention pogram called "Invitation to Life" which includes various interventions intended to counter the phenomenon of suicide in the region. Actually the epidemiological research upon the phenomenon of suicide in Trentino region is one of the main pillars of the project: it represents a fundamental requirement to identify risk and protective factors in the population in order to adopt more specific and effective preventive strategies. This article aims to present methods and instruments for epidemiological monitoring of suicide and attempted suicide which are applied in Trentino and to describe results after seven years from the beginning of the local prevention program "Invitation to life".

  13. [Mental disorder and suicide prevention in patients with physical illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Masatoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsuyuka

    2012-01-01

    Suicide rate in Japan is 25/100,000 in a year. The rate is higher than those in other developed countries. Physical illness is a risk factor for suicide. To prevent suicide in patients with physical illness, identification of mental illness, such as depression, is important. In addition, palliative care for distressing physical and psychological symptoms is also important. In process of identification of mental illness and distressing physical symptoms, communications between medical staff and patients are essential. Enhancing communication skills of medical staff may be a key point to prevent suicide.

  14. National Institutes of Health Pathways to Prevention Workshop: Advancing Research to Prevent Youth Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Todd D; Roche, Kathleen M; Chow, Sy-Miin; Schenck, Anna P; Byam, Leslie-Ann

    2016-12-06

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Pathways to Prevention Workshop "Advancing Research to Prevent Youth Suicide" was cosponsored by the NIH Office of Disease Prevention, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, and National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. A multidisciplinary working group developed the agenda, and an evidence-based practice center prepared an evidence report that addressed data systems relevant to suicide prevention efforts through a contract with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. During the workshop, experts discussed the evidence and participants commented during open forums. After considering the data from the evidence report, expert presentations, and public comments, an independent panel prepared a draft report that was posted on the NIH Office of Disease Prevention Web site for 5 weeks for public comment. This abridged version of the final report provides a road map for optimizing youth suicide prevention efforts by highlighting strategies for guiding the next decade of research in this area. These strategies include recommendations for improving data systems, enhancing data collection and analysis methods, and strengthening the research and practice community.

  15. The Impact of Knowledge of Suicide Prevention and Work Experience among Clinical Staff on Attitudes towards Working with Suicidal Patients and Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, Inga-Lill; Di Lucca, Maria Anna; Hadlaczky, Gergö

    2016-02-04

    Suicide-preventive training has shown to influence attitudes. This study aimed at investigating what impact other factors than knowledge might have on attitudes towards work with suicidal patients and suicide prevention. In 2007, 500 health-care staff working in a psychiatric clinic in Stockholm received a questionnaire with items concerning work with suicidal patients to which 358 (71.6%) responded. A set of attitude items were tested using structural equation modelling (LISREL). Three models were found to be satisfactory valid and reliable: Job clarity, Job confidence and Attitudes towards prevention. These were then used in regression analyses as dependent variables with predictors such as experience of work with suicidal patients, perceived sufficient training, age and gender. Perceived sufficient training was consistently the most important predictor for all three attitude concepts (p suicide for Job confidence (p suicide preventive education is likely to improve attitudes towards the prevention of suicide, clarity and confidence regarding their role in the care for suicidal patients. These improvements may contribute to the prevention of suicide in health care settings.

  16. Suicide prevention for men - using the internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anneberg, Inger; Madsen, Bente Hjorth

      In most countries men have a higher suicide rate than women. In Denmark suicide among men is almost three times as frequent as among women. For this reason we wanted to ask the following question: Is there any way to facilitate mens' access to help, when they are in a crisis? Could men be better...... to accept need of help, when it comes to suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts?...

  17. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Enhancing Mental Health Care for Suicidal Individuals and Other People in Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Munfakh, Jimmie L. H.; Kleinman, Marjorie; Lake, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    Linking at-risk callers to ongoing mental health care is a key goal of crisis hotline interventions that has not often been addressed in evaluations of hotlines' effectiveness. We conducted telephone interviews with 376 suicidal and 278 nonsuicidal crisis callers to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (Lifeline) to assess rates of mental…

  18. VA Suicide Prevention Applications Network: A National Health Care System-Based Suicide Event Tracking System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmire, Claire; Stephens, Brady; Morley, Sybil; Thompson, Caitlin; Kemp, Janet; Bossarte, Robert M

    2016-11-01

    The US Department of Veterans Affairs' Suicide Prevention Applications Network (SPAN) is a national system for suicide event tracking and case management. The objective of this study was to assess data on suicide attempts among people using Veterans Health Administration (VHA) services. We assessed the degree of data overlap on suicide attempters reported in SPAN and the VHA's medical records from October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2014-overall, by year, and by region. Data on suicide attempters in the VHA's medical records consisted of diagnoses documented with E95 codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision. Of 50 518 VHA patients who attempted suicide during the 4-year study period, data on fewer than half (41%) were reported in both SPAN and the medical records; nearly 65% of patients whose suicide attempt was recorded in SPAN had no data on attempted suicide in the VHA's medical records. Evaluation of administrative data suggests that use of SPAN substantially increases the collection of data on suicide attempters as compared with the use of medical records alone, but neither SPAN nor the VHA's medical records identify all suicide attempters. Further research is needed to better understand the strengths and limitations of both systems and how to best combine information across systems.

  19. Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies for Suicide among the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Rebecca; Burnett, Donna O.; Evans, Retta R.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a preventable public health concern affecting the nation as the 10th leading cause of death. The prevalence of suicide among the elderly is higher than any other group. Risk factors attributed to this phenomenon are depression, social isolation, substance abuse, poor physical health or function, financial stress, and access to lethal…

  20. Evaluating the SOS suicide prevention program: a replication and extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glanovsky Jaime

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide is a leading cause of death for children and youth in the United States. Although school based programs have been the principal vehicle for youth suicide prevention efforts for over two decades, few have been systematically evaluated. This study examined the effectiveness of the Signs of Suicide (SOS prevention program in reducing suicidal behavior. Methods 4133 students in 9 high schools in Columbus, Georgia, western Massachusetts, and Hartford, Connecticut were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups during the 2001–02 and 2002–03 school years. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by students in both groups approximately 3 months after program implementation. Results Significantly lower rates of suicide attempts and greater knowledge and more adaptive attitudes about depression and suicide were observed among students in the intervention group. Students' race/ethnicity, grade, and gender did not alter the impact of the intervention on any of the outcomes assessed in this analysis. Conclusion This study has confirmed preliminary analysis of Year 1 data with a larger and more racially and socio-economically diverse sample. SOS continues to be the only universal school-based suicide prevention program to demonstrate significant effects of self-reported suicide attempts in a study utilizing a randomized experimental design. Moreover, the beneficial effects of SOS were observed among high school-aged youth from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds, highlighting the program's utility as a universal prevention program. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT000387855.

  1. Impacts of stress, self-efficacy, and optimism on suicide ideation among rehabilitation patients with acute pesticide poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Feng

    Full Text Available The high incidence of pesticide ingestion as a means to commit suicide is a critical public health problem. An important predictor of suicidal behavior is suicide ideation, which is related to stress. However, studies on how to defend against stress-induced suicidal thoughts are limited.This study explores the impact of stress on suicidal ideation by investigating the mediating effect of self-efficacy and dispositional optimism.Direct and indirect (via self-efficacy and dispositional optimism effects of stress on suicidal ideation were investigated among 296 patients with acute pesticide poisoning from four general hospitals. For this purpose, structural equation modeling (SEM and bootstrap method were used.Results obtained using SEM and bootstrap method show that stress has a direct effect on suicide ideation. Furthermore, self-efficacy and dispositional optimism partially weakened the relationship between stress and suicidal ideation.The final model shows a significant relationship between stress and suicidal ideation through self-efficacy or dispositional optimism. The findings extended prior studies and provide enlightenment on how self-efficacy and optimism prevents stress-induced suicidal thoughts.

  2. Impacts of stress, self-efficacy, and optimism on suicide ideation among rehabilitation patients with acute pesticide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jun; Li, Shusheng; Chen, Huawen

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of pesticide ingestion as a means to commit suicide is a critical public health problem. An important predictor of suicidal behavior is suicide ideation, which is related to stress. However, studies on how to defend against stress-induced suicidal thoughts are limited. This study explores the impact of stress on suicidal ideation by investigating the mediating effect of self-efficacy and dispositional optimism. Direct and indirect (via self-efficacy and dispositional optimism) effects of stress on suicidal ideation were investigated among 296 patients with acute pesticide poisoning from four general hospitals. For this purpose, structural equation modeling (SEM) and bootstrap method were used. Results obtained using SEM and bootstrap method show that stress has a direct effect on suicide ideation. Furthermore, self-efficacy and dispositional optimism partially weakened the relationship between stress and suicidal ideation. The final model shows a significant relationship between stress and suicidal ideation through self-efficacy or dispositional optimism. The findings extended prior studies and provide enlightenment on how self-efficacy and optimism prevents stress-induced suicidal thoughts.

  3. Preventing suicide at suicide hotspots: a case study from Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, Anne; Cheung, Yee Tak Derek; Cox, Georgina; Robinson, Jo; Williamson, Michelle; Harris, Meredith; Machlin, Anna; Moffat, Caitlin; Pirkis, Jane

    2014-08-01

    The Gap Park Self-Harm Minimisation Masterplan project is a collaborative attempt to address jumping suicides at Sydney’s Gap Park through means restriction, encouraging help-seeking, and increasing the likelihood of third-party intervention. We used various data sources to describe the Masterplan project’s processes, impacts, and outcomes. There have been reductions in reported jumps and confirmed suicides, although the trends are not statistically significant. There has been a significant increase in police call-outs to intervene with suicidal people who have not yet reached the cliff’s edge. The collaborative nature of the Masterplan project and its multifaceted approach appear to be reaping benefits.

  4. Technology-enhanced suicide prevention interventions: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuze, Elizabeth; Jenkins, Carolyn; Gregoski, Mathew; York, Janet; Mueller, Martina; Lamis, Dorian A; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2017-07-01

    Objective Suicide prevention is a high priority. Scalable and sustainable interventions for suicide prevention are needed to set the stage for population-level impact. This systematic review explores how technology-enhanced interventions target suicide risk and protective factors, using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2015) Risk and Protective Factors Ecological Model. Methods Information databases (PsycINFO, PubMed and CINAHL) were systematically searched and records including technology-enhanced interventions for suicide prevention ( n = 3764) were reviewed. Records with varying technologies and diverse methodologies were integrated into the search. Results Review of the records resulted in the inclusion of 16 studies that utilized technology-enhanced interventions to address determinants of suicidal behaviour. This includes the use of standalone or, in most cases, adjunct technology-enhanced interventions for suicide prevention delivered by mobile phone application, text message, telephone, computer, web, CD-ROM and video. Conclusion Intervention effectiveness was variable, but several technology-enhanced interventions have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing suicidal ideation and mental health co-morbidities. Large-scale research and evaluation initiatives are needed to evaluate the costs and long-term population-level impact of these interventions.

  5. Assessing and managing suicidal behaviour in the primary care setting: A model for an integrated regional suicide prevention strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voros, Viktor; Osvath, Peter; Fekete, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    Although suicide rates are decreasing in most countries, suicide is still a major health concern. Our aim was to introduce a complex, integrative, regional suicide prevention strategy. Based on reviewing the literature and on our previous studies we developed a suicide prevention model, which includes recognition, risk assessment and intervention. The main steps of the model are the recognition of warning signs (communicative or behavioural), exploration of crisis situation and/or psychopathologic symptoms, assessment of protective and risk factors, estimation of suicide risk and a plan for management of suicidal patients through different levels of interventions. In the management of suicidal behaviour, the complex stress-diathesis model has to be adjusted by considering biological markers and psycho-social factors. Only after the assessment of these factors can primary care professionals, as gatekeepers, manage suicidal patients effectively by using adequate psychopharmacotherapeutic and psychotherapeutic interventions in the recognition, treatment and prevention of suicidal behaviour.

  6. [Suicide prevention activities of psychiatry-related professional societies: the promotion of suicide prevention in psychiatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kotaro; Kawanishi, Chiaki

    2014-01-01

    Suicide prevention is promoted nationally in Japan. In the General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy determined in 2007, the areas in which, psychiatry contributed were shown to be important, for example, psychiatric care, suicide, aftercare program for suicide attempters, mental health promotion, and actual elucidation of the cause of suicide. At a part of these national measures, guidelines on suicide attempters' care are devised by the Japanese Society for Emergency Medicine and the Japanese Association for Emergency Psychiatry, and a training workshop on caring for suicide attempters was held by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The Japanese society for Emergency Medicine devised an educational program of care for patients with mental health problems in emergency care in cooperation with the Japanese Association for Emergency Psychiatry and Japanese Society of General Hospital Psychiatry. On the other hand, suicide prevention and staff care at hospitals are important problems, and the Japan Council for Quality Health Care devised a program and conducted a training workshop. Also, the Japanese Association for Suicide Prevention conducted workshops for both the educational program of cognitive-behavioral therapy and facilitator training program for gatekeeper. The Japanese Society of Mood Disorders conducted a training workshop involving clinical high-risk case discussion. Also, the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology devised clinical guidelines for suicide prevention and distributed them to all society members. In this society, on-site discussion of the guidelines and the holding of workshops are expected in the future. It is hoped that these guidelines will be utilized and training workshops will be held in the future.

  7. Technology-based suicide prevention: current applications and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxton, David D; June, Jennifer D; Kinn, Julie T

    2011-01-01

    This review reports on current and emerging technologies for suicide prevention. Technology-based programs discussed include interactive educational and social networking Web sites, e-mail outreach, and programs that use mobile devices and texting. We describe innovative applications such as virtual worlds, gaming, and text analysis that are currently being developed and applied to suicide prevention and outreach programs. We also discuss the benefits and limitations of technology-based applications and discuss future directions for their use.

  8. [Pharmacological suicide prevention under special consideration of lithium salts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Oerlinghausen, Bruno

    2007-09-01

    This minireview summarizes the existing evidence from large, international observational studies and RCTs on the suicide preventive effects of lithium as compared to other mood stabilizers and antidepressants. Unsystematic literature review. There is increasing and robust evidence from a relatively large number of studies and metaanalyses that lithium long-term treatment reduces the suicide risk and overall mortality in patients with all kinds of depressive disorders (unipolar, bipolar, schizoaffective). Comparable evidence does not exist with regard to other mood stabilizers including atypical neuroleptics, or antidepressants. The existing evidence on the suicide preventive effect of lithium should be integrated in therapeutic guidelines and routine psychiatric care.

  9. Outcomes of a Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training on a University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indelicato, Natalie Arce; Mirsu-Paun, Anca; Griffin, Wayne D.

    2011-01-01

    A university-wide suicide prevention program was implemented to provide students, faculty, and staff tools to identify, assist, and refer distressed and suicidal individuals. The study examined participant self-reports of suicide-related knowledge and prevention skills, group differences in suicide prevention knowledge and skills, group…

  10. Gun Control, Gun Ownership, and Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    1988-01-01

    Explored relationship between the extent of gun ownership and the strictness of gun control laws to suicide and homicide rates in the nine major geographic regions of the United States. Found gun ownership, rather than the strictness of gun control laws, was the strongest correlate of the rates of suicide and homicide by guns. (Author)

  11. E-health interventions for suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Helen; Batterham, Philip J; O'Dea, Bridianne

    2014-08-12

    Many people at risk of suicide do not seek help before an attempt, and do not remain connected to health services following an attempt. E-health interventions are now being considered as a means to identify at-risk individuals, offer self-help through web interventions or to deliver proactive interventions in response to individuals' posts on social media. In this article, we examine research studies which focus on these three aspects of suicide and the internet: the use of online screening for suicide, the effectiveness of e-health interventions aimed to manage suicidal thoughts, and newer studies which aim to proactively intervene when individuals at risk of suicide are identified by their social media postings. We conclude that online screening may have a role, although there is a need for additional robust controlled research to establish whether suicide screening can effectively reduce suicide-related outcomes, and in what settings online screening might be most effective. The effectiveness of Internet interventions may be increased if these interventions are designed to specifically target suicidal thoughts, rather than associated conditions such as depression. The evidence for the use of intervention practices using social media is possible, although validity, feasibility and implementation remains highly uncertain.

  12. A scoping review of Indigenous suicide prevention in circumpolar regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redvers, Jennifer; Bjerregaard, Peter; Eriksen, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Suicide is a serious public health challenge in circumpolar regions, especially among Indigenous youth. Indigenous communities, government agencies and health care providers are making concerted efforts to reduce the burden of suicide and strengthen protective factors for individuals......, families and communities. The persistence of suicide has made it clear that more needs to be done. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to undertake a scoping review of the peer-reviewed literature on suicide prevention and interventions in Indigenous communities across the circumpolar north. Our objective...... and 2014. We included articles that described interventions in differentiated circumpolar Indigenous populations and provided evaluation data. We retained grey literature publications for comparative reference. RESULTS: Our search identified 95 articles that focused on suicide in distinct circumpolar...

  13. [Current situation of suicide in Japan, and what pharmacists contribute to suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

      In Japan, a national countermeasure has been forwarded since the enactment of the Basic Act on Suicide Countermeasures in 2006 and the Comprehensive Suicide Prevention Initiative in 2007. The distinctive policy of the Japanese countermeasure is expressed as the word, "comprehensive," which means that suicide prevention may not only be carried out only by mental health measures but also by comprehensive measures including chance of administrative practices. This policy is proper, although mental health measures appear to be too simple inclining to psychiatric treatments for the classic type of "depression" by a pharmacotherapy. The authors have insisted that mental health measures including psychiatric treatments are also required to be more comprehensive. This paper describes that benzodiazepine (BZ)-abuse problems including overdosing by suicidal intents have got worse recently as psychiatric clinics have increased and most of BZ abusers obtain the abused drugs form psychiatrists. This current situation indicates that pharmacists need to monitor psychiatrists' prescribing behavior and qualities of psychiatric treatment is required to be refined, suggesting pharmacists may be one of the "Gate Keeper," as supporting resources for suicide prevention. Additionally, this paper explained that basic attitudes and responses acquired by pharmacists as a supporter for suicide prevention.

  14. A community intervention trial of multimodal suicide prevention program in Japan: A Novel multimodal Community Intervention program to prevent suicide and suicide attempt in Japan, NOCOMIT-J

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Yuriko

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To respond to the rapid surge in the incidence of suicide in Japan, which appears to be an ongoing trend, the Japanese Multimodal Intervention Trials for Suicide Prevention (J-MISP have launched a multimodal community-based suicide prevention program, NOCOMIT-J. The primary aim of this study is to examine whether NOCOMIT-J is effective in reducing suicidal behavior in the community. Methods/DesignThis study is a community intervention trial involving seven intervention regions with accompanying control regions, all with populations of statistically sufficient size. The program focuses on building social support networks in the public health system for suicide prevention and mental health promotion, intending to reinforce human relationships in the community. The intervention program components includes a primary prevention measures of awareness campaign for the public and key personnel, secondary prevention measures for screening of, and assisting, high-risk individuals, after-care for individuals bereaved by suicide, and other measures. The intervention started in July 2006, and will continue for 3.5 years. Participants are Japanese and foreign residents living in the intervention and control regions (a total of population of 2,120,000 individuals. Discussion The present study is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the community-based suicide prevention program in the seven participating areas. Trial registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR UMIN000000460.

  15. [Recommendation for revision of the General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Tadashi; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Yoshitomo; Kawanishi, Chiaki; Saito, Toshikazu; Saito, Yukio; Motohashi, Yutaka; Yanaga, Yuriko; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Kawano, Kenji; Katsumata, Yotaro

    2012-01-01

    Since the promulgation of the Basic Act for Suicide Prevention, suicide prevention in Japan has developed rapidly. In order to further reinforce such activities, it is necessary to balance universal, selective, and indicated prevention. For the revision of the General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy, the Center for Suicide Prevention announced this recommendation with 29 societies. We hope that it will promote suicide prevention in Japan and lead to expansion of the suicide prevention network by academic organizations, NGOs, as well as local and central government.

  16. Comparison of Families with and without a Suicide Prevention Plan Following a Suicidal Attempt by a Family Member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heung-Don; Kim, Nam-Young; Gil, Hyo-wook; Jeong, Du-shin; Hong, Sae-yong

    2015-07-01

    The frequency and extent of the existence of a familial suicide prevention plan may differ across cultures. The aim of this work was, therefore, to determine how common it was for families to develop a suicide prevention plan and to compare the main measures used by families with and without such a plan, after an attempt to commit suicide was made by a member of a family living in a rural area of Korea. On the basis of the presence or absence of a familial suicide prevention plan, we compared 50 recruited families that were divided into 2 groups, with Group A (31 families) employing a familial suicide prevention plan after a suicide attempt by a family member, and Group B (19 families) not doing so. The strategy that was employed most frequently to prevent a reoccurrence among both populations was promoting communication among family members, followed by seeking psychological counseling and/or psychiatric treatment. Contrary to our expectation, the economic burden from medical treatment after a suicide attempt did not influence the establishment of a familial suicide prevention plan. It is a pressing social issue that 38% (19 of 50) of families in this study did not employ a familial suicide prevention plan, even after a family member had attempted suicide. Regional suicide prevention centers and/or health authorities should pay particular attention to these patients and their families.

  17. Prevention of suicide: police powers, parliamentary intent and judicial interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Danuta

    2009-05-01

    While in most countries suicide is no longer a crime, it is also acknowledged that the state has an interest in the preservation of human life, the prevention of suicide, and the protection of vulnerable persons from harming themselves. In a civil, secular and democratic society, however, the public law principle of state protective powers has to be balanced against the private law principle of personal autonomy (personal self-determination). Under the doctrine of autonomy, competent adults of sound mind can make legally binding voluntary choices, including the so-called "death-choice" (refusal of life-sustaining or life-prolonging treatment as well as suicide). To add to the complexity, whereas the powers of the state in relation to suicide and its prevention have been codified, the concepts of personal autonomy and personal liberty are grounded in common law. Kirkland-Veenstra v Stuart [2008] Aust Torts Reports 81-936; [2008] VSCA 32, which is at present being considered by the High Court of Australia, exemplifies tensions that arise in the suicide-prevention area of jurisprudence. This article explores the powers and duties of police officers in relation to suicide prevention and the notion of mental illness by reference to the Kirkland-Veenstra case, the relevant statutory framework and the common law.

  18. A systematic review of psychosocial suicide prevention interventions for youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calear, Alison L; Christensen, Helen; Freeman, Alexander; Fenton, Katherine; Busby Grant, Janie; van Spijker, Bregje; Donker, Tara

    2016-05-01

    Youth suicide is a significant public health problem. A systematic review was conducted to examine the effectiveness of school, community and healthcare-based interventions in reducing and preventing suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and deliberate self-harm in young people aged 12-25 years. PsycInfo, PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched to the end of December 2014 to identify randomised controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for youth suicide. In total, 13,747 abstracts were identified and screened for inclusion in a larger database. Of these, 29 papers describing 28 trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the current review. The results of the review indicated that just over half of the programs identified had a significant effect on suicidal ideation (Cohen's d = 0.16-3.01), suicide attempts (phi = 0.04-0.38) or deliberate self-harm (phi = 0.29-0.33; d = 0.42). The current review provides preliminary support for the implementation of universal and targeted interventions in all settings, using a diverse range of psychosocial approaches. Further quality research is needed to strengthen the evidence-base for suicide prevention programs in this population. In particular, the development of universal school-based interventions is promising given the potential reach of such an approach.

  19. Willingness to pay for suicide prevention in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueki, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to establish willingness to pay for suicide prevention among taxpayers in Japan. We conducted an internet-based questionnaire survey using a double-bounded dichotomous choice contingent valuation, and analyzed data for 956 participants. The median willingness to pay to reduce the mortality risk from suicide by 25% was JPY 1,572 ($13.67 USD). Being married was significantly associated with willingness to pay. The willingness to pay to reduce the mortality risk from suicide may be lower than that to reduce other mortality risks such as traffic accidents.

  20. [Out of hopelessness--problem solving training in suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perczel Forintos, Dóra; Póos, Judit

    2008-01-01

    Psychological studies have great importance in suicide prevention since psychological factors belong to the modifiable risk factors in suicide. These are the negative cognitive triad and hopelessness which are related to vague, over-generalized autobiographical memory and lead to poor problem solving abilities. In this paper we review the most relevant clinical psychology studies and models such as the cognitive model of suicide as well as the entrapment theory by Williams (2004). In the second part we describe the frequently used method of problem solving training/therapy which can be used in either individual or group format. We hope that the problem solving skill training will soon become a part of suicide prevention in Hungary also, since short,focused and evidence based interventions are much needed in psychiatric care.

  1. Literature Review of Military Related Suicide Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display...19a. NAME OF RESONSIBLE PERSON Dr Steve Bullock a. REPORT Unclassified b. ABSTRACT Unclassified c. THIS PAGE Unclassified 19b...Litts DA, Talcott GW, Feig JC, Caine ED. Risk of Suicide and Related Adverse Outcomes After Exposure to a Suicide Prevention Programme in the US Air

  2. A Systematic Assessment of Smartphone Tools for Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Mark Erik; Nicholas, Jennifer; Christensen, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death globally, and there has been a rapid growth in the use of new technologies such as mobile health applications (apps) to help identify and support those at risk. However, it is not known whether these apps are evidence-based, or indeed contain potentially harmful content. This review examines the concordance of features in publicly available apps with current scientific evidence of effective suicide prevention strategies. Apps referring to suicide or deliberate self-harm (DSH) were identified on the Android and iOS app stores. Systematic review methodology was employed to screen and review app content. App features were labelled using a coding scheme that reflected the broad range of evidence-based medical and population-based suicide prevention interventions. Best-practice for suicide prevention was based upon a World Health Organization report and supplemented by other reviews of the literature. One hundred and twenty-three apps referring to suicide were identified and downloaded for full review, 49 of which were found to contain at least one interactive suicide prevention feature. Most apps focused on obtaining support from friends and family (n = 27) and safety planning (n = 14). Of the different suicide prevention strategies contained within the apps, the strongest evidence in the literature was found for facilitating access to crisis support (n = 13). All reviewed apps contained at least one strategy that was broadly consistent with the evidence base or best-practice guidelines. Apps tended to focus on a single suicide prevention strategy (mean = 1.1), although safety plan apps provided the opportunity to provide a greater number of techniques (mean = 3.9). Potentially harmful content, such as listing lethal access to means or encouraging risky behaviour in a crisis, was also identified. Many suicide prevention apps are available, some of which provide elements of best practice, but none that provide comprehensive evidence

  3. A Systematic Assessment of Smartphone Tools for Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Mark Erik; Nicholas, Jennifer; Christensen, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background Suicide is a leading cause of death globally, and there has been a rapid growth in the use of new technologies such as mobile health applications (apps) to help identify and support those at risk. However, it is not known whether these apps are evidence-based, or indeed contain potentially harmful content. This review examines the concordance of features in publicly available apps with current scientific evidence of effective suicide prevention strategies. Methods Apps referring to suicide or deliberate self-harm (DSH) were identified on the Android and iOS app stores. Systematic review methodology was employed to screen and review app content. App features were labelled using a coding scheme that reflected the broad range of evidence-based medical and population-based suicide prevention interventions. Best-practice for suicide prevention was based upon a World Health Organization report and supplemented by other reviews of the literature. Results One hundred and twenty-three apps referring to suicide were identified and downloaded for full review, 49 of which were found to contain at least one interactive suicide prevention feature. Most apps focused on obtaining support from friends and family (n = 27) and safety planning (n = 14). Of the different suicide prevention strategies contained within the apps, the strongest evidence in the literature was found for facilitating access to crisis support (n = 13). All reviewed apps contained at least one strategy that was broadly consistent with the evidence base or best-practice guidelines. Apps tended to focus on a single suicide prevention strategy (mean = 1.1), although safety plan apps provided the opportunity to provide a greater number of techniques (mean = 3.9). Potentially harmful content, such as listing lethal access to means or encouraging risky behaviour in a crisis, was also identified. Discussion Many suicide prevention apps are available, some of which provide elements of best practice, but none

  4. Campus suicide prevention: bridging paradigms and forging partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, David J; Denmark, Adryon Burton

    2012-01-01

    Colleges and universities are increasingly recognizing the need to expand suicide-prevention efforts beyond the standard, clinical-intervention paradigm of suicide prevention, which relies on referral to, and treatment by, mental health services. These services frequently struggle, however, to provide effective, comprehensive care. After reviewing findings that support the need to adopt a broader, problem-focused paradigm, the article provides a framework for bridging this paradigm with the clinical-intervention approach and for conceptualizing a full continuum of preventive interventions. For each level of intervention (ranging from the individual to the ecological), we describe the goals and methods used, and provide examples to illustrate the role of psychiatrists and other campus mental health providers in the collaborative partnerships that must form to support a comprehensive, campus-wide suicide-prevention strategy.

  5. Suicide Prevention among High School Students: Evaluation of a Nonrandomized Trial of a Multi-Stage Suicide Screening Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torcasso, Gina; Hilt, Lori M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Suicide is a leading cause of death among youth. Suicide screening programs aim to identify mental health issues and prevent death by suicide. Objective: The present study evaluated outcomes of a multi-stage screening program implemented over 3 school years in a moderately-sized Midwestern high school. Methods: One hundred ninety-three…

  6. Suicide Prevention among High School Students: Evaluation of a Nonrandomized Trial of a Multi-Stage Suicide Screening Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torcasso, Gina; Hilt, Lori M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Suicide is a leading cause of death among youth. Suicide screening programs aim to identify mental health issues and prevent death by suicide. Objective: The present study evaluated outcomes of a multi-stage screening program implemented over 3 school years in a moderately-sized Midwestern high school. Methods: One hundred ninety-three…

  7. Increased Suicides in the United States Army: Improving the Effectiveness of the US Army’s Suicide Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    a major cause of suicide, as expressed by an individual who suffered from it to the extent that he made a compulsive decision that almost cost him...Has the US Army Suicide Prevention Program changed the rate (either increased or decreased) of suicide in terms of more “ buy in” from senior leadership

  8. Exposure to a Mnemonic Interferes with Recall of Suicide Warning Signs in a Community-Based Suicide Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Craig J.; Steiner-Pappalardo, Nicole; Rudd, M. David

    2009-01-01

    The incremental impact of adding a mnemonic to remember suicide warning signs to the Air Force Suicide Prevention Program (AFSPP) community awareness briefing was investigated with a sample of young, junior-enlisted airmen. Participants in the standard briefing significantly increased their ability to list suicide warning signs and improved…

  9. Suicide prevention strategies in Japan: a 15-year review (1998-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Tadashi; Yamauchi, Takashi; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Kodaka, Manami; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Kawano, Kenji; Katsumata, Yotaro; Fujimori, Maiko; Hisanaga, Ayaka; Takahashi, Yoshitomo

    2015-02-01

    Suicide is a global public health problem and solutions to it can be found only through a global dialog. The suicide rate in Japan has been alarming, but Japan has made substantial efforts to reduce this rate, making prevention a high priority. This report reviews the developmental stages of a comprehensive policy of suicide prevention in Japan from 1998 to 2013. Our review suggests that suicide prevention activities were facilitated by the 2006 Basic Act for Suicide Prevention and the 2007 General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy. Along with the establishment of a Special Fund program for local governments, the Basic Act and General Principles led to the development of a comprehensive and multi-sector approach to suicide prevention. Suicide rates in Japan, especially among middle-aged men, decreased consistently after 2009, suggesting that the initiatives were effective. Continuous monitoring is needed to evaluate Japan's suicide prevention policy.

  10. Why Do We Report Suicides and How Can We Facilitate Suicide Prevention Efforts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qijin; Fu, King-wa; Caine, Eric; Yip, Paul S. F.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Hong Kong news media report suicide-related events more frequently and sensationally than Western countries. Little is known about Hong Kong media professionals’ experiences and thoughts about such reporting. Aims To understand Hong Kong media professionals’ experiences and perceptions of suicide reporting and whether the news media can be better engaged into suicide prevention. Method We conducted three focus groups of journalists from both the Cantonese and English language news media. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Results We discerned three rationales from participants regarding their intense coverage of suicide-related events: (1) satisfying commercial competitiveness, (2) addressing social problems, and (3) responding to readers’ interests. The first rationale was a dominant and vigorous motivating factor, and often influenced suicide reporting among local Cantonese media. Media professionals recommended engagement strategies targeted at frontline journalists, media managers, and general media consumers. Conclusion We see potential to involve news media professionals in Hong Kong as working partners in suicide prevention. To succeed, this effort requires engagement in a proactive, consistent, and sustained fashion. PMID:24322824

  11. [Can we consider the journalist an actor in suicide prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notredame, C-E; Pauwels, N; Vaiva, G; Danel, T; Walter, M

    2016-10-01

    After more than 50 years of dedicated research, media coverage of suicide is now well known to have a significant influence on the suicide epidemiology. This influence is supposed to result from two opposite effects. The Werther effect (WE) refers to the robust increase of suicide rates following the publication of a suicide story. This specific kind of mass cluster implies a suggestion process, i.e. imitation of the depicted death by vulnerable persons. In contract, the preventive potential of medias has been labeled the "Papageno effect" (PE). Although more recently discovered and far less known, PE predicts that journalists can help prevent suicidal behaviors beyond a simple WE reduction. Because PE and WE directly bridge journalistic productions to suicidal events, several national and international health organisms (including the World Health Organization) started to see the media as new prevention opportunities. In this paper, we intend to assess the extent to which journalists can be considered as public health actors in the specific field of suicide prevention. Based on a critical review of the so-called Media effect studies, we explore the opportunities, limits and constraints of collaborating with media professionals for public health actions. For that purpose, we focus on the main strategy employed so far, namely providing recommendations for more cautious coverage of suicide. An overview of the efficacy of these recommendations serves not only as a starting point for understanding how public health and journalistic perspectives can confront, but also how they can be combined in a fertile way. Numerous suicide prevention organisms developed strategies in order to assist journalists in reporting suicide stories in a safer way. As a formal support to these strategies, around 30 national or international guides have been produced around the word, with the shared aim of reducing WE and, eventually, promoting PE. The recommendations about articles' style

  12. [Discontinuation of depression treatment from the perspective of suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    It is assumed that discontinuation of treatment for depression may increase the risk of suicide. A population-based register study in Denmark did not find a lower risk among people over age 50 who followed treatment in comparison with those who discontinued treatment with antidepressants at an early stage. This result, however, does not allow us to think superficially that early discontinuation of treatment does not increase the risk of suicide. It is because the study has limitations without information of such as psychiatric diagnoses, severity of the depressed state, and reasons of discontinuation. It is safe for clinicians to aim at preventing discontinuation of treatment. Particularly, in Japan and South Korea where there is a sociocultural climate of tolerability for suicide, suicide can occur in milder depressed state and discontinuation of treatment should be taken more seriously than in Western countries.

  13. Effects of educating local government officers and healthcare and welfare professionals in suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniwa, Isao; Kawanishi, Chiaki; Suda, Akira; Hirayasu, Yoshio

    2012-03-01

    Suicide is a major public health issue. In Japan, local governments are responsible for suicide prevention, and local government officers are therefore expected to act as gatekeepers for suicide prevention. In this study, through a questionnaire survey, the authors examined the current knowledge and attitudes concerning suicide prevention among local government officers and healthcare and welfare professionals, and the effects of providing suicide prevention education on their knowledge of and attitudes toward suicide and its prevention. One hundred eighty-three local government officers and 432 healthcare/welfare professionals completed the survey before and after a single education session. Before the session, the local government officers and healthcare/welfare professionals showed mainly positive attitudes toward suicide prevention efforts, with little difference between the two groups. After the training, knowledge and attitudes were further improved for most questionnaire items. Respondents with one or more experiences of suicide prevention training showed significantly more knowledge and positive attitudes before the training than those with no such experience. Moreover, knowledge of depression and having a sympathetic attitude were found to be especially associated with the overall attitude that "suicide can be prevented". Training in suicide prevention was shown to be effective in promoting appropriate knowledge and attitudes among local government officers and healthcare/welfare professionals who are gatekeepers for preventing suicide. Our findings confirm the importance of suicide prevention education, and will contribute to creating a standard educational program on suicide prevention in Japan.

  14. Effects of Educating Local Government Officers and Healthcare and Welfare Professionals in Suicide Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Hirayasu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is a major public health issue. In Japan, local governments are responsible for suicide prevention, and local government officers are therefore expected to act as gatekeepers for suicide prevention. In this study, through a questionnaire survey, the authors examined the current knowledge and attitudes concerning suicide prevention among local government officers and healthcare and welfare professionals, and the effects of providing suicide prevention education on their knowledge of and attitudes toward suicide and its prevention. One hundred eighty-three local government officers and 432 healthcare/welfare professionals completed the survey before and after a single education session. Before the session, the local government officers and healthcare/welfare professionals showed mainly positive attitudes toward suicide prevention efforts, with little difference between the two groups. After the training, knowledge and attitudes were further improved for most questionnaire items. Respondents with one or more experiences of suicide prevention training showed significantly more knowledge and positive attitudes before the training than those with no such experience. Moreover, knowledge of depression and having a sympathetic attitude were found to be especially associated with the overall attitude that “suicide can be prevented”. Training in suicide prevention was shown to be effective in promoting appropriate knowledge and attitudes among local government officers and healthcare/welfare professionals who are gatekeepers for preventing suicide. Our findings confirm the importance of suicide prevention education, and will contribute to creating a standard educational program on suicide prevention in Japan.

  15. [Mental Health and Prevention of Suicide in Japanese Workplaces Based on a Pilot Study of Job Stress and Suicide Ideation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakagami, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese suicide rate is still high compared with other countries. Worker suicide especially leads to marked social and economic losses and severely affects the bereaved. There is an urgent need to devise a system to prevent suicide at a very early stage. Generally, it is considered very difficult to intervene and prevent suicide in cases in which individuals kill themselves suddenly. However, according to some studies on suicide attempts, even those who killed themselves suddenly had experienced some kind of conflict or a desire to die for a long period. Therefore, it is essential to analyze the risk factors at an early stage when individuals have vague thoughts of suicide. This will help reduce the risk of suicide in such cases. In this article, I first survey the data related to workers' mental health in Japan. Second, I introduce the results of our pilot study in which we investigated mental health issues related to suicide among workers who have taken leave from work for more than two months. In this study, workers who do not exhibit help-seeking behavior are suggested to be a high-risk group for suicide. It is speculated that this behavior is related to several factors such as the sex, age, social status, education, personal stigma, and perceived stigma. Therefore, we must focus on both clinical and social solutions for the prevention of suicide. I believe that psychiatrists will come to play a more important role as liaisons between workplaces and social resources for the prevention of suicide.

  16. Epidemiology, risk factors, intervention, and prevention of adolescent suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosewater, K M; Burr, B H

    1998-08-01

    Increasing rates of adolescent suicide are a significant health concern and the third leading cause of death for this age group. Recent research into psychiatric, gender-related, family, cultural and neurobiologic risk factors is reviewed. The effects of suicide exposure and media influences are also examined. Although many risk factors have been identified, the application of this knowledge to clinical practice requires further study. The limited number of studies on prevention and intervention strategies are discussed. High rates of nonadherence to follow-up remain problematic. More research is needed to develop appropriate treatments, prevention programs and outcome measures.

  17. Suicide prevention program for the elderly: the experience in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yutaka

    2004-03-01

    In this article, the author describes a suicide prevention program for the elderly in Japan carried out in a small town, Nagawamachi, Aomori. Because of the recent sharp increase in this town in the rate of suicides, we started to develop a suicide prevention program with the goal of trying to detect depression in its early stages. At first we adopted various questionnaires and used structured interviews, and then developed a screener for depression. Screening is an important part of our suicide prevention program, because elderly who are suicidal often do not recognize their distress is a treatable medical condition, partly due to a negative image of mental illness, and most of them do not seek medical help. The author underscores the importance of educational programs to address how to recognize the symptoms of depression and to develop a community network for the elderly to communicate with locals and support each other. It is also important to focus on a social schema to produce a society that respects "being" and not just "doing".

  18. Suicide Prevention in Social Work Education: How Prepared Are Social Work Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Philip J.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Sharpe, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of suicide suggests social workers will encounter clients at risk for suicide, but research shows social workers receive little to no training on suicide and suicide prevention and feel unprepared to work effectively with clients at risk. Baseline results from a randomized intervention study of the Question, Persuade, and Refer…

  19. Suicide Prevention in Social Work Education: How Prepared Are Social Work Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Philip J.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Sharpe, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of suicide suggests social workers will encounter clients at risk for suicide, but research shows social workers receive little to no training on suicide and suicide prevention and feel unprepared to work effectively with clients at risk. Baseline results from a randomized intervention study of the Question, Persuade, and Refer…

  20. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Suicide Prevention (CBT-SP): Treatment Model, Feasibility, and Acceptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Barbara; Brown, Gregory; Brent, David A.; Wells, Karen; Poling, Kim; Curry, John; Kennard, Betsy D.; Wagner, Ann; Cwik, Mary F.; Klomek, Anat Brunstein; Goldstein, Tina; Vitiello, Benedetto; Barnett, Shannon; Daniel, Stephanie; Hughes, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the elements of a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for suicide prevention (CBT-SP) and to report its feasibility in preventing the recurrence of suicidal behavior in adolescents who have recently attempted suicide. Method: The CBT-SP was developed using a risk reduction and relapse prevention approach and…

  1. Hope and Resilience - Suicide Prevention in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Cecilia Petrine; Larsen, Christina Viskum Lytken

    Konference rapport fra seminaret "Hope and Resilience in Suicide Prevention", der blev afholdt i Nuuk, november 2009. Rapporten beskriver baggrunden for seminaret og indeholder referater af oplæg fra seminaret givet af forskere, praktikere og unge. Et væsentligt indhold i rapporten er desuden...

  2. Preventing Suicide: A Mission Too Big to Fail

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Preventing Suicide: A Mission Too Big to Fail by Ms. Gloria Duck Lieutenant Colonel Timothy Holman Ms. Jennifer Jessup...Lieutenant Colonel Timothy Holman United States Army Ms. Jennifer Jessup Department of Veterans Affairs Civilian Colonel Keith...Gloria Duck Department of the Army Civilian Lieutenant Colonel Timothy Holman United States Army Ms. Jennifer Jessup Department of Veterans Affairs

  3. The School's Role in the Prevention of Youth Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Brenda Robinson

    1995-01-01

    Describes three basic components of a comprehensive suicide intervention program in the school setting: prevention, intervention, and postvention. Addresses the necessity for collaboration among staff in a successful program, emphasizing the role of school social worker and school counselor. Discusses confidentiality with particular attention to…

  4. Sociopsychological factors relating to suicide prevention in a Japanese rural community: coping behaviors and attitudes toward depression and suicidal ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Shinji; Tanaka, Eriko; Neichi, Keiko; Sato, Kyoko; Ono, Yutaka

    2006-12-01

    In response to the rise in suicide in Japan since 1998, some suicide prevention measures in local communities have been put into action. However, in the previous suicide prevention measures, sociopsychological factors were not fully taken into consideration. In the present study, the authors surveyed sociopsychological factors relating to suicide and depression (i.e. people's coping behavior and thoughts about depression and suicidal ideation, and their attitudes toward suicide and psychiatric treatment), and their differences in gender and generations. The present study was conducted in a rural area of Japan (Town A), where the suicide rate is much higher than the national average. The authors randomly selected 10% of the residents (i.e. 532 people) aged between 40 and 79 years on the basis of resident registration. Health promotion volunteers in Town A visited these 532 people individually, distributed questionnaires, and asked them to anonymously answer the questionnaire within 4 weeks. Data from 450 residents (193 men, 257 women) were analyzed in the present study. Although there were few gender differences, some significant differences were found between the younger (40-59 years) and older (60-79 years) residents. Generally, the younger were more pessimistic about their mental health than the elderly. It was also noteworthy that about 10% of the people thought that it was natural for them to have suicidal ideation, and about 18% reported that they had experienced suicidal ideation. Some suggestions were given to provide more effective suicide prevention measures.

  5. The Opinions of GP's Patients About Suicide, Assisted Suicide, Euthanasia, and Suicide Prevention: An Italian Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Stefano Zanone; Vicentini, Silvia; Siviero, Francesca; Grossi, Antonello; Toniolo, Emanuele; Baldo, Vincenzo; De Leo, Diego

    2015-08-01

    A survey about opinions on end-of-life issues of a population represented by 1,171 people in the waiting room of general practitioners' surgeries was conducted in a province of northern Italy. Most subjects did not consider suicide as a reasonable option even in cases of a serious and incurable disease. Moreover, subjects did not consider euthanasia as a possible option either; however, they did express an opposite attitude when considering euthanasia in a third-person perspective. People with a personal history of suicidal behavior appear to present as a different population, overall expressing more open attitudes.

  6. Teaching medical professionals and trainees about adolescent suicide prevention: five key problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Leo

    2012-01-01

    Predicting and preventing suicide represent very difficult challenges for clinicians. The awareness of adolescent suicide as a major social and medical problem has increased over the past years. However, many health care professionals who have frequent contact with adolescents are not sufficiently trained in suicide evaluation techniques and approaches to adolescents with suicidal behavior. Suicide prevention efforts among adolescents are restricted by the fact that there are five key problems related to the evaluation and management of suicidality in adolescents: 1. Many clinicians underestimate the importance of the problem of adolescent suicidal behavior and underestimate its prevalence. 2. There is a misconception that direct questioning of adolescents about suicidality is sufficient to evaluate suicide risk. 3. Another misconception is that adolescents with non-psychiatric illnesses do not need to be evaluated for suicidality. 4. Many clinicians do not know about or underestimate the role of contagion in adolescent suicidal behavior. 5. There is a mistaken belief that adolescent males are at lower suicide risk than adolescent females. Educating medical professionals and trainees about the warning signs and symptoms of adolescent suicide and providing them with tools to recognize, evaluate, and manage suicidal patients represent a promising approach to adolescent suicide prevention.

  7. Resolving Ethical Dilemmas in Suicide Prevention: The Case of Telephone Helpline Rescue Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishara, Brian L.; Weisstub, David N.

    2010-01-01

    The ethical basis of suicide prevention is illustrated by contrasting helpline emergency rescue policies of the Samaritans and the AAS and the U.S. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline network. We contrast moralist, relativist, and libertarian ethical premises and question whether suicide can be rational. Samaritans respect a caller's right to…

  8. Building and Maintaining an Effective Campus-Wide Coalition for Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslow, Nadine J.; Garcia-Williams, Amanda; Moffitt, Lauren; McLeod, Mark; Zesiger, Heather; Ammirati, Rachel; Berg, John P.; McIntosh, Belinda J.

    2012-01-01

    Preventing suicide is a commonly shared priority among college administrators, faculty, staff, students, and family members. Coalitions are popular health promotion mechanisms for solving community-wide problems and are valuable in campus-wide suicide prevention efforts. This article provides an example of an effective suicide prevention…

  9. Relationship of optimism and suicidal ideation in three groups of patients at varying levels of suicide risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jeff C; Boehm, Julia K; Beach, Scott R; Beale, Eleanor E; DuBois, Christina M; Healy, Brian C

    2016-06-01

    Optimism has been associated with reduced suicidal ideation, but there have been few studies in patients at high suicide risk. We analyzed data from three study populations (total N = 319) with elevated risk of suicide: (1) patients with a recent acute cardiovascular event, (2) patients hospitalized for heart disease who had depression or an anxiety disorder, and (3) patients psychiatrically hospitalized for suicidal ideation or following a suicide attempt. For each study we analyzed the association between optimism (measured by the Life-Orientation Test-Revised) and suicidal ideation, and then completed an exploratory random effects meta-analysis of the findings to synthesize this data. The meta-analysis of the three studies showed that higher levels of self-reported optimism were associated with a lower likelihood of suicidal ideation (odds ratio [OR] = .89, 95% confidence interval [CI] = .85-.95, z = 3.94, p optimism (OR = .84, 95% CI = .76-.92, z = 3.57, p optimism may be associated with a lower risk of suicidal ideation, above and beyond the effects of depressive symptoms, for a wide range of patients with clinical conditions that place them at elevated risk for suicide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Suicide Prevention in College Students: A Collaborative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Rodríguez, María Del C; Huertas, Ivonne Bayron

    2013-01-01

    Described by Durkheim (1966) as the crudest expression of the social phenomena, suicide is of interest to clinicians, academics and researchers. Within the academic context, this issue has to be addressed and prevented. We are interested in sharing the process of participative action that led to the creation of a Suicide Prevention Program (SPP) for college students. Based on knowledge that was generated through a collaborative effort among all sectors of the academic community, we developed a prevention campaign that is culturally sensitive to our university's environment. This campaign is directed towards overcoming the stigma of seeking help and is characterized by promoting a sense of wellbeing in a holistic manner, paying attention not only to the individual, but also to elements of their sociocultural environment.

  11. A scoping review of Indigenous suicide prevention in circumpolar regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Redvers

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suicide is a serious public health challenge in circumpolar regions, especially among Indigenous youth. Indigenous communities, government agencies and health care providers are making concerted efforts to reduce the burden of suicide and strengthen protective factors for individuals, families and communities. The persistence of suicide has made it clear that more needs to be done. Objective: Our aim was to undertake a scoping review of the peer-reviewed literature on suicide prevention and interventions in Indigenous communities across the circumpolar north. Our objective was to determine the extent and types of interventions that have been reported during past decade. We want to use this knowledge to support community initiative and inform intervention development and evaluation. Design: We conducted a scoping review of online databases to identify studies published between 2004 and 2014. We included articles that described interventions in differentiated circumpolar Indigenous populations and provided evaluation data. We retained grey literature publications for comparative reference. Results: Our search identified 95 articles that focused on suicide in distinct circumpolar Indigenous populations; 19 articles discussed specific suicide-related interventions and 7 of these described program evaluation methods and results in detail. The majority of publications on specific interventions were found in North American countries. The majority of prevention or intervention documentation was found in supporting grey literature sources. Conclusion: Despite widespread concern about suicide in the circumpolar world and active community efforts to promote resilience and mental well-being, we found few recorded programs or initiatives documented in the peer-reviewed literature, and even fewer focusing specifically on youth intervention. The interventions described in the studies we found had diverse program designs and content, and used varied

  12. Culturally Grounded Stress Reduction and Suicide Prevention for African American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, W LaVome; Case, Mary H; Whipple, Christopher R; Gooden, Adia S; Lopez-Tamayo, Roberto; Lambert, Sharon F; Jason, Leonard A

    2016-06-01

    Suicide is an often-overlooked manifestation of violence among African American youth that has become more prevalent in the last two decades. This article reports on the process used to culturally adapt a cognitive-behavioral coping with stress prevention intervention for African American adolescents. We implemented this adapted school-based suicide prevention intervention with 758 African American 9(th,) 10(th) and 11(th) grade students at four high schools in a large Midwestern city. The findings presented are preliminary. The adolescents in this sample endorsed high levels of suicide risk, with females endorsing significantly more suicide risk than males. Those receiving the prevention intervention evidenced an 86% relative suicide risk reduction, compared to the standard care control participants. The presented model of adaptation and resulting culturally-grounded suicide prevention intervention significantly reduced suicide risk among African American adolescents. Clinical, research and policy implications are discussed.

  13. The Influence of Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training on Resident Assistants' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Martin A. Swanbrow; Drum, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the mental health influence on resident assistants associated with their training in suicide prevention and their subsequent role as campus mental health gatekeepers. Despite considerable prior personal experience with their own suicidal thinking as well as with others who have thoughts of suicide, a multiple regression…

  14. Campus Suicide Prevention and Intervention: Putting Best Practice Policy into Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Cheryl A.; Mandrusiak, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Findings from biannual American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment surveys have highlighted the prevalence of depression, suicidal ideation, and attempted suicides on Canadian university campuses and the need for comprehensive suicide prevention programs. This article explores how one large western Canadian university…

  15. The Influence of Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training on Resident Assistants' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Martin A. Swanbrow; Drum, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the mental health influence on resident assistants associated with their training in suicide prevention and their subsequent role as campus mental health gatekeepers. Despite considerable prior personal experience with their own suicidal thinking as well as with others who have thoughts of suicide, a multiple regression…

  16. Alberta's Suicide Prevention Training Programs: A Retrospective Comparison with Rothman's Developmental Research Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, R. F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared Rothman's social research and development (R&D) method with procedure used to develop Suicide Prevention Training Programs in Alberta, Canada. Retrospective review found that Alberta method closely paralleled phases of Rothman's model and that transformation of knowledge about suicide into widely disseminated suicide prevention…

  17. Long-Term Outcomes for the Promoting CARE Suicide Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooven, Carole; Herting, Jerald R.; Snedker, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To provide a long-term look at suicide risk from adolescence to young adulthood for former participants in Promoting CARE, an indicated suicide prevention program. Methods: Five hundred ninety-three suicide-vulnerable high school youth were involved in a long-term follow-up study. Latent class growth models identify patterns of change…

  18. Long-Term Outcomes for the Promoting CARE Suicide Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooven, Carole; Herting, Jerald R.; Snedker, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To provide a long-term look at suicide risk from adolescence to young adulthood for former participants in Promoting CARE, an indicated suicide prevention program. Methods: Five hundred ninety-three suicide-vulnerable high school youth were involved in a long-term follow-up study. Latent class growth models identify patterns of change…

  19. The role of nonprofessional volunteers in a Suicide Prevention Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, S M; Farberow, N L; Litman, R E; Shneidman, E S

    1968-08-01

    The procedures in the selection, training and supervision of 10 nonprofessional volunteers, to provide direct therapeutic crisis services to patients in a Suicide Prevention Center are described. One year's experience indicates a high degree of proficiency achieved by the volunteer in the handling of suicidal crises. The volunteers' reactions to the program are reported. Significant problems for the agency emerged in reference to precipitous increase in size of staff communication, and for the volunteer, in stimulation of problems of identity and selfconcept. The comments are limited to agency situations involving the use of nonprofessional volunteers in regular collaboration with a professional staff. Other models, such as entirely volunteer staffed groups, must be evaluated separately.

  20. The efficacy of telephonic follow up in prevention of suicidal reattempt in patients with suicide attempt history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ghafur Mousavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: prevention of suicide is one of priority world health. Suicide is one of the preventable causes of death. The aim of this study is evaluation of telephone follow up on suicide reattempt. Materials and Methods : This randomized controlled clinical trial is a prospective study which has been done in Noor Hospital of Isfahan-Iran, at 2010. 139 patients who have suicide attempt history divided in one of two groups, randomly, 70 patients in" treatment as usual (TAU" and 69 patients in "brief interventional control (BIC. Seven telephone contact with BIC group patients have been done "during six months" and two questionnaires have been filled in each session. The data has been analyzed by descriptive and Chi-square test, under SPSS. Results : No significant differences of suicide reattempt has been found between two groups (P = 0.18, but significant reduction in frequency of suicidal thoughts (P = 0.007 and increase in hope at life (P = 0.001 was shown in intervention group. Conclusion : Telephones follow up in patients with suicide history decrease suicidal thought frequency" and increase hope in life, significantly.

  1. A ‘systems’ approach to suicide prevention: radical change or doing the same things better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Fitzpatrick

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is a significant public health concern. Continued high suicide rates, coupled with emerging international evidence, have led to the development of a ‘systems’ approach to suicide prevention, which is now being trialled as part of a proposed Suicide Prevention Framework for NSW (New South Wales, Australia. The Framework replicates successful international approaches. It is organised around nine components, ranging from individual to population-level approaches, to improve coordination and integration of existing services. If implemented fully, the Framework may lead to a significant reduction in suicide. However, to ensure its long-term success, we must attend to underlying structures within the system and their interrelationships. Such an approach will also ensure that policy makers and local suicide prevention action groups, particularly in rural areas, are able to respond to local challenges and incorporate multiple perspectives into their practice, including evidence for the broader social determinants of suicide.

  2. Science from evaluation: testing hypotheses about differential effects of three youth-focused suicide prevention trainings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Daniel; Del Quest, Aisling

    2015-01-01

    As part of an evaluation component of a youth suicide prevention, a quasi-experimental repeated measures design tested hypotheses about two brief suicide prevention gatekeeper trainings (Question, Persuade, Refer [QPR] and RESPONSE) and one longer suicide intervention skills training (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training [ASIST]). All three trainings showed large changes in prevention attitudes and self-efficacy, largely maintained at follow-up. ASIST trainees had large increases in asking at-risk youth about suicide at follow-up. Convergent with other research, modeling and role-play in training are crucial to increased prevention behaviors. Practice and research implications are discussed, including social work roles in suicide prevention and research.

  3. Promising strategies for advancement in knowledge of suicide risk factors and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, Jitender; Isaak, Corinne; Katz, Laurence Y; Bolton, James; Enns, Murray W; Stein, Murray B

    2014-09-01

    Suicide is an important public health problem. Although there have been advances in our knowledge of suicide, gaps remain in knowledge about suicide risk factors and prevention. Here, we discuss research pathways that have the potential to rapidly advance knowledge in suicide risk assessment and reduction of suicide deaths over the next decade. We provide a concise overview of the methodologic approaches that have the capacity to rapidly increase knowledge and change practice, which have been successful in past work in psychiatry and other areas of medicine. We suggest three specific pathways to advance knowledge of suicide risk factors and prevention. First, analysis of large-scale epidemiologic surveys and administrative data sets can advance the understanding of suicide. Second, given the low base rate of suicide, there is a need for networks/consortia of investigators in the field of suicide prevention. Such consortia have the capacity to analyze existing epidemiologic data sets, create multi-site cohort studies of high-risk groups to increase knowledge of biological and other risk factors, and create a platform for multi-site clinical trials. Third, partnerships with policymakers and researchers would facilitate careful scientific evaluation of policies and programs aimed at reducing suicide. Suicide intervention policies are often multifaceted, expensive, and rarely evaluated. Using quasi-experimental methods or sophisticated analytic strategies such as propensity score-matching techniques, the impact of large-scale interventions on suicide can be evaluated. Furthermore, such partnerships between policymakers and researchers can lead to the design and support of prospective RCTs (e.g., cluster randomized trials, stepped wedge designs, waiting list designs) in high-risk groups (e.g., people with a history of suicide attempts, multi-axial comorbidity, and offspring of people who have died by suicide). These research pathways could lead to rapid knowledge uptake

  4. [The national strategies for suicide prevention by the United Nation/World Health Organization and the present situation of suicide in the East Asia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshitomo; Takahashi, Sho; Imamura, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Rira

    2014-01-01

    We discussed "Prevention of suicide: Guidelines for the formulation and implementation of national strategies" formulated by the United Nations and the World Health Organization in 1996 and the present situation of suicide in the East Asia. Although much public attention has been paid to a high suicide rate of Japan in the world, the increasing tendency of suicide rates have been found in other East Asian countries as well. For example the Republic of Korea shows a recent suicide rate higher than 30 per 100,000, which surpasses the suicide rate of Japan. Facing the fact, various measures for suicide prevention have been conducted. The UN guidelines for suicide prevention point out that these strategies should be discussed to meet each country's need for more appropriate suicide prevention. The Japanese government had the Basic Law on Suicide Prevention enforced in 2006 to implement measures that society must tackle because various social factors are behind suicides. In recent years, some countries in the East Asia also show increasing suicide rates, which attract the society's serious concern. The rapid economic growth and globalization have led to personnel cut, performance-based compensation, and the widening gap between the rich and the poor and the society cannot maintain the conventional employment system. In addition, socio-economic changes have brought collapse of the original societal and familial system, which might have existed behind the increase of suicide in this region.

  5. Teachers' Perspectives on Preventing Suicide in Children and Adolescents in Schools: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Victoria; Kõlves, Kairi; De Leo, Diego

    2016-08-31

    Given the important role teachers play as gatekeepers in school suicide prevention, this study explored teachers' perspectives on what should be done to improve current suicide prevention efforts. The study, in Queensland, Australia, was part of a large-scale survey examining teachers' knowledge, attitudes and experience of suicidality. One hundred and fifteen teachers responded to an online survey question regarding their views on the requirements for school suicide prevention. Qualitative analysis identified five themes from teachers' responses: awareness and stigma reduction, support services for students, education and training, bullying and the role of social media. The results of this study provide some profound insights into teachers' perspectives on suicide and highlight the critical need for improved suicide prevention efforts in schools.

  6. Dispositional and Explanatory Style Optimism as Potential Moderators of the Relationship between Hopelessness and Suicidal Ideation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jameson K.; Conner, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that higher levels of optimism reduce the association between hopelessness and suicidal ideation, 284 college students completed self-report measures of optimism and Beck scales for hopelessness, suicidal ideation, and depression. A statistically significant interaction between hopelessness and one measure of optimism was…

  7. Suicide Postvention as Suicide Prevention: Improvement and Expansion in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Regina T. P.; Slater, Holli

    2010-01-01

    The authors asserted the need for increased postvention efforts for suicide survivors, individuals left behind to grieve the loss of a loved one by suicide, because they have an increased risk for suicide. Indeed, Shneidman (1972) asserted that suicide postvention efforts serve the dual purpose of assisting survivors through the grief process and…

  8. Suicide Postvention as Suicide Prevention: Improvement and Expansion in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Regina T. P.; Slater, Holli

    2010-01-01

    The authors asserted the need for increased postvention efforts for suicide survivors, individuals left behind to grieve the loss of a loved one by suicide, because they have an increased risk for suicide. Indeed, Shneidman (1972) asserted that suicide postvention efforts serve the dual purpose of assisting survivors through the grief process and…

  9. Suicide among animals: clues from folklore that may prevent suicidal behaviour in human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Antonio

    2005-10-01

    Knowing the most likely reasons for suicide might increase the chances to identify the early signs of suicide. Folkloric tales on suicide among animals are a possible source of such information, since people probably explain animal suicide using the same reasons they would apply to their kin. Modern naturalistic studies ave found little evidence of self-harming conduct among nonhuman species. Nevertheless, mythological accounts often report suicidal behaviour among animals. Claudius Aelian's De natura animalium, a classic in its genre, written in the 2nd century AD, reports 21 cases of suicide among animals. In Aelian's tales, the severing of social ties emerges as an important motive for suicide, together with incest and rage caused by adultery. Paying attention to the mechanisms leading to suicide described in ancient mythology may help us understand unusual and uncommon motives for suicide and the reasons people feel suicidal.

  10. Clinical Characteristics of the Suicide Attempters Who Refused to Participate in a Suicide Prevention Case Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyoung; Choi, Kyoung Ho; Oh, Youngmin; Lee, Hae-Kook; Kweon, Yong-Sil; Lee, Chung Tai; Lee, Kyoung-Uk

    2015-10-01

    Case management interventions for suicide attempters aimed at helping adjust their social life to prevent reattempts have high nonparticipation and dropout rates. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of the group who refused to participate in the suicide prevention program in Korea. A total of 489 patients with a suicide attempt who visited Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital, the Catholic University of Korea, from December 2009 to December 2013 were analyzed. All patients were divided into the participation group (n = 262) and the refusal group (n = 227) according to their participation in the case management program. Demographic and clinical characteristics of each group were examined. Results showed that the refusal group had low risks for suicide in terms of risk factors related with psychopathologies and presenting suicide behavior. That is, the refusal group had less patients with co-morbid medical illnesses and more patients with mild severity of depression compared to the participation group. However, the refusal group had more interpersonal conflict, more isolation of social integrity, and more impaired insight about suicide attempt. The results suggest that nonparticipation in the case management program may depend upon the patient's impaired insight about the riskiness of suicide and lack of social support.

  11. [30 years against suicide: a summary of our research on depression and suicide prevention between 1985 and 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihmer, Zoltán; Döme, Péter; Gonda, Xénia

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we gather and discuss the results of our workgroup on depression and suicide prevention published between 1985 and 2015. We hope that this summary will focus the interest of the scientific community on suicidology and turn the attention of decision-makers on the fact that despite of its marked decrease in the past three decades, the suicide rate in Hungary is still the second highest in the EU. So, based on expert opinion, joint action is needed in order to achieve a further decrease of suicide rate in Hungary.

  12. The Economic Cost of Suicide and Non-Fatal Suicide Behavior in the Australian Workforce and the Potential Impact of a Workplace Suicide Prevention Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchin, Irina; Doran, Christopher M

    2017-03-27

    Suicide and non-fatal suicide behavior (NFSB) are significant problems faced by most countries. The objective of this research is to quantify the economic cost of suicide and NFSB in the Australian workforce and to examine the potential impact of introducing a workplace suicide prevention intervention to reduce this burden. The analysis used the best available suicide data, a well-established costing methodology, and a proven workplace intervention. In 2014, 903 workers died by suicide, 2303 workers harmed themselves resulting in full incapacity, and 11,242 workers harmed themselves resulting in a short absence from work. The present value of the economic cost of suicide and NFSB is estimated at $6.73 billion. Our analysis suggests the economic benefit of implementing a universal workplace strategy would considerably outweigh the cost of the strategy. For every one dollar invested, the benefits would be in excess of $1.50 ($1.11-$3.07), representing a positive economic investment. All variations of the key parameter hold the positive benefit-cost ratio. Rates of suicide and NFSB are far too high in Australia and elsewhere. More needs to be done to reduce this burden. Although workplace strategies are appropriate for those employed, these interventions must be used within a multifaceted approach that reflects the complex nature of self-harming behavior.

  13. Evaluating Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) Suicide Prevention Training in a College Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Kader, Mahrin; Darrow, Sherri A.; Haggerty, Melinda Z.; Keating, Niki L.

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses short-term and long-term learning outcomes of Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) suicide prevention training in a college setting. Two hundred seventy-three participants completed pretest, posttest, and follow-up surveys regarding suicide prevention knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Results indicated: (a) increases in suicide…

  14. Expanding Capacity for Suicide Prevention: The ALIVE @ Purdue Train-the-Trainers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter Morris, Carrie A.; Taub, Deborah J.; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Miles, Nathan; Werden, Donald; Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students. One effective strategy for suicide prevention is gatekeeper training. Gatekeeper training has been described as a prevention strategy that improves detection and referral of at-risk individuals. Purdue recognized that only some of the resident assistants (RAs) were receiving this…

  15. Expanding Capacity for Suicide Prevention: The ALIVE @ Purdue Train-the-Trainers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter Morris, Carrie A.; Taub, Deborah J.; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Miles, Nathan; Werden, Donald; Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students. One effective strategy for suicide prevention is gatekeeper training. Gatekeeper training has been described as a prevention strategy that improves detection and referral of at-risk individuals. Purdue recognized that only some of the resident assistants (RAs) were receiving this…

  16. 76 FR 27384 - Agency Information Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... better understand Veterans and their families' awareness of VA's suicide prevention and mental health... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activity (Veteran Suicide Prevention Online Quantitative Surveys.... Veterans Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513. b. Veterans Family Online Survey, VA Form 10-0513a. c....

  17. Social Aspects of Suicidal Behavior and Prevention in Early Life: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Apter

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present review summarizes the updated literature on the social aspects of suicidal behavior and prevention in adolescents. Recent findings: The predictive role of psychiatric disorders and past history are well recognized in adolescent suicide, but the role of social and cultural factors is less clear. Studies have focused on the importance of ethnicity, gender, family characteristics, and socioeconomic status. More recently, attention has been addressed to broader social risk factors, such as bullying in adolescents, suicide contagion, sexual orientation, and the popular media. Further empirical evidence is needed to advance our understanding of suicidal youth, develop better assessment tools, and formulate effective prevention and treatment programs. Summary: Suicidal behavior remains an important clinical problem and major cause of death in youth. Social factors may be at least as important as genetics. Advancing our understanding of underlying cultural and sociological issues in youth suicide will help clinicians achieve more efficient prediction, prevention and treatment.

  18. Social Aspects of Suicidal Behavior and Prevention in Early Life: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitai, Maya; Apter, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The present review summarizes the updated literature on the social aspects of suicidal behavior and prevention in adolescents. Recent findings: The predictive role of psychiatric disorders and past history are well recognized in adolescent suicide, but the role of social and cultural factors is less clear. Studies have focused on the importance of ethnicity, gender, family characteristics, and socioeconomic status. More recently, attention has been addressed to broader social risk factors, such as bullying in adolescents, suicide contagion, sexual orientation, and the popular media. Further empirical evidence is needed to advance our understanding of suicidal youth, develop better assessment tools, and formulate effective prevention and treatment programs. Summary: Suicidal behavior remains an important clinical problem and major cause of death in youth. Social factors may be at least as important as genetics. Advancing our understanding of underlying cultural and sociological issues in youth suicide will help clinicians achieve more efficient prediction, prevention and treatment. PMID:22690178

  19. [Expectation for JSPN's contribution following revision of General Principles for Suicide Prevention Policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Japan's national suicide prevention efforts following the 1998 surge in the number of suicide deaths can be divided into three stages: the first stage administrated mainly by the health ministry (1998-2005), the second and transitional stage when it was upgraded to a full governmental issue (2005-2006), and the third and present stage following the promulgation of the Basic Act for Suicide Prevention in 2006. In June 2007, the General Principles for Suicide Prevention Policy (GPSP), a guideline on how the national government should act to promote suicide prevention, was announced, urging local governments to tackle the problem of suicide. The GPSP was set to be revised after around five years from its publication, and, thus, a revised GPSP was published in August of 2012. Based on the five years of challenges, the revised GPSP states that suicide prevention strategies should move on to more practical and community-oriented ones. The National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry (NCNP), through its Center for Suicide Prevention, played a coordinating role in putting forward a proposal for the revision, working with 29 academic societies including the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology (JSPN). In February 2013, by further developing the relationships with academic societies, etc., which were forged in the above-mentioned process, NCNP set up the Preparatory Committee for the Evidence-based Suicide Prevention Consortium in order to contribute to suicide prevention strategies from an academic perspective. Meanwhile, in the World Health Organization's 66th World Health Assembly held in May 2013, the Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 was approved. Its core principle is "no health without mental health", and it has the following four objectives: (1) to strengthen effective leadership and governance for mental health; (2) to provide comprehensive, integrated, and responsive mental health and social care services in community-based settings; (3) to

  20. Towards a shared understanding: Perspectives from Toronto's first media forum for suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyor, Mark; Pirkis, Jane; Picard, André; McKeown, David; Vincent, Margaret; Cheung, Christian; Schaffer, Ayal; Fordham, Jan; Mishaiel, Rosie; Heisel, Marnin

    2016-10-20

    Media reporting on suicide may have harmful and/or protective effects on deaths by suicide, depending on the nature of the coverage. Canada's first forum on this important issue was held in Toronto on November 6, 2015. Participating in the forum were public health policy-makers, mental health and suicide prevention experts and senior media representatives. This commentary summarizes the content of the forum and highlights the need for ongoing collaboration between suicide prevention experts and media professionals aimed at safe and respectful reporting that maintains the public's need to be informed.

  1. SIAM (Suicide intervention assisted by messages): the development of a post-acute crisis text messaging outreach for suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrouiguet, Sofian; Alavi, Zarrin; Vaiva, Guillaume; Courtet, Philippe; Baca-García, Enrique; Vidailhet, Pierre; Gravey, Michel; Guillodo, Elise; Brandt, Sara; Walter, Michel

    2014-11-18

    Suicidal behaviour and deliberate self-harm are common among adults. Research indicates that maintaining contact either via letter or postcard with at-risk adults following discharge from care services can reduce reattempt risk. Feasibility trials demonstrated that intervention through text message was also effective in preventing suicide repetition amongst suicide attempters. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of text message intervention versus traditional treatment on reducing the risk of suicide attempt repetition among adults after self-harm. The study will be a 2-year multicentric randomized controlled trial conducted by the Brest University Hospital, France. Participants will be adults discharged after self-harm, from emergency services or after a short hospitalization. Participants will be recruited over a 12-month period. The intervention is comprised of an SMS that will be sent at h48, D7, D15 and monthly. The text message enquires about the patients' well-being and includes information regarding individual sources of help and evidence-based self help strategies. Participants will be assessed at the baseline, month 6 and 13. As primary endpoint, we will assess the number of patients who reattempt suicide in each group at 6 months. As secondary endpoints, we will assess the number of patients who reattempt suicide at 13 month, the number of suicide attempts in the intervention and control groups at 6 and 13 month, the number of death by suicide in the intervention and control groups at month 6 and 13. In both groups, suicidal ideations, will be assessed at the baseline, month 6 and 13. Medical costs and satisfaction will be assessed at month 13. This paper describes the design and deployment of a trial SIAM; an easily reproducible intervention that aims to reduce suicide risk in adults after self-harm. It utilizes several characteristics of interventions that have shown a significant reduction in the number of suicide reattempts. We

  2. The Role of Optimism in the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Kathy A.; Wingate, LaRicka R.

    2011-01-01

    A possible relationship between Joiner's (2005) interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior and optimism was investigated by examining the ability of optimism to act as a moderator of perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and acquired capability to engage in self-injury in the prediction of suicidal ideation. Results…

  3. Prevention of suicide and attempted suicide in Denmark. Epidemiological studies of suicide and intervention studies in selected risk groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete

    2007-01-01

    percent as previously accepted, but lower. Risk factors for suicide among patients with schizophrenia were evaluated in case control studies, in nested case control studies, and in prospective studies. The following risk factors were the most important and frequently observed predictors: male gender...... patients in the integrated treatment. There were four suicides and one probable suicide (drowning) in standard treatment and one suicide in integrated treatment at two-year follow-up, but the study did not have sufficient power to detect these differences in proportion to who committed suicide; more than......-up of persons who attempted suicide. It was concluded that the risk of repetition in short- and medium-term follow-up studies was approximately 16 percent, with lower risk among "first-evers" compared to repeaters. There was a large variation in repetition rate. The proportion who committed suicide in medium...

  4. Prevention of suicide and attempted suicide in Denmark. Epidemiological studies of suicide and intervention studies in selected risk groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete

    2007-01-01

    percent as previously accepted, but lower. Risk factors for suicide among patients with schizophrenia were evaluated in case control studies, in nested case control studies, and in prospective studies. The following risk factors were the most important and frequently observed predictors: male gender...... patients in the integrated treatment. There were four suicides and one probable suicide (drowning) in standard treatment and one suicide in integrated treatment at two-year follow-up, but the study did not have sufficient power to detect these differences in proportion to who committed suicide; more than......-up of persons who attempted suicide. It was concluded that the risk of repetition in short- and medium-term follow-up studies was approximately 16 percent, with lower risk among "first-evers" compared to repeaters. There was a large variation in repetition rate. The proportion who committed suicide in medium...

  5. Optimal strategies for flood prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijgenraam, Carel; Brekelmans, Ruud; den Hertog, Dick; Roos, C.

    2016-01-01

    Flood prevention policy is of major importance to the Netherlands since a large part of the country is below sea level and high water levels in rivers may also cause floods. In this paper we propose a dike height optimization model to determine economically efficient flood protection standards. We i

  6. Why do we report suicides and how can we facilitate suicide prevention efforts? Perspectives of Hong Kong media professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qijin; Fu, King-wa; Caine, Eric; Yip, Paul S F

    2014-01-01

    The Hong Kong news media report suicide-related events more frequently and sensationally than Western countries. Little is known about Hong Kong media professionals' experiences and thoughts about such reporting. To understand Hong Kong media professionals' experiences and perceptions of suicide reporting and whether the news media can be better engaged into suicide prevention. We conducted three focus groups of journalists from both the Cantonese and English language news media. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methods. We discerned three rationales from participants regarding their intense coverage of suicide-related events: (1) satisfying commercial competitiveness, (2) addressing social problems, and (3) responding to readers' interests. The first rationale was a dominant and vigorous motivating factor, and often influenced suicide reporting among local Cantonese media. Media professionals recommended engagement strategies targeted at frontline journalists, media managers, and general media consumers. We see potential to involve news media professionals in Hong Kong as working partners in suicide prevention. To succeed, this effort requires engagement in a proactive, consistent, and sustained fashion.

  7. Role of the family in suicide prevention: an attachment and family systems perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo Prabhu, Sheila; Molinari, Victor; Bowers, Theron; Lomax, James

    2010-01-01

    Suicide can be an act of despair, anger, or escape from intolerable pain associated with prior bonding disturbances within the family system, interpersonal loss, and current perceived lack of social support. Using a variety of online databases, the authors examined the research on the family's role in preventing suicide from an attachment and family systems perspective. They found relevant articles describing how to make use of family support in suicide prevention. From a study of the literature, the authors outline three new family concepts in suicide prevention: family cohesion, family adhesion, and formation of a new family. Therapists should use every familial resource to avoid premature closure and to expand perception of support options. The authors suggest specific practice recommendations to successfully involve families in suicide prevention based on the outlined family conceptual framework, and they recommend research investigation to determine empirical validation of these tentative formulations.

  8. Prevention of suicide among adolescents and young people: reflecting on the experience of Western models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Bovina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze various preventive and proactive suicide programs, which operate in a number of Western countries. We consider various measures implemented under the auspices of the WHO, as well as in the framework of the European Alliance Against Depression. Following J. Henden, wediscuss three types of suicide prevention: primary, secondary and tertiary. Primary prevention covers the population as a whole – suicide prevention is to promote the value of health and life. This type of prevention is addressed to a wide audience, including teenagers and young adults groups. Secondary prevention is aimed at those who have attempted to commit suicide, because the presence of attempts is a significant feature that allows to predict next attempts. Tertiary prevention is addressed to suicider’s close circle, it aims at help the suicider’s relatives to survive this event, use the appropriate ways of coping with the tragic situation.

  9. Community-based suicide prevention through group activity for the elderly successfully reduced the high suicide rate for females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Watanabe, Naoki; Ono, Yutaka; Sakashita, Tomoe; Takenoshita, Yuka; Taguchi, Manabu; Takizawa, Tohru; Miura, Reiko; Kumagai, Keiko

    2005-06-01

    The lack of social support is the most common risk factor for late-life suicide. Few previous community-based interventions against the lack of social relationships reduced suicide. This study aims to evaluate outcomes of a community-based prevention program against suicide amongst the elderly in rural Japan. During 1995-2002, the program based on population strategy including group activity, psychoeducation and self-assessment of depression but no screening for depression, was implemented for elderly residents in Yuri town, Japan (5-year average population 6817; 5-year average suicide rate [> or =65 years old] 291.4/10(5)). Changes in the relative risk of suicide for individuals (> or =65 years old) before and after the 8-year implementation were estimated by the incidence rate ratio (IRR), using a quasi-experimental design with a neighboring reference, Chokai town, Japan (5-year average population 8136; 5-year average suicide rate [> or =65 years old] 216.5/10(5)). The risk of elderly females in Yuri completing suicide was reduced by 76% (age-adjusted IRR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.10-0.58), while there was no change in the risks for Yuri's elderly males and both Chokai's elderly males and females. General loglinear analysis estimated a ratio of the female IRR in Yuri to that in its Akita prefecture of 0.35 (95% CI, 0.14-0.84), showing that the reduction of the risk in the intervention area was greater than a historical trend. A community-based suicide prevention through a group intervention designed to increase knowledge and to cultivate social relationships would be effective for elderly females but not males.

  10. Prediction and prevention of suicide in patients with unipolar depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Xenia; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Kaprinis, George; Rihmer, Zoltan

    2007-09-05

    Epidemiological data suggest that between 59 and 87% of suicide victims suffered from major depression while up to 15% of these patients will eventually commit suicide. Male gender, previous suicide attempt(s), comorbid mental disorders, adverse life-situations, acute psycho-social stressors etc. also constitute robust risk factors. Anxiety and minor depression present with a low to moderate increase in suicide risk but anxiety-depression comorbidity increases this risk dramatically Contrary to the traditional psychoanalytic approach which considers suicide as a retrospective murder or an aggression turned in-wards, more recent studies suggest that the motivations to commit suicide may vary and are often too obscure. Neurobiological data suggest that low brain serotonin activity might play a key role along with the tryptophan hydroxylase gene. Social factors include social support networks, religion etc. It is proven that most suicide victims had asked for professional help just before committing suicide, however they were either not diagnosed (particularly males) or the treatment they received was inappropriate or inadequate. The conclusion is that promoting suicide prevention requires the improving of training and skills of both psychiatrists and many non-psychiatrists and especially GPs in recognizing and treating depression and anxiety. A shift of focus of attention is required in primary care to detect potentially suicidal patients presenting with psychological problems. The proper use of antidepressants, after a careful diagnostic evaluation, is important and recent studies suggest that successful acute and long-term antidepressant pharmacotherapy reduces suicide morbidity and mortality.

  11. Work-related risk factors for suicidal behaviour, protective factors and possibilities for prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Tina Podlogar

    2016-01-01

    Work is an important part of adult life. As such it is closely connected to health and mental health. Aspects of occupation, work and employment can represent risk factors for suicidal behaviour or protective factors against it. Aim of this article is to present the known work-related risk factors for suicidal behaviour, protective factors and possibilities for preventive activities in this context. An important risk factor for suicidal behaviour is unemployment. Connection between unemployme...

  12. Preventing Suicide: A Neglected Social Work Research Agenda

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Social workers encounter suicidal clients; however, little is known about social work’s empirical knowledge base for suicide assessment and treatment. In the first comprehensive study of social work’s contribution to the suicide literature, the authors conducted systematic electronic and manual searches for suicide research published in peer-reviewed journals by social work investigators for the period 1980–2006, with the purpose of ascertaining the state of clinical knowledge related to suic...

  13. Talisman or taboo: the controversy of the suicide-prevention contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M C; Jacobs, D G; Gutheil, T G

    1998-01-01

    The suicide-prevention contract is a widely used but overvalued clinical and risk-management technique. The scant information on this topic in the psychiatric and mental health literature is reviewed, along with the literature on collateral subjects including suicide prediction, medicolegal aspects of treating suicidal patients, the therapeutic alliance, and countertransference with suicidal patients. A group of 112 psychiatrists and psychologists was surveyed about their use of suicide-prevention contracts; the majority of them had never received any formal training on the topic. A combination of factors--the unpredictability of suicide, the many different antecedents to completed suicides, the complex psychological reactions of clinicians (including fear of litigation), the incongruity between clinical and legal usages of the contract concept, and the hazards that come of collapsing a complex treatment process into a few words--limit the applicability of suicide-prevention contracts. We reason that the use of these contracts is based upon subjective belief rather than on objective data or formal training. We recommend an alternative approach to suicide risk management rooted in the well-known and well-defined principles of informed consent.

  14. The Struggle to Prevent and Evaluate: Application of Population Attributable Risk and Preventive Fraction to Suicide Prevention Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysinska, Karolina; Martin, Graham

    2009-01-01

    Population attributable risk (PAR) estimates have been used in suicide research to evaluate the impact of psychosocial and socioeconomic risk factors, including affective disorders, traumatic life events, and unemployment. A parallel concept of preventive fraction (PF), allowing for estimation of the impact of protective factors and effectiveness…

  15. The effectiveness of suicide prevention programmes: urban and gender disparity in age-specific suicide rates in a Taiwanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, F-W; Liao, S-C; Wu, C-Y; Lee, M-B

    2017-06-01

    The effectiveness of suicide prevention programmes is an important issue worldwide today. The impact of urbanization and gender is controversial in suicide rates. Hence, this study adjusted on potential risk factors and secular changes for suicide rates in gender and rural/urban areas. Observational study. A Suicide Prevention Center was established by the Executive Yuan in Taiwan in 2005 and tried to carry out suicidal intervention in the community in every city and town. There were two phases, including the first phase of the programme from 2005 to 2008, and the second phase of the programme from 2009 to 2013. The crude suicide rates data from the period of 1991-2013, which recruited nine urban and 14 rural areas in Taiwan, were extracted from the Taiwanese national mortality data file. The suicide rates in two areas of Taiwan (Taipei city and Yilan County) were further used to compare the differences between urban and rural areas. The results show that unemployment increased the suicide rate in men aged 45-64 years and in women older than 65 years of age in Taiwan. High divorce and unemployment rates resulted in increased suicide rates in men in the city, whereas emotional distress was the main cause of suicides in men in rural areas. The main method of suicide was jumping from a high building for both sexes in the city, whereas drowning was the most common method of suicide for men in rural areas. Following the intervention programme, suicide behaviour began to decrease in all urban and rural areas of Taiwan. This study showed the cumulative effect of the intervention programme in decreasing the suicide rate in Taiwan. Moreover, the gender-specific suicidal rate and disparity in suicidal methods in urban and rural areas should be considered in further preventive strategies in Taiwan. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... suicide attempts occur when someone is under the influence of alcohol or drugs. This doesn't mean ... coach, a relative, a school counselor, a religious leader, or a teacher. Call a suicide crisis line ( ...

  17. Suicide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scott B Patten

    2016-01-01

    ....3 Research into suicide and suicide attempts must use large, available data sets such as the National Mortality Database, Hospital Discharge Abstracts, and data from the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System...

  18. Evaluating the effectiveness of barrier installation for preventing railway suicides in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, C K; Yip, Paul S F; Chan, Wincy S C; Fu, King-Wa; Wong, Paul W C; Law, Y W

    2009-04-01

    Railway suicide is a serious mortality issue. Most attempters are unmarried psychotic young men under psychiatric care having a high level of lethal intent. Installation of platform screen doors (PSDs) to limit access to the track has been suggested as an effective way for prevention. This study aims to examine the effectiveness of installing PSDs for preventing railway suicides; any sign of substitution of suicide location; and changes in psychiatric profile of suicide deceased after the PSD installation in the subway system of Hong Kong. Cases of railway suicide and related information from 1997 to 2007 were provided by the railway operators and the Coroner's Court. The effectiveness of installing PSDs was assessed through a quasi-experimental setting. Poisson regression and chi-squared test were used. Over the 11-year study period, a total of 76 railway suicide cases (0.71% of all suicides) were reported. A significant reduction of 59.9% (p=0.0003) in railway suicides was found after the PSD installation. Analyses confirmed that there was no significant sign of substitution by displacing potential attempters to unsealed platforms (p=0.9051). Those having psychosis would be better protected as no suicide cases with such psychiatric background were reported after the installation of PSDs. It has not considered the potential economic benefits of PSD. It is difficult if not possible to examine whether the potential attempters would substitute to an alternative method of suicide. This study shows that PSDs can effectively prevent suicides with no substitution by "delethalizing" the image and altering people's perception about the desirability of railway suicide. Railway operators should extend the coverage of PSD to all railway stations in Hong Kong without any delay.

  19. Is suicide prevention possible? An evaluation of a prevention program among high school students

    OpenAIRE

    Córdova Moreno, María José Cubillas Rpdríguez, Rosario Román Pérez, María Alejandra; Centro d eInvestigacíon en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C. (CIAD, A.C.)

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate a secondary prevention program of suicide risk behavior in educated adolescentsand their families using a familial democratization focus. Method. A prospective, exploratory study in which participative methodology (reflection-action workshops) was employed; and a pre and post test evaluation of 81 secondary and tertiary education students and their families was applied. Results. A level-based analysis was used to note that some participants improved notably both in their levels of...

  20. [The General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy from the perspective of clinical psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    In view of the fact that the suicide rate in Japan has remained high since 1998, the Basic Act on Suicide Prevention was implemented in 2006 with the objective of comprehensively promoting suicide prevention measures on a national scale. Based on this Basic Act, in 2007, the Japanese government formulated the General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy as a guideline for recommended suicide prevention measures. These General Principles were revised in 2012 in accordance with the initial plan of holding a review after five years. The Basic Act places an emphasis on the various social factors that underlie suicides and takes the perspective that suicide prevention measures are also social measures. The slogan of the revised General Principles is "Toward Realization of a Society in which Nobody is Driven to Commit Suicide". The General Principles list various measures that are able to be used universally. These contents would be sufficient if the objective of the General Principles were "realization of a society that is easy to live in"; however, the absence of information on the effectiveness and order of priority for each measure may limit the specific effectiveness of the measures in relation to the actual prevention of suicide. In addition, considering that nearly 90% of suicide victims are in a state at the time of committing suicide in which a psychiatric disorder would be diagnosed, it would appear from a psychiatric standpoint that measures related to mental health, including expansion of psychiatric services, should be the top priority in suicide prevention measures. However, this is not the case in the General Principles, in either its original or revised form. Revisions to the General Principles related to clinical psychiatry provide more detailed descriptions of measures for individuals who unsuccessfully attempt suicide and identify newly targeted mental disorders other than depression; however, the overall proportion of contents relating to

  1. Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suicide is the tenth most common cause of death in the United States. People may consider suicide when they are hopeless and can't see ... event. People who have the highest risk of suicide are white men. But women and teens report ...

  2. The Hospital Management of Fatal Self-Poisoning in Industrialized Countries: An Opportunity for Suicide Prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Navneet; Turnbull, Pauline; Hawton, Keith; Simkin, Sue; Mackway-Jones, Kevin; Gunnell, David

    2006-01-01

    Suicide by self-poisoning is a prevalent cause of death worldwide. A substantial proportion of individuals who poison themselves come into contact with medical services before they die. Our focus in the current study was the medical management of drug self-poisoning in industrialized countries and its possible contribution to suicide prevention.…

  3. Maintained Attitudinal Changes in Nursing Personnel after a Brief Training on Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botega, Neury J.; Silva, Sidney V.; Reginato, Diogo G.; Rapeli, Claudemir B.; Cais, Carlos F. S.; Mauro, Marisa L. F.; Stefanello, Sabrina; Cecconi, Janaina P.

    2007-01-01

    Nursing personnel (N = 317) working at a general hospital attended a 6-hour training program on suicide prevention. They answered anonymously pre- and post-training the Suicide Behavior Attitude Questionnaire (SBAQ), which comprises 21 visual analogue scale items divided in three factorial subscales. The results indicated there were positive…

  4. Improvements to Suicide Prevention Training for Prison Staff in England and Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Adrian J.; Shaw, Jenny J.; Lever-Green, Gillian; Parker, Dianne; Gask, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Suicide prevention training for the prison service in England and Wales has been criticized. STORM is a package emphasizing the practice and review of interactions with suicidal persons and was evaluated in a pilot study for use in prisons. Trainees completed questionnaires immediately before and after training and at 6 to 8 months follow-up.…

  5. Key considerations for preventing suicide in older adults: consensus opinions of an expert panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete; Conwell, Yeates

    2011-01-01

    The number of older adults is growing rapidly. This fact, combined with the high rates of suicide in later life, indicates that many more older adults will die by their own hands before rigorous trials can be conducted to fully understand the best approaches to prevent late life suicide....

  6. The Impact of Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention on University Resident Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Deborah J.; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Miles, Nathan; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Wachter Morris, Carrie A.; Prieto-Welch, Susan L.; Werden, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Resident assistants (RAs) can serve as important suicide prevention gatekeepers. The purpose of the study was to determine if training improved RAs' crisis communications skills and suicide-related knowledge and to determine if the knowledge elements predicted crisis communications skills. New RAs showed significant improvement in all areas from…

  7. Advancing suicide prevention research with rural American Indian and Alaska Native populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Lisa; Chandler, Michael; Gone, Joseph P; Cwik, Mary; Kirmayer, Laurence J; LaFromboise, Teresa; Brockie, Teresa; O'Keefe, Victoria; Walkup, John; Allen, James

    2015-05-01

    As part of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Task Force, a multidisciplinary group of AI/AN suicide research experts convened to outline pressing issues related to this subfield of suicidology. Suicide disproportionately affects Indigenous peoples, and remote Indigenous communities can offer vital and unique insights with relevance to other rural and marginalized groups. Outcomes from this meeting include identifying the central challenges impeding progress in this subfield and a description of promising research directions to yield practical results. These proposed directions expand the alliance's prioritized research agenda and offer pathways to advance the field of suicide research in Indigenous communities and beyond.

  8. Key considerations for preventing suicide in older adults: consensus opinions of an expert panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete; Conwell, Yeates

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The number of older adults is growing rapidly. This fact, combined with the high rates of suicide in later life, indicates that many more older adults will die by their own hands before rigorous trials can be conducted to fully understand the best approaches to prevent late life suicide....... AIMS: To disseminate key considerations for interventions addressing senior suicidal behavior. METHODS: An international expert panel has reviewed and discussed key considerations for interventions against suicide in older adults based on existing evidence, where available, and expert opinion. RESULTS...

  9. Does a Gatekeeper Suicide Prevention Program Work in a School Setting? Evaluating Training Outcome and Moderators of Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Tanya L.; Witt, Jody; Abraibesh, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    The current study sought to evaluate the suicide prevention gatekeeper training program QPR (Question, Persuade, and Refer) among school personnel using a non-equivalent control group design. Substantial gains were demonstrated from pre- to post-test for attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs regarding suicide and suicide prevention. Exploratory…

  10. Psychologist suicide: Incidence, impact, and suggestions for prevention, intervention, and postvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleespies, Phillip M; Van Orden, Kimberly A; Bongar, Bruce; Bridgeman, Diane; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Hillbrand, Marc; Yufit, Robert I

    2011-06-01

    Psychologist practitioners are not immune to some mental health problems, including suicidality, for which they provide services. In the aftermath of two recent psychologist suicides, the American Psychological Association's Advisory Committee on Colleague Assistance (ACCA) initiated the formation of a conjoint ad hoc committee consisting of members from ACCA, the American Psychological Association (APA) Practice Directorate, and the Section on Clinical Emergencies and Crises (Section VII of APA's Division 12) to investigate the incidence of psychologist suicide and its impact on colleagues, students or interns, patients or clients, and the profession. The committee reviewed the extant empirical literature on suicide rates for psychologists, evaluated unpublished data on psychologist suicide provided by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), interviewed colleague survivors, reviewed published case reports of the impact of therapist suicides, and linked their findings to the literature on professional distress, impairment, and self-care. The committee concluded that there is evidence suggestive of an elevated risk of suicide for psychologists in past decades. It further concluded that there is a need for further research to confirm if there is a heightened risk of suicide for psychologists in the present day, and to determine factors that might contribute to such risk. Accounts from colleague-survivors suggest that the impact of a psychologist's suicide can affect many people including family, colleagues, students, and patients or clients. This article offers suggestions for possible preventive approaches, for intervention with potentially at-risk colleagues, and for postvention efforts in the wake of a colleague suicide.

  11. Requirements and Facilitators for Suicide Terrorism: an Explanatory Framework for Prediction and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Lankford

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to explaining, predicting, and preventing suicide terrorism, there is a lot more important work to be done.  This paper draws on the most recent evidence about where suicide terrorism occurs and why to propose a basic explanatory framework.  Taking a bottom-up approach, it first identifies the minimum requirements for a suicide terrorism attack, and then outlines additional facilitators for the deadliest attacks and most prolonged suicide terrorism campaigns.  Next, it applies these variables to clarify popular misunderstandings about foreign occupation as the primary cause of suicide terrorism.  Finally, it shows how security officials can use this framework to develop a series of short term and long term countermeasures and begin to reduce the prevalence of suicide terrorism worldwide.

  12. OSTA program: A French follow up intervention program for suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouaffak, Fayçal; Marchand, Arnaud; Castaigne, Emmanuelle; Arnoux, Armelle; Hardy, Patrick

    2015-12-30

    Attempted suicide is a strong risk factor for subsequent suicidal behavior. In recent years, a particular interest has been given to follow-up interventions as a potential effective strategy in preventing recurrent suicidal behavior. We developed a follow-up intervention program called OSTA (organization of a suitable monitoring for suicide attempters) aimed at addressing this issue and tested its effectiveness in a 1-year randomized controlled trial. Individuals who attempted suicide and were admitted to the emergency department (ED) of Bicêtre Hospital (n=320) were randomly allocated to receive either the OSTA program or a control treatment. On an intention to treat basis, the proportion of patients who reattempted suicide did not differ significantly between the interventional group (IG) 14.5% (22/152) and the control group (CG) 14% (21/150). There were also no significant differences, between the two arms, in the number of suicide attempts. Although no significant difference has been found between the OSTA program and the control treatment concerning the rate of suicide reattempts, we believe that further studies should be conducted to test the effectiveness of more standardized follow-up studies in suicide prevention.

  13. Measuring Associations of the Department of Veterans Affairs' Suicide Prevention Campaign on the Use of Crisis Support Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Elizabeth; Lu, Naiji; Zuo, Guoxin; Tu, Xin M; Stephens, Brady; Draper, John; Thompson, Caitlin; Bossarte, Robert M

    2016-08-01

    Campaigns have become popular in public health approaches to suicide prevention; however, limited empirical investigation of their impact on behavior has been conducted. To address this gap, utilization patterns of crisis support services associated with the Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Crisis Line (VCL) suicide prevention campaign were examined. Daily call data for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, VCL, and 1-800-SUICIDE were modeled using a novel semi-varying coefficient method. Analyses reveal significant increases in call volume to both targeted and broad resources during the campaign. Findings underscore the need for further research to refine measurement of the effects of these suicide prevention efforts.

  14. Rail-suicide prevention: Systematic literature review of evidence-based activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Emma; Kolves, Kairi; De Leo, Diego

    2017-09-01

    Rail-related suicide is a relatively rare but extremely lethal method of suicide that can have far-reaching consequences. The aim of the systematic literature review was to analyze the existing literature on the effectiveness of rail-suicide prevention activities. Databases used were Scopus, Medline, and ProQuest. The search terms used were "suicid*," "prevent*," "rail*," or "train." English-language studies published in peer-reviewed journals between 1 January 1990 and 30 April 2015 that presented an overview of rail-related suicide prevention activities and included an analysis of effectiveness were used. We retrieved 1,229 results in the original search with nine papers presenting empirical evidence. Three studies in the review analyzed the effectiveness of platform screen doors and another three analyzed the installation of blue lights, two papers analyzed the effectiveness of suicide pits, and one included the influence of media reporting guidelines. Platform screen doors, suicide pits, blue lights, and improved media guidelines all have the potential to reduce rail-related suicide events and deaths. The review was restricted to English-language peer-reviewed papers published within the chosen time period. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. School personnel perspectives on their school's implementation of a school-based suicide prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Bradley D; Kataoka, Sheryl H; Hamilton, Alison B; Schultz, Dana; Ryan, Gery; Vona, Pamela; Wong, Marleen

    2010-07-01

    Youth suicide is a national public health priority, with policymakers highlighting schools as an ideal setting in which to deliver suicide prevention programs. Over the past decade, the number of schools implementing such programs has grown substantially, yet little is known about how successfully such programs are being implemented. This study examines the implementation of a district-wide suicide prevention program through key informant interviews with school personnel. Schools with higher rates of implementing district protocols for at-risk students had an organized system to respond to at-risk students, a process for effectively responding to students who were at-risk for suicide, and strong administrative support. In contrast, schools that had lower rates of implementing district protocols relied on a handful of individuals for suicide prevention activities and had limited administrative support. Attention to organizational factors leading to successful implementation of school-based suicide prevention programs may enhance the role of schools in national adolescent suicide prevention efforts.

  16. A descriptive study of baccalaureate nursing students' responses to suicide prevention education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, Julie M; Gilje, Fredricka; Tesar, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Internationally, little is known regarding the amount of educational content on suicide in undergraduate nursing curriculum. The literature conducted found few published research studies on implementation of suicide prevention instruction in baccalaureate nursing curriculum, even though various international healthcare and nursing initiatives address suicide prevention. The aim was to describe senior baccalaureate students' responses to an evidence-based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program entitled Question-Persuade-Refer implemented in a required course. This is a multi-method descriptive study. Data were collected utilizing a pre-post-survey questionnaire administered to 150 students in four classes of a psychiatric nursing course over a two-year period. The quantitative data were statistically significant (p < 0.000) indicating an overall positive rating of the training. From the qualitative data, the main theme was 'becoming capable intervening with persons at risk for suicide'. Students responded very positively to the evidence based suicide prevention gatekeeper training program. The instruction addresses various national initiatives and strategies filling a void in nursing curriculum, as well as empowering students to engage in suicide prevention interventions.

  17. A national survey of school-based, adolescent suicide prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, A; Shaffer, D; Whittle, B

    1989-11-01

    A national survey of suicide prevention programs was conducted to determine the number, distribution and content of school-based, curriculum programs for adolescents. One hundred fifteen programs were identified. The total number of students and schools targeted for prevention efforts more than doubled during the academic years 1984/1985 to 1986/1987. Content of the programs was similar, with nearly all including information on suicide warning signs and other facts, as well as on accessing community mental health resources. Most included a separate component for school staff and parents. Ninety-five percent subscribed to the view that suicide is most commonly a response to extreme stress or pressure and could happen to anyone. Possible negative implications of this "stress model" of suicide were discussed. While this survey plays an important first step in providing a description of these programs, more evaluative research is needed to determine what effect, if any, these programs have on suicidal behavior.

  18. Effectiveness of a multimodal community intervention program to prevent suicide and suicide attempts: a quasi-experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Ono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multilevel and multimodal interventions have been suggested for suicide prevention. However, few studies have reported the outcomes of such interventions for suicidal behaviours. METHODS: We examined the effectiveness of a community-based multimodal intervention for suicide prevention in rural areas with high suicide rates, compared with a parallel prevention-as-usual control group, covering a total of 631,133 persons. The effectiveness was also examined in highly populated areas near metropolitan cities (1,319,972 persons. The intervention started in July 2006, and continued for 3.5 years. The primary outcome was the incidence of composite outcome, consisting of completed suicides and suicide attempts requiring admission to an emergency ward for critical care. We compared the rate ratios (RRs of the outcomes adjusted by sex, age group, region, period and interaction terms. Analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis and stratified by sex and age groups. FINDINGS: In the rural areas, the overall median adherence of the intervention was significantly higher. The RR of the composite outcome in the intervention group decreased 7% compared with that of the control group. Subgroup analyses demonstrated heterogeneous effects among subpopulations: the RR of the composite outcome in the intervention group was significantly lower in males (RR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.59-0.998, p = 0.0485 and the RR of suicide attempts was significantly lower in males (RR = 0.39, 95% CI 0.22-0.68, p = 0.001 and the elderly (RR = 0.35, 95% CI 0.17-0.71, p = 0.004. The intervention had no effect on the RR of the composite outcome in the highly populated areas. INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that this community-based multimodal intervention for suicide prevention could be implemented in rural areas, but not in highly populated areas. The effectiveness of the intervention was shown for males and for the elderly in rural areas

  19. Developing Social Media-Based Suicide Prevention Messages in Partnership With Young People: Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jo; Bailey, Eleanor; Hetrick, Sarah; Paix, Steve; O'Donnell, Matt; Cox, Georgina; Ftanou, Maria; Skehan, Jaelea

    2017-10-04

    Social media is increasingly being used by young people for health-related issues, including communicating about suicide. Due to the concerns about causing distress or inducing suicidal thoughts or behaviors, to date young people neither have been engaged in the development of social media-based suicide prevention interventions nor have interventions focused on educating young people about safe ways to communicate about suicide online. Given the potential that social media holds to deliver messages to vast numbers of people across space and time and the fact that young people often prefer to seek help from their friends and peers, safely educating and engaging young people to develop suicide prevention messages that can be delivered via social media is an obvious next step. The objectives of this study were to (1) provide education to a small number of secondary school students about safe ways to communicate about suicide via social media; (2) engage the same young people in the development of a suite of social media-based suicide prevention multimedia messages; (3) assess the impact of this on participants; and (4) assess the acceptability and safety of the messages developed. This study involved two phases. In phase 1, 20 participants recruited from two schools took part in an 8- to 10-week program during which they were provided with psychoeducation about mental health and suicide, including how to talk safely about suicide online, and they were then supported to design and develop their own media messages. These participants completed an evaluation questionnaire at the conclusion of the program. In phase 2, a larger group of participants (n=69), recruited via an opt-in process, viewed the media messages and completed a short questionnaire about each one. Participants in phase 1 enjoyed the program and reported that they learned new skills, such as how to talk safely about suicide online, and felt more able to provide emotional support to others (16/20, 80%). No

  20. Prevention Programs to Augment Family and Child Resilience Can Have Lasting Effects on Suicidal Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, David

    2016-04-01

    In this commentary, the effects of four family-based preventive interventions designed to augment parent and child resilience, originally designed to prevent mental health and substance abuse, on suicide ideation and attempts are reviewed. Three of the preventive interventions showed a beneficial effect either on child suicide ideation or attempts, and one found a beneficial effect on parental suicidal ideation. The duration of effects in two of these studies was well longer than a decade. These studies suggest that interventions to augment family and child resiliency originally designed to prevent mental health and substance abuse disorders can also have beneficial, often long-term, effects on suicidal ideation and behavior. © 2016 The American Association of Suicidology.

  1. Assisted Suicide, Euthanasia, and Suicide Prevention: The Implications of the Dutch Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendin, Herbert

    1995-01-01

    A study illustrates how legal sanction promotes a culture that transforms suicide into assisted suicide and encourages choosing death when faced with serious illness. The question of extending legal euthanasia to those not physically ill complicates the issue. Also, doctors may feel they can end a terminally-ill patient's life without consent.…

  2. Assisted Suicide, Euthanasia, and Suicide Prevention: The Implications of the Dutch Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendin, Herbert

    1995-01-01

    A study illustrates how legal sanction promotes a culture that transforms suicide into assisted suicide and encourages choosing death when faced with serious illness. The question of extending legal euthanasia to those not physically ill complicates the issue. Also, doctors may feel they can end a terminally-ill patient's life without consent.…

  3. Work-related risk factors for suicidal behaviour, protective factors and possibilities for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Podlogar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Work is an important part of adult life. As such it is closely connected to health and mental health. Aspects of occupation, work and employment can represent risk factors for suicidal behaviour or protective factors against it. Aim of this article is to present the known work-related risk factors for suicidal behaviour, protective factors and possibilities for preventive activities in this context. An important risk factor for suicidal behaviour is unemployment. Connection between unemployment and suicidality is complex and can be explained in two ways: (i underlying vulnerability leads to both unemployment and suicidal behaviour, while (ii the connection is also thought be causal to some extent. The addressed topic is very important in the period of economic recession, when unemployment rates are high and adverse changes in terms of working conditions can occur. Different psycho-social and other working conditions are also connected to suicidal behaviour. Efficient preventive activities include approaches on multiple levels: active politics of solving economic crisis and improving the labour market conditions, creating and maintaining stimulating working conditions, raising awareness and mental health promotion among the employees, gatekeeper training, and restriction of means for suicide in occupations with access to them. Due to complexity of suicidal behaviour there is a need for further research, which would contribute to better understanding of specific risk factors and especially protective factors in vulnerable groups.

  4. Reconsidering the effects of blue-light installation for prevention of railway suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Masao; Inada, Haruhiko; Kumeji, Minae

    2014-01-01

    A recent preliminary communication suggested that the calming effect of blue lights installed at the ends of railway platforms in Japan reduced suicides by 84%. This estimate is potentially misleading from an epidemiological point of view and is reconsidered in the present study. Governmental data listing all railway suicide attempts in Japan from April 2002 to March 2012 were used to investigate the proportion of suicide attempts within station premises, where blue lights are potentially installed, and at night, when they would be lit. For those suicide attempts within station premises, we also estimated the proportion that occurred at the ends of the platforms at night. Of 5841 total reported suicide attempts, 43% occurred within the station premises, 43% occurred at night (from 18:00 to 05:59), and 14% occurred both within the station premises and at night. Of the 2535 attempts within station premises, 32% occurred at night and 28% at most were at the end of a platform at night. The exact proportion of nighttime suicide attempts at the ends of railway platforms was not calculable. Nonetheless, the proportion of suicide attempts that is potentially preventable by blue lights should be less than our conservative estimate. The installation of blue lights on platforms, even were they to have some effect in preventing railway suicides at night, would have a much smaller impact than previously estimated. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Frequency and preventative interventions for non-suicidal self-injury and suicidal behaviour in primary school-age children: a scoping review protocol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danai Bem; Charlotte Connor; Colin Palmer; Sunita Channa; Max Birchwood

    2017-01-01

    ... reviews of preventative interventions for NSSI and suicide in adolescents, few have explored its prevalence in younger children and the potential impact of preventative interventions at this stage of life...

  6. A systematic review of the literature on safety measures to prevent railway suicides and trespassing accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havârneanu, Grigore M; Burkhardt, Jean-Marie; Paran, Françoise

    2015-08-01

    This review covers a central aspect in railway safety which is the prevention of suicides and trespassing accidents. The paper attempts to answer the following research question: 'What measures are available to reduce railway suicide and trespass, and what is the evidence for their effectiveness?' The review is based on 139 relevant publications, ranging from 1978 to 2014. The analysis aimed to identify the past and current trend in the prevention practice by looking both quantitatively and qualitatively at the recommended measures. According to the results, there has been a constant focus on suicide prevention, and only relatively recent interest in trespass countermeasures. The content analysis revealed 19 main preventative categories which include more than 100 specific measures. We identified 16 common categories against railway suicide and trespass, and 3 categories of specific measures to prevent suicide. There are only 22 studies which provide empirical support for the effectiveness of measures. Actual combinations of measures are barely evaluated, but several challenges emerge from the literature. The discussion focuses on the need for a unified approach to suicide and trespass prevention, and on the importance to consider the effect mechanism of the measures in order to design better interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Best Practices for Suicide Prevention Messaging and Evaluating California's "Know the Signs" Media Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Joie; Ramchand, Rajeev; Becker, Amariah

    2017-02-23

    Although communication is a key component of US strategies to prevent suicide and there are a number of marketing campaigns promoting messages that suicide is a preventable public health problem, there has been little evaluation of these campaigns. The study describes the development of a checklist of best practices for suicide prevention communication campaigns and the use of the checklist to evaluate California's investment in "Know the Signs" (KTS-M), a suicide prevention mass media campaign. We conducted a literature review and solicited expert feedback to identify best practices and then used the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method to assess whether KTS-M was consistent with the identified best practices. Overall, experts agreed that KTS-M adhered to most of the 46 checklist items and suggested that the campaign was among the best suicide prevention media campaigns they had observed. The checklist was developed through expert input and literature review and focuses only on media campaigns. Given the nascent state of the evidence about what makes an effective suicide prevention message and the growing number of campaigns, the checklist of best practices reflects one way of promoting quality in this evolving field. The consistency between the experts' comments and their ratings of KTS-M suggests that the checklist may provide important guidance to inform the development of future campaigns and the evaluation of ongoing campaigns.

  8. A systematic review of elderly suicide prevention programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapierre, Sylvie; Erlangsen, Annette; Waern, Margda

    2011-01-01

    of patients or in the suicide rate of the participating communities. However, not all studies used measures of suicidality to evaluate the outcome of the intervention, and rarely did they aim at improving protective factors. CONCLUSIONS: Innovative strategies should improve resilience and positive aging...

  9. Suicide Prevention in an Emergency Department Population: The ED-SAFE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ivan W; Camargo, Carlos A; Arias, Sarah A; Sullivan, Ashley F; Allen, Michael H; Goldstein, Amy B; Manton, Anne P; Espinola, Janice A; Jones, Richard; Hasegawa, Kohei; Boudreaux, Edwin D

    2017-06-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of deaths in the United States. Although the emergency department (ED) is an opportune setting for initiating suicide prevention efforts, ED-initiated suicide prevention interventions remain underdeveloped. To determine whether an ED-initiated intervention reduces subsequent suicidal behavior. This multicenter study of 8 EDs in the United States enrolled adults with a recent suicide attempt or ideation and was composed of 3 sequential phases: (1) a treatment as usual (TAU) phase from August 2010 to December 2011, (2) a universal screening (screening) phase from September 2011 to December 2012, and (3) a universal screening plus intervention (intervention) phase from July 2012 to November 2013. Screening consisted of universal suicide risk screening. The intervention phase consisted of universal screening plus an intervention, which included secondary suicide risk screening by the ED physician, discharge resources, and post-ED telephone calls focused on reducing suicide risk. The primary outcome was suicide attempts (nonfatal and fatal) over the 52-week follow-up period. The proportion and total number of attempts were analyzed. A total of 1376 participants were recruited, including 769 females (55.9%) with a median (interquartile range) age of 37 (26-47) years. A total of 288 participants (20.9%) made at least 1 suicide attempt, and there were 548 total suicide attempts among participants. There were no significant differences in risk reduction between the TAU and screening phases (23% vs 22%, respectively). However, compared with the TAU phase, patients in the intervention phase showed a 5% absolute reduction in suicide attempt risk (23% vs 18%), with a relative risk reduction of 20%. Participants in the intervention phase had 30% fewer total suicide attempts than participants in the TAU phase. Negative binomial regression analysis indicated that the participants in the intervention phase had significantly fewer total suicide attempts

  10. Suicide Prevention and Intervention%自杀的预防和干预

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐波

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨自杀的预防和干预。方法大多数自杀是可以预防和干预的。针对个体进行自杀的防治工作,对住院精神病患者的自杀行为进行分析。结果大多数精神卫生工作者都认为,住院患者的自杀大都是可以避免的。结论急性自杀患者往往患有某种较严重的精神障碍,如重症心境障碍或精神分裂症。自杀危险通常随着疾病的缓解而消失。半数以上的这类自杀患者在自杀前一段时间中曾被精神卫生工作者当面规劝过要坚持服药。%Objective To investigate the suicide prevention and intervention.MethodsMost Suicide is preventable and can be prevented. Make suicide prevention for individuals and make analysis on suicidal behavior of patients in psychiatric hospitals.ResultsThe majority of mental health workers believe that to commit suicide in hospitalized patients are mostly avoided.Conclusion Acute suicidal patients often suffer from some serious mental disorders, such as severe mood disorders or schizophrenia. Suicide risk disease usually disappears with ease. More than half of patients with this type of suicide before the suicide time have been personally had to adhere to medication advice by mental health workers.

  11. Mobile Apps for Suicide Prevention: Review of Virtual Stores and Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Isabel; Castillo, Gema; Arambarri, Jon; López-Coronado, Miguel; Franco, Manuel A

    2017-10-10

    The best manner to prevent suicide is to recognize suicidal signs and signals, and know how to respond to them. We aim to study the existing mobile apps for suicide prevention in the literature and the most commonly used virtual stores. Two reviews were carried out. The first was done by searching the most commonly used commercial app stores, which are iTunes and Google Play. The second was a review of mobile health (mHealth) apps in published articles within the last 10 years in the following 7 scientific databases: Science Direct, Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, The Cochrane Library, IEEE Xplore, and Google Scholar. A total of 124 apps related to suicide were found in the cited virtual stores but only 20 apps were specifically designed for suicide prevention. All apps were free and most were designed for Android. Furthermore, 6 relevant papers were found in the indicated scientific databases; in these studies, some real experiences with physicians, caregivers, and families were described. The importance of these people in suicide prevention was indicated. The number of apps regarding suicide prevention is small, and there was little information available from literature searches, indicating that technology-based suicide prevention remains understudied. Many of the apps provided no interactive features. It is important to verify the accuracy of the results of different apps that are available on iOS and Android. The confidence generated by these apps can benefit end users, either by improving their health monitoring or simply to verify their body condition.

  12. Correlates of Process of Suicide Attempt and Perception of its Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushad Ram

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Suicide attempt may follow a process right from the inception of the first information about ‎suicide until the act itself. This study was conducted to determine the relationship between ‎perception of suicide prevention with the process of suicide attempt and demographic ‎variables following a suicidal attempt.‎Method: In this hospital based cross-sectional study, 168 consecutive admitted participants with a ‎suicide attempt were screened, and 109 who met the study criteria were recruited to ‎participate in this study before discharge. They were assessed using the socio-demographic ‎and clinical proforma designed for this study as well as by the Pierce Suicide Intent Scale. To ‎assess the process of suicide attempt and perception of suicide prevention, a 17- item ‎questionnaire was developed and used after rigorous literature search. The Cronbach’s ‎alpha coefficient value of this questionnaire found to be 0.84 in the reliability analysis.‎Results: Media was the first source of information, and the majority had short duration of ‎preoccupation and interval between making the decision and the actual attempt and the ‎control of emotion during the attempt. A significant positive correlation was observed ‎between the source of the first information and age (p<01, reason for the method used and ‎economic status (p<01, duration since the first information and family history of suicide (p<01. Psychiatric diagnosis had a statistically significant association with the method used (p<01, duration of preoccupation (p<01, preparedness (p<01 and emotional state during ‎the attempt (p<01. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between the ‎source of the first information and education (p<01, any psychiatric diagnosis and duration ‎since the first death wish (p<01. On the score of perception about suicide prevention, a ‎significant group difference was observed for marital status

  13. Lessons in Suicide Prevention from the Golden Gate Bridge: Means Restriction, Public Health, and the School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Youth suicide is a global public health problem and some lessons for more effectively preventing it can be found in a perhaps unlikely source: the Golden Gate Bridge. Issues discussed include means restriction and method substitution, the stigma associated with suicide and the consequences of it, myths and misconceptions regarding suicide, and…

  14. Lessons in Suicide Prevention from the Golden Gate Bridge: Means Restriction, Public Health, and the School Psychologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Youth suicide is a global public health problem and some lessons for more effectively preventing it can be found in a perhaps unlikely source: the Golden Gate Bridge. Issues discussed include means restriction and method substitution, the stigma associated with suicide and the consequences of it, myths and misconceptions regarding suicide, and…

  15. The Zero Suicide Program (ZSP) as a Strategy for Reduction and Prevention of Suicides Among Active Duty United States Air Force Members: A Program and Evaluation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    3. DATES COVERED (From – To) December 2013 – April 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Zero Suicide Program (ZSP) as a Strategy for Reduction and...Prevention of Suicides Among Active Duty United States Air Force Members: A Program and Evaluation Plan 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The problem of suicide among our military members is one of growing concern for military commanders and political leaders alike

  16. Prediction and prevention of suicide in patients with unipolar depression and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaprinis George

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epidemiological data suggest that between 59 and 87% of suicide victims suffered from major depression while up to 15% of these patients will eventually commit suicide. Male gender, previous suicide attempt(s, comorbid mental disorders, adverse life-situations, acute psycho-social stressors etc. also constitute robust risk factors. Anxiety and minor depression present with a low to moderate increase in suicide risk but anxiety-depression comorbidity increases this risk dramatically Contrary to the traditional psychoanalytic approach which considers suicide as a retrospective murder or an aggression turned in-wards, more recent studies suggest that the motivations to commit suicide may vary and are often too obscure. Neurobiological data suggest that low brain serotonin activity might play a key role along with the tryptophan hydroxylase gene. Social factors include social support networks, religion etc. It is proven that most suicide victims had asked for professional help just before committing suicide, however they were either not diagnosed (particularly males or the treatment they received was inappropriate or inadequate. The conclusion is that promoting suicide prevention requires the improving of training and skills of both psychiatrists and many non-psychiatrists and especially GPs in recognizing and treating depression and anxiety. A shift of focus of attention is required in primary care to detect potentially suicidal patients presenting with psychological problems. The proper use of antidepressants, after a careful diagnostic evaluation, is important and recent studies suggest that successful acute and long-term antidepressant pharmacotherapy reduces suicide morbidity and mortality.

  17. Use of New Technologies in the Prevention of Suicide in Europe: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Juan-Luis; Delgado, Carmen; Sánchez-Prada, Andrés; Pérez-López, Mercedes; Franco-Martín, Manuel A

    2017-06-27

    New technologies are an integral component of today's society and can complement existing suicide prevention programs. Here, we analyzed the use of new technologies in the prevention of suicide in 8 different European countries. The aim of this paper was to assess the opinions of professionals in incorporating such resources into the design of a suicide prevention program for the region of Zamora in Spain. This investigation, encompassed within the European project entitled European Regions Enforcing Actions against Suicide (EUREGENAS), includes 11 regions from 8 different countries and attempts to advance the field of suicide prevention in Europe. Using a specifically designed questionnaire, we assessed the opinions of 3 different groups of stakeholders regarding the use, frequency of use, facilitators, content, and format of new technologies for the prevention of suicide. The stakeholders were comprised of policy and public management professionals, professionals working in the area of mental health, and professionals related to the social area and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). A total of 416 participants were recruited in 11 regions from 8 different European countries. The utility of the new technologies was valued positively in all 8 countries, despite these resources being seldom used in those countries. In all the countries, the factors that contributed most to facilitating the use of new technologies were accessibility and free of charge. Regarding the format of new technologies, the most widely preferred formats for use as a tool for the prevention of suicide were websites and email. The availability of information about signs of alarm and risk factors was the most relevant content for the prevention of suicide through the use of new technologies. The presence of a reference mental health professional (MHP) was also considered to be a key aspect. The countries differed in the evaluations given to the different formats suggesting that the cultural

  18. [Most important deficits, contradictions and possibilities in suicide prevention in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, Sándor

    2015-03-01

    Suicide is not only a contradictory biological, psychological, sociocultural and spiritual phenomenon, but also a serious public health problem, which is manifold, therefore the fight against it is also complex. The aim of the present publication is to establish the current situation of the fight against suicide in Hungary, which are the most important deficits, contradictions and unexploited possibilities. The author states that although we have accomplished important steps in the prevention of suicide, we did not realise the majority of them in everyday practice. The author defines the most important problems and tasks which should be solved in the next decade. In the near future a great deal more should be done for prevention than what we have accomplished so far in order to significantly reduce the number of suicide victims in Hungary.

  19. Effects of rumination and optimism on the relationship between psychological distress and non-suicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Alicia K; Hasking, Penelope; Martin, Graham

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, increasing concern regarding non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents has prompted investigation of factors that may prevent this behavior. This study examined the relationship between psychological distress and NSSI in a community sample of adolescents, and the moderating effect of both optimism and rumination on this association. Two thousand five hundred seventy-two participants (12-18 years) completed self-report questionnaires assessing psychological distress, cognitive, and emotional characteristics, and NSSI history. Ten percent of the sample reported a history of NSSI, and as hypothesized, optimism moderated the relationship between psychological distress and NSSI; the association was only evident when optimism was low. Rumination was not found to moderate the relationship between psychological distress and NSSI. These findings highlight the utility of considering optimism in NSSI prevention and early intervention programs.

  20. Social Aspects of Suicidal Behavior and Prevention in Early Life: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Apter; Maya Amitai

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The present review summarizes the updated literature on the social aspects of suicidal behavior and prevention in adolescents. Recent findings: The predictive role of psychiatric disorders and past history are well recognized in adolescent suicide, but the role of social and cultural factors is less clear. Studies have focused on the importance of ethnicity, gender, family characteristics, and socioeconomic status. More recently, attention has been addressed to broader social risk fa...

  1. The role of mobile phone technology in understanding and preventing suicidal behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, we discuss how mobile phone technology has the potential to move the field forward in terms of understanding suicide risk as well as laying foundations for the development of effective treatments/interventions. We have focused on mobile health technology given the rapid growth of mobile health approaches in suicide prevention (De Jaegere & Portzky, 2014; Mishara & Kerkhof, 2013) and psychological research more generally (Myin-Germeys et al., 2009; Nock, Prinstein, & Sterba,...

  2. Gender Differences in Suicide Prevention Responses: Implications for Adolescents Based on an Illustrative Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Hamilton

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are well-documented gender differences in adolescent suicidal behavior; death by suicide is more common in males, while nonfatal suicide attempts are more common among females. Over the past three decades, researchers have documented the effectiveness of a myriad of suicide prevention initiatives. However, there has been insufficient attention to which types of suicide prevention interventions are effective in changing attitudes and behaviors for young males and females. In this review of the literature, we consider common examples of primarily universal suicide prevention programs from three implementation settings: school-based, community-based, and healthcare-based. Our purpose is to delineate how the potential gender bias in such strategies may translate into youth suicide prevention efforts. Methods: Research in which gender was found to moderate program success was retrieved through online databases. Results: The results that feature programming effects for both males and females are provocative, suggesting that when gender differences are evident, in almost all cases, females seem to be more likely than males to benefit from existing prevention programming. Conclusions: We conclude by considering recommendations that may benefit males more directly. Implications for adolescent suicide prevention in particular are discussed. Personalization of suicide intervention is presented as a promising solution to reduce suicide rates.

  3. The SOS Suicide Prevention Program: Further Evidence of Efficacy and Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Elizabeth A; Aseltine, Robert H; James, Amy

    2016-02-01

    This study replicated and extended previous evaluations of the Signs of Suicide (SOS) prevention program in a high school population using a more rigorous pre-test post-test randomized control design than used in previous SOS evaluations in high schools (Aseltine and DeMartino 2004; Aseltine et al. 2007). SOS was presented to an ethnically diverse group of ninth grade students in technical high schools in Connecticut. After controlling for the pre-test reports of suicide behaviors, exposure to the SOS program was associated with significantly fewer self-reported suicide attempts in the 3 months following the program. Ninth grade students in the intervention group were approximately 64% less likely to report a suicide attempt in the past 3 months compared with students in the control group. Similarly, exposure to the SOS program resulted in greater knowledge of depression and suicide and more favorable attitudes toward (1) intervening with friends who may be exhibiting signs of suicidal intent and (2) getting help for themselves if they were depressed or suicidal. In addition, high-risk SOS participants, defined as those with a lifetime history of suicide attempt, were significantly less likely to report planning a suicide in the 3 months following the program compared to lower-risk participants. Differential attrition is the most serious limitation of the study; participants in the intervention group who reported a suicide attempt in the previous 3 months at baseline were more likely to be missing at post-test than their counterparts in the control group.

  4. Suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Lynge, Inge

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of youth suicides has increased dramatically among the Inuit in Greenland since the modernization started in the 1950s. Suicides currently peak at age 15-24 Men: 400-500, Women: 100-150 per 100,000 person-years. The methods are drastic: shooting or hanging. An early peak was seen...... in the capital, a later peak in the rest of West Greenland, and high and increasing rates in remote East Greenland. Suicidal thoughts occur more often in young people who grew up in homes with a poor emotional environment, alcohol problems and violence. There is a definite correlation with several aspects...... of the modernization process but it is hard to pinpoint causal relationships. It is rather the "modernization package" that should be regarded as risk factors for suicides....

  5. Research priorities in suicide prevention: an examination of Australian-based research 2007-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jo; Pirkis, Jane

    2014-02-01

    Suicide prevention, including among youth, has been a national priority in Australia for some time. Yet despite this, rates of suicide, and related behaviour, remain high. The aim of this study was to review all suicide-prevention research that had been conducted in Australia between January 2007 and December 2011, with a specific emphasis on studies relating to young people, in order to determine whether or not we are prioritising the sort of research that can adequately inform policy development and guide 'best practice'. Data were collected from two sources. First, several electronic databases were searched in October 2012 in order to identify published journal articles relating to suicide, written by Australian authors. Second, summary data obtained from the National Health and Medical Research Council, the Australian Rotary Health Research Fund and the Australian Research Council were examined in order to identify currently funded studies that relate to suicide. Studies were then classified according to whether or not they had a focus on youth, and according to research type, type of suicide-related behaviour under investigation and method of suicide. There were 224 articles published and 12 grants funded that specifically focussed on suicide-related behaviour over the period January 2007 to December 2011. Of these, 47 articles (21%) and five funded grants (42%) focussed on young people. Youth studies, in particular those reported in the published articles, tended to be epidemiological in nature and only six of the published articles (13%) and two of the funded grants related to intervention studies. Although the focus on youth is welcome, the lack of intervention studies is disappointing. Given that rates of suicide and related behaviour remain high, there is a clear need for a stronger body of intervention research that can inform national policy, if we are to successfully develop effective approaches to reducing suicide risk. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC

  6. Awareness in nine countries: a public health approach to suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoven, Christina W; Wasserman, Danuta; Wasserman, Camilla; Mandell, Donald J

    2009-04-01

    Suicide is an important public health problem, increasing worldwide, and on a yearly basis accounting for the death of more than one million people, with estimates as high as 10-20 times that many attempting to take their own life. Because successful suicide prevention depends upon recognition of symptoms of mental ill-health, awareness of these signs is a necessary precondition. The ability and responsibility for recognizing signs and symptoms of suicide, until most recently, however, was the exclusive purview of mental health professionals. Lately, there have been efforts to screen high risk populations and to train others to effectively respond to suicidal behavior, including classic first responders, primary care providers, hot line operators, teachers, etc. But what about everyone else who may have an opportunity to prevent a suicide simply by knowing when to ask questions, what to listen for, and understanding when additional assistance is warranted? What about the suicidal person who wants to tell someone about their distress but "knows" that such a conversation will not help nor be well-received? Where does a person living where mental health services are lacking or are beyond one's financial means turn to for relief and assistance? Does not Public Health have something to offer in response to these pressing questions? In 2002-2005, a study was carried out in nine countries, distributed over five continents, under the auspices and support of the Presidential Commission of the World Psychiatric Association (WPA), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the International Association of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions (IACAPAP), to test the feasibility and effectiveness of raising awareness and increasing knowledge about child mental health, including suicidality, among students, teachers and parents. Implications for this approach as a model for suicide prevention are presented.

  7. Does Practice Make Perfect? A Randomized Control Trial of Behavioral Rehearsal on Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Wendi F.; Seaburn, David; Gibbs, Danette; Schmeelk-Cone, Karen; White, Ann Marie; Caine, Eric D.

    2011-01-01

    Suicide is the third leading cause of death among 10-24-year-olds and the target of school-based prevention efforts. Gatekeeper training, a broadly disseminated prevention strategy, has been found to enhance participant knowledge and attitudes about intervening with distressed youth. Although the goal of training is the development of gatekeeper…

  8. Integrating a Suicide Prevention Program into the Primary Health Care Network: A Field Trial Study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Kazem Malakouti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe and evaluate the feasibility of integrating a suicide prevention program with Primary Health Care services and evaluate if such system can improve screening and identification of depressive disorder, reduce number of suicide attempters, and lower rate of suicide completion. Methodology. This was a quasi-experimental trial in which one community was exposed to the intervention versus the control community with no such exposure. The study sites were two counties in Western Iran. The intervention protocol called for primary care and suicide prevention collaboration at different levels of care. The outcome variables were the number of suicides committed, the number of documented suicide attempts, and the number of identified depressed cases. Results. We identified a higher prevalence of depressive disorders in the intervention site versus the control site (χ2=14.8, P<0.001. We also found a reduction in the rate of suicide completion in the intervention region compared to the control, but a higher prevalence of suicide attempts in both the intervention and the control sites. Conclusion. Integrating a suicide prevention program with the Primary Health Care network enhanced depression and suicide surveillance capacity and subsequently reduced the number of suicides, especially in rural areas.

  9. A strategic approach for prioritizing research and action to prevent suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Beverly; Colpe, Lisa J; Heinssen, Robert K; Schoenbaum, Michael; Sherrill, Joel T; Claassen, Cynthia A; Pearson, Jane L

    2013-01-01

    It is time to strategically apply science and accountability to the public health problem of preventable suicide. U.S. suicide rates have remained stable for decades. More than 36,000 individuals now die by suicide each year. A public health-based approach to quickly and substantially reduce suicides requires strategic deployment of existing evidence-based interventions, rapid development of new interventions, and measures to increase accountability for results. The purpose of this Open Forum is to galvanize researchers to further develop and consolidate knowledge needed to guide these actions. As researchers overcome data limitations and methodological challenges, they enable better prioritization of high-risk subgroups for targeted suicide prevention efforts, identification of effective interventions ready for deployment, estimation of the implementation impact of effective interventions in real-world settings, and assessment of time horizons for taking implementation to scale. This new knowledge will permit decision makers to take strategic action to reduce suicide and stakeholders to hold them accountable for results.

  10. On the Relationship Between Suicide-Prevention and Suicide-Advocacy Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battin, Margaret Pabst

    Numerous advocacy groups concerned with "death with dignity" have formed in response to medical advances which extend the process of dying. Natural death legislation and the Living Will are but two examples of suicide advocacy for the terminally ill. These groups are emerging world-wide and range from conservative insistence on passive…

  11. Aggression and Suicide: A Critical Evaluation of the Suicide Prevention Ethic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Franklyn L.

    1978-01-01

    It is argued that many outward-directed acts of aggression may be more appropriately self-directed. It is concluded that for certain individuals suicide may now represent the most appropriate and efficacious solution to chronic conditions of low life-satisfaction, maladjustment, and despair. (Author)

  12. Moral perspectives on the prevention of suicide in mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, J L; Edwards, S D

    2006-12-01

    The response to suicidal clients is a recurrent and deep ethical problem in mental health practice. Rational suicide is rarely considered in relation to psychological suffering and is generally only discussed within the literature in connection with terminal illness. Focusing on a case example derived from a composite of patient experiences, this paper considers the premise that suicidal ideation may not be an irrational belief arising from mental disorder and analyses the ethical aspects of nursing care through the competing moral frameworks of the care-based and principle-based approaches to nursing ethics. We conclude that when the client is not capable of autonomous decision making, the two approaches lead to the same response. But when the client is capable of autonomous decision making, the two approaches lead to different responses. Specifically, from the care-based perspective, intervention to prevent suicide is easier to justify and helps formulate a nursing response, which promotes hope through the engagement.

  13. Depression, desperation, and suicidal ideation in college students: results from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention College Screening Project at Emory University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlow, Steven J; Rosenberg, Jill; Moore, J David; Haas, Ann P; Koestner, Bethany; Hendin, Herbert; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to examine suicidal ideation and depression in undergraduate college students who participated in the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention-sponsored College Screening Project at Emory University. The principal measure of depressive symptoms was the nine-item depression module from the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Additional questions were focused on current suicidal ideation, past suicide attempts, and episodes of deliberate self-harm and on symptoms of anxiety and distress. Seven hundred and twenty-nine students participated over a 3-school-year interval (2002-2005). Most notably, 11.1% of the students endorsed current (past 4 weeks) suicidal ideation and 16.5% had a lifetime suicide attempt or self-injurious episode. Students with current suicidal ideation had significantly higher depression symptom severity than those without suicidal ideation (t = -9.34, df = 706, Pstudents with PHQ-9 scores of 15 or higher reported suicidal ideation compared to 5.7% of those with lower scores (chi(2) = 56.29, df = 1, Pstudents with moderately severe to severe depression (85%) or current suicidal ideation (84%) were not receiving any psychiatric treatment at the time of assessment. These results suggest that there is a strong relationship between severity of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in college students, and that suicidal feelings and actions are relatively common in this group. This underscores the need to provide effective mental health outreach and treatment services to this vulnerable population. As this analysis was based on data collected at a single institution, the results may not be representative of all college students or young adults.

  14. Suicidal ideation and behaviour among persons seeking HIV testing in peri-urban areas of Cape Town, South Africa: a lost opportunity for suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Saal, Wylene

    2016-12-28

    Suicidal ideation and behaviour (SIB) are among the psychiatric sequela of HIV/AIDS. Few studies have however examined the prevalence and correlates of SIB among persons seeking HIV testing. We set out to document the prevalence and correlates of SIB among people seeking HIV testing in peri-urban areas of Cape Town, South Africa (SA). A cross-sectional research design was used to recruit a sample (n = 500) of individuals seeking HIV testing. Self-report measures were used to assess two-week prevalence of SIB as well as life-time prevalence of suicide attempt. A structured clinical interview was used to assess common mental disorders (CMDs). Regression analysis was used to determine if CMD and socio-demographic variables predicted suicidal ideation. The mean age of the sample was 36 years, 51.6% were female and 46.6% were unemployed. The two-week prevalence of suicidal ideation was 24.27% while the two-week prevalence of suicide attempt and suicide plans was 2.8%. Suicidal ideation was not associated with age, gender, employment status, family income or household food insecurity. CMDs were significantly associated with suicidal ideation; individuals with depressive disorders were approximately 5.5 times more likely to report suicidal ideation, while those with generalised anxiety disorder, trauma-related disorders and alcohol use disorder were approximately 7, 4.7 and 2.8 times more likely to report suicidal ideation, respectively. Results suggest that persons seeking HIV testing may be a well-delineated group of persons at risk of suicide in this region of SA. Contact with the health care system during HIV testing provides an opportunity for targeted suicide prevention interventions in what appears to be a high risk group.

  15. The Role of Loneliness in Prison Suicide Prevention and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Samantha; Day, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Suicide in prisons has been seen as a public health concern reaching crisis proportions around the world. In this study, data from 60 inmates in a South Australian remand facility were used to examine the relationship between loneliness and known predictors of self-harm, such as depression and hopelessness. As predicted, the results suggested that…

  16. suicide prevention and management in the sa national defence force

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rene

    United Kingdom (UK) regular armed forces: 624 among males, and 14 ... white males between the ages of 18 and 25 were forced by law under the P.W.. Botha ...... 32 Heginbotham, C. “Commentary on suicide, euthanasia and the psychiatrist”.

  17. Helper Therapy in an Online Suicide Prevention Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greidanus, Elaine; Everall, Robin D.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals who feel comfortable using Internet-based communication often seek help online when they are feeling distressed. This study examines an online community formed to provide support for distressed adolescents. Content analysis revealed themes in a series of online postings from youth who were experiencing suicidal thoughts. Youth…

  18. Family - protective factor to prevent suicidal behavior in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana R. Rusu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of our research was to establish a possible correlation between suicide risk in adolescents and a series ofintra-familial protective factors such as family harmony, intact families, increased family involvement in child education, empathy, ability toexpress emotions. Materials and Methods The study comprised the 1143 pupils, aged between 14 and 16 years from Cluj and Maramures counties,that participated in the SEYLE baseline evaluation. Results: Adolescents who have no problems with parents (p<0.001, being understoodby them (p<0.001 and having the belief that family is very important to them (p<0.001, are protected from the risk of committing suicide. Atthe same time, parents’ ability to listen children opinion (p<0.001 and help them take important decisions (p<0.001, the time spent discussingwith teens the problems they’re going through (p<0.001, and the fact that parents know what they do in their spare time (p=0.003 showsprotective factors of suicidal behavior with a statistically significant value in this study.Conclusion: The family is a psychosocial system witha major impact on adolescents’ personality formation. The attitude towards children, the parents availability to important moments for teens,the ability to be both subjective and objective towards their children initiatives, are factors of protection against adolescents’ suicidal behavior.

  19. [Perceived satisfaction and usefulness of suicide prevention information for patients and relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triñanes, Y; Senra-Rivera, C; Seoane-Pesqueira, G; González-García, A; Álvarez-Ariza, M; de-Las-Heras-Liñero, E; Atienza, G

    2014-01-01

    To assess the satisfaction of persons with suicidal behaviour and their relatives using patient information material included in the Clinical Practice Guidelines on Prevention and Treatment of Suicidal Behaviour. The sample was made up of 57 patients with suicidal ideation or behaviour, and 52 relatives. The participants were recruited through a suicide prevention programme (Programa de intervención intensiva en conducta suicida [PII] - Suicidal Behaviour Intensive Intervention Programme) and a family association (Federación de Asociaciones de Familiares y Personas con enfermedad mental de Galicia [FEAFES] - Galician Federation of Associations of Relatives and Persons with mental diseases). An ad-hoc questionnaire was designed to ascertain the degree of perceived satisfaction and usefulness of using the information included in the guidelines. The descriptive data of the sample is presented, along with an exploratory factorial analysis of the questionnaire that yielded two dimensions, i.e., format and usefulness. Patients scored significantly lower than the relatives in two dimensions; nevertheless, no significant differences were found between the two groups in the level of general satisfaction. The socio-demographic variables did not influence the results. Similarly, no differences were observed between patients with and without history of suicidal behaviour. Participants stressed that Primary Care was the setting best suited for dissemination of this type of information. In general, both patients and relatives displayed a high level of satisfaction with the patient information material assessed. Furnishing information of this type to patients with suicidal ideation and/or behaviour could act as a preventive-educational tool. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Epidemiology & preventive aspects of railway suicides and fatalities related to trespassing accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sachil; Verma, Anoop K; Bhattacharya, Sandeep; Singh, Uma Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Suicide and trespass are major contributors to risk on the railway, resulting in around 170-180 fatalities per year in Lucknow region, as well as associated major disruption to the rail network. Lucknow is the capital city of the state of Uttar Pradesh in India. The analysis included train-pedestrian fatalities during 2007-2012. The data for 2007-2012 were collected from the autopsy reports of the university, case sheets from the hospital, the general prosecutor's investigations report and the inquest reports from police. The results show that the majority of victims were males. Half of the suicide victims were 20-39 years old. Accidents happened most frequently in situations when a person was walking on the tracks/in front of train (22.7%) or were crossing the tracks illegally (20.9%). Among all train-pedestrian fatalities, about half of the victims (42.8%) were intoxicated by alcohol. Female suicide victims suffered from mental health problems more frequently (55.8%) than male suicide victims. Overall, there is no reason to believe that train-pedestrian fatalities are unavoidable. By contrast, the effective prevention of railway suicides and accidents should be based on a systems approach involving effective measures introduces by several organisations such as government, railway organisations, various authorities (such as public health, education, enforcement, urban planning) and communities. Same measures can often be used to prevent both trespassing and suicides, even though their effectiveness may depend on the target group. In addition, there are measures specifically targeted to prevent either trespassing or suicides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  1. MATES in Construction: Impact of a Multimodal, Community-Based Program for Suicide Prevention in the Construction Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullestrup, Jorgen; Lequertier, Belinda; Martin, Graham

    2011-01-01

    A large-scale workplace-based suicide prevention and early intervention program was delivered to over 9,000 construction workers on building sites across Queensland. Intervention components included universal General Awareness Training (GAT; general mental health with a focus on suicide prevention); gatekeeper training provided to construction worker volunteer ‘Connectors’; Suicide First Aid (ASIST) training offered to key workers; outreach support provided by trained and supervised MIC staff; state-wide suicide prevention hotline; case management service; and postvention support provided in the event of a suicide. Findings from over 7,000 workers (April 2008 to November 2010) are reported, indicating strong construction industry support, with 67% building sites and employers approached agreeing to participate in MIC. GAT participants demonstrated significantly increased suicide prevention awareness compared with a comparison group. Connector training participants rated MIC as helpful and effective, felt prepared to intervene with a suicidal person, and knew where to seek help for a suicidal individual following the training. Workers engaged positively with the after-hours crisis support phone line and case management. MIC provided postvention support to 10 non-MIC sites and sites engaged with MIC, but not yet MIC-compliant. Current findings support the potential effectiveness and social validity of MIC for preventing suicide in construction workers. PMID:22163201

  2. MATES in Construction: Impact of a Multimodal, Community-Based Program for Suicide Prevention in the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Martin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale workplace-based suicide prevention and early intervention program was delivered to over 9,000 construction workers on building sites across Queensland. Intervention components included universal General Awareness Training (GAT; general mental health with a focus on suicide prevention; gatekeeper training provided to construction worker volunteer ‘Connectors’; Suicide First Aid (ASIST training offered to key workers; outreach support provided by trained and supervised MIC staff; state-wide suicide prevention hotline; case management service; and postvention support provided in the event of a suicide. Findings from over 7,000 workers (April 2008 to November 2010 are reported, indicating strong construction industry support, with 67% building sites and employers approached agreeing to participate in MIC. GAT participants demonstrated significantly increased suicide prevention awareness compared with a comparison group. Connector training participants rated MIC as helpful and effective, felt prepared to intervene with a suicidal person, and knew where to seek help for a suicidal individual following the training. Workers engaged positively with the after-hours crisis support phone line and case management. MIC provided postvention support to 10 non-MIC sites and sites engaged with MIC, but not yet MIC-compliant. Current findings support the potential effectiveness and social validity of MIC for preventing suicide in construction workers.

  3. Suicide and suicidal behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turecki, Gustavo; Brent, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Suicide is a complex public health problem of global dimension. Suicidal behaviour (SB) shows marked differences between genders, age groups, geographic regions and socio-political realities, and variably associates with different risk factors, underscoring likely etiological heterogeneity. Although there is no effective algorithm to predict suicide in clinical practice, improved recognition and understanding of clinical, psychological, sociological, and biological factors may facilitate the detection of high-risk individuals and assist in treatment selection. Psychotherapeutic, pharmacological, or neuromodulatory treatments of mental disorders can often prevent SB; additionally, regular follow-up of suicide attempters by mental health services is key to prevent future SB. PMID:26385066

  4. A Value-Critical Choice Analysis of a Policy to Prevent Suicide in Veterans and Service Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, Donna L; Schuman, Donald L

    2016-10-01

    A few years after the advent of the Global War on Terror, veteran and service member suicide emerged on the national forefront as a public health issue of significant concern. This social policy analysis applies a value-critical choice model to the military suicide prevention provisions mandated by Section 2 of Exec. Order No. 13625 (2012): Improving Access to Mental Health Services for Veterans, Service Members, and Military Families. Results reveal that the suicide prevention provisions mandated by the order have not been fully and effectively implemented and the goal of reducing military suicide remains elusive.

  5. Suicide prevention by online support groups: an action theory-based model of emotional first aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat, Itzhak; Shahar, Golan

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, online support groups have become a valuable source of help for individuals in suicidal crisis. Their attractiveness is attributed to features that enhance help-seeking and self-disclosure such as availability, anonymity, and use of written communication. However, online support groups also suffer from limitations and potential risks as agents of suicide prevention. The Israeli Association for Emotional First Aid (ERAN) has developed a practical model that seeks to maximize the benefits and minimize the risks of online suicide prevention. The model applies the Action Theory concepts whereby individuals shape their own environment. The present paper presents the model, which is based on an online support group combined with personal chat and a telephonic help line. The online support group is moderated by paraprofessionals who function as both process regulators and support providers. The principles and practice of the model are described, the theoretical rationale is presented, and directions for future research are suggested.

  6. A scoping review of Indigenous suicide prevention in circumpolar regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redvers, Jennifer; Bjerregaard, Peter; Eriksen, Heidi;

    2015-01-01

    , and even fewer focusing specifically on youth intervention. The interventions described in the studies we found had diverse program designs and content, and used varied evaluation methods and outcomes. The studies we included consistently reported that it was important to use community-based and culturally......BACKGROUND: Suicide is a serious public health challenge in circumpolar regions, especially among Indigenous youth. Indigenous communities, government agencies and health care providers are making concerted efforts to reduce the burden of suicide and strengthen protective factors for individuals...... was to determine the extent and types of interventions that have been reported during past decade. We want to use this knowledge to support community initiative and inform intervention development and evaluation. DESIGN: We conducted a scoping review of online databases to identify studies published between 2004...

  7. Suicide protective factors among trans adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Chérie; Smith, Nathan Grant

    2013-07-01

    A recent study indicated a suicide attempt rate of 41 % among trans (e.g., trans, transgender, transexual/transsexual, genderqueer, two-spirit) individuals. Although this rate is alarming, there is a dearth of literature regarding suicide prevention for trans individuals. A vital step in developing suicide prevention models is the identification of protective factors. It was hypothesized that social support from friends, social support from family, optimism, reasons for living, and suicide resilience, which are known to protect cis (non-trans) individuals, also protect trans individuals. A sample of self-identified trans Canadian adults (N = 133) was recruited from LGBT and trans LISTSERVs. Data were collected online using a secure survey platform. A three block hierarchical multiple regression model was used to predict suicidal behavior from protective factors. Social support from friends, social support from family, and optimism significantly and negatively predicted 33 % of variance in participants' suicidal behavior after controlling for age. Reasons for living and suicide resilience accounted for an additional 19 % of the variance in participants' suicidal behavior after controlling for age, social support from friends, social support from family, and optimism. Of the factors mentioned above, perceived social support from family, one of three suicide resilience factors (emotional stability), and one of six reasons for living (child-related concerns) significantly and negatively predicted participants' suicidal behavior. Overall, these findings can be used to inform the practices of mental health workers, medical doctors, and suicide prevention workers working with trans clients.

  8. Suicide Prevention: It’s All About Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Emile Durkheim in his book A Study in Sociology, and Thomas Joiner’s book Why People Die By Suicide. In order to frame Durkheim’s and Joiner’s theories...rates within France. For example, Durkheim theorized religious affiliation, not necessarily beliefs, but the very belonging and active participation...collective rules generated through immersion in group life (integration).ൢ 10 According to Durkheim : What constitutes this society is the

  9. Effect of phone call versus face-to-face follow-up on recurrent suicide attempts prevention in individuals with a history of multiple suicide attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyed Ghafur; Amini, Mohsen; Mahaki, Behzad; Bagherian-Sararoudi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the efficacy of different ways of communications on prevention of suicidal reattempt, we compared the efficacy of phone call versus face-to-face follow-up in patients with previous attempt. Materials and Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical trial, 55 suicide reattempters who were admitted to the poisoning emergency were divided into phone call (29 patients) and face-to-face (26 patients) groups randomly. They were followed at 8 occasions: 2nd and 4th weeks, and the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 8th months. The suicidal reattempt, suicidal thought, hope, and interest of the patients were assessed on each occasion, and the patients were guided to visit by a therapist, if needed. The findings were analyzed by Mann–Whitney, Chi-square, Cochran, Friedman, and independent t-tests using SPSS 20. Results: The status of “hope” and “interest” improved in both groups, but it showed more significant difference in the face-to-face group. Suicidal thoughts in both groups decreased over time, and this was more significant in the face-to-face group. However, we did not found any significant difference in the frequency of the suicidal reattempts between two groups. Conclusion: Face-to-face versus phone call follow-up of suicide attempters can significantly alleviate suicidal thoughts and improve hopes and interests. PMID:28028524

  10. Prevention of suicidal behavior in adolescents with post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Eugene; Sher, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is significantly associated with an increased risk for suicidal behavior among adolescents. Suicide is one of the top three causes of adolescent deaths worldwide. Despite the strong relationship between PTSD and suicidal behavior, precise causal pathways linking PTSD to suicide in adolescents remains unclear. A slew of mediating factors and variables commonly present themselves with both suicide and PTSD, including co-morbid psychiatric disorders, exposure to different forms of trauma and stressful life events, core neurobiological changes, and mental, emotional, and physiological states such as hyperarousal, impulsivity, and aggression. Because youth is such a critical stage of development, it is very important that at-risk adolescents are identified and referred for treatment. With many treatment challenges in these populations, effective implementation and use of prevention methods are of increasing importance. The most proven prevention methods include physician education, means restriction, and gatekeeper training. Other strategies that have received empirical support are public education campaigns and implementing guidelines for the media, including those for television, print media, and the Internet.

  11. Integrating Motivational Interviewing and Self-Determination Theory with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Peter C.; Patrick, Heather; Wenzel, Amy; Williams, Geoffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in preventing suicide-related behavior. However, it is often difficult to engage patients who are at-risk in treatment. Motivational Interviewing (MI) has been shown to increase treatment engagement and improve treatment outcomes when it is used to complement other treatments. As a…

  12. Preventing Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescents: The Signs of Self-Injury Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Walsh, Barent W.; McDade, Moira

    2010-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) continues to be a problem among youth and there is a great need for programming aimed at reducing NSSI in adolescents. The signs of self-injury program is the first known NSSI school-based prevention program for adolescents that attempts to increase knowledge, improve help-seeking attitudes and behaviors, and…

  13. A Centennial Milestone (1910-2010): 100 Years of Youth Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Anniversaries are appropriate times for reflecting on the past and planning for the future, and in this 100th anniversary year of Sigmund Freud's famous group meeting--a meeting among a large group of prominent mental health professionals that provides a useful marker and arguable "starting point" for contemporary youth suicide prevention efforts,…

  14. SHPPS 2006: School Health Policies and Programs Study--Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School health policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. This brief reports study results in the area of suicide prevention, covering the following topics: (1) Health Education; (2) Health Services and Mental…

  15. Outcomes of Community-Based Screening for Depression and Suicide Prevention among Japanese Elders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Fujita, Motoi; Goto, Masahiro; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Tomoe

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In this study we evaluate outcomes of a community-based program to prevent suicide among elderly individuals aged 65 and older. Design and Methods: We used a quasi-experimental design with intervention and referent municipalities. The program included a 7-year implementation of depression screening with follow-up by general practitioners…

  16. A Centennial Milestone (1910-2010): 100 Years of Youth Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Anniversaries are appropriate times for reflecting on the past and planning for the future, and in this 100th anniversary year of Sigmund Freud's famous group meeting--a meeting among a large group of prominent mental health professionals that provides a useful marker and arguable "starting point" for contemporary youth suicide prevention efforts,…

  17. Developing suicide prevention programs for African American youth in African American churches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molock, Sherry Davis; Matlin, Samantha; Barksdale, Crystal; Puri, Rupa; Lyles, Joseph

    2008-06-01

    Suicide prevention programs for African American youth in African American churches may have broad appeal because: (1) the Black Church has a strong history of helping community members, regardless of church membership; (2) African Americans have the highest level of public and private religiousness; and (3) the church can help shape religious and cultural norms about mental health and help-seeking. The proposed gatekeeper model trains lay helpers and clergy to recognize the risk and protective factors for depression and suicide, to make referrals to the appropriate community mental health resources, and to deliver a community education curriculum. Potential barriers and suggestions for how to overcome these barriers are discussed.

  18. A scoping review of Indigenous suicide prevention in circumpolar regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redvers, Jennifer; Bjerregaard, Peter; Eriksen, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    was to determine the extent and types of interventions that have been reported during past decade. We want to use this knowledge to support community initiative and inform intervention development and evaluation. DESIGN: We conducted a scoping review of online databases to identify studies published between 2004...... and 2014. We included articles that described interventions in differentiated circumpolar Indigenous populations and provided evaluation data. We retained grey literature publications for comparative reference. RESULTS: Our search identified 95 articles that focused on suicide in distinct circumpolar...

  19. The effectiveness of platform screen doors for the prevention of subway suicides in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yong Woon; Kang, Sung Jin; Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Michiko

    2016-04-01

    Subway suicide can significantly impact the general public. Platform Screen Doors (PSDs) are considered to be an effective strategy to prevent suicides at subway stations, but the evidence on their effectiveness is limited. We assessed the effectiveness of installing half- and full-height platform screen doors in reducing subway suicides using Poisson regression analysis. Ten-year monthly panel data for 121 subway stations between 2003 and 2012 in the Seoul metropolitan area were used for the analysis. We found that installing PSDs decreases fatal suicide cases by 89% (95% CI: 57-97%). We also found that the installation of full-height PSDs resulted in the elimination of subway suicides by completely blocking access to the track area; however, half-height PSDs, which do not extend to the ceiling of the platform, were not as effective as full-height ones. Our findings were based on the data from a single subway operator for a limited period of time. Accordingly, we did not consider the possibility that some passengers choose to die at a station run by other operators. Our study did not examine the potential substitution effects of other suicide methods. Installing physical barriers at subway stations can be an effective strategy to reduce the number of subway suicides; however, half-height PSDs are not as effective as full-height ones, even when they are as high as the height of an adult. Thus, these barriers should be made high enough so that nobody can climb over them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Tackling stress management, addiction, and suicide prevention in a predoctoral dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Mario A; Ramanula, Dhorea; Pattanaporn, Komkhamn

    2014-09-01

    Health care professionals, particularly dentists, are subject to high levels of stress. Without proper stress management, problems related to mental health and addiction and, to a lesser extent, deliberate self-harm such as suicide may arise. There is a lack of information on teaching methodologies employed to discuss stress management and suicide prevention in dental education. The purpose of this article is to describe a University of British Columbia Faculty of Dentistry module designed to address stress management and suicide prevention, using students' personal reflections to illustrate the impact of the pedagogies used. The module enrolls more than 200 students per year and has sessions tailored to the discussion of stress management and suicide prevention. The pedagogies include standardized patients, invited guest lectures, in-class activities, video presentation, and self-reflections. More than 500 students' self-reflections collected over the past five years illustrate the seriousness of the issues discussed and the level of discomfort students experience when pondering such issues. The instructors hope to have increased students' awareness of the stressors in their profession. Further studies are needed to unravel the extent to which such pedagogy influences a balanced practice of dentistry.

  1. [Cooperation with primary care physicians on the issue of suicide prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Shinji; Tsubouchi, Ken; Kobayashi, Takafumi

    2012-01-01

    The "General Outline of Comprehensive Suicide Prevention Measures," formulated in 2007, places heavy emphasis on the role of primary care physicians (hereinafter "PC physicians") in preventing suicide, calling for improvements to their diagnostic and treatment capabilities, as well as for increased availability of appropriate psychiatric care. The following are study findings from Shimane Prefecture, Japan. 1. Among PC physicians, 38.4% had experienced the suicide of outpatients. For internists, the figure was 55.6%, while for physicians in other specialties it was 17%. 2. In the greater Matsue area, of the 948 new patients seen at psychiatric hospitals and clinics between June and August, 2009, 29.6% had been referred from PC physicians. Of the referred patients, 25.3% exhibited suicidal ideation (17.8% classified as mild, 5.7% as moderate, and 1.8% severe), while 12.5% had attempted suicide (6.4% classified as minor attempts, 3.9% as moderate, and 2.1% as serious). 3. In the greater Izumo area, although 73% of family doctors are treating patients with symptoms of depression, 38% of physicians noted the absence of specialists with whom they can consult. This highlights the need for greater availability of local psychiatric consultation services. 4. In the greater Masuda area, which had a very high suicide rate, a model suicide prevention project was implemented over two years, beginning in 2004. The project put great emphasis on cooperation between numerous concerned entities and organizations. Notable aspects of this project included cooperation between medical institutions and psychiatric hospitals, as well as efforts to promote the use of self check mental health assessments at the time of regular health checkups, after which persons with mental health issues were provided with support at the checkup site, as well as at medical and other facilities. Another element of the program consisted of the proactive implementation of home visits by public health nurses

  2. Local community intervention through depression screening and group activity for elderly suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Ono, Yutaka; Watanabe, Naoki; Tanaka, Eriko; Kudoh, Seijiro; Sakashita, Tomoe; Sakamoto, Shinji; Neichi, Keiko; Satoh, Kyoko; Nakamura, Kenji; Yoshimura, Kimio

    2006-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate outcomes of a community-based program to prevent suicide among the elderly (>or=65 years old) using a quasi-experimental design with two neighboring references. During 1999-2004, the program including depression screening and group activity was conducted by the public health nurses in the Minami district (population 1685) of Nagawa town, rural Japan. Pre-post changes in the risk of completing suicide were estimated by the incidence rate ratios (IRR). The risk for Minami's elderly females was reduced by 74% (age-adjusted IRR, 0.26; 90% CI, 0.07-0.98) more than the historical trend, while there was no change in the risk of Minami's males and nor in the male or female references. The local intervention using public health nursing would be effective against suicide for elderly females without diffusing to the surroundings.

  3. Getting into trouble: perspectives on stress and suicide prevention among Pacific Northwest Indian youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, C June; Cooper, Michelle

    2011-07-01

    Suicide rates among Indian youth in the United States are two to three times the national average. Although researchers have identified related risk and protective factors, they have limited understanding of the perspectives of youth at risk. In this descriptive, ethnographic study in a Pacific Northwest tribe, the goal was to gain an understanding of the life experiences of the youth. Focus groups and observations were conducted with 30 Indian youth aged between 14 and 19 years in a Pacific Northwest tribe. Youth were asked to talk about their stressors, sense of family/community support, and hopes for the future. Youth reported major stress and noted that friends and family were both a support and also a source of stress. They hoped for strengthening of cultural values, economic development, and opportunities to give their talents to the tribe. These findings provide further insight about suicide risk among Indian youth and advance the understanding of suicide prevention in a transcultural setting.

  4. Cognitive behaviour therapy to prevent complicated grief among relatives and spouses bereaved by suicide: Csuster andomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.; Keyser, de J.; Neeleman, J.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Nolen, W.; Burger, H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of a family based grief counselling programme to prevent complicated grief among first degree relatives and spouses of someone who had committed suicide. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial with follow-up at 13 months after the suicide. Setting General p

  5. Cognitive behaviour therapy to prevent complicated grief among relatives and spouses bereaved by suicide : cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M.; de Keijser, J.; Neeleman, J.; Kerkhof, A.; Nolen, W.; Burger, H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of a family based grief counselling programme to prevent complicated grief among first degree relatives and spouses of someone who had committed suicide. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial with follow-up at 13 months after the suicide. Setting General p

  6. Patterns of intimate partner homicide suicide in later life: Strategies for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Salari

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonia SalariDepartment Family and Consumer Studies, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USAAbstract: Intimate partner homicide suicide (IPHS constitutes the most violent domestic abuse outcome, devastating individuals, families, neighborhoods and communities. This research used content analysis to analyze 225 murder suicide events (444 deaths among dyads with at least one member 60 or older. Data were collected from newspaper articles, television news transcripts, police reports and obituaries published between 1999 and 2005. Findings suggest the most dangerous setting was the home and the majority of perpetrators were men. Firearms were most often employed in the violence. Relationship strife was present in some cases, but only slightly higher than the divorce rate for that age group. Illness was cited in just over half of the cases, but 30% of sick elderly couples had only a perpetrator who was ill. Evidence of suicide pacts and mercy killings were very rare and practitioners are encouraged to properly investigate these events. Suicidal men in this age range must be recognized as a potential threat to others, primarily their partner. Homicide was sometimes the primary motive, and the perpetrators in those cases resembled the “intimate terrorist.” Victims in those cases were often terrorized before the murder. Clinicians are educated about the patterns of fatal violence in later life dyads and provided with strategies for prevention.Keywords: murder-suicide, domestic violence, elder abuse, self abuse

  7. Does a TV Public Service Advertisement Campaign for Suicide Prevention Really Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In Han; You, Jung-Won; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Jung-Soo; Kwon, Se Won; Park, Jong-Ik

    2017-05-01

    One of the critical measures in suicide prevention is promoting public awareness of crisis hotline numbers so that individuals can more readily seek help in a time of crisis. Although public service advertisements (PSA) may be effective in raising the rates of both awareness and use of a suicide hotline, few investigations have been performed regarding their effectiveness in South Korea, where the suicide rate is the highest among OECD countries. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a television PSA campaign. We analyzed a database of crisis phone calls compiled by the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare to track changes in call volume to a crisis hotline that was promoted in a TV campaign. We compared daily call counts for three periods of equal length: before, during, and after the campaign. The number of crisis calls during the campaign was about 1.6 times greater than the number before or after the campaign. Relative to the number of suicide-related calls in the previous year, the number of calls during the campaign period surged, displaying a noticeable increase. The findings confirmed that this campaign had a positive impact on call volume to the suicide hotline.

  8. Opinions on Suicide and Perceived Barriers to Care in a Sample of United States Marine Non-Commissioned Officers: Implications for Future Frontline Supervisors’ Suicide Prevention Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    most frequent message in suicide notes is of loneliness . .58 65 External factors, like lack of money, are a major reason for suicide. .58 76 Long...questions about our plans, please contact CDR Aaron D. Werbel, Ph.D., Suicide Prevention Program Manager, U.S. Marine Corps, 3280 Russell Road, Quantico, VA

  9. Suicidal behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neeleman, J

    2001-01-01

    -Prevention of suicidal behaviour remains difficult, despite increasing knowledge of its determinants. Health service efforts hardly affect suicide rates. -Recent shifts in the epidemiology of suicidal behaviour are rising rates among the young and increasing use of violent methods. these can be lin

  10. Preventing repetition of attempted suicide-III. The Amager Project, 5-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahoz, Titia; Hvid, Marianne; Wang, August G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Amager Project was initiated as a quasi-experimental study in 2005, based on an active outreach suicide preventive intervention inspired by the Norwegian Baerum Model. A 1-year follow-up study was conducted as a randomized controlled trial showing that this kind of active outreach...... follow-up study. METHOD: One hundred and thirty-three suicide attempters were included at this 5-year follow-up RCT study at Copenhagen University Hospital, Amager, and randomized to a rapid outreach suicide preventive intervention (OPAC) or TAU. RESULTS: Offering OPAC intervention to patients after...

  11. Can an Infusion of Federal Funds Result in Sustainable Projects? An Evaluation of Suicide Prevention Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsler, Robert; Formica, Scott W; Stout, Ellyson; Carr, Colleen

    2017-09-08

    Our study evaluated the sustainability of programs in early cohorts of the Garrett Lee Smith (GLS) Memorial Act suicide prevention initiative, a major source of federal funding for youth suicide prevention among states, tribes, and institutions of higher education. We sought to: (1) determine whether suicide prevention activities initiated with federal support continued after funding ended, and (2) identify factors associated with sustainment. Thirty-three sites between 1 and 4 years beyond the end of their GLS grant participated in a retrospective online survey assessing their level of suicide prevention activity 1 year before, during (during-GLS), and 1 year after funding (after-GLS). We found that, on average, sites experienced a 6% decrease in their overall level of activity from during- to after-GLS. Twenty-two (67% of responding sites) exhibited either an increase in activity level or no more than a 10% decline from during- to after-GLS periods. After-GLS scores for the 11 remaining sites declined between 11 and 30% from their during-GLS levels. We conducted semi-structured follow-up interviews with 13 sites that successfully continued their activities to explore factors associated with sustainability. Our findings indicate that program actions in the during-GLS period associated with sustainability included: maintaining a sustainability mindset, developing and nurturing partnerships and relationships, embedding services in parent organizations, pursuing new and diversified funding, and implementing cost-reduction efficiencies. Actions in the after-GLS period associated with sustainability included: obtaining funding from other sources, reconfiguring, and maintaining continuous leadership.

  12. The Army’s Use of Spirituality in the Prevention of Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    of Religion/Spirituality in the Prevention of Suicide Psychological and Psychiatric Studies Sigmund Freud , a critic of religion, believed religion...might help people with behavioral health issues. In his writings, Freud affirmed, “If only religion can answer the question of the purpose of life one...youth ministry. 47 Sigmund Freud , Civilization and its Discontents (1930) trans. James Strachey, Standard Addition of the Psychological Works of

  13. Public involvement in suicide prevention: understanding and strengthening lay responses to distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belam Judith

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The slogan "Suicide prevention is everyone's business" has been used in a number of campaigns worldwide in recent years, but most research into suicide prevention has focused on the role of medical professionals in identifying and managing risk. Little consideration has been given to the role that lay people can play in suicide prevention, or to the resources they need in order to do so. The majority of people who take their own lives are not under the care of specialist mental health services, and around half have not had recent contact with their general practitioner. These individuals are not known to be 'at risk' and there is little or no opportunity for clinical intervention. Family members and friends may be the only ones to know that a person is troubled or distressed, and their capacity to recognise, assess and respond to that distress is therefore vitally important. This study aims to discover what the suicidal process looks like from the point of view of relatives and friends and to gain insight into the complex and difficult judgements that people have to make when trying to support a distressed individual. Methods/Design The study uses qualitative methods to build up a detailed picture of 15–20 completed suicides, aged 18–34. Data are gathered by means of in-depth interviews with relatives, friends and others who knew the deceased well. In each case, as many informants as possible are sought using a purposive snowballing technique. Interviews focus on the family and social network of the deceased, the ways in which relatives and friends interpreted and responded to his/her distress, the potential for intervention that may have existed within the lay network and the knowledge, skills and other resources that would have helped members to support the distressed individual more effectively. Discussion The study will inform interventions to promote public mental health awareness and will provide a basis on which to

  14. Patterns of intimate partner homicide suicide in later life: Strategies for prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    Intimate partner homicide suicide (IPHS) constitutes the most violent domestic abuse outcome, devastating individuals, families, neighborhoods and communities. This research used content analysis to analyze 225 murder suicide events (444 deaths) among dyads with at least one member 60 or older. Data were collected from newspaper articles, television news transcripts, police reports and obituaries published between 1999 and 2005. Findings suggest the most dangerous setting was the home and the majority of perpetrators were men. Firearms were most often employed in the violence. Relationship strife was present in some cases, but only slightly higher than the divorce rate for that age group. Illness was cited in just over half of the cases, but 30% of sick elderly couples had only a perpetrator who was ill. Evidence of suicide pacts and mercy killings were very rare and practitioners are encouraged to properly investigate these events. Suicidal men in this age range must be recognized as a potential threat to others, primarily their partner. Homicide was sometimes the primary motive, and the perpetrators in those cases resembled the “intimate terrorist.” Victims in those cases were often terrorized before the murder. Clinicians are educated about the patterns of fatal violence in later life dyads and provided with strategies for prevention. PMID:18044194

  15. Suicide prevention through means restriction: Impact of the 2008-2011 pesticide restrictions on suicide in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Sen; Dawson, Andrew; Eddleston, Michael; Konradsen, Flemming; Metcalfe, Chris; Gunnell, David

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of 3-year phased bans of the pesticides dimethoate and fenthion in 2008–2010, and paraquat in 2009–2011, on suicide mortality in Sri Lanka. Methods Age-standardised overall, sex-specific, and method-specific suicide rates were calculated using Sri Lankan police data (1989–2015). Using negative binomial regression models, we estimated the change in the rate and number of suicide deaths in post-ban years (2011–15) compared to those expected based on pre-ban trends (2001–10). Findings Overall suicide mortality dropped by 21% between 2011 and 2015, from 18.3 to 14.3 per 100,000. The decline in pesticide suicides during this same period was larger than for overall suicides: from 8.5 to 4.2 per 100,000, a 50% reduction. This was accompanied by a smaller concurrent rise in non-pesticide suicide mortality with a 2% increase (9.9 to 10.1 per 100,000). In 2015, the ratio between the observed and expected pesticide suicide rates was 0.49 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.40, 0.62), corresponding to an estimated 937 (95% CI 574, 1389) fewer pesticide suicides than expected from pre-ban suicide rates. Findings were similar in sensitivity analyses using 2008 or 2012 as commencement of the post intervention period. Conclusion Bans of paraquat, dimethoate and fenthion in Sri Lanka were associated with a reduction in pesticide suicide mortality and in overall suicide mortality despite a small rise in other methods. This study provides further evidence for the effectiveness of pesticide regulation in limiting the availability of highly hazardous pesticides and thereby reducing the number of global suicides. PMID:28264041

  16. Reducing the burden of suicide in the U.S.: the aspirational research goals of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention Research Prioritization Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Cynthia A; Pearson, Jane L; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Satow, Phillip M; Gebbia, Robert; Berman, Alan L; Reidenberg, Daniel J; Feldman, Saul; Molock, Sherry; Carras, Michelle C; Lento, René M; Sherrill, Joel; Pringle, Beverly; Dalal, Siddhartha; Insel, Thomas R

    2014-09-01

    The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention Research Prioritization Task Force (RPTF) has created a prioritized national research agenda with the potential to rapidly and substantially reduce the suicide burden in the U.S. if fully funded and implemented. Viable, sustainable scientific research agendas addressing challenging public health issues such as suicide often need to incorporate perspectives from multiple stakeholder groups (e.g., researchers, policymakers, and other end-users of new knowledge) during an agenda-setting process. The Stakeholder Survey was a web-based survey conducted and analyzed in 2011-2012 to inform the goal-setting step in the RPTF agenda development process. The survey process, and the final list of "aspirational" research goals it produced, are presented here. Using a modified Delphi process, diverse constituent groups generated and evaluated candidate research goals addressing pressing suicide prevention research needs. A total of 716 respondents representing 49 U.S. states and 18 foreign countries provided input that ultimately produced 12 overarching, research-informed aspirational goals aimed at reducing the U.S. suicide burden. Highest-rated goals addressed prevention of subsequent suicidal behavior after an initial attempt, strategies to retain patients in care, improved healthcare provider training, and generating care models that would ensure accessible treatment. The Stakeholder Survey yielded widely valued research targets. Findings were diverse in focus, type, and current phase of research development but tended to prioritize practical solutions over theoretical advancement. Other complex public health problems requiring input from a broad-based constituency might benefit from web-based tools that facilitate such community input. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  17. [Study protocol of a prevention of recurrent suicidal behaviour program based on case management (PSyMAC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáiz, Pilar A; Rodríguez-Revuelta, Julia; González-Blanco, Leticia; Burón, Patricia; Al-Halabí, Susana; Garrido, Marlen; García-Alvarez, Leticia; García-Portilla, Paz; Bobes, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of suicidal behaviour is a public health priority in the European Union. A previous suicide attempt is the best risk predictor for future attempts, as well as completed suicides. The primary aim of this article is to describe a controlled study protocol designed for prevention of recurrent suicidal behaviour that proposes case management, and includes a psychoeducation program, as compared with the standard intervention (PSyMAC). Patients admitted from January 2011 to June 2013 to the emergency room of the Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias were evaluated using a protocol including sociodemographic, psychiatric, and psychosocial assessment. Patients were randomly assigned to either a group receiving continuous case management including participation in a psychoeducation program (experimental group), or a control group receiving standard care. The primary objective is to examine whether or not the period of time until recurrent suicidal behaviour in the experimental group is significantly different from that of the control group. PSyMAC proposes low cost and easily adaptable interventions to the usual clinical setting that can help to compensate the shortcoming of specific action protocols and suicidal behaviour prevention programs in our country. The evaluation of PSyMAC results will determine their real effectivity as a case-magament program to reduce suicidal risk. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. The possibilities of suicide prevention in adolescents. A holistic approach to protective and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, Sándor

    2013-03-01

    physical or biological-somatic level which includes physical circumstances, genetics, health, and diseases; (2) at the mental or psychological level, which includes mental health, self-esteem, and ability to deal with difficult circumstances, manage emotions, or cope with stress; (3) at the cultural level or the broader life environment, and this includes social, political, environmental, and economic factors that contribute to available options and quality of life; (4) at the social level, which includes relationships and involvement with others such as family, friends, workmates, the wider community and the person's sense of belonging; (5) at the spiritual level, which includes faith, hope, charity, despair, salvation. Children and adolescents spend a lot of time at school, so teachers must be educated to notice any warning signs of suicide, but the majority of pedagogues not only do not know the most important mental and psychosomatic symptoms, but do not recognize them in children and do not know how to handle them either. Hopelessness is the most important spiritual risk factor. The Beck Hopelessness Scale is a tool for easy application in general practice. The author lists some important symptoms and signs that neither parents nor teachers are able to recognize and handle, and provides useful advice for prevention.

  19. Mental health care providers' perceptions of the barriers to suicide prevention amongst people with substance use disorders in South Africa: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Daniel; Bantjes, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Substance use is a well-established, and potentially modifiable, risk factor for suicide. Suicide prevention interventions are typically framed within the biomedical paradigm and focus on addressing individual risk factors, improving access to psychiatric care, and improving the skills of medical personnel to recognise at-risk individuals. Few studies have focused on contextual factors that hinder suicide prevention in people with substance use disorders, particularly in low-resource settings. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore mental health care providers' perceptions of barriers to suicide prevention in people with substance use disorders in South Africa. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 mental health care providers who worked with suicidal people with substance use disorders in Cape Town, South Africa. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and Atlas.ti software was used to code the data inductively. Two superordinate themes were identified: structural issues in service provision and broad contextual issues that pose barriers to suicide prevention. Participants thought that inadequate resources and insufficient training hindered them from preventing suicide. Fragmented service provision was perceived to lead to patients not receiving the psychiatric, psychological, and social care that they needed. Contextual problems such as poverty and inequality, the breakdown of family, and stigma made participants think that preventing suicide in people with substance use disorders was almost impossible. These findings suggest that structural, social, and economic issues serve as barriers to suicide prevention. This challenges individual risk-factor models of suicide prevention and highlights the need to consider a broad range of contextual and socio-cultural factors when planning suicide prevention interventions. Findings suggest that the responsibility for suicide prevention may need to be distributed between multiple stakeholders

  20. Effectiveness of Structured Teaching Programme on Knowledge regarding Risk factors and Prevention of Suicidal Behaviour among Adolescents in a selected College, Salem, Tamil Nadu

    OpenAIRE

    Loganathan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Objectives: The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behavior, to evaluate the effectiveness of structured teaching programme on knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behaviour among Adolescents, and to associate the pre-test knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behaviour among adolescents with their selected demographic variables.Materials & Methods: A quantitative eval...

  1. Hybrid Optimization Algorithm of Particle Swarm Optimization and Cuckoo Search for Preventive Maintenance Period Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Jianwen Guo; Zhenzhong Sun; Hong Tang; Xuejun Jia; Song Wang; Xiaohui Yan; Guoliang Ye; Guohong Wu

    2016-01-01

    All equipment must be maintained during its lifetime to ensure normal operation. Maintenance is one of the critical roles in the success of manufacturing enterprises. This paper proposed a preventive maintenance period optimization model (PMPOM) to find an optimal preventive maintenance period. By making use of the advantages of particle swarm optimization (PSO) and cuckoo search (CS) algorithm, a hybrid optimization algorithm of PSO and CS is proposed to solve the PMPOM problem. The test fun...

  2. The need for a culturally-tailored gatekeeper training intervention program in preventing suicide among Indigenous peoples: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Bushra Farah; Hides, Leanne; Kisely, Steve; Ranmuthugala, Geetha; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Black, Emma; Gill, Neeraj; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Toombs, Maree

    2016-10-21

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among Indigenous youth worldwide. The aim of this literature review was to determine the cultural appropriateness and identify evidence for the effectiveness of current gatekeeper suicide prevention training programs within the international Indigenous community. Using a systematic strategy, relevant databases and targeted resources were searched using the following terms: 'suicide', 'gatekeeper', 'training', 'suicide prevention training', 'suicide intervention training' and 'Indigenous'. Other internationally relevant descriptors for the keyword "Indigenous" (e.g. "Maori", "First Nations", "Native American", "Inuit", "Metis" and "Aboriginal") were also used. Six articles, comprising five studies, met criteria for inclusion; two Australian, two from USA and one Canadian. While pre and post follow up studies reported positive outcomes, this was not confirmed in the single randomised controlled trial identified. However, the randomised controlled trial may have been underpowered and contained participants who were at higher risk of suicide pre-training. Uncontrolled evidence suggests that gatekeeper training may be a promising suicide intervention in Indigenous communities but needs to be culturally tailored to the target population. Further RCT evidence is required.

  3. Thinking and Doing Prevention: A Critical Analysis of Contemporary Youth Crime and Suicide Prevention Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jennifer; Stoneman, Lorinda

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we have traced some of the dominant cultural narratives shaping current understandings of youth crime and suicide. We have aimed to show some of the ways that our received understandings of what the problem is and what should be done about it are social constructions that privilege a certain kind of scientific explanation. By…

  4. Optimization of preventive health care facility locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGregor S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventive health care programs can save lives and contribute to a better quality of life by diagnosing serious medical conditions early. The Preventive Health Care Facility Location (PHCFL problem is to identify optimal locations for preventive health care facilities so as to maximize participation. When identifying locations for preventive health care facilities, we need to consider the characteristics of the preventive health care services. First, people should have more flexibility to select service locations. Second, each preventive health care facility needs to have a minimum number of clients in order to retain accreditation. Results This paper presents a new methodology for solving the PHCFL problem. In order to capture the characteristics of preventive health care services, we define a new accessibility measurement that combines the two-step floating catchment area method, distance factor, and the Huff-based competitive model. We assume that the accessibility of preventive health care services is a major determinant for participation in the service. Based on the new accessibility measurement, the PHCFL problem is formalized as a bi-objective model based on efficiency and coverage. The bi-objective model is solved using the Interchange algorithm. In order to accelerate the solving process, we implement the Interchange algorithm by building two new data structures, which captures the spatial structure of the PHCFL problem. In addition, in order to measure the spatial barrier between clients and preventive health care facilities accurately and dynamically, this paper estimates travelling distance and travelling time by calling the Google Maps Application Programming Interface (API. Conclusions Experiments based on a real application for the Alberta breast cancer screening program show that our work can increase the accessibility of breast cancer screening services in the province.

  5. Ibobbly mobile health intervention for suicide prevention in Australian Indigenous youth: a pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Fiona; Ridani, Rebecca; Mackinnon, Andrew; De La Mata, Nicole; Christensen, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Rates of youth suicide in Australian Indigenous communities are 4 times the national youth average and demand innovative interventions. Historical and persistent disadvantage is coupled with multiple barriers to help seeking. Mobile phone applications offer the opportunity to deliver therapeutic interventions directly to individuals in remote communities. The pilot study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-help mobile app (ibobbly) targeting suicidal ideation, depression, psychological distress and impulsivity among Indigenous youth in remote Australia. Setting Remote and very remote communities in the Kimberley region of North Western Australia. Participants Indigenous Australians aged 18–35 years. Interventions 61 participants were recruited and randomised to receive either an app (ibobbly) which delivered acceptance-based therapy over 6 weeks or were waitlisted for 6 weeks and then received the app for the following 6 weeks. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was the Depressive Symptom Inventory—Suicidality Subscale (DSI-SS) to identify the frequency and intensity of suicidal ideation in the previous weeks. Secondary outcomes were the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), The Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) and the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11). Results Although preintervention and postintervention changes on the (DSI-SS) were significant in the ibobbly arm (t=2.40; df=58.1; p=0.0195), these differences were not significant compared with the waitlist arm (t=1.05; df=57.8; p=0.2962). However, participants in the ibobbly group showed substantial and statistically significant reductions in PHQ-9 and K10 scores compared with waitlist. No differences were observed in impulsivity. Waitlist participants improved after 6 weeks of app use. Conclusions Apps for suicide prevention reduce distress and depression but do not show significant reductions on suicide ideation or impulsivity. A feasible

  6. Educational needs assessment for psychiatry residents to prevent suicide: a qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barekatain, Majid; Aminoroaia, Mahin; Samimi, Seyed Mehdi Ardestani; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Attari, Abbas

    2013-10-01

    Suicide is a commonly encountered and stressful event in professional life of any psychiatrist. Suicide risk assessment is a major gateway to patient treatment and management. It is a core competency requirement in training of psychiatry. The present study designed to assesseducational needsfor suicide prevention in residents of psychiatry in two medical schools in Iran, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS) and Shahid Beheshti Medical University (SBUMS) inTehran. This was a qualitative triangulation study, conducted in two steps. The first step was based on a phenomenological approach and the second was based on focus groups. The studied population was the psychiatric residents of IUMS and SBUMS. Purposive sampling was implemented until saturation. Interviews were performed. Colaizzi method was used to analyze the data. In the second step, participants attended a session, in which all final codes of the first step were discussed, and regarding the views, educational priorities and needs were listed. A total of 2047 codes, extracted from 31 interviews, analyzed through Colaizzi method, were categorized in three groups: Educational, facilities and processes, human resources. According to defects of current educational program, we suggest regular reevaluations and revisions of clinical training programs according to current needs.

  7. [After the Great East Japan Earthquake : suicide prevention and a gatekeeper program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kotaro; Sakai, Akio; Nakamura, Hikaru; Akahira, Mitsuko

    2014-01-01

    When considering approaches to mental health in areas affected by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, as well as the resulting tsunami and Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, it is not sufficient to focus interventions solely on individuals experiencing mental health issues. The situation demands a comprehensive approach that includes programs that target improvements to mental health literacy among residents in areas affected by the disaster, the rebuilding of relationships between residents themselves, collaboration with recovery and support activities, and mental health support for people participating in recovery and support efforts. From a medium- to long-term perspective, suicide prevention is an important issue. Comprehensive suicide prevention efforts are being promoted in areas of Iwate Prefecture affected by the disaster. In suicide prevention programs, it is crucial to foster the development of human resources in the local community. In order to expand community supports, it is necessary to provide education on ways of supporting those affected by a disaster to local medical personnel, people staffing inquiry and consultation offices, and people in fields related to mental health. Suicide prevention and disaster relief efforts are both approaches that target people in difficulty, and they share commonalities in principles, systems, and approaches to human resource development. "Mental health first aid" is a program developed in Australia that defines methods of early intervention by non-professionals who encounter someone experiencing a mental health problem. The mental health first aid-based gatekeeper training program of the Japanese government's Cabinet Office, which the author's research team helped to develop, allows participants to obtain the knowledge and skills required of gatekeepers. In 2012, a module for disaster-affected areas was developed and added to the program, with additional content that provides program participants with the

  8. Suicide, Suicide Attempts, and Suicidal Ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonsky, E David; May, Alexis M; Saffer, Boaz Y

    2016-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Fortunately, recent developments in suicide theory and research promise to meaningfully advance knowledge and prevention. One key development is the ideation-to-action framework, which stipulates that (a) the development of suicidal ideation and (b) the progression from ideation to suicide attempts are distinct phenomena with distinct explanations and predictors. A second key development is a growing body of research distinguishing factors that predict ideation from those that predict suicide attempts. For example, it is becoming clear that depression, hopelessness, most mental disorders, and even impulsivity predict ideation, but these factors struggle to distinguish those who have attempted suicide from those who have only considered suicide. Means restriction is also emerging as a highly effective way to block progression from ideation to attempt. A third key development is the proliferation of theories of suicide that are positioned within the ideation-to-action framework. These include the interpersonal theory, the integrated motivational-volitional model, and the three-step theory. These perspectives can and should inform the next generation of suicide research and prevention.

  9. The need for a culturally-tailored gatekeeper training intervention program in preventing suicide among Indigenous peoples: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushra Farah Nasir

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide is a leading cause of death among Indigenous youth worldwide. The aim of this literature review was to determine the cultural appropriateness and identify evidence for the effectiveness of current gatekeeper suicide prevention training programs within the international Indigenous community. Method Using a systematic strategy, relevant databases and targeted resources were searched using the following terms: ‘suicide’, ‘gatekeeper’, ‘training’, ‘suicide prevention training’, ‘suicide intervention training’ and ‘Indigenous’. Other internationally relevant descriptors for the keyword “Indigenous” (e.g. “Maori”, “First Nations”, “Native American”, “Inuit”, “Metis” and “Aboriginal” were also used. Results Six articles, comprising five studies, met criteria for inclusion; two Australian, two from USA and one Canadian. While pre and post follow up studies reported positive outcomes, this was not confirmed in the single randomised controlled trial identified. However, the randomised controlled trial may have been underpowered and contained participants who were at higher risk of suicide pre-training. Conclusion Uncontrolled evidence suggests that gatekeeper training may be a promising suicide intervention in Indigenous communities but needs to be culturally tailored to the target population. Further RCT evidence is required.

  10. Reshaping Time: Recommendations for Suicide Prevention in LBGT Populations. Reflections on "Suicide and Suicide Risk in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Populations: Review and Recommendations" from Journal of Homosexuality 58(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Clare

    2016-01-01

    This article serves as one of the supplementary pieces of this special issue on "Mapping Queer Bioethics," in which we take a solipsistic turn to "map" the Journal of Homosexuality itself. Here, the author examines the journal's 2011 consensus recommendations for the prevention of LGBT suicide. Invoking the axiom approach of Eve Kosovsky Sedgwick's seminal Epistemology of the Closet, the author argues that merely offering practical guidelines at the level of the demonstrative and the instructive may not be sufficient models to address the urgency of suicide rates in LGBTQ youth populations.

  11. Predictors of Clergy's Ability to Fulfill a Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Karen; Geist, Monica; Kuo, Richard; Marshall, Day; Wines, James D

    2016-03-01

    Catholic, Jewish and Protestant clergy (n = 801) completed a survey to identify predictors of clergy's ability to fulfill a suicide gatekeeper role. Exploratory backward stepwise regression identified predictors of risk identification including suicide knowledge, religion, conducting suicide funerals, having an attitude that people have a right to die, age, and race. Predictors of ability to intervene include suicide knowledge, training, religion, right to die attitude, and ethnicity. Recommendations include more suicide training and clergy self-care.

  12. 75 FR 4051 - Defense Health Board; DoD Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... of the Secretary Defense Health Board; DoD Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the...: Pursuant to the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5 U.S.C., Appendix as amended), the Sunshine in the...)(2) of Public Law, the DoD Task Force on the Prevention of Suicide by Members of the Armed Forces...

  13. Effectiveness of the Surviving the Teens® Suicide Prevention and Depression Awareness Program: An Impact Evaluation Utilizing a Comparison Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Catherine M.; King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.; Sorter, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Youth suicide is a serious public health issue in the United States. It is currently the third leading cause of death for youth aged 10 to 19. School-based prevention programs may be an effective method of educating youth and enhancing their help-seeking. Most school-based suicide prevention programs have not been rigorously evaluated for their…

  14. Entrepreneurship education: A strength-based approach to substance use and suicide prevention for American Indian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Ingalls, Allison; Craft, Todd; Sprengeler, Feather; McGuire, Courtney; Barlow, Allison

    2016-01-01

    American Indian (AI) adolescents suffer the largest disparities in substance use and suicide. Predominating prevention models focus primarily on risk and utilize deficit-based approaches. The fields of substance use and suicide prevention research urge for positive youth development frameworks that are strength based and target change at individual and community levels. Entrepreneurship education is an innovative approach that reflects the gap in available programs. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a youth entrepreneurship education program in partnership with one AI community. We detail the curriculum, process evaluation results, and the randomized controlled trial evaluating its efficacy for increasing protective factors. Lessons learned may be applicable to other AI communities.

  15. Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Personal Stories Peers Celebrating Art Peers Celebrating Music Be Vocal Support Group Locator DBSA In-Person ... you or someone you know is living with depression or bipolar disorder, you understand all too well ...

  16. Development of a 2-h suicide prevention program for medical staff including nurses and medical residents: A two-center pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Yukako; Kubo, Hiroaki; Katsuki, Ryoko; Sakai, Tomomichi; Sugihara, Genichi; Naito, Chisako; Oda, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Kohei; Suzuki, Yuriko; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kobara, Keiji; Cho, Tetsuji; Kuga, Hironori; Takao, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Yoko; Matsumura, Yumi; Murai, Toshiya; Akashi, Koichi; Kanba, Shigenobu; Otsuka, Kotaro; Kato, Takahiro A

    2017-08-30

    Suicide is a crucial global health concern and effective suicide prevention has long been warranted. Mental illness, especially depression is the highest risk factor of suicide. Suicidal risk is increased in people not only with mental illness but also with physical illnesses, thus medical staff caring for physically-ill patients are also required to manage people with suicidal risk. In the present study, we evaluated our newly developed suicide intervention program among medical staff. We developed a 2-h suicide intervention program for medical staff, based on the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), which had originally been developed for the general population. We conducted this program for 74 medical staff members from 2 hospitals. Changes in knowledge, perceived skills, and confidence in early intervention of depression and suicide-prevention were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires at 3 points; pre-program, immediately after the program, and 1 month after program. This suicide prevention program had significant effects on improving perceived skills and confidence especially among nurses and medical residents. These significant effects lasted even 1 month after the program. Design was a single-arm study with relatively small sample size and short-term follow up. The present study suggests that the major target of this effective program is nurses and medical residents. Future research is required to validate the effects of the program with control groups, and also to assess long-term effectiveness and actual reduction in suicide rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A randomized controlled multicenter trial of post-suicide attempt case management for the prevention of further attempts in Japan (ACTION-J

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamijo Yoshito

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A previous suicide attempt is a potent risk factor for suicide later on. Crisis intervention, psychiatric and psychosocial evaluation at emergency medical facilities, and follow-up care for suicide attempters are considered important components for suicide prevention. The Japanese Multimodal Intervention Trials for Suicide Prevention (J-MISP includes a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial of post-suicide attempt case management for the prevention of further attempts (ACTION-J to address the continuing increase in suicides in Japan. The primary aim of ACTION-J is to examine the effectiveness of an extensive intervention for suicide attempters in prevention of recurrent suicidal behavior, as compared with standard intervention. This paper describes the rationale and protocol of the ACTION-J trial. Methods/Design In this clinical trial, case management intervention will be provided at 19 emergency medical facilities in Japan. After crisis intervention including psychiatric evaluation, psychosocial assessment, and psychological education, subjects will be randomly assigned to either a group receiving continuous case management or a control group receiving standard care. Suicidal ideation, depressive symptoms, and general health condition will be evaluated as secondary measures. The intervention was initiated in July 2006. By December, 2009, 842 subjects will be randomized. Subject follow-up will continue for 1.5 to 5 years. Discussion Suicide is a complex phenomenon that encompasses multiple factors. Case management by multi-sector collaboration is needed. ACTION-J may provide valuable information on suicide attempters and may develop effective case management to reduce future risk for suicide attempters. Trial registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry number, UMIN000000444. ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00736918.

  18. Hispanic Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the suicide rate for all Hispanic Americans was 5.24 per ... males and females • Hispanic adolescents may also experience stress with ... help because they feel that suicide should be dealt with by the family or ...

  19. Hybrid Optimization Algorithm of Particle Swarm Optimization and Cuckoo Search for Preventive Maintenance Period Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available All equipment must be maintained during its lifetime to ensure normal operation. Maintenance is one of the critical roles in the success of manufacturing enterprises. This paper proposed a preventive maintenance period optimization model (PMPOM to find an optimal preventive maintenance period. By making use of the advantages of particle swarm optimization (PSO and cuckoo search (CS algorithm, a hybrid optimization algorithm of PSO and CS is proposed to solve the PMPOM problem. The test functions show that the proposed algorithm exhibits more outstanding performance than particle swarm optimization and cuckoo search. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm has advantages of strong optimization ability and fast convergence speed to solve the PMPOM problem.

  20. Suicide Prevention Interventions for Sexual & Gender Minority Youth: An Unmet Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    Suicide is currently the second leading cause of death in the U.S. among youth ages 10 to 24. Sexual and gender minority (SGM) youth face heightened risk for suicide and report greater odds of attempting suicide than their heteronormative peers. Contributing factors of experience, which are distinctly different from the experiences of heteronormative youth, place SGM youth at heightened risk for suicide. While interventions aimed at addressing suicide risk factors for all youth are being implemented and many have proven effective in the general population, no evidence-based intervention currently exists to reduce suicide risk within this special population. This perspective article discusses this need and proposes the development of an evidence-based suicide risk reduction intervention tailored to SGM youth. Creating a supportive school climate for SGM youth has been shown to reduce suicide risk and may provide protective effects for all youth while simultaneously meeting the unique needs of SGM youth.

  1. Suicidal mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Gentile

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidemiological research has demonstrated that suicidal ideation is a relatively frequent complication of pregnancy in both developed and developing countries. Hence, the aims of this study are: to assess whether or not pregnancy may be considered a period highly susceptible to suicidal acts; to recognize potential contributing factors to suicidal behaviors; to describe therepercussions of suicide attempts on maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcome; to identify a typical profile of women at high risk of suicide during pregnancy.Methods: Medical literature information published in any language since 1950 was identified using MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. Search terms were: “pregnancy”,(antenatal “depression”, “suicide”. Searches were last updated on 28 September 2010. Forty-six articles assessing the suicidal risk during pregnancy and obstetrical outcome of pregnancies complicated by suicide attempts were analyzed, without methodological limitations.Results: Worldwide, frequency of suicidal attempts and the rate of death by suicidal acts are low. Although this clinical event is rare, the consequences of a suicidal attempt are medically andpsychologically devastating for the mother-infant pair. We also found that common behaviors exist in women at high risk for suicide during pregnancy. Review data indeed suggest that a characteristicprofile can prenatally identify those at highest risk for gestational suicide attempts.Conclusions: Social and health organizations should make all possible efforts to identify women at high suicidal risk, in order to establish specific programs to prevent this tragic event. The available data informs health policy makers with a typical profile to screen women at high risk ofsuicide during pregnancy. Those women who have a current or past history of psychiatric disorders,are young, unmarried, unemployed, have incurred an unplanned pregnancy (eventually terminated with an

  2. Community-Based Suicide Prevention Research in Remote On-Reserve First Nations Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaak, Corinne A.; Campeau, Mike; Katz, Laurence Y.; Enns, Murray W.; Elias, Brenda; Sareen, Jitender

    2010-01-01

    Suicide is a complex problem linked to genetic, environmental, psychological and community factors. For the Aboriginal population more specifically, loss of culture, history of traumatic events, individual, family and community factors may also play a role in suicidal behaviour. Of particular concern is the high rate of suicide among Canadian…

  3. A Season of Loss: Training Manual for the Prevention of Elderly Depression and Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praeger, Susan; And Others

    This instructional module emphasizes that depression and suicide are real problems for elderly people, shows how depression and suicidal thoughts can arise in older people, and describes interventions that can be used. Chapter 1 presents an introduction and overview of elderly suicide and includes sections on the plight of the elderly, community…

  4. Does Availability of Mental Health Resources Prevent Recurrent Suicidal Behavior? An Ecological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sara L.; Lezotte, Dennis; Jacobellis, Jillian; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether availability of mental health resources in the county of residence is associated with subsequent suicidal behavior after a previous suicide attempt. Among 10,922 individuals who attempted suicide in Colorado between 1998 and 2002, residence in a county that offered a minimum safety-net of mental health services…

  5. Creating a Community of Practice to Prevent Suicide Through Multiple Channels: Describing the Theoretical Foundations and Structured Learning of PC CARES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Lisa; McEachern, Diane; DiFulvio, Gloria; Smith, Cristine; Graham, Louis F; Dombrowski, Kirk

    2016-01-01

    It is critical to develop practical, effective, ecological, and decolonizing approaches to indigenous suicide prevention and health promotion for the North American communities. The youth suicide rates in predominantly indigenous small, rural, and remote Northern communities are unacceptably high. This health disparity, however, is fairly recent, occurring over the last 50 to 100 years as communities experienced forced social, economic, and political change and intergenerational trauma. These conditions increase suicide risk and can reduce people's access to shared protective factors and processes. In this context, it is imperative that suicide prevention includes--at its heart--decolonization, while also utilizing the "best practices" from research to effectively address the issue from multiple levels. This article describes such an approach: Promoting Community Conversations About Research to End Suicide (PC CARES). PC CARES uses popular education strategies to build a "community of practice" among local and regional service providers, friends, and families that fosters personal and collective learning about suicide prevention in order to spur practical action on multiple levels to prevent suicide and promote health. This article will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of the community intervention and describe the form that PC CARES takes to structure ongoing dialogue, learning, solidarity, and multilevel mobilization for suicide prevention.

  6. Simplifying rules for optimal allocation of preventive care resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandjour, Afschin

    2012-04-01

    Given the limited resources for preventive care, policy-makers need to consider the efficiency/cost-effectiveness of preventive measures, such as drugs and vaccines, when allocating preventive care resources. However, in many settings only limited information on lifetime costs and effects of preventive measures exists. Therefore, it seems useful to provide policy-makers with some simplifying rules when allocating preventive care resources. The purpose of this article is to investigate the relevance of risk and severity of the disease to be prevented for the optimal allocation of preventive care resources. The report shows - based on a constrained optimization model - that optimal allocation of preventive care resources does, in fact, depend on both factors. Resources should be allocated to the prevention of diseases with a higher probability of occurrence or larger severity. This article also identifies situations where preventive care resources should be allocated to the prevention of less severe disease.

  7. To waiver or not to waiver? The dilemma of informed consent in emergency department suicide prevention research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Joubert

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethical issues are inherent in research with vulnerablepopulations; researchers are encouraged to view theseissues as challenges rather than obstacles. This paper detailsthe request of a suicide prevention research collaborationto collect data in specific circumstances involving the waiverof consent. The conflicting multi-ethics committees’responses to this request are examined, with the purpose ofhighlighting the resultant impact of delayed multi-siteethical approvals. Implications of the committees’responses for this research in terms of being able to addressthe original stated project aims of improving future acutehealth service provision to suicidal individuals are discussed.

  8. VA telemental health: suicide assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godleski, Linda; Nieves, J Edwin; Darkins, Adam; Lehmann, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) encompasses one of the largest telemental health networks in the world, with over 45,000 videoconferencing and over 5,000 home telemental health encounters annually. Recently, the VA designated suicide prevention as a major priority, with telehealth modalities providing opportunities for remote interventions. Suicide risk assessments, using videoconferencing, are now documented in the literature, as are current studies that find telemental health to be equivalent to face-to-face treatment. Remote assessment of suicidality, however, involves complex legal issues: licensing requirements for remote delivery of care, legal procedures for involuntary detainment and commitment of potentially harmful patients, and liability questions related to the remote nature of the mental health service. VA best practices for remote suicide risk assessment include paradigms for establishing procedures in the context of legal challenges (licensing and involuntary detainment/commitment), for utilizing clinical assessment and triage decision protocols, and for contingency planning to optimize patient care and reduce liability.

  9. The baby or the bath water? Lessons learned from the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention Research Prioritization Task Force literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis Molock, Sherry; Heekin, Janet M; Matlin, Samantha G; Barksdale, Crystal L; Gray, Ekwenzi; Booth, Chelsea L

    2014-09-01

    The Research Prioritization Task Force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention conducted a comprehensive literature review of suicide prevention/intervention trials to assess the quality of the scientific evidence. A literature "review of reviews" was conducted by searching the most widely used databases for mental health and public health research. The quality of the reviews was evaluated using the Revised Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews system; the quality of the scientific evidence for the suicide preventions/interventions was assessed using U.S. Preventive Services Task Force criteria. The reviews were limited to peer-reviewed publications with human subjects published in English. Ninety-eight systematic reviews and 45 primary sources on suicide prevention/interventions published between January 2000 and September 2012 were evaluated. The results suggest that the quality of both the systematic reviews and the scientific evidence for suicide preventions/interventions were mixed. The majority of the systematic reviews and prevention/interventions were evaluated as fair to poor in quality. There are many promising suicide prevention/intervention trials, but research findings are often inconclusive because of methodologic problems. Methodologic problems across systematic reviews include not conducting hand searches, not surveying gray literature, and being unable to aggregate data across studies. Methodologic problems with the scientific quality of the prevention/intervention trials include paucity of information on sample demographic characteristics, poorly defined outcomes, and excluding actively suicidal participants. Suggestions for ways to improve the quality of the systematic reviews and suicide preventions/interventions are provided. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  10. Suicide: current trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rahn K; Patel, Tejas C; Avenido, Jaymie; Patel, Milapkumar; Jaleel, Mohammad; Barker, Narviar C; Khan, Jahanzeb Ali; Ali, Shahid; Jabeen, Shagufta

    2011-07-01

    Suicide is the act of a human being intentionally causing his or her own death. More than 1 million people commit suicide every year. It is the 13th leading cause of death worldwide, with China, India, and Japan accounting for almost half of all suicides. In less than 50 years, the rate of suicide among Sri Lankans has risen from a modest level to one of the highest in the world (118 per 100,000). Suicide is a major preventable cause of premature death. It is influenced by psychosocial, cultural, and environmental risk factors. The impact of suicide can be devastating for all concerned. It is common in people who are living with chronic mental illness. Individuals with severe clinical depression and alcohol use disorders are at highest risk if untreated. On an interpersonal level, friends and families of suicide victims require social support. On a national level, governments need to recognize the causes of suicide and protect those most vulnerable. If governments commit to defining national responses to prevent suicide, significant progress can be made. On a global scale, research and health organizations can identify global trends and encourage the sharing of information in effective prevention activities. In September 2010, World Suicide Prevention Day, with a theme of "Many faces, many places: suicide prevention across the world," encouraged public awareness worldwide to unite in commitment and action to promote understanding about suicide and removal of stigmatization'. There is compelling evidence that adequate prevention and awareness can reduce suicide rates.

  11. [Suicide in psychiatric hospitals : Results, risk factors and therapeutic measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfersdorf, M; Vogel, R; Vogl, R; Grebner, M; Keller, F; Purucker, M; Wurst, F M

    2016-05-01

    Suicide prevention is a core responsibility of psychiatry and psychotherapy. Periods of change in psychiatric inpatient treatment concepts are usually also accompanied by an increase in psychopathological behavior and with increased suicide rates in psychiatric hospitals, as seen in the 1970s and 1980s in Germany. That this represented a real increase of inpatient suicides during those years was confirmed and subsequently the number and rate of inpatient suicides has decreased from approximately 280 out of 100,000 admissions of patients in 1980 to approximately 50 in 2014. Death can also occur in psychiatric hospitals and an absolute prevention is not possible even under optimal conditions of therapy and nursing, communication and security. The suicide rate has clearly decreased over the last two decades in relation to admissions. The group of young male schizophrenic patients newly identified as having a high clinical suicide risk has decreased among the suicide victims whereas the percentage of severely depressed patients with delusions has increased. This reduction could be associated with the comprehensive improvements in educational and training programs in the field of suicide and suicide prevention, objectification of coping methods, development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, improvements in therapy and relationship possibilities and a general reduction in the number of suicides in Germany.

  12. CDC Grand Rounds: Preventing Suicide Through a Comprehensive Public Health Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Ferdon, Corinne; Crosby, Alex E; Caine, Eric D; Hindman, Jarrod; Reed, Jerry; Iskander, John

    2016-09-02

    Suicide in the United States is a major public health problem with approximately 42,000 reported suicides in 2014 among persons aged >10 years (1). The overall suicide rate is increasing, with a 27% increase from 2000 (12.1 per 100,000 population) to 2014 (15.4 per 100,000) (Figure 1). Males, youths and young adults, and certain racial/ethnic groups have historically had higher rates of suicide. In 2014, suicide rates were approximately four times higher among males (24.3 per 100,000) than females (6.8 per 100,000), and suicide was the second leading cause of death among youths and young adults aged 10-34 years (1). Among persons aged 10-24 years, the 2014 suicide rate among non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Natives was 20.2 per 100,000, 1.9 times higher than non-Hispanic whites (10.5 per 100,000), 3.5 times higher than non-Hispanic blacks (5.8 per 100,000), and 3.7 times higher than Hispanics (5.5 per 100,000) (1). Adults aged 35-64 years are an emerging group at risk, with suicide rates increasing 33% since 2000 and accounting for the largest proportion of suicides (1).

  13. Longevity, genes and efforts: an optimal taxation approach to prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, M-L; Pestieau, P; Ponthiere, G

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies the analytical tools of optimal taxation theory to the design of the optimal subsidy on preventive behaviours, in an economy where longevity varies across agents, and depends on preventive expenditures and on longevity genes. Public intervention can be here justified on three grounds: corrections for misperceptions of the survival process and for externalities related to individual preventive behaviour, and redistribution across both earnings and genetic dimensions. The optimal subsidy on preventive expenditures is shown to depend on the combined impacts of misperception, externalities and self-selection. It is generally optimal to subsidize preventive efforts to an extent depending on the degree of individual myopia, on how productivity and genes are correlated, and on the complementarity of genes and preventive efforts in the survival function.

  14. [Approaches for suicide prevention in Osaka Psychiatric Medical Center: the importance of multi-disciplinary cooperation and partnerships with other organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a very common problem in psychiatric practice today. Therefore, almost all staff of psychiatric hospitals have encountered the suicide of one or more of their patients. Our hospital, Osaka Psychiatric Medical Center, is a public psychiatric hospital in Japan. We provide treatment and support for patients from the acute to chronic phases of psychiatric disorders, and patients range from children to the elderly. Because we accept many patients with severe mental illness from other hospitals, many of our staff are routinely confronted with patients' violence or suicidal attempts. If a patient commits suicide, the relevant staff immediately have a conference to implement measures for preventing a recurrence. At the same time, information about the incident is conveyed to the medical safety management office and made known to all staff in our hospital. This office was established in 2007. Currently, all information about incidents and accidents in our hospital (e.g., suicide, problems between patients, problems with hospital facilities) is aggregated in the office and distributed to all staff members through the hospital intranet. This system makes it possible for staff to consider countermeasures against similar incidents and accidents, even if not involved in the incident. Additionally, we make an effort to develop cooperative relationships with organizations including the police, public health centers, and the fire department. The social welfare council in Hirakata City, where our hospital is located, provides some services to prevent suicide (e.g., telephone counseling, meetings with bereaved family members). Our hospital cooperates with these services by providing lecturers. The partnerships with these organizations help regarding the mental crises of patients in our hospital and fulfill a role to prevent suicide. Multi-disciplinary cooperation and partnerships with community organizations are not special approaches to suicide prevention, but ordinary

  15. Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention: A Theoretical Model and Review of the Empirical Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    b) focused on the epidemiology of suicide; (c) were published in a language other than English; or (d) were editorials, letters, commentaries, or...with suicidal behavior. The didactic com- ponent of the program is based on the action steps “acknowledge, care, and tell” (ACT), through which youths

  16. The Impact of Suicide Prevention Public Service Announcements on Help-Seeking Attitudes: The Message Makes a Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Klimes-Dougan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Suicide continues to be one of the most serious public health challenges. Public service announcements are frequently used to address this challenge, but are rarely sufficiently evaluated to determine if they meet the intended goals, or are associated with potential iatrogenic effects. Although it is challenging to assess the relative impact of different PSA modalities, our group previously noted that one billboard message failed to show the same benefits as one TV ad (e.g., Klimes-Dougan & Lee, 2010. The purpose of this study was to extend these findings to test critical aspects of suicide prevention billboard messaging. Although both simulated billboard messages presented had identical supporting messages, we predicted that the more personal billboard message, focused on saving one’s life, would cause more favorable help-seeking attitudes than the message focused on suicide. Young adult university students (N = 785 were randomly assigned to one of three conditions; one of two billboard simulations or a TV ad simulation. Help-seeking attitudes, maladaptive coping and reports of concern and distress were evaluated. The results of this study suggest some relative benefits in endorsement of favorable help-seeking attitudes for one of the billboard conditions - Stop depression from taking another life. Although further research is needed to determine what methods will alter the risk for suicide in the population, the results of this study provide a useful first step showing that some billboard messaging may favorably influence help-seeking attitudes.

  17. Preventing repetition of attempted suicide-II. The Amager Project, a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Marianne; Vangborg, Kerstin; Sørensen, Holger J;

    2010-01-01

    with major psychiatric diagnoses (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, severe/psychotic depression), were offered participation. The intervention group received the OPAC programme (outreach, problem solving, adherence, continuity) and the control group received treatment as usual (TAU). The intervention period...... was 6 months. After this intervention period, all patients were followed passively for an extra 6 months. The design was an intent-to-treat one. The outcomes were: 1) repetition of attempted suicide or suicide, and 2) total number of suicidal acts. A total of 200 patients were offered participation, 67......Repetition after attempted suicide is high but only few effect studies have been carried out. The Baerum Model from Norway offers practical and affordable intervention for those not being offered psychiatric treatment. During a period from 2005-2007, all attempted suicide patients except those...

  18. Preventing repetition of attempted suicide-II. The Amager Project, a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Marianne; Vangborg, Kerstin; Sørensen, Holger J;

    2010-01-01

    Repetition after attempted suicide is high but only few effect studies have been carried out. The Baerum Model from Norway offers practical and affordable intervention for those not being offered psychiatric treatment. During a period from 2005-2007, all attempted suicide patients except those...... with major psychiatric diagnoses (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, severe/psychotic depression), were offered participation. The intervention group received the OPAC programme (outreach, problem solving, adherence, continuity) and the control group received treatment as usual (TAU). The intervention period...... was 6 months. After this intervention period, all patients were followed passively for an extra 6 months. The design was an intent-to-treat one. The outcomes were: 1) repetition of attempted suicide or suicide, and 2) total number of suicidal acts. A total of 200 patients were offered participation, 67...

  19. Treatment of suicide attempters with bipolar disorder: a randomized clinical trial comparing lithium and valproate in the prevention of suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquendo, Maria A; Galfalvy, Hanga C; Currier, Dianne; Grunebaum, Michael F; Sher, Leo; Sullivan, Gregory M; Burke, Ainsley K; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill; Sublette, M Elizabeth; Parsey, Ramin V; Mann, J John

    2011-10-01

    Bipolar disorder is associated with high risk for suicidal acts. Observational studies suggest a protective effect of lithium against suicidal behavior. However, testing this effect in randomized clinical trials is logistically and ethically challenging. The authors tested the hypothesis that lithium offers bipolar patients with a history of suicide attempt greater protection against suicidal behavior compared to valproate. Patients with bipolar disorder and past suicide attempts (N=98) were randomly assigned to treatment with lithium or valproate, plus adjunctive medications as indicated, in a double-blind 2.5-year trial. An intent-to-treat analysis was performed using the log-rank test for survival data. Two models were fitted: time to suicide attempt and time to suicide event (attempt or hospitalization or change in medication in response to suicide plans). There were 45 suicide events in 35 participants, including 18 suicide attempts made by 14 participants, six from the lithium group and eight from the valproate group. There were no suicides. Intent-to-treat analysis using the log-rank test showed no differences between treatment groups in time to suicide attempt or to suicide event. Post hoc power calculations revealed that the modest sample size, reflective of challenges in recruitment, only permits detection of a relative risk of 5 or greater. Despite the high frequency of suicide events during the study, this randomized controlled trial detected no difference between lithium and valproate in time to suicide attempt or suicide event in a sample of suicide attempters with bipolar disorder. However, smaller clinically significant differences between the two drugs were not ruled out.

  20. Developing Tools to Counteract and Prevent Suicide Bomber Incidents: A Case Study in Value Sensitive Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royakkers, Lambèr; Steen, Marc

    2017-08-01

    Developers and designers make all sorts of moral decisions throughout an innovation project. In this article, we describe how teams of developers and designers engaged with ethics in the early phases of innovation based on case studies in the SUBCOP project (SUBCOP stands for 'SUicide Bomber COunteraction and Prevention'). For that purpose, Value Sensitive Design (VSD) will be used as a reference. Specifically, we focus on the following two research questions: How can researchers/developers learn about users' perspectives and values during the innovation process? and How can researchers/developers take into account these values, and related design criteria, in their decision-making during the innovation process? Based on a case study of several innovation processes in this project, we conclude the researchers/developers involved are able to do something similar to VSD (without them knowing about VSD or calling it 'VSD'), supported by relatively simple exercises in the project, e.g., meetings with potential end-users and discussions with members of the Ethical Advisory Board of the project. Furthermore, we also found-possibly somewhat counterintuitively-that a commercial, with its focus on understanding and satisfying customers' needs, can promote VSD.

  1. [Suicide and suicide tendencies in adolescent detainees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radeloff, Daniel; Lempp, Thomas; Rauf, Amna; Bennefeld-Kersten, Katharina; Kettner, Mattias; Freitag, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    Following accidents, suicide is the second leading cause of death in adolescence. This stage of life has the most suicide attempts of all age groups. In addition to mentally ill juveniles, adolescent delinquents represent a high-risk group for suicidal behavior and completed suicide. In particular, the population of detainees, an extreme form of juvenile delinquency, have a 16- to 18-fold higher risk of suicidal behavior and suicide compared to the general population. Because the composition of juvenile detainees differs greatly from that of detained adults, age-specific scientific approaches and prevention programs are needed. This task cannot be addressed by juvenile detention staff alone, but rather demands close cooperation between adolescent psychiatrists, psychologists, prison medical staff, legal experts and prison officers to use the opportunity for suicide prevention in juvenile detention facilities.

  2. Understanding Homicide-Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, James L

    2016-12-01

    Homicide-suicide is the phenomenon in which an individual kills 1 or more people and commits suicide. Research on homicide-suicide has been hampered by a lack of an accepted classification scheme and reliance on media reports. Mass murder-suicide is gaining increasing attention particularly in the United States. This article reviews the research and literature on homicide-suicide, proposing a standard classification scheme. Preventive methods are discussed and sociocultural factors explored. For a more accurate and complete understanding of homicide-suicide, it is argued that future research should use the full psychological autopsy approach, to include collateral interviews. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Effectiveness of Family-Based Cognitive-Behavior Grief Therapy to Prevent Complicated Grief in Relatives of Suicide Victims: The Mediating Role of Suicide Ideation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Marieke; Neeleman, Jan; van der Meer, Klaas; Burger, Huibert

    2010-01-01

    Grief interventions are more effective for high risk individuals. The presence of suicide ideation following suicide bereavement was examined to determine whether it indicates a high risk status. Using data from a randomized controlled trial (n = 122) on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy, the effect of suicide ideation on the…

  4. Suicide Clusters and Contagion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenere, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    Youth suicide is one of the most serious preventable health problems in the United States. It is the third leading cause of death among adolescents. According to a recent national survey of students in grades 9-12, nearly 15% of respondents had seriously considered suicide and 7% actually had attempted suicide in the previous 12 months. Moreover,…

  5. Optimizing Screening and Risk Assessment for Suicide Risk in the U.S. Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    2007). Furthermore, approximately one third of the homeless population consists of military veterans ( Gamache, Rosenheck, & Tessler, 2003), a...veterans, with whom such soldiers could share experiences, might serve as an effective point of crisis intervention capable of mitigating severely...Gender differences in predictors of suicidal thoughts and attempts among homeless veterans that abuse substances. Suicide and Life-threatening

  6. Optimizing the assessment of suicidal behavior: the application of curtailment techniques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, D.P. de; Fokkema, M.; O'Connor, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Given their length, commonly used scales to assess suicide risk, such as the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (SSI) are of limited use as screening tools. In the current study we tested whether deterministic and stochastic curtailment can be applied to shorten the 19-item SSI, without

  7. Preventing Suicides in the Military | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of its kind ever undertaken. In addition to suicide, this study is targeting depression, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Unlike typical research studies, which can ...

  8. Patterns of intimate partner homicide suicide in later life: Strategies for prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia Salari

    2007-01-01

    Sonia SalariDepartment Family and Consumer Studies, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USAAbstract: Intimate partner homicide suicide (IPHS) constitutes the most violent domestic abuse outcome, devastating individuals, families, neighborhoods and communities. This research used content analysis to analyze 225 murder suicide events (444 deaths) among dyads with at least one member 60 or older. Data were collected from newspaper articles, television news transcripts, police reports and obi...

  9. The War Within: Preventing Suicide in the U.S. Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    West Dunbartonshire, June 2007. Barry, Sheila, “Pastoral Counseling in the Military,” in Robert J. Wicks, Richard D. Parsons , and Donald Capps...December 2000, pp. 402–407. Knox, Kerry L., David A. Litts, G. Wayne Talcott , Jill Catalano Feig, and Eric D. Caine, “Risk of Suicide and Related...and G. Wayne Talcott , “Development of a Clinical Guide to Enhance Care for Suicidal Patients,” Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, Vol

  10. Preventing Suicide in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Prisoners: A Critique of U.K. Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Max; McCrae, Niall

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a global problem in prisons. As in society generally, gay men in prison have a higher risk of attempting suicide compared with their heterosexual peers. The Howard League for Penal Reform Sex in Prison Commission 2015 reveals a pervasive culture of consensual and coercive sexual relations, with gay men more likely to be targeted for unsolicited sex. Research shows an inadequate institutional response to such abuse. Victims of sexual assault in prison have high rates of psychological problems, which can lead to self-harm and suicide. The Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork procedure to assess and manage risk of suicide in prisoners, however, makes no reference to the needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender prison population, despite national policy and best practice guidance that advocates an individualized approach to suicide risk with due consideration of vulnerable group status. This article argues that the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork procedure should be tuned to the requirements of the Equality Act 2010 to ensure that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender prisoners are not exposed to the double jeopardy of sexual assault and related suicidal tendencies.

  11. Teaching Evidence-Based Approaches to Suicide Risk Assessment and Prevention that Enhance Psychiatric Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisook, Sidney; Anzia, Joan; Atri, Ashutosh; Baroni, Argelinda; Clayton, Paula; Haller, Ellen; Lomax, Jim; Mann, J. John; Oquendo, Maria A.; Pato, Michele; Perez-Rodriguez, M. Mercedes; Prabhakar, Deepak; Sen, Srijan; Thrall, Grace; Yaseen, Zimri S.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes one in a series of National Institute of Health (NIH) supported conferences aimed at enhancing the ability of leaders of psychiatry residency training to teach research literacy and produce both clinician-scholars and physician-scientists in their home programs. Most psychiatry training directors would not consider themselves research scholars or even well-schooled in evidence based practice. Yet they are the front line educators to prepare tomorrow’s psychiatrists to keep up with, critically evaluate, and in some cases actually participate in the discovery of new and emerging psychiatric knowledge. This annual conference is meant to help psychiatry training directors become more enthusiastic, knowledgeable and pedagogically prepared to create research-friendly environments at their home institutions, so that more trainees will, in turn, become research literate, practice evidence-based psychiatry, and enter research fellowships and careers. The overall design of each year’s meeting is a series of plenary sessions introducing participants to new information pertaining to the core theme of that year’s meeting, integrated with highly interactive small group teaching sessions designed to consolidate knowledge and provide pragmatic teaching tools appropriate for residents at various levels of training. The theme of each meeting, selected to be a compelling and contemporary clinical problem, serves as a vehicle to capture training directors’ attention while teaching relevant brain science, research literacy and effective pedagogy. This report describes the content and assessment of the 2011 annual pre-meeting, “Evidence-based Approaches to Suicide Risk Assessment and Prevention: Insights from the Neurosciences and Behavioral Sciences for use in Psychiatry Residency Training.” PMID:22995449

  12. Evaluation of the 113Online Suicide Prevention Crisis Chat Service: Outcomes, Helper Behaviors and Comparison to Telephone Hotlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkenstorm, Jan K; Eikelenboom, Merijn; Huisman, Annemiek; Wiebenga, Jasper; Gilissen, Renske; Kerkhof, Ad J F M; Smit, Johannes H

    2017-06-01

    Recognizing the importance of digital communication, major suicide prevention helplines have started offering crisis intervention by chat. To date there is little evidence supporting the effectiveness of crisis chat services. To evaluate the reach and outcomes of the 113Online volunteer-operated crisis chat service, 526 crisis chat logs were studied, replicating the use of measures that were developed to study telephone crisis calls. Reaching a relatively young population of predominantly females with severe suicidality and (mental) health problems, chat outcomes for this group were found to be comparable to those found for crisis calls to U.S. Lifeline Centers in 2003-2004, with similar but not identical associations with specific helpers' styles and attitudes. Our findings support a positive effect of the 113Online chat service, to be enhanced by practice standards addressing an apparent lack of focus on the central issue of suicidality during chats, as well as by the development of best practices specific for online crisis intervention. © 2016 The American Association of Suicidology.

  13. Prioritizing research to reduce youth suicide and suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Jeffrey A; Horowitz, Lisa M; Fontanella, Cynthia A; Grupp-Phelan, Jackie; Campo, John V

    2014-09-01

    The goal of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention is to reduce suicide and suicide attempts in the U.S. by 40% in the next decade. In this paper, a public health approach is applied to suicide prevention to illustrate how reductions in youth suicide and suicidal behavior might be achieved by prioritizing research in two areas: (1) increasing access to primary care-based behavioral health interventions for depressed youth and (2) improving continuity of care for youth who present to emergency departments after a suicide attempt. Finally, some scientific, clinical, and methodologic breakthroughs needed to achieve rapid, substantial, and sustained reductions in youth suicide and suicidal behavior are discussed. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Suicide Prevention and Crisis Intervention from Multiple Aspects and Perspectives%多层面多角度的自杀预防与危机干预

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘慧

    2011-01-01

    It is found that suicide is increasingly serious. However, the intervention is only to suicide itself. To provide the basis for the efficiency, suicide prevention and crisis intervention from multiple aspects and perspectives are proposed, including preventive intervention of suicide, intervention of perceiving or told to try to commit suicide, crisis intervention of the attempted suicide and of suiciderelated personnel.%文章针对自杀的日益严重性及目前就事论事、治标不治本的自杀预防和干预珥状,提出多层面多角度的自杀预防和危机干预,包括自杀预干预、觉察或被告知想自杀的干预、自杀未遂者的危机干预以及自杀者相关人员的危机干预四个层面与多个角度,为提高该工作的有效性提供依据。

  15. Suicide and Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nahit Ozmenler

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Many factors may play role in the emergence of suicidal behavior. Familial tendency including some features of personality structure, hopelessness, affective disorder, and suicide behavior have attracted close attention recently. Personality disorders seem to be prevalent in individuals who attempt suicide. Beside it has been reported that personality disorders and other psychiatric disorder comorbidity increase the risk of suicide. To present the relationship between suicide and personality is quite important for developing strategies in order to prevent suicide attempt. In this field, the data show variability based on scales used for the evaluation of personality, its definition and classification in the research. For example, while some authors used DSM criteria or ICD criteria, others preferred to focus on the temperament and character dimensions of personality. In studies based on diagnostic criteria; B group personality disorders, such as antisocial and borderline personality disorders were found to be most common comorbid personality disorder diagnosis. In studies aiming to investigate the relationship among suicide attempt, temperament and character features, the suicide attempters were found to have lower levels of self directedness, cooperativeness, and higher scores for self transcendence. Suicidal patients were inclined to have higher scores in several temperament groups like harm avoidance, novelty seeking, and reward dependence. Tendency to impulsive behavior is reported as a common denominator for suicidal patients. Individuals, who have familial or acquired tendency of impulsivity, could react more dramatically and present with depressive and pessimistic mood when they have difficulties and encounter stress factors in their daily routine and could easily develop depressive disorders. These factors as a whole could lead to self destructive actions like suicide. Individual or familial history of suicide attempts or completed

  16. Engaging Chinese Immigrant Parents in Youth Suicide Prevention: Shifting Parenting Paradigm in a Culturally Relevant Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Irene Wai Ming; Chu, Hsiao-Ching; Bloom, Scott

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses a school and community collaborative initiative that targeted students of Chinese descent as a suicide at-risk population. Its main focus was to reach out to immigrant parents to help them strengthen communication and relationships with their adolescent children and to facilitate their access to mental health services in the…

  17. Adolescents' Perspectives of Youth Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Emily; Hasking, Penelope; Martin, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is of increasing concern, yet many adolescents who self-injure are reluctant to seek professional help. Instead, they turn to friends for support, although it is unclear what these friends can offer. This study aimed to identify adolescents' views of how peers and online friends can help young people who…

  18. The role of mobile phone technology in understanding and preventing suicidal behavior.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, D. de; Kirtley, O.; Kerkhof, A.; Portzky, G.; O'Connor, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, we discuss how mobile phone technology has the potential to move the field forward in terms of understanding suicide risk as well as laying foundations for the development of effective treatments/interventions. We have focused on mobile health technology given the rapid growth of

  19. Temporary Transfer of Firearms From the Home to Prevent Suicide: Legal Obstacles and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Alexander D; Vernick, Jon S; Betz, Marian E; Brandspigel, Sara; Runyan, Carol W

    2017-01-01

    The presence of firearms in the home increases the risk of suicide for residents. As a result, clinicians and professional organizations recommend counseling about temporary removal of firearms from the home of potentially suicidal individuals. In some states, however, firearm laws may affect the ability to easily transfer a gun temporarily to reduce suicide risk. In particular, universal background check (UBC) laws-which require a background check whenever a gun is transferred, even by non-gun dealers-may also apply to temporary transfers intended to reduce suicide risk. Clinicians have previously reported that confusion regarding state firearm laws and uncertainty over the legality of a temporary transfer have affected their ability to effectively counsel patients. We summarize the laws of all 50 states and specifically examine the relevant firearm laws of 3 representative states with UBCs and different approaches-Maryland, Colorado, and California. We identify both helpful and problematic aspects of state laws regarding temporary transfer of firearms. We provide recommendations for amending UBC laws to make it easier for clinicians and patients to temporarily transfer firearms.

  20. A Human Systems Integration Analysis of the Army Suicide Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Events are not Detected Early ..................................................................................................49  Figure 18.  Number...to remain suicidal as a function of session number. (From Jobes et al., 2012, p. 610) .101  Figure 38.  ASPP System Top-Down and Bottom-Up HTA ...Services Agency xiv HIPAA Health Insurance Privacy and Accountability Act HPRR Health Promotion Risk Reduction HSI Human Systems Integration HTA

  1. The Preventive Effect of Strict Gun Control Laws on Suicide and Homicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David; Murrell, Mary E.

    1982-01-01

    Examined state gun control laws and used a multidimensional scaling technique to study the relationship of strictness and death rates. Results showed states with stricter laws had lower suicide rates by firearms but higher rates by other means. No effect on homicide was found. (JAC)

  2. The role of mobile phone technology in understanding and preventing suicidal behavior.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, D. de; Kirtley, O.; Kerkhof, A.; Portzky, G.; O'Connor, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, we discuss how mobile phone technology has the potential to move the field forward in terms of understanding suicide risk as well as laying foundations for the development of effective treatments/interventions. We have focused on mobile health technology given the rapid growth of

  3. Effectiveness of Structured Teaching Programme on Knowledge regarding Risk factors and Prevention of Suicidal Behaviour among Adolescents in a selected College, Salem, Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Loganathan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behavior, to evaluate the effectiveness of structured teaching programme on knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behaviour among Adolescents, and to associate the pre-test knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behaviour among adolescents with their selected demographic variables.Materials & Methods: A quantitative evaluative approach with a pre-experimental (one group pre test- post test design was adopted; the setting of the study was Sri Vidya Mandir College, Salem, Tamilnadu. A Structured Self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge of the adolescents. The systematic random sampling technique was used and 60 adolescents involved on Structured Teaching Programme regarding Risk factors and prevention of Suicidal Behaviour by using a Power-point slide presentation followed with pre-test. On 7th day, the post test was conducted. The data collection period of the study was 09.12.2014 to 15.12.2014.Results: The study findings revealed that during Pre-test, the knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behaviour among adolescents, 45(75% had inadequate knowledge, 15(25% had moderately adequate knowledge and none of them had adequate knowledge. During post test, 23 adolescents (38.33% had adequate knowledge, 37(61.67% had moderately adequate knowledge and none of them had inadequate knowledge. The mean score during pre-test was 9.9±3.88 and the mean score during post test was 17.03±4.12. The paired ‘t’ value was 16.84 which were significant at p<0.05 level. Thus it shows that the structured teaching programme was effective in improving knowledge regarding risk factors and prevention of suicidal behaviour among adolescents. There was no significant association found between the pre-test scores on knowledge regarding risk factors and

  4. The Effectiveness of Family-Based Cognitive-Behavior Grief Therapy to Prevent Complicated Grief in Relatives of Suicide Victims : The Mediating Role of Suicide Ideation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M.; Neeleman, J.; van der Meer, K.; Burger, H.

    2010-01-01

    Grief interventions are more effective for high risk individuals. The presence of suicide ideation following suicide bereavement was examined to determine whether it indicates a high risk status. Using data from a randomized controlled trial (n =122) on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior

  5. The Effectiveness of Family-Based Cognitive-Behavior Grief Therapy to Prevent Complicated Grief in Relatives of Suicide Victims : The Mediating Role of Suicide Ideation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M.; Neeleman, J.; van der Meer, K.; Burger, H.

    2010-01-01

    Grief interventions are more effective for high risk individuals. The presence of suicide ideation following suicide bereavement was examined to determine whether it indicates a high risk status. Using data from a randomized controlled trial (n =122) on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therap

  6. The Effectiveness of Family-Based Cognitive-Behavior Grief Therapy to Prevent Complicated Grief in Relatives of Suicide Victims : The Mediating Role of Suicide Ideation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M.; Neeleman, J.; van der Meer, K.; Burger, H.

    2010-01-01

    Grief interventions are more effective for high risk individuals. The presence of suicide ideation following suicide bereavement was examined to determine whether it indicates a high risk status. Using data from a randomized controlled trial (n =122) on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therap

  7. Patterns of Suicide and Other Trespassing Fatalities on State-Owned Railways in Greater Stockholm; Implications for Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Rådbo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Each year, approximately 80–100 people are killed on state-owned railways due to train-person collisions in Sweden. Underlying causes are suicide and accidents; suicide constituting a vast majority. Earlier Swedish studies at a national level revealed a relation between population density and incident frequency, however, with places of occurrence often located to the outskirts of cities some distance away from station areas where victims can await approaching trains in seclusion. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this national pattern also applies to larger urban areas such as greater Stockholm, and to discuss preventative implications based on these observations. All registered incidents (N = 41 where people were hit or run-over by trains with a fatal outcome over the four-year period 2005–2008 were investigated. Results deviating from the national pattern include that most incidents occur at station areas, and that most victims enter the tracks from platforms. Passing express trains appear to be overrepresented, compared to commuter trains. Due to a low number of cases, our observations must be interpreted with caution. However, they imply that preventative measures in this type of area should focus on platform safety foremost, especially protection against rapid trains passing by station areas.

  8. Rational choice theory and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, D

    1988-12-01

    The implications of viewing the decision to kill oneself as a rational choice, based on an analysis of the costs and benefits, were explored. Suicide is but one symptom for an individual in distress to choose, and if suicide is prevented, other symptoms may appear in its place. Similarly, a critical question to be asked in suicide prevention is whether restriction of the availability of one method for suicide (such as detoxifying domestic gas or car exhaust) will result in suicidal individuals switching to a different method for suicide or to a different symptom of distress.

  9. Pathways for Preparation: Locating Suicide Education in Preparing Professionals for Encounters with Suicidal Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranahan, Patti

    2013-01-01

    Current suicide prevention strategies often include suicide education based on the premise that education can lead to recognition of those at risk of suicide and others who are prepared can respond and potentially save lives. As suicide is a leading cause of death for young people, it is relevant to explore how suicide education is made available…

  10. Optimal investment in a portfolio of HIV prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaric, G S; Brandeau, M L

    2001-01-01

    In this article, the authors determine the optimal allocation of HIV prevention funds and investigate the impact of different allocation methods on health outcomes. The authors present a resource allocation model that can be used to determine the allocation of HIV prevention funds that maximizes quality-adjusted life years (or life years) gained or HIV infections averted in a population over a specified time horizon. They apply the model to determine the allocation of a limited budget among 3 types of HIV prevention programs in a population of injection drug users and nonusers: needle exchange programs, methadone maintenance treatment, and condom availability programs. For each prevention program, the authors estimate a production function that relates the amount invested to the associated change in risky behavior. The authors determine the optimal allocation of funds for both objective functions for a high-prevalence population and a low-prevalence population. They also consider the allocation of funds under several common rules of thumb that are used to allocate HIV prevention resources. It is shown that simpler allocation methods (e.g., allocation based on HIV incidence or notions of equity among population groups) may lead to alloctions that do not yield the maximum health benefit. The optimal allocation of HIV prevention funds in a population depends on HIV prevalence and incidence, the objective function, the production functions for the prevention programs, and other factors. Consideration of cost, equity, and social and political norms may be important when allocating HIV prevention funds. The model presented in this article can help decision makers determine the health consequences of different allocations of funds.

  11. Development and Pilot Test of the RAND Suicide Prevention Program Evaluation Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    chaplains, and front-desk attendants, at installation gyms to identify individuals at increased risk for suicide and to actively refer those in...articles to supplement existing information in the toolkit chap- ters. Because information in these articles varied widely, we could not use a standard...improved by supplementing the toolkit with training and technical assistance, which could be provided in conjunction with dissemination efforts. This

  12. Suicide letters in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Boon-Hock; Chia, Audrey; Tai, Bee-Choo

    2008-01-01

    The contents of suicide letters provide insight into the reasons for suicide and the mental states of victims. Coroner court records of 1,721 Singaporean suicides occurring between 2000 and 2004 were reviewed, 398 (23%) of whom left suicide letters. Letter writers tended to be younger, single, and less likely to have mental or physical illness. A reason for suicide was evident in 58%. Major reasons included school and relationship problems in the young, financial and marital problems in adults and physical illnesses in the elderly. Positive sentiment (care/concern) was expressed in 59%. Negative emotions in 45% of which despondency/agony (60%) was the most common, followed by emptiness (25%), guilt/shame (15%), hopelessness (10%), and anger (3%). The study of these letters suggests that there are combinations of social, psychological and physical factors that influence a person to suicide, all of which are important in the prevention, assessment, and management of suicide.

  13. 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention: Goals and Objectives for Action. A Report of the U.S. Surgeon General and of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a serious public health problem that causes immeasurable pain, suffering, and loss to individuals, families, and communities nationwide. Many people may be surprised to learn that suicide was one of the top 10 causes of death in the United States in 2009. And death is only the tip of the iceberg. For every person who dies by suicide,…

  14. Suicide and suicidal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use Emotional trauma Serious physical illness Unemployment or money problems Risk factors for suicide in teenagers include: Access to guns Family member who completed suicide History of hurting themselves on purpose History of being ...

  15. Suicides in late life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orden, Kimberly; Conwell, Yeates

    2011-06-01

    Suicide in late life is an enormous public health problem that will likely increase in severity as adults of the baby boom generation age. Data from psychological autopsy studies supplemented with recent studies of suicidal ideation and attempts point to a consistent set of risk factors for the spectrum of suicidal behaviors in late life (suicide ideation, attempts, and deaths). Clinicians should be vigilant for psychiatric illness (especially depression), physical illness, pain, functional impairment, and social disconnectedness. Recent advances in late-life suicide prevention have in common collaborative, multifaceted intervention designs. We suggest that one mechanism shared by all preventive interventions shown to reduce the incidence of late-life suicide is the promotion of connectedness. For the clinician working with older adults, our recommendation is to not only consider risk factors, such as depression, and implement appropriate treatments but to enhance social connectedness as well.

  16. Population-based outreach versus care as usual to prevent suicide attempt: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Gregory E.; Beck, Arne; Rossom, Rebecca; Richards, Julie; Kirlin, Beth; King, Deborah; Shulman, Lisa; Ludman, Evette J; Penfold, Robert; Shortreed, Susan M.; Whiteside, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Background Suicide remains the 10th-ranked most frequent cause of death in the United States, accounting for over 40,000 deaths per year. Nonfatal suicide attempts lead to over 200,000 hospitalizations and 600,000 emergency department visits annually. Recent evidence indicates that responses to the commonly used Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9) can identify outpatients who are at risk of suicide attempt and suicide death and that specific psychotherapy or Care Management programs can preve...

  17. A Study of Suicide-Related Behaviors among Colombian Youth: Reflections on Prevention and Implications for Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Perez, Helda; Perez, Miguel A.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed 10th graders from 32 Colombian public schools to examine risk behaviors related to depression and suicide. About 21 percent of respondents expressed suicidal feelings. This transcended to actual plans in 19 percent of respondents, while 16 percent reported at least one attempt in the previous 30 days. Suicidal thoughts and attempts…

  18. Emotionally troubled teens' help-seeking behaviors: an evaluation of surviving the Teens® suicide prevention and depression awareness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Catherine M; Sorter, Michael T; Ossege, Julianne; King, Keith A

    2014-10-01

    Many school-based suicide prevention programs do not show a positive impact on help-seeking behaviors among emotionally troubled teens despite their being at high risk for suicide. This study is a secondary analysis of the Surviving the Teens(®) program evaluation to determine its effect on help-seeking behaviors among troubled youth. Results showed significant increases in mean scores of the Behavioral Intent to Communicate with Important Others Regarding Emotional Health Issues subscale (p Teens program has a positive effect on help-seeking behaviors in troubled youth.

  19. Suicide Terrorists: Are They Suicidal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Are suicide terrorists suicidal? A review of the worldwide literature on suicide terrorism uncovered five published empirical studies describing data collected from potential suicide terrorists or the surviving friends and families of deceased terrorists. The many discrepancies uncovered between suicide terrorists and other suicides on key factors…

  20. Experiences and wisdom behind the numbers: qualitative analysis of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's Research Prioritization Task Force stakeholder survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Chelsea L

    2014-09-01

    The Research Prioritization Task Force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention conducted a stakeholder survey including 716 respondents from 49 U.S. states and 18 foreign countries. To conduct a qualitative analysis on responses from individuals representing four main stakeholder groups: attempt and loss survivors, researchers, providers, and policy/administrators. This article focuses on a qualitative analysis of the early-round, open-ended responses collected in a modified online Delphi process, and, as an illustration of the research method, focuses on analysis of respondents' views of the role of life and emotional skills in suicide prevention. Content analysis was performed using both inductive and deductive code and category development and systematic qualitative methods. After the inductive coding was completed, the same data set was re-coded using the 12 Aspirational Goals (AGs) identified by the Delphi process. Codes and thematic categories produced from the inductive coding process were, in some cases, very similar or identical to the 12 AGs (i.e., those dealing with risk and protective factors, provider training, preventing reattempts, and stigma). Other codes highlighted areas that were not identified as important in the Delphi process (e.g., cultural/social factors of suicide, substance use). Qualitative and mixed-methods research are essential to the future of suicide prevention work. By design, qualitative research is explorative and appropriate for complex, culturally embedded social issues such as suicide. Such research can be used to generate hypotheses for testing and, as in this analysis, illuminate areas that would be missed in an approach that imposed predetermined categories on data. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Suicide inside: a systematic review of inpatient suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Len; Banda, Tumi; Nijman, Henk

    2010-05-01

    The literature on inpatient suicides was systematically reviewed. English, German, and Dutch articles were identified by means of the electronic databases PsycInfo, Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE psychiatry, CINAHL, and British Nursing Index. In total, 98 articles covering almost 15,000 suicides were reviewed and analyzed. Rates and demographic features connected to suicides varied substantially between articles, suggesting distinct subgroups of patients committing suicide (e.g., depressed vs. schizophrenic patients) with their own suicide determinants and patterns. Early in the admission is clearly a high-risk period for suicide, but risk declines more slowly for patients with schizophrenia. Suicide rates were found to be associated with admission numbers, and as expected, previous suicidal behavior was found to be a robust predictor of future suicide. The methods used for suicide are linked to availability of means. Timing and location of suicides seem to be associated with absence of support, supervision, and the presence of family conflict. Although there is a strong notion that suicides cluster in time, clear statistical evidence for this is lacking. For prevention of suicides, staff need to engage with patients' family problems, and reduce absconding without locking the door. Future research should take into account the heterogeneous subgroups of patients who commit suicide, with case-control studies addressing these separately.

  2. Military Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    CDYA) programs. (S) Evaluate the appropriateness and, if appropriate, the Feasibility of operating a crisis hot line in all Army MTFs which maintain...Affairs), Washington, D.C., July 1985. 2. Deparatment of Health and Human Services, Helth Unitgd States. 1584, December 1S8’*. 3. Wood, Major Billy R...James E., Jr. "Suicide Prevention in the Air Force: A Training Guide For Crisis Intervention Service Volunteer Counselors". Unpublished Air Command

  3. Suicide and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, William C.; Waldhart-Letzel, Edith

    1981-01-01

    Presents statistics on the extent of child and adolescent suicide. Symptoms and causes are suggested including ego weakness, child rearing attitudes and practices, and social influences. Considers the ethics of interfering with the attempt to commit suicide and makes recommendations for prevention. (RC)

  4. Youth Suicidal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be prevented. Youth across America are affected by suicide, be it in families, at school, or in their own lives. The ... viii Nonsuicidal self-injury x Exposure to friends’/family members’ suicide xii Low self-esteem xiii Protective Factors Family ...

  5. Psychological models of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, Shira; Apter, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is highly complex and multifaceted. Consequent to the pioneering work of Durkheim and Freud, theoreticians have attempted to explain the biological, social, and psychological nature of suicide. The present work presents an overview and critical discussion of the most influential theoretical models of the psychological mechanisms underlying the development of suicidal behavior. All have been tested to varying degrees and have important implications for the development of therapeutic and preventive interventions. Broader and more in-depth approaches are still needed to further our understanding of suicidal phenomena.

  6. Suicide Risk Assessments: Which Suicide Risk Factors Psychiatric Residents Consider Significant?

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Hwang, Sunyoung; Yeon, Bora; Choi, Kyoung Ho; Oh, Youngmin; Lee, Hae-Kook; Kweon, Yong-Sil; Lee, Chung Tai; Lee, Kyoung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients visiting the emergency department (ED) after a suicide attempt are generally assessed for suicide risk by psychiatric residents. Psychiatric residents' competence in evaluating the risk posed by the patients who attempted suicide is critical to preventing suicide. Methods We investigated factors considered important by psychiatric residents when evaluating suicide risk. This study included 140 patients admitted to the ED after attempting suicide. Psychiatric residents rated...

  7. Suicide: an existentialist reconceptualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M; Lamont, E

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenon of suicide is one of the primary concerns for mental health professions. The health-care literature is dominated by discussions that focus variously on local and national suicide prevention policies, on the assessment of those individuals judged to be at risk of committing suicide as well as the appropriateness and efficacy of interventions for those who express suicidal ideation and display suicidal behaviours. What appear less frequently in the literature, however, are critical analyses of the concept of suicide and, in particular, critical reflections on the manner in which the concept of suicide has been, and continues to be, understood or 'framed'. In an attempt to respond to this apparent omission, this paper will suggest that the work of Albert Camus, and his philosophical work The Myth of Sisyphus in particular, can be understood as providing a significant reconceptualization and reframing of suicide. In doing so, it will be suggested that Camus's work not only challenges how the concept of suicide has traditionally been situated within the context of mental illness, but can also be understood as challenging the efficacy of the interventions that have been associated with an understanding of suicide within that context.

  8. Preventing Suicide through Improved Training in Suicide Risk Assessment and Care: An American Association of Suicidology Task Force Report Addressing Serious Gaps in U.S. Mental Health Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, William M., Jr.; Allen, Michael H.; Feldman, Barry N.; Gutin, Nina J.; Jahn, Danielle R.; Kleespies, Phillip M.; Quinnett, Paul; Simpson, Skip

    2012-01-01

    There are twice as many suicides as homicides in the United States, and the suicide rate is rising. Suicides increased 12% between 1999 and 2009. Mental health professionals often treat suicidal patients, and suicide occurs even among patients who are seeking treatment or are currently in treatment. Despite these facts, training of most mental…

  9. Identification and Prevention on High-risk Suicide Groups%自杀高危人群的识别及预防研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张胜洪; 胡胜

    2013-01-01

    自杀是由严重心理危机导致的行为.通过描述自杀高危人群存在的时代状况,从社会学与心理-精神病学的维度分析了高危人群的自杀成因,进而对其自杀前的异常言行表现、自杀的方式及当前各种预防措施进行讨论.同时,对中国文化语境下的自杀及其预防展开了反思与展望.%Suicide is a behavior which caused by serious psychological crisis.In this article,status of high-risk groups were described.Suicide causes were explained in the perspectives of sociology,psychology and psychiatry.Then abnormal behaviors,suicide methods and its prevention were discussed.Meanwhile,the suicide and its prevention were reflected and prospected in the perspective of Chinese cultural context.

  10. Positive-Themed Suicide Prevention Messages Delivered by Adolescent Peer Leaders: Proximal Impact on Classmates' Coping Attitudes and Perceptions of Adult Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Mariya; Wyman, Peter A; Schmeelk-Cone, Karen; Pisani, Anthony R

    2015-12-01

    Developing science-based communication guidance and positive-themed messages for suicide prevention are important priorities. Drawing on social learning and elaboration likelihood models, we designed and tested two positive-focused presentations by high school peer leaders delivered in the context of a suicide prevention program (Sources of Strength). Thirty-six classrooms in four schools (N = 706 students) were randomized to (1) peer leader modeling of healthy coping, (2) peer leader modeling plus audience involvement to identify trusted adults, or (3) control condition. Students' attitudes and norms were assessed by immediate post-only assessments. Exposure to either presentation enhanced positive coping attitudes and perceptions of adult support. Students who reported suicide ideation in the past 12 months benefited more than nonsuicidal students. Beyond modeling alone, audience involvement modestly enhanced expectations of adult support, congruent with the elaboration likelihood model. Positive peer modeling is a promising alternative to communications focused on negative consequences and directives and may enhance social-interpersonal factors linked to reduced suicidal behaviors.

  11. Holiday Suicides: Fact or Myth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Violence Data LGB Suicidal Thoughts & Experiences Data LGB Youth Report School Violence Featured Topic: Opportunities for Action Featured Topic: Bullying Research Featured Topic: Prevent Gang Membership Featured Topic: ...

  12. Suicide and suicidal behavior among transgender persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H G Virupaksha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suicide rate and suicidal tendencies among transgender persons are considerably high compared to general population. Hence, this review is an attempt to understand the issues around the suicide and suicidal behavior among transgender persons. Methodology: The literature search conducted using three sources, i.e., electronic databases (PubMed, ProQuest, Google Scholar, PsycInfo, manual search (library catalog, and gray literature (consultation with experts. Results: The suicide attempt rate among transgender persons ranges from 32% to 50% across the countries. Gender-based victimization, discrimination, bullying, violence, being rejected by the family, friends, and community; harassment by intimate partner, family members, police and public; discrimination and ill treatment at health-care system are the major risk factors that influence the suicidal behavior among transgender persons. Conclusion: In spite of facing a number of hardships in their day-to-day life, the transgender community holds a number of resiliency factors. Further, this community needs to be supported to strengthen their resiliency factors and draw culturally sensitive and transgender-inclusive suicide prevention strategies and increase protective factors to tackle this high rate of suicidality.

  13. Suicidality in schizophrenia: a review of the evidence for risk factors and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2002-08-01

    Suicide is a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality of schizophrenia, accounting for approximately 10% of deaths in these patients. The known risk factors for suicide in schizophrenia include prior suicide attempts, substance abuse, male sex, onset during first decade of illness, social isolation, depression, and feelings of hopelessness. There is significant evidence suggesting that clozapine reduces the suicide rate in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Possible factors that lead to a decrease in suicidality with clozapine include the following: a direct antidepressant action, improved cognitive function and insight, diminished negative symptoms, reduced substance abuse, and improved compliance. These effects may converge or lessen feelings of hopelessness and more of its converse optimism. The International Suicide Prevention Trial (InterSePT) is a large prospective, 2-year randomized trial of the comparative effects of clozapine and olanzapine involving 980 patients at high risk for suicide in 11 countries in 56 sites. The study included complete freedom to augment these treatments if needed, blinded ratings, a blinded Suicide Monitoring Board, and equivalent clinical contact. The results support the superiority of clozapine over olanzapine to reduce the risk of suicidality and suggest its use should be considered for all patients with schizophrenia with high risk for suicide.

  14. Preventing repetition of attempted suicide--I. Feasibility (acceptability, adherence, and effectiveness) of a Baerum-model like aftercare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Marianne; Wang, August G

    2009-01-01

    Repetition after attempted suicide is high with only limited research been put into effect studies. The Baerum-model from Norway offers a practical and affordable intervention. Our aim was to study the acceptability and effectiveness of a Baerum-model like intervention after attempted suicide using...... a quasi-experimental design. During a period in 2004, attempted suicide patients were offered follow-up care by a rapid-response outreach programme, an intervention lasting 6 months; a control group was established prospectively from a similar period in 2002. The design was an intent-to-treat analysis....... The outcome was measured by: 1) participation by acceptance and adherence, 2) repetition of suicide attempt and suicide, and 3) including the number of repetitive acts in 1 year after the attempted suicide episode. Follow-up period was 1 year. Participation was 70%. There was a significant lower repetition...

  15. Preventing repetition of attempted suicide-I. Feasibility (acceptability, adherence, and effectiveness) of a Baerum-model like aftercare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, M.; Wang, August Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Repetition after attempted suicide is high with only limited research been put into effect studies. The Baerum-model from Norway offers a practical and affordable intervention. Our aim was to study the acceptability and effectiveness of a Baerum-model like intervention after attempted suicide using...... a quasi-experimental design. During a period in 2004, attempted suicide patients were offered follow-up care by a rapid-response outreach programme, an intervention lasting 6 months; a control group was established prospectively from a similar period in 2002. The design was an intent-to-treat analysis....... The outcome was measured by: 1) participation by acceptance and adherence, 2) repetition of suicide attempt and suicide, and 3) including the number of repetitive acts in 1 year after the attempted suicide episode. Follow-up period was 1 year. Participation was 70%. There was a significant lower repetition...

  16. Studying survivors of near-lethal suicide attempts as a proxy for completed suicide in prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivlin, Adrienne; Fazel, Seena; Marzano, Lisa; Hawton, Keith

    2012-07-10

    Suicides in prisons are common. There is a pressing need to understand more about the causes and prevention of prisoner suicides. A particularly informative approach is through studying survivors of near-lethal suicide attempts. However, the extent to which this approach is a good proxy for completed suicide requires verification. In this article we aimed to assess (1) the extent to which male and female prisoners who made near-lethal suicide attempts in prison are similar to prisoners who die by suicide; (2) the suicidal intent of those making near-lethal suicide attempts; and (3) the applicability of the Suicide Intent Scale in prisons. Survivors of near-lethal suicide attempts and prisoners who died by suicide were compared on sociodemographic and criminological characteristics. The suicidal intent of prisoners engaging in near-lethal self-harm was assessed using Beck's Suicide Intent Scale. There were no significant differences when the sociodemographic and criminological profiles of prisoners who made near-lethal suicide attempts and those who died by suicide were compared, except that male prisoners who made near-lethal suicide attempts were somewhat younger. Most prisoners carrying out near-lethal acts had high suicidal intent. However, some questions in the Suicide Intent Scale were inappropriate for assessing intent in prisoners. Prisoners who survive near-lethal self-harm would appear to be a valid proxy for those who die by suicide in prison. The Suicide Intent Scale requires some modifications for use in prisons.

  17. Suicide Ideation among College Students Evidencing Subclinical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrowicz, Kelly C.; Schlegel, Erin F.; Smith, Phillip N.; Jacobs, Matthew P.; Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Paukert, Ambert L.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying elevated suicide ideation in college students is a critical step in preventing suicide attempts and deaths by suicide on college campuses. Although suicide ideation may be most prominent in students with severe depression, this should not suggest that only students with severe depression experience significant risk factors for suicide.…

  18. Suicide Ideation among College Students Evidencing Subclinical Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrowicz, Kelly C.; Schlegel, Erin F.; Smith, Phillip N.; Jacobs, Matthew P.; Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Paukert, Ambert L.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying elevated suicide ideation in college students is a critical step in preventing suicide attempts and deaths by suicide on college campuses. Although suicide ideation may be most prominent in students with severe depression, this should not suggest that only students with severe depression experience significant risk factors for suicide.…

  19. Suicide Ideation Among College Students Evidencing Subclinical Depression

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Identifying elevated suicide ideation in college students is a critical step in preventing suicide attempts and deaths by suicide on college campuses. Although suicide ideation may be most prominent in students with severe depression, this should not suggest that only students with severe depression experience significant risk factors for suicide.

  20. Vitamin C: optimal dosages, supplementation and use in disease prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callen Pacier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of vitamin C as a way to prevent scurvy has been known for centuries. More recent research on vitamin C has expanded beyond scurvy prevention, providing promising evidence for additional health benefits and clinical applications. This review of scientific literature will evaluate many aspects of vitamin C including deficient versus optimal blood plasma levels, adequate daily amounts necessary to maintain ideal levels, and the safety of higher doses. It will also focus on the importance of vitamin C as a powerful bioactive compound, and its utilization in the prevention and management of different chronic diseases. This review is necessary to express the importance of alternative healthcare methods in both preventative and clinical care. Vitamin C was chosen as a representative of this concept due to its powerful antioxidant capacity, incredibly important physiological implications, and very minimal chance of side-effects. This review focuses on studies involving human participants that address how vitamin C is important for our health

  1. Masculinity and suicidal thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkis, Jane; Spittal, Matthew J; Keogh, Louise; Mousaferiadis, Tass; Currier, Dianne

    2017-03-01

    Males feature prominently in suicide statistics, but relatively little work has been done to date to explore whether endorsement of dominant masculinity norms heightens the risk of or is protective against suicidal thinking. This paper aimed to further knowledge in this area. We used baseline data from 13,884 men (aged 18-55) in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health (Ten to Men) cohort. These men filled in self-complete questionnaires in 2013/14 which covered a range of topics, including conformity to dominant masculinity norms and suicidal thinking. We conducted logistic regression analyses to estimate the strength of association between these two variables. After controlling for other key predictors of suicidal thinking, one characteristic of dominant masculinity-self-reliance-stood out as a risk factor for suicidal thinking (AOR 1.34; 95% CI 1.26-1.43). It suggests that one particular element of dominant masculinity-being self-reliant-may place men at increased risk of suicidal thinking. This finding resonates with current theories of how suicidal thinking develops and leads to action. It also has implications for the full gamut of suicide prevention approaches that target males in clinical settings and in the general population, and for our broader society. Further work is needed, however, to confirm the direction of the relationship between self-reliance and suicidality, and to unpack the means through which self-reliance may exert an influence.

  2. Elderly Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elderly Suicide Fact Sheet Based on 2012 Data (2014) Overview • The elderly (ages 65 and older) made up 13. ... population; they accounted for 16.37% of all suicides in the US. • The rate of suicides for ...

  3. Untangling a Complex Web: How Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Suicide Attempts Differ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Kerr, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal behavior is complex and often difficult to untangle. While most self-injurers never exhibit suicidality, there is evidence of a correlation between suicidality and NSSI, and a clear overlap of risk between the two behaviors. Therefore, it is important to both prevention and…

  4. You Can't Recover from Suicide: Perspectives on Suicide Education in MSW Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Betty J.; Gianino, Mark; Muroff, Jordana; McLaughlin, Donna; Feldman, Barry N.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a profound worldwide public health problem that has received increased attention in recent years. The major federal response, the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention, calls for more suicide education for mental health professionals, including social workers. Little is known about the amount of suicide education in MSW curricula…

  5. Dissemination and implementation of suicide prevention training in one Scottish region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hays Rebecca

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As part of a national co-ordinated and multifaceted response to the excess suicide rate, the Choose Life initiative, the Highland Choose Life Group launched an ambitious programme of training for National Health Service (NHS, Council and voluntary organisation staff. In this study of the dissemination and implementation of STORM (Skills-based Training On Risk Management, we set out to explore not only the outcomes of training, but key factors involved in the processes of diffusion, dissemination and implementation of the educational intervention. Methods Participants attending STORM training in Highland Region provided by 12 trained facilitators during the period March 2004 to February 2005 were recruited. Quantitative data collection from participants took place at three time points; immediately before training, immediately post-training and six months after training. Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out with the training facilitators and with a sample of course participants 6 months after they had been trained. We have utilized the conceptual model described by Greenhalgh and colleagues in a Framework analysis of the data, for considering the determinants of diffusion, dissemination and implementation of interventions in health service delivery and organization. Results Some 203 individuals completed a series of questionnaire measures immediately pre (time 1 and immediately post (time 2 training and there were significant improvements in attitudes and confidence of participants. Key factors in the diffusion, dissemination and implementation process were the presence of a champion or local opinion leader who supported and directed the intervention, local adaptation of the materials, commissioning of a group of facilitators who were provided with financial and administrative support, dedicated time to provide the training and regular peer-support. Conclusion Features that contributed to the success of STORM

  6. Time-trends in method-specific suicide rates compared with the availability of specific compounds. The Danish experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Qin, Ping; Helweg-Larsen, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Restriction of means for suicide is an important part of suicide preventive strategies in different countries. All suicides in Denmark between 1970 and 2000 were examined with regard to method used for suicide. Overall suicide mortality and method-specific suicide mortality was compared with offi......Restriction of means for suicide is an important part of suicide preventive strategies in different countries. All suicides in Denmark between 1970 and 2000 were examined with regard to method used for suicide. Overall suicide mortality and method-specific suicide mortality was compared...

  7. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and suicide: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, Judit; Kereszteny, Agnes

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate suicidality and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), this paper aims to systematically review the literature as an extension of previous reviews. METHODS We searched five databases (Ovid MEDLINE, Psychinfo, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science) with two categories of search terms: (1) suicide; suicidal; suicide behavior; suicide attempt; suicidal thought; and (2) ADHD. RESULTS The search resulted 26 articles. There is a positive association between ADHD and suicidality in both sexes and in all age groups. Comorbid disorders mediate between suicidality and ADHD. CONCLUSION Recognizing ADHD, comorbid conditions and suicidality is important in prevention. PMID:28401048

  8. Suicides on a Southwestern American Indian Reservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marv

    1979-01-01

    Results showed suicides clustered by day of the week, season, and reservation location, and typical victims as young, unmarried males holding unskilled or semiskilled jobs. Suggested are strategies maximizing suicide prevention efforts. Journal availability: see RC 503 481. (DS)

  9. Train suicides in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houwelingen, Cornelis A J; Kerkhof, Ad J F M; Beersma, Domien G M

    2010-12-01

    Little is known about train suicide and factors influencing its prevalence. This study tests the hypotheses that railway density, railway transportation volume, familiarity with railway transportation and population density contribute to train suicide. It also tests the relationship between train suicide and general population suicide and examines the prevalence and the characteristics of high-risk locations and their contribution to the grand total of train suicides. Trends in train suicides were compared with trends in railway track length, train kilometres, passenger kilometres and national suicide figures over the period 1950-2007. The geographical distribution over the national network over the period 1980-2007 was studied. Data were obtained from The Netherlands Railways, Prorail and Statistics Netherlands. 1. The incidence of train suicides is unrelated to railway parameters. 2. Being familiar with railway transportation as a passenger is not a contributory factor. 3. Train suicide rates are unrelated to regional population density. 4. The incidence of train suicides parallels that of general population suicides. 5. Half of the train suicides took place at a limited number of locations, the most important of which were situated within a village or town and were close to a psychiatric hospital. Most conclusions are based on correlational relationships between variables. 1. Train suicide trends reflect trends in general population suicides. 2. Increased train transportation does not lead to more train suicides. 3. The prevention of train suicide at high-risk locations (HRLs) in built-up areas and near psychiatric hospitals deserves first priority. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The additive effect on suicidality of family history of suicidal behavior and early traumatic experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Castroman, J; Guillaume, S; Olié, E; Jaussent, I; Baca-García, E; Courtet, P

    2015-01-01

    Family history of suicidal behavior and personal history of childhood abuse are reported risk factors for suicide attempts and suicide completion. We aim to quantify the additive effect of family history of suicidal behavior and different subtypes of childhood abuse on suicidal behavior. We examined a sample of 496 suicide attempters, comparing individuals with family history of suicidal behavior and personal history of childhood (physical or sexual) abuse, individuals with family history of suicidal behavior only, individuals with history of early traumatic experiences only, and individuals with none of these two risk factors with regards to suicidal features. An additive effect was found for the age at the first attempt in suicide attempters with both family history of suicidal behavior and either physical or sexual abuse. No significant interactions were found between family history of suicidal behavior and childhood trauma in relation to any characteristics of suicidal behavior. Subjects presenting family history of suicidal behavior and childhood abuse attempt suicide earlier in life than subjects with just one or none of them, particularly if they were sexually abused. Other suicidality indexes were only partially or not associated with this combination of risk factors. A careful assessment of patients with both family history of suicidal behavior and childhood abuse could help to prevent future suicide attempts, particularly in young people.

  11. Suicide and Suicidal Thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an underlying psychiatric disorder, such as major depression, post-traumatic stress disorder or bipolar disorder Have a family history of mental disorders, substance abuse, suicide, or violence, including physical or sexual abuse Have ...

  12. A social work contribution to suicide prevention through assertive brief psychotherapy and community linkage: use of the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, Melissa; Joubert, Lynette

    2013-01-01

    There is a striking absence of literature articulating and evaluating clinical social work contributions to suicide prevention, despite considerable practice in this important field. This article reports on a model of assertive brief psychotherapeutic intervention and facilitated linkage to community services utilized in a prospective cohort study of emergency department suicide attempt aftercare. A key outcome measure, the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA), was used with 65 patients to assess psychosocial domains at initial presentation, 4-weeks, 3-months, and 6-months. There were significant improvements in the domains of work, finance, leisure, social life, living situation, personal safety and health by 3 months. There were highly significant correlations between psychosocial improvements and improved depression scores.

  13. Rational Suicide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, David J.

    1998-01-01

    The rational suicide paradigm is contrasted with the traditional view of the mental health professions. Historical background on suicide in western civilization is supplied and the concept of rationality elucidated. Parallels between the questions of refusing life-prolonging therapy and rational suicide are discussed, as are reasons for suicide.…

  14. Preventing suicide in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender prisoners:A critique of U.K. policy

    OpenAIRE

    Read, Max; Mccrae, Niall

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a global problem in prisons. As in society generally, gay men in prison have a higher risk of attempting suicide compared with their heterosexual peers. The Howard League for Penal Reform Sex in Prison Commission 2015 reveals a pervasive culture of consensual and coercive sexual relations, with gay men more likely to be targeted for unsolicited sex. Research shows an inadequate institutional response to such abuse. Victims of sexual assault in prison have high rates of psychologica...

  15. Review of Well-Being in the Context of Suicide Prevention and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    construct is the well-researched construct of quality of life ( QoL ) [15]. The WHO provided the following definition of QoL : “An individual’s...DCoE. Their members included Jeff Greenberg, PhD; Kate Blaney, MS ; Cree Scott, PsyD; Deirdre Farrell, MA; Angela Fix, MPH; and Maria Mouratidis, PsyD...resilience and prevention. These staff members include in alphabetical order: Paul Bartone, PhD; David Brown, PsyD; Colanda Cato, PhD; George Durgin, MS

  16. Suicide policy in Canada: lessons from history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiwak, Rae; Elias, Brenda; Bolton, James M; Martens, Patricia J; Sareen, Jitender

    2012-07-18

    In Canada, suicide has transitioned from being a criminal activity with much associated stigma, to being a public health concern that needs to be managed by governments and clinicians in a culturally sensitive manner. In Canada and worldwide, the social attitudes toward and legal interpretation of suicide have been dynamic. Much has been proposed in the development of suicide policy in Canada, however Canada is unique in that it remains one of the only industrialized countries without a national suicide prevention strategy. The current article provides a critical review of the history of suicide in Canada, as well as an appraisal of Canadian suicide prevention policies and key government and political milestones that have impacted suicide policy. Current activity regarding a national suicide prevention strategy in Canada is discussed, as well as potential options for clinician involvement.

  17. Depression and exposure to suicide predict suicide attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanayakkara, Sonali; Misch, Diane; Chang, Laura; Henry, David

    2013-10-01

    To examine the role of depression and exposure to peer or family suicide and their interaction as risk factors for adolescent suicide attempts. The study used the public-use data set of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), which is a nationally representative stratified sample of U.S. high school students. Sample size was 4,719. Analyses predicted suicide attempts from preexisting depression and exposure to suicide of a friend or family member, controlling for previous suicide attempts, exposure, and depression. The greatest risk for future suicide attempts (relative risk = 3.3), was attributable to an attempt in the preceding year, controlling for preexisting and current depression and exposure. There was a main effect of exposure with the next highest relative risk of 3.2. A similar risk ratio, 3.2, was found for the difference between no depression and current severe depression, controlling for past depression and attempts. There was no evidence of an interaction between exposure to a peer or family member suicide attempt and depression. Supplementary analyses found that exposure to a friend or family member suicide attempt or completed suicide each added significantly to risk for adolescents regardless of depression levels. Exposure to suicidal behavior in a friend or family member poses risk equivalent to the risk posed by becoming severely depressed. Attending to such risks could benefit clinical practice with adolescence and public health suicide prevention efforts. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Prevalence of suicidal ideation, suicide plans, and attempted suicide: a population-based survey in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botega, Neury José; Marín-León, Letícia; Oliveira, Helenice Bosco de; Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo; Silva, Viviane Franco da; Dalgalarrondo, Paulo

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to estimate the lifetime prevalence rates for suicidal ideation, suicide plans, and attempted suicide, based on a cluster sample of 515 residents of Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil. The Multisite Intervention Study on Suicidal Behavior interview was performed, and lifetime prevalence rates and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated. Lifetime prevalence rates were 17.1% (95%CI: 12.9-21.2) for suicidal ideation, 4.8% (95%CI: 2.8-6.8) for suicide plans, and 2.8% (95%CI: 0.09-4.6) for attempted suicide. Suicidal behavior was more frequent among women and young adults. The suicide plan/attempt ratio was approximately 5:3. Only one-third of those who attempted suicide contacted a health service following the attempt. Prevalence rates for suicidal behavior were similar to most studies from other countries. Suicide prevention strategies should take data from community-based studies into account.

  19. Controlling Access to Suicide Means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Iosue

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Restricting access to common means of suicide, such as firearms, toxic gas, pesticides and other, has been shown to be effective in reducing rates of death in suicide. In the present review we aimed to summarize the empirical and clinical literature on controlling the access to means of suicide. Methods: This review made use of both MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science and the Cochrane library databases, identifying all English articles with the keywords “suicide means”, “suicide method”, “suicide prediction” or “suicide prevention” and other relevant keywords. Results: A number of factors may influence an individual’s decision regarding method in a suicide act, but there is substantial support that easy access influences the choice of method. In many countries, restrictions of access to common means of suicide has lead to lower overall suicide rates, particularly regarding suicide by firearms in USA, detoxification of domestic and motor vehicle gas in England and other countries, toxic pesticides in rural areas, barriers at jumping sites and hanging, by introducing “safe rooms” in prisons and hospitals. Moreover, decline in prescription of barbiturates and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs, as well as limitation of drugs pack size for paracetamol and salicylate has reduced suicides by overdose, while increased prescription of SSRIs seems to have lowered suicidal rates. Conclusions: Restriction to means of suicide may be particularly effective in contexts where the method is popular, highly lethal, widely available, and/or not easily substituted by other similar methods. However, since there is some risk of means substitution, restriction of access should be implemented in conjunction with other suicide prevention strategies.

  20. Discussion of Late-Life Suicide: How Social Workers Perceive and Intervene in Elderly Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yujin

    2013-01-01

    As the prevalence of suicide among the elderly has developed in recent years into one of the more serious social problems in South Korea, preventing these elderly suicides has emerged as a national priority. Korean social workers play a major role in the recent elderly suicide prevention efforts that were implemented starting in 2007. The purpose…

  1. Characteristics of suicide hotspots on the Belgian railway network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbaut, Kevin; Krysinska, Karolina; Andriessen, Karl

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, railway suicide accounted for 5.3% of all suicides in Belgium. In 2008, Infrabel (Manager of the Belgian Railway Infrastructure) introduced a railway suicide prevention programme, including identification of suicide hotspots, i.e., areas of the railway network with an elevated incidence of suicide. The study presents an analysis of 43 suicide hotspots based on Infrabel data collected during field visits and semi-structured interviews conducted in mental health facilities in the vicinity of the hotspots. Three major characteristics of the hotspots were accessibility, anonymity, and vicinity of a mental health institution. The interviews identified several risk and protective factors for railway suicide, including the training of staff, introduction of a suicide prevention policy, and the role of the media. In conclusion, a comprehensive railway suicide prevention programme should continuously safeguard and monitor hotspots, and should be embedded in a comprehensive suicide prevention programme in the community.

  2. Suicide prevention in the US armed forces and implications for Chinese armed forces%透视美军自杀防控工作

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于双平; 杨征; 毛军文

    2012-01-01

    过去10年间,尤其是阿富汗和伊拉克战争爆发以来,美军的自杀问题日益突出,其自杀率呈持续上升趋势,为此,美国国防部和各军种采取了一系列自杀防控措施,取得了一定效果.本文对美军自杀问题现状、采取的防控措施及面临的主要挑战进行了分析,并对中国军队做好相关工作提出了若干启示.%Suicide is one of the leading causes of death in the US armed forces in the past decade, especially after increased deployments as a result of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq. The US Department of Defense and its four services have done a lot to fight against suicide. Suicide prevention in the US armed forces is briefly reviewed based on the current information and its implications for Chinese armed forces are also summarized.

  3. [Evaluation of suicide risk factors based on a survey of suicides and suicidal attempts at psychiatric hospitals in Aichi Prefecture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takao

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined cases of suicide, suicidal attempts, and risk factors in 41 psychiatric hospitals of Aichi Prefecture. As a result, some characteristics of psychiatric wards considered to be effective in suicide prevention were shown. In addition, as for measures to resolve risk factors and the state of the patients, there were many which were effective in the prevention of suicide attempts. Regarding measures to reduce risk factors for symptoms and treat patients, there were many techniques which were effective in the prevention of suicidal attempts, but, for cases which did not respond to treatment, suicide was frequent. In addition, a "suicide preventive manual in a psychiatric hospital" produced based on these results was distributed.

  4. Social modeling in the transmission of suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leo, Diego; Heller, Travis

    2008-01-01

    Evidence from twin, adoption, and family studies suggests that there is strong aggregation of suicidal behaviors in some families. By comparison, the role of social modeling through peers has yet to be convincingly established. This paper uses data from four large studies (the WHO/EURO Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behaviour, the WHO/SUPRE-MISS, the CASE study, and the Queensland Suicide Register) to compare the effects of exposure to fatal and nonfatal suicidal behavior in family members and nonfamilial associates on the subsequent suicidal behavior of male and female respondents of different ages. Across all studies, we found that prior suicidal behaviors among respondents' social groups were more important predictors of suicidal behavior in the respondents themselves than previous research had indicated. Community-based suicide attempters in the WHO SUPRE-MISS had higher rates of exposure to prior suicide in nonfamilial associates than in family members. In an adolescent population, exposure to prior fatal suicidal behavior did not predict deliberate self-harm when exposure to nonfatal suicidal behavior (both familial and social) were controlled for, but exposure to nonfatal suicidal behaviors in family and friends was predictive of deliberate self-harm and suicide ideation, even after controlling for exposure to fatal suicidal behavior. The potential impact of "containment" of information regarding suicidal behaviors as a prevention initiative is discussed, in light of information behavior principles of social marketing.

  5. Measuring the suicidal mind: implicit cognition predicts suicidal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, Matthew K; Park, Jennifer M; Finn, Christine T; Deliberto, Tara L; Dour, Halina J; Banaji, Mahzarin R

    2010-04-01

    Suicide is difficult to predict and prevent because people who consider killing themselves often are unwilling or unable to report their intentions. Advances in the measurement of implicit cognition provide an opportunity to test whether automatic associations of self with death can provide a behavioral marker for suicide risk. We measured implicit associations about death/suicide in 157 people seeking treatment at a psychiatric emergency department. Results confirmed that people who have attempted suicide hold a significantly stronger implicit association between death/suicide and self than do psychiatrically distressed individuals who have not attempted suicide. Moreover, the implicit association of death/suicide with self was associated with an approximately 6-fold increase in the odds of making a suicide attempt in the next 6 months, exceeding the predictive validity of known risk factors (e.g., depression, suicide-attempt history) and both patients' and clinicians' predictions. These results provide the first evidence of a behavioral marker for suicidal behavior and suggest that measures of implicit cognition may be useful for detecting and predicting sensitive clinical behaviors that are unlikely to be reported.

  6. Suicide risk in primary care: identification and management in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raue, Patrick J; Ghesquiere, Angela R; Bruce, Martha L

    2014-09-01

    The National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (2012) has set a goal to reduce suicides by 20% within 5 years. Suicide rates are higher in older adults compared to most other age groups, and the majority of suicide completers have visited their primary care physician in the year before suicide. Primary care is an ideal setting to identify suicide risk and initiate mental health care. We review risk factors for late-life suicide; methods to assess for different levels of suicidality; and recent research developments regarding both effective assessment and management of suicide risk among older primary care patients. We highlight that broader scale screening of suicide risk may be considered in light of findings that suicidality can occur even in the absence of major risk factors like depression. We also highlight collaborative care models targeting suicide risk, and recent innovative interventions that aim to prevent the development of suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior.

  7. Parents' Perspectives on Young Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nicky

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for the prevention of adolescent suicide are frequently designed to identify those young people who represent a high risk in order that services and support can be effectively targeted. This study explored the experiences of parents who had lost a child through suicide. The findings suggest that the range of behaviours perceived by…

  8. Suicide Interventions Targeted toward At-Risk Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Lamis, Dorian A.; McCullars, Adrianne

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is currently the third leading cause of death among youth; it has been named a public health concern. A number of programs have been developed to prevent suicide; many of these involve intervening with youth who are known to be at-risk because of their depression, expressed suicide ideation, or previous suicide attempts. This paper serves…

  9. An overview of suicide--1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danto, B L

    1980-03-01

    There are many changes taking place and new directions being developed all the time in suicidology. The various changes and why they are happening are discussed. The activities of the suicide prevention centers are reviewed and some of the experiences of the Detroit Suicide Prevention and Drug Information Center are reported. There is discussion of the role of the psychiatrist in support of some aspects of law enforcement activities including crisis intervention technics. The American Association of Suicidology is discussed as is the International Association for Suicide Prevention.

  10. Suicidal Behavior and Alcohol Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Pompili

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is an escalating public health problem, and alcohol use has consistently been implicated in the precipitation of suicidal behavior. Alcohol abuse may lead to suicidality through disinhibition, impulsiveness and impaired judgment, but it may also be used as a means to ease the distress associated with committing an act of suicide. We reviewed evidence of the relationship between alcohol use and suicide through a search of MedLine and PsychInfo electronic databases. Multiple genetically-related intermediate phenotypes might influence the relationship between alcohol and suicide. Psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, mood disorders and anxiety disorders, as well as susceptibility to stress, might increase the risk of suicidal behavior, but may also have reciprocal influences with alcohol drinking patterns. Increased suicide risk may be heralded by social withdrawal, breakdown of social bonds, and social marginalization, which are common outcomes of untreated alcohol abuse and dependence. People with alcohol dependence or depression should be screened for other psychiatric symptoms and for suicidality. Programs for suicide prevention must take into account drinking habits and should reinforce healthy behavioral patterns.

  11. Suicidal Behavior and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Serafini, Gianluca; Innamorati, Marco; Dominici, Giovanni; Ferracuti, Stefano; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D.; Serra, Giulia; Girardi, Paolo; Janiri, Luigi; Tatarelli, Roberto; Sher, Leo; Lester, David

    2010-01-01

    Suicide is an escalating public health problem, and alcohol use has consistently been implicated in the precipitation of suicidal behavior. Alcohol abuse may lead to suicidality through disinhibition, impulsiveness and impaired judgment, but it may also be used as a means to ease the distress associated with committing an act of suicide. We reviewed evidence of the relationship between alcohol use and suicide through a search of MedLine and PsychInfo electronic databases. Multiple genetically-related intermediate phenotypes might influence the relationship between alcohol and suicide. Psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, mood disorders and anxiety disorders, as well as susceptibility to stress, might increase the risk of suicidal behavior, but may also have reciprocal influences with alcohol drinking patterns. Increased suicide risk may be heralded by social withdrawal, breakdown of social bonds, and social marginalization, which are common outcomes of untreated alcohol abuse and dependence. People with alcohol dependence or depression should be screened for other psychiatric symptoms and for suicidality. Programs for suicide prevention must take into account drinking habits and should reinforce healthy behavioral patterns. PMID:20617037

  12. Suicide in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richa, Sami; Fahed, Mario; Khoury, Elias; Mishara, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on suicide in patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) as well as risk factors and comorbidities of persons with ASD who have attempted suicide. Research was conducted by searching PubMed and Psychinfo for articles. Suicide in ASD is largely understudied. Although suicide is common in clinical samples, we have little knowledge of suicide in persons with ASD in the general population. Comorbidity, particularly with depression and other affective disorders or schizoid disorders and psychotic symptoms, is often reported, so it is difficult to determine if suicidality is associated with ASD or the comorbid disorder. Clinical samples suggest that suicide occurs more frequently in high functioning autism. Physical and sexual abuse, bullying, and changes in routine are precipitating events associated with suicide risk. Persons with ASD present risk factors inherent to their diagnosis (deficit in expression of feelings and thoughts), along with risk factors pertaining to the general population (abuse, depression, anxiety, etc.). The inability of persons with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) to express emotions and thoughts makes the diagnosis of suicidal ideation difficult and demands important adjustments to traditional psychotherapeutic interventions. More research is needed to determine the incidence of suicidal behaviors in persons with ASD, to identify risk and protective factors, as well as to assess the effectiveness of prevention strategies and interventions.

  13. 重庆市大学生自杀行为的预警及防控策略%Early warning and prevention strategies of suicide behavior of college students in Chongqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王我; 况利; 吕臻; 艾明; 陈建梅; 陈小容; 周东东; 万里洋

    2016-01-01

    It is of great practical significance to prevent college students from committing suicide and to make reasonable and feasible suicidal prevention and control programs.In view of some problems in suicidal prevention work among college students,such as the imperfect discovery mechanism of psychological problems and the incomplete referral procedures of high risk students,our research group has collaborated with several universities in Chongqing,carried out research on integration and early warning of suicidal prevention and control measures.We put forward the strategy for suicidal early warning,prevention and control from at least three aspects,which are improving awareness of the importance of suicidal prevention,establishing the working mechanism of "the joint meeting of mental work in students" and improving suicidal prevention and control system in students.The close collaboration between schools and specialist hospitals is an important innovation in the strategy.In suicidal prevention and control system,we should especially focus on strengthening the students-oriented main level control mechanism,developing psychological crisis intervention plan in students,strengthening the teachers' professional ability in students' management,and conducting the education of parents on students' psychological health.%预防大学生自杀并制定合理可行的自杀防控方案,具有重要的现实意义.针对大学生自杀预防工作存在发现机制和高危学生转诊流程不完备等问题,课题组与重庆市多家高校合作,开展对自杀防控措施整合和预警的研究.并提出从提高对预防自杀重要性的认识、建立“学生心理工作联席会议”机制、健全学生自杀防控体系等方面,进行自杀的预警和防控.其中,学校和专科医院的紧密合作是自杀防控策略的一个重要创新.在自杀防控体系中,尤其需要加强以学生为主体的一级防控机制、制定学生心理危机干预预案、加

  14. Suicide and Suicide Risk in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Populations: Review and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Ann P.; Eliason, Mickey; Mays, Vickie M.; Mathy, Robin M.; Cochran, Susan D.; D'Augelli, Anthony R.; Silverman, Morton M.; Fisher, Prudence W.; Hughes, Tonda; Rosario, Margaret; Russell, Stephen T.; Malley, Effie; Reed, Jerry; Litts, David A.; Haller, Ellen; Sell, Randall L.; Remafedi, Gary; Bradford, Judith; Beautrais, Annette L.; Brown, Gregory K.; Diamond, Gary M.; Friedman, Mark S.; Garofalo, Robert; Turner, Mason S.; Hollibaugh, Amber; Clayton, Paula J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite strong indications of elevated risk of suicidal behavior in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, limited attention has been given to research, interventions or suicide prevention programs targeting these populations. This article is a culmination of a three-year effort by an expert panel to address the need for better understanding of suicidal behavior and suicide risk in sexual minority populations, and stimulate the development of needed prevention strategies, interventions and policy changes. This article summarizes existing research findings, and makes recommendations for addressing knowledge gaps and applying current knowledge to relevant areas of suicide prevention practice. PMID:21213174

  15. Suicide and suicide risk in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender populations: review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Ann P; Eliason, Mickey; Mays, Vickie M; Mathy, Robin M; Cochran, Susan D; D'Augelli, Anthony R; Silverman, Morton M; Fisher, Prudence W; Hughes, Tonda; Rosario, Margaret; Russell, Stephen T; Malley, Effie; Reed, Jerry; Litts, David A; Haller, Ellen; Sell, Randall L; Remafedi, Gary; Bradford, Judith; Beautrais, Annette L; Brown, Gregory K; Diamond, Gary M; Friedman, Mark S; Garofalo, Robert; Turner, Mason S; Hollibaugh, Amber; Clayton, Paula J

    2011-01-01

    Despite strong indications of elevated risk of suicidal behavior in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, limited attention has been given to research, interventions or suicide prevention programs targeting these populations. This article is a culmination of a three-year effort by an expert panel to address the need for better understanding of suicidal behavior and suicide risk in sexual minority populations, and stimulate the development of needed prevention strategies, interventions and policy changes. This article summarizes existing research findings, and makes recommendations for addressing knowledge gaps and applying current knowledge to relevant areas of suicide prevention practice.

  16. The impact of media reporting of suicide on actual suicides in Taiwan, 2002-05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Yeh; Chen, Feng; Yip, Paul S F

    2011-10-01

    To assess changes in the intensity of suicide news reporting in Taiwan's local newspapers after the arrival of a daily tabloid-type newspaper, Apple Daily (AD), and evaluate the impact of suicide news reporting on actual suicides and possible mutual causation. A counting process was used to estimate the intensity of daily suicide news items reported in the China Times (CT) and United Daily (UD) before and after the arrival of AD (2002-05). Poisson regression models were used to assess the impact of the intensity of suicide news reporting on the actual number of next day suicides. Granger's causation model was used to assess mutual causation between suicide news reporting and actual suicides. There was a significant increase in reporting intensity of suicide news in the UD soon after the entry of the AD into Taiwan's media market, while a delayed increase of approximately 1 year was observed in the CT. After the arrival of the AD, the reporting intensity in the UD was significantly related to the occurrence of actual suicides (psuicide news reporting and actual suicides was also observed. The presence of the AD in Taiwan has fuelled competitive reporting of suicide news among traditional newspapers. This increase in the intensity of suicide news reporting has consequently had an impact on the actual number of suicides. This provides further empirical support for improving media reporting as a key element in suicide prevention.

  17. Psychological strains and suicide intent: Results from a psychological autopsy study with Chinese rural young suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Long; Li, Han; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Qiong

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have examined the prevalence of psychological strains among various suicide populations. However, it is still unexamined whether psychological strains can predict suicide intent directly. We planned to explore the prevalence of psychological strains and analyze the relationship between psychological strains and suicide intent among Chinese rural young suicides. Psychological autopsy method was used to investigate the environmental and other factors of rural young suicides. Psychological strains were identified from in-depth interviews by the proxy informants of each suicide. The first 8 items of Beck's Suicidal Intention Scale (SIS) were used to estimate the suicide intent. Results showed that 96.6% of the suicides had at least one type of strain, and those suicides who had more strains tended to score higher on the suicide intent scale. The study further supports that suicide intent can be predicted by psychological strains in Chinese rural young suicides. The scanning of psychological strains can be used for suicide prevention in Chinese rural young suicides. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. THE OPTIMIZATION OF CORRUPTION PREVENTION TOWARDS INDONESIA CORRUPTION-FREE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hibnu Nugroho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevention and eraducation of corruption case are the strategy which can’t be implemented separatly it should be done synergistically, integrated and concurrently to prevent a new corruptor generation and other new corruptor. So the problem comes on how the strategy which are prevention and eraducation corruption by Indonesian goverment to reach Indonesia free from corruption and what the obsacles in order to reach strategy prevention and eraducation of corruption that already done by Indonesiaan goverment. This research used empirical yuridical method with descriptive analysis, qualitatieve descriptive and conten analysis. By this research can be known that goverment already had preventive and solutive corruption strategy to solve corruption, but there is still be found obstacles such as oerlaping, weak supervison among institution, profesion that related with law enforcemen and not maximal enough witness and informl protection.

  19. Geographic distribution of suicide and railway suicide in Belgium, 2008-2013: a principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strale, Mathieu; Krysinska, Karolina; Overmeiren, Gaëtan Van; Andriessen, Karl

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the geographic distribution of suicide and railway suicide in Belgium over 2008--2013 on local (i.e., district or arrondissement) level. There were differences in the regional distribution of suicide and railway suicides in Belgium over the study period. Principal component analysis identified three groups of correlations among population variables and socio-economic indicators, such as population density, unemployment, and age group distribution, on two components that helped explaining the variance of railway suicide at a local (arrondissement) level. This information is of particular importance to prevent suicides in high-risk areas on the Belgian railway network.

  20. A Novel Therapy for People Who Attempt Suicide and Why We Need New Models of Suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Michel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model of suicidal behaviour based on suicide as a goal-directed action, and its implications. An action theoretical model has guided the authors in the development of a brief therapy for individuals who attempt suicide (ASSIP—Attempted Suicide Short Intervention Program. Key elements are an early therapeutic alliance, narrative interviewing, psychoeducation, a joint case conceptualization, safety planning, and regular letters over 24 months. In a randomized controlled trial, ASSIP was highly effective in reducing the risk of suicide reattempts. The therapeutic elements in this treatment are described and possible implications for future directions in clinical suicide prevention discussed.

  1. [Non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts: grounding of differential diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitkowski, D; Petermann, F

    2010-01-01

    Three criteria for differential diagnosis of non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts were validated by means of more recent empirical studies. Criteria concerning motives (functions), methods of self-injury (medical severity), lifetime frequency and lifetime number of episodes were investigated. Literature research showed only a few studies concentrated on a direct comparison of non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts. Therefore, studies examing the relationship of suicide intent to the relevant features, are considered, too. Empirical results concerning motives (functions), methods (medical severity), lifetime frequency and number of episodes were compared to the three criteria. Except for lifetime frequency, studies support the criteria. However, in the case of motives, a more differentiated examination is needed to distinguish between non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts. To optimize the assessment, guidelines should be slightly modified. Because of the phenomenological overlap of non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts, a dimensional assessment can be helpful.

  2. Preventing repetition of attempted suicide--I. Feasibility (acceptability, adherence, and effectiveness) of a Baerum-model like aftercare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Marianne; Wang, August G

    2009-01-01

    a quasi-experimental design. During a period in 2004, attempted suicide patients were offered follow-up care by a rapid-response outreach programme, an intervention lasting 6 months; a control group was established prospectively from a similar period in 2002. The design was an intent-to-treat analysis...... rate in the intervention group, where the proportion of repetitive patients fell from 34% to 14%. There were also fewer suicidal acts, in total 37 acts in 58 patients in the control group and 22 acts in 93 patients for the intervention group. We have concluded that the outreach programme has a good...... feasibility because of high acceptability and adherence, and has an acceptable effectiveness in the follow up period of 1 year. We have therefore initiated a similar study using a randomization design in order to study efficacy....

  3. Suicidal behavior in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Rajiv

    2005-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of suicidal behavior in individuals suffering from schizophrenia and recent investigations substantially elucidate this problem and provide useful insights about clinical risk factors, neurobiologic underpinnings and the impact of various treatments on reducing such behavior. The risk of suicide is greatest early in the course of schizophrenic illness but continues throughout life; risk factors for suicidal behavior include psychosis, depression and substance abuse. Effectively treating positive symptoms and depression, reducing substance abuse, avoiding akathisia, addressing demoralization and instilling hope are important elements in this treatment approach. The newer generation of atypical antipsychotics (particularly clozapine) and new psychologic approaches (particularly cognitive behavioral therapy) appear to be useful in reducing suicidality in schizophrenia. The significant advances in defining the neurobiologic basis of suicidality may enable the development of more effective treatments. The renewed emphasis on resilience and recovery as desired outcomes in schizophrenia and the accompanying sense of hope encourage optimism about effectively reducing suicidality in schizophrenia. Over the past 10 years, much has been learnt and hopefully this momentum will be translated into increasingly better outcomes.

  4. Bullying, cyberbullying, and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinduja, Sameer; Patchin, Justin W

    2010-01-01

    Empirical studies and some high-profile anecdotal cases have demonstrated a link between suicidal ideation and experiences with bullying victimization or offending. The current study examines the extent to which a nontraditional form of peer aggression--cyberbullying--is also related to suicidal ideation among adolescents. In 2007, a random sample of 1,963 middle-schoolers from one of the largest school districts in the United States completed a survey of Internet use and experiences. Youth who experienced traditional bullying or cyberbullying, as either an offender or a victim, had more suicidal thoughts and were more likely to attempt suicide than those who had not experienced such forms of peer aggression. Also, victimization was more strongly related to suicidal thoughts and behaviors than offending. The findings provide further evidence that adolescent peer aggression must be taken seriously both at school and at home, and suggest that a suicide prevention and intervention component is essential within comprehensive bullying response programs implemented in schools.

  5. Religious commitment, attitudes toward suicide, and suicidal behaviors among college students of different ethnic and religious groups in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Xiang Yi; Alwi, Muhd Najib Mohd; Ismail, Siti Irma Fadhillah; Ibrahim, Normala; Osman, Zubaidah Jamil

    2014-06-01

    The variation in suicide patterns across ethnic groups with different religious background is a puzzling social phenomenon. This study sought to examine the impact of religious commitment and attitudes toward suicide on suicidal behaviors of college students across major ethnic and religious groups in a multicultural society of Malaysia. A total of 139 college students completed Religious Commitment Inventory-10, Attitudes Toward Suicide Scale, and Suicidal Behavior Questionnaire-Revised. Findings showed significant discrepancies in attitudes toward suicide, but not suicidal behaviors across ethnic and religious groups. Suicide acceptance significantly affected suicidal behaviors as well. Although religious commitment is not associated with suicidal behaviors, its deviation is reflected in students' acceptance of suicide. Additionally, college students' suicide risk, lifetime, and recent suicide ideation, as well as their likelihood of future suicide attempt can be associated with their acceptance of suicide. The influence of attitudes toward suicide and religion, therefore, should be taken into consideration while implementing suicide prevention programs as it helps shape the norms about suicide among youths.

  6. 19例住院患者夜间自杀现状分析与防范对策%Current Situation of Night Suicide of Inpatients and Its Preventive Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡德英; 丁小萍; 熊宇; 曾莉; 颜巧元

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究综合医院住院患者夜间自杀现状及其防范对策。方法回顾性分析2008年1月—2014年7月某三级甲等医院护理安全不良事件上报系统中的30例住院患者自杀事件。结果30例自杀患者中,夜间自杀患者共19例,占63%,住院患者夜间自杀所占比例高于白天。而在19例夜间自杀患者中,45~59岁中年患者 9例,占47%;癌症晚期患者12例,占63%。夜间自杀患者自杀方式以跳楼为主,地点多选择在病房内;夜间患者自杀行为致死率高,结局严重。结论综合性医院住院患者夜间自杀问题比较突出,不容忽视,建议采取防范对策,以减少或杜绝患者夜间自杀行为的发生。%Objective To study the current situation of night suicide of inpatients in general hospital and its preventive strategies. Methods Thirty suicide samples reported in a Class Ⅲ Grade Ⅰhospital from January 2008 to July 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Results Of the total, 19 samples committed suicide at night, accounting for 63%. The proportion of suicide at night was higher than that in the daytime. In 19 cases inpatients committing suicide at night, there were nine patients aged from 45 to 49, accounting for 47%, and 12 patients with advanced cancer, accounting for 63%. Jumping from the building was the main method for suicide at night, and ward witnessed the suicide frequently. Suicide at night caused high fatality rate and serious consequence. Conclusion It should not be ignored that inpatients commit suicide at night in general hospitals and preventive strategies should be taken to reduce or eliminate the occurrence of night suicide.

  7. Suicide in Asia: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Yeh; Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang; Yousuf, Saman; Yip, Paul S F

    2012-01-01

    Asian countries account for approximately 60% of the world's suicides, but there is a great mismatch in the region between the scale of the problem and the resources available to tackle it. Despite certain commonalities, the continent itself is culturally, economically, and socially diverse. This paper reviews current epidemiologic patterns of suicide, including suicide trends, sociodemographic factors, urban/rural living, suicide methods, sociocultural religious influences, and risk and protective factors in Asia, as well as their implications. The observed epidemiologic distributions of suicides reflect complex interplays among the traditional value/culture system, rapid economic transitions under market globalization, availability/desirability of suicide methods, and sociocultural permission/prohibitions regarding suicides. In general, compared with Western countries, Asian countries still have a higher average suicide rate, lower male-to-female suicide gender ratio, and higher elderly-to-general-population suicide ratios. The role of mental illness in suicide is not as important as that in Western countries. In contrast, aggravated by access to lethal means in Asia (e.g., pesticide poisoning and jumping), acute life stress (e.g., family conflicts, job and financial security issues) plays a more important role than it does in Western countries. Some promising suicide prevention programs in Asia are illustrated. Considering the specific socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the region, community-based suicide intervention programs integrating multiple layers of intervention targets may be the most feasible and cost-effective strategy in Asia, with its populous areas and limited resources.

  8. Attempted suicide and contact with the primary health authorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E N; Jensen, Knud

    1994-01-01

    In a study describing suicide attempters' approach to the health and social welfare authorities prior to a suicide attempt, it was found that one-fourth of the patients seeking help requested therapeutic consultations and only a few asked for medicinal treatment. Forty-four percent had taken newly...... with their general practitioner prior to the suicide attempt. Postgraduate courses for practitioners on depression diagnostics and suicidal behaviour are proposed as a measure in suicide prevention....

  9. Building Trinity Suicide Prevention System among College Students%构筑三位一体的大学生自杀预防体系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫守轩; 王亚静

    2014-01-01

    为应对日益严峻的大学生自杀问题,理论与实践界进行了积极探索。心理咨询致力于矫正、治疗可能导致自杀行为的心理问题,生命教育以珍爱生命、提升生命品质为宗旨,在预防大学生自杀中彰显出独特优势和显著成效,但同时也各有其局限与难为之困境。大学生自杀之根源与对其施以制约和影响的社会情境密不可分。在心理咨询、生命教育预防基础上拓展与深化,增强大学生在风险社会中的平等体验与积极的自我建构,是有效预防大学生自杀的“治本”之举。为此,政府和社会应促进高等教育资源配置公平,推进大学生公平就业,完善与改进贫困大学生资助体系;大学生要努力提升自身专业素质,提升体悟生命的内在教养,追寻“自我同一性”。%In response to the increasingly serious problem of suicide among college students ,the theory and practice community has been actively exploring .Counseling is committed to orthodontic treatment in psy-chological problems which may lead to suicidal behavior .Life education is based on cherishing life and en-hancing the quality of life ,which highlights the unique strengths and remarkable achievements in the pre-vention of suicide of college students ,but it also has its plight of limitations and difficulty .Students’ sui-cide causes and the social context which imposes constraints and impact are inseparable and there are many radical measures to prevent the college students’ suicide effectively :to expand and deepen psychological counseling and life education based on the prevention ,to strengthen equal experience and positive self-con-struction in social risk .For this ,the government and society should promote fair allocation of resources of higher education and fair employment of college students and improve the funding system of poor students . College students should strive to improve their

  10. Multi-Level Cultural Intervention for the Prevention of Suicide and Alcohol Use Risk with Alaska Native Youth: a Nonrandomized Comparison of Treatment Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, James; Rasmus, Stacy M; Fok, Carlotta Ching Ting; Charles, Billy; Henry, David

    2017-08-07

    Suicide and alcohol use disorders are primary determinants of health disparity among Alaska Native people in contrast to the US general population. Qungasvik, a Yup'ik word for toolbox, is a strengths-based, multi-level, community/cultural intervention for rural Yup'ik youth ages 12-18. The intervention uses "culture as intervention" to promote reasons for life and sobriety in young people using local expertise, high levels of community direction, and community based staff. The intervention is grounded in local practices and adaptive to local cultural differences distinctive to rural Yup'ik communities. The current study compares the effectiveness of high-intensity intervention in one community (treatment), operationalized as a high number of intervention activities, or modules, implemented and attended by youth, contrasted to a lower intensity intervention in a second community (comparison) that implemented fewer modules. A Yup'ik Indigenous theory of change developed through previous qualitative and quantitative work guides intervention. In the model, direct intervention effects on proximal or intermediate variables constituting protective factors at the individual, family, community, and peer influences levels lead to later change on the ultimate prevention outcome variables of Reasons for Life protective from suicide risk and Reflective Processes about alcohol use consequences protective from alcohol risk. Mixed effects regression models contrasted treatment and comparison arms, and identified significant intervention effects on Reasons for Life (d = 0.27, p < .05) but not Reflective Processes.

  11. Etiology and Prevention Countermeasures for College Student Suicide%大学生自杀的病因学及预防对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝雁; 刘晓瑞; 高小雁

    2013-01-01

    The following causes for college student suicide were analyzed:the emotional frustrations,employmert pressure,the pressure of study,personal relationship tension,mental and physical diseases,inner conflicts.Prevention strategies were put forward:paying more attention to student's frustration education,strengthening the students'psychological health education,increasing the intensity of life ethics education and establishing early warning and intervention mechanism for college student suicide.%分析了导致大学生自杀的主要原因:情感受挫、就业压力、学业压力、人际关系紧张、精神和躯体疾患、内心冲突.提出预防大学生自杀的策略:重视对学生的挫折教育、加强学生心理健康教育、加大对学生生命伦理观教育的力度、建立大学生自杀危机预警与干预机制.

  12. Pilot Trial of Inpatient Cognitive Therapy for the Prevention of Suicide in Military Personnel with Acute Stress Disorder or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Psychopathology Course Lecture on Professional Burnout & Suicide – Medical Psychology Course Lecture on Suicide Risk Assessment & Management...acute coronary syndromes , and heart failure: The role of inflammatory processes. (USUHS Doctoral Dissertation, Medical Psychology) Branlund, S. (2008

  13. Communication of suicide intent by schizophrenic subjects: data from the Queensland Suicide Register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Leo Diego

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide in mentally ill subjects, like schizophrenics, remains unbearably frequent in Australia and elsewhere. Since these patients are known to constitute a high-risk group, suicide in them should be amongst the most preventable ones. The objective of this study is to investigate the frequency of suicide communication in subjects with reported history of schizophrenia who completed suicide. Method The Queensland Suicide Register (QSR was utilised to identify suicide cases. Frequency of suicide communication was examined in subjects with schizophrenia, and compared with persons with other psychiatric conditions and with subjects with no reported diagnosis. Socio-demographic variables, history of suicidal behaviour, pharmacological treatment and mental health service utilisation were also compared among the three groups. Results and discussion Subjects with a reported diagnosis of schizophrenia comprised 7.2% (n = 135 of the 1,863 suicides included in this study. Subjects with schizophrenia and those with other psychiatric disorders communicated their suicide intent more frequently than those with no psychiatric diagnosis, and persons with schizophrenia communicated their intent more than those with other psychiatric diagnoses. Seventy one per cent of schizophrenia subjects had contact with a mental health professional within the three months prior to suicide. Conclusion The fact that subjects with schizophrenia had the highest prevalence of suicide intent communication could offer concrete opportunities for suicide prevention.

  14. Treatment of Intrusive Suicidal Imagery Using Eye Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaël S. van Bentum

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Suicide and suicidal behavior are major public health concerns, and affect 3–9% of the population worldwide. Despite increased efforts for national suicide prevention strategies, there are still few effective interventions available for reducing suicide risk. In this article, we describe various theoretical approaches for suicide ideation and behavior, and propose to examine the possible effectiveness of a new and innovative preventive strategy. A model of suicidal intrusion (mental imagery related to suicide, also referred to as suicidal flash-forwards is presented describing one of the assumed mechanisms in the etiology of suicide and the mechanism of therapeutic change. We provide a brief rationale for an Eye Movement Dual Task (EMDT treatment for suicidal intrusions, describing techniques that can be used to target these suicidal mental images and thoughts to reduce overall behavior. Based on the available empirical evidence for the mechanisms of suicidal intrusions, this approach appears to be a promising new treatment to prevent suicidal behavior as it potentially targets one of the linking pins between suicidal ideation and suicidal actions.

  15. Electroconvulsive Therapy and Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanney, Bryan L.

    1986-01-01

    When the effectiveness and mortality-morbidity of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are compared with those of drug therapies, it appears that ECT is an effective and preferred treatment strategy. It remains underutilized as a modality of suicide prevention. Addresses controversies that presently limit the use of this treatment. (Author/ABB)

  16. Life Cycle and Suicidal Behavior among Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Mendez-Bustos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is nowadays accepted that, independently of methodological issues, women commit fewer suicides than men but make more frequent attempts. Yet, female suicidal risk varies greatly along the lifetime and is linked to the most significant moments in it. A wide analysis of the existing literature was performed to provide a narrative description on the evolution of female suicidal rates from childhood to old age, considering the milestones in their life history. A detailed analysis of gender differences in suicidal behavior is key to establish preventive measures and priorities. More specific studies are needed to adapt future interventions on female suicide.

  17. Treatment of Depression and Suicide in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhar, Sunil S.; Brown, Gregory K.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention for suicide prevention in older adults. Although many studies have found that CBT interventions are efficacious for reducing depressive symptoms in the elderly, researchers have yet to evaluate the efficacy of such interventions for preventing suicide or reducing suicide risk…

  18. Suicide neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Carl; Mechawar, Naguib; Turecki, Gustavo

    2009-12-01

    In this review, we examine the history of the neurobiology of suicide, as well as the genetics, molecular and neurochemical findings in suicide research. Our analysis begins with a summary of family, twin, and adoption studies, which provide support for the investigation of genetic variation in suicide risk. This leads to an overview of neurochemical findings restricted to neurotransmitters and their receptors, including recent findings in whole genome gene expression studies. Next, we look at recent studies investigating lipid metabolism, cell signalling with a particular emphasis on growth factors, stress systems with a focus on the role of polyamines, and finally, glial cell pathology in suicide. We conclude with a description of new ideas to study the neurobiology of suicide, including subject-specific analysis, protein modification assessment, neuroarchitecture studies, and study design strategies to investigate the complex suicide phenotype.

  19. Optimization of preventive condition-based tamping for railway tracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Min; Li, Rui; Salling, Kim Bang

    2016-01-01

    This work considers the scheduling of railway preventive condition-based tamping, which is the maintenance operation performed to restore the track irregularities to ensure both safety and comfort for passengers and freight. The problem is to determine when to perform the tamping on which section...

  20. Interventions to reduce suicides at suicide hotspots: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Georgina R; Owens, Christabel; Robinson, Jo; Nicholas, Angela; Lockley, Anne; Williamson, Michelle; Cheung, Yee Tak Derek; Pirkis, Jane

    2013-03-09

    'Suicide hotspots' include tall structures (for example, bridges and cliffs), railway tracks, and isolated locations (for example, rural car parks) which offer direct means for suicide or seclusion that prevents intervention. We searched Medline for studies that could inform the following question: 'What interventions are available to reduce suicides at hotspots, and are they effective?' There are four main approaches: (a) restricting access to means (through installation of physical barriers); (b) encouraging help-seeking (by placement of signs and telephones); (c) increasing the likelihood of intervention by a third party (through surveillance and staff training); and (d) encouraging responsible media reporting of suicide (through guidelines for journalists). There is relatively strong evidence that reducing access to means can avert suicides at hotspots without substitution effects. The evidence is weaker for the other approaches, although they show promise. More well-designed intervention studies are needed to strengthen this evidence base.

  1. Suicide among American Indian Adolescents. Some Facts about the Rising Rate of Suicide among American Indian Adolescents; Information on Causes and Warning Signs; and Examples of Effective Efforts and Prevention Resources. Linkages for Indian Child Welfare Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Irving N.

    Suicide among American Indian adolescents has increased by almost 1000% over the past 20 years to become, as in Anglo society, the second most frequent cause of death in the 10 to 20 year old age group. The two major causes of adolescent suicide are acute stress and chronic depression. Environmental factors contributing to American Indian suicides…

  2. Development and Optimization of an Injury Prevention Intervention for Physical Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Sien; De Clercq, Dirk; Goossens, Lennert; Aelterman, Nathalie; Haerens, Leen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Injury prevention is highly needed in physically active populations, such as pre-service and in-service physical education teachers (PETs). As a lack of adherence to preventive strategies is problematic in injury, it seems crucial to develop and optimize interventions that correspond to the specific needs and wishes of PETs. Aim: The…

  3. Development and Optimization of an Injury Prevention Intervention for Physical Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Sien; De Clercq, Dirk; Goossens, Lennert; Aelterman, Nathalie; Haerens, Leen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Injury prevention is highly needed in physically active populations, such as pre-service and in-service physical education teachers (PETs). As a lack of adherence to preventive strategies is problematic in injury, it seems crucial to develop and optimize interventions that correspond to the specific needs and wishes of PETs. Aim: The…

  4. Mediating Tragedy: Facebook, Aboriginal Peoples and Suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Lee Carlson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Some Australian Aboriginal communities experience suicide rates that are among the highest in the world. They are also, however, avid social media users—approximately 20% higher than the national average. This article presents some preliminary findings from a current national study, funded by the Australian Research Council, titled Aboriginal identity and community online: a sociological exploration of Aboriginal peoples’ use of online social media. The purpose of the study is to gain insights into how Aboriginal peoples utilise and interact on social media, and how these technologies can assist with suicide prevention strategies. It found that Aboriginal people are engaging with Facebook to both seek and offer help for issues relating to suicide and self-harm. An existing continuum of suicide prevention strategies was evident—from light emotional support to direct suicide intervention involving health services. These strategies can be leveraged to implement effective and appropriate suicide prevention programs.

  5. Suicide in the military environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čabarkapa Milanko M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicide of soldiers has its own specifics, because not only it represents the tragedy for the individuals and their family, but also has great psychological effect on social environment and military unit in which it occurs. Suicide can be caused by variety of factors, as reported in the literature. The case reviewed in this article presents multilateral determination of suicide, with particular stress on the character of each individual and social interaction of soldiers. Psychological complex of basic inferiority, low educational level, family problems, and poor integration into military unit could be considered the leading determinants of this suicide. This emphasizes the importance of certain preventive measures such as more rigorous psychological selection for specific military duty, and the education of non-commissioned officers for better recognition and understanding of pre-suicidal syndrome.

  6. USASOC Injury Prevention/Performance Optimization Musculoskeletal Screening Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    able to perform maximally and are combat ready more quickly. Background: Carbohydrate is the major fuel source for skeletal muscle and the brain ...performance and injury prevention research with USASOC if they were aged 18 to 60 years (inclusive); had no recent (3 month) history of traumatic brain ...proportion of Soldiers demonstrated bilateral asymmetry > 10%. This threshold has been previously identified as a risk factor for musculoskeletal

  7. A national survey of medical student suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jacklyn; Kumar, Shelley; Nelson, Elizabeth; Harris, Toi; Coverdale, John

    2014-10-01

    Because there is no current information on medical student suicides, the authors surveyed US medical schools about deaths by suicide of medical students from June 2006 to July 2011. In spring through summer of 2012, the authors sent electronic surveys to the 133 accredited US allopathic medical schools at the time, excluding Puerto Rican schools. The 15-item survey included questions about deaths by suicide and deaths by means other than suicide. In the case of a reported suicide, the survey obtained information regarding demographic characteristics and method of suicide. The 90 responding schools (response rate 69 %) reported a total of six suicides (four males, two females; five Caucasians, one Asian) from July 2006 to June 2011. Two deaths by suicide occurred in first year, two in second year, and two in third year. Two of the suicides occurred by gunshot, two by hanging, one by overdose, and for one, the cause of death was unknown. Three of the six students left a suicide note. Although the number and rate of suicides among medical students may be lower than a prior survey that was conducted more than 15 years ago, these data affirm the importance of suicide prevention programs for medical students.

  8. Cultural correlates of youth suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckersley, Richard; Dear, Keith

    2002-12-01

    Youth suicide has risen in most developed nations over the past 50 years, especially among males, but the increase remains to be explained. Statistical analyses were used to examine associations between youth suicide rates in 11-21 mainly Western, developed nations and 32 socio-economic and cultural variables. The central hypothesis was that suicide rates would be correlated with various cultural measures of social attachment and integration, especially individualism. Socio-economic variables were included in the analysis to demonstrate the relative strength of the cultural associations. The study found a strong positive correlation between male youth suicide rates and subjective measures of health, optimism, and several indices of individualism, including personal freedom and control. Correlations between female youth suicide and individualism were smaller, attaining significance in only one instance. Male youth suicide and individualism were negatively correlated with older people's sense of parental duty. Correlations between suicide and other possibly relevant cultural variables--tolerance of suicide, belief in God and national pride--were not significant. The analysis of socio-economic variables yielded only one significant, but doubtful, correlation. The findings can be interpreted as supporting two very different hypotheses: that youth suicide represents "an island of misery in an ocean of happiness" or "the tip of an iceberg of suffering". In favouring the latter interpretation, and consistent with Durkheim's theories on suicide, it is argued that increased youth suicide reflects a failure of Western societies to provide appropriate sites or sources of social identity and attachment, and, conversely, a tendency to promote unrealistic or inappropriate expectations of individual freedom and autonomy.

  9. Religion and Completed Suicide: a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Andrew; Wang, Jing-Yu; Jia, Cun-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern and a leading cause of death around the world. How religion influences the risk of completed suicide in different settings across the world requires clarification in order to best inform suicide prevention strategies. A meta-analysis using search results from Pubmed and Web of Science databases was conducted following PRISMA protocol and using the keywords "religion" or "religious" or "religiosity" or "spiritual" or "spirituality" plus "suicide" or "suicidality" or "suicide attempt". Random and fixed effects models were used to generate pooled ORs and I2 values. Sub-analyses were conducted among the following categories: young age (Religion plays a protective role against suicide in a majority of settings where suicide research is conducted. However, this effect varies based on the cultural and religious context. Therefore, public health professionals need to strongly consider the current social and religious atmosphere of a given population when designing suicide prevention strategies.

  10. High rates of suicide and attempted suicide using pesticides in Nickerie, Suriname, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graafsma, T; Kerkhof, A; Gibson, D; Badloe, R; van de Beek, L M

    2006-01-01

    Suicide and attempted suicide are identified as a serious mental health problem in Suriname, especially in the district of Nickerie. An epidemiological study in the Nickerie catchment area revealed high rates of suicide (48 per 100,000) and attempted suicide (207 per 100,000) on average in the years 2000-2004. Particularly remarkable is the high number of attempted suicides among males (49%), and the use of pesticides in both fatal (55%) and nonfatal suicidal behavior (44%). Probably this high incidence of suicidal behavior reflects the very poor economic situation of the district, poverty of most of the population, high levels of alcohol misuse, domestic violence, the rigidity of Hindustani culture regarding family traditions, the accessibility of pesticides, and the lack of future perspectives. Health care alone will not be sufficient to tackle this problem. One of the most urgent measures to prevent suicides is to stow away pesticides in locked cabinets with the key held by the proprietor.

  11. Gender differences in suicidal intent and choice of method among suicide attempters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Branner, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to examine gender differences in choice of method and suicidal intent among persons referred to a suicide prevention center. A total of 351 consecutive patients who had attempted suicide were interviewed using the European Parasuicide Study Interview Schedule I (EPSIS I) while...... participating in a 2-week inpatient treatment program. They were invited to a 1-year follow-up interview, and followed in the National Patient Register. Compared to women, men who had attempted suicide were older, had better self-esteem, fewer depressive symptoms, and higher total suicidal intention scores......, but they were not more likely to use violent methods. Neither use of violent method nor dangerousness of the attempt was associated with suicidal intention. Although men had higher suicide intent scores than women, there were no significant gender differences in the number of repeat suicide attempts during a 1...

  12. Medically Serious Suicide Attempters With or Without Plan in Rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Long; Zhang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Although previous studies have discussed the risk factors of unplanned suicide behavior in several countries, the unplanned suicide attempt in China was not explored in a large sample. We aim to look into the characteristics of unplanned suicide attempters in China and compare them with those suicide attempters with plans. Subjects were 791 medically serious suicide attempters aged 15-54 years in rural China. The sixth item of Beck's Suicide Intent Scale was used to estimate the planned and unplanned suicide attempt. Logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the factors related to planned or unplanned suicide attempt. The results showed that the planned suicide attempts were associated with higher education, hopelessness, and previous suicide act. The unplanned suicide attempt tends to be suicide by pesticide and store pesticide at home. A ban of lethal pesticides may be a method for suicide prevention in rural China.

  13. Malignant diseases as suicidal motives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanović Ljiljana

    2007-01-01

    care of health workers in order to enable the application of adequate measures in the prevention of suicides in persons with malignant diseases. The suicide analyses performed so far indicated that a malignant disease was the motive. Doctors have to show maximal interest for the patient. Prevention is crucial, so the patient should be provided with such surroundings in which the person will not feel alone and abandoned.

  14. Suicide in childhood: a literatura review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Girliani Silva de; Santos, Marília Suzi Pereira Dos; Silva, Amanda Tabosa Pereira da; Perrelli, Jaqueline Galdino Albuquerque; Sougey, Everton Botelho

    2017-09-01

    This is an integrated review of specific literature on the main factors associated to suicidal behavior in children under 14 years. Data were retrieved from PubMed and PsycInfo databases for the 1980-2016 period, with the following descriptors: "risk of suicide"; "children"; "suicide"; "childhood". Twenty-nine papers complied with the eligibility criteria of the review and were thus selected and analyzed. Results pointed to an association of suicide with neurobiological, school-related, social and mental factors, among which the role of impulsivity stands out. In addition, results found show that most of suicidal behavior-vulnerable factors are preventable insofar as they are identified and the child receives psychological and medical treatment. We conclude that family conflicts, school-related problems, bullying, impulsivity and depression are associated with childhood suicide. In addition, the scarce national research on suicide can contribute to the invisibility of this theme when establishing health promotion and treatment programs.

  15. Cultural influences on suicide in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Roxanne; Metraux, Daniel; Tohen, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Following the economic crash of the late 1990s, the suicide rate in Japan increased to a rate of over 30 000 people per year and has been one of the highest in the world. Cultural factors have influenced this high suicide rate, such as a tradition of honorable suicide as well as permissive attitudes towards suicide that remain in modern times. Additionally, the economic downturn, particularly the trend of unemployment in middle-aged men, also played a significant role in the high suicide rate. The suicide rate has started to decrease in recent years perhaps in part due to suicide prevention measures undertaken by the government. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2016 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  16. Animal model and neurobiology of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Antonio

    2011-06-01

    Animal models are formidable tools to investigate the etiology, the course and the potential treatment of an illness. No convincing animal model of suicide has been produced to date, and despite the intensive study of thousands of animal species naturalists have not identified suicide in nonhuman species in field situations. When modeling suicidal behavior in the animal, the greatest challenge is reproducing the role of will and intention in suicide mechanics. To overcome this limitation, current investigations on animals focus on every single step leading to suicide in humans. The most promising endophenotypes worth investigating in animals are the cortisol social-stress response and the aggression/impulsivity trait, involving the serotonergic system. Astroglia, neurotrophic factors and neurotrophins are implied in suicide, too. The prevention of suicide rests on the identification and treatment of every element increasing the risk.

  17. Suicides in the military: the post-modern combat veteran and the Hemingway effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carl Andrew; Kintzle, Sara

    2014-08-01

    Suicides in the military have increased over the last ten years. Much effort has been focused on suicide prevention and treatment, as well as understanding the reasons for the sharp increase in military suicides. Despite this effort, the definitive causes of military suicides remain elusive. Further, highly effective suicide prevention and treatment approaches have not yet been developed. The purpose of this article is to present a short review of the current state of suicide prevention interventions within the context of the military. The root causes of suicidal behavior and the role of combat in the military are each discussed. Interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide and the military transition theory are introduced as guiding frameworks for understanding suicides and suicidal behavior amongst active military personnel and military veterans. The article concludes with a set of recommendations for moving forward in understanding and addressing suicides in the military.

  18. Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults: differences in risk factors and their implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Cho Ryok; Bang, Ji Hwan; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Kui Nam; Lee, Hee-Jin; Ryu, Bo Yeong; Cho, Soo Kyung; Lee, Young Hwa; Oh, Myoung-Don; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated risk factors for suicidal ideation and suicide attempt; however, most have failed to show differences in risk factors between suicidal ideation and suicide attempt among the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. This study was designed to identify differences in risk factors between suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among HIV-infected adults in Seoul. A face-to-face survey of 457 HIV-infected adults was conducted by the Seoul Metropolitan Government in 2013. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. Among 422 participants, 44% had suicidal ideation, and 11% had suicide attempts. The independent risk factors for suicidal ideation were young and middle age, living with someone, history of AIDS-defining opportunistic disease, history of treatment for depression, lower social support, and psychological status. Beneficiaries of National Medical Aid, economic barriers to treatment, history of treatment for depression, and lower psychological status were independently associated with suicide attempts. Patients with HIV in Korea were treated without cost in some centers. Thus, experiencing an economic barrier to treatment might be due in part to ignorance of HIV care policies. Our findings indicate that suicide attempts are associated with socioeconomic factors and information inequality regarding medical care. In conclusion, suicidal ideation closely associated with the psychosocial factors, whereas suicide attempt demonstrates a stronger association with socioeconomic factors. Suicide prevention measures should be implemented to provide information to help HIV-infected patients.

  19. Grief and attitudes toward suicide in peers affected by a cluster of suicides as adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Caroline H; Zakriski, Audrey L

    2014-12-01

    Eighty-five young adults exposed to a cluster of peer suicides as adolescents completed measures of attitudes toward suicide, grief, and social support. Closeness to the peers lost to suicide was positively correlated with grief and the belief that suicide is not preventable, with grief further elevated in close individuals with high social support from friends. Overall, social support was related to healthy attitudes about suicide including preventability, yet it was also related to some stigmatizing beliefs. Compared with 67 young adults who had not been exposed to a suicide cluster, the exposed sample was more likely to think that suicide is normal but more likely to think of it as incomprehensible. © 2014 The American Association of Suicidology.

  20. The impact of pesticide suicide on the geographic distribution of suicide in Taiwan: a spatial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Shu-Sen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pesticide self-poisoning is the most commonly used suicide method worldwide, but few studies have investigated the national epidemiology of pesticide suicide in countries where it is a major public health problem. This study aims to investigate geographic variations in pesticide suicide and their impact on the spatial distribution of suicide in Taiwan. Methods Smoothed standardized mortality ratios for pesticide suicide (2002-2009 were mapped across Taiwan's 358 districts (median population aged 15 or above = 27 000, and their associations with the size of agricultural workforce were investigated using Bayesian hierarchical models. Results In 2002-2009 pesticide poisoning was the third most common suicide method in Taiwan, accounting for 13.6% (4913/36 110 of all suicides. Rates were higher in agricultural East and Central Taiwan and lower in major cities. Almost half (47% of all pesticide suicides occurred in areas where only 13% of Taiwan's population lived. The geographic distribution of overall suicides was more similar to that of pesticide suicides than non-pesticide suicides. Rural-urban differences in suicide were mostly due to pesticide suicide. Areas where a higher proportion of people worked in agriculture showed higher pesticide suicide rates (adjusted rate ratio [ARR] per standard deviation increase in the proportion of agricultural workers = 1.58, 95% Credible Interval [CrI] 1.44-1.74 and overall suicide rates (ARR = 1.06, 95% CrI 1.03-1.10 but lower non-pesticide suicide rates (ARR = 0.91, 95% CrI 0.87-0.95. Conclusion Easy access to pesticides appears to influence the geographic distribution of suicide in Taiwan, highlighting the potential benefits of targeted prevention strategies such as restricting access to highly toxic pesticides.

  1. 精神病患者自杀行为临床特征分析及预防措施%Analyses of clinical features of suicidal behaviors of psychosis patients and preventative measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王重建; 刘娟

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨精神病患者自杀行为的临床特征,为制定临床预防措施提供依据。方法对30例有自杀行为的精神病患者的临床资料进行回顾分析。结果本组自杀者以抑郁症(60.0%)、精神分裂症(36.7%)居多,自杀行为多发生于凌晨1时-2时(50.0%),自杀前主要表现为焦虑、绝望、痛苦、抑郁等,自杀地点多发生在卫生间、病房、窗户、床头。结论精神病患者自杀行为具有一定的规律性,护理人员应加强安全管理,积极采取综合预防措施,杜绝或减少自杀的发生。%Objective To explore clinical features of suicidal behaviors of psycho-sis patients in order to provide basis for enacting clinical preventative measures . Methods Clinical data of 30 suicide psychosis patients were retrospectively analyzed .Results Farmers made up 76 .7% of the patients ,schizophrenics did 36 .7% ,ones with incomplete suicide did 73 .3% , 50 .0% of patients committed suicide during 1~2 am ,their main manifestations before suicide were anxie-ty ,hopelessness ,distress ,depression and so on ,suicides taken place in toilet ,ward ,window and bedside mainly .Conclusion Suicidal behaviors of psychosis patients have determinate regularity ,safety manage-ments should be enhanced and universal preventative measures actively adopted in order to eliminate or re-duce the developments of suicide .

  2. Characteristics of schizophrenia suicides compared with suicides by other diagnosed psychiatric disorders and those without a psychiatric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Juncheng; Zhang, Jie

    2014-05-01

    suicides with schizophrenia, with other diagnosed psychiatric disorder and without psychiatric disorders. The result indicated that each groups showed their unique characteristics, which gave us new viewpoints to control and prevent the prevalence of suicides according to their different characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Media Influences on Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirkis, Jane E; Mok, Katherine; Robinson, Jo

    2016-01-01

    . The recent proliferation of pro-suicide websites has led to concerns that contagion effects may operate in newer media like the Internet, particularly with the advent of Web 2.0. There are numerous suicide prevention websites, which include educational, interactive, and social networking content. A body......This chapter explores the influence of the media on suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Until recently, the vast majority of studies in this area were concerned with traditional forms of media like newspapers and television and looked at the potential for irresponsible reporting of suicide to lead...... to copycat acts. Particular subgroups in the population, especially those with depression, may be especially vulnerable to engaging in imitative suicidal behaviors. The World Health Organization and the International Association for Suicide Prevention have also developed a set of international guidelines...

  4. The Role of Social Connectedness and Sexual Orientation in the Prevention of Youth Suicide Ideation and Attempts Among Sexually Active Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Deborah M; Luo, Feijun; Lippy, Caroline; McIntosh, Wendy LiKamWa

    2015-08-01

    The impact of types of social connectedness-family, other adult, and school-on suicide ideation and attempts among all youth, the relative impact of each type, and effect modification by sexual orientation was assessed. Data were from the 2007-2009 Milwaukee Youth Risk Behavior Surveys. Multivariable logistic regression analyses calculated the risk of suicide ideation and attempts by sexual orientation, types of social connectedness, and their interaction. Among all youth, each type of connectedness modeled singly conferred protective effects for suicide ideation. Family and other adult connectedness protected against suicide attempts. When modeled simultaneously, family connectedness protected against ideation and attempts. Sexual orientation modified the association between other adult connectedness and suicide ideation. Findings suggest that family connectedness confers the most consistent protection among all youth and sexual orientation does not generally modify the association between connectedness and suicidal behavior.

  5. Suicides by jumping from a height in Hong Kong: a review of coroner court files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Paul W C; Caine, Eric D; Lee, Carmen K M; Beautrais, Annette; Yip, Paul S F

    2014-02-01

    Jumping from a height is the most common method for suicide in Hong Kong and other urban cities, but it remains understudied locally and internationally. We used Coroner records in exploring the ecological factors associated with these deaths and the personal characteristics of persons who jumped to their death (hereafter, "jumping suicides"). We compared suicides by jumping with all other suicides and examined the suicides that occurred at ten different jumping sites. The Coroner's files of all suicides in Hong Kong from 2002 to 2007 included 6,125 documented deaths. 2,964 (48.4%) involved jumping during the study period. Eighty-three percent (83%) of suicide jumps occurred in residential buildings, and of these, 61% occurred from the decedent's own home. Jumping suicides differed from non-jumping suicides in terms of their socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., for male: 60.8 vs. 67.3% of jumping suicide and non-jumping suicides, p suicides, p suicides (p suicide prevention. Installation of physical barriers, one of the mean restriction strategies, at common places for suicide has strong evidence to avert suicides without substitution effects. There seems to be challenges to implement physical barriers to prevent residential jumping suicides. Simply applying physical barriers to preclude jumping in Hong Kong appears to be difficult given its ubiquitous "high-rise" residential dwellings. Hence, we also need to develop alternative strategies aimed at preventing people from becoming suicidal.

  6. Suicide by Insulin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165701.html Suicide by Insulin? Self-harm and suicidal behavior may ... higher rates of depression, the researchers explained. And suicide or suicide attempts using insulin or other diabetes ...

  7. Feasibility of a community intervention for the prevention of suicide and alcohol abuse with Yup'ik Alaska Native youth: the Elluam Tungiinun and Yupiucimta Asvairtuumallerkaa studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohatt, Gerald V; Fok, Carlotta Ching Ting; Henry, David; Allen, James

    2014-09-01

    The Elluam Tungiinun and Yupiucimta Asvairtuumallerkaa studies evaluated the feasibility of a community intervention to prevent suicide and alcohol abuse among rural Yup'ik Alaska Native youth in two remote communities. The intervention originated in an Indigenous model of protection, and its development used a community based participatory research process. Feasibility assessment aimed to assess the extent to which (1) the intervention could be implemented in rural Alaska Native communities, and (2) the intervention was capable of producing measurable effects. Scales maximally sensitive to change were derived from earlier measurement work, and the study contrasted implementation process and outcomes across the two communities. In one community, medium dose response effects (d = .30-.50), with dose defined as number of intervention activities attended, were observed in the growth of intermediate protective factors and ultimate variables. In the other community, medium dose effects were observed for one intermediate protective factor variable, and small dose effects were observed in ultimate variables. Differences across communities in resources supporting intervention explain these contrasting outcomes. Results suggest implementation in these rural Alaska settings is feasible when sufficient resources are available to sustain high levels of local commitment. In such cases, measureable effects are sufficient to warrant a prevention trial.

  8. Preventive Maintenance Optimization in Healthcare Domain: Status of Research and Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mahfoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although medical equipment maintenance has been carefully managed for years, very few in-depth studies have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of these implemented preventive maintenance strategies, especially after the debate about the credibility of manufacturer’s recommendations has increased in the clinical engineering community. Facing the dilemma of merely following manufactures maintenance manual or establishing an evidence-based maintenance, medical equipment maintenance could have exploited an advanced area in operations research which is maintenance optimization research. In this paper, we review and examine carefully the status of application oriented research on preventive maintenance optimization of medical devices. This study addresses preventive healthcare maintenance with a focus on factors influencing the maintenance decision making. The analysis is structured by defining different aspects necessary to construct a maintenance optimization model. We conclusively propose directions to develop suitable tools for better healthcare maintenance management.

  9. Injury Prevention and Performance Optimization in Soldiers of the Army 101st Airborne/Air Assault Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    prevention , performance optimization, and nutritional repletion) must be specific to the Soldier based on the specific tasks he has to perform as... prevention and control15-17 adapted to also include performance and nutrition interventions (Figure 1). Our model incorporates multiple research...musculoskeletal, and nutritional characteristics. Testing Figure 1: University of Pittsburgh Injury Prevention and Performance Optimization Model Journal

  10. Suicides among persons with psychiatric hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger, Nehama; Haklai, Ziona; Pugachova, Inna; Levav, Itzhak

    2015-01-01

    Persons with severe mental disorders have higher suicide rates than the general population. Their risk profile needs to be fully explored to better guide suicide preventive efforts. Downsizing the number of beds in psychiatric hospitals and high bed turnover may also affect the suicide risk. To investigate 1) Suicide rates among persons who were ever hospitalized in psychiatric facilities compared to the general population, 2) Associated sociodemographic and psychiatric factors, 3) Changes in rate over time, and 4) Timing of suicide deaths. We linked the National Psychiatric Case Register (NPCR) with the national database on causes of death. Suicides in the years 1981-2009 were analyzed for the study group of Israelis aged 18 and over ever hospitalized (N= 158,800). Suicide rates were computed by age, gender, psychiatric diagnosis and year of death, as well as agestandardized rates and rate ratios (RR) for persons in the NPCR compared with those never hospitalized. The proportion of suicides committed by the ever hospitalized from all suicides in the population was calculated. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR) for suicide were computed for the ever hospitalized based on the total suicide rates of the population. A multivariate logistic model investigated risk factors associated with suicide in the ever-hospitalized population. The age-standardized suicide rate of Jews and Others with a psychiatric hospitalization was 17.6 times higher than that of the non-hospitalized (95% CI 16.7-18.6) and 29.7 times higher for Arabs (95% CI 23.4- 37.9). The rates were higher among females and younger persons. In the years 2007-2009, 30% of all suicides of Jews and Others were committed by persons who had been hospitalized in psychiatric facilities. The SMRs of Jews and Others, which increased at the beginning of the study period, fell steadily until 1995. In recent years they have been rising since 2000 and 2005 among females and males, respectively. One fifth (19%) of suicides

  11. Internet Pathways in Suicidality: A Review of the Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Carli

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The general aim of this study was to review the scientific literature concerning the Internet and suicidality and to examine the different pathways by which suicidal risks and prevention efforts are facilitated through the Internet. An online literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases. The main themes that were investigated included pathological Internet use and suicidality, pro-suicide websites, suicide pacts on the Internet, and suicide prevention via the Internet. Articles were screened based on the titles and abstracts reporting on the themes of interest. Thereafter, articles were selected based on scientific relevance of the study, and included for full text assessment. The results illustrated that specific Internet pathways increased the risk for suicidal behaviours, particularly in adolescents and young people. Several studies found significant correlations between pathological Internet use and suicidal ideation and non-suicidal self-injury. Pro-suicide websites and online suicide pacts were observed as high-risk factors for facilitating suicidal behaviours, particularly among isolated and susceptible individuals. Conversely, the evidence also showed that the Internet could be an effective tool for suicide prevention, especially for socially-isolated and vulnerable individuals, who might otherwise be unreachable. It is this paradox that accentuates the need for further research in this field.

  12. Culturally sanctioned suicide: Euthanasia, seppuku, and terrorist martyrdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Joseph M

    2015-03-22

    Suicide is one of the greatest concerns in psychiatric practice, with considerable efforts devoted to prevention. The psychiatric view of suicide tends to equate it with depression or other forms of mental illness. However, some forms of suicide occur independently of mental illness and within a framework of cultural sanctioning such that they aren't regarded as suicide at all. Despite persistent taboos against suicide, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in the context of terminal illness is increasingly accepted as a way to preserve autonomy and dignity in the West. Seppuku, the ancient samurai ritual of suicide by self-stabbing, was long considered an honorable act of self-resolve such that despite the removal of cultural sanctioning, the rate of suicide in Japan remains high with suicide masquerading as seppuku still carried out both there and abroad. Suicide as an act of murder and terrorism is a practice currently popular with Islamic militants who regard it as martyrdom in the context of war. The absence of mental illness and the presence of cultural sanctioning do not mean that suicide should not be prevented. Culturally sanctioned suicide must be understood in terms of the specific motivations that underlie the choice of death over life. Efforts to prevent culturally sanctioned suicide must focus on alternatives to achieve similar ends and must ultimately be implemented within cultures to remove the sanctioning of self-destructive acts.

  13. Culturally sanctioned suicide: Euthanasia, seppuku, and terrorist martyrdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is one of the greatest concerns in psychiatric practice, with considerable efforts devoted to prevention. The psychiatric view of suicide tends to equate it with depression or other forms of mental illness. However, some forms of suicide occur independently of mental illness and within a framework of cultural sanctioning such that they aren’t regarded as suicide at all. Despite persistent taboos against suicide, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide in the context of terminal illness is increasingly accepted as a way to preserve autonomy and dignity in the West. Seppuku, the ancient samurai ritual of suicide by self-stabbing, was long considered an honorable act of self-resolve such that despite the removal of cultural sanctioning, the rate of suicide in Japan remains high with suicide masquerading as seppuku still carried out both there and abroad. Suicide as an act of murder and terrorism is a practice currently popular with Islamic militants who regard it as martyrdom in the context of war. The absence of mental illness and the presence of cultural sanctioning do not mean that suicide should not be prevented. Culturally sanctioned suicide must be understood in terms of the specific motivations that underlie the choice of death over life. Efforts to prevent culturally sanctioned suicide must focus on alternatives to achieve similar ends and must ultimately be implemented within cultures to remove the sanctioning of self-destructive acts. PMID:25815251

  14. Predicting suicides after outpatient mental health visits in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, R C; Stein, M B; Petukhova, M V; Bliese, P; Bossarte, R M; Bromet, E J; Fullerton, C S; Gilman, S E; Ivany, C; Lewandowski-Romps, L; Millikan Bell, A; Naifeh, J A; Nock, M K; Reis, B Y; Rosellini, A J; Sampson, N A; Zaslavsky, A M; Ursano, R J

    2017-04-01

    The 2013 US Veterans Administration/Department of Defense Clinical Practice Guidelines (VA/DoD CPG) require comprehensive suicide risk assessments for VA/DoD patients with mental disorders but provide minimal guidance on how to carry out these assessments. Given that clinician-based assessments are not known to be strong predictors of suicide, we investigated whether a precision medicine model using administrative data after outpatient mental health specialty visits could be developed to predict suicides among outpatients. We focused on male nondeployed Regular US Army soldiers because they account for the vast majority of such suicides. Four machine learning classifiers (naive Bayes, random forests, support vector regression and elastic net penalized regression) were explored. Of the Army suicides in 2004-2009, 41.5% occurred among 12.0% of soldiers seen as outpatient by mental health specialists, with risk especially high within 26 weeks of visits. An elastic net classifier with 10-14 predictors optimized sensitivity (45.6% of suicide deaths occurring after the 15% of visits with highest predicted risk). Good model stability was found for a model using 2004-2007 data to predict 2008-2009 suicides, although stability decreased in a model using 2008-2009 data to predict 2010-2012 suicides. The 5% of visits with highest risk included only 0.1% of soldiers (1047.1 suicides/100 000 person-years in the 5 weeks after the visit). This is a high enough concentration of risk to have implications for targeting preventive interventions. An even better model might be developed in the future by including the enriched information on clinician-evaluated suicide risk mandated by the VA/DoD CPG to be recorded.

  15. Predicting suicides after outpatient mental health visits in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Stein, Murray B.; Petukhova, Maria V.; Bliese, Paul; Bossarte, Robert M.; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Ivany, Christopher; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Bell, Amy Millikan; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Reis, Benjamin Y.; Rosellini, Anthony J.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 U.S. Veterans Administration/Department of Defense Clinical Practice Guidelines (VA/DoD CPG) require comprehensive suicide risk assessments for VA/DoD patients with mental disorders but provide minimal guidance on how to carry out these assessments. Given that clinician-based assessments are known not to be strong predictors of suicide, we investigated whether a precision medicine model using administrative data after outpatient mental health specialty visits could be developed to predict suicides among outpatients. We focused on male non-deployed Regular U.S. Army soldiers because they account for the vast majority of such suicides. Four machine learning classifiers (naïve Bayes, random forests, support vector regression, elastic net penalized regression) were explored. 41.5% of Army suicides in 2004-2009 occurred among the 12.0% of soldiers seen as outpatient by mental health specialists, with risk especially high within 26 weeks of visits. An elastic net classifier with 10-14 predictors optimized sensitivity (45.6% of suicide deaths occurring after the 15% of visits with highest predicted risk). Good model stability was found for a model using 2004-2007 data to predict 2008-2009 suicides, although stability decreased in a model using 2008-2009 data to predict 2010-2012 suicides. The 5% of visits with highest risk included only 0.1% of soldiers (1047.1 suicides/100,000 person-years in the 5 weeks after the visit). This is a high enough concentration of risk to have implications for targeting preventive interventions. An even better model might be developed in the future by including the enriched information on clinician-evaluated suicide risk mandated by the VA/DoD CPG to be recorded. PMID:27431294

  16. DSM-IV Axis II personality disorders and suicide and attempted suicide in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yongsheng; Phillips, Michael R; Conner, Kenneth R

    2016-10-01

    There are meagre data on Axis II personality disorders and suicidal behaviour in China. To describe the prevalence of Axis II personality disorders in suicides and suicide attempts in China and to estimate risk for these outcomes associated with personality disorders. People who died by suicide (n = 151), people who attempted suicide (n = 118) and living community controls (n = 140) were randomly sampled from four Chinese counties and studied using the Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) and Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II). We also determined the prevalence of subthreshold versions of ten DSM-IV personality disorders. Axis II personality disorders were present in 7% of the suicide group, 6% of the suicide attempt group and 1% of the control group. Threshold and subthreshold personality disorders had adjusted odds ratios (point estimates) in the range of 2.7-8.0 for suicide and for suicide attempts. Axis II personality disorders may confer increased risk for suicidal behaviour in China, but their low prevalence in the community and among people with suicidal behaviour suggests that other personality constructs such as select dimensional traits may be a more fruitful avenue for understanding and preventing suicide in China. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  17. [The contagion of adolescent suicide: cultural, ethical and psychosocial aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, N; Delvenne, V; Nicolis, H

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among adolescents. The risk factors are many and varied. The contagion of suicide was raised as a potential cause of youth suicide. In support of this argument, we did a review of the literature on the possible contagion of adolescent suicide. Several types of situations can support this hypothesis : when a youth is faced with the suicide of a relative or close friend, when he lived in a community, through the media or via the Internet. The way suicide is reported in the press shows a correlation with increased incidence of suicide among adolescents. In summary, there is evidence increasingly obvious that the contagion is the source of some youth suicides. For this reason, it seems important that preventive measures are in place. However, although this mechanism has been instrumental in initiating the act, it is important to note that suicide is always the result of several factors including the personal history of the subject.

  18. Does art imitate death? Depictions of suicide in fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridmore, Saxby; Walter, Garry

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether fiction (narrative products) deals with the issue of suicide and, if so, what it tells us about suicide "drivers". Accounts of suicide in narrative products were sought through web-based lists, book club members, other active readers and a prize-winning film writer and producer. Seventy-one depictions of fictional suicidal events were identified. In 12 suicides, the author appeared to indicate that the death was directly or indirectly due to mental disorder. In 15 suicides, the motivation could not be determined by the reader, and in 44 cases the motivation was social/situational factors. Suicidal events are depicted in fiction, and the features are broadly similar to the features of suicide in the real world. Should it be determined that cultural influences, including fiction, are important in suicide, any preventive activities aimed at modifying cultural influences will need to consider all forms of narrative product.

  19. Smoking and Suicide: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorolajal, Jalal; Darvishi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background Many studies have reported a positive association between smoking and suicide, but the results are inconsistent. This meta-analysis was carried out to estimate the association between smoking and suicidal ideation, suicide plan, suicide attempt, and suicide death. Methods Major electronic databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and ScienceDirect were searched until May 2015. The reference lists of included studies were screened too. Epidemiological studies addressing the association between smoking and suicidal behaviors were enrolled. The heterogeneity across studies was explored by Q-test and I2 statistic. The possibility of publication bias was assessed using Begg's and Egger's tests and Trim & Fill analysis. The results were reported based on risk ratio (RR) and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using a random-effects model. Results We identified a total of 8062 references and included 63 studies with 8,063,634 participants. Compared to nonsmokers, the current smokers were at higher risk of suicidal ideation (OR = 2.05; 95% CI: 1.53, 2.58; 8 studies; I2 = 80.8%; P<0.001), suicide plan (OR = 2.36; 95% CI: 1.69, 3.02; 6 studies; I2 = 85.2%; P<0.001), suicide attempt (OR = 2.84; 95% CI: 1.49, 4.19; 5 studies; I2 = 89.6%; (P<0.001), and suicide death (RR = 1.83; 95% CI: 1.64, 2.02; 14 studies; I2 = 49.7%; P = 0.018). Conclusions There is sufficient evidence that smoking is associated with an increased risk of suicidal behaviors. Therefore, smoking is a contributing factor for suicide. Although this association does not imply causation, however, smoking prevention and cessation should be the target of suicide prevention programs. PMID:27391330

  20. Connectedness and Perceived Burdensomeness among Adolescents at Elevated Suicide Risk: An Examination of the Interpersonal Theory of Suicidal Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opperman, Kiel; Czyz, Ewa K; Gipson, Polly Y; King, Cheryl A

    2015-01-01

    The interpersonal theory of suicidal behavior emphasizes the constructs of perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and acquired capacity, which warrant investigation in adolescents at risk for suicide due to interpersonal stressors. This study examined one component of the interpersonal theory of suicidal behavior, "suicidal desire" (suicidal ideation), in 129 adolescents (12-15 years) recruited from a general medical emergency department who screened positive for bully victimization, bully perpetration, or low interpersonal connectedness. Greater perceived burdensomeness combined with low family connectedness was a significant predictor of suicidal ideation. This suggests the importance of addressing connectedness and perceptions of burdensomeness in prevention and early intervention efforts with at-risk adolescents.

  1. [Economic recession, unemployment and suicide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duleba, Timea; Gonda, Xenia; Rihmer, Zoltan; Dome, Peter

    2012-03-01

    Considering the ongoing global economic crisis which began in 2007 it is reasonable to discuss its possible and expectable effects on mental health. In our narrative review we have summarized the scientific literature on the relationship between economic downturns, unemployment and suicide rate. In addition, we have summarized the theories about the background of this relationship as well. Suicide is an extremely complex phenomenon since it is influenced by several environmental and genetic factors. Furthermore, some of these factors are mutually interrelated, so the independent effect of these frequently remains elusive and hard to investigate from a methodological point of view. Although results are somewhat contradictory, it seems that unemployment is an independent risk factor for both suicide and depression. The first papers about the effect of the current economic crisis on suicide rates have been published and their results confirmed the association between the rise of unemployment rate and the increase of suicide rate in both old and new members of the European Union. Although psychiatric, and primarily depressive illness is a major risk factor for suicide, understanding the contributing role of other etiologic factors in their complex relationship may be an important task in predicting and preventing suicide both at the level of at risk individuals and the whole population.

  2. Randomized Trial of Suicide Gatekeeper Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jodi M.; Osteen, Phillip J.; Sharpe, Tanya L.; Pastoor, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Problem: Education and research on social work's role in preventing client suicide is limited. Method: Seventy advanced master of social work students were randomly assigned to either the training group (Question, Persuade, and Referral suicide gatekeeper training) or the control group. Outcomes measured over time included suicide knowledge,…

  3. Risk of suicide according to level of psychiatric treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten Rygaard; Madsen, Trine; Agerbo, Esben

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Knowledge of the epidemiology of suicide is a necessary prerequisite of suicide prevention. We aimed to conduct a nationwide study investigating suicide risk in relation to level of psychiatric treatment. METHODS: Nationwide nested case-control study comparing individuals who died from...

  4. Impacts of Academic Stress, Self-efficacy and Optimism on Suicide Ideation of Doctoral Students%学术压力、自我效能和乐观对博士生自杀意念的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤方华; 陈志霞

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanisms underlying the relationship between academic stress and suicide ideation of doctoral students. Methods: 375 doctoral students from four universities in Wuhan city were randomly investigated with questionnaires. Results: Academic stress directly and positively predicted the suicide ideation of doctoral students at higher grade. For students in lower level of self-efficacy, the more severe academic stress was reported, the higher degree of suicide ideation was detected at deepest depression time, a similar relationship was also found between academic stress and suicide ideation in the current week for students in lower level of optimism. The relationship between academic stress and suicide ideation of students at lower grade was mediated by the mediator chain consisting of two mediators (i.e., self-efficacy and optimism, the former predicted the latter), among the antecedents of suicide ideation optimism played a proximal role. Conclusion: Academic stress impacts suicide ideation of doctoral students in both direct and indirect ways.%目的:考察学术压力对博士生自杀意念的影响机制.方法:通过随机抽样法对武汉市4所高校博士生进行问卷调查,获得375份有效数据.结果:学术压力对高年级博士生自杀意念有显著的直接影响.低自我效能博士生最消沉、最抑郁时的自杀意念表现出随学术压力增加而上升的趋势,低乐观博士生近一周自杀意念也呈同样趋势.学术压力通过自我效能与乐观的链式中介间接影响低年级博士生自杀意念,其中,乐观是影响博士生自杀意念的近端前因.结论:学术压力对博士生自杀意念的影响存在直接和间接效应.

  5. Research to reduce the suicide rate among older adults: methodology roadblocks and promising paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szanto, Katalin; Lenze, Eric J; Waern, Margda; Duberstein, Paul; Bruce, Martha L; Epstein-Lubow, Gary; Conwell, Yeates

    2013-06-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention have requested input into the development of a national suicide research agenda. In response, a working group of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry has prepared recommendations to ensure that the suicide prevention dialogue includes older adults, a large and fast-growing population at high risk of suicide. In this Open Forum, the working group describes three methodology roadblocks to research into suicide prevention among elderly persons and three paradigms that might provide directions for future research into suicide prevention strategies for older adults.

  6. Suicides of the Marginalised: Cultural Approaches to Suicide, Minorities and Relationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Cover

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Suicides among marginalised groups are one of the few occasions in which self-harm and suicide are framed as having cultural, social, environental, historical or structural causes. Suicidology, psychology and public discourse typically understand suicide causality to be grounded in individualised psychic pain and pathology, disavowing the social, cultural, environmental and linguistic contexts. However, public discourse on suicides of ‘marginalised’ groups such as asylum seekers, Indigenous persons and queer/LGBT youth are ‘authorised’ to be discussed from social perspectives, informing opportunities to re-think suicidality, identity and liveability. Building on recent critical challenges to dominant theories, this article examines some of the ways in which the suicides of marginalised groups are described in social terms, demonstrating how cultural approaches to relationality, aspiration, performativity and mobility can expand current thinking on suicide cause and prevention.

  7. Suicide by drowning: A forensic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todt, Melanie; Ast, Friedrich; Wolff-Maras, Roman; Roesler, Birte; Germerott, Tanja

    2014-07-01

    In the case of suicidal drowning forensic examination is difficult, particularly with regard to differentiating between suicide, accident, homicide and natural death. Bondage and weighting with objects, putrescence and attendant lesions aggravate interpretation and investigation of postmortal forensic findings. In this respect, two cases of seemingly homicidal drowning with leg and arm bondage and weighting, to prevent resurfacing, are presented and discussed.

  8. Rational suicide: philosophical perspectives on schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Jeanette

    2010-02-01

    Suicide prevention is a National Health Service priority in the United Kingdom. People with mental illness are seen to represent one of the most vulnerable groups for suicide and recent British Government policy has focused on prevention and management of perceived risk. This approach to suicide prevention is constructed under a biomedical model of psychiatry, which maintains that suicidal persons suffer from some form of disease or irrational drive towards self-destruction. Many react to the idea of self-inflicted death with instinctive revulsion, which has prevented serious discussion of the concept of rational suicide, particularly in relation to those with schizophrenia. The idea that there may be circumstances in which suicide can be viewed as rational is discussed within the biomedical approach to ethics and wider literature primarily in relation to physical disease, terminal states and chronic pain. It is not deemed a viable choice for those who are considered 'non-autonomous' due to the controlling forces of mental illness. I propose that suicide is not a consequence of mental illness per se, and that it may be seen as a rational response to a realistic perspective on the course and consequences of living with schizophrenia. The denial of dialogue about the validity of suicidal ideation for people with schizophrenia has led to negative consequences for people with serious mental illness in terms of justice and recognition of person-hood.

  9. Predicting Suicide: Issues, Methods and Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettieri, Dan J.

    With the proliferation of suicide prevention centers in the United States, the task of rapidly and effectively assessing an individual caller's suicide potential has become an important research problem. However, the social science researcher is often confronted with an ethical problem when the results of his predictive equations can be used to…

  10. Analysis of a National Toll Free Suicide Crisis Line in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Sue-Ann; Broom, Yvonne

    2007-01-01

    The first national toll free suicide crisis line for South Africa was launched in October 2003 with the aim of providing a service dedicated to the prevention of suicide in this country. The intervention was motivated by South Africa's suicide rate which had risen higher than the global suicide rate, with the majority of attempted suicides…

  11. Psychological Autopsy: A Psychobiographical Exploration of Suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alonso Andrade Salazar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work is a conceptual approach on psychosocial factors related to suicidal psychobiography from the exploration of the lives of people who self-eliminate, for which there will be a review of the literature, based on input from journal articles and books published in various sources of documentation. Autopsy psychology is a data collection method that provides light on the psychosocial motivations that drive and reinforce the act of suicide, and is currently used by professionals responsible for investigating the causes of suicide while contributing data produced in the developing programs to promote mental health and prevention of suicidal ideation and behavior.

  12. The psychology of suicide terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Jerrold M; Ali, Farhana; Henderson, Schuyler W; Shanfield, Steven; Victoroff, Jeff; Weine, Stevan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews current understandings of the psychology of suicide terrorism for psychiatrists and other mental health professionals to help them better understand this terrifying phenomenon. After discussing key concepts and definitions, the paper reviews both group and individual models for explaining the development of suicide terrorists, with an emphasis on "collective identity." Stressing the importance of social psychology, it emphasizes the "normality" and absence of individual psychopathology of the suicide bombers. It will discuss the broad range of terrorisms, but will particularly emphasize terrorism associated with militant Islam. The article emphasizes that comprehending suicide terrorism requires a multidisciplinary approach that includes anthropological, economic, historical, and political factors as well as psychological ones. The paper concludes with a discussion of implications for research, policy, and prevention, reviewing the manner in which social psychiatric knowledge and understandings applied to this phenomenon in an interdisciplinary framework can assist in developing approaches to counter this deadly strategy.

  13. Prevention of Crime and the Optimal Standard of Proof in Criminal Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The standard of proof in criminal law a®ects retributive justice throughthe number of wrong convictions and wrong acquittals. It also a®ects thelevel of crime, since a higher standard of proof implies less deterrence andless incapacitation. This article derives an expression for the optimal...... standardfrom a trade-o® between these e®ects, and applies the expression tothe crime of sexual violation against women. For this crime, social preferencesfor justice versus prevention of crime are elicited through a surveyand inserted into the expression for the optimal standard. The result indicatesthat...... the concern for prevention of crime may have a signi¯cant e®ecton the optimal standard of proof....

  14. Do newspaper reports of suicides comply with standard suicide reporting guidelines? A study from Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Prabha S; Doraiswamy, Padmavathy; Padmanabh, Anuroopa; Philip, Mariamma

    2014-11-01

    Several countries have prescribed standard guidelines for media professionals on suicide reporting. However, the implementation of these guidelines has been varied. Suicide rates in South Asia are one of the highest in the world, and it is known that media guidelines for suicide reporting are not followed adequately. However, there are no published reports available from this region. This study aimed at assessing newspaper reports of suicide for quality of reporting based on standard reporting guidelines and to study differences between English and vernacular (Kannada) newspapers in Bangalore, South India. A total of 341 newspaper reports of suicide from 550 newspapers (3 English and 3 Kannada) over 3 months were systematically assessed for compliance with reporting guidelines. Each report was evaluated on 2 domains and 36 parameters. Data were analyzed for frequency of inappropriate reporting and patterns compared between vernacular and English newspapers. In all, 87% of the reports were those of completed suicide. Non-compliant reporting - method of suicide was reported in 89% and 32% of reports were in prominent pages of the newspaper, 95% mentioned gender, 90% reported the name, 80% reported age and suicide location, 75% reported life events related to suicide, 70% reported occupation, 69% had headline explicity on suicide and 61% reported monocausality. Only 16% reported mental disorder related to suicide, and less than 3% included information on suicide prevention and helplines. Vernacular papers showed significantly better compliance in 16 of the 20 areas. However, protective characteristics were better reported in English newspapers. Majority of reports on suicides in newspapers from Bangalore did not comply with standard guidelines of reporting. There is a strong need to evolve local guidelines and mechanisms for ensuring responsible reporting which have important implications in prevention of suicide. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Mindfulness in the Treatment of Suicidal Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Jason B; Villatte, Jennifer L

    2012-01-05

    Suicidal behavior is exhibited by a diverse population of individuals and spans many diagnostic categories. In order to develop effective prevention and treatment programs, it is important to identify transdiagnostic processes that impact the many pathways to suicidality, are amenable to intervention, and affect clinical outcomes when modified. A growing body of data suggests that experiential avoidance, or the tendency to escape or avoid unwanted psychological experiences, even when such efforts cause harm, may represent one such universal process. This article reviews theory and evidence that support mindfulness and psychological acceptance as a means to target experiential avoidance in suicidal clients and thereby reduce the risk of suicide. The article also provides two case examples of the application of mindfulness to suicidality and discusses how mindfulness may help clinicians in managing the stress associated with treating suicidal clients.

  16. Issues in research on aging and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orden, Kimberly A; Conwell, Yeates

    2016-01-01

    Late-life suicide is a complex clinical and public health problem. In this article, some of the key complexities inherent in studying late-life suicide are discussed in the service of promoting high-quality late-life suicide prevention science. We discuss the following research issues: the relatively greater lethality of suicidal behavior in later life (compared to younger ages); the lack of data on whether thoughts of death in later life are indicators of suicide risk; the fact that older adults do not tend to seek specialty mental health care, necessitating moving research into primary care clinics and the community; the lack of theory-based research in late-life suicide; the unclear role of cognitive impairment; and the promise of taking a 'patient centered' and 'participatory research' approach to late-life suicide research efforts. We believe that these perspectives are too often not capitalized upon in research on suicide prevention with older adults and that voice of the older person could contribute much to our understanding of why older adults think about and act on suicidal thoughts, as well as the most acceptable ways to reach and intervene with those at risk.

  17. Suicide Probability in Adolescents With a History of Childhood Maltreatment: The Role of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury, Emotion Regulation Difficulties, and Forms of Self-Criticism

    OpenAIRE

    Khanipour; Hakim shooshtari; Bidaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Suicidal attempt and non-suicidal self-injury are very common in adolescents with a history of childhood maltreatment. By identifying correlates of these kinds of high-risk behaviors, it is possible to prevent and decrease completed suicide. Objectives The aims of this study were: 1) to compare adolescents with a history of childhood maltreatment with non-suicidal self injury (NSSI) or past suicidal attempt in terms of ...

  18. Time trend by region of suicides and suicidal thoughts among Greenland Inuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Larsen, Christina Viskum Lytken

    2015-01-01

    Suicides remain a major public health problem in Greenland. Their increase coincides with the modernization since 1950. Serious suicidal thoughts are reported by a significant proportion of participants in countrywide surveys. To analyze the time trend by region of suicides and suicidal thoughts among the Inuit in Greenland. Data included the Greenland registry of causes of death for 1970-2011 and 2 cross-sectional health surveys carried out in 1993-1994 and 2005-2010 with 1,580 and 3,102 Inuit participants, respectively. Suicide rates were higher among men than women while the prevalence of suicidal thoughts was higher among women. Suicide rates for men and women together increased from 1960 to 1980 and have remained around 100 per 100,000 person-years since then. The regional pattern of time trend for suicide rates varied with an early peak in the capital, a continued increase to very high rates in remote East and North Greenland and a slow increase in villages relative to towns on the West Coast. Suicidal thoughts followed the regional pattern for completed suicides. Especially for women there was a noticeable increasing trend in the villages. The relative risk for suicide was highest among those who reported suicidal thoughts, but most suicides happened outside this high-risk group. Suicide rates and the prevalence of suicidal thoughts remain high in Greenland but different regional trends point towards an increased marginalization between towns on the central West Coast, villages and East and North Greenland. Different temporal patterns call for different regional strategies of prevention.

  19. DoD’s Response When Psychological Health is Failing: Lessons Learned from Suicide Experiences. A survivor and clinician’s perspective on how suicide prevention efforts can be enhanced within the Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    wasn’t doing what I was told to do.” BLOG writer, 17 June 2010 Suicide is on people’s minds … 2011 MHS Conference  “I need help i am very scared what do...i do” Text note to Dr. Patrin on cell phone from Army SPC 6 Suicide is on people’s minds … (sent to Dr. Patrin by family friend) The tougher challenge...provider)  Family Hx of multiple severe mental health diagnoses - depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, bulimia, alcoholism, autism  Social Hx

  20. Suicides in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children: analysis of Queensland Suicide Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soole, Rebecca; Kõlves, Kairi; De Leo, Diego

    2014-12-01

    Suicide rates among Indigenous Australian children are higher than for other Australian children. The current study aimed to identify factors associated with Indigenous child suicide when compared to other Australian children. Using the Queensland Suicide Register, suicides in Indigenous children (10-14 years) and other Australian children in the same age band were compared. Between 2000 and 2010, 45 child suicides were recorded: 21 of Indigenous children and 24 of other Australian children. This corresponded to a suicide rate of 10.15 suicides per 100,000 for Indigenous children - 12.63 times higher than the suicide rate for other Australian children (0.80 per 100,000). Hanging was the predominant method used by all children. Indigenous children were significantly more likely to suicide outside the home, to be living outside the parental home at time of death, and be living in remote or very remote areas. Indigenous children were found to consume alcohol more frequently before suicide, compared to other Australian children. Current and past treatments of psychiatric disorders were significantly less common among Indigenous children compared to other Australian children. Western conceptualisation of mental illness may not adequately embody Indigenous people's holistic perspective regarding mental health. Further development of culturally appropriate suicide prevention activities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children is required. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.