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Sample records for optimizing proton therapy

  1. Risk-optimized proton therapy to minimize radiogenic second cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechner, Laura A; Eley, John G; Howell, Rebecca M

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy confers substantially lower predicted risk of second cancer compared with photon therapy. However, no previous studies have used an algorithmic approach to optimize beam angle or fluence-modulation for proton therapy to minimize those risks. The objectives of this study were...... to demonstrate the feasibility of risk-optimized proton therapy and to determine the combination of beam angles and fluence weights that minimizes the risk of second cancer in the bladder and rectum for a prostate cancer patient. We used 6 risk models to predict excess relative risk of second cancer. Treatment...

  2. Risk-optimized proton therapy to minimize radiogenic second cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechner, Laura A.; Eley, John G.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Zhang, Rui; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy confers substantially lower predicted risk of second cancer compared with photon therapy. However, no previous studies have used an algorithmic approach to optimize beam angle or fluence-modulation for proton therapy to minimize those risks. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the feasibility of risk-optimized proton therapy and to determine the combination of beam angles and fluence weights that minimize the risk of second cancer in the bladder and rectum for a prostate cancer patient. We used 6 risk models to predict excess relative risk of second cancer. Treatment planning utilized a combination of a commercial treatment planning system and an in-house risk-optimization algorithm. When normal-tissue dose constraints were incorporated in treatment planning, the risk model that incorporated the effects of fractionation, initiation, inactivation, and repopulation selected a combination of anterior and lateral beams, which lowered the relative risk by 21% for the bladder and 30% for the rectum compared to the lateral-opposed beam arrangement. Other results were found for other risk models. PMID:25919133

  3. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Young Lee

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy.

  4. Linear energy transfer incorporated intensity modulated proton therapy optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenhua; Khabazian, Azin; Yepes, Pablo P.; Lim, Gino; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David R.; Mohan, Radhe

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of incorporating linear energy transfer (LET) into the optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans. Because increased LET correlates with increased biological effectiveness of protons, high LETs in target volumes and low LETs in critical structures and normal tissues are preferred in an IMPT plan. However, if not explicitly incorporated into the optimization criteria, different IMPT plans may yield similar physical dose distributions but greatly different LET, specifically dose-averaged LET, distributions. Conventionally, the IMPT optimization criteria (or cost function) only includes dose-based objectives in which the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is assumed to have a constant value of 1.1. In this study, we added LET-based objectives for maximizing LET in target volumes and minimizing LET in critical structures and normal tissues. Due to the fractional programming nature of the resulting model, we used a variable reformulation approach so that the optimization process is computationally equivalent to conventional IMPT optimization. In this study, five brain tumor patients who had been treated with proton therapy at our institution were selected. Two plans were created for each patient based on the proposed LET-incorporated optimization (LETOpt) and the conventional dose-based optimization (DoseOpt). The optimized plans were compared in terms of both dose (assuming a constant RBE of 1.1 as adopted in clinical practice) and LET. Both optimization approaches were able to generate comparable dose distributions. The LET-incorporated optimization achieved not only pronounced reduction of LET values in critical organs, such as brainstem and optic chiasm, but also increased LET in target volumes, compared to the conventional dose-based optimization. However, on occasion, there was a need to tradeoff the acceptability of dose and LET distributions. Our conclusion is that the

  5. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  6. Optimizing proton therapy at the LBL medical accelerator. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.

    1992-03-01

    This Grant has marked the beginning of a multi-year study process expected to lead to design and construction of at least one, possibly several hospital-based proton therapy facilities in the United States.

  7. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  8. Treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery technqiues for intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengbusch, Evan R.

    Physical properties of proton interactions in matter give them a theoretical advantage over photons in radiation therapy for cancer treatment, but they are seldom used relative to photons. The primary barriers to wider acceptance of proton therapy are the technical feasibility, size, and price of proton therapy systems. Several aspects of the proton therapy landscape are investigated, and new techniques for treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery are presented. The results of these investigations suggest a means by which proton therapy can be delivered more efficiently, effectively, and to a much larger proportion of eligible patients. An analysis of the existing proton therapy market was performed. Personal interviews with over 30 radiation oncology leaders were conducted with regard to the current and future use of proton therapy. In addition, global proton therapy market projections are presented. The results of these investigations serve as motivation and guidance for the subsequent development of treatment system designs and treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery methods. A major factor impacting the size and cost of proton treatment systems is the maximum energy of the accelerator. Historically, 250 MeV has been the accepted value, but there is minimal quantitative evidence in the literature that supports this standard. A retrospective study of 100 patients is presented that quantifies the maximum proton kinetic energy requirements for cancer treatment, and the impact of those results with regard to treatment system size, cost, and neutron production is discussed. This study is subsequently expanded to include 100 cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) patients, and the results are discussed in the context of a proposed dedicated proton SRS treatment system. Finally, novel proton therapy optimization and delivery techniques are presented. Algorithms are developed that optimize treatment plans over beam angle, spot size, spot spacing

  9. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  10. A fast optimization algorithm for multicriteria intensity modulated proton therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Craft, David; Madden, Thomas M.; Zhang, Kewu; Kooy, Hanne M.; Herman, Gabor T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a fast projection algorithm for optimizing intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans and to describe and demonstrate the use of this algorithm in multicriteria IMPT planning. Methods: The authors develop a projection-based solver for a class of convex optimization problems and apply it to IMPT treatment planning. The speed of the solver permits its use in multicriteria optimization, where several optimizations are performed which span the space of possible treatment plans. The authors describe a plan database generation procedure which is customized to the requirements of the solver. The optimality precision of the solver can be specified by the user. Results: The authors apply the algorithm to three clinical cases: A pancreas case, an esophagus case, and a tumor along the rib cage case. Detailed analysis of the pancreas case shows that the algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than industry-standard general purpose algorithms (MOSEK's interior point optimizer, primal simplex optimizer, and dual simplex optimizer). Additionally, the projection solver has almost no memory overhead. Conclusions: The speed and guaranteed accuracy of the algorithm make it suitable for use in multicriteria treatment planning, which requires the computation of several diverse treatment plans. Additionally, given the low memory overhead of the algorithm, the method can be extended to include multiple geometric instances and proton range possibilities, for robust optimization.

  11. A fast optimization algorithm for multicriteria intensity modulated proton therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Craft, David; Madden, Thomas M; Zhang, Kewu; Kooy, Hanne M; Herman, Gabor T

    2010-09-01

    To describe a fast projection algorithm for optimizing intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans and to describe and demonstrate the use of this algorithm in multicriteria IMPT planning. The authors develop a projection-based solver for a class of convex optimization problems and apply it to IMPT treatment planning. The speed of the solver permits its use in multicriteria optimization, where several optimizations are performed which span the space of possible treatment plans. The authors describe a plan database generation procedure which is customized to the requirements of the solver. The optimality precision of the solver can be specified by the user. The authors apply the algorithm to three clinical cases: A pancreas case, an esophagus case, and a tumor along the rib cage case. Detailed analysis of the pancreas case shows that the algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than industry-standard general purpose algorithms (MOSEK'S interior point optimizer, primal simplex optimizer, and dual simplex optimizer). Additionally, the projection solver has almost no memory overhead. The speed and guaranteed accuracy of the algorithm make it suitable for use in multicriteria treatment planning, which requires the computation of several diverse treatment plans. Additionally, given the low memory overhead of the algorithm, the method can be extended to include multiple geometric instances and proton range possibilities, for robust optimization.

  12. Optimization of adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer: Solutions for photon and proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Schoot, A.J.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    In cervical cancer radiation therapy, an adaptive strategy is required to compensate for interfraction anatomical variations in order to achieve adequate dose delivery. In this thesis, we have aimed at optimizing adaptive radiation therapy in cervical cancer to improve treatment efficiency and

  13. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  14. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  15. Linear Energy Transfer-Guided Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: Feasibility Study and Clinical Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula, E-mail: dgiantsoudi@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. Results: The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. Conclusions: We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in

  16. Linear Energy Transfer-Guided Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: Feasibility Study and Clinical Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. Results: The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. Conclusions: We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in

  17. Multifield Optimization Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Head and Neck Tumors: A Translation to Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lewin, Jan S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Palmer, Matthew B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Wei; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Background: We report the first clinical experience and toxicity of multifield optimization (MFO) intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for patients with head and neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Fifteen consecutive patients with head and neck cancer underwent MFO-IMPT with active scanning beam proton therapy. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) had comprehensive treatment extending from the base of the skull to the clavicle. The doses for chemoradiation therapy and radiation therapy alone were 70 Gy and 66 Gy, respectively. The robustness of each treatment plan was also analyzed to evaluate sensitivity to uncertainties associated with variations in patient setup and the effect of uncertainties with proton beam range in patients. Proton beam energies during treatment ranged from 72.5 to 221.8 MeV. Spot sizes varied depending on the beam energy and depth of the target, and the scanning nozzle delivered the spot scanning treatment “spot by spot” and “layer by layer.” Results: Ten patients presented with SCC and 5 with adenoid cystic carcinoma. All 15 patients were able to complete treatment with MFO-IMPT, with no need for treatment breaks and no hospitalizations. There were no treatment-related deaths, and with a median follow-up time of 28 months (range, 20-35 months), the overall clinical complete response rate was 93.3% (95% confidence interval, 68.1%-99.8%). Xerostomia occurred in all 15 patients as follows: grade 1 in 10 patients, grade 2 in 4 patients, and grade 3 in 1 patient. Mucositis within the planning target volumes was seen during the treatment of all patients: grade 1 in 1 patient, grade 2 in 8 patients, and grade 3 in 6 patients. No patient experienced grade 2 or higher anterior oral mucositis. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of MFO-IMPT for head and neck tumors. Early clinical outcomes are encouraging and warrant further investigation of proton therapy in prospective clinical trials.

  18. Including robustness in multi-criteria optimization for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Unkelbach, Jan; Trofimov, Alexei; Madden, Thomas; Kooy, Hanne; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David

    2012-02-01

    We present a method to include robustness in a multi-criteria optimization (MCO) framework for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The approach allows one to simultaneously explore the trade-off between different objectives as well as the trade-off between robustness and nominal plan quality. In MCO, a database of plans each emphasizing different treatment planning objectives, is pre-computed to approximate the Pareto surface. An IMPT treatment plan that strikes the best balance between the different objectives can be selected by navigating on the Pareto surface. In our approach, robustness is integrated into MCO by adding robustified objectives and constraints to the MCO problem. Uncertainties (or errors) of the robust problem are modeled by pre-calculated dose-influence matrices for a nominal scenario and a number of pre-defined error scenarios (shifted patient positions, proton beam undershoot and overshoot). Objectives and constraints can be defined for the nominal scenario, thus characterizing nominal plan quality. A robustified objective represents the worst objective function value that can be realized for any of the error scenarios and thus provides a measure of plan robustness. The optimization method is based on a linear projection solver and is capable of handling large problem sizes resulting from a fine dose grid resolution, many scenarios, and a large number of proton pencil beams. A base-of-skull case is used to demonstrate the robust optimization method. It is demonstrated that the robust optimization method reduces the sensitivity of the treatment plan to setup and range errors to a degree that is not achieved by a safety margin approach. A chordoma case is analyzed in more detail to demonstrate the involved trade-offs between target underdose and brainstem sparing as well as robustness and nominal plan quality. The latter illustrates the advantage of MCO in the context of robust planning. For all cases examined, the robust optimization for

  19. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiasen; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100,000 spots with a target volume of ∼ 1000 cm(3) and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and

  20. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jiasen, E-mail: ma.jiasen@mayo.edu; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. Methods: An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. Results: For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100 000 spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cm{sup 3} and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. Conclusions: A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45

  1. Shortening Delivery Times of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy by Reducing Proton Energy Layers During Treatment Plan Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Water, Steven van de, E-mail: s.vandewater@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kooy, Hanne M. [F. H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To shorten delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy by reducing the number of energy layers in the treatment plan. Methods and Materials: We have developed an energy layer reduction method, which was implemented into our in-house-developed multicriteria treatment planning system “Erasmus-iCycle.” The method consisted of 2 components: (1) minimizing the logarithm of the total spot weight per energy layer; and (2) iteratively excluding low-weighted energy layers. The method was benchmarked by comparing a robust “time-efficient plan” (with energy layer reduction) with a robust “standard clinical plan” (without energy layer reduction) for 5 oropharyngeal cases and 5 prostate cases. Both plans of each patient had equal robust plan quality, because the worst-case dose parameters of the standard clinical plan were used as dose constraints for the time-efficient plan. Worst-case robust optimization was performed, accounting for setup errors of 3 mm and range errors of 3% + 1 mm. We evaluated the number of energy layers and the expected delivery time per fraction, assuming 30 seconds per beam direction, 10 ms per spot, and 400 Giga-protons per minute. The energy switching time was varied from 0.1 to 5 seconds. Results: The number of energy layers was on average reduced by 45% (range, 30%-56%) for the oropharyngeal cases and by 28% (range, 25%-32%) for the prostate cases. When assuming 1, 2, or 5 seconds energy switching time, the average delivery time was shortened from 3.9 to 3.0 minutes (25%), 6.0 to 4.2 minutes (32%), or 12.3 to 7.7 minutes (38%) for the oropharyngeal cases, and from 3.4 to 2.9 minutes (16%), 5.2 to 4.2 minutes (20%), or 10.6 to 8.0 minutes (24%) for the prostate cases. Conclusions: Delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy can be reduced substantially without compromising robust plan quality. Shorter delivery times are likely to reduce treatment uncertainties and costs.

  2. Optimization of dual-energy CT acquisitions for proton therapy using projection-based decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilches-Freixas, Gloria; Létang, Jean Michel; Ducros, Nicolas; Rit, Simon

    2017-09-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) has been presented as a valid alternative to single-energy CT to reduce the uncertainty of the conversion of patient CT numbers to proton stopping power ratio (SPR) of tissues relative to water. The aim of this work was to optimize DECT acquisition protocols from simulations of X-ray images for the treatment planning of proton therapy using a projection-based dual-energy decomposition algorithm. We have investigated the effect of various voltages and tin filtration combinations on the SPR map accuracy and precision, and the influence of the dose allocation between the low-energy (LE) and the high-energy (HE) acquisitions. For all spectra combinations, virtual CT projections of the Gammex phantom were simulated with a realistic energy-integrating detector response model. Two situations were simulated: an ideal case without noise (infinite dose) and a realistic situation with Poisson noise corresponding to a 20 mGy total central dose. To determine the optimal dose balance, the proportion of LE-dose with respect to the total dose was varied from 10% to 90% while keeping the central dose constant, for four dual-energy spectra. SPR images were derived using a two-step projection-based decomposition approach. The ranges of 70 MeV, 90 MeV, and 100 MeV proton beams onto the adult female (AF) reference computational phantom of the ICRP were analytically determined from the reconstructed SPR maps. The energy separation between the incident spectra had a strong impact on the SPR precision. Maximizing the incident energy gap reduced image noise. However, the energy gap was not a good metric to evaluate the accuracy of the SPR. In terms of SPR accuracy, a large variability of the optimal spectra was observed when studying each phantom material separately. The SPR accuracy was almost flat in the 30-70% LE-dose range, while the precision showed a minimum slightly shifted in favor of lower LE-dose. Photon noise in the SPR images (20 mGy dose

  3. Optimization of proton and heavy ion therapy using an adaptive inversion algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahme, A.; Kaellman, P.; Lind, B.K.

    1989-01-01

    From the examples presented it is clear that the clinical advantages of high energy proton beams are considerable when optimally employed. Protons can generate almost any desired dose distribution in an arbitrary shaped target volume. When only ordinary uniform proton beams of fixed range modulation are available, the clinical advantages compared for example to high quality high energy electrons are not so pronounced. The new iterative inversion algorithm presented here therefore opens the door for precise and efficient use of the dose distributional advantages of high energy protons, pions and heavy ions. (author). 22 refs.; 7 figs

  4. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  5. A critical evaluation of worst case optimization methods for robust intensity-modulated proton therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksson, Albin; Bokrantz, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To critically evaluate and compare three worst case optimization methods that have been previously employed to generate intensity-modulated proton therapy treatment plans that are robust against systematic errors. The goal of the evaluation is to identify circumstances when the methods behave differently and to describe the mechanism behind the differences when they occur. Methods: The worst case methods optimize plans to perform as well as possible under the worst case scenario that can physically occur (composite worst case), the combination of the worst case scenarios for each objective constituent considered independently (objectivewise worst case), and the combination of the worst case scenarios for each voxel considered independently (voxelwise worst case). These three methods were assessed with respect to treatment planning for prostate under systematic setup uncertainty. An equivalence with probabilistic optimization was used to identify the scenarios that determine the outcome of the optimization. Results: If the conflict between target coverage and normal tissue sparing is small and no dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints are present, then all three methods yield robust plans. Otherwise, they all have their shortcomings: Composite worst case led to unnecessarily low plan quality in boundary scenarios that were less difficult than the worst case ones. Objectivewise worst case generally led to nonrobust plans. Voxelwise worst case led to overly conservative plans with respect to DVH constraints, which resulted in excessive dose to normal tissue, and less sharp dose fall-off than the other two methods. Conclusions: The three worst case methods have clearly different behaviors. These behaviors can be understood from which scenarios that are active in the optimization. No particular method is superior to the others under all circumstances: composite worst case is suitable if the conflicts are not very severe or there are DVH constraints whereas

  6. Reducing Dose Uncertainty for Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy of Moving Tumors by Optimizing the Spot Delivery Sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Heng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate a novel delivery strategy for reducing the respiratory motion–induced dose uncertainty of spot-scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: The spot delivery sequence was optimized to reduce dose uncertainty. The effectiveness of the delivery sequence optimization was evaluated using measurements and patient simulation. One hundred ninety-one 2-dimensional measurements using different delivery sequences of a single-layer uniform pattern were obtained with a detector array on a 1-dimensional moving platform. Intensity modulated proton therapy plans were generated for 10 lung cancer patients, and dose uncertainties for different delivery sequences were evaluated by simulation. Results: Without delivery sequence optimization, the maximum absolute dose error can be up to 97.2% in a single measurement, whereas the optimized delivery sequence results in a maximum absolute dose error of ≤11.8%. In patient simulation, the optimized delivery sequence reduces the mean of fractional maximum absolute dose error compared with the regular delivery sequence by 3.3% to 10.6% (32.5-68.0% relative reduction) for different patients. Conclusions: Optimizing the delivery sequence can reduce dose uncertainty due to respiratory motion in spot-scanning proton therapy, assuming the 4-dimensional CT is a true representation of the patients' breathing patterns.

  7. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  8. SU-F-T-193: Evaluation of a GPU-Based Fast Monte Carlo Code for Proton Therapy Biological Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleei, R; Qin, N; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Peeler, C [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Jia, X [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Biological treatment plan optimization is of great interest for proton therapy. It requires extensive Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to compute physical dose and biological quantities. Recently, a gPMC package was developed for rapid MC dose calculations on a GPU platform. This work investigated its suitability for proton therapy biological optimization in terms of accuracy and efficiency. Methods: We performed simulations of a proton pencil beam with energies of 75, 150 and 225 MeV in a homogeneous water phantom using gPMC and FLUKA. Physical dose and energy spectra for each ion type on the central beam axis were scored. Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) was calculated using repair-misrepair-fixation model. Microdosimetry calculations were performed using Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS). Results: Ranges computed by the two codes agreed within 1 mm. Physical dose difference was less than 2.5 % at the Bragg peak. RBE-weighted dose agreed within 5 % at the Bragg peak. Differences in microdosimetric quantities such as dose average lineal energy transfer and specific energy were < 10%. The simulation time per source particle with FLUKA was 0.0018 sec, while gPMC was ∼ 600 times faster. Conclusion: Physical dose computed by FLUKA and gPMC were in a good agreement. The RBE differences along the central axis were small, and RBE-weighted dose difference was found to be acceptable. The combined accuracy and efficiency makes gPMC suitable for proton therapy biological optimization.

  9. Robustness Recipes for Minimax Robust Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voort, Sebastian van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Water, Steven van de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Perkó, Zoltán [Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lathouwers, Danny [Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Hoogeman, Mischa, E-mail: m.hoogeman@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: We aimed to derive a “robustness recipe” giving the range robustness (RR) and setup robustness (SR) settings (ie, the error values) that ensure adequate clinical target volume (CTV) coverage in oropharyngeal cancer patients for given gaussian distributions of systematic setup, random setup, and range errors (characterized by standard deviations of Σ, σ, and ρ, respectively) when used in minimax worst-case robust intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization. Methods and Materials: For the analysis, contoured computed tomography (CT) scans of 9 unilateral and 9 bilateral patients were used. An IMPT plan was considered robust if, for at least 98% of the simulated fractionated treatments, 98% of the CTV received 95% or more of the prescribed dose. For fast assessment of the CTV coverage for given error distributions (ie, different values of Σ, σ, and ρ), polynomial chaos methods were used. Separate recipes were derived for the unilateral and bilateral cases using one patient from each group, and all 18 patients were included in the validation of the recipes. Results: Treatment plans for bilateral cases are intrinsically more robust than those for unilateral cases. The required RR only depends on the ρ, and SR can be fitted by second-order polynomials in Σ and σ. The formulas for the derived robustness recipes are as follows: Unilateral patients need SR = −0.15Σ{sup 2} + 0.27σ{sup 2} + 1.85Σ − 0.06σ + 1.22 and RR=3% for ρ = 1% and ρ = 2%; bilateral patients need SR = −0.07Σ{sup 2} + 0.19σ{sup 2} + 1.34Σ − 0.07σ + 1.17 and RR=3% and 4% for ρ = 1% and 2%, respectively. For the recipe validation, 2 plans were generated for each of the 18 patients corresponding to Σ = σ = 1.5 mm and ρ = 0% and 2%. Thirty-four plans had adequate CTV coverage in 98% or more of the simulated fractionated treatments; the remaining 2 had adequate coverage in 97.8% and 97.9%. Conclusions: Robustness recipes were derived that can

  10. SU-E-T-182: Feasibility of Dose Painting by Numbers in Proton Therapy with Contour-Driven Plan Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero, A Barragan; Differding, S; Lee, J; Sterpin, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The work aims to 1) prove the feasibility of dose painting by numbers (DPBN) in proton therapy with usual contour-driven plan optimization and 2) compare the achieved plan quality to that of rotational IMRT. Methods: For two patients with head and neck cancers, voxel-by-voxel prescription to the target volume (PTV-PET) was calculated from 18 FDG-PET images and converted to contour-based prescription by defining several sub-contours. Treatments were planned with RayStation (RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) and proton pencil beam scanning modality. In order to determine the optimal plan parameters to approach the DPBN prescription, the effect of the number of fields, number of sub-contours and use of range shifter were tested separately on each patient. The number of sub-contours were increased from 3 to 11 while the number of fields were set to 3, 5, 7 and 9. Treatment plans were also optimized on two rotational IMRT systems (TomoTherapy and Varian RapidArc) using previously published guidelines. Results: For both patients, more than 99% of the PTV-PET received at least 95% of the prescribed dose while less than 1% of the PTV-PET received more than 105%, which demonstrates the feasibility of the treatment. Neither the use of a range shifter nor the increase of the number of fields had a significant influence on PTV coverage. Plan quality increased when increasing number of fields up to 7 or 9 and slightly decreased for a bigger number of sub-contours. Good OAR sparing is achieved while keeping high plan quality. Finally, proton therapy achieved significantly better plan quality than rotational IMRT. Conclusion: Voxel-by-voxel prescriptions can be approximated accurately in proton therapy using a contour-driven optimization. Target coverage is nearly insensitive to the number of fields and the use of a range shifter. Finally, plan quality assessment confirmed the superiority of proton therapy compared to rotational IMRT

  11. TU-EF-304-07: Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Song, T; Wu, Z; Liu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is increasingly used in proton therapy. For IMPT optimization, Monte Carlo (MC) is desired for spots dose calculations because of its high accuracy, especially in cases with a high level of heterogeneity. It is also preferred in biological optimization problems due to the capability of computing quantities related to biological effects. However, MC simulation is typically too slow to be used for this purpose. Although GPU-based MC engines have become available, the achieved efficiency is still not ideal. The purpose of this work is to develop a new optimization scheme to include GPU-based MC into IMPT. Methods: A conventional approach using MC in IMPT simply calls the MC dose engine repeatedly for each spot dose calculations. However, this is not the optimal approach, because of the unnecessary computations on some spots that turned out to have very small weights after solving the optimization problem. GPU-memory writing conflict occurring at a small beam size also reduces computational efficiency. To solve these problems, we developed a new framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculations and plan optimizations. At each dose calculation step, the particles were sampled from different spots altogether with Metropolis algorithm, such that the particle number is proportional to the latest optimized spot intensity. Simultaneously transporting particles from multiple spots also mitigated the memory writing conflict problem. Results: We have validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one prostate case. The total computation time of our method was ∼5–6 min on one NVIDIA GPU card, including both spot dose calculation and plan optimization, whereas a conventional method naively using the same GPU-based MC engine were ∼3 times slower. Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel optimization workflow is developed. The high efficiency makes it attractive for clinical

  12. TU-EF-304-07: Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y [Tsinghua University, Beijing, Beijing (China); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Song, T [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Wu, Z; Liu, Y [Tsinghua University, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is increasingly used in proton therapy. For IMPT optimization, Monte Carlo (MC) is desired for spots dose calculations because of its high accuracy, especially in cases with a high level of heterogeneity. It is also preferred in biological optimization problems due to the capability of computing quantities related to biological effects. However, MC simulation is typically too slow to be used for this purpose. Although GPU-based MC engines have become available, the achieved efficiency is still not ideal. The purpose of this work is to develop a new optimization scheme to include GPU-based MC into IMPT. Methods: A conventional approach using MC in IMPT simply calls the MC dose engine repeatedly for each spot dose calculations. However, this is not the optimal approach, because of the unnecessary computations on some spots that turned out to have very small weights after solving the optimization problem. GPU-memory writing conflict occurring at a small beam size also reduces computational efficiency. To solve these problems, we developed a new framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculations and plan optimizations. At each dose calculation step, the particles were sampled from different spots altogether with Metropolis algorithm, such that the particle number is proportional to the latest optimized spot intensity. Simultaneously transporting particles from multiple spots also mitigated the memory writing conflict problem. Results: We have validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one prostate case. The total computation time of our method was ∼5–6 min on one NVIDIA GPU card, including both spot dose calculation and plan optimization, whereas a conventional method naively using the same GPU-based MC engine were ∼3 times slower. Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel optimization workflow is developed. The high efficiency makes it attractive for clinical

  13. Journal of Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Proton Therapy (JPT is an international open access, peer-reviewed journal, which publishes original research, technical reports, reviews, case reports, editorials, and other materials on proton therapy with focus on radiation oncology, medical physics, medical dosimetry, and radiation therapy.No article processing/submission feeNo publication feePeer-review completion within 3-6 weeksImmediate publication after the completion of final author proofreadDOI assignment for each published articleFree access to published articles for all readers without any access barriers or subscriptionThe views and opinions expressed in articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the Journal of Proton Therapy.Authors are encouraged to submit articles for publication in the inaugural issue of the Journal of Proton Therapy by online or email to editor@protonjournal.comOfficial Website of Journal of Proton Therapy: http://www.protonjournal.org/

  14. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  15. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  16. Proton imaging apparatus for proton therapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipala, V.; Lo Presti, D.; Brianzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Scaringella, M.; Talamonti, C.; Bucciolini, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Randazzo, N.; Stancampiano, C.; Tesi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy with protons, due to the physical properties of these particles, offers several advantages for cancer therapy as compared to the traditional radiotherapy and photons. In the clinical use of proton beams, a p CT (Proton Computer Tomography) apparatus can contribute to improve the accuracy of the patient positioning and dose distribution calculation. In this paper a p CT apparatus built by the Prima (Proton Imaging) Italian Collaboration will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  17. Proton therapy in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Proton therapy has been in use since 1954 and over 25,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Until recently most patients were treated at physics research facilities but with the development of more compact and reliable accelerators it is now possible to realistically plan for proton therapy in an Australian hospital. The Australian National Proton Project has been formed to look at the feasibility of a facility which would be primarily for patient treatment but would also be suitable for research and commercial applications. A detailed report will be produced by the end of the year. The initial clinical experience was mainly with small tumours and other lesions close to critical organs. Large numbers of eye tumours have also been treated. Protons have a well-defined role in these situations and are now being used in the treatment of more common cancers. With the development of hospital-based facilities, over 2,500 patients with prostate cancer have been treated using a simple technique which gives results at least as good as radical surgery, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Importantly, the incidence of severe complications is very low. There are encouraging results in many disease sites including lung, liver, soft tissue sarcomas and oesophagus. As proton therapy becomes more widely available, randomised trials comparing it with conventional radiotherapy or Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) will be possible. In most situations the use of protons will enable a higher dose to be given safely but in situations where local control rates are already satisfactory, protons are expected to produce less complications than conventional treatment. The initial costs of a proton facility are high but the recurrent costs are similar to other forms of high technology radiotherapy. . Simple treatment techniques with only a few fields are usually possible and proton therapy avoids the high integral doses associated with IMRT. This reduction in

  18. Feasibility and robustness of dose painting by numbers in proton therapy with contour-driven plan optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barragán, A. M.; Differding, S.; Lee, J. A.; Sterpin, E.; Janssens, G.

    2015-01-01

    prescription for robust-optimized plans, while they were more than 50% for PTV plans. Low dose to organs at risk (OARs) could be achieved for both PTV and robust-optimized plans. Conclusions: DPBN in proton therapy is feasible with the use of a sufficient number subcontours, automatically generated scanning patterns, and no more than three beams are needed. Robust optimization ensured the required target coverage and minimal overdosing, while PTV-approach led to nonrobust plans with excessive overdose. Low dose to OARs can be achieved even in the presence of a high-dose escalation as in DPBN

  19. Radiotherapy : proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The first phase of proton therapy at the National Accelerator Centre will be the development of a 200 MeV small-field horizontal beam radioneurosurgical facility in the south treatment vault. A progressive expansion of this facility is planned. The patient support and positioning system has been designed and developed by the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Surveying of the University of Cape Town to ensure the accurate positioning in the proton beam of the lesion to be treated. The basic components of the system are an adjustable chair, a series of video cameras and two computers. The specifications for the proton therapy interlock system require that the inputs to and the outputs from the system be similar to those of the neutron therapy system. Additional facilities such as a full diagnostic system which would assist the operators in the event of an error will also be provided. Dosimeters are required for beam monitoring, for monitor calibration and for determining dose distributions. Several designs of transmission ionization chambers for beam monitoring have been designed and tested, while several types of ionization chambers and diodes have been used for the dose distribution measurements. To facilitate the comparison of measured ranges and energy losses of proton beams in the various materials with tabled values, simple empirical approximations, which are sufficiently accurate for most applications, have been used. 10 refs., 10 fig., 4 tabs

  20. SU-E-T-07: 4DCT Robust Optimization for Esophageal Cancer Using Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, L [Proton Therapy Center, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Yu, J; Zhu, X; Li, H; Zhang, X [Proton Therapy Center, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Li, Y [Proton Therapy Center, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Varian Medical Systems, Houston, TX (United States); Lim, G [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a 4DCT robust optimization method to reduce the dosimetric impact from respiratory motion in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for esophageal cancer. Methods: Four esophageal cancer patients were selected for this study. The different phases of CT from a set of 4DCT were incorporated into the worst-case dose distribution robust optimization algorithm. 4DCT robust treatment plans were designed and compared with the conventional non-robust plans. Result doses were calculated on the average and maximum inhale/exhale phases of 4DCT. Dose volume histogram (DVH) band graphic and ΔD95%, ΔD98%, ΔD5%, ΔD2% of CTV between different phases were used to evaluate the robustness of the plans. Results: Compare to the IMPT plans optimized using conventional methods, the 4DCT robust IMPT plans can achieve the same quality in nominal cases, while yield a better robustness to breathing motion. The mean ΔD95%, ΔD98%, ΔD5% and ΔD2% of CTV are 6%, 3.2%, 0.9% and 1% for the robustly optimized plans vs. 16.2%, 11.8%, 1.6% and 3.3% from the conventional non-robust plans. Conclusion: A 4DCT robust optimization method was proposed for esophageal cancer using IMPT. We demonstrate that the 4DCT robust optimization can mitigate the dose deviation caused by the diaphragm motion.

  1. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  2. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; van Dijk, Lisanne V; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I; Sasai, Keisuke; Van't Veld, Aart A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Korevaar, Erik W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans

  3. [Why proton therapy? And how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariat, Juliette; Habrand, Jean Louis; Lesueur, Paul; Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Kammerer, Emmanuel; Lecomte, Delphine; Batalla, Alain; Balosso, Jacques; Tessonnier, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Proton therapy is a radiotherapy, based on the use of protons, charged subatomic particles that stop at a given depth depending on their initial energy (pristine Bragg peak), avoiding any output beam, unlike the photons used in most of the other modalities of radiotherapy. Proton therapy has been used for 60 years, but has only become ubiquitous in the last decade because of recent major advances in particle accelerator technology. This article reviews the history of clinical implementation of protons, the nature of the technological advances that now allows its expansion at a lower cost. It also addresses the technical and physical specificities of proton therapy and the clinical situations for which proton therapy may be relevant but requires evidence. Different proton therapy techniques are possible. These are explained in terms of their clinical potential by explaining the current terminology (such as cyclotrons, synchrotrons or synchrocyclotrons, using superconducting magnets, fixed line or arm rotary with passive diffusion delivery or active by scanning) in basic words. The requirements associated with proton therapy are increased due to the precision of the depth dose deposit. The learning curve of proton therapy requires that clinical indications be prioritized according to their associated uncertainties (such as range uncertainties and movement in lung tumors). Many clinical indications potentially fall under proton therapy ultimately. Clinical strategies are explained in a paralleled manuscript. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploratory Study of 4D versus 3D Robust Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei, E-mail: Liu.Wei@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Yu-Hui [Division of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Wen, Zhifei [Department of Radiation Physics, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shen, Jiajian; Stoker, Joshua B.; Ding, Xiaoning; Hu, Yanle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Herman, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Vargas, Carlos; Keole, Sameer; Wong, William; Bues, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of uncertainties and interplay on 3-dimensional (3D) and 4D robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans for lung cancer in an exploratory methodology study. Methods and Materials: IMPT plans were created for 11 nonrandomly selected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases: 3D robustly optimized plans on average CTs with internal gross tumor volume density overridden to irradiate internal target volume, and 4D robustly optimized plans on 4D computed tomography (CT) to irradiate clinical target volume (CTV). Regular fractionation (66 Gy [relative biological effectiveness; RBE] in 33 fractions) was considered. In 4D optimization, the CTV of individual phases received nonuniform doses to achieve a uniform cumulative dose. The root-mean-square dose-volume histograms (RVH) measured the sensitivity of the dose to uncertainties, and the areas under the RVH curve (AUCs) were used to evaluate plan robustness. Dose evaluation software modeled time-dependent spot delivery to incorporate interplay effect with randomized starting phases of each field per fraction. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) indices comparing CTV coverage, homogeneity, and normal tissue sparing were evaluated using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: 4D robust optimization plans led to smaller AUC for CTV (14.26 vs 18.61, respectively; P=.001), better CTV coverage (Gy [RBE]) (D{sub 95%} CTV: 60.6 vs 55.2, respectively; P=.001), and better CTV homogeneity (D{sub 5%}-D{sub 95%} CTV: 10.3 vs 17.7, resspectively; P=.002) in the face of uncertainties. With interplay effect considered, 4D robust optimization produced plans with better target coverage (D{sub 95%} CTV: 64.5 vs 63.8, respectively; P=.0068), comparable target homogeneity, and comparable normal tissue protection. The benefits from 4D robust optimization were most obvious for the 2 typical stage III lung cancer patients. Conclusions: Our exploratory methodology study showed

  5. Biological Considerations When Comparing Proton Therapy. With Photon Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paganetti, Harald; van Luijk, Peter

    Owing to the limited availability of data on the outcome of proton therapy, treatments are generally optimized based on broadly available data on photon-based treatments. However, the microscopic pattern of energy deposition of protons differs from that of photons, leading to a different biological

  6. Practical Radiobiology for Proton Therapy Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bleddyn

    2017-12-01

    Practical Radiobiology for Proton Therapy Planning covers the principles, advantages and potential pitfalls that occur in proton therapy, especially its radiobiological modelling applications. This book is intended to educate, inform and to stimulate further research questions. Additionally, it will help proton therapy centres when designing new treatments or when unintended errors or delays occur. The clear descriptions of useful equations for high LET particle beam applications, worked examples of many important clinical situations, and discussion of how proton therapy may be optimized are all important features of the text. This important book blends the relevant physics, biology and medical aspects of this multidisciplinary subject. Part of Series in Physics and Engineering in Medicine and Biology.

  7. Impact of Spot Size and Spacing on the Quality of Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Plans for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenbin; Schild, Steven E; Chang, Joe Y; Liao, Zhongxing; Korte, Shawn; Shen, Jiajian; Ding, Xiaoning; Hu, Yanle; Kang, Yixiu; Keole, Sameer R; Sio, Terence T; Wong, William W; Sahoo, Narayan; Bues, Martin; Liu, Wei

    2018-06-01

    To investigate how spot size and spacing affect plan quality, robustness, and interplay effects of robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for lung cancer. Two robustly optimized IMPT plans were created for 10 lung cancer patients: first by a large-spot machine with in-air energy-dependent large spot size at isocenter (σ: 6-15 mm) and spacing (1.3 σ), and second by a small-spot machine with in-air energy-dependent small spot size (σ: 2-6 mm) and spacing (5 mm). Both plans were generated by optimizing radiation dose to internal target volume on averaged 4-dimensional computed tomography scans using an in-house-developed IMPT planning system. The dose-volume histograms band method was used to evaluate plan robustness. Dose evaluation software was developed to model time-dependent spot delivery to incorporate interplay effects with randomized starting phases for each field per fraction. Patient anatomy voxels were mapped phase-to-phase via deformable image registration, and doses were scored using in-house-developed software. Dose-volume histogram indices, including internal target volume dose coverage, homogeneity, and organs at risk (OARs) sparing, were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Compared with the large-spot machine, the small-spot machine resulted in significantly lower heart and esophagus mean doses, with comparable target dose coverage, homogeneity, and protection of other OARs. Plan robustness was comparable for targets and most OARs. With interplay effects considered, significantly lower heart and esophagus mean doses with comparable target dose coverage and homogeneity were observed using smaller spots. Robust optimization with a small spot-machine significantly improves heart and esophagus sparing, with comparable plan robustness and interplay effects compared with robust optimization with a large-spot machine. A small-spot machine uses a larger number of spots to cover the same tumors compared with a large

  8. TH-C-BRD-07: Minimizing Dose Uncertainty for Spot Scanning Beam Proton Therapy of Moving Tumor with Optimization of Delivery Sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H; Zhang, X; Zhu, X; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) has been shown to be able to reduce dose to normal tissue compared to intensity modulated photon radio-therapy (IMRT), and has been implemented for selected lung cancer patients. However, respiratory motion-induced dose uncertainty remain one of the major concerns for the radiotherapy of lung cancer, and the utility of IMPT for lung patients was limited because of the proton dose uncertainty induced by motion. Strategies such as repainting and tumor tracking have been proposed and studied but repainting could result in unacceptable long delivery time and tracking is not yet clinically available. We propose a novel delivery strategy for spot scanning proton beam therapy. Method: The effective number of delivery (END) for each spot position in a treatment plan was calculated based on the parameters of the delivery system, including time required for each spot, spot size and energy. The dose uncertainty was then calculated with an analytical formula. The spot delivery sequence was optimized to maximize END and minimize the dose uncertainty. 2D Measurements with a detector array on a 1D moving platform were performed to validate the calculated results. Results: 143 2D measurements on a moving platform were performed for different delivery sequences of a single layer uniform pattern. The measured dose uncertainty is a strong function of the delivery sequence, the worst delivery sequence results in dose error up to 70% while the optimized delivery sequence results in dose error of <5%. END vs. measured dose uncertainty follows the analytical formula. Conclusion: With optimized delivery sequence, it is feasible to minimize the dose uncertainty due to motion in spot scanning proton therapy

  9. TH-A-19A-12: A GPU-Accelerated and Monte Carlo-Based Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Optimization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Beltran, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a clinically applicable intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization system that utilizes more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation, rather than analytical dose calculation. Methods: A very fast in-house graphics processing unit (GPU) based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified gradient based optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVH). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve the spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that Result from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution and large number of proton spots. The dose effects were studied particularly in cases with heterogeneous materials in comparison with the commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Results: For a relatively large and complex three-field bi-lateral head and neck case (i.e. >100K spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cc and multiple surrounding critical structures), the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation can be done in a clinically viable time frame (i.e. less than 15 minutes) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The DVHs of the MC TPS plan compare favorably with those of a commercial treatment planning system. Conclusion: A GPU accelerated and MC-based IMPT optimization system was developed. The dose calculation and plan optimization can be performed in less than 15 minutes on a hardware system costing less than 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and optimization makes the system easily expandable to robust and multi-criteria optimization. This work was funded in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  10. TH-A-19A-12: A GPU-Accelerated and Monte Carlo-Based Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Optimization System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, J; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Beltran, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a clinically applicable intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization system that utilizes more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation, rather than analytical dose calculation. Methods: A very fast in-house graphics processing unit (GPU) based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified gradient based optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVH). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve the spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that Result from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution and large number of proton spots. The dose effects were studied particularly in cases with heterogeneous materials in comparison with the commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Results: For a relatively large and complex three-field bi-lateral head and neck case (i.e. >100K spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cc and multiple surrounding critical structures), the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation can be done in a clinically viable time frame (i.e. less than 15 minutes) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The DVHs of the MC TPS plan compare favorably with those of a commercial treatment planning system. Conclusion: A GPU accelerated and MC-based IMPT optimization system was developed. The dose calculation and plan optimization can be performed in less than 15 minutes on a hardware system costing less than 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and optimization makes the system easily expandable to robust and multi-criteria optimization. This work was funded in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc

  11. Proton therapy of hypophyseal adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirakova, E.I.; Kirpatovskaya, L.E.; Lyass, F.M.; Snigireva, R.Ya.; Krymskij, V.A.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehksperimental'noj Ehndokrinologii i Khimii Gormonov)

    1983-01-01

    The authors present the results of proton therapy in 59 patients with different hypophyseal adenomas. The period of observation lasted from 6 mos. to 5 yrs. Irradiation was done using a multifield-convergent method and a proton beam of the ITEF synchrotron. The beam energy was 200 MeV, the beam diameter 7-15 mm. Radiation response and immediate results were evaluated for all the patients. The least favorable results were noted in the patients with prolactinomas, for which, in addition to irradiation, parlodel therapy is needed. No marked radiation reactions, neurological complications and manifestations of hypopituitarism were observed with the chosen doses and schemes of irradiation

  12. Proton Therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The brochure deals with the following topics: radiation therapy and its significance, proton therapy - worldwide and at PSI, advantages of the protons, the new proton therapy facility at PSI, therapy at PSI using the spot-scan technique. figs., tabs., refs

  13. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  14. Proton therapy project at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Akanuma, A.; Karasawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    Particle radiation which might present steeper dose distribution has received much attention as the third particle facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. Proton conformation with sharp fall-off is considered to be the radiation beam suitable for confining high doses to a target volume without complications and for verifying which factor out of high RBE or physical dose distribution is more essential for local control in malignant tumors. This paper discusses the current status of the spot scanning method, which allows three dimensional conformation radiotherapy, and preliminary results. Preliminary dose distribution with proton conformation technique was acquired by modifying a computer program for treatment planning in pion treatment. In a patient with prostate carcinoma receiving both proton and pion radiation therapy, proton conformation was found to confine high doses to the target area and spare both the bladder and rectum well; and pion therapy was found to deliver non-homogeneous radiation to these organs. Although there are some obstacles in the proton project at PSI, experimental investigations are encouraging. The dynamic spot scanning method with combination of the kicker magnet, wobbler magnet, range shifter, patient transporter, and position sensitive monitor provides highly confined dose distribution, making it possible to increase total doses and thus to improve local control rate. Proton confirmation is considered to be useful for verifying possible biological effectiveness of negative pion treatment of PSI as well. (N.K.)

  15. Clinically Applicable Monte Carlo–based Biological Dose Optimization for the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancers With Spot-Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Chan Tseung, Hok Seum, E-mail: wanchantseung.hok@mayo.edu; Ma, Jiasen; Kreofsky, Cole R.; Ma, Daniel J.; Beltran, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: Our aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of fast Monte Carlo (MC)–based inverse biological planning for the treatment of head and neck tumors in spot-scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Recently, a fast and accurate graphics processor unit (GPU)–based MC simulation of proton transport was developed and used as the dose-calculation engine in a GPU-accelerated intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimizer. Besides dose, the MC can simultaneously score the dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET{sub d}), which makes biological dose (BD) optimization possible. To convert from LET{sub d} to BD, a simple linear relation was assumed. By use of this novel optimizer, inverse biological planning was applied to 4 patients, including 2 small and 1 large thyroid tumor targets, as well as 1 glioma case. To create these plans, constraints were placed to maintain the physical dose (PD) within 1.25 times the prescription while maximizing target BD. For comparison, conventional intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and IMPT plans were also created using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems) in each case. The same critical-structure PD constraints were used for the IMRT, IMPT, and biologically optimized plans. The BD distributions for the IMPT plans were obtained through MC recalculations. Results: Compared with standard IMPT, the biologically optimal plans for patients with small tumor targets displayed a BD escalation that was around twice the PD increase. Dose sparing to critical structures was improved compared with both IMRT and IMPT. No significant BD increase could be achieved for the large thyroid tumor case and when the presence of critical structures mitigated the contribution of additional fields. The calculation of the biologically optimized plans can be completed in a clinically viable time (<30 minutes) on a small 24-GPU system. Conclusions: By exploiting GPU acceleration, MC-based, biologically optimized plans were created for

  16. Proton Therapy for Thoracoabdominal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tokuuye, Koichi

    In advanced-stage disease of certain thoracoabdominal tumors, proton therapy (PT) with concurrent chemotherapy may be an option to reduce side effects. Several technological developments, including a respiratory gating system and implantation of fiducial markers for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), are necessary for the treatment in thoracoabdominal tumors. In this chapter, the role of PT for tumors of the lung, the esophagus, and liver are discussed.

  17. SU-E-T-452: Impact of Respiratory Motion On Robustly-Optimized Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy to Treat Lung Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W; Schild, S; Bues, M; Liao, Z; Sahoo, N; Park, P; Li, H; Li, Y; Li, X; Shen, J; Anand, A; Dong, L; Zhu, X; Mohan, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We compared conventionally optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans against the worst-case robustly optimized treatment plans for lung cancer. The comparison of the two IMPT optimization strategies focused on the resulting plans' ability to retain dose objectives under the influence of patient set-up, inherent proton range uncertainty, and dose perturbation caused by respiratory motion. Methods: For each of the 9 lung cancer cases two treatment plans were created accounting for treatment uncertainties in two different ways: the first used the conventional Method: delivery of prescribed dose to the planning target volume (PTV) that is geometrically expanded from the internal target volume (ITV). The second employed the worst-case robust optimization scheme that addressed set-up and range uncertainties through beamlet optimization. The plan optimality and plan robustness were calculated and compared. Furthermore, the effects on dose distributions of the changes in patient anatomy due to respiratory motion was investigated for both strategies by comparing the corresponding plan evaluation metrics at the end-inspiration and end-expiration phase and absolute differences between these phases. The mean plan evaluation metrics of the two groups were compared using two-sided paired t-tests. Results: Without respiratory motion considered, we affirmed that worst-case robust optimization is superior to PTV-based conventional optimization in terms of plan robustness and optimality. With respiratory motion considered, robust optimization still leads to more robust dose distributions to respiratory motion for targets and comparable or even better plan optimality [D95% ITV: 96.6% versus 96.1% (p=0.26), D5% - D95% ITV: 10.0% versus 12.3% (p=0.082), D1% spinal cord: 31.8% versus 36.5% (p =0.035)]. Conclusion: Worst-case robust optimization led to superior solutions for lung IMPT. Despite of the fact that robust optimization did not explicitly

  18. SU-E-T-266: Development of Evaluation System of Optimal Synchrotron Controlling Parameter for Spot Scanning Proton Therapy with Multiple Gate Irradiations in One Operation Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T; Fujii, Y; Miyamoto, N; Matsuura, T; Takao, S; Matsuzaki, Y; Koyano, H; Shirato, H; Nihongi, H; Umezawa, M; Matsuda, K; Umegaki, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We have developed a gated spot scanning proton beam therapy system with real-time tumor-tracking. This system has the ability of multiple-gated irradiation in a single synchrotron operation cycle controlling the wait-time for consecutive gate signals during a flat-top phase so that the decrease in irradiation efficiency induced by irregular variation of gate signal is reduced. Our previous studies have shown that a 200 ms wait-time is appropriate to increase the average irradiation efficiency, but the optimal wait-time can vary patient by patient and day by day. In this research, we have developed an evaluation system of the optimal wait-time in each irradiation based on the log data of the real-time-image gated proton beam therapy (RGPT) system. Methods: The developed system consists of logger for operation of RGPT system and software for evaluation of optimal wait-time. The logger records timing of gate on/off, timing and the dose of delivered beam spots, beam energy and timing of X-ray irradiation. The evaluation software calculates irradiation time in the case of different wait-time by simulating the multiple-gated irradiation operation using several timing information. Actual data preserved in the log data are used for gate on and off time, spot irradiation time, and time moving to the next spot. Design values are used for the acceleration and deceleration times. We applied this system to a patient treated with the RGPT system. Results: The evaluation system found the optimal wait-time of 390 ms that reduced the irradiation time by about 10 %. The irradiation time with actual wait-time used in treatment was reproduced with accuracy of 0.2 ms. Conclusion: For spot scanning proton therapy system with multiple-gated irradiation in one synchrotron operation cycle, an evaluation system of the optimal wait-time in each irradiation based on log data has been developed. Funding Support: Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through the FIRST

  19. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foote Robert L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Summary sentence Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy.

  20. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Robert L; Haddock, Michael G; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia N; Arndt, Carola A S

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy

  1. Principles and practice of proton beam therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Indra J

    2015-01-01

    Commissioned by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for their June 2015 Summer School, this is the first AAPM monograph printed in full color. Proton therapy has been used in radiation therapy for over 70 years, but within the last decade its use in clinics has grown exponentially. This book fills in the proton therapy gap by focusing on the physics of proton therapy, including beam production, proton interactions, biology, dosimetry, treatment planning, quality assurance, commissioning, motion management, and uncertainties. Chapters are written by the world's leading medical physicists who work at the pioneering proton treatment centers around the globe. They share their understandings after years of experience treating thousands of patients. Case studies involving specific cancer treatments show that there is some art to proton therapy as well as state-of-the-art science. Even though the focus lies on proton therapy, the content provided is also valuable to heavy charged particle th...

  2. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0-255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal

  3. Comparison of linear and nonlinear programming approaches for "worst case dose" and "minmax" robust optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghian, Maryam; Cao, Wenhua; Liu, Wei; Kardar, Laleh; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Mohan, Radhe; Lim, Gino

    2017-03-01

    Robust optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) takes uncertainties into account during spot weight optimization and leads to dose distributions that are resilient to uncertainties. Previous studies demonstrated benefits of linear programming (LP) for IMPT in terms of delivery efficiency by considerably reducing the number of spots required for the same quality of plans. However, a reduction in the number of spots may lead to loss of robustness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance in terms of plan quality and robustness of two robust optimization approaches using LP and nonlinear programming (NLP) models. The so-called "worst case dose" and "minmax" robust optimization approaches and conventional planning target volume (PTV)-based optimization approach were applied to designing IMPT plans for five patients: two with prostate cancer, one with skull-based cancer, and two with head and neck cancer. For each approach, both LP and NLP models were used. Thus, for each case, six sets of IMPT plans were generated and assessed: LP-PTV-based, NLP-PTV-based, LP-worst case dose, NLP-worst case dose, LP-minmax, and NLP-minmax. The four robust optimization methods behaved differently from patient to patient, and no method emerged as superior to the others in terms of nominal plan quality and robustness against uncertainties. The plans generated using LP-based robust optimization were more robust regarding patient setup and range uncertainties than were those generated using NLP-based robust optimization for the prostate cancer patients. However, the robustness of plans generated using NLP-based methods was superior for the skull-based and head and neck cancer patients. Overall, LP-based methods were suitable for the less challenging cancer cases in which all uncertainty scenarios were able to satisfy tight dose constraints, while NLP performed better in more difficult cases in which most uncertainty scenarios were hard to meet

  4. Proton beam therapy control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael A [Riverside, CA; Beloussov, Alexandre V [Bernardino, CA; Bakir, Julide [Alta Loma, CA; Armon, Deganit [Redlands, CA; Olsen, Howard B [Colton, CA; Salem, Dana [Riverside, CA

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  5. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; Dijk, Lisanne V. van; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Sasai, Keisuke; Veld, Aart A. van't; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D_2 − D_9_8, where D_2 and D_9_8 are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Results: The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to 98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions: In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects have limited impact on target coverage, dose homogeneity, and

  6. Integrated beam orientation and scanning-spot optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy for brain and unilateral head and neck tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenbo; O'Connor, Daniel; Nguyen, Dan; Yu, Victoria Y; Ruan, Dan; Dong, Lei; Sheng, Ke

    2018-04-01

    Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) is the state-of-the-art method of delivering proton radiotherapy. Previous research has been mainly focused on optimization of scanning spots with manually selected beam angles. Due to the computational complexity, the potential benefit of simultaneously optimizing beam orientations and spot pattern could not be realized. In this study, we developed a novel integrated beam orientation optimization (BOO) and scanning-spot optimization algorithm for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). A brain chordoma and three unilateral head-and-neck patients with a maximal target size of 112.49 cm 3 were included in this study. A total number of 1162 noncoplanar candidate beams evenly distributed across 4π steradians were included in the optimization. For each candidate beam, the pencil-beam doses of all scanning spots covering the PTV and a margin were calculated. The beam angle selection and spot intensity optimization problem was formulated to include three terms: a dose fidelity term to penalize the deviation of PTV and OAR doses from ideal dose distribution; an L1-norm sparsity term to reduce the number of active spots and improve delivery efficiency; a group sparsity term to control the number of active beams between 2 and 4. For the group sparsity term, convex L2,1-norm and nonconvex L2,1/2-norm were tested. For the dose fidelity term, both quadratic function and linearized equivalent uniform dose (LEUD) cost function were implemented. The optimization problem was solved using the Fast Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm (FISTA). The IMPT BOO method was tested on three head-and-neck patients and one skull base chordoma patient. The results were compared with IMPT plans created using column generation selected beams or manually selected beams. The L2,1-norm plan selected spatially aggregated beams, indicating potential degeneracy using this norm. L2,1/2-norm was able to select spatially separated beams and achieve

  7. TH-CD-209-05: Impact of Spot Size and Spacing On the Quality of Robustly-Optimized Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Plans for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W; Ding, X; Hu, Y; Shen, J; Korte, S; Bues, M; Schild, S; Wong, W; Chang, J; Liao, Z; Sahoo, N; Herman, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how spot size and spacing affect plan quality, especially, plan robustness and the impact of interplay effect, of robustly-optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans for lung cancer. Methods: Two robustly-optimized IMPT plans were created for 10 lung cancer patients: (1) one for a proton beam with in-air energy dependent large spot size at isocenter (σ: 5–15 mm) and spacing (1.53σ); (2) the other for a proton beam with small spot size (σ: 2–6 mm) and spacing (5 mm). Both plans were generated on the average CTs with internal-gross-tumor-volume density overridden to irradiate internal target volume (ITV). The root-mean-square-dose volume histograms (RVH) measured the sensitivity of the dose to uncertainties, and the areas under RVH curves were used to evaluate plan robustness. Dose evaluation software was developed to model time-dependent spot delivery to incorporate interplay effect with randomized starting phases of each field per fraction. Patient anatomy voxels were mapped from phase to phase via deformable image registration to score doses. Dose-volume-histogram indices including ITV coverage, homogeneity, and organs-at-risk (OAR) sparing were compared using Student-t test. Results: Compared to large spots, small spots resulted in significantly better OAR sparing with comparable ITV coverage and homogeneity in the nominal plan. Plan robustness was comparable for ITV and most OARs. With interplay effect considered, significantly better OAR sparing with comparable ITV coverage and homogeneity is observed using smaller spots. Conclusion: Robust optimization with smaller spots significantly improves OAR sparing with comparable plan robustness and similar impact of interplay effect compare to larger spots. Small spot size requires the use of larger number of spots, which gives optimizer more freedom to render a plan more robust. The ratio between spot size and spacing was found to be more relevant to determine plan

  8. TH-CD-209-05: Impact of Spot Size and Spacing On the Quality of Robustly-Optimized Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Plans for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W; Ding, X; Hu, Y; Shen, J; Korte, S; Bues, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Schild, S; Wong, W [Mayo Clinic AZ, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Chang, J [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao, Z; Sahoo, N [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Herman, M [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate how spot size and spacing affect plan quality, especially, plan robustness and the impact of interplay effect, of robustly-optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans for lung cancer. Methods: Two robustly-optimized IMPT plans were created for 10 lung cancer patients: (1) one for a proton beam with in-air energy dependent large spot size at isocenter (σ: 5–15 mm) and spacing (1.53σ); (2) the other for a proton beam with small spot size (σ: 2–6 mm) and spacing (5 mm). Both plans were generated on the average CTs with internal-gross-tumor-volume density overridden to irradiate internal target volume (ITV). The root-mean-square-dose volume histograms (RVH) measured the sensitivity of the dose to uncertainties, and the areas under RVH curves were used to evaluate plan robustness. Dose evaluation software was developed to model time-dependent spot delivery to incorporate interplay effect with randomized starting phases of each field per fraction. Patient anatomy voxels were mapped from phase to phase via deformable image registration to score doses. Dose-volume-histogram indices including ITV coverage, homogeneity, and organs-at-risk (OAR) sparing were compared using Student-t test. Results: Compared to large spots, small spots resulted in significantly better OAR sparing with comparable ITV coverage and homogeneity in the nominal plan. Plan robustness was comparable for ITV and most OARs. With interplay effect considered, significantly better OAR sparing with comparable ITV coverage and homogeneity is observed using smaller spots. Conclusion: Robust optimization with smaller spots significantly improves OAR sparing with comparable plan robustness and similar impact of interplay effect compare to larger spots. Small spot size requires the use of larger number of spots, which gives optimizer more freedom to render a plan more robust. The ratio between spot size and spacing was found to be more relevant to determine plan

  9. Anatomical robust optimization to account for nasal cavity filling variation during intensity-modulated proton therapy: a comparison with conventional and adaptive planning strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Water, Steven; Albertini, Francesca; Weber, Damien C.; Heijmen, Ben J. M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Lomax, Antony J.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop an anatomical robust optimization method for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) that accounts for interfraction variations in nasal cavity filling, and to compare it with conventional single-field uniform dose (SFUD) optimization and online plan adaptation. We included CT data of five patients with tumors in the sinonasal region. Using the planning CT, we generated for each patient 25 ‘synthetic’ CTs with varying nasal cavity filling. The robust optimization method available in our treatment planning system ‘Erasmus-iCycle’ was extended to also account for anatomical uncertainties by including (synthetic) CTs with varying patient anatomy as error scenarios in the inverse optimization. For each patient, we generated treatment plans using anatomical robust optimization and, for benchmarking, using SFUD optimization and online plan adaptation. Clinical target volume (CTV) and organ-at-risk (OAR) doses were assessed by recalculating the treatment plans on the synthetic CTs, evaluating dose distributions individually and accumulated over an entire fractionated 50 GyRBE treatment, assuming each synthetic CT to correspond to a 2 GyRBE fraction. Treatment plans were also evaluated using actual repeat CTs. Anatomical robust optimization resulted in adequate CTV doses (V95%  ⩾  98% and V107%  ⩽  2%) if at least three synthetic CTs were included in addition to the planning CT. These CTV requirements were also fulfilled for online plan adaptation, but not for the SFUD approach, even when applying a margin of 5 mm. Compared with anatomical robust optimization, OAR dose parameters for the accumulated dose distributions were on average 5.9 GyRBE (20%) higher when using SFUD optimization and on average 3.6 GyRBE (18%) lower for online plan adaptation. In conclusion, anatomical robust optimization effectively accounted for changes in nasal cavity filling during IMPT, providing substantially improved CTV and

  10. Inverse planning of intensity modulated proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nill, S.; Oelfke, U.; Bortfeld, T.

    2004-01-01

    A common requirement of radiation therapy is that treatment planning for different radiation modalities is devised on the basis of the same treatment planning system (TPS). The present study presents a novel multi-modal TPS with separate modules for the dose calculation, the optimization engine and the graphical user interface, which allows to integrate different treatment modalities. For heavy-charged particles, both most promising techniques, the distal edge tracking (DET) and the 3-dimensional scanning (3D) technique can be optimized. As a first application, the quality of optimized intensity-modulated treatment plans for photons (IMXT) and protons (IMPT) was analyzed in one clinical case on the basis of the achieved physical dose distributions. A comparison of the proton plans with the photon plans showed no significant improvement in terms of target volume dose, however there was an improvement in terms of organs at risk as well as a clear reduction of the total integral dose. For the DET technique, it is possible to create a treatment plan with almost the same quality of the 3D technique, however with a clearly reduced number (factor of 5) of beam spots as well as a reduced optimization time. Due to its modular design, the system can be easily expanded to more sophisticated dose-calculation algorithms or to modeling of biological effects. (orig.) [de

  11. Proton Therapy Research and Treatment Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodnight, J.E. Jr. (University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center); Alonso, J.R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-05-01

    This Grant proposal outlines the steps that will be undertaken to bring the UC Davis Proton Therapy Research and Treatment, known locally as the Proton Therapy Facility (PTF), through its design and construction phases. This application concentrates on the design phase of the PTF project.

  12. SU-F-BRD-01: A Novel 4D Robust Optimization Mitigates Interplay Effect in Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W; Shen, J; Stoker, J; Bues, M; Schild, S; Wong, W; Chang, J; Liao, Z; Wen, Z; Sahoo, N; Herman, M; Mohan, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the impact of interplay effect on 3D and 4D robustly optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to treat lung cancer. Methods: Two IMPT plans were created for 11 non-small-cell-lung-cancer cases with 6–14 mm spots. 3D robust optimization generated plans on average CTs with the internal gross tumor volume density overridden to deliver 66 CGyE in 33 fractions to the internal target volume (ITV). 4D robust optimization generated plans on 4D CTs with the delivery of prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV). In 4D optimization, the CTV of individual 4D CT phases received non-uniform doses to achieve a uniform cumulative dose. Dose evaluation software was developed to model time-dependent spot delivery to incorporate interplay effect with randomized starting phases of each field per fraction. Patient anatomy voxels were mapped from phase to phase via deformable image registration to score doses. Indices from dose-volume histograms were used to compare target coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal-tissue sparing. DVH indices were compared using Wilcoxon test. Results: Given the presence of interplay effect, 4D robust optimization produced IMPT plans with better target coverage and homogeneity, but slightly worse normal tissue sparing compared to 3D robust optimization (unit: Gy) [D95% ITV: 63.5 vs 62.0 (p=0.014), D5% - D95% ITV: 6.2 vs 7.3 (p=0.37), D1% spinal cord: 29.0 vs 29.5 (p=0.52), Dmean total lung: 14.8 vs 14.5 (p=0.12), D33% esophagus: 33.6 vs 33.1 (p=0.28)]. The improvement of target coverage (D95%,4D – D95%,3D) was related to the ratio RMA3/(TVx10−4), with RMA and TV being respiratory motion amplitude (RMA) and tumor volume (TV), respectively. Peak benefit was observed at ratios between 2 and 10. This corresponds to 125 – 625 cm3 TV with 0.5-cm RMA. Conclusion: 4D optimization produced more interplay-effect-resistant plans compared to 3D optimization. It is most effective when respiratory motion is modest

  13. SU-F-BRD-01: A Novel 4D Robust Optimization Mitigates Interplay Effect in Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W; Shen, J; Stoker, J; Bues, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Schild, S; Wong, W [Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Chang, J; Liao, Z; Wen, Z; Sahoo, N [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Herman, M [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the impact of interplay effect on 3D and 4D robustly optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to treat lung cancer. Methods: Two IMPT plans were created for 11 non-small-cell-lung-cancer cases with 6–14 mm spots. 3D robust optimization generated plans on average CTs with the internal gross tumor volume density overridden to deliver 66 CGyE in 33 fractions to the internal target volume (ITV). 4D robust optimization generated plans on 4D CTs with the delivery of prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV). In 4D optimization, the CTV of individual 4D CT phases received non-uniform doses to achieve a uniform cumulative dose. Dose evaluation software was developed to model time-dependent spot delivery to incorporate interplay effect with randomized starting phases of each field per fraction. Patient anatomy voxels were mapped from phase to phase via deformable image registration to score doses. Indices from dose-volume histograms were used to compare target coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal-tissue sparing. DVH indices were compared using Wilcoxon test. Results: Given the presence of interplay effect, 4D robust optimization produced IMPT plans with better target coverage and homogeneity, but slightly worse normal tissue sparing compared to 3D robust optimization (unit: Gy) [D95% ITV: 63.5 vs 62.0 (p=0.014), D5% - D95% ITV: 6.2 vs 7.3 (p=0.37), D1% spinal cord: 29.0 vs 29.5 (p=0.52), Dmean total lung: 14.8 vs 14.5 (p=0.12), D33% esophagus: 33.6 vs 33.1 (p=0.28)]. The improvement of target coverage (D95%,4D – D95%,3D) was related to the ratio RMA3/(TVx10−4), with RMA and TV being respiratory motion amplitude (RMA) and tumor volume (TV), respectively. Peak benefit was observed at ratios between 2 and 10. This corresponds to 125 – 625 cm3 TV with 0.5-cm RMA. Conclusion: 4D optimization produced more interplay-effect-resistant plans compared to 3D optimization. It is most effective when respiratory motion is modest

  14. SU-F-T-187: Quantifying Normal Tissue Sparing with 4D Robust Optimization of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newpower, M; Ge, S; Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To report an approach to quantify the normal tissue sparing for 4D robustly-optimized versus PTV-optimized IMPT plans. Methods: We generated two sets of 90 DVHs from a patient’s 10-phase 4D CT set; one by conventional PTV-based optimization done in the Eclipse treatment planning system, and the other by an in-house robust optimization algorithm. The 90 DVHs were created for the following scenarios in each of the ten phases of the 4DCT: ± 5mm shift along x, y, z; ± 3.5% range uncertainty and a nominal scenario. A Matlab function written by Gay and Niemierko was modified to calculate EUD for each DVH for the following structures: esophagus, heart, ipsilateral lung and spinal cord. An F-test determined whether or not the variances of each structure’s DVHs were statistically different. Then a t-test determined if the average EUDs for each optimization algorithm were statistically significantly different. Results: T-test results showed each structure had a statistically significant difference in average EUD when comparing robust optimization versus PTV-based optimization. Under robust optimization all structures except the spinal cord received lower EUDs than PTV-based optimization. Using robust optimization the average EUDs decreased 1.45% for the esophagus, 1.54% for the heart and 5.45% for the ipsilateral lung. The average EUD to the spinal cord increased 24.86% but was still well below tolerance. Conclusion: This work has helped quantify a qualitative relationship noted earlier in our work: that robust optimization leads to plans with greater normal tissue sparing compared to PTV-based optimization. Except in the case of the spinal cord all structures received a lower EUD under robust optimization and these results are statistically significant. While the average EUD to the spinal cord increased to 25.06 Gy under robust optimization it is still well under the TD50 value of 66.5 Gy from Emami et al. Supported in part by the NCI U19 CA021239.

  15. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Tatsuya [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Widder, Joachim; Dijk, Lisanne V. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Takegawa, Hideki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Anneyuko I. [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sasai, Keisuke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Veld, Aart A. van' t; Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Korevaar, Erik W., E-mail: e.w.korevaar@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D{sub 2} − D{sub 98}, where D{sub 2} and D{sub 98} are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Results: The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to <98% (clinical threshold) in 3 of 10 patients for robust 5-mm evaluations. However, the TC remained >98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions: In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range

  16. Quality verification for respiratory gated proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Sook; Jang, Yo Jong; Park, Ji Yeon; Kang, Dong Yun; Yeom, Doo Seok

    2013-01-01

    To verify accuracy of respiratory gated proton therapy by measuring and analyzing proton beam delivered when respiratory gated proton therapy is being performed in our institute. The plan data of 3 patients who took respiratory gated proton therapy were used to deliver proton beam from proton therapy system. The manufactured moving phantom was used to apply respiratory gating system to reproduce proton beam which was partially irradiated. The key characteristics of proton beam, range, spreat-out Bragg peak (SOBP) and output factor were measured 5 times and the same categories were measured in the continuous proton beam which was not performed with respiratory gating system. Multi-layer ionization chamber was used to measure range and SOBP, and Scanditronix Wellhofer and farmer chamber was used to measure output factor. The average ranges of 3 patients (A, B, C), who had taken respiratory gated proton therapy or not, were (A) 7.226, 7.230, (B) 12.216, 12.220 and (C) 19.918, 19.920 g/cm 2 and average SOBP were (A) 4.950, 4.940, (B) 6.496, 6.512 and (C) 8.486, 8.490 g/cm 2 . And average output factor were (A) 0.985, 0.984 (B) 1.026, 1.027 and (C) 1.138, 1.136 cGy/MU. The differences of average range were -0.004, -0.004, -0.002 g/cm 2 , that of SOBP were 0.010, -0.016, -0.004 g/cm 2 and that of output factor were 0.001, -0.001, 0.002 cGy/MU. It is observed that the range, SOBP and output factor of proton beam delivered when respiratory gated proton therapy is being performed have the same beam quality with no significant difference compared to the proton beam which was continuously irradiated. Therefore, this study verified the quality of proton beam delivered when respiratory gated proton therapy and confirmed the accuracy of proton therapy using this

  17. Design of Linear Accelerator (LINAC) tanks for proton therapy via Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellano, T.; De Palma, L.; Laneve, D.; Strippoli, V.; Cuccovilllo, A.; Prudenzano, F. [Electrical and Information Engineering Department (DEI), Polytechnic Institute of Bari, 4 Orabona Street, CAP 70125, Bari, (Italy); Dimiccoli, V.; Losito, O.; Prisco, R. [ITEL Telecomunicazioni, 39 Labriola Street, CAP 70037, Ruvo di Puglia, Bari, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    A homemade computer code for designing a Side- Coupled Linear Accelerator (SCL) is written. It integrates a simplified model of SCL tanks with the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm. The computer code main aim is to obtain useful guidelines for the design of Linear Accelerator (LINAC) resonant cavities. The design procedure, assisted via the aforesaid approach seems very promising, allowing future improvements towards the optimization of actual accelerating geometries. (authors)

  18. Design of Linear Accelerator (LINAC) tanks for proton therapy via Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, T.; De Palma, L.; Laneve, D.; Strippoli, V.; Cuccovilllo, A.; Prudenzano, F.; Dimiccoli, V.; Losito, O.; Prisco, R.

    2015-01-01

    A homemade computer code for designing a Side- Coupled Linear Accelerator (SCL) is written. It integrates a simplified model of SCL tanks with the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm. The computer code main aim is to obtain useful guidelines for the design of Linear Accelerator (LINAC) resonant cavities. The design procedure, assisted via the aforesaid approach seems very promising, allowing future improvements towards the optimization of actual accelerating geometries. (authors)

  19. SU-E-T-574: Novel Chance-Constrained Optimization in Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Planning to Account for Range and Patient Setup Uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Y; Liang, J; Liu, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We propose to apply a probabilistic framework, namely chanceconstrained optimization, in the intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning subject to range and patient setup uncertainties. The purpose is to hedge against the influence of uncertainties and improve robustness of treatment plans. Methods: IMPT plans were generated for a typical prostate patient. Nine dose distributions are computed — the nominal one and one each for ±5mm setup uncertainties along three cardinal axes and for ±3.5% range uncertainty. These nine dose distributions are supplied to the solver CPLEX as chance constraints to explicitly control plan robustness under these representative uncertainty scenarios with certain probability. This probability is determined by the tolerance level. We make the chance-constrained model tractable by converting it to a mixed integer optimization problem. The quality of plans derived from this method is evaluated using dose-volume histogram (DVH) indices such as tumor dose homogeneity (D5% – D95%) and coverage (D95%) and normal tissue sparing like V70 of rectum, V65, and V40 of bladder. We also compare the results from this novel method with the conventional PTV-based method to further demonstrate its effectiveness Results: Our model can yield clinically acceptable plans within 50 seconds. The chance-constrained optimization produces IMPT plans with comparable target coverage, better target dose homogeneity, and better normal tissue sparing compared to the PTV-based optimization [D95% CTV: 67.9 vs 68.7 (Gy), D5% – D95% CTV: 11.9 vs 18 (Gy), V70 rectum: 0.0 % vs 0.33%, V65 bladder: 2.17% vs 9.33%, V40 bladder: 8.83% vs 21.83%]. It also simultaneously makes the plan more robust [Width of DVH band at D50%: 2.0 vs 10.0 (Gy)]. The tolerance level may be varied to control the tradeoff between plan robustness and quality. Conclusion: The chance-constrained optimization generates superior IMPT plan compared to the PTV-based optimization with

  20. SU-F-T-197: Investigating Optimal Oblique-Beam Arrangement for Bilateral Metallic Prosthesis Prostate Cancer in Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, S; Tesfamicael, B; Park, S [McLaren Proton Therapy Center, Karmanos Cancer Institute at McLaren-Flint, Flint, MI (United States); Zheng, Y; Singh, H; Twyford, T [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Cheng, C [Vantage Oncology, West Hills, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to investigate the optimum oblique-beam arrangement for bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer treatment in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy. Methods: A computed tomography dataset of bilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer case was selected for this retrospective study. A total of four beams (rightanterior- oblique [RAO], left-anterior-oblique [LAO], left-posterior-oblique [LPO], and right-posterior-oblique [RPO]) were selected for treatment planning. PBS plans were generated using multi-field-optimization technique for a total dose of 79.2 Gy[RBE] to be delivered in 44 fractions. Specifically, five different PBS plans were generated based on 2.5% ± 2 mm range uncertainty using five different beam arrangements (i)LAO+RAO+LPO+RPO, (ii)LAO+RAO, (iii)LPO+RPO, (iv)RAO+LPO, and (v)LAO+RPO. Each PBS plan was optimized by applying identical dose-volume constraints to the PTV, rectum, and bladder. Treatment plans were then compared based on the dose-volume histograms results. Results: The PTV coverage was found to be greater than 99% in all five plans. The homogeneity index (HI) was found to be almost identical (range, 0.03–0.04). The PTV mean dose was found to be comparable (range, 81.0–81.1 Gy[RBE]). For the rectum, the lowest mean dose (8.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (31.1 Gy[RBE]) were found in RAO+LAO plan and LPO+RPO plan, respectively. LAO+RAO plan produced the most favorable dosimetric results of the rectum in the medium-dose region (V50) and high-dose region (V70). For the bladder, the lowest (5.0 Gy[RBE]) and highest mean dose (10.3 Gy[RBE]) were found in LPO+RPO plan and RAO+LAO plan, respectively. Other dosimetric results (V50 and V70) of the bladder were slightly better in LPO+RPO plan than in other plans. Conclusion: Dosimetric findings from this study suggest that two anterior-oblique proton beams arrangement (LAO+RAO) is a more favorable option with the possibility of reducing rectal

  1. Australian proton therapy facilities - status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleasel, S.; Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of cancer; both in the curative treatment of localised disease and in alleviating symptoms in more advanced disease. Radiotherapy is usually given with megavoltage X-rays which give good penetration at depth and a lower dose on the skin. The aim is to give a high dose to the tumour while keeping the dose to normal tissues as low as possible. While X-rays continue beyond the target volume, protons and other charged particles have a finite range in tissue and this allows the high dose region to closely conform to the tumour, thereby giving the best chance of tumour control with minimum side effects. This is particularly important for small tumours adjacent to critical normal structures. The unmodified Bragg peak is too narrow to be useful but can be spread out to cover the tumour. Protons of energy 70 - 250 MeV are required to achieve the optimal depth in the body. Protons have been used for cancer treatment since 1954 but most of these treatments have been given in physics-based facilities which do not provide an ideal environment for the patient and may have only limited beam time available. A dedicated, hospital based facility was built at Loma Linda in California in 1991 and has now treated over 5,000 patients. Several other centres are being built in the USA, Japan and Europe and one is now being considered for Australia. Early 1998 Hitachi Australia Ltd. was asked to research the possibility of building a facility in Australia to serve Oceania. Two major hospitals showed interest, Royal Brisbane Hospital and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. Both hospitals are undergoing redevelopment and have space for a building 3 stories high with a foot-print of approximately 50 m x 50 m. What is proposed for Australia is a principally clinical research facility with a dedicated area for physics research. A Steering Committee will be established to develop a document for presentation to Government. The facility

  2. Multiple field optimisation for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, A.

    1997-01-01

    Intensity modulation in radiation treatment planning for photons has great potential for tailoring dose distributions in particularly challenging cases. Here we describe some preliminary work into the application of such methods to proton therapy. (author) 4 refs

  3. TH-CD-209-04: Fuzzy Robust Optimization in Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Planning to Account for Range and Patient Setup Uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Y; Bues, M; Schild, S; Liu, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We propose to apply a robust optimization model based on fuzzy-logic constraints in the intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning subject to range and patient setup uncertainties. The purpose is to ensure the plan robustness under uncertainty and obtain the best trade-off between tumor dose coverage and organ-at-risk(OAR) sparing. Methods: Two IMPT plans were generated for 3 head-and-neck cancer patients: one used the planning target volume(PTV) method; the other used the fuzzy robust optimization method. In the latter method, nine dose distributions were computed - the nominal one and one each for ±3mm setup uncertainties along three cardinal axes and for ±3.5% range uncertainty. For tumors, these nine dose distributions were explicitly controlled by adding hard constraints with adjustable parameters. For OARs, fuzzy constraints that allow the dose to vary within a certain range were used so that the tumor dose distribution was guaranteed by minimum compromise of that of OARs. We rendered this model tractable by converting the fuzzy constraints to linear constraints. The plan quality was evaluated using dose-volume histogram(DVH) indices such as tumor dose coverage(D95%), homogeneity(D5%-D95%), plan robustness(DVH band at D95%), and OAR sparing like D1% of brain and D1% of brainstem. Results: Our model could yield clinically acceptable plans. The fuzzy-logic robust optimization method produced IMPT plans with comparable target dose coverage and homogeneity compared to the PTV method(unit: Gy[RBE]; average[min, max])(CTV D95%: 59 [52.7, 63.5] vs 53.5[46.4, 60.1], CTV D5% - D95%: 11.1[5.3, 18.6] vs 14.4[9.2, 21.5]). It also generated more robust plans(CTV DVH band at D95%: 3.8[1.2, 5.6] vs 11.5[6.2, 16.7]). The parameters of tumor constraints could be adjusted to control the tradeoff between tumor coverage and OAR sparing. Conclusion: The fuzzy-logic robust optimization generates superior IMPT with minimum compromise of OAR sparing. This research

  4. TH-CD-209-04: Fuzzy Robust Optimization in Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Planning to Account for Range and Patient Setup Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Y; Bues, M; Schild, S; Liu, W [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We propose to apply a robust optimization model based on fuzzy-logic constraints in the intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning subject to range and patient setup uncertainties. The purpose is to ensure the plan robustness under uncertainty and obtain the best trade-off between tumor dose coverage and organ-at-risk(OAR) sparing. Methods: Two IMPT plans were generated for 3 head-and-neck cancer patients: one used the planning target volume(PTV) method; the other used the fuzzy robust optimization method. In the latter method, nine dose distributions were computed - the nominal one and one each for ±3mm setup uncertainties along three cardinal axes and for ±3.5% range uncertainty. For tumors, these nine dose distributions were explicitly controlled by adding hard constraints with adjustable parameters. For OARs, fuzzy constraints that allow the dose to vary within a certain range were used so that the tumor dose distribution was guaranteed by minimum compromise of that of OARs. We rendered this model tractable by converting the fuzzy constraints to linear constraints. The plan quality was evaluated using dose-volume histogram(DVH) indices such as tumor dose coverage(D95%), homogeneity(D5%-D95%), plan robustness(DVH band at D95%), and OAR sparing like D1% of brain and D1% of brainstem. Results: Our model could yield clinically acceptable plans. The fuzzy-logic robust optimization method produced IMPT plans with comparable target dose coverage and homogeneity compared to the PTV method(unit: Gy[RBE]; average[min, max])(CTV D95%: 59 [52.7, 63.5] vs 53.5[46.4, 60.1], CTV D5% - D95%: 11.1[5.3, 18.6] vs 14.4[9.2, 21.5]). It also generated more robust plans(CTV DVH band at D95%: 3.8[1.2, 5.6] vs 11.5[6.2, 16.7]). The parameters of tumor constraints could be adjusted to control the tradeoff between tumor coverage and OAR sparing. Conclusion: The fuzzy-logic robust optimization generates superior IMPT with minimum compromise of OAR sparing. This research

  5. Recircular accelerator to proton ocular therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, Luisa A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: luisarabelo88@gmail.com, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Proton therapy has been used for the treatment of Ocular Tumors, showing control in most cases as well as conservation of the eyeball, avoiding the enucleation. The protons provide higher energetic deposition in depth with reduced lateral spread, compared to the beam of photons and electrons, with characteristic dose deposition peak (Bragg peak). This technique requires large particle accelerators hampering the deployment a Proton Therapy Center in some countries due to the need for an investment of millions of dollars. This study is related to a new project of an electromagnetic unit of proton circular accelerator to be coupled to the national radiopharmaceutical production cyclotrons, to attend ocular therapy. This project evaluated physical parameters of proton beam circulating through classical and relativistic mechanical formulations and simulations based on an ion transport code in electromagnetic fields namely CST (Computer Simulation Technology). The structure is differentiated from other circular accelerations (patent CTIT/UFMG NRI research group/UFMG). The results show the feasibility of developing compact proton therapy equipment that works like pre-accelerator or post-accelerator to cyclotrons, satisfying the interval energy of 15 MeV to 64 MeV. Methods of reducing costs of manufacture, installation and operation of this equipment will facilitate the dissemination of the proton treatment in Brazil and consequently advances in fighting cancer. (author)

  6. Recircular accelerator to proton ocular therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabelo, Luisa A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy has been used for the treatment of Ocular Tumors, showing control in most cases as well as conservation of the eyeball, avoiding the enucleation. The protons provide higher energetic deposition in depth with reduced lateral spread, compared to the beam of photons and electrons, with characteristic dose deposition peak (Bragg peak). This technique requires large particle accelerators hampering the deployment a Proton Therapy Center in some countries due to the need for an investment of millions of dollars. This study is related to a new project of an electromagnetic unit of proton circular accelerator to be coupled to the national radiopharmaceutical production cyclotrons, to attend ocular therapy. This project evaluated physical parameters of proton beam circulating through classical and relativistic mechanical formulations and simulations based on an ion transport code in electromagnetic fields namely CST (Computer Simulation Technology). The structure is differentiated from other circular accelerations (patent CTIT/UFMG NRI research group/UFMG). The results show the feasibility of developing compact proton therapy equipment that works like pre-accelerator or post-accelerator to cyclotrons, satisfying the interval energy of 15 MeV to 64 MeV. Methods of reducing costs of manufacture, installation and operation of this equipment will facilitate the dissemination of the proton treatment in Brazil and consequently advances in fighting cancer. (author)

  7. Proton beam therapy how protons are revolutionizing cancer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Yajnik, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is an emerging technology with promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. While nearly half of all patients diagnosed with cancer in the US receive radiation therapy, the majority is delivered via electron accelerators, where photons are used to irradiate cancerous tissue. Because of the physical properties of photon beams, photons may deposit energy along their entire path length through the body. On the other hand, a proton beam directed at a tumor travels in a straight trajectory towards its target, gives off most of its energy at a defined depth called the Bragg peak, and then stops. While photons often deposit more energy within the healthy tissues of the body than within the cancer itself, protons can deposit most of their cancer-killing energy within the area of the tumor. As a result, in the properly selected patients, proton beam therapy has the ability to improve cure rates by increasing the dose delivered to the tumor and simultaneously reduce side-effects by decreasing...

  8. IBA's state of art Proton Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternier, Sonja

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In recent years, IBA has developed a state-of-the-art Proton Therapy System that is currently being implemented at the Northeast Proton Therapy Center in Boston. First patient treatment is predicted for the fourth quarter of 2001. The IBA Proton Therapy System consists of a 230 MeV accelerator (a fixed energy isochronous cyclotron), an Energy Selection System that can decrease the energy down to 70 MeV and up to five treatment rooms. There are two types of treatment rooms. A gantry treatment room in which a patient can be treated from virtually any angle or a fixed horizontal beam line aimed at treatments of the of the head and neck. The system is equipped with a Therapy Control System and a Global Safety Management System. The Integrated Therapy Control System is an integrated system ensuring the control of the treatment sessions through independent but networked therapy control units and, therefore, the control of each equipment subsystem. The integrated safety management system, independent of the Therapy Control System, includes a set of hard-wired safety devices, ensuring the safety of the patient and personnel. The system will be capable of delivering proton treatments in four-treatment modes: Double Scattering, Single Scattering, Wobbling and Pencil Beam Scanning. The presentation will show the most important subsystems and treatment modes capabilities as well as the most recent advances in the technology. (author)

  9. Proton-beam radiation therapy dosimetry standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, K.P.

    1995-01-01

    Beams of protons have been used for radiation therapy applications for over 40 years. In the last decade the number of facilities treating patients and the total number of patients being treated has begun go grow rapidly. Due to the limited and experimental nature of the early programs, dosimetry protocols tended to be locally defined. With the publication of the AAPM Task Group 20 report open-quotes Protocol for Dosimetry of Heavy Charged Particlesclose quotes and the open-quotes European Code of Practice for Proton-Beam Dosimetryclose quotes the practice of determining dose in proton-beam therapy was somewhat unified. The ICRU has also recently commissioned a report on recommendations for proton-beam dosimetry. There have been three main methods of determining proton dose; the Faraday cup technique, the ionization chamber technique, and the calorimeter technique. For practical reasons the ionization chamber technique has become the most widely used. However, due to large errors in basic parameters (e.g., W-value) is also has a large uncertainty for absolute dose. It has been proposed that the development of water calorimeter absorbed dose standards would reduce the uncertainty in absolute proton dose as well as the relative dose between megavoltage X-ray beams and proton beams. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed

  10. Laryngeal adenocystic carcinoma treated by proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Tomonori; Araki, Mamika; Fukukita, Kouhei; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Adenocystic carcinoma most commonly develops in the major salivary glands, on the other hand it is rare for adenocystic carcinoma to develop in the larynx. We report a case of adenocystic carcinoma in the larynx. A 54-year-old male was hospitalized with symptoms of hoarseness and dyspnea on exertion. He presented a tumor that developed at the base of the right arytenoid, and covered over the glottis. It was confirmed to be adenocystic carcinoma (solid type) by biopsy. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT also revealed a left cervical lymph node metastasis and multiple pulmonary metastases (T1N2cM1). He was treated with proton therapy to the larynx to prevent airway obstruction by growth of the tumor and to preserve the larynx because he had uncontrollable pulmonary metastasis. Although the tumor vanished after the treatment, one month later he had halitosis, dyspnea and bilateral vocal cord palsy. Despite administration of an antibacterial drug and steroid, there was no improvement to the narrowness of the glottis. A tracheotomy was therefore performed three months after the proton therapy. PET-CT, which was performed after the tracheotomy, suggested growth of the residual tumor or laryngeal radionecrosis. This study confirmed that proton therapy is effective for adenocystic carcinoma in the larynx. However, proton therapy also was found to cause laryngeal radionecrosis. These results indicate the importance of evaluating the side effects of radiation therapy and providing that information to the patient. (author)

  11. WE-D-BRB-01: Basic Physics of Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjomandy, B. [McLaren Cancer Institute (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  12. WE-D-BRB-00: Basics of Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  13. WE-D-BRB-00: Basics of Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  14. WE-D-BRB-01: Basic Physics of Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjomandy, B.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  15. MSPT: Motion Simulator for Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In proton therapy, the delivery method named spot scanning, can provide a particularly efficient treatment in terms of tumor coverage and healthy tissues protection. The dosimetric benefits of proton therapy may be greatly degraded due to intra-fraction motions. Hence, the study of mitigation or adaptive methods is necessary. For this purpose, we developed an open-source 4D dose computation and evaluation software, MSPT (Motion Simulator for Proton Therapy), for the spot-scanning delivery technique. It aims at highlighting the impact of intra-fraction motions during a treatment delivery by computing the dose distribution in the moving patient. In addition, the use of MSPT allowed us to develop and propose a new motion mitigation strategy based on the adjustment of the beam's weight when the proton beam is scanning across the tumor. In photon therapy, a main concern for deliveries using a multi-leaf collimator (MLC) relies on finding a series of MLC configurations to deliver properly the treatment. The efficiency of such series is measured by the total beam-on time and the total setup time. In our work, we study the minimization of these efficiency criteria from an algorithmic point of view, for new variants of MLCs: the rotating MLC and the dual-layer MLC. In addition, we propose an approximation algorithm to find a series of configurations that minimizes the total beam-on time for the rotating MLC. (author) [fr

  16. Technology for bolus verification in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipulin, K. N.; Mytsin, G. V.; Agapov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    To ensure the conformal depth-dose distribution of a proton beam within a target volume, complex shaped range shifters (so-called boluses), which account for the heterogeneous structure of patient tissue and organs in the beam path, were calculated and manufactured. The precise manufacturing of proton compensators used for patient treatment is a vital step in quality assurance in proton therapy. In this work a software-hardware complex that verifies the quality and precision of bolus manufacturing at the Medico-Technical Complex (MTC) was developed. The boluses consisted of a positioning system with two photoelectric biosensors. We evaluated 20 boluses used in proton therapy of five patients. A total number of 2562 experimental points were measured, of which only two points had values that differed from the calculated value by more than 0.5 mm. The other data points displayed a deviation within ±0.5 mm from the calculated value. The technology for bolus verification developed in this work can be used for the high precision testing of geometrical parameters of proton compensators in radiotherapy.

  17. Proton radiation therapy for clivus chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Tsunoda, Takashi; Hyodo, Akio; Nose, Tadao; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Inada, Tetsuo; Maruhashi, Akira; Hayakawa, Yoshinori.

    1993-01-01

    A 57-year-old male with clival chordoma developed severe hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysphonia 1 month after a second removal of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass 10 cm in diameter in the region of the middle clivus enhanced inhomogeneously by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, and a defect in the skull base. There was evidence of compression of the anterior surface of the pons. He received proton irradiation employing a pair of parallel opposed lateral proton beams. The dose aimed at the tumor mass was 75.5 Gy, to the pharyngeal wall less than 38 Gy, and to the anterior portion of the pons less than 30 Gy. Time dose and fractionation factor was calculated at 148. Thirty-one months following treatment, he was free of clinical neurological sequelae. Proton therapy should be considered in treatment planning following initial surgical removal or for inoperable clivus chordoma. (author)

  18. Proton-therapy and hadron-therapy ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissonnat, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the ARCHADE project (Advanced Resource Center for Hadron-therapy in Europe), a research project in Carbone ion beam therapy and clinical Proton-therapy, this work investigates the beam monitoring and dosimetry aspects of ion beam therapy. The main goal, here, is to understand the operating mode of air ionization chambers, the detectors used for such applications. This study starts at a very fundamental level as the involved physical and chemical parameters of air were measured in various electric field conditions with dedicated setups and used to produce a simulation tools aiming at reproducing the operating response in high intensity PBS (Pencil Beam Scanning) coming from IBA's (Ion Beam Applications) next generation of proton beam accelerators. In addition, an ionization chamber-based dosimetry equipment was developed, DOSION III, for radiobiology studies conducted at GANIL under the supervision of the CIMAP laboratory. (author)

  19. Repeated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tokuuye, Koichi; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Igaki, Hiroshi; Hata, Masaharu; Kagei, Kenji; Sugahara, Shinji; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the safety and effectiveness of repeated proton beam therapy for newly developed or recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From June 1989 through July 2000, 225 patients with HCC underwent their first course of proton beam therapy at University of Tsukuba. Of them, 27 with 68 lesions who had undergone two or more courses were retrospectively reviewed in this study. Median interval between the first and second course was 24.5 months (range 3.3-79.8 months). Median total dose of 72 Gy in 16 fractions and 66 Gy in 16 fractions were given for the first course and the rest of the courses, respectively. Results: The 5-year survival rate and median survival period from the beginning of the first course for the 27 patients were 55.6% and 62.2 months, respectively. Five-year local control rate for the 68 lesions was 87.8%. Of the patients, 1 with Child-Pugh class B and another with class C before the last course suffered from acute hepatic failure. Conclusions: Repeated proton beam therapy for HCC is safe when the patient has a target in the peripheral region of the liver and liver function is Child-Pugh class A

  20. SU-F-T-195: Systematic Constraining of Contralateral Parotid Gland Led to Improved Dosimetric Outcomes for Multi-Field Optimization with Scanning Beam Proton Therapy: Promising Results From a Pilot Study in Patients with Base of Tongue Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R; Liu, A; Poenisch, F; Palmer, M; Gillin, M; Zhu, X [Department of Radiation Physics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Crowford, C; Georges, R; Amin, M [Department of Medical Dosimetry, MD Anderson Cancer Ctr, Houston, TX (United States); Sio, T; Gunn, B; Frank, S [Radiation Oncology Department MD Anderson Cancer Ctr, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treatment planning for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for head and neck cancer is time-consuming due to the large number of organs-at-risk (OAR) to be considered. As there are many competing objectives and also wide range of acceptable OAR constraints, the final approved plan may not be most optimal for the given structures. We evaluated the dose reduction to the contralateral parotid by implementing standardized constraints during optimization for scanning beam proton therapy planning. Methods: Twenty-four (24) consecutive patients previously treated for base of tongue carcinoma were retrospectively selected. The doses were 70Gy, 63Gy and 57Gy (SIB in 33 fractions) for high-, intermediate-, and standard-risk clinical target volumes (CTV), respectively; the treatment included bilateral neck. Scanning beams using MFO with standardized bilateral anterior oblique and PA fields were applied. New plans where then developed and optimized by employing additional contralateral parotid constraints at multiple defined dose levels. Using a step-wise iterative process, the volume-based constraints at each level were then further reduced until known target coverages were compromised. The newly developed plans were then compared to the original clinically approved plans using paired student t-testing. Results: All 24 newly optimized treatment plans maintained initial plan quality as compared to the approved plans, and the 98% prescription dose coverage to the CTV’s were not compromised. Representative DVH comparison is shown in FIGURE 1. The contralateral parotid doses were reduced at all levels of interest when systematic constraints were applied to V10, V20, V30 and V40Gy (All P<0.0001; TABLE 1). Overall, the mean contralateral parotid doses were reduced by 2.26 Gy on average, a ∼13% relative improvement. Conclusion: Applying systematic and volume-based contralateral parotid constraints for IMPT planning significantly reduced the dose at all dosimetric

  1. Fan beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick M.

    A fan beam proton therapy is developed which delivers intensity modulated proton therapy using distal edge tracking. The system may be retrofit onto existing proton therapy gantries without alterations to infrastructure in order to improve treatments through intensity modulation. A novel range and intensity modulation system is designed using acrylic leaves that are inserted or retracted from subsections of the fan beam. Leaf thicknesses are chosen in a base-2 system and motivated in a binary manner. Dose spots from individual beam channels range between 1 and 5 cm. Integrated collimators attempting to limit crosstalk among beam channels are investigated, but found to be inferior to uncollimated beam channel modulators. A treatment planning system performing data manipulation in MATLAB and dose calculation in MCNPX is developed. Beamlet dose is calculated on patient CT data and a fan beam source is manually defined to produce accurate results. An energy deposition tally follows the CT grid, allowing straightforward registration of dose and image data. Simulations of beam channels assume that a beam channel either delivers dose to a distal edge spot or is intensity modulated. A final calculation is performed separately to determine the deliverable dose accounting for all sources of scatter. Treatment plans investigate the effects that varying system parameters have on dose distributions. Beam channel apertures may be as large as 20 mm because the sharp distal falloff characteristic of proton dose provides sufficient intensity modulation to meet dose objectives, even in the presence of coarse lateral resolution. Dose conformity suffers only when treatments are delivered from less than 10 angles. Jaw widths of 1--2 cm produce comparable dose distributions, but a jaw width of 4 cm produces unacceptable target coverage when maintaining critical structure avoidance. Treatment time for a prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 minutes. Neutron production

  2. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-09-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described. The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods. It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan. When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT.

  3. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-10-07

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described.The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods.It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan.When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT.

  4. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described.The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods.It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan.When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT. (note)

  5. Proton-Beam Therapy for Olfactory Neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hideki; Ogino, Takashi; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Nihei, Keiji; Arahira, Satoko; Onozawa, Masakatsu; Katsuta, Shoichi; Nishio, Teiji

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the feasibility and efficacy of proton-beam therapy (PBT) for olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) as a definitive treatment, by reviewing our preliminary experience. Olfactory neuroblastoma is a rare disease, and a standard treatment strategy has not been established. Radiation therapy for ONB is challenging because of the proximity of ONBs to critical organs. Proton-beam therapy can provide better dose distribution compared with X-ray irradiation because of its physical characteristics, and is deemed to be a feasible treatment modality. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on 14 patients who underwent PBT for ONB as definitive treatment at the National Cancer Center Hospital East (Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan) from November 1999 to February 2005. A total dose of PBT was 65 cobalt Gray equivalents (Gy E ), with 2.5-Gy E once-daily fractionations. Results: The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 40 months. One patient died from disseminated disease. There were two persistent diseases, one of which was successfully salvaged with surgery. The 5-year overall survival rate was 93%, the 5-year local progression-free survival rate was 84%, and the 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 71%. Liquorrhea was observed in one patient with Kadish's stage C disease (widely destroying the skull base). Most patients experienced Grade 1 to 2 dermatitis in the acute phase. No other adverse events of Grade 3 or greater were observed according to the RTOG/EORTC acute and late morbidity scoring system. Conclusions: Our preliminary results of PBT for ONB achieved excellent local control and survival outcomes without serious adverse effects. Proton-beam therapy is considered a safe and effective modality that warrants further study

  6. Journal of Proton Therapy: Call for Papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Journal of Proton Therapy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Proton Therapy (JPT is an international open access, peer-reviewed journal, which publishes original research, technical reports, reviews, case reports, editorials, and other materials on proton therapy with focus on radiation oncology, medical physics, medical dosimetry, and radiation therapy.No article processing/submission feeNo publication feePeer-review completion within 3-6 weeksImmediate publication after the completion of final author proofreadDOI assignment for each published articleFree access to published articles for all readers without any access barriers or subscriptionThe views and opinions expressed in articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the Journal of Proton Therapy.Authors are encouraged to submit articles for publication in the inaugural issue of the Journal of Proton Therapy by online or email to editor@protonjournal.comFor more information, please visit www. protonjournal.comwww. protonjournal.org **************************************Journal of Proton Therapy Welcomes Editorial Board Members Chee-Wai Cheng, PhD Dr. Cheng is the Director of Proton Medical Physics at the University Hospitals as well as Professor of Clinical Radiation Oncology at the Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.Carlos Vargas, MDDr. Vargas is a Radiation Oncologist at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona. Luca Cozzi, PhD Dr. Cozzi is a Clinical Research Scientist at the Department of Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery at Humanitas Cancer Center, Milan, Italy.Ted Ling, MD Dr. Ling is a Resident Physician at the Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California, USA.Haibo Lin, PhD Dr. Lin is a Medical Physicist at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.Xiaodong Zhang, PhD Dr. Zhang is an Associate Professor at the Department of Radiation Physics

  7. Compact superconducting 250 MeV proton cyclotron for the PSI PROSCAN proton therapy project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillo, M.; Geisler, A.; Hobl, A.; Klein, H.U.; Krischel, D.; Meyer-Reumers, M.; Piel, C.; Blosser, H.; Kim, J.-W.; Marti, F.; Vincent, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Beijers, J.P.M.

    2001-01-01

    A cyclotron for proton therapy has to fulfill many requirements set by the specific operational and safety needs of a medical facility and the medical environment. These are for instance high extraction efficiency, high availability and reliability, simple and robust operation. ACCEL Instruments GmbH has refined the design concept of a medical cyclotron for the PSI PROSCAN project with the objective to use this cyclotron as the standard accelerator in complete proton therapy facilities, which ACCEL intends to market. Starting from the design, we have carried out further detail clarifications, optimizations and adaptations to the needs of PSI. The work was performed in a collaboration between ACCEL, NSCL and KVI in view of the requirements from the PSI PROSCAN project. An overview on the design will be given touching on subjects such as the 3D structural analysis of the coil, detailed magnetic modeling for optimization of the inner region and the spiral, optimization of the RF power, optimization of the cryogenic design based on available cryocoolers instead of a liquefaction plant and Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the heat balance produced by neutrons at 4K components

  8. SU-F-T-163: Improve Proton Therapy Efficiency: Report of a Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Flanz, J [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mah, D [Procure Treatment Center, Somerset, NJ (United States); Pankuch, M; Kreydick, B [Northwestern Medicine Proton Center, Warrenville, IL (United States); Beltran, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Robison, B; Schreuder, A [Provision Healthcare Partners, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The technology of proton therapy, especially the pencil beam scanning technique, is evolving very quickly. However, the efficiency of proton therapy seems to lag behind conventional photon therapy. The purpose of the abstract is to report on the findings of a workshop on improvement of QA, planning and treatment efficiency in proton therapy. Methods: A panel of physicists, clinicians, and vendor representatives from over 18 institutions in the United States and internationally were convened in Knoxville, Tennessee in November, 2015. The panel discussed several topics on how to improve proton therapy efficiency, including 1) lean principle and failure mode and effects analysis, 2) commissioning and machine QA, 3) treatment planning, optimization and evaluation, 4) patient positioning and IGRT, 5) vendor liaison and machine availability, and 6) staffing, education and training. Results: The relative time needed for machine QA, treatment planning & check in proton therapy was found to range from 1 to 2.5 times of that in photon therapy. Current status in proton QA, planning and treatment was assessed. Key areas for efficiency improvement, such as elimination of unnecessary QA items or steps and development of efficient software or hardware tools, were identified. A white paper to summarize our findings is being written. Conclusion: It is critical to improve efficiency by developing reliable proton beam lines, efficient software tools on treatment planning, optimization and evaluation, and dedicated proton QA device. Conscious efforts and collaborations from both industry leaders and proton therapy centers are needed to achieve this goal and further advance the technology of proton therapy.

  9. High gradient linac for proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Benedetti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Proposed for the first time almost 30 years ago, the research on radio frequency linacs for hadron therapy experienced a sparkling interest in the past decade. The different projects found a common ground on a relatively high rf operating frequency of 3 GHz, taking advantage of the availability of affordable and reliable commercial klystrons at this frequency. This article presents for the first time the design of a proton therapy linac, called TULIP all-linac, from the source up to 230 MeV. In the first part, we will review the rationale of linacs for hadron therapy. We then divided this paper in two main sections: first, we will discuss the rf design of the different accelerating structures that compose TULIP; second, we will present the beam dynamics design of the different linac sections.

  10. Proton Therapy Coverage for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos; Wagner, Marcus; Mahajan, Chaitali; Indelicato, Daniel; Fryer, Amber; Falchook, Aaron; Horne, David C.; Chellini, Angela; McKenzie, Craig C.; Lawlor, Paula C.; Li Zuofeng; Lin Liyong; Keole, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of prostate motion on dose coverage in proton therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 prostate positions were analyzed on 10 treatment plans for 10 prostate patients treated using our low-risk proton therapy prostate protocol (University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute 001). Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging T 2 -weighted turbo spin-echo scans were registered for all cases. The planning target volume included the prostate with a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superoinferior expansion. The prostate was repositioned using 5- and 10-mm one-dimensional vectors and 10-mm multidimensional vectors (Points A-D). The beam was realigned for the 5- and 10-mm displacements. The prescription dose was 78 Gy equivalent (GE). Results: The mean percentage of rectum receiving 70 Gy (V 70 ) was 7.9%, the bladder V 70 was 14.0%, and the femoral head/neck V 50 was 0.1%, and the mean pelvic dose was 4.6 GE. The percentage of prostate receiving 78 Gy (V 78 ) with the 5-mm movements changed by -0.2% (range, 0.006-0.5%, p > 0.7). However, the prostate V 78 after a 10-mm displacement changed significantly (p 78 coverage had a large and significant reduction of 17.4% (range, 13.5-17.4%, p 78 coverage of the clinical target volume. The minimal prostate dose was reduced 33% (25.8 GE), on average, for Points A-D. The prostate minimal dose improved from 69.3 GE to 78.2 GE (p < 0.001) with realignment for 10-mm movements. Conclusion: The good dose coverage and low normal doses achieved for the initial plan was maintained with movements of ≤5 mm. Beam realignment improved coverage for 10-mm displacements

  11. From 2D to 3D: Proton Radiography and Proton CT in proton therapy: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; van Goethem, M.-J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, Aleksandra

    (1) Purpose In order to reduce the uncertainty in translation of the X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) image into a map of proton stopping powers (3-4% and even up to 10% in regions containing bones [1-8]), proton radiography is being studied as an alternative imaging technique in proton therapy. We

  12. Optimization of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsubo, Masaaki

    1990-01-01

    In radiotherapy, dose optimization is to give adequate dose uniformly over target volume and minimize the dose to normal and adjacent critical organs. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze dose distribution in detail. This paper presents a method for quantitatively assessing treatment planning by analysis of dose distribution. For this purpose, several parameters were introduced, such as D T, min (minimum target absorbed dose), NUF (nonuniformity factor), volume rate of damaged lung and spinal cord, R T/T (ratio of target volume to treatment volume), LE (local efficiency), integral dose, etc. And some criteria were made using these parameters, and were applied to evaluate various plans in external beam radiation therapy for lung and esophagus cancer. In these parameters, NUF was especially useful to obtain three-dimensional dose information of target volume, and value of NUF was in agreement with the information provided by dose volume histogram. AP-PA parallel opposed fields technique was inferior in D T,min and NUF. In lung cancer, there was no spinal cord injury in oblique parallel opposed fields technique, and this technique is particularly useful when target volume is in posterior. In these two techniques, R T/T was small and hot spots were frequently observed. R T/T was largest in oblique wedged two-fields technique, but this technique was inferior in D T, min and NUF. About D T, min and NUF, four fields technique was the best, but in this technique spinal cord complication often occurred in case that target volume was in the middle. In moving beam technique (360deg rotation or arc), integral dose is large, and the more target volume is in posterior, the more often spinal cord complication occurs. In esophageal cancer, three fields technique was the best to avoid spinal cord injury. It seems that this method is very useful for optimization in radiation treatment planning. (author)

  13. Principles and Reality of Proton Therapy Treatment Allocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Asch, David A. [Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); The Wharton School and Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Tochner, Zelig [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Friedberg, Joseph [Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vaughn, David J. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rash, Ellen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Raksowski, Kevin [Department of Internal Medicine, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To present the principles and rationale of the Proton Priority System (PROPS), a priority points framework that assigns higher scores to patients thought to more likely benefit from proton therapy, and the distribution of PROPS scores by patient characteristics Methods and Materials: We performed multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between PROPS scores and receipt of proton therapy, adjusted for insurance status, gender, race, geography, and the domains that inform the PROPS score. Results: Among 1529 adult patients considered for proton therapy prioritization during our Center's ramp-up phase of treatment availability, PROPS scores varied by age, diagnosis, site, and other PROPS domains. In adjusted analyses, receipt of proton therapy was lower for patients with non-Medicare relative to Medicare health insurance (commercial vs Medicare: adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.64; managed care vs Medicare: OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.28-0.56; Medicaid vs Medicare: OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.13-0.44). Proton Priority System score and age were not significantly associated with receipt of proton therapy. Conclusions: The Proton Priority System is a rationally designed and transparent system for allocation of proton therapy slots based on the best available evidence and expert opinion. Because the actual allocation of treatment slots depends mostly on insurance status, payers may consider incorporating PROPS, or its underlying principles, into proton therapy coverage policies.

  14. Principles and Reality of Proton Therapy Treatment Allocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Asch, David A.; Tochner, Zelig; Friedberg, Joseph; Vaughn, David J.; Rash, Ellen; Raksowski, Kevin; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present the principles and rationale of the Proton Priority System (PROPS), a priority points framework that assigns higher scores to patients thought to more likely benefit from proton therapy, and the distribution of PROPS scores by patient characteristics Methods and Materials: We performed multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between PROPS scores and receipt of proton therapy, adjusted for insurance status, gender, race, geography, and the domains that inform the PROPS score. Results: Among 1529 adult patients considered for proton therapy prioritization during our Center's ramp-up phase of treatment availability, PROPS scores varied by age, diagnosis, site, and other PROPS domains. In adjusted analyses, receipt of proton therapy was lower for patients with non-Medicare relative to Medicare health insurance (commercial vs Medicare: adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.64; managed care vs Medicare: OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.28-0.56; Medicaid vs Medicare: OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.13-0.44). Proton Priority System score and age were not significantly associated with receipt of proton therapy. Conclusions: The Proton Priority System is a rationally designed and transparent system for allocation of proton therapy slots based on the best available evidence and expert opinion. Because the actual allocation of treatment slots depends mostly on insurance status, payers may consider incorporating PROPS, or its underlying principles, into proton therapy coverage policies

  15. Properties of the proton therapy. A high precision radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    The proton therapy is a radiotherapy using protons beams. The protons present interesting characteristics but they need heavy technologies to be used, such particles accelerators, radiation protection wall and sophisticated technologies to reach the high precision allowed by their ballistic qualities (planning of treatment, beam conformation and patient positioning). (N.C.)

  16. The proton therapy system for Massachusetts General Hospital's Northeast Proton Therapy Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In 1989, two companies, Ion Beam Applications in Belgium (IBA) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries in Japan (SHI) started to design proton therapy equipments based on cyclotrons. In 1991, SHI and IBA decided to join their development efforts in this field. In 1993, the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), pioneer in the field of proton therapy, launched an international request for proposals for the procurement of an in-hospital proton therapy facility. The 18 may 1994, the contract was signed with a team of industries led by IBA, including also SHI and General Atomics (GA) of California. The proposed system is based on a fixed energy, isochronous cyclotron, followed by an energy degrader and an energy selection system. The variable energy beam can be rapidly switched in any one of three treatment rooms. Two rooms are equipped with large isocentric gantries and robotic patient positioners allowing to direct the proton beam within the patient from any direction. The third room is equipped with fixed horizontal beam. The complete system is computer controlled by a distributed network of computers, programmable logic controllers and workstations. This computer control allows to change the energy in one treatment room is less than two second, a performance matching or exceeding the flexibility offered by synchrotrons. The system is now built and undergoing factory tests. The beam has been accelerated to full energy in the cyclotron, and beam extraction tests are underway. Installation in the hospital building will take place in 1997. (author)

  17. The Indiana University proton radiation therapy project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, C.; Derenchuk, V.; Cameron, J.; Fasano, M.; Gilmore, J.; Hashemian, R.; Hornback, N.; Low, D.A.; Morphis, J.; Peterson, C.; Rosselot, D.; Sandison, G.; Shen, R.N.; Shidnia, H.

    1993-01-01

    A fixed horizontal beam line at the Indiana University cyclotron facility (IUCF) has been equipped for proton radiation therapy treatment of head, neck, and brain tumors. The complete system will be commissioned and ready to treat patients early in 1993. IUCF can produce external proton beams from 45 to 200 MeV in energy, which corresponds to a maximum range in water of 26 cm. Beam currents over 100 nA are easily attained, allowing dose rates in excess of 200 cGy/min, even for large fields. Beam spreading systems have been tested which provide uniform fields up to 20 cm in diameter. Range modulation is accomplished with a rotating acrylic device, which provides uniform depth dose distributions from 3 to 18 cm in extent. Tests have been conducted on detectors which monitor the beam position and current, and the dose symmetry. This report discusses those devices, as well as the cyclotron characteristics, measured beam properties, safety interlocks, computerized dose delivery/monitoring system, and future plans. (orig.)

  18. Pitfalls of tungsten multileaf collimator in proton beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States) and Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center (Formerly Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    due to {sup 179}Ta with a half-life of 1.82 yr and thus require prolonged storage for activity cooling. The H*(10) near the patient side of the tungsten block is about 100 {mu}Sv/h and is 27 times higher at the upstream side of the block. This would lead to an accumulated dose for therapists in a year that may exceed occupational maximum permissible dose (50 mSv/yr). The value of H*(10) at the upstream surface of the tungsten block is about 220 times higher than that of the brass. Conclusions: MLC is an efficient way for beam shaping and overall cost reduction device in proton therapy. However, based on this study, tungsten seems to be not an optimal material for MLC in proton beam therapy. Usage of tungsten MLC in clinic may create unnecessary risks associated with the secondary neutrons and induced radioactivity for patients and staff depending on the patient load. A careful selection of material for manufacturing of an optimal MLC for proton therapy is thus desired.

  19. Acromegaly said to respond to proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, C.A.

    1988-02-12

    A news article is presented which discusses a new use for proton therapy. As physicians and physicists continue to refine the clinical applications for charged particles, they can point to at least one notable success story: the treatment of acromegaly, a disorder that afflicts an estimated 250 persons in the United States each year. Bernard Kliman, MD, reported at the annual Endocrine Society meeting in Indianapolis that his group at Harvard Medical School, Boston, and the Harvard cyclotron has cured 479 (85.5%) of 560 patients with acromegaly or gigantism. Cure is defined as reducing growth hormone level to less than 5 ..mu..g/L and shrinking the soft tissue growth characteristic of the disease.

  20. Acromegaly said to respond to proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    A news article is presented which discusses a new use for proton therapy. As physicians and physicists continue to refine the clinical applications for charged particles, they can point to at least one notable success story: the treatment of acromegaly, a disorder that afflicts an estimated 250 persons in the United States each year. Bernard Kliman, MD, reported at the annual Endocrine Society meeting in Indianapolis that his group at Harvard Medical School, Boston, and the Harvard cyclotron has cured 479 (85.5%) of 560 patients with acromegaly or gigantism. Cure is defined as reducing growth hormone level to less than 5 μg/L and shrinking the soft tissue growth characteristic of the disease

  1. Synchrotron accelerator technology for proton beam therapy with high accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramoto, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Proton beam therapy was applied at the beginning to head and neck cancers, but it is now extended to prostate, lung and liver cancers. Thus the need for a pencil beam scanning method is increasing. With this method radiation dose concentration property of the proton beam will be further intensified. Hitachi group has supplied a pencil beam scanning therapy system as the first one for M. D. Anderson Hospital in United States, and it has been operational since May 2008. Hitachi group has been developing proton therapy system to correspond high-accuracy proton therapy to concentrate the dose in the diseased part which is located with various depths, and which sometimes has complicated shape. The author described here on the synchrotron accelerator technology that is an important element for constituting the proton therapy system. (K.Y.)

  2. Proton Therapy for Skull Base Chordomas: An Outcome Study from the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Deraniyagala, Rohan L.; Yeung, Daniel; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Okunieff, Paul; Malyapa, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Skull base chordoma is a rare, locally aggressive tumor located adjacent to critical structures. Gross total resection is difficult to achieve, and proton therapy has the conformal advantage of delivering a high postoperative dose to the tumor bed. We present our experience using proton therapy to treat 33 patients with skull base chordomas.

  3. Radiobiology of Proton Therapy - Results of an international expert workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin; von Neubeck, Cläre; Pawelke, Jörg

    2018-01-01

    The physical properties of proton beams offer the potential to reduce toxicity in tumor-adjacent normal tissues. Toward this end, the number of proton radiotherapy facilities has steeply increased over the last 10-15 years to currently around 70 operational centers worldwide. However, taking full...... in proton therapy combined with systemic treatments, and (4) testing biological effects of protons in clinical trials. Finally, important research avenues for improvement of proton radiotherapy based on radiobiological knowledge are identified. The clinical distribution of radiobiological effectiveness...... of protons alone or in combination with systemic chemo- or immunotherapies as well as patient stratification based on biomarker expressions are key to reach the full potential of proton beam therapy. Dedicated preclinical experiments, innovative clinical trial designs, and large high-quality data...

  4. New superconducting cyclotron driven scanning proton therapy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Hans-Udo; Baumgarten, Christian; Geisler, Andreas; Heese, Juergen; Hobl, Achim; Krischel, Detlef; Schillo, Michael; Schmidt, Stefan; Timmer, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Since one and a half decades ACCEL is investing in development and engineering of state of the art particle-therapy systems. A new medical superconducting 250 MeV proton cyclotron with special focus on the present and future beam requirements of fast scanning treatment systems has been designed. The first new ACCEL medical proton cyclotron is under commissioning at PSI for their PROSCAN proton therapy facility having undergone successful factory tests especially of the closed loop cryomagnetic system. The second cyclotron is part of ACCEL's integrated proton therapy system for Europe's first clinical center, RPTC in Munich. The cyclotron, the energy selection system, the beamline as well as the four gantries and patient positioners have been installed. The scanning system and major parts of the control software have already been tested. We will report on the concept of ACCEL's superconducting cyclotron driven scanning proton therapy systems and the current status of the commissioning work at PSI and RPTC

  5. Spot-Scanning Proton Arc (SPArc) Therapy: The First Robust and Delivery-Efficient Spot-Scanning Proton Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Xuanfeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, J. Michele; Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Stevens, Craig; Yan, Di

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel robust and delivery-efficient spot-scanning proton arc (SPArc) therapy technique. Methods and Materials: A SPArc optimization algorithm was developed that integrates control point resampling, energy layer redistribution, energy layer filtration, and energy layer resampling. The feasibility of such a technique was evaluated using sample patients: 1 patient with locally advanced head and neck oropharyngeal cancer with bilateral lymph node coverage, and 1 with a nonmobile lung cancer. Plan quality, robustness, and total estimated delivery time were compared with the robust optimized multifield step-and-shoot arc plan without SPArc optimization (Arc_m_u_l_t_i_-_f_i_e_l_d) and the standard robust optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan. Dose-volume histograms of target and organs at risk were analyzed, taking into account the setup and range uncertainties. Total delivery time was calculated on the basis of a 360° gantry room with 1 revolutions per minute gantry rotation speed, 2-millisecond spot switching time, 1-nA beam current, 0.01 minimum spot monitor unit, and energy layer switching time of 0.5 to 4 seconds. Results: The SPArc plan showed potential dosimetric advantages for both clinical sample cases. Compared with IMPT, SPArc delivered 8% and 14% less integral dose for oropharyngeal and lung cancer cases, respectively. Furthermore, evaluating the lung cancer plan compared with IMPT, it was evident that the maximum skin dose, the mean lung dose, and the maximum dose to ribs were reduced by 60%, 15%, and 35%, respectively, whereas the conformity index was improved from 7.6 (IMPT) to 4.0 (SPArc). The total treatment delivery time for lung and oropharyngeal cancer patients was reduced by 55% to 60% and 56% to 67%, respectively, when compared with Arc_m_u_l_t_i_-_f_i_e_l_d plans. Conclusion: The SPArc plan is the first robust and delivery-efficient proton spot-scanning arc therapy technique, which could potentially be

  6. Spot-Scanning Proton Arc (SPArc) Therapy: The First Robust and Delivery-Efficient Spot-Scanning Proton Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Xuanfeng, E-mail: Xuanfeng.ding@beaumont.org; Li, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, J. Michele; Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Stevens, Craig; Yan, Di

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To present a novel robust and delivery-efficient spot-scanning proton arc (SPArc) therapy technique. Methods and Materials: A SPArc optimization algorithm was developed that integrates control point resampling, energy layer redistribution, energy layer filtration, and energy layer resampling. The feasibility of such a technique was evaluated using sample patients: 1 patient with locally advanced head and neck oropharyngeal cancer with bilateral lymph node coverage, and 1 with a nonmobile lung cancer. Plan quality, robustness, and total estimated delivery time were compared with the robust optimized multifield step-and-shoot arc plan without SPArc optimization (Arc{sub multi-field}) and the standard robust optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan. Dose-volume histograms of target and organs at risk were analyzed, taking into account the setup and range uncertainties. Total delivery time was calculated on the basis of a 360° gantry room with 1 revolutions per minute gantry rotation speed, 2-millisecond spot switching time, 1-nA beam current, 0.01 minimum spot monitor unit, and energy layer switching time of 0.5 to 4 seconds. Results: The SPArc plan showed potential dosimetric advantages for both clinical sample cases. Compared with IMPT, SPArc delivered 8% and 14% less integral dose for oropharyngeal and lung cancer cases, respectively. Furthermore, evaluating the lung cancer plan compared with IMPT, it was evident that the maximum skin dose, the mean lung dose, and the maximum dose to ribs were reduced by 60%, 15%, and 35%, respectively, whereas the conformity index was improved from 7.6 (IMPT) to 4.0 (SPArc). The total treatment delivery time for lung and oropharyngeal cancer patients was reduced by 55% to 60% and 56% to 67%, respectively, when compared with Arc{sub multi-field} plans. Conclusion: The SPArc plan is the first robust and delivery-efficient proton spot-scanning arc therapy technique, which could potentially be implemented

  7. PROTON RADIATION THERAPY: CLINICAL APPLICATION OPPORTUNITIES AND RESEARCH PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Zabelin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the review of literature concerning use of proton beam therapy in treatment of oncology. The staticized data on comparison of effi ciency of this method at an eye melanoma are lit. Advantages of proton therapy on the level of local control and depression of frequency of development of the radio induced cataract are refl ected in the provided data. In evident material the technology of preparation and carrying out radiation of an eye is shortly covered with a fascicle of protons. The experience of use of proton therapy of tumors of a skull base got for the last several decades, showed good results. Physical properties of a fascicle of protons allow to achieve the maximum dose conformality, having lowered, thereby, a radial load on the next crucial anatomical structures. The presented material on an oncopediatrics shows insuffi cient knowledge of scientists concerning advantage of a fascicle of protons over modern methods of photon radiation. There are only preliminary clinical results concerning generally of treatment of cranyopharyngiomas. At cancer therapy of a mammary gland, proton therapy showed the best local control of postoperative recurrent tumors, and also depression of a dose load on the contralateral party. The available results of the retrospective analysis of clinical data in the University medical center of Lome Linda, testify to advantages of proton therapy of the localized prostate cancer. The lack of a biochemical recurrence and a local tumoral progression within 5 years after radiation was shown. The data obtained from experience of use of proton radiation therapy with passively scattered fascicle for cancer therapy of a prostate at an early stage showed the admixed results in comparison with modern methods of radiation therapy with the modulated intensity. In treatment of non-small cell cancer of mild advantage of proton therapy aren’t absolutely proved yet. There are data on extreme toxicity of a combination

  8. Fabrication and optimization of a fiber-optic radiation sensor for proton beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, K.W.; Yoo, W.J.; Seo, J.K.; Heo, J.Y.; Moon, J.; Park, J.-Y.; Hwang, E.J.; Shin, D.; Park, S.-Y.; Cho, H.-S.; Lee, B.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor for proton therapy dosimetry and measured the output and the peak-to-plateau ratio of scintillation light with various kinds of organic scintillators in order to select an organic scintillator appropriate for measuring the dose of a proton beam. For the optimization of an organic scintillator, the linearity between the light output and the stopping power of a proton beam was evaluated for two different diameters of the scintillator, and the angular dependency and standard deviation of the light pulses were investigated for four different scintillator lengths. We also evaluated the linearity between the light output and the dose rate and monitor units of a proton generator, respectively. The relative depth-dose curve of the proton beam was obtained and corrected using Birk's theory.

  9. Variable-Energy Cyclotron for Proton Therapy Application

    CERN Document Server

    Alenitsky, Yu G; Vorozhtsov, A S; Glazov, A A; Mytsyn, G V; Molokanov, A G; Onishchenko, L M

    2004-01-01

    The requirements to characteristics of the beams used for proton therapy are considered. The operation and proposed cyclotrons for proton therapy are briefly described. The technical decisions of creation of the cyclotron with energy variation in the range 70-230 MeV and with current up to 100 nA are estimated. Taking into account the fact, that the size and cost of the cyclotron are approximately determined by the maximum proton energy, it is realistically offered to limit the maximum proton energy to 190 MeV and to elaborate a cyclotron project with a warm winding of the magnet for acceleration of H^{-} ions. The energy of the extracted protons for each run is determined by a stripped target radius in the vacuum chamber of the accelerator, and the radiation dose field for the patient is created by the external devices using the developed techniques.

  10. Conception of a New Recoil Proton Telescope for Real-Time Neutron Spectrometry in Proton-Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Rodolphe; Arbor, Nicolas; el Bitar, Ziad; Higueret, Stéphane; Husson, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Neutrons are the main type of secondary particles emitted in proton-therapy. Because of the risk of secondary cancer and other late occurring effects, the neutron dose should be included in the out-of-field dose calculations. A neutron spectrometer has to be used to take into account the energy dependence of the neutron radiological weighting factor. Due to its high dependence on various parameters of the irradiation (beam, accelerator, patient), the neutron spectrum should be measured independently for each treatment. The current reference method for the measurement of the neutron energy, the Bonner Sphere System, consists of several homogeneous polyethylene spheres with increasing diameters equipped with a proportional counter. It provides a highresolution reconstruction of the neutron spectrum but requires a time-consuming work of signal deconvolution. New neutron spectrometers are being developed, but the main experimental limitation remains the high neutron flux in proton therapy treatment rooms. A new model of a real-time neutron spectrometer, based on a Recoil Proton Telescope technology, has been developed at the IPHC. It enables a real-time high-rate reconstruction of the neutron spectrum from the measurement of the recoil proton trajectory and energy. A new fast-readout microelectronic integrated sensor, called FastPixN, has been developed for this specific purpose. A first prototype, able to detect neutrons between 5 and 20 MeV, has already been validated for metrology with the AMANDE facility at Cadarache. The geometry of the new Recoil Proton Telescope has been optimized via extensive Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. Uncertainty sources have been carefully studied in order to improve simultaneously efficiency and energy resolution, and solutions have been found to suppress the various expected backgrounds. We are currently upgrading the prototype for secondary neutron detection in proton therapy applications.

  11. Registration and planning of radiotherapy and proton therapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bausse, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Within the frame of an update and renewal project, the Orsay Proton Therapy Centre of the Curie Institute (IPCO) renews its software used for the treatment of patients by proton therapy, a radiotherapy technique which uses proton beams. High energies used in these treatments and the precision provided by proton particle characteristics require a more precise patient positioning than conventional radiotherapy: proton therapy requires a precision of about a millimetre. Thus, markers are placed on the skull which are generally well accepted by patients, but are a problem in the case of paediatric treatment, notably for the youngest children whose skull is still growing. The first objective of this research is thus to use only intrinsic information from X-ray images used when positioning the patient. A second objective is to make the new software (TPS Isogray) perfectly compatible with IPCO requirements by maintaining the strengths of the previous TPS (Treatment Planning System) and being prepared to the implementation of a new installation. After a presentation of the context and state of the art in radiotherapy and patient positioning, the author proposes an overview of 2D registration methods, presents a new method for 2x2D registration, and addresses the problem of 3D registration. Then, after a presentation of proton therapy, the author addresses different specific issues and aspects: the compensator (simulation, calculation, and tests), dose calculation, the 'Pencil-Beam' algorithm, tests, and introduced improvements [fr

  12. A proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingchang

    2001-01-01

    A scattering proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy is described. The beam is laterally spread out by a dual-ring double scattering system and collimated by a program-controlled multileaf collimator and patient specific fixed collimators. The proton range is adjusted and modulated by a program controlled binary filter and ridge filters

  13. Optimization of laser accelerated proton beams for possible applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Omari, Husam [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: LIGHT-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Optimization of transported proton beams through a pulsed solenoid in the laser proton experiment LIGHT at GSI has been studied numerically. TraceWin, SRIM and ATIMA codes were employed for this study with an initial distribution generated by MATLAB program fitted to Phelix measured data. Two individual tools have been used to produce protons beam as a later beam source: an aperture located at the solenoid focal spot as energy selection tool; and a scattering foil at a suitable position in the beam path that smoothens the simulated radial energy imprint on the beam profile. The simulation results show that the proton energy spectrum is filtered by the aperture and the radial energy correlation is smoothened.

  14. Development of dosimetry tools for proton therapy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Dogyun

    2010-01-01

    Dosimetry tools for proton therapy research have been developed to measure the properties of a therapeutic proton beam. A CCD camera-scintillation screen system, which can verify the 2D dose distribution of a scanning beam and can be used for proton radiography, was developed. Also developed were a large area parallel-plate ionization chamber and a multi-layer Faraday cup to monitor the beam current and to measure the beam energy, respectively. To investigate the feasibility of locating the distal dose falloff in real time during patient treatment, a prompt gamma measuring system composed of multi-layer shielding structures was then devised. The system worked well for a pristine proton beam. However, correlation between the distal dose falloff and the prompt gamma distribution was blurred by neutron background for a therapy beam formed by scattering method. We have also worked on the design of a Compton camera to image the 2D distribution of prompt gamma rays.

  15. Estimation dose of secondary neutrons in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, T.

    2014-01-01

    Most of proton therapy centers for cancer treatment are still based on the passive scattering, in some of them there is system of the active scanning installed as well. The aim of this study is to compare secondary neutron doses in and around target volumes in proton therapy for both treatment techniques and for different energies and profile of incident proton beam. The proton induced neutrons have been simulated in the very simple geometry of tissue equivalent phantom (imitate the patient) and scattering and scanning nozzle, respectively. In simulations of the scattering nozzle, different types of scattering filters and brass collimators have been used as well. 3D map of neutron doses in and around the chosen/potential target volume in the phantom/patient have been evaluated and compared in the context of the dose deposited in the target volume. Finally, the simulation results have been compared with published data. (author)

  16. WE-D-BRB-02: Proton Treatment Planning and Beam Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankuch, M. [Northwestern Medicine Proton Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  17. Proton beam characterization in the experimental room of the Trento Proton Therapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, F.; Rovituso, M.; Fabiano, S.; Piffer, S.; Manea, C.; Lorentini, S.; Lanzone, S.; Wang, Z.; Pasini, M.; Burger, W. J.; La Tessa, C.; Scifoni, E.; Schwarz, M.; Durante, M.

    2017-10-01

    As proton therapy is becoming an established treatment methodology for cancer patients, the number of proton centres is gradually growing worldwide. The economical effort for building these facilities is motivated by the clinical aspects, but might be also supported by the potential relevance for the research community. Experiments with high-energy protons are needed not only for medical physics applications, but represent also an essential part of activities dedicated to detector development, space research, radiation hardness tests, as well as of fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics. Here we present the characterization of the beam line installed in the experimental room of the Trento Proton Therapy Centre (Italy). Measurements of beam spot size and envelope, range verification and proton flux were performed in the energy range between 70 and 228 MeV. Methods for reducing the proton flux from typical treatments values of 106-109 particles/s down to 101-105 particles/s were also investigated. These data confirm that a proton beam produced in a clinical centre build by a commercial company can be exploited for a broad spectrum of experimental activities. The results presented here will be used as a reference for future experiments.

  18. Proton-counting radiography for proton therapy: a proof of principle using CMOS APS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poludniowski, G; Esposito, M; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Anaxagoras, T; Green, S; Parker, D J; Price, T; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the early recognition of the potential of proton imaging to assist proton therapy (Cormack 1963 J. Appl. Phys. 34 2722), the modality is still removed from clinical practice, with various approaches in development. For proton-counting radiography applications such as computed tomography (CT), the water-equivalent-path-length that each proton has travelled through an imaged object must be inferred. Typically, scintillator-based technology has been used in various energy/range telescope designs. Here we propose a very different alternative of using radiation-hard CMOS active pixel sensor technology. The ability of such a sensor to resolve the passage of individual protons in a therapy beam has not been previously shown. Here, such capability is demonstrated using a 36 MeV cyclotron beam (University of Birmingham Cyclotron, Birmingham, UK) and a 200 MeV clinical radiotherapy beam (iThemba LABS, Cape Town, SA). The feasibility of tracking individual protons through multiple CMOS layers is also demonstrated using a two-layer stack of sensors. The chief advantages of this solution are the spatial discrimination of events intrinsic to pixelated sensors, combined with the potential provision of information on both the range and residual energy of a proton. The challenges in developing a practical system are discussed. (paper)

  19. Proton-counting radiography for proton therapy: a proof of principle using CMOS APS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Anaxagoras, T; Esposito, M; Green, S; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J; Parker, D J; Price, T; Evans, P M

    2014-06-07

    Despite the early recognition of the potential of proton imaging to assist proton therapy (Cormack 1963 J. Appl. Phys. 34 2722), the modality is still removed from clinical practice, with various approaches in development. For proton-counting radiography applications such as computed tomography (CT), the water-equivalent-path-length that each proton has travelled through an imaged object must be inferred. Typically, scintillator-based technology has been used in various energy/range telescope designs. Here we propose a very different alternative of using radiation-hard CMOS active pixel sensor technology. The ability of such a sensor to resolve the passage of individual protons in a therapy beam has not been previously shown. Here, such capability is demonstrated using a 36 MeV cyclotron beam (University of Birmingham Cyclotron, Birmingham, UK) and a 200 MeV clinical radiotherapy beam (iThemba LABS, Cape Town, SA). The feasibility of tracking individual protons through multiple CMOS layers is also demonstrated using a two-layer stack of sensors. The chief advantages of this solution are the spatial discrimination of events intrinsic to pixelated sensors, combined with the potential provision of information on both the range and residual energy of a proton. The challenges in developing a practical system are discussed.

  20. Proton therapy analysis using the Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshad, Houshyar [Center for Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, AEOI, P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: hnoshad@aeoi.org.ir; Givechi, Nasim [Islamic Azad University, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-10-01

    The range and straggling data obtained from the transport of ions in matter (TRIM) computer program were used to determine the trajectories of monoenergetic 60 MeV protons in muscle tissue by using the Monte Carlo technique. The appropriate profile for the shape of a proton pencil beam in proton therapy as well as the dose deposited in the tissue were computed. The good agreements between our results as compared with the corresponding experimental values are presented here to show the reliability of our Monte Carlo method.

  1. Algorithms for optimizing drug therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lene

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug therapy has become increasingly efficient, with more drugs available for treatment of an ever-growing number of conditions. Yet, drug use is reported to be sub optimal in several aspects, such as dosage, patient's adherence and outcome of therapy. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibility to optimize drug therapy using computer programs, available on the Internet. Methods One hundred and ten officially endorsed text documents, published between 1996 and 2004, containing guidelines for drug therapy in 246 disorders, were analyzed with regard to information about patient-, disease- and drug-related factors and relationships between these factors. This information was used to construct algorithms for identifying optimum treatment in each of the studied disorders. These algorithms were categorized in order to define as few models as possible that still could accommodate the identified factors and the relationships between them. The resulting program prototypes were implemented in HTML (user interface and JavaScript (program logic. Results Three types of algorithms were sufficient for the intended purpose. The simplest type is a list of factors, each of which implies that the particular patient should or should not receive treatment. This is adequate in situations where only one treatment exists. The second type, a more elaborate model, is required when treatment can by provided using drugs from different pharmacological classes and the selection of drug class is dependent on patient characteristics. An easily implemented set of if-then statements was able to manage the identified information in such instances. The third type was needed in the few situations where the selection and dosage of drugs were depending on the degree to which one or more patient-specific factors were present. In these cases the implementation of an established decision model based on fuzzy sets was required. Computer programs

  2. TU-G-BRCD-01: Will the High Cost of Proton Therapy Facilities Limit the Availability of Proton Therapy Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, R

    2012-06-01

    The potential dose distribution advantages associated with proton therapy, and particularly with pencil beam scanning (PBS) techniques, have lead to considerable interest in this modality in recent years. However, the large capital expenditure necessary for such a project requires careful financial consideration and business planning. The complexity of the beam delivery systems impacts the capital expenditure and the PBS only systems presently being advocated can reduce these costs. Also several manufacturers are considering "one-room" facilities as less expensive alternatives to multi-room facilities. This presentation includes a brief introduction to beam delivery options (passive scattering, uniform and modulated scanning) and some of the new technologies proposed for providing less expensive proton therapy systems. Based on current experience, data on proton therapy center start-up costs, running costs and the financial challenges associated with making this highly conformal therapy more widely available will be discussed. Issues associated with proton therapy implementation that are key to project success include strong project management, vendor cooperation and collaboration, staff recruitment and training. Time management during facility start up is a major concern, particularly in multi-room systems, where time must be shared between continuing vendor system validation, verification and acceptance testing, and user commissioning and patient treatments. The challenges associated with facility operation during this period and beyond are discussed, focusing on how standardization of process, downtime and smart scheduling can influence operational efficiency. 1. To understand the available choices for proton therapy facilities, the different beam delivery systems and the financial implications associated with these choices. 2. To understand the key elements necessary for successfully implementing a proton therapy program. 3. To understand the challenges

  3. Proton linac for hospital-based fast neutron therapy and radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, A.J.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Swenson, D.A.; Winje, R.A.; Young, D.E.

    1989-09-01

    Recent developments in linac technology have led to the design of a hospital-based proton linac for fast neutron therapy. The 180 microamp average current allows beam to be diverted for radioisotope production during treatments while maintaining an acceptable dose rate. During dedicated operation, dose rates greater than 280 neutron rads per minute are achievable at depth, DMAX = 1.6 cm with source to axis distance, SAD = 190 cm. Maximum machine energy is 70 MeV and several intermediate energies are available for optimizing production of isotopes for Positron Emission Tomography and other medical applications. The linac can be used to produce a horizontal or a gantry can be added to the downstream end of the linac for conventional patient positioning. The 70 MeV protons can also be used for proton therapy for ocular melanomas. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  4. Proton Conductive Channel Optimization in Methanol Resistive Hybrid Hyperbranched Polyamide Proton Exchange Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on a previously developed polyamide proton conductive macromolecule, the nano-scale structure of the self-assembled proton conductive channels (PCCs is adjusted via enlarging the nano-scale pore size within the macromolecules. Hyperbranched polyamide macromolecules with different size are synthesized from different monomers to tune the nano-scale pore size within the macromolecules, and a series of hybrid membranes are prepared from these two micromoles to optimize the PCC structure in the proton exchange membrane. The optimized membrane exhibits methanol permeability low to 2.2 × 10−7 cm2/s, while the proton conductivity of the hybrid membrane can reach 0.25 S/cm at 80 °C, which was much higher than the value of the Nafion 117 membrane (0.192 S/cm. By considering the mechanical, dimensional, and the thermal properties, the hybrid hyperbranched polyamide proton exchange membrane (PEM exhibits promising application potential in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC.

  5. Proton therapy with spot scanning: the Rinecker Proton Therapy Center in Munich. Part 2: Technical and physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchert, H. J.; Mayr, M.; Schneider, R. A.; Arnold, M. R.; Geismar, D. E.; Wilms, M.; Wisser, L.; Herbst, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Rinecker Proton Therapy Center (RPTC) in Munich is about to introduce into clinical radiation therapy, a 2D scanning technique (spot scanning) of a single proton pencil beam. It will be available at four gantries and a fifth treatment room allocates a fixed beam unit for a scattering technique. A superconducting cyclotron extracts protons with a constant energy of 250 MeV. Far upstream of the patient follows modulation of the energy with a degrader according to the prescription of the patients treatment planning. A 10 mm pencil beam at full width of half maximum (FWHM) will enable scanning of individual tumour volumes at any depth i.e. 1 minute for a target volume of 1 litre and a dose of 2 Gy. Innovative solutions will be established for other important issues such as dosimetric monitoring, safety concepts and positioning of the patient. The physical characteristics of proton beam spot scanning offer exceptional possibilities in conformal radiation therapy. Together with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) it significantly improves the sparing of organs at risk and of healthy tissues. (author)

  6. Margins for treatment planning of proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Simon J

    2006-01-01

    For protons and other charged particles, the effect of set-up errors on the position of isodoses is considerably less in the direction of the incident beam than it is laterally. Therefore, the margins required between the clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) can be less in the direction of the incident beam than laterally. Margins have been calculated for a typical head plan and a typical prostate plan, for a single field, a parallel opposed and a four-field arrangement of protons, and compared with margins calculated for photons, assuming identical geometrical uncertainties for each modality. In the head plan, where internal motion was assumed negligible, the CTV-PTV margin reduced from approximately 10 mm to 3 mm in the axial direction for the single field and parallel opposed plans. For a prostate plan, where internal motion cannot be ignored, the corresponding reduction in margin was from 11 mm to 7 mm. The planning organ at risk (PRV) margin in the axial direction reduced from 6 mm to 2 mm for the head plan, and from 7 mm to 4 mm for the prostate plan. No reduction was seen on the other axes, or for any axis of the four-field plans. Owing to the shape of proton dose distributions, there are many clinical cases in which good dose distributions can be obtained with one or two fields. When this is done, it is possible to use smaller PTV and PRV margins. This has the potential to convert untreatable cases, in which the PTV and PRV overlap, into cases with a gap between PTV and PRV of adequate size for treatment planning

  7. WE-D-BRB-04: Clinical Applications of CBCT for Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, B. [University of Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  8. WE-D-BRB-03: Current State of Volumetric Image Guidance for Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, C. [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  9. WE-D-BRB-04: Clinical Applications of CBCT for Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, B.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  10. WE-D-BRB-03: Current State of Volumetric Image Guidance for Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, C.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this session is to review the physics of proton therapy, treatment planning techniques, and the use of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. The course material covers the physics of proton interaction with matter and physical characteristics of clinical proton beams. It will provide information on proton delivery systems and beam delivery techniques for double scattering (DS), uniform scanning (US), and pencil beam scanning (PBS). The session covers the treatment planning strategies used in DS, US, and PBS for various anatomical sites, methods to address uncertainties in proton therapy and uncertainty mitigation to generate robust treatment plans. It introduces the audience to the current status of image guided proton therapy and clinical applications of CBCT for proton therapy. It outlines the importance of volumetric imaging in proton therapy. Learning Objectives: Gain knowledge in proton therapy physics, and treatment planning for proton therapy including intensity modulated proton therapy. The current state of volumetric image guidance equipment in proton therapy. Clinical applications of CBCT and its advantage over orthogonal imaging for proton therapy. B. Teo, B.K Teo had received travel funds from IBA in 2015.

  11. Proton linacs for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, A.J.

    1993-08-01

    Recent advances in the ability to deliver boron-containing drugs to brain tumors have generated interest in ∼4 MeV linacs as sources of epithermal neutrons for radiation therapy. In addition, fast neutron therapy facilities have been studying methods to moderate their beams to take advantage of the high cross section for epithermal neutrons on boron-10. This paper describes the technical issues involved in each approach and presents the motivation for undertaking such studies using the Fermilab linac. the problems which must be solved before therapy can begin are outlined. Status of preparatory work and results of preliminary measurements are presented

  12. An end-to-end assessment of range uncertainty in proton therapy using animal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Kang, Yixiu; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Niek

    2016-11-01

    Accurate assessment of range uncertainty is critical in proton therapy. However, there is a lack of data and consensus on how to evaluate the appropriate amount of uncertainty. The purpose of this study is to quantify the range uncertainty in various treatment conditions in proton therapy, using transmission measurements through various animal tissues. Animal tissues, including a pig head, beef steak, and lamb leg, were used in this study. For each tissue, an end-to-end test closely imitating patient treatments was performed. This included CT scan simulation, treatment planning, image-guided alignment, and beam delivery. Radio-chromic films were placed at various depths in the distal dose falloff region to measure depth dose. Comparisons between measured and calculated doses were used to evaluate range differences. The dose difference at the distal falloff between measurement and calculation depends on tissue type and treatment conditions. The estimated range difference was up to 5, 6 and 4 mm for the pig head, beef steak, and lamb leg irradiation, respectively. Our study shows that the TPS was able to calculate proton range within about 1.5% plus 1.5 mm. Accurate assessment of range uncertainty in treatment planning would allow better optimization of proton beam treatment, thus fully achieving proton beams’ superior dose advantage over conventional photon-based radiation therapy.

  13. Beam Phase Detection for Proton Therapy Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, Bachtior; Getta, Markus; Kolesov, Sergej; Pupeter, Nico; Stephani, Thomas; Timmer, J

    2005-01-01

    The industrial application of proton cyclotrons for medical applications has become one of the important contributions of accelerator physics during the last years. This paper describes an advanced vector demodulating technique used for non-destructive measurements of beam intensity and beam phase over 360°. A computer controlled I/Q-based phase detector with a very large dynamic range of 70 dB permits the monitoring of beam intensity, phase and eventually energy for wide range of beam currents down to -130 dBm. In order to avoid interference from the fundamental cyclotron frequency the phase detection is performed at the second harmonic frequency. A digital low pass filter with adjustable bandwidth and steepness is implemented to improve accuracy. With a sensitivity of the capacitive pickup in the beam line of 30 nV per nA of proton beam current at 250 MeV, accurate phase and intensity measurements can be performed with beam currents down to 3.3 nA.

  14. Non-invasive anesthesia for children undergoing proton radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owusu-Agyemang, Pascal; Grosshans, David; Arunkumar, Radha; Rebello, Elizabeth; Popovich, Shannon; Zavala, Acsa; Williams, Cynthia; Ruiz, Javier; Hernandez, Mike; Mahajan, Anita; Porche, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proton therapy is a newer modality of radiotherapy during which anesthesiologists face specific challenges related to the setup and duration of treatment sessions. Purpose: Describe our anesthesia practice for children treated in a standalone proton therapy center, and report on complications encountered during anesthesia. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of anesthetic records for patients ⩽18 years of age treated with proton therapy at our institution between January 2006 and April 2013 was performed. Results: A total of 9328 anesthetics were administered to 340 children with a median age of 3.6 years (range, 0.4–14.2). The median daily anesthesia time was 47 min (range, 15–79). The average time between start of anesthesia to the start of radiotherapy was 7.2 min (range, 1–83 min). All patients received Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) with spontaneous ventilation, with 96.7% receiving supplemental oxygen by non-invasive methods. None required daily endotracheal intubation. Two episodes of bradycardia, and one episode each of; seizure, laryngospasm and bronchospasm were identified for a cumulative incidence of 0.05%. Conclusions: In this large series of children undergoing proton therapy at a freestanding center, TIVA without daily endotracheal intubation provided a safe, efficient, and less invasive option of anesthetic care

  15. Proton therapy of hormone-secreting hypophyseal adenomas: gluconeogenesis assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konnova, L.A.; Konnov, B.A.; Mel'nikov, L.A.; Lebedeva, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of blood plasma aminograms of patients with hormone secreting hypophyseal adenomas (somatotropinomas and prolactinomas), that were obtained before and after a course of proton therapy, has confirmed the gluconeogenic effect of hypophyseal hormones and evidenced the relationship between this effect and dismetabolism of some amino acids

  16. Dosimetric Considerations to Determine the Optimal Technique for Localized Prostate Cancer Among External Photon, Proton, or Carbon-Ion Therapy and High-Dose-Rate or Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, Dietmar; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Gòra, Joanna; Kuess, Peter; Kragl, Gabriele; Berger, Daniel; Hegazy, Neamat; Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), scanned proton therapy (intensity-modulated proton therapy, IMPT), scanned carbon-ion therapy (intensity-modulated carbon-ion therapy, IMIT), and low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were considered for this planning study. For external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), planning target volume was created by adding a margin of 5 mm (lateral/anterior–posterior) and 8 mm (superior–inferior) to the clinical target volume. Bladder wall (BW), rectal wall (RW), femoral heads, urethra, and pelvic tissue were considered as organs at risk. For VMAT and IMPT, 78 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE)/2 Gy were prescribed. The IMIT was based on 66 Gy(RBE)/20 fractions. The clinical target volume planning aims for HDR-BT ( 192 Ir) and LDR-BT ( 125 I) were D 90% ≥34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction and D 90% ≥145 Gy. Both physical and RBE-weighted dose distributions for protons and carbon-ions were converted to dose distributions based on 2-Gy(IsoE) fractions. From these dose distributions various dose and dose–volume parameters were extracted. Results: Rectal wall exposure 30-70 Gy(IsoE) was reduced for IMIT, LDR-BT, and HDR-BT when compared with VMAT and IMPT. The high-dose region of the BW dose–volume histogram above 50 Gy(IsoE) of IMPT resembled the VMAT shape, whereas all other techniques showed a significantly lower high-dose region. For all 3 EBRT techniques similar urethra D mean around 74 Gy(IsoE) were obtained. The LDR-BT results were approximately 30 Gy(IsoE) higher, HDR-BT 10 Gy(IsoE) lower. Normal tissue and femoral head sparing was best with BT. Conclusion: Despite the different EBRT prescription and fractionation schemes, the high-dose regions of BW and RW expressed in Gy(IsoE) were on the same order of magnitude. Brachytherapy techniques were clearly superior in

  17. Dosimetric Considerations to Determine the Optimal Technique for Localized Prostate Cancer Among External Photon, Proton, or Carbon-Ion Therapy and High-Dose-Rate or Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, Dietmar, E-mail: Dietmar.Georg@akhwien.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hopfgartner, Johannes [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Gòra, Joanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kuess, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Kragl, Gabriele [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Berger, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hegazy, Neamat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Goldner, Gregor; Georg, Petra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/Allgemeines Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), scanned proton therapy (intensity-modulated proton therapy, IMPT), scanned carbon-ion therapy (intensity-modulated carbon-ion therapy, IMIT), and low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were considered for this planning study. For external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), planning target volume was created by adding a margin of 5 mm (lateral/anterior–posterior) and 8 mm (superior–inferior) to the clinical target volume. Bladder wall (BW), rectal wall (RW), femoral heads, urethra, and pelvic tissue were considered as organs at risk. For VMAT and IMPT, 78 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE)/2 Gy were prescribed. The IMIT was based on 66 Gy(RBE)/20 fractions. The clinical target volume planning aims for HDR-BT ({sup 192}Ir) and LDR-BT ({sup 125}I) were D{sub 90%} ≥34 Gy in 8.5 Gy per fraction and D{sub 90%} ≥145 Gy. Both physical and RBE-weighted dose distributions for protons and carbon-ions were converted to dose distributions based on 2-Gy(IsoE) fractions. From these dose distributions various dose and dose–volume parameters were extracted. Results: Rectal wall exposure 30-70 Gy(IsoE) was reduced for IMIT, LDR-BT, and HDR-BT when compared with VMAT and IMPT. The high-dose region of the BW dose–volume histogram above 50 Gy(IsoE) of IMPT resembled the VMAT shape, whereas all other techniques showed a significantly lower high-dose region. For all 3 EBRT techniques similar urethra D{sub mean} around 74 Gy(IsoE) were obtained. The LDR-BT results were approximately 30 Gy(IsoE) higher, HDR-BT 10 Gy(IsoE) lower. Normal tissue and femoral head sparing was best with BT. Conclusion: Despite the different EBRT prescription and fractionation schemes, the high-dose regions of BW and RW expressed in Gy(IsoE) were on the same order of magnitude. Brachytherapy techniques

  18. TH-CD-209-10: Scanning Proton Arc Therapy (SPArc) - The First Robust and Delivery-Efficient Spot Scanning Proton Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, X; Li, X; Zhang, J; Kabolizadeh, P; Stevens, C; Yan, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a delivery-efficient proton spot-scanning arc therapy technique with robust plan quality. Methods: We developed a Scanning Proton Arc(SPArc) optimization algorithm integrated with (1)Control point re-sampling by splitting control point into adjacent sub-control points; (2)Energy layer re-distribution by assigning the original energy layers to the new sub-control points; (3)Energy layer filtration by deleting low MU weighting energy layers; (4)Energy layer re-sampling by sampling additional layers to ensure the optimal solution. A bilateral head and neck oropharynx case and a non-mobile lung target case were tested. Plan quality and total estimated delivery time were compared to original robust optimized multi-field step-and-shoot arc plan without SPArc optimization (Arcmulti-field) and standard robust optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy(IMPT) plans. Dose-Volume-Histograms (DVH) of target and Organ-at-Risks (OARs) were analyzed along with all worst case scenarios. Total delivery time was calculated based on the assumption of a 360 degree gantry room with 1 RPM rotation speed, 2ms spot switching time, beam current 1nA, minimum spot weighting 0.01 MU, energy-layer-switching-time (ELST) from 0.5 to 4s. Results: Compared to IMPT, SPArc delivered less integral dose(−14% lung and −8% oropharynx). For lung case, SPArc reduced 60% of skin max dose, 35% of rib max dose and 15% of lung mean dose. Conformity Index is improved from 7.6(IMPT) to 4.0(SPArc). Compared to Arcmulti-field, SPArc reduced number of energy layers by 61%(276 layers in lung) and 80%(1008 layers in oropharynx) while kept the same robust plan quality. With ELST from 0.5s to 4s, it reduced 55%–60% of Arcmulti-field delivery time for the lung case and 56%–67% for the oropharynx case. Conclusion: SPArc is the first robust and delivery-efficient proton spot-scanning arc therapy technique which could be implemented in routine clinic. For modern proton machine with ELST close

  19. Dosimetric intercomparison between protons and electrons therapies applied to retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Flavia Vieira

    2008-01-01

    In this work we propose a construction of a simple human eye model in order to simulate the dosimetric response for a treatment with protons and electrons in a retinoblastoma cancer. The computational tool used in this simulation was the Geant4 code, in the version 4.9.1, all these package are free and permit simulate the interaction of radiation with matter. In our simulation we use a box with 4 cm side, with water, for represent the human eye. The simulation was performed considering mono energetics beams of protons and electrons with energy range between 50 and 70 MeV for protons and 2 and 10 MeV for electrons. The simulation was based on the advanced hadron therapy example of the Geant 4 code. In these example the phantom is divided in voxels with 0.2 mm side and it is generated the energy deposited in each voxel. The simulation results show the energy deliver in each voxel, with these energie we can calculate the dose deposited in that region. We can see the dose profile of, proton and electron, and we can see in both cases that for protons the position of delivered dose is well know, that happen in the position where the proton stop, for electrons the energies is delivered along the way and pass the desired position for high dose deposition. (author)

  20. Preliminary design of a dedicated proton therapy linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.W.; Crandall, K.R.; Potter, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary design has been completed for a low current, compact proton linac dedicated to cancer therapy. A 3 GHz side-coupled structure accelerates the beam from a 70 MeV drift tube linac using commercially available S-band rf power systems and accelerating cavities. This significantly reduces the linac cost and allows incremental energies up to 250 MeV. The short beam pulse width and high repetition rate make the linac similar to the high energy electron linacs now used for cancer therapy, yet produce a proton flux sufficient for treatment of large tumors. The high pulse repetition rate permits raster scanning, and the small output beam size and emittance result in a compact isocentric gantry design. Such a linac will reduce the facility and operating costs for a dedicated cancer therapy system

  1. Intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated protons: a Monte Carlo dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourkal, E; Li, J S; Xiong, W; Nahum, A; Ma, C-M

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo studies of intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated proton beams. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. Through the introduction of a spectrometer-like particle selection system that delivers small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra it is feasible to use laser-accelerated protons for intensity modulated radiotherapy. The method presented in this paper is a three-dimensional modulation in which the proton energy spectrum and intensity of each individual beamlet are modulated to yield a homogeneous dose in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. As an evaluation of the efficacy of this method, it has been applied to two prostate cases using a variety of beam arrangements. We have performed a comparison study between intensity modulated photon plans and those for laser-accelerated protons. For identical beam arrangements and the same optimization parameters, proton plans exhibit superior coverage of the target and sparing of neighbouring critical structures. Dose-volume histogram analysis of the resulting dose distributions shows up to 50% reduction of dose to the critical structures. As the number of fields is decreased, the proton modality exhibits a better preservation of the optimization requirements on the target and critical structures. It is shown that for a two-beam arrangement (parallel-opposed) it is possible to achieve both superior target coverage with 5% dose inhomogeneity within the target and excellent sparing of surrounding tissue

  2. Clinical results of proton beam therapy for skull base chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igaki, Hiroshi; Tokuuye, Koichi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kagei, Kenji; Hata, Masaharu; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tsuboi, Koji; Takano, Shingo; Matsumura, Akira; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical results of proton beam therapy for patients with skull base chordoma. Methods and materials: Thirteen patients with skull base chordoma who were treated with proton beams with or without X-rays at the University of Tsukuba between 1989 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. A median total tumor dose of 72.0 Gy (range, 63.0-95.0 Gy) was delivered. The patients were followed for a median period of 69.3 months (range, 14.6-123.4 months). Results: The 5-year local control rate was 46.0%. Cause-specific, overall, and disease-free survival rates at 5 years were 72.2%, 66.7%, and 42.2%, respectively. The local control rate was higher, without statistical significance, for those with preoperative tumors <30 mL. Partial or subtotal tumor removal did not yield better local control rates than for patients who underwent biopsy only as the latest surgery. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy is effective for patients with skull base chordoma, especially for those with small tumors. For a patient with a tumor of <30 mL with no prior treatment, biopsy without tumor removal seems to be appropriate before proton beam therapy

  3. Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Isakoff, Steven J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods.

  4. Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea; Specht, Michelle; Isakoff, Steven J.; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods

  5. Proton radiation therapy for clivus chordoma; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Tsunoda, Takashi; Hyodo, Akio; Nose, Tadao [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Inada, Tetsuo; Maruhashi, Akira; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    1993-03-01

    A 57-year-old male with clival chordoma developed severe hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysphonia 1 month after a second removal of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass 10 cm in diameter in the region of the middle clivus enhanced inhomogeneously by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, and a defect in the skull base. There was evidence of compression of the anterior surface of the pons. He received proton irradiation employing a pair of parallel opposed lateral proton beams. The dose aimed at the tumor mass was 75.5 Gy, to the pharyngeal wall less than 38 Gy, and to the anterior portion of the pons less than 30 Gy. Time dose and fractionation factor was calculated at 148. Thirty-one months following treatment, he was free of clinical neurological sequelae. Proton therapy should be considered in treatment planning following initial surgical removal or for inoperable clivus chordoma. (author).

  6. Outcomes of Proton Therapy for the Treatment of Uveal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamran, Sophia C.; Collier, John M.; Lane, Anne Marie; Kim, Ivana; Niemierko, Andrzej; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Munzenrider, John E.; Gragoudas, Evangelos; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Radiation therapy can be used to treat uveal metastases with the goal of local control and improvement of quality of life. Proton therapy can be used to treat uveal tumors efficiently and with expectant minimization of normal tissue injury. Here, we report the use of proton beam therapy for the management of uveal metastases. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was made of all patients with uveal metastases treated at our institution with proton therapy between June 2002 and June 2012. Patient and tumor characteristics, fractionation and dose schemes, local control, and toxicities are reported. Results: Ninety patients were identified. Of those, 13 were excluded because of missing information. We report on 77 patients with 99 affected eyes with available data. Patients were 68% female, and the most common primary tumor was breast carcinoma (49%). The median age at diagnosis of uveal metastasis was 57.9 years. Serous retinal detachment was seen in 38% of treated eyes. The median follow-up time was 7.7 months. The median dose delivered to either eye was 20 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) in 2 fractions. Local control was 94%. The median survival after diagnosis of uveal metastases was 12.3 months (95% confidence interval, 7.7-16.8). Death in all cases was secondary to systemic disease. Radiation vasculopathy, measured decreased visual acuity, or both was observed in 50% of evaluable treated eyes. The actuarial rate of radiation vasculopathy, measured decreased visual acuity, or both was 46% at 6 months and 73% at 1 year. The 6 eyes with documented local failure were successfully salvaged with retreatment. Conclusions: Proton therapy is an effective and efficient means of treating uveal metastases. Acutely, the majority of patients experience minor adverse effects. For longer-term survivors, the risk of retinal injury with vision loss increases significantly over the first year

  7. Outcomes of Proton Therapy for the Treatment of Uveal Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Sophia C. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Collier, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lane, Anne Marie; Kim, Ivana [Retina Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin E.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Munzenrider, John E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gragoudas, Evangelos [Retina Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Radiation therapy can be used to treat uveal metastases with the goal of local control and improvement of quality of life. Proton therapy can be used to treat uveal tumors efficiently and with expectant minimization of normal tissue injury. Here, we report the use of proton beam therapy for the management of uveal metastases. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was made of all patients with uveal metastases treated at our institution with proton therapy between June 2002 and June 2012. Patient and tumor characteristics, fractionation and dose schemes, local control, and toxicities are reported. Results: Ninety patients were identified. Of those, 13 were excluded because of missing information. We report on 77 patients with 99 affected eyes with available data. Patients were 68% female, and the most common primary tumor was breast carcinoma (49%). The median age at diagnosis of uveal metastasis was 57.9 years. Serous retinal detachment was seen in 38% of treated eyes. The median follow-up time was 7.7 months. The median dose delivered to either eye was 20 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) in 2 fractions. Local control was 94%. The median survival after diagnosis of uveal metastases was 12.3 months (95% confidence interval, 7.7-16.8). Death in all cases was secondary to systemic disease. Radiation vasculopathy, measured decreased visual acuity, or both was observed in 50% of evaluable treated eyes. The actuarial rate of radiation vasculopathy, measured decreased visual acuity, or both was 46% at 6 months and 73% at 1 year. The 6 eyes with documented local failure were successfully salvaged with retreatment. Conclusions: Proton therapy is an effective and efficient means of treating uveal metastases. Acutely, the majority of patients experience minor adverse effects. For longer-term survivors, the risk of retinal injury with vision loss increases significantly over the first year.

  8. The proton therapy nozzles at Samsung Medical Center: A Monte Carlo simulation study using TOPAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Kim, Jinsung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Ahn, Sunghwan; Han, Youngyih

    2015-07-01

    To expedite the commissioning process of the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC), we have developed a Monte Carlo simulation model of the proton therapy nozzles by using TOol for PArticle Simulation (TOPAS). At SMC proton therapy center, we have two gantry rooms with different types of nozzles: a multi-purpose nozzle and a dedicated scanning nozzle. Each nozzle has been modeled in detail following the geometry information provided by the manufacturer, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. For this purpose, the novel features of TOPAS, such as the time feature or the ridge filter class, have been used, and the appropriate physics models for proton nozzle simulation have been defined. Dosimetric properties, like percent depth dose curve, spreadout Bragg peak (SOBP), and beam spot size, have been simulated and verified against measured beam data. Beyond the Monte Carlo nozzle modeling, we have developed an interface between TOPAS and the treatment planning system (TPS), RayStation. An exported radiotherapy (RT) plan from the TPS is interpreted by using an interface and is then translated into the TOPAS input text. The developed Monte Carlo nozzle model can be used to estimate the non-beam performance, such as the neutron background, of the nozzles. Furthermore, the nozzle model can be used to study the mechanical optimization of the design of the nozzle.

  9. Estimated radiation pneumonitis risk after photon versus proton therapy alone or combined with chemotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Westerly, David C; Aznar, Marianne Camille

    2011-01-01

    Background. Traditionally, radiation therapy plans are optimized without consideration of chemotherapy. Here, we model the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in the presence of a possible interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution. Material and methods. Three alternative......-radiation combinations could be an interesting indication for selecting patients for proton therapy. It is likely that the IMRT plans would perform better if the CERD was accounted for during optimization, but more clinical data is required to facilitate evidence-based plan optimization in the multi-modality setting....... treatment plans are compared in 18 non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy; the tomotherapy plan, an intensity modulated proton therapy plan (IMPT) and a three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan. All plans are optimized without consideration...

  10. Definitive proton beam radiation therapy for inoperable gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Susumu; Takase, Yasuhiro; Aoyagi, Hiroyuki; Orii, Kazuo; Sharma, N.; Iwasaki, Yoji; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsujii, Hiroshi.

    1991-01-01

    Proton beam radiation therapy using 250 MeV protons was carried out on two patients with early gastric cancer (T1, N0, M0). One patient was an 85-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIa + IIc. The other one was a 70-year-old man with early gastric cancer of type IIc. In both cases histological examination of biopsy specimens showed differential adenocarcinoma; distant metastasis was not found by other examinations. Both patients were considered inoperable due to their poor cardiac and/or respiratory functions. Therefore, it was decided to treat them by definitive proton irradiation, delivering total doses of 86 Gy and 83 Gy, respectively. In both patients, skin erythema that did not require any special treatment was found in the irradiation field. Hematobiological examinations did not show any abnormality. Although endoscopic examination at two years after irradiation in the former case and at seven months in the latter case showed persistent gastric ulcer at the site of the cancerous lesions, cancer cells were not found histologically. Therefore, we concluded that proton irradiation therapy was useful for inoperable early gastric cancers. (author)

  11. Feasibility of using laser ion accelerators in proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S V

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of using the laser plasma as a source of the high-energy ions for the proton radiation therapy is discussed. The proposal is based on the recent inventions of the effective ions acceleration in the experiments and through numerical modeling of the powerful laser radiation interaction with the gaseous and solid state targets. The principal peculiarity of the dependence of the protons energy losses in the tissues (the Bragg peak of losses) facilities the solution of one of the most important problems of the radiation therapy, which consists in realizing the tumor irradiation by sufficiently high and homogeneous dose with simultaneous minimization of the irradiation level, relative to the healthy and neighbouring tissues and organs

  12. Proton therapy in ophthalmology: status report and problems encountered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvel, P.; Iborra-Brassart, N.; Courdi, A.; Herault, J.; Teissier, E.; Pignol, J.P.; Bondiau, P.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The proton therapy facility of the Centre Antoine-Lacassagne in Nice began of ocular tumors in June 1991. Up to October 1995, a total number of 600 patients were treated. An overview of the cases treated during the first 4 years of activity is given and the main problems encountered in the field, possibly interacting with the accuracy and reliability of the dose distribution, are listed. (author)

  13. A method to select aperture margin in collimated spot scanning proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R; Gelover, Edgar; Flynn, Ryan T; Hyer, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    The use of collimator or aperture may sharpen the lateral dose gradient for spot scanning proton therapy. However, to date, there has not been a standard method to determine the aperture margin for a single field in collimated spot scanning proton therapy. This study describes a theoretical framework to select the optimal aperture margin for a single field, and also presents the spot spacing limit required such that the optimal aperture margin exists. Since, for a proton pencil beam partially intercepted by collimator, the maximum point dose (spot center) shifts away from the original pencil beam central axis, we propose that the optimal margin should be equal to the maximum pencil beam center shift under the condition that spot spacing is small with respect to the maximum pencil beam center shift, which can be numerically determined based on beam modeling data. A test case is presented which demonstrates agreement with the prediction made based on the proposed methods. When apertures are applied in a commercial treatment planning system this method may be implemented. (note)

  14. WE-FG-BRB-01: Clinical Significance of RBE Variations in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganetti, H. [Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The physical pattern of energy deposition and the enhanced relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons and carbon ions compared to photons offer unique and not fully understood or exploited opportunities to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy. Variations in RBE within a pristine or spread out Bragg peak and between particle types may be exploited to enhance cell killing in target regions without a corresponding increase in damage to normal tissue structures. In addition, the decreased sensitivity of hypoxic tumors to photon-based therapies may be partially overcome through the use of more densely ionizing radiations. These and other differences between particle and photon beams may be used to generate biologically optimized treatments that reduce normal tissue complications. In this symposium, speakers will examine the impact of the RBE of charged particles on measurable biological endpoints, treatment plan optimization, and the prediction or retrospective assessment of treatment outcomes. In particular, an AAPM task group was formed to critically examine the evidence for a spatially-variant RBE in proton therapy. Current knowledge of proton RBE variation with respect to dose, biological endpoint, and physics parameters will be reviewed. Further, the clinical relevance of these variations will be discussed. Recent work focused on improving simulations of radiation physics and biological response in proton and carbon ion therapy will also be presented. Finally, relevant biology research and areas of research needs will be highlighted, including the dependence of RBE on genetic factors including status of DNA repair pathways, the sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, the role of charged particles in hypoxic tumors, and the importance of fractionation effects. In addition to the physical advantages of protons and more massive ions over photons, the future application of biologically optimized treatment plans and their potential to

  15. Proposed parameters for a circular particle accelerator for proton beam therapy obtained by genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Gustavo L.; Campos, Tarcísio P.R.

    2017-01-01

    This paper brings to light optimized proposal for a circular particle accelerator for proton beam therapy purposes (named as ACPT). The methodology applied is based on computational metaheuristics based on genetic algorithms (GA) were used to obtain optimized parameters of the equipment. Some fundamental concepts in the metaheuristics developed in Matlab® software will be presented. Four parameters were considered for the proposed modeling for the equipment, being: potential difference, magnetic field, length and radius of the resonant cavity. As result, this article showed optimized parameters for two ACPT, one of them used for ocular radiation therapy, as well some parameters that will allow teletherapy, called in order ACPT - 65 and ACPT - 250, obtained through metaheuristics based in GA. (author)

  16. Proposed parameters for a circular particle accelerator for proton beam therapy obtained by genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Gustavo L.; Campos, Tarcísio P.R., E-mail: gustavo.lobato@ifmg.edu.br, E-mail: tprcampos@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: gustavo.lobato@ifmg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    This paper brings to light optimized proposal for a circular particle accelerator for proton beam therapy purposes (named as ACPT). The methodology applied is based on computational metaheuristics based on genetic algorithms (GA) were used to obtain optimized parameters of the equipment. Some fundamental concepts in the metaheuristics developed in Matlab® software will be presented. Four parameters were considered for the proposed modeling for the equipment, being: potential difference, magnetic field, length and radius of the resonant cavity. As result, this article showed optimized parameters for two ACPT, one of them used for ocular radiation therapy, as well some parameters that will allow teletherapy, called in order ACPT - 65 and ACPT - 250, obtained through metaheuristics based in GA. (author)

  17. Hospital-based proton linear accelerator for particle therapy and radioisotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    1991-05-01

    Taking advantage of recent advances in linear accelerator technology, it is possible for a hospital to use a 70 MeV proton linac for fast neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy, proton therapy for ocular melanomas, and production of radiopharmaceuticals. The linac can also inject protons into a synchrotron for proton therapy of deep-seated tumors. With 180 μA average current, a single linac can support all these applications. This paper presents a conceptual design for a medical proton linac, switchyard, treatment rooms, and isotope production rooms. Special requirements for each application are outlined and a layout for sharing beam among the applications is suggested.

  18. Rethinking the Combination of Proton Exchanger Inhibitors in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iessi, Elisabetta; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Mizzoni, Davide; Di Raimo, Rossella; Supuran, Claudiu T; Fais, Stefano

    2017-12-23

    Microenvironmental acidity is becoming a key target for the new age of cancer treatment. In fact, while cancer is characterized by genetic heterogeneity, extracellular acidity is a common phenotype of almost all cancers. To survive and proliferate under acidic conditions, tumor cells up-regulate proton exchangers and transporters (mainly V-ATPase, Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger (NHE), monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), and carbonic anhydrases (CAs)), that actively extrude excess protons, avoiding intracellular accumulation of toxic molecules, thus becoming a sort of survival option with many similarities compared with unicellular microorganisms. These systems are also involved in the unresponsiveness or resistance to chemotherapy, leading to the protection of cancer cells from the vast majority of drugs, that when protonated in the acidic tumor microenvironment, do not enter into cancer cells. Indeed, as usually occurs in the progression versus malignancy, resistant tumor clones emerge and proliferate, following a transient initial response to a therapy, thus giving rise to more malignant behavior and rapid tumor progression. Recent studies are supporting the use of a cocktail of proton exchanger inhibitors as a new strategy against cancer.

  19. Proton therapy for prostate cancer online: patient education or marketing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Daniel J; Ellimoottil, Chandy S; Tejwani, Ajay; Gorbonos, Alex

    2013-12-01

    Proton therapy (PT) for prostate cancer is an expensive treatment with limited evidence of benefit over conventional radiotherapy. We sought to study whether online information on PT for prostate cancer was balanced and whether the website source influenced the content presented. We applied a systematic search process to identify 270 weblinks associated with PT for prostate cancer, categorized the websites by source, and filtered the results to 50 websites using predetermined criteria. We then used a customized version of the DISCERN instrument, a validated tool for assessing the quality of consumer health information, to evaluate the remaining websites for balance of content and description of risks, benefits and uncertainty. Depending on the search engine and key word used, proton center websites (PCWs) made up 10%-47% of the first 30 encountered links. In comparison, websites from academic and nonacademic medical centers without ownership stake in proton centers appeared much less frequently as a search result (0%-3%). PCWs scored lower on DISCERN questions compared to other sources for being balanced/unbiased (p online information regarding PT for prostate cancer may represent marketing by proton centers rather than comprehensive and unbiased patient education. An awareness of these results will also better prepare clinicians to address the potential biases of patients with prostate cancer who search the Internet for health information.

  20. Monitoring proton radiation therapy with in-room PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xuping; Ouyang Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Espana, Samuel; Daartz, Juliane; Liebsch, Norbert; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    We used a mobile positron emission tomography (PET) scanner positioned within the proton therapy treatment room to study the feasibility of proton range verification with an in-room, stand-alone PET system, and compared with off-line equivalent studies. Two subjects with adenoid cystic carcinoma were enrolled into a pilot study in which in-room PET scans were acquired in list-mode after a routine fractionated treatment session. The list-mode PET data were reconstructed with different time schemes to generate in-room short, in-room long and off-line equivalent (by skipping coincidences from the first 15 min during the list-mode reconstruction) PET images for comparison in activity distribution patterns. A phantom study was followed to evaluate the accuracy of range verification for different reconstruction time schemes quantitatively. The in-room PET has a higher sensitivity compared to the off-line modality so that the PET acquisition time can be greatly reduced from 30 to 15 O component and lower biological washout. For soft tissue-equivalent material, the distal fall-off edge of an in-room short acquisition is deeper compared to an off-line equivalent scan, indicating a better coverage of the high-dose end of the beam. In-room PET is a promising low cost, high sensitivity modality for the in vivo verification of proton therapy. Better accuracy in Monte Carlo predictions, especially for biological decay modeling, is necessary.

  1. Proton radiation therapy for retinoblastoma: Comparison of various intraocular tumor locations and beam arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krengli, Marco; Hug, Eugen B.; Adams, Judy A.; Smith, Alfred R.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Munzenrider, John E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study the optimization of proton beam arrangements for various intraocular tumor locations; and to correlate isodose distributions with various target and nontarget structures. Methods and materials: We considered posterior-central, nasal, and temporal tumor locations, with straight, intrarotated, or extrarotated eye positions. Doses of 46 cobalt grey equivalent (CGE) to gross tumor volume (GTV) and 40 CGE to clinical target volume (CTV) (2 CGE per fraction) were assumed. Using three-dimensional planning, we compared isodose distributions for lateral, anterolateral oblique, and anteromedial oblique beams and dose-volume histograms of CTVs, GTVs, lens, lacrimal gland, bony orbit, and soft tissues. Results: All beam arrangements fully covered GTVs and CTVs with optimal lens sparing. Only 15% of orbital bone received doses ≥20 CGE with a lateral beam, with 20-26 CGE delivered to two of three growth centers. The anterolateral oblique approach with an intrarotated eye resulted in additional reduction of bony volume and exposure of only one growth center. No appreciable dose was delivered to the contralateral eye, brain tissue, or pituitary gland. Conclusions: Proton therapy achieved homogeneous target coverage with true lens sparing. Doses to orbit structures, including bony growth centers, were minimized with different beam arrangements and eye positions. Proton therapy could reduce the risks of second malignancy and cosmetic and functional sequelae

  2. Proton therapy for uveal melanomas and other eye lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munzenrider, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating intra-ocular lesions, since they can be made to deposit their dose in the target, while significantly limiting dose received by non-involved ocular and orbital structures. Proton beam treatment of large numbers of uveal melanoma patients consistently achieves local control rates in excess of 95%, and eye retention rates of approximately 90%. Visual preservation is related to initial visual acuity, tumor size and location, and dose received by the macula, disc, and lens. The probability of distant metastasis is increased by larger tumor diameter, more anterior tumor location, and older patient age. Proton therapy is also effective treatment for patients with ocular angiomas, hemangiomas, metastatic tumors, and retinoblastomas, and may be beneficial for patients with exudative ('wet') age-related macular degeneration. (orig.)

  3. Proton therapy for uveal melanomas and other eye lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J.E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Univ. Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating intra-ocular lesions, since they can be made to deposit their dose in the target, while significantly limiting dose received by non-involved ocular and orbital structures. Proton beam treatment of large numbers of uveal melanoma patients consistently achieves local control rates in excess of 95%, and eye retention rates of approximately 90%. Visual preservation is related to initial visual acuity, tumor size and location, and dose received by the macula, disc, and lens. The probability of distant metastasis is increased by larger tumor diameter, more anterior tumor location, and older patient age. Proton therapy is also effective treatment for patients with ocular angiomas, hemangiomas, metastatic tumors, and retinoblastomas, and may be beneficial for patients with exudative (`wet`) age-related macular degeneration. (orig.)

  4. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino J.; Li, Yupeng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment

  5. Strategic level proton therapy patient admission planning: a Markov decision process modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Ridvan; Zhang, Shengfan; Rainwater, Chase

    2017-06-01

    A relatively new consideration in proton therapy planning is the requirement that the mix of patients treated from different categories satisfy desired mix percentages. Deviations from these percentages and their impacts on operational capabilities are of particular interest to healthcare planners. In this study, we investigate intelligent ways of admitting patients to a proton therapy facility that maximize the total expected number of treatment sessions (fractions) delivered to patients in a planning period with stochastic patient arrivals and penalize the deviation from the patient mix restrictions. We propose a Markov Decision Process (MDP) model that provides very useful insights in determining the best patient admission policies in the case of an unexpected opening in the facility (i.e., no-shows, appointment cancellations, etc.). In order to overcome the curse of dimensionality for larger and more realistic instances, we propose an aggregate MDP model that is able to approximate optimal patient admission policies using the worded weight aggregation technique. Our models are applicable to healthcare treatment facilities throughout the United States, but are motivated by collaboration with the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute (UFPTI).

  6. Outcomes of Proton Therapy for Patients With Functional Pituitary Adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattson, Daniel A.; Tanguturi, Shyam K.; Spiegel, Daphna Y.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Biller, Beverly M.K.; Nachtigall, Lisa B.; Bussière, Marc R.; Swearingen, Brooke; Chapman, Paul H.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of proton therapy for functional pituitary adenomas (FPAs). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 165 patients with FPAs who were treated at a single institution with proton therapy between 1992 and 2012 and had at least 6 months of follow-up. All but 3 patients underwent prior resection, and 14 received prior photon irradiation. Proton stereotactic radiosurgery was used for 92% of patients, with a median dose of 20 Gy(RBE). The remainder received fractionated stereotactic proton therapy. Time to biochemical complete response (CR, defined as ≥3 months of normal laboratory values with no medical treatment), local control, and adverse effects are reported. Results: With a median follow-up time of 4.3 years (range, 0.5-20.6 years) for 144 evaluable patients, the actuarial 3-year CR rate and the median time to CR were 54% and 32 months among 74 patients with Cushing disease (CD), 63% and 27 months among 8 patients with Nelson syndrome (NS), 26% and 62 months among 50 patients with acromegaly, and 22% and 60 months among 9 patients with prolactinomas, respectively. One of 3 patients with thyroid stimulating hormone—secreting tumors achieved CR. Actuarial time to CR was significantly shorter for corticotroph FPAs (CD/NS) compared with other subtypes (P=.001). At a median imaging follow-up time of 43 months, tumor control was 98% among 140 patients. The actuarial 3-year and 5-year rates of development of new hypopituitarism were 45% and 62%, and the median time to deficiency was 40 months. Larger radiosurgery target volume as a continuous variable was a significant predictor of hypopituitarism (adjusted hazard ratio 1.3, P=.004). Four patients had new-onset postradiosurgery seizures suspected to be related to generously defined target volumes. There were no radiation-induced tumors. Conclusions: Proton irradiation is an effective treatment for FPAs, and hypopituitarism remains the primary

  7. Outcomes of Proton Therapy for Patients With Functional Pituitary Adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattson, Daniel A.; Tanguturi, Shyam K. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Spiegel, Daphna Y. [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biller, Beverly M.K.; Nachtigall, Lisa B. [Neuroendocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bussière, Marc R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Swearingen, Brooke; Chapman, Paul H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of proton therapy for functional pituitary adenomas (FPAs). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 165 patients with FPAs who were treated at a single institution with proton therapy between 1992 and 2012 and had at least 6 months of follow-up. All but 3 patients underwent prior resection, and 14 received prior photon irradiation. Proton stereotactic radiosurgery was used for 92% of patients, with a median dose of 20 Gy(RBE). The remainder received fractionated stereotactic proton therapy. Time to biochemical complete response (CR, defined as ≥3 months of normal laboratory values with no medical treatment), local control, and adverse effects are reported. Results: With a median follow-up time of 4.3 years (range, 0.5-20.6 years) for 144 evaluable patients, the actuarial 3-year CR rate and the median time to CR were 54% and 32 months among 74 patients with Cushing disease (CD), 63% and 27 months among 8 patients with Nelson syndrome (NS), 26% and 62 months among 50 patients with acromegaly, and 22% and 60 months among 9 patients with prolactinomas, respectively. One of 3 patients with thyroid stimulating hormone—secreting tumors achieved CR. Actuarial time to CR was significantly shorter for corticotroph FPAs (CD/NS) compared with other subtypes (P=.001). At a median imaging follow-up time of 43 months, tumor control was 98% among 140 patients. The actuarial 3-year and 5-year rates of development of new hypopituitarism were 45% and 62%, and the median time to deficiency was 40 months. Larger radiosurgery target volume as a continuous variable was a significant predictor of hypopituitarism (adjusted hazard ratio 1.3, P=.004). Four patients had new-onset postradiosurgery seizures suspected to be related to generously defined target volumes. There were no radiation-induced tumors. Conclusions: Proton irradiation is an effective treatment for FPAs, and hypopituitarism remains the primary

  8. Mapping {sup 15}O Production Rate for Proton Therapy Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grogg, Kira; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Zhu, Xuping [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Min, Chul Hee [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Kangwon (Korea, Republic of); Testa, Mauro; Winey, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Normandin, Marc D. [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); El Fakhri, Georges, E-mail: elfakhri@pet.mgh.harvard.edu [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: This work was a proof-of-principle study for the evaluation of oxygen-15 ({sup 15}O) production as an imaging target through the use of positron emission tomography (PET), to improve verification of proton treatment plans and to study the effects of perfusion. Methods and Materials: Dynamic PET measurements of irradiation-produced isotopes were made for a phantom and rabbit thigh muscles. The rabbit muscle was irradiated and imaged under both live and dead conditions. A differential equation was fitted to phantom and in vivo data, yielding estimates of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, which were compared to live versus dead rates for the rabbit and to Monte Carlo predictions. Results: PET clearance rates agreed with decay constants of the dominant radionuclide species in 3 different phantom materials. In 2 oxygen-rich materials, the ratio of {sup 15}O production rates agreed with the expected ratio. In the dead rabbit thighs, the dynamic PET concentration histories were accurately described using {sup 15}O decay constant, whereas the live thigh activity decayed faster. Most importantly, the {sup 15}O production rates agreed within 2% (P>.5) between conditions. Conclusions: We developed a new method for quantitative measurement of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates in the period immediately following proton therapy. Measurements in the phantom and rabbits were well described in terms of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, plus a correction for other isotopes. These proof-of-principle results support the feasibility of detailed verification of proton therapy treatment delivery. In addition, {sup 15}O clearance rates may be useful in monitoring permeability changes due to therapy.

  9. Proton Therapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma After Extrapleural Pleuropneumonectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krayenbuehl, Jerome; Hartmann, Matthias; Lomax, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To perform comparative planning for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy (PT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma after radical surgery. Methods and Materials: Eight patients treated with IMRT after extrapleural pleuropneumonectomy (EPP) were replanned for PT, comparing dose homogeneity, target volume coverage, and mean and maximal dose to organs at risk. Feasibility of PT was evaluated regarding the dose distribution with respect to air cavities after EPP. Results: Dose coverage and dose homogeneity of the planning target volume (PTV) were significantly better for PT than for IMRT regarding the volume covered by >95% (V95) for the high-dose PTV. The mean dose to the contralateral kidney, ipsilateral kidney, contralateral lung, liver, and heart and spinal cord dose were significantly reduced with PT compared with IMRT. After EPP, air cavities were common (range, 0-850 cm 3 ), decreasing from 0 to 18.5 cm 3 /day. In 2 patients, air cavity changes during RT decreased the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) in the case of using an a value of < - 10 to the PTV2 to <2 Gy in the presence of changing cavities for PT, and to 40 Gy for IMRT. Small changes were observed for gEUD of PTV1 because PTV1 was reached by the beams before air. Conclusion: Both PT and IMRT achieved good target coverage and dose homogeneity. Proton therapy accomplished additional dose sparing of most organs at risk compared with IMRT. Proton therapy dose distributions were more susceptible to changing air cavities, emphasizing the need for adaptive RT and replanning.

  10. Evaluation of the breath-hold approach in proton therapy of lung tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgisyan, Jenny

    Proton therapy has the potential to improve the treatment effect as compared to conventional radiation therapy for lung cancer patients. However, the proton therapy delivery is prone to uncertainties caused by anatomical changes and motion during the treatment and between the treatment fractions ...

  11. Early experience of proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Youjirou; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Makita, Chiyoko; Suzuki, Motohisa; Azami, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2013-01-01

    Between 2009 and 2012, 10 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer underwent proton therapy combined with chemotherapy. The initial results of this therapy were 8 complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR), local recurrence was detected 1 patient. Proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy is thought to be an effective treatment for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. (author)

  12. Alanine EPR dosimeter response in proton therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, K.; Serago, C.; Desrosiers, M.; Bensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    We report a series of measurements directed to assess the suitability of alanine as a mailable dosimeter for dosimetry quality assurance of proton radiation therapy beams. These measurements include dose-response of alanine at 140 MeV, and comparison of response vs energy with a parallel plate ionization chamber. All irradiations were made at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, and the dosimeters were read at NIST. The results encourage us that alanine could be expected to serve as a mailable dosimeter with systematic error due to differential energy response no greater than 3% when doses of 25 Gy are used. (Author)

  13. Patterns of Failure in Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma After Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vern-Gross, Tamara Z.; Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org; Bradley, Julie A.; Rotondo, Ronny L.

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To report on the patterns of failure in children with rhabdomyosarcoma treated with proton therapy. Patients and Methods: Between February 2007 and November 2013, 66 children with a median age of 4.1 years (range, 0.6-15.3 years) diagnosed with nonmetastatic rhabdomyosarcoma were treated with proton therapy. Clinical target volume 1 was defined as the prechemotherapy tumor plus a 1-cm anatomically constrained margin. Clinical target volume 2 was defined as the postchemotherapy tumor (or tumor bed) plus a 0.5-cm anatomically constrained margin, further expanded to encompass potential pathways of spread, including soft tissue infiltrated with tumor at diagnosis. Results: Of the 66 children, 11 developed locally progressive disease at a median of 16 months (range, 14-32 months), for an actuarial 2-year local control rate of 88%. Among the children who progressed, median age and tumor size at diagnosis were 6.7 years (range, 0.6-16 years) and 6 cm (range, 2-8 cm), respectively. Of the recurrences, 64% and 36% were embryonal and alveolar, respectively. Disease progression was observed in 7 (64%) parameningeal, 2 (18%) head and neck (other), and 2 (18%) bladder/prostate subsites. At diagnosis, 8 of 11 patients who developed a recurrence were Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study stage 3, and all 11 were group III. Of the relapses, 100% (11 of 11) were confirmed as in-field within the composite 95% isodose line. One of the 11 patients (9%) developed a new simultaneous regional nodal recurrence outside of the previously treated radiation field. Conclusion: Early data suggest that the sharp dosimetric gradient associated with proton therapy is not associated with an increased risk of marginal failure. Routine use of a 0.5- to 1-cm clinical target volume 1/2 margin with highly conformal proton therapy does not compromise local control in children diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma with unfavorable risk features.

  14. Conformal proton radiation therapy for pediatric low-grade astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, E.B.; Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA; Darthmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire; Muenter, M.W.; Archambeau, J.O.; DeVries, A.; Loredo, L.N.; Grove, R.I.; Slater, J.D.; Liwnicz, B.

    2002-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of proton radiation therapy (PRT) for intracranial low-grade astrocytomas, the authors analyzed the first 27 pediatric patients treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). Patients and Method: Between September 1991 and August 1997, 27 patients (13 female, 14 male) underwent fractionated proton radiation therapy for progressive or recurrent low-grade astrocytoma. Age at time of treatment ranged from 2 to 18 years (mean: 8.7 years). Tumors were located centrally (diencephatic) in 15 patients, in the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres in seven patients, and in the brainstem in five patients. 25/27 patients (92%) were treated for progressive, unresectable, or residual disease following subtotal resection. Tissue diagnosis was available in 23/27 patients (85%). Four patients with optic pathway tumors were treated without histologic confirmation. Target doses between 50.4 and 63.0 CGE (cobalt gray equivalent, mean: 55.2 CGE) were prescribed at 1.8 CGE per fraction, five treatments per week. Results: At a mean follow-up period of 3.3 years (0.6-6.8 years), 6/27 patients experienced local failure (all located within the irradiated field), and 4/27 patients had died. By anatomic site these data translated into rates of local control and survival of 87% (13/15 patients) and 93% (14/15 patients) for central tumors, 71% (5/7 patients) and 86% (6/7 patients) for hemispheric tumors, and 60% (3/5 patients) and 60% (3/5 patients) for tumors located in the brainstem. Proton radiation therapy was generally well tolerated. All children with local control maintained their performance status. One child with associated neurofibromatosis, Type 1, developed Moyamoya disease. All six patients with optic pathway tumors and useful vision maintained or improved their visual status. Conclusions: This report on pediatric low-grade astrocytomas confirms proton radiation therapy as a safe and efficacious 3-D conformal treatment

  15. Experimental validation of a Monte Carlo proton therapy nozzle model incorporating magnetically steered protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S W; Polf, J; Archambault, L; Beddar, S; Bues, M; Ciangaru, G; Smith, A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate the accuracy of a Monte Carlo calculation model of a proton magnetic beam scanning delivery nozzle developed using the Geant4 toolkit. The Monte Carlo model was used to produce depth dose and lateral profiles, which were compared to data measured in the clinical scanning treatment nozzle at several energies. Comparisons were also made between measured and simulated off-axis profiles to test the accuracy of the model's magnetic steering. Comparison of the 80% distal dose fall-off values for the measured and simulated depth dose profiles agreed to within 1 mm for the beam energies evaluated. Agreement of the full width at half maximum values for the measured and simulated lateral fluence profiles was within 1.3 mm for all energies. The position of measured and simulated spot positions for the magnetically steered beams agreed to within 0.7 mm of each other. Based on these results, we found that the Geant4 Monte Carlo model of the beam scanning nozzle has the ability to accurately predict depth dose profiles, lateral profiles perpendicular to the beam axis and magnetic steering of a proton beam during beam scanning proton therapy.

  16. Proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected CBCT image: Feasibility study for adaptive proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yang-Kyun, E-mail: ykpark@mgh.harvard.edu; Sharp, Gregory C.; Phillips, Justin; Winey, Brian A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images for the purpose of adaptive proton therapy. Methods: CBCT projection images were acquired from anthropomorphic phantoms and a prostate patient using an on-board imaging system of an Elekta infinity linear accelerator. Two previously introduced techniques were used to correct the scattered x-rays in the raw projection images: uniform scatter correction (CBCT{sub us}) and a priori CT-based scatter correction (CBCT{sub ap}). CBCT images were reconstructed using a standard FDK algorithm and GPU-based reconstruction toolkit. Soft tissue ROI-based HU shifting was used to improve HU accuracy of the uncorrected CBCT images and CBCT{sub us}, while no HU change was applied to the CBCT{sub ap}. The degree of equivalence of the corrected CBCT images with respect to the reference CT image (CT{sub ref}) was evaluated by using angular profiles of water equivalent path length (WEPL) and passively scattered proton treatment plans. The CBCT{sub ap} was further evaluated in more realistic scenarios such as rectal filling and weight loss to assess the effect of mismatched prior information on the corrected images. Results: The uncorrected CBCT and CBCT{sub us} images demonstrated substantial WEPL discrepancies (7.3 ± 5.3 mm and 11.1 ± 6.6 mm, respectively) with respect to the CT{sub ref}, while the CBCT{sub ap} images showed substantially reduced WEPL errors (2.4 ± 2.0 mm). Similarly, the CBCT{sub ap}-based treatment plans demonstrated a high pass rate (96.0% ± 2.5% in 2 mm/2% criteria) in a 3D gamma analysis. Conclusions: A priori CT-based scatter correction technique was shown to be promising for adaptive proton therapy, as it achieved equivalent proton dose distributions and water equivalent path lengths compared to those of a reference CT in a selection of anthropomorphic phantoms.

  17. Proton and heavy ion beam (charged particle therapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2003-01-01

    There are distinguished therapeutic irradiation facilities of proton and heavy ion beam in Japan. The beam, due to its physical properties, is advantageous for focusing on the lesion in the body and for reducing the exposure dose to normal tissues, relative to X-ray. This makes it possible to irradiate the target lesion with the higher dose. The present review describes physical properties of the beam, equipments for the therapeutic irradiation, the respiratory-gated irradiation system, the layer-stacking irradiation system, therapy planning, and future prospect of the therapy. More than 1,400 patients have received the therapy in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) and given a good clinical outcome. The targets are cancers of the head and neck, lung, liver, uterine and prostate, and osteosarcoma. The therapy of osteosarcoma is particularly important, which bringing about the high cure rate. Severe adverse effects are not seen with exception for the digestive tract ulcer. Many attempts like the respiratory-gated and layer-stacking systems and to shorten the therapy period to within 1 week are in progress. (N.I.)

  18. Reduction of the secondary neutron dose in passively scattered proton radiotherapy, using an optimized pre-collimator/collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J; Elliston, Carl D; Hall, Eric J; Paganetti, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy represents a potential major advance in cancer therapy. Most current proton beams are spread out to cover the tumor using passive scattering and collimation, resulting in an extra whole-body high-energy neutron dose, primarily from proton interactions with the final collimator. There is considerable uncertainty as to the carcinogenic potential of low doses of high-energy neutrons, and thus we investigate whether this neutron dose can be significantly reduced without major modifications to passively scattered proton beam lines. Our goal is to optimize the design features of a patient-specific collimator or pre-collimator/collimator assembly. There are a number of often contradictory design features, in terms of geometry and material, involved in an optimal design. For example, plastic or hybrid plastic/metal collimators have a number of advantages. We quantify these design issues, and investigate the practical balances that can be achieved to significantly reduce the neutron dose without major alterations to the beamline design or function. Given that the majority of proton therapy treatments, at least for the next few years, will use passive scattering techniques, reducing the associated neutron-related risks by simple modifications of the collimator assembly design is a desirable goal.

  19. Optimal therapy in Gaucher disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goker-Alpan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ozlem Goker-AlpanLysosomal Diseases Research and Treatment Unit, Center for Clinical Trials, O&O Alpan LLC, Springfield, VA, USAAbstract: Gaucher disease (GD, the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, presents with a wide range of symptoms of varying severity, and primarily affects the skeletal, hematologic and nervous systems. To date, the standard of care has included enzyme replacement therapy with imiglucerase. Although imiglucerase is highly effective in reversing the visceral and hematologic manifestations, skeletal disease is slow to respond, pulmonary involvement is relatively resistant, and the CNS involvement is not impacted. Because of the recent manufacturing and processing problems, the research and development of alternative therapeutics has become more pressing. The divergent phenotypes and the heterogeneity involving different organ systems implicates the involvement of several pathological processes that include enzyme deficiency, substrate accumulation, protein misfolding, and macrophage activation, that differ in each patient with GD. Thus, the therapy should be tailored individually in order to target multiple pathways that interplay in GD.Keywords: glucocerebrosidase, enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy, protein misfolding and chaperone therapy, macrophage

  20. Improving Outcomes for Esophageal Cancer using Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuong, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Yu, Jen; Badiyan, Shahed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Merrell, Kenneth W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mishra, Mark V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Li, Heng [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Lin, Steven H., E-mail: shlin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) plays an essential role in the management of esophageal cancer. Because the esophagus is a centrally located thoracic structure there is a need to balance the delivery of appropriately high dose to the target while minimizing dose to nearby critical structures. Radiation dose received by these critical structures, especially the heart and lungs, may lead to clinically significant toxicities, including pneumonitis, pericarditis, and myocardial infarction. Although technological advancements in photon RT delivery like intensity modulated RT have decreased the risk of such toxicities, a growing body of evidence indicates that further risk reductions are achieved with proton beam therapy (PBT). Herein we review the published dosimetric and clinical PBT literature for esophageal cancer, including motion management considerations, the potential for reirradiation, radiation dose escalation, and ongoing esophageal PBT clinical trials. We also consider the potential cost-effectiveness of PBT relative to photon RT.

  1. Proton-minibeam radiation therapy: A proof of concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prezado, Y. [IMNC-UMR 8165, CNRS, Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Fois, G. R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Strada provinciale Monserrato Sestu km 0.700, Monserrato, Cagliari 09042 (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This Monte Carlo simulation work aims at studying a new radiotherapy approach called proton-minibeam radiation therapy (pMBRT). The main objective of this proof of concept was the evaluation of the possible gain in tissue sparing, thanks to the spatial fractionation of the dose, which could be used to deposit higher and potentially curative doses in clinical cases where tissue tolerances are a limit for conventional methods. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations (GATE v.6) have been used as a method to calculate the ratio of the peak-to-valley doses (PVDR) for arrays of proton minibeams of 0.7 mm width and several center-to-center distances, at different depths in a water phantom. The beam penumbras were also evaluated as an important parameter for tissue sparing, for example, in the treatment of non-cancer diseases like epilepsy. Two proton energies were considered in this study: a clinically relevant energy (105 MeV) and a very high energy (1 GeV), to benefit from a reduced lateral scattering. For the latter case, an interlaced geometry was also evaluated. Results: Higher or similar PVDR than the ones obtained in x-rays minibeam radiation therapy were achieved in several pMBRT configurations. In addition, for the two energies studied, the beam penumbras are smaller than in the case of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Conclusions: The high PVDR obtained for some configurations and the small penumbras in comparison with existing radiosurgery techniques, suggest a potential gain in healthy tissue sparing in this new technique. Biological studies are warranted to assess the effects of pMBRT on both normal and tumoral tissues.

  2. Fast multipurpose Monte Carlo simulation for proton therapy using multi- and many-core CPU architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souris, Kevin, E-mail: kevin.souris@uclouvain.be; Lee, John Aldo [Center for Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, Université catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 54, 1200 Brussels, Belgium and ICTEAM Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348 (Belgium); Sterpin, Edmond [Center for Molecular Imaging and Experimental Radiotherapy, Institut de Recherche Expérimentale et Clinique, Université catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 54, 1200 Brussels, Belgium and Department of Oncology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, O& N I Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Accuracy in proton therapy treatment planning can be improved using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. However the long computation time of such methods hinders their use in clinical routine. This work aims to develop a fast multipurpose Monte Carlo simulation tool for proton therapy using massively parallel central processing unit (CPU) architectures. Methods: A new Monte Carlo, called MCsquare (many-core Monte Carlo), has been designed and optimized for the last generation of Intel Xeon processors and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. These massively parallel architectures offer the flexibility and the computational power suitable to MC methods. The class-II condensed history algorithm of MCsquare provides a fast and yet accurate method of simulating heavy charged particles such as protons, deuterons, and alphas inside voxelized geometries. Hard ionizations, with energy losses above a user-specified threshold, are simulated individually while soft events are regrouped in a multiple scattering theory. Elastic and inelastic nuclear interactions are sampled from ICRU 63 differential cross sections, thereby allowing for the computation of prompt gamma emission profiles. MCsquare has been benchmarked with the GATE/GEANT4 Monte Carlo application for homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. Results: Comparisons with GATE/GEANT4 for various geometries show deviations within 2%–1 mm. In spite of the limited memory bandwidth of the coprocessor simulation time is below 25 s for 10{sup 7} primary 200 MeV protons in average soft tissues using all Xeon Phi and CPU resources embedded in a single desktop unit. Conclusions: MCsquare exploits the flexibility of CPU architectures to provide a multipurpose MC simulation tool. Optimized code enables the use of accurate MC calculation within a reasonable computation time, adequate for clinical practice. MCsquare also simulates prompt gamma emission and can thus be used also for in vivo range verification.

  3. Fast multipurpose Monte Carlo simulation for proton therapy using multi- and many-core CPU architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souris, Kevin; Lee, John Aldo; Sterpin, Edmond

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accuracy in proton therapy treatment planning can be improved using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. However the long computation time of such methods hinders their use in clinical routine. This work aims to develop a fast multipurpose Monte Carlo simulation tool for proton therapy using massively parallel central processing unit (CPU) architectures. Methods: A new Monte Carlo, called MCsquare (many-core Monte Carlo), has been designed and optimized for the last generation of Intel Xeon processors and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. These massively parallel architectures offer the flexibility and the computational power suitable to MC methods. The class-II condensed history algorithm of MCsquare provides a fast and yet accurate method of simulating heavy charged particles such as protons, deuterons, and alphas inside voxelized geometries. Hard ionizations, with energy losses above a user-specified threshold, are simulated individually while soft events are regrouped in a multiple scattering theory. Elastic and inelastic nuclear interactions are sampled from ICRU 63 differential cross sections, thereby allowing for the computation of prompt gamma emission profiles. MCsquare has been benchmarked with the GATE/GEANT4 Monte Carlo application for homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. Results: Comparisons with GATE/GEANT4 for various geometries show deviations within 2%–1 mm. In spite of the limited memory bandwidth of the coprocessor simulation time is below 25 s for 10"7 primary 200 MeV protons in average soft tissues using all Xeon Phi and CPU resources embedded in a single desktop unit. Conclusions: MCsquare exploits the flexibility of CPU architectures to provide a multipurpose MC simulation tool. Optimized code enables the use of accurate MC calculation within a reasonable computation time, adequate for clinical practice. MCsquare also simulates prompt gamma emission and can thus be used also for in vivo range verification.

  4. Fast multipurpose Monte Carlo simulation for proton therapy using multi- and many-core CPU architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souris, Kevin; Lee, John Aldo; Sterpin, Edmond

    2016-04-01

    Accuracy in proton therapy treatment planning can be improved using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. However the long computation time of such methods hinders their use in clinical routine. This work aims to develop a fast multipurpose Monte Carlo simulation tool for proton therapy using massively parallel central processing unit (CPU) architectures. A new Monte Carlo, called MCsquare (many-core Monte Carlo), has been designed and optimized for the last generation of Intel Xeon processors and Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. These massively parallel architectures offer the flexibility and the computational power suitable to MC methods. The class-II condensed history algorithm of MCsquare provides a fast and yet accurate method of simulating heavy charged particles such as protons, deuterons, and alphas inside voxelized geometries. Hard ionizations, with energy losses above a user-specified threshold, are simulated individually while soft events are regrouped in a multiple scattering theory. Elastic and inelastic nuclear interactions are sampled from ICRU 63 differential cross sections, thereby allowing for the computation of prompt gamma emission profiles. MCsquare has been benchmarked with the gate/geant4 Monte Carlo application for homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. Comparisons with gate/geant4 for various geometries show deviations within 2%-1 mm. In spite of the limited memory bandwidth of the coprocessor simulation time is below 25 s for 10(7) primary 200 MeV protons in average soft tissues using all Xeon Phi and CPU resources embedded in a single desktop unit. MCsquare exploits the flexibility of CPU architectures to provide a multipurpose MC simulation tool. Optimized code enables the use of accurate MC calculation within a reasonable computation time, adequate for clinical practice. MCsquare also simulates prompt gamma emission and can thus be used also for in vivo range verification.

  5. Comparative Risk Predictions of Second Cancers After Carbon-Ion Therapy Versus Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John G., E-mail: jeley@som.umaryland.edu [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Friedrich, Thomas [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Homann, Kenneth L.; Howell, Rebecca M. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Scholz, Michael; Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Newhauser, Wayne D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: This work proposes a theoretical framework that enables comparative risk predictions for second cancer incidence after particle beam therapy for different ion species for individual patients, accounting for differences in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the competing processes of tumor initiation and cell inactivation. Our working hypothesis was that use of carbon-ion therapy instead of proton therapy would show a difference in the predicted risk of second cancer incidence in the breast for a sample of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: We generated biologic treatment plans and calculated relative predicted risks of second cancer in the breast by using two proposed methods: a full model derived from the linear quadratic model and a simpler linear-no-threshold model. Results: For our reference calculation, we found the predicted risk of breast cancer incidence for carbon-ion plans-to-proton plan ratio, , to be 0.75 ± 0.07 but not significantly smaller than 1 (P=.180). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that second cancer risks are, on average, comparable between proton therapy and carbon-ion therapy.

  6. Fast optimization and dose calculation in scanned ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hild, S.; Graeff, C.; Trautmann, J.; Kraemer, M.; Zink, K.; Durante, M.; Bert, C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Particle therapy (PT) has advantages over photon irradiation on static tumors. An increased biological effectiveness and active target conformal dose shaping are strong arguments for PT. However, the sensitivity to changes of internal geometry complicates the use of PT for moving organs. In case of interfractionally moving objects adaptive radiotherapy (ART) concepts known from intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be adopted for PT treatments. One ART strategy is to optimize a new treatment plan based on daily image data directly before a radiation fraction is delivered [treatment replanning (TRP)]. Optimizing treatment plans for PT using a scanned beam is a time consuming problem especially for particles other than protons where the biological effective dose has to be calculated. For the purpose of TRP, fast optimization and fast dose calculation have been implemented into the GSI in-house treatment planning system (TPS) TRiP98. Methods: This work reports about the outcome of a code analysis that resulted in optimization of the calculation processes as well as implementation of routines supporting parallel execution of the code. To benchmark the new features, the calculation time for therapy treatment planning has been studied. Results: Compared to the original version of the TPS, calculation times for treatment planning (optimization and dose calculation) have been improved by a factor of 10 with code optimization. The parallelization of the TPS resulted in a speedup factor of 12 and 5.5 for the original version and the code optimized version, respectively. Hence the total speedup of the new implementation of the authors' TPS yielded speedup factors up to 55. Conclusions: The improved TPS is capable of completing treatment planning for ion beam therapy of a prostate irradiation considering organs at risk in this has been overseen in the review process. Also see below 6 min

  7. A critical appraisal of the clinical utility of proton therapy in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy is an emerging technology for providing radiation therapy to cancer patients. The depth dose distribution of a proton beam makes it a preferable radiation modality as it reduces radiation to the healthy tissue outside the tumor, compared with conventional photon therapy. While theoretically beneficial, its clinical values are still being demonstrated from the increasing number of patients treated with proton therapy, from several dozen proton therapy centers around the world. High equipment and facility costs are often the major obstacle for its wider adoption. Because of the high cost and lack of definite clinical evidence of its superiority, proton therapy treatment faces criticism on its cost-effectiveness. Technological development is causing a gradual lowering of costs, and research and clinical studies are providing further evidence on its clinical utility. PMID:26604838

  8. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K; Hansen, D; Rit, S; Belka, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  9. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU Munich), Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Hansen, D [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Jutland (Denmark); Rit, S [University Lyon, Lyon, Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes (France); Belka, C [LMU Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  10. MO-A-201-01: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, J.

    2016-01-01

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  11. MO-A-201-00: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  12. MO-A-201-00: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  13. MO-A-201-01: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, J. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  14. Proton Therapy for Reirradiation of Progressive or Recurrent Chordoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: mmcdona2@iuhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Linton, Okechuckwu R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Shah, Mitesh V. [Department of Neurosurgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report the results in patients reirradiated with proton therapy for recurrent or progressive chordoma, with or without salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 16 consecutive patients treated from 2005 to 2012 was performed. All patients had received at least 1 prior course of radiation therapy to the same area, and all but 1 patient had at least 1 surgical resection for disease before receiving reirradiation. At the time of recurrence or progression, half of the patients underwent additional salvage surgery before receiving reirradiation. The median prior dose of radiation was 75.2 Gy (range, 40-79.2 Gy). Six patients had received prior proton therapy, and the remainder had received photon radiation. The median gross tumor volume at the time of reirradiation was 71 cm{sup 3} (range, 0-701 cm{sup 3}). Reirradiation occurred at a median interval of 37 months after prior radiation (range, 12-129 months), and the median dose of reirradiation was 75.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) (range. 71.2-79.2 Gy [RBE]), given in standard daily fractionation (n=14) or hyperfractionation (n=2). Results: The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 6-63 months); it was 26 months in patients alive at the last follow-up visit (range, 12-63 months). The 2-year estimate for local control was 85%, overall survival 80%, chordoma-specific survival 88%, and development of distant metastases 20%. Four patients have had local progression: 3 in-field and 1 marginal. Late toxicity included grade 3 bitemporal lobe radionecrosis in 1 patient that improved with hyperbaric oxygen, a grade 4 cerebrospinal fluid leak with meningitis in 1 patient, and a grade 4 ischemic brainstem stroke (out of radiation field) in 1 patient, with subsequent neurologic recovery. Conclusions: Full-dose proton reirradiation provided encouraging initial disease control and overall survival for patients with recurrent or progressive chordoma, although additional

  15. Proton Therapy for Reirradiation of Progressive or Recurrent Chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Mark W.; Linton, Okechuckwu R.; Shah, Mitesh V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results in patients reirradiated with proton therapy for recurrent or progressive chordoma, with or without salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 16 consecutive patients treated from 2005 to 2012 was performed. All patients had received at least 1 prior course of radiation therapy to the same area, and all but 1 patient had at least 1 surgical resection for disease before receiving reirradiation. At the time of recurrence or progression, half of the patients underwent additional salvage surgery before receiving reirradiation. The median prior dose of radiation was 75.2 Gy (range, 40-79.2 Gy). Six patients had received prior proton therapy, and the remainder had received photon radiation. The median gross tumor volume at the time of reirradiation was 71 cm 3 (range, 0-701 cm 3 ). Reirradiation occurred at a median interval of 37 months after prior radiation (range, 12-129 months), and the median dose of reirradiation was 75.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) (range. 71.2-79.2 Gy [RBE]), given in standard daily fractionation (n=14) or hyperfractionation (n=2). Results: The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 6-63 months); it was 26 months in patients alive at the last follow-up visit (range, 12-63 months). The 2-year estimate for local control was 85%, overall survival 80%, chordoma-specific survival 88%, and development of distant metastases 20%. Four patients have had local progression: 3 in-field and 1 marginal. Late toxicity included grade 3 bitemporal lobe radionecrosis in 1 patient that improved with hyperbaric oxygen, a grade 4 cerebrospinal fluid leak with meningitis in 1 patient, and a grade 4 ischemic brainstem stroke (out of radiation field) in 1 patient, with subsequent neurologic recovery. Conclusions: Full-dose proton reirradiation provided encouraging initial disease control and overall survival for patients with recurrent or progressive chordoma, although additional toxicities may

  16. Proton therapy detector studies under the experience gained at the CATANA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttone, G.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Di Rosa, F.; Lojacono, P.A.; Lo Nigro, S.; Marino, C.; Mongelli, V.; Patti, I.V.; Pittera, S.; Raffaele, L.; Russo, G.; Sabini, M.G.; Salamone, V.; Valastro, L.M.

    2007-01-01

    Proton therapy represents the most promising radiotherapy technique for external tumor treatments. At Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN-LNS), Catania (I), a proton therapy facility is active since March 2002 and 140 patients, mainly affected by choroidal and iris melanoma, have been successfully treated. Proton beams are characterized by higher dose gradients and linear energy transfer with respect to the conventional photon and electron beams, commonly used in medical centers for radiotherapy. In this paper, we report the experience gained in the characterization of different dosimetric systems, studied and/or developed during the last ten years in our proton therapy facility

  17. Proton therapy detector studies under the experience gained at the CATANA facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttone, G.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Di Rosa, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Lojacono, P.A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Lo Nigro, S.; Marino, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Mongelli, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Patti, I.V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Pittera, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [A.O.U. Policlinico, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Russo, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Sabini, M.G. [A.O. Cannizzaro, Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Salamone, V.; Valastro, L.M. [A.O.U. Policlinico, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    Proton therapy represents the most promising radiotherapy technique for external tumor treatments. At Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN-LNS), Catania (I), a proton therapy facility is active since March 2002 and 140 patients, mainly affected by choroidal and iris melanoma, have been successfully treated. Proton beams are characterized by higher dose gradients and linear energy transfer with respect to the conventional photon and electron beams, commonly used in medical centers for radiotherapy. In this paper, we report the experience gained in the characterization of different dosimetric systems, studied and/or developed during the last ten years in our proton therapy facility.

  18. Proton therapy detector studies under the experience gained at the CATANA facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttone, G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Di Rosa, F.; Lojacono, P. A.; Lo Nigro, S.; Marino, C.; Mongelli, V.; Patti, I. V.; Pittera, S.; Raffaele, L.; Russo, G.; Sabini, M. G.; Salamone, V.; Valastro, L. M.

    2007-10-01

    Proton therapy represents the most promising radiotherapy technique for external tumor treatments. At Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN-LNS), Catania (I), a proton therapy facility is active since March 2002 and 140 patients, mainly affected by choroidal and iris melanoma, have been successfully treated. Proton beams are characterized by higher dose gradients and linear energy transfer with respect to the conventional photon and electron beams, commonly used in medical centers for radiotherapy.In this paper, we report the experience gained in the characterization of different dosimetric systems, studied and/or developed during the last ten years in our proton therapy facility.

  19. Machine learning-based patient specific prompt-gamma dose monitoring in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueth, P.; Dauvergne, D.; Freud, N.; Létang, J. M.; Ray, C.; Testa, E.; Sarrut, D.

    2013-07-01

    Online dose monitoring in proton therapy is currently being investigated with prompt-gamma (PG) devices. PG emission was shown to be correlated with dose deposition. This relationship is mostly unknown under real conditions. We propose a machine learning approach based on simulations to create optimized treatment-specific classifiers that detect discrepancies between planned and delivered dose. Simulations were performed with the Monte-Carlo platform Gate/Geant4 for a spot-scanning proton therapy treatment and a PG camera prototype currently under investigation. The method first builds a learning set of perturbed situations corresponding to a range of patient translation. This set is then used to train a combined classifier using distal falloff and registered correlation measures. Classifier performances were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curves and maximum associated specificity and sensitivity. A leave-one-out study showed that it is possible to detect discrepancies of 5 mm with specificity and sensitivity of 85% whereas using only distal falloff decreases the sensitivity down to 77% on the same data set. The proposed method could help to evaluate performance and to optimize the design of PG monitoring devices. It is generic: other learning sets of deviations, other measures and other types of classifiers could be studied to potentially reach better performance. At the moment, the main limitation lies in the computation time needed to perform the simulations.

  20. Machine learning-based patient specific prompt-gamma dose monitoring in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueth, P; Freud, N; Létang, J M; Sarrut, D; Dauvergne, D; Ray, C; Testa, E

    2013-01-01

    Online dose monitoring in proton therapy is currently being investigated with prompt-gamma (PG) devices. PG emission was shown to be correlated with dose deposition. This relationship is mostly unknown under real conditions. We propose a machine learning approach based on simulations to create optimized treatment-specific classifiers that detect discrepancies between planned and delivered dose. Simulations were performed with the Monte-Carlo platform Gate/Geant4 for a spot-scanning proton therapy treatment and a PG camera prototype currently under investigation. The method first builds a learning set of perturbed situations corresponding to a range of patient translation. This set is then used to train a combined classifier using distal falloff and registered correlation measures. Classifier performances were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curves and maximum associated specificity and sensitivity. A leave-one-out study showed that it is possible to detect discrepancies of 5 mm with specificity and sensitivity of 85% whereas using only distal falloff decreases the sensitivity down to 77% on the same data set. The proposed method could help to evaluate performance and to optimize the design of PG monitoring devices. It is generic: other learning sets of deviations, other measures and other types of classifiers could be studied to potentially reach better performance. At the moment, the main limitation lies in the computation time needed to perform the simulations. (paper)

  1. Research advances in proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAI Shuyang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, one of the most common malignancies with high prevalence and mortality rate, usually results in poor prognosis and limited survival. A comprehensive analysis on the number and location of tumors, Child-Pugh grade, and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage will help the development of suitable treatment programs and improve prediction of prognosis. A majority of patients are complicated by cirrhosis, enlarged tumor, multiple lesions, vascular invasion, and even cancer embolus in the portal vein. With the growth of knowledge about the radiation tolerance of normal tissue and the advances in radiotherapy techniques, radiotherapy has become an important tool for step-down therapy and adjuvant therapy for liver cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT is emerging as a novel radiotherapy for the management of HCC, which, benefiting from the effect of Bragg Peak from PBT, effectively decreases the toxicity of traditional radiotherapies to the liver and does little harm to the uninvolved liver tissue or the surrounding structures while intensifying the destruction in targeted malignant lesions. Furthermore, several previous studies on the treatment of HCC with PBT revealed excellent local control. The distinctive biophysical attributes of PBT in the treatment of HCC, as well as the available literature regarding clinical outcomes and toxicity of using PBT for HCC, are reviewed. Current evidence provides limited indications for PBT, which suggests that further study on the relationship between liver function and PBT is required to gain further insight into its indication and standardization.

  2. Obscure bleeding colonic duplication responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Jérémie; Projetti, Fabrice; Legros, Romain; Valgueblasse, Virginie; Sarabi, Matthieu; Carrier, Paul; Fredon, Fabien; Bouvier, Stéphane; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Sautereau, Denis

    2013-09-21

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male admitted to our academic hospital with massive rectal bleeding. Since childhood he had reported recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and had two exploratory laparotomies 5 and 2 years previously. An emergency abdominal computed tomography scan, gastroscopy and colonoscopy, performed after hemodynamic stabilization, were considered normal. High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was initiated and bleeding stopped spontaneously. Two other massive rectal bleeds occurred 8 h after each cessation of PPI which led to a hemostatic laparotomy after negative gastroscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy. This showed long tubular duplication of the right colon, with fresh blood in the duplicated colon. Obscure lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a difficult medical situation and potentially life-threatening. The presence of ulcerated ectopic gastric mucosa in the colonic duplication explains the partial efficacy of PPI therapy. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding responding to empiric anti-acid therapy should probably evoke the diagnosis of bleeding ectopic gastric mucosa such as Meckel's diverticulum or gastrointestinal duplication, and gastroenterologists should be aware of this potential medical situation.

  3. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konyang University Hospital. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D{sub 30%}, D{sub 60%}, D{sub 90%}, V{sub 30%}, V{sub 60%}, V{sub 90}%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor.

  4. Proton therapy for tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Univ. Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating skull base and cervical spine tumors: dose can be focused in the target, while achieving significant sparing of the brain, brain stem, cervical cord, and optic nerves and chiasm. For skull base tumors, 10-year local control rates with combined proton-photon therapy are highest for chondrosarcomas, intermediate for male chordomas, and lowest for female chordomas (94%, 65%, and 42%, respectively). For cervical spine tumors, 10-year local control rates are not significantly different for chordomas and chondrosarcomas (54% and 48%, respectively), nor is there any difference in local control between males and females. Observed treatment-related morbidity has been judged acceptable, in view of the major morbidity and mortality which accompany uncontrolled tumor growth. (orig.)

  5. Technological aspects and clinical applications of proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habrand, J.L.; Mazal, A.; Schlienger, P.; Schwartz, L.; Desjardins, L.; D'Hermies, F.; Mammar, H.

    1995-01-01

    Proton therapy certainly presents a ballistic advantage with in-depth dose distribution following a Bragg peak. Some fifteen health-care centres are presently applying this technique in the U.S., Europe and Japan. Low-energy systems allow the treatment of tumours of the eye while higher energies are able to reach tumours deep in the trunk. The present two major indications are the conservative treatment of ocular melanomas and the post-operative irradiation of sarcomas of the skull base and of the spinal canal. Other treatments are presently being explored: carcinomas of the prostate; tumours of the head and neck, of the central nervous system and of the liver. (authors). 9 refs

  6. Proton therapy for tumors of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating skull base and cervical spine tumors: dose can be focused in the target, while achieving significant sparing of the brain, brain stem, cervical cord, and optic nerves and chiasm. For skull base tumors, 10-year local control rates with combined proton-photon therapy are highest for chondrosarcomas, intermediate for male chordomas, and lowest for female chordomas (94%, 65%, and 42%, respectively). For cervical spine tumors, 10-year local control rates are not significantly different for chordomas and chondrosarcomas (54% and 48%, respectively), nor is there any difference in local control between males and females. Observed treatment-related morbidity has been judged acceptable, in view of the major morbidity and mortality which accompany uncontrolled tumor growth. (orig.)

  7. Application of fluence field modulation to proton computed tomography for proton therapy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedes, G; De Angelis, L; Rit, S; Hansen, D; Belka, C; Bashkirov, V; Johnson, R P; Coutrakon, G; Schubert, K E; Schulte, R W; Parodi, K; Landry, G

    2017-07-12

    This simulation study presents the application of fluence field modulated computed tomography, initially developed for x-ray CT, to proton computed tomography (pCT). By using pencil beam (PB) scanning, fluence modulated pCT (FMpCT) may achieve variable image quality in a pCT image and imaging dose reduction. Three virtual phantoms, a uniform cylinder and two patients, were studied using Monte Carlo simulations of an ideal list-mode pCT scanner. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected for high image quality and only PBs intercepting them preserved full fluence (FF). Image quality was investigated in terms of accuracy (mean) and noise (standard deviation) of the reconstructed proton relative stopping power compared to reference values. Dose calculation accuracy on FMpCT images was evaluated in terms of dose volume histograms (DVH), range difference (RD) for beam-eye-view (BEV) dose profiles and gamma evaluation. Pseudo FMpCT scans were created from broad beam experimental data acquired with a list-mode pCT prototype. FMpCT noise in ROIs was equivalent to FF images and accuracy better than  -1.3%(-0.7%) by using 1% of FF for the cylinder (patients). Integral imaging dose reduction of 37% and 56% was achieved for the two patients for that level of modulation. Corresponding DVHs from proton dose calculation on FMpCT images agreed to those from reference images and 96% of BEV profiles had RD below 2 mm, compared to only 1% for uniform 1% of FF. Gamma pass rates (2%, 2 mm) were 98% for FMpCT while for uniform 1% of FF they were as low as 59%. Applying FMpCT to preliminary experimental data showed that low noise levels and accuracy could be preserved in a ROI, down to 30% modulation. We have shown, using both virtual and experimental pCT scans, that FMpCT is potentially feasible and may allow a means of imaging dose reduction for a pCT scanner operating in PB scanning mode. This may be of particular importance to proton therapy given the low integral dose found

  8. Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Disease Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Blanchard, Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fuller, C. David [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Medical Physics Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohamed, Abdallah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Alexandria (Egypt); Morrison, William H.; Phan, Jack; Beadle, Beth M.; Skinner, Heath D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hutcheson, Kate A. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: A single-institution prospective study was conducted to assess disease control and toxicity of proton therapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Disease control, toxicity, functional outcomes, and patterns of failure for the initial cohort of patients with oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma (OPC) treated with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) were prospectively collected in 2 registry studies at a single institution. Locoregional failures were analyzed by using deformable image registration. Results: Fifty patients with OPC treated from March 3, 2011, to July 2014 formed the cohort. Eighty-four percent were male, 50% had never smoked, 98% had stage III/IV disease, 64% received concurrent therapy, and 35% received induction chemotherapy. Forty-four of 45 tumors (98%) tested for p16 were positive. All patients received IMPT (multifield optimization to n=46; single-field optimization to n=4). No Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 4 or 5 toxicities were observed. The most common grade 3 toxicities were acute mucositis in 58% of patients and late dysphagia in 12%. Eleven patients had a gastrostomy (feeding) tube placed during therapy, but none had a feeding tube at last follow-up. At a median follow-up time of 29 months, 5 patients had disease recurrence: local in 1, local and regional in 1, regional in 2, and distant in 1. The 2-year actuarial overall and progression-free survival rates were 94.5% and 88.6%. Conclusions: The oncologic, toxicity, and functional outcomes after IMPT for OPC are encouraging and provide the basis for ongoing and future clinical studies.

  9. Computer models for optimizing radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duechting, W.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this contribution is to outline how methods of system analysis, control therapy and modelling can be applied to simulate normal and malignant cell growth and to optimize cancer treatment as for instance radiation therapy. Based on biological observations and cell kinetic data, several types of models have been developed describing the growth of tumor spheroids and the cell renewal of normal tissue. The irradiation model is represented by the so-called linear-quadratic model describing the survival fraction as a function of the dose. Based thereon, numerous simulation runs for different treatment schemes can be performed. Thus, it is possible to study the radiation effect on tumor and normal tissue separately. Finally, this method enables a computer-assisted recommendation for an optimal patient-specific treatment schedule prior to clinical therapy. (orig.) [de

  10. Interactive X-ray and proton therapy training and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza-Lup, Felix G; Farrar, Shane; Leon, Erik

    2015-10-01

    External beam X-ray therapy (XRT) and proton therapy (PT) are effective and widely accepted forms of treatment for many types of cancer. However, the procedures require extensive computerized planning. Current planning systems for both XRT and PT have insufficient visual aid to combine real patient data with the treatment device geometry to account for unforeseen collisions among system components and the patient. The 3D surface representation (S-rep) is a widely used scheme to create 3D models of physical objects. 3D S-reps have been successfully used in CAD/CAM and, in conjunction with texture mapping, in the modern gaming industry to customize avatars and improve the gaming realism and sense of presence. We are proposing a cost-effective method to extract patient-specific S-reps in real time and combine them with the treatment system geometry to provide a comprehensive simulation of the XRT/PT treatment room. The X3D standard is used to implement and deploy the simulator on the web, enabling its use not only for remote specialists' collaboration, simulation, and training, but also for patient education. An objective assessment of the accuracy of the S-reps obtained proves the potential of the simulator for clinical use.

  11. The current status of proton therapy in the world, the European Union and Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzicka, J.

    2011-01-01

    Proton therapy is considered to be very promising cancer treatment modality, and therefore many countries of the world are trying to (regardless of the high investment costs) to build their own atomic centre (or other proton centres if they operate already some). Proton therapy allows better control of therapeutic doses of radiation to which the patient is exposed. Proton irradiation of the tumor can kill more cancer cells while minimizing damage of healthy tissue. Currently there is about 33 facilities in operation in the world where proton therapy can be carried out. Proton therapy complex with new, highly sophisticated equipment is also being constructed in Slovakia - in The Central Military Hospital in Ruzomberok. The project is in its final stage of implementation. The paper describes the current status of proton therapy in the world, the European Union (EU) and Slovakia. In conclusion principally new Proton therapy unit complex built in Slovakia with similar facilities currently existing in EU countries (old 15 member states) is compared (especially from technical and medical aspects). (author)

  12. A Novel Approach to Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Using Scanned Proton Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depauw, Nicolas, E-mail: ndepauw@partners.org [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Batin, Estelle; Daartz, Julianne [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Adams, Judith; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon; Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), currently offered at Massachusetts General Hospital, uses proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with intensity modulation, achieving complete target coverage of the chest wall and all nodal regions and reduced dose to the cardiac structures. This work presents the current methodology for such treatment and the ongoing effort for its improvements. Methods and Materials: A single PBS field is optimized to ensure appropriate target coverage and heart/lung sparing, using an in–house-developed proton planning system with the capability of multicriteria optimization. The dose to the chest wall skin is controlled as a separate objective in the optimization. Surface imaging is used for setup because it is a suitable surrogate for superficial target volumes. In order to minimize the effect of beam range uncertainties, the relative proton stopping power ratio of the material in breast implants was determined through separate measurements. Phantom measurements were also made to validate the accuracy of skin dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Additionally, the treatment planning robustness was evaluated relative to setup perturbations and patient breathing motion. Results: PBS PMRT planning resulted in appropriate target coverage and organ sparing, comparable to treatments by passive scattering (PS) beams but much improved in nodal coverage and cardiac sparing compared to conventional treatments by photon/electron beams. The overall treatment time was much shorter than PS and also shorter than conventional photon/electron treatment. The accuracy of the skin dose calculation by the planning system was within ±2%. The treatment was shown to be adequately robust relative to both setup uncertainties and patient breathing motion, resulting in clinically satisfying dose distributions. Conclusions: More than 25 PMRT patients have been successfully treated at Massachusetts General Hospital by using single-PBS fields

  13. A Novel Approach to Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy Using Scanned Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depauw, Nicolas; Batin, Estelle; Daartz, Julianne; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Adams, Judith; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), currently offered at Massachusetts General Hospital, uses proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with intensity modulation, achieving complete target coverage of the chest wall and all nodal regions and reduced dose to the cardiac structures. This work presents the current methodology for such treatment and the ongoing effort for its improvements. Methods and Materials: A single PBS field is optimized to ensure appropriate target coverage and heart/lung sparing, using an in–house-developed proton planning system with the capability of multicriteria optimization. The dose to the chest wall skin is controlled as a separate objective in the optimization. Surface imaging is used for setup because it is a suitable surrogate for superficial target volumes. In order to minimize the effect of beam range uncertainties, the relative proton stopping power ratio of the material in breast implants was determined through separate measurements. Phantom measurements were also made to validate the accuracy of skin dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Additionally, the treatment planning robustness was evaluated relative to setup perturbations and patient breathing motion. Results: PBS PMRT planning resulted in appropriate target coverage and organ sparing, comparable to treatments by passive scattering (PS) beams but much improved in nodal coverage and cardiac sparing compared to conventional treatments by photon/electron beams. The overall treatment time was much shorter than PS and also shorter than conventional photon/electron treatment. The accuracy of the skin dose calculation by the planning system was within ±2%. The treatment was shown to be adequately robust relative to both setup uncertainties and patient breathing motion, resulting in clinically satisfying dose distributions. Conclusions: More than 25 PMRT patients have been successfully treated at Massachusetts General Hospital by using single-PBS fields

  14. Integration and evaluation of automated Monte Carlo simulations in the clinical practice of scanned proton and carbon ion beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J; Sommerer, F; Mairani, A; Unholtz, D; Farook, R; Handrack, J; Frey, K; Marcelos, T; Tessonnier, T; Ecker, S; Ackermann, B; Ellerbrock, M; Debus, J; Parodi, K

    2014-08-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of beam interaction and transport in matter are increasingly considered as essential tools to support several aspects of radiation therapy. Despite the vast application of MC to photon therapy and scattered proton therapy, clinical experience in scanned ion beam therapy is still scarce. This is especially the case for ions heavier than protons, which pose additional issues like nuclear fragmentation and varying biological effectiveness. In this work, we present the evaluation of a dedicated framework which has been developed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center to provide automated FLUKA MC simulations of clinical patient treatments with scanned proton and carbon ion beams. Investigations on the number of transported primaries and the dimension of the geometry and scoring grids have been performed for a representative class of patient cases in order to provide recommendations on the simulation settings, showing that recommendations derived from the experience in proton therapy cannot be directly translated to the case of carbon ion beams. The MC results with the optimized settings have been compared to the calculations of the analytical treatment planning system (TPS), showing that regardless of the consistency of the two systems (in terms of beam model in water and range calculation in different materials) relevant differences can be found in dosimetric quantities and range, especially in the case of heterogeneous and deep seated treatment sites depending on the ion beam species and energies, homogeneity of the traversed tissue and size of the treated volume. The analysis of typical TPS speed-up approximations highlighted effects which deserve accurate treatment, in contrast to adequate beam model simplifications for scanned ion beam therapy. In terms of biological dose calculations, the investigation of the mixed field components in realistic anatomical situations confirmed the findings of previous groups so far reported only in

  15. A critical appraisal of the clinical utility of proton therapy in oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Dongxu WangDepartment of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USAAbstract: Proton therapy is an emerging technology for providing radiation therapy to cancer patients. The depth dose distribution of a proton beam makes it a preferable radiation modality as it reduces radiation to the healthy tissue outside the tumor, compared with conventional photon therapy. While theoretically beneficial, its clinical values are still being demonstrated from the incre...

  16. Carbon/proton therapy: A novel gantry design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Trbojevic

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A major expense and design challenge in carbon/proton cancer therapy machines are the isocentric gantries. The transport elements of the carbon/proton gantry are presently made of standard conducting dipoles. Because of their large weight, of the order of ∼100   tons, the total weight of the gantry with support structure is ∼600   tons. The novel gantry design that is described here is made of fixed field superconducting magnets, thus dramatically reducing magnet size and weight compared to conventional magnets. In addition, the magnetic field is constant throughout the whole energy region required for tumor treatment. Particles make very small orbit offsets, passing through the beam line. The beam line is built of combined-function dipoles such as a nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient (NS-FFAG structure. The very large momentum acceptance NS-FFAG comes from very strong focusing and very small dispersion. The NS-FFAG small magnets almost completely filled the beam line. They first make a quarter (or close to a quarter of an arc bending upward and an additional half of a circle beam line finishing so that the beam is pointed towards the patient. At the end of the gantry, additional magnets with a fast response are required to allow radial scanning and to provide the required position and spot size. The fixed field combined-function magnets for the carbon gantry could be made of superconducting magnets by using low temperature superconducting cable or by using high temperature superconductors.

  17. Monte Carlo calculations supporting patient plan verification in proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Viana Miranda Lima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Patient’s treatment plan verification covers substantial amount of the quality assurance (QA resources, this is especially true for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT. The use of Monte Carlo (MC simulations in supporting QA has been widely discussed and several methods have been proposed. In this paper we studied an alternative approach from the one being currently applied clinically at Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO. We reanalysed the previously published data (Molinelli et al. 2013, where 9 patient plans were investigated in which the warning QA threshold of 3% mean dose deviation was crossed. The possibility that these differences between measurement and calculated dose were related to dose modelling (Treatment Planning Systems (TPS vs MC, limitations on dose delivery system or detectors mispositioning was originally explored but other factors such as the geometric description of the detectors were not ruled out. For the purpose of this work we compared ionisation-chambers measurements with different MC simulations results. It was also studied some physical effects introduced by this new approach for example inter detector interference and the delta ray thresholds. The simulations accounting for a detailed geometry typically are superior (statistical difference - p-value around 0.01 to most of the MC simulations used at CNAO (only inferior to the shift approach used. No real improvement were observed in reducing the current delta-ray threshold used (100 keV and no significant interference between ion chambers in the phantom were detected (p-value 0.81. In conclusion, it was observed that the detailed geometrical description improves the agreement between measurement and MC calculations in some cases. But in other cases position uncertainty represents the dominant uncertainty. The inter chamber disturbance was not detected for the therapeutic protons energies and the results from the current delta threshold are

  18. Joint Estimation of Cardiac Toxicity and Recurrence Risks After Comprehensive Nodal Photon Versus Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stick, Line B., E-mail: line.bjerregaard.stick@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Yu, Jen [Maryland Proton Treatment Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Maraldo, Maja V. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aznar, Marianne C. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Pedersen, Anders N. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bentzen, Søren M. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Maryland Proton Treatment Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Vogelius, Ivan R. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: The study aims to perform joint estimation of the risk of recurrence caused by inadequate radiation dose coverage of lymph node targets and the risk of cardiac toxicity caused by radiation exposure to the heart. Delivered photon plans are compared with realistic proton plans, thereby providing evidence-based estimates of the heterogeneity of treatment effects in consecutive cases for the 2 radiation treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: Forty-one patients referred for postlumpectomy comprehensive nodal photon irradiation for left-sided breast cancer were included. Comparative proton plans were optimized by a spot scanning technique with single-field optimization from 2 en face beams. Cardiotoxicity risk was estimated with the model of Darby et al, and risk of recurrence following a compromise of lymph node coverage was estimated by a linear dose-response model fitted to the recurrence data from the recently published EORTC (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) 22922/10925 and NCIC-CTG (National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group) MA.20 randomized controlled trials. Results: Excess absolute risk of cardiac morbidity was small with photon therapy at an attained age of 80 years, with median values of 1.0% (range, 0.2%-2.9%) and 0.5% (range, 0.03%-1.0%) with and without cardiac risk factors, respectively, but even lower with proton therapy (0.13% [range, 0.02%-0.5%] and 0.06% [range, 0.004%-0.3%], respectively). The median estimated excess absolute risk of breast cancer recurrence after 10 years was 0.10% (range, 0.0%-0.9%) with photons and 0.02% (range, 0.0%-0.07%) with protons. The association between age of the patient and benefit from proton therapy was weak, almost non-existing (Spearman rank correlations of −0.15 and −0.30 with and without cardiac risk factors, respectively). Conclusions: Modern photon therapy yields limited risk of cardiac toxicity in most patients, but proton therapy can reduce the

  19. Reoptimization of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Plans Based on Linear Energy Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkelbach, Jan, E-mail: junkelbach@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Botas, Pablo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Faculty of Physics, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Gorissen, Bram L.; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: We describe a treatment plan optimization method for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) that avoids high values of linear energy transfer (LET) in critical structures located within or near the target volume while limiting degradation of the best possible physical dose distribution. Methods and Materials: To allow fast optimization based on dose and LET, a GPU-based Monte Carlo code was extended to provide dose-averaged LET in addition to dose for all pencil beams. After optimizing an initial IMPT plan based on physical dose, a prioritized optimization scheme is used to modify the LET distribution while constraining the physical dose objectives to values close to the initial plan. The LET optimization step is performed based on objective functions evaluated for the product of LET and physical dose (LET×D). To first approximation, LET×D represents a measure of the additional biological dose that is caused by high LET. Results: The method is effective for treatments where serial critical structures with maximum dose constraints are located within or near the target. We report on 5 patients with intracranial tumors (high-grade meningiomas, base-of-skull chordomas, ependymomas) in whom the target volume overlaps with the brainstem and optic structures. In all cases, high LET×D in critical structures could be avoided while minimally compromising physical dose planning objectives. Conclusion: LET-based reoptimization of IMPT plans represents a pragmatic approach to bridge the gap between purely physical dose-based and relative biological effectiveness (RBE)-based planning. The method makes IMPT treatments safer by mitigating a potentially increased risk of side effects resulting from elevated RBE of proton beams near the end of range.

  20. When to Wait for More Evidence? Real Options Analysis in Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Keith R.; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Peters, Hans J.M.; Beutner, Eric; Lambin, Philippe; Joore, Manuela A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Trends suggest that cancer spending growth will accelerate. One method for controlling costs is to examine whether the benefits of new technologies are worth the extra costs. However, especially new and emerging technologies are often more costly, while limited clinical evidence of superiority is available. In that situation it is often unclear whether to adopt the new technology now, with the risk of investing in a suboptimal therapy, or to wait for more evidence, with the risk of withholding patients their optimal treatment. This trade-off is especially difficult when it is costly to reverse the decision to adopt a technology, as is the case for proton therapy. Real options analysis, a technique originating from financial economics, assists in making this trade-off. Methods. We examined whether to adopt proton therapy, as compared to stereotactic body radiotherapy, in the treatment of inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Three options are available: adopt without further research; adopt and undertake a trial; or delay adoption and undertake a trial. The decision depends on the expected net gain of each option, calculated by subtracting its total costs from its expected benefits. Results. In The Netherlands, adopt and trial was found to be the preferred option, with an optimal sample size of 200 patients. Increase of treatment costs abroad and costs of reversal altered the preferred option. Conclusion. We have shown that real options analysis provides a transparent method of weighing the costs and benefits of adopting and/or further researching new and expensive technologies. PMID:22147003

  1. Pencil beam scanning proton therapy vs rotational arc radiation therapy: A treatment planning comparison for postoperative oropharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apinorasethkul, Ontida, E-mail: Ontida.a@gmail.com; Kirk, Maura; Teo, Kevin; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Lukens, John N.; Lin, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer are traditionally treated with photon radiotherapy. Proton therapy is currently being used clinically and may potentially reduce treatment-related toxicities by minimizing the dose to normal organs in the treatment of postoperative oropharyngeal cancer. The finite range of protons has the potential to significantly reduce normal tissue toxicity compared to photon radiotherapy. Seven patients were planned with both proton and photon modalities. The planning goal for both modalities was achieving the prescribed dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Dose-volume histograms were compared in which all cases met the target coverage goals. Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans for the oral cavity (1771 cGy photon vs 293 cGy proton, p < 0.001), contralateral parotid (1796 cGy photon vs 1358 proton, p < 0.001), and the contralateral submandibular gland (3608 cGy photon vs 3251 cGy proton, p = 0.03). Average total integral dose was 9.1% lower in proton plans. The significant dosimetric sparing seen with proton therapy may lead to reduced side effects such as pain, weight loss, taste changes, and dry mouth. Prospective comparisons of protons vs photons for disease control, toxicity, and patient-reported outcomes are therefore warranted and currently being pursued.

  2. WE-EF-303-10: Single- Detector Proton Radiography as a Portal Imaging Equivalent for Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolan, P [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Testa, M; Cascio, E; Lu, H [Massachussetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Royle, G [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Gottschalk, B [Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, patient alignment is of critical importance due to the sensitivity of the proton range to tissue heterogeneities. Traditionally proton radiography is used for verification of the water-equivalent path length (WEPL), which dictates the depth protons reach. In this work we propose its use for alignment. Additionally, many new proton centers have cone-beam computed tomography in place of beamline X-ray imaging and so proton radiography offers a unique patient alignment verification similar to portal imaging in photon therapy. Method: Proton radiographs of a CIRS head phantom were acquired using the Beam Imaging System (BIS) (IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve) in a horizontal beamline. A scattered beam was produced using a small, dedicated, range modulator (RM) wheel fabricated out of aluminum. The RM wheel was rotated slowly (20 sec/rev) using a stepper motor to compensate for the frame rate of the BIS (120 ms). Dose rate functions (DRFs) over two RM wheel rotations were acquired. Calibration was made with known thicknesses of homogeneous solid water. For each pixel the time width, skewness and kurtosis of the DRFs were computed. The time width was used to compute the object WEPL. In the heterogeneous phantom, the excess skewness and excess kurtosis (i.e. difference from homogeneous cases) were computed and assessed for suitability for patient set up. Results: The technique allowed for the simultaneous production of images that can be used for WEPL verification, showing few internal details, and excess skewness and kurtosis images that can be used for soft tissue alignment. These latter images highlight areas where range mixing has occurred, correlating with phantom heterogeneities. Conclusion: The excess skewness and kurtosis images contain details that are not visible in the WET images. These images, unique to the time-resolved proton radiographic method, could be used for patient set up according to soft tissues.

  3. Visual Outcomes of Parapapillary Uveal Melanomas Following Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Therapy, Cancer Center Antoine Lacassagne-Nice Sophia Antipolis University Hospital, Nice (France); Grange, Jean-Daniel [Department of Ophthalmology, Eye University Clinic la Croix Rousse, Lyon (France); Mosci, Carlo [Department of Ophthalmology, National Institute for Cancer Research, Mura Delle Cappucine, Genova (Italy); Rosier, Laurence [Eye Clinic, Centre d' Exploration et de Traitement de la Retine et de la Macula, Bordeaux (France); Maschi, Celia [Department of Ophthalmology, Eye University Clinic Pasteur 2, Nice (France); Lanza, Francesco [Department of Ophthalmology, National Institute for Cancer Research, Mura Delle Cappucine, Genova (Italy); Nguyen, Anh Minh [Department of Ophthalmology, Eye University Clinic la Croix Rousse, Lyon (France); Jaspart, Franck; Bacin, Franck; Bonnin, Nicolas [Department of Ophthalmology, Eye University Clinic Gabriel Montpied, Clermont Ferrand (France); Gaucher, David [Department of Ophthalmology, Eye University Clinic, Hopital Civil, Strasbourg (France); Sauerwein, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Therapy, NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitätsklinikum Essen, Essen (Germany); Angellier, Gaelle; Hérault, Joel [Department of Radiation Therapy, Cancer Center Antoine Lacassagne-Nice Sophia Antipolis University Hospital, Nice (France); Caujolle, Jean-Pierre [Department of Ophthalmology, Eye University Clinic Pasteur 2, Nice (France)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: In parapapillary melanoma patients, radiation-induced optic complications are frequent and visual acuity is often compromised. We investigated dose-effect relationships for the optic nerve with respect to visual acuity after proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Of 5205 patients treated between 1991 and 2014, those treated using computed tomography (CT)-based planning to 52 Gy (prescribed dose, not accounting for relative biologic effectiveness correction of 1.1) in 4 fractions, with minimal 6-month follow-up and documented initial and last visual acuity, were included. Deterioration of ≥0.3 logMAR between initial and last visual acuity results was reported. Results: A total of 865 consecutive patients were included. Median follow-up was 69 months, mean age was 61.7 years, tumor abutted the papilla in 35.1% of patients, and tumor-to-fovea distance was ≤3 mm in 74.2% of patients. Five-year relapse-free survival rate was 92.7%. Visual acuity was ≥20/200 in 72.6% of patients initially and 47.2% at last follow-up. A wedge filter was used in 47.8% of the patients, with a positive impact on vision and no impact on relapse. Glaucoma, radiation-induced optic neuropathy, maculopathy were reported in 17.9%, 47.5%, and 33.6% of patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, age, diabetes, thickness, initial visual acuity and percentage of macula receiving 26 Gy were predictive of visual acuity. Furthermore, patients irradiated to ≥80% of their papilla had better visual acuity when limiting the 50% (30-Gy) and 20% (12-Gy) isodoses to ≤2 mm and 6 mm of optic nerve length, respectively. Conclusions: A personalized proton therapy plan with optic nerve and macular sparing can be used efficiently with good oncological and functional results in parapapillary melanoma patients.

  4. Visual Outcomes of Parapapillary Uveal Melanomas Following Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thariat, Juliette; Grange, Jean-Daniel; Mosci, Carlo; Rosier, Laurence; Maschi, Celia; Lanza, Francesco; Nguyen, Anh Minh; Jaspart, Franck; Bacin, Franck; Bonnin, Nicolas; Gaucher, David; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Angellier, Gaelle; Hérault, Joel; Caujolle, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In parapapillary melanoma patients, radiation-induced optic complications are frequent and visual acuity is often compromised. We investigated dose-effect relationships for the optic nerve with respect to visual acuity after proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Of 5205 patients treated between 1991 and 2014, those treated using computed tomography (CT)-based planning to 52 Gy (prescribed dose, not accounting for relative biologic effectiveness correction of 1.1) in 4 fractions, with minimal 6-month follow-up and documented initial and last visual acuity, were included. Deterioration of ≥0.3 logMAR between initial and last visual acuity results was reported. Results: A total of 865 consecutive patients were included. Median follow-up was 69 months, mean age was 61.7 years, tumor abutted the papilla in 35.1% of patients, and tumor-to-fovea distance was ≤3 mm in 74.2% of patients. Five-year relapse-free survival rate was 92.7%. Visual acuity was ≥20/200 in 72.6% of patients initially and 47.2% at last follow-up. A wedge filter was used in 47.8% of the patients, with a positive impact on vision and no impact on relapse. Glaucoma, radiation-induced optic neuropathy, maculopathy were reported in 17.9%, 47.5%, and 33.6% of patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, age, diabetes, thickness, initial visual acuity and percentage of macula receiving 26 Gy were predictive of visual acuity. Furthermore, patients irradiated to ≥80% of their papilla had better visual acuity when limiting the 50% (30-Gy) and 20% (12-Gy) isodoses to ≤2 mm and 6 mm of optic nerve length, respectively. Conclusions: A personalized proton therapy plan with optic nerve and macular sparing can be used efficiently with good oncological and functional results in parapapillary melanoma patients.

  5. Quantitative analysis of treatment process time and throughput capacity for spot scanning proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazumichi; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Poenisch, Falk; Mackin, Dennis S.; Liu, Amy Y.; Wu, Richard; Zhu, X. Ronald; Gillin, Michael T.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Frank, Steven J.; Lee, Andrew K.

    2016-01-01

    approximately 30%–40% of total treatment time for the total target volumes exceeding 200 cm 3 , which was the case for more than 80% of the patients in this study. When total treatment time was modeled as a function of the number of fields and total target volume, the model overestimated total treatment time by 12% on average, with a standard deviation of 32%. A sensitivity analysis of throughput capacity for a hypothetical four-room spot scanning proton therapy center identified several priority items for improvements in throughput capacity, including operation time, beam delivery time, and patient immobilization and setup time. Conclusions: The spot scanning port at our proton therapy center has operated at a high performance level and has been used to treat a large number of complex cases. Further improvements in efficiency may be feasible in the areas of facility operation, beam delivery, patient immobilization and setup, and optimization of treatment scheduling.

  6. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the trachea: first reported case treated with proton beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, R; Bernstein, J M; Brennan, B; Rothera, M P

    2012-09-01

    We report a case of rhabdomyosarcoma of the trachea in a 14-month-old child, and we present the first reported use of proton beam therapy for this tumour. A 14-month-old girl presented acutely with a seven-day history of biphasic stridor. Emergency endoscopic debulking of a posterior tracheal mass was undertaken. Histological examination revealed an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma with anaplasia. Multimodality therapy with surgery and chemotherapy was administered in the UK, and proton beam therapy in the USA. Only three cases of rhabdomyosarcoma of the trachea have previously been reported in the world literature. This is the first reported case of treatment of this tumour with proton beam therapy. Compared with conventional radiotherapy, proton beam therapy may confer improved long-term outcome in children, with benefits including reduced irradiation of the spinal cord.

  7. A novel patch-field design using an optimized grid filter for passively scattered proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Dong Lei; Mohan, Radhe

    2007-01-01

    For tumors with highly complex shapes, a 'patching' strategy is often used in passively scattered proton therapy to match the sharp distal edge of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the patch field to the lateral penumbra of the through field at 50% dose level. The differences in the dose gradients at the distal edge and at the lateral penumbra could cause hot and cold doses at the junction. In this note, we describe an algorithm developed to optimize the range compensator design to yield a more uniform dose distribution at the junction. The algorithm is based on the fact that the distal fall-off of the SOBP can be tailored using a grid filter that is placed perpendicular to the beam's path. The filter is optimized so that the distal fall-off of the patch field complements the lateral penumbra fall-off of the through field. In addition to optimizing the fall-off, the optimization process implicitly accounts for the limitations of conventional compensator design algorithms. This algorithm uses simple ray tracing to determine the compensator shape and ignore scatter. The compensated dose distribution may therefore differ substantially from the intended dose distribution, especially when complex heterogeneities are encountered, such as those in the head and neck. In such a case, an adaptive optimization strategy can be used to optimize the 'grid' filter locally considering the tissue heterogeneities. The grid filter thus obtained is superimposed on the original range compensator so that the composite compensator leads to a more uniform dose distribution at the patch junction. An L-shaped head and neck tumor was used to demonstrate the validity of the proposed algorithm. A robustness analysis with focus on range uncertainty effect is carried out. (note)

  8. Proton therapy of cancer: Potential clinical advantages and cost-effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundkvist, Jonas; Ekman, Mattias; Rehn Ericsson, Suzanne; Glimelius, Bengt; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala

    2005-01-01

    Proton therapy may offer potential clinical advantages compared with conventional radiation therapy for many cancer patients. Due to the large investment costs for building a proton therapy facility, however, the treatment cost with proton radiation is higher than with conventional radiation. It is therefore important to evaluate whether the medical benefits of proton therapy are large enough to motivate the higher costs. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of proton therapy in the treatment of four different cancers: left-sided breast cancer, prostate cancer, head and neck cancer, and childhood medulloblastoma. A Markov cohort simulation model was created for each cancer type and used to simulate the life of patients treated with radiation. Cost and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) were used as primary outcome measures. The results indicated that proton therapy was cost-effective if appropriate risk groups were chosen. The average cost per QALY gained for the four types of cancer assessed was about Euro 10,130. If the value of a QALY was set to Euro 55,000, the total yearly net benefit of treating 925 cancer patients with the four types of cancer was about Euro 20.8 million. Investment in a proton facility may thus be cost-effective. The results must be interpreted with caution, since there is a lack of data, and consequently large uncertainties in the assumptions used

  9. Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimensional Conformal Proton Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy, and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pediatric Craniopharyngiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques B. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Palmer, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Song, Xiaofei; Amos, Richard A.; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meyer, Jeffrey J.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Cranial irradiation in pediatric patients is associated with serious long-term adverse effects. We sought to determine whether both three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) decrease integral dose to brain areas known to harbor neuronal stem cells, major blood vessels, and other normal brain structures for pediatric patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: IMRT, forward planned, passive scattering proton, and IMPT plans were generated and optimized for 10 pediatric patients. The dose was 50.4 Gy (or cobalt Gy equivalent) delivered in 28 fractions with the requirement for planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% or better. Integral dose data were calculated from differential dose-volume histograms. Results: The PTV target coverage was adequate for all modalities. IMRT and IMPT yielded the most conformal plans in comparison to 3D-PRT. Compared with IMRT, 3D-PRT and IMPT plans had a relative reduction of integral dose to the hippocampus (3D-PRT, 20.4; IMPT, 51.3%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), dentate gyrus (27.3, 75.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and subventricular zone (4.5, 57.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Vascular organs at risk also had reduced integral dose with the use of proton therapy (anterior cerebral arteries, 33.3{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; middle cerebral arteries, 25.9%{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; anterior communicating arteries, 30.8{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 41.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; and carotid arteries, 51.5{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 77.6{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Relative reduction of integral dose to the infratentorial brain (190.7{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 109.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), supratentorial brain without PTV (9.6, 26.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), brainstem (45.6, 22.4%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and whole brain without PTV (19.4{sup Asterisk

  10. Establishing Evidence-Based Indications for Proton Therapy: An Overview of Current Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Mark V., E-mail: mmishra@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aggarwal, Sameer [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Knight, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute at Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To review and assess ongoing proton beam therapy (PBT) clinical trials and to identify major gaps. Methods and Materials: Active PBT clinical trials were identified from (clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Platform Registry. Data on clinical trial disease site, age group, projected patient enrollment, expected start and end dates, study type, and funding source were extracted. Results: A total of 122 active PBT clinical trials were identified, with target enrollment of >42,000 patients worldwide. Ninety-six trials (79%), with a median planned sample size of 68, were classified as interventional studies. Observational studies accounted for 21% of trials but 71% (n=29,852) of planned patient enrollment. The most common PBT clinical trials focus on gastrointestinal tract tumors (21%, n=26), tumors of the central nervous system (15%, n=18), and prostate cancer (12%, n=15). Five active studies (lung, esophagus, head and neck, prostate, breast) will randomize patients between protons and photons, and 3 will randomize patients between protons and carbon ion therapy. Conclusions: The PBT clinical trial portfolio is expanding rapidly. Although the majority of ongoing studies are interventional, the majority of patients will be accrued to observational studies. Future efforts should focus on strategies to encourage optimal patient enrollment and retention, with an emphasis on randomized, controlled trials, which will require support from third-party payers. Results of ongoing PBT studies should be evaluated in terms of comparative effectiveness, as well as incremental effectiveness and value offered by PBT in comparison with conventional radiation modalities.

  11. 94: Treatment plan optimization for conformal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, I.I.; Lane, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    Computer-controlled conformal radiation therapy techniques can deliver complex treatments utilizing large numbers of beams, gantry angles and beam shapes. Linear programming is well-suited for planning conformal treatments. Given a list of available treatment beams, linear programming calculates the relative weights of the beams such that the objective function is optimized and doses to constraint points are within the prescribed limits. 5 refs.; 3 figs

  12. 3D printed plastics for beam modulation in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, C; Hoehr, C; Kumlin, J; Schaffer, P; Jirasek, A; Lee, R; Martinez, D M

    2015-01-01

    Two 3D printing methods, fused filament fabrication (FFF) and PolyJet™ (PJ) were investigated for suitability in clinical proton therapy (PT) energy modulation. Measurements of printing precision, printed density and mean stopping power are presented. FFF is found to be accurate to 0.1 mm, to contain a void fraction of 13% due to air pockets and to have a mean stopping power dependent on geometry. PJ was found to print accurate to 0.05 mm, with a material density and mean stopping power consistent with solid poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Both FFF and PJ were found to print significant, sporadic defects associated with sharp edges on the order of 0.2 mm. Site standard PT modulator wheels were printed using both methods. Measured depth-dose profiles with a 74 MeV beam show poor agreement between PMMA and printed FFF wheels. PJ printed wheel depth-dose agreed with PMMA within 1% of treatment dose except for a distal falloff discrepancy of 0.5 mm. (note)

  13. Proton Beam Therapy Interference With Implanted Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiro, Yoshiko; Sugahara, Shinji; Noma, Mio; Sato, Masato; Sakakibara, Yuzuru; Sakae, Takeji; Hayashi, Yasutaka; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tsuboi, Koji; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of proton beam therapy (PBT) on implanted cardiac pacemaker function. Methods and Materials: After a phantom study confirmed the safety of PBT in patients with cardiac pacemakers, we treated 8 patients with implanted pacemakers using PBT to a total tumor dose of 33-77 gray equivalents (GyE) in dose fractions of 2.2-6.6 GyE. The combined total number of PBT sessions was 127. Although all pulse generators remained outside the treatment field, 4 patients had pacing leads in the radiation field. All patients were monitored by means of electrocardiogram during treatment, and pacemakers were routinely examined before and after PBT. Results: The phantom study showed no effect of neutron scatter on pacemaker generators. In the study, changes in heart rate occurred three times (2.4%) in 2 patients. However, these patients remained completely asymptomatic throughout the PBT course. Conclusions: PBT can result in pacemaker malfunctions that manifest as changes in pulse rate and pulse patterns. Therefore, patients with cardiac pacemakers should be monitored by means of electrocardiogram during PBT

  14. Conformal proton radiation therapy for pediatric low-grade astrocytomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, E.B. [Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Medicine; Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics and Dept. of Pathology; Darthmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States). Section of Radiation Oncology; Muenter, M.W.; Archambeau, J.O.; DeVries, A.; Loredo, L.N.; Grove, R.I.; Slater, J.D. [Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Medicine; Liwnicz, B. [Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States). Dept. of Pathology

    2002-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of proton radiation therapy (PRT) for intracranial low-grade astrocytomas, the authors analyzed the first 27 pediatric patients treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC). Patients and Method: Between September 1991 and August 1997, 27 patients (13 female, 14 male) underwent fractionated proton radiation therapy for progressive or recurrent low-grade astrocytoma. Age at time of treatment ranged from 2 to 18 years (mean: 8.7 years). Tumors were located centrally (diencephatic) in 15 patients, in the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres in seven patients, and in the brainstem in five patients. 25/27 patients (92%) were treated for progressive, unresectable, or residual disease following subtotal resection. Tissue diagnosis was available in 23/27 patients (85%). Four patients with optic pathway tumors were treated without histologic confirmation. Target doses between 50.4 and 63.0 CGE (cobalt gray equivalent, mean: 55.2 CGE) were prescribed at 1.8 CGE per fraction, five treatments per week. Results: At a mean follow-up period of 3.3 years (0.6-6.8 years), 6/27 patients experienced local failure (all located within the irradiated field), and 4/27 patients had died. By anatomic site these data translated into rates of local control and survival of 87% (13/15 patients) and 93% (14/15 patients) for central tumors, 71% (5/7 patients) and 86% (6/7 patients) for hemispheric tumors, and 60% (3/5 patients) and 60% (3/5 patients) for tumors located in the brainstem. Proton radiation therapy was generally well tolerated. All children with local control maintained their performance status. One child with associated neurofibromatosis, Type 1, developed Moyamoya disease. All six patients with optic pathway tumors and useful vision maintained or improved their visual status. Conclusions: This report on pediatric low-grade astrocytomas confirms proton radiation therapy as a safe and efficacious 3-D conformal treatment

  15. Beam tests on a proton linac booster for hadron therapy

    CERN Document Server

    De Martinis, C; Berra, P; Birattari, C; Calabretta, L; Crandall, K; Giove, D; Masullo, M R; Mauri, M; Rosso, E; Rovelli, A; Serafini, L; Szeless, Balázs; Toet, D Z; Vaccaro, Vittorio G; Weiss, M; Zennaro, R

    2002-01-01

    LIBO is a 3 GHz modular side-coupled proton linac booster designed to deliver beam energies up to 200 MeV, as required for the therapy of deep seated tumours. The injected beam of 50 to 70 MeV is produced by a cyclotron like those in several hospitals and research institutes. A full-scale prototype of the first module with an input/output energy of 62/74 MeV, respectively, was designed and built in 1999 and 2000. Full power RF tests were carried out successfully at CERN using a test facility at LIL at the end of the year 2000. In order to prove the feasibility of the acceleration process, an experimental setup with this module was installed at the INFN Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud (LNS) in Catania during 2001. The superconducting cyclotron provided the 62 MeV test beam. A compact solid-state RF modulator with a 4 MW klystron, made available by IBA-Scanditronix, was put into operation to power the linac. In this paper the main features of the accelerator are reviewed and the experimental results obtained duri...

  16. Measurements of Loma Linda proton therapy gantry dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, H.D.; Mazur, P.O.; Sim, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe the procedures used by the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility (MTF) to perform tests of dipoles to be installed in the beam lines of the Loma Linda Univ. Medical Center Proton Therapy Facility. The dipoles were manufactured in two styles, one style having a 45 degrees bending angle and the other a 135 degrees bending angle. The tests included magnetic field measurements using a Hall probe and the measurement of coil temperatures, voltages, and water flow rates. The probe was mounted on a movable cart which could be wheeled along the magnet beam pipe; they mounted extensions onto each end of the beam pipe to allow for the probe to measure the magnet end fields. The probe was also mounted at varying transverse positions on the cart to allow for field shape measurements, from which body quadrupole and sextupole coefficients were determined. A longitudinal sampling of the field down the entire length of the magnet allowed the authors to measure the total integrated field of each magnet. Hall probe measurements were controlled by a C program running on a Unix workstation

  17. Measurements of Loma Linda proton therapy gantry dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, H.D.; Mazur, P.O.; Sim, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    We describe the procedures used by the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility (MTF) to perform tests of dipoles to be installed in the beam lines of the Loma Linda University Medical Center Proton Therapy Facility. The dipoles were manufactured in two styles, one style having a 45 degree bending angle and the other a 135 degree bending angle. The tests included magnetic field measurements using a Hall probe and the measurement of coil temperatures, voltages, and water flow rates. The probe was mounted on a movable cart which could be wheeled along the magnet beam pipe; we mounted extensions onto each end of the beam pipe to allow for the probe to measure the magnet end fields. The probe was also mounted at varying transverse positions on the cart to allow for field shape measurements, from which body quadrupole and sextupole coefficients were determined. A longitudinal sampling of the field down the entire length of the magnet allowed us to measure the total integrated field of each magnet. Hall probe measurements were controlled by a C program running on a Unix workstation

  18. Optimizing hydroxyurea therapy for sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Russell E

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyurea has proven efficacy in numerous clinical trials as a disease-modifying treatment for patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but is currently under-used in clinical practice. To improve the effectiveness of hydroxyurea therapy, efforts should be directed toward broadening the clinical treatment indications, optimizing the daily dosage, and emphasizing the benefits of early and extended treatment. Here, various issues related to hydroxyurea treatment are discussed, focusing on both published evidence and clinical experience. Specific guidance is provided regarding important but potentially unfamiliar aspects of hydroxyurea treatment for SCA, such as escalating to maximum tolerated dose, treating in the setting of cerebrovascular disease, switching from chronic transfusions to hydroxyurea, and using serial phlebotomy to alleviate iron overload. Future research directions to optimize hydroxyurea therapy are also discussed, including personalized dosing based on pharmacokinetic modeling, prediction of fetal hemoglobin responses based on pharmacogenomics, and the risks and benefits of hydroxyurea for non-SCA genotypes and during pregnancy/lactation. Another critical initiative is the introduction of hydroxyurea safely and effectively into global regions that have a high disease burden of SCA but limited resources, such as sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and India. Final considerations emphasize the long-term goal of optimizing hydroxyurea therapy, which is to help treatment become accepted as standard of care for all patients with SCA. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  19. SU-E-J-63: Feasibility Study of Proton Digital Tomosynthesis in Proton Beam Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, B; Kwak, J; Lee, J; Cho, S; Park, S; Yoo, S; Chung, K; Cho, S; Lim, Y; Shin, D; Lee, S; Kim, J

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the feasibility of proton tomosynthesis as daily positioning of patients and compared the results with photon tomosynthesis as an alternative to conventional portal imaging or on-board cone-beam computed tomography. Dedicated photon-like proton beam using the passively scattered proton beams by the cyclotron was generated for proton imaging. The eleven projections were acquired over 30 degree with 3 degree increment in order to investigate the performance of proton tomosynthesis. The cylinder blocks and resolution phantom were used to evaluate imaging performance. Resolution phantom of a cylinder of diameter 12 cm was used to investigate the reconstructed imaging characteristics. Electron density cylinder blocks with diameter of 28 mm and height of 70 mm were employed to assess the imaging quality. The solid water, breast, bone, adipose, lung, muscle, and liver, which were tissue equivalent inserts, were positioned around the resolution phantom. The images were reconstructed by projection onto convex sets (POCS) algorithm and total variation minimization (TVM) methods. The Gafchromic EBT films were utilized for measuring the photon-like proton beams as a proton detector. In addition, the photon tomosynthesis images were obtained for a comparison with proton tomosynthesis images. The same angular sampling data were acquired for both proton and photon tomosynthesis. In the resolution phantom image obtained proton tomosynthesis, down to 1.6 mm diameter rods were resolved visually, although the separation between adjacent rods was less distinct. In contrast, down to 1.2 mm diameter rods were resolved visually in the reconstructed image obtained photon tomosynthesis. Both proton and photon tomosynthesis images were similar in intensities of different density blocks. Our results demonstrated that proton tomosynthesis could make it possible to provide comparable tomography imaging to photon tomosynthesis for positioning as determined by manual registration

  20. SU-E-T-214: Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Based On Passively Scattered Protons and Multi-Leaf Collimation: Prototype TPS and Dosimetry Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Carabe-Fernandez, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Intensity-modulated proton therapy is usually implemented with multi-field optimization of pencil-beam scanning (PBS) proton fields. However, at the view of the experience with photon-IMRT, proton facilities equipped with double-scattering (DS) delivery and multi-leaf collimation (MLC) could produce highly conformal dose distributions (and possibly eliminate the need for patient-specific compensators) with a clever use of their MLC field shaping, provided that an optimal inverse TPS is developed. Methods. A prototype TPS was developed in MATLAB. The dose calculation process was based on a fluence-dose algorithm on an adaptive divergent grid. A database of dose kernels was precalculated in order to allow for fast variations of the field range and modulation during optimization. The inverse planning process was based on the adaptive simulated annealing approach, with direct aperture optimization of the MLC leaves. A dosimetry study was performed on a phantom formed by three concentrical semicylinders separated by 5 mm, of which the inner-most and outer-most were regarded as organs at risk (OARs), and the middle one as the PTV. We chose a concave target (which is not treatable with conventional DS fields) to show the potential of our technique. The optimizer was configured to minimize the mean dose to the OARs while keeping a good coverage of the target. Results. The plan produced by the prototype TPS achieved a conformity index of 1.34, with the mean doses to the OARs below 78% of the prescribed dose. This Result is hardly achievable with traditional conformal DS technique with compensators, and it compares to what can be obtained with PBS. Conclusion. It is certainly feasible to produce IMPT fields with MLC passive scattering fields. With a fully developed treatment planning system, the produced plans can be superior to traditional DS plans in terms of plan conformity and dose to organs at risk

  1. Deformable motion reconstruction for scanned proton beam therapy using on-line x-ray imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ye; Knopf, A; Tanner, Colby; Boye, Dirk; Lomax, Antony J.

    2013-01-01

    Organ motion is a major problem for any dynamic radiotherapy delivery technique, and is particularly so for spot scanned proton therapy. On the other hand, the use of narrow, magnetically deflected proton pencil beams is potentially an ideal delivery technique for tracking tumour motion on-line. At

  2. Outcomes of Sinonasal Cancer Treated With Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagan, Roi, E-mail: rdagan@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Bryant, Curtis; Li, Zuofeng; Yeung, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Justice, Jeb; Dzieglewiski, Peter; Werning, John [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Fernandes, Rui; Pirgousis, Phil [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Lanza, Donald C. [Sinus & Nasal Institute of Florida, St. Petersburg, Florida (United States); Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To report disease outcomes after proton therapy (PT) for sinonasal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four adult patients without metastases received primary (13%) or adjuvant (87%) PT for sinonasal cancers (excluding melanoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma). Common histologies were olfactory neuroblastoma (23%), squamous cell carcinoma (22%), and adenoid cystic carcinoma (17%). Advanced stage (T3 in 25% and T4 in 69%) and high-grade histology (51%) were common. Surgical procedures included endoscopic resection alone (45%), endoscopic resection with craniotomy (12%), or open resection (30%). Gross residual disease was present in 26% of patients. Most patients received hyperfractionated PT (1.2 Gy [relative biological effectiveness (RBE)] twice daily, 99%) and chemotherapy (75%). The median PT dose was 73.8 Gy (RBE), with 85% of patients receiving more than 70 Gy (RBE). Prognostic factors were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and proportional hazards regression for multiple regression. Dosimetric parameters were evaluated using logistic regression. Serious, late grade 3 or higher toxicity was reported using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4. The median follow-up was 2.4 years for all patients and 2.7 years among living patients. Results: The local control (LC), neck control, freedom from distant metastasis, disease-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 83%, 94%, 73%, 63%, 70%, and 68%, respectively, at 3 years. Gross total resection and PT resulted in a 90% 3-year LC rate. The 3-year LC rate was 61% for primary radiation therapy and 59% for patients with gross disease. Gross disease was the only significant factor for LC on multivariate analysis, whereas grade and continuous LC were prognostic for overall survival. Six of 12 local recurrences were marginal. Dural dissemination represented 26% of distant recurrences. Late toxicity occurred in 24% of patients (with

  3. Proton Beam Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Steven H., E-mail: shlin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Myles, Bevan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guo Xiaomao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a promising modality for the management of thoracic malignancies. We report our preliminary experience of treating esophageal cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy (CChT) and PBT (CChT/PBT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of 62 esophageal cancer patients enrolled on a prospective study evaluating normal tissue toxicity from CChT/PBT from 2006 to 2010. Patients were treated with passive scattering PBT with two- or three-field beam arrangement using 180 to 250 MV protons. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to assess time-to-event outcomes and compared the distributions between groups using the log-rank test. Results: The median follow-up time was 20.1 months for survivors. The median age was 68 years (range, 38-86). Most patients were males (82%) who had adenocarcinomas (76%) and Stage II-III disease (84%). The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (RBE [relative biologic equivalence]) (range, 36-57.6). The most common grade 2 to 3 acute toxicities from CChT/PBT were esophagitis (46.8%), fatigue (43.6%), nausea (33.9%), anorexia (30.1%), and radiation dermatitis (16.1%). There were two cases of grade 2 and 3 radiation pneumonitis and two cases of grade 5 toxicities. A total of 29 patients (46.8%) received preoperative CChT/PBT, with one postoperative death. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for the surgical cohort was 28%, and the pCR and near CR rates (0%-1% residual cells) were 50%. While there were significantly fewer local-regional recurrences in the preoperative group (3/29) than in the definitive CChT/PBT group (16/33) (log-rank test, p = 0.005), there were no differences in distant metastatic (DM)-free interval or overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Conclusions: This is the first report of patients treated with PBT/CChT for esophageal cancer. Our data suggest that this modality is associated with a few severe toxicities, but the pathologic response and clinical

  4. Proton Beam Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Steven H.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing; Wei, Caimiao; Myles, Bevan; Guo Xiaomao; Palmer, Matthew; Mohan, Radhe; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a promising modality for the management of thoracic malignancies. We report our preliminary experience of treating esophageal cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy (CChT) and PBT (CChT/PBT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of 62 esophageal cancer patients enrolled on a prospective study evaluating normal tissue toxicity from CChT/PBT from 2006 to 2010. Patients were treated with passive scattering PBT with two- or three-field beam arrangement using 180 to 250 MV protons. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to assess time-to-event outcomes and compared the distributions between groups using the log–rank test. Results: The median follow-up time was 20.1 months for survivors. The median age was 68 years (range, 38–86). Most patients were males (82%) who had adenocarcinomas (76%) and Stage II-III disease (84%). The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (RBE [relative biologic equivalence]) (range, 36–57.6). The most common grade 2 to 3 acute toxicities from CChT/PBT were esophagitis (46.8%), fatigue (43.6%), nausea (33.9%), anorexia (30.1%), and radiation dermatitis (16.1%). There were two cases of grade 2 and 3 radiation pneumonitis and two cases of grade 5 toxicities. A total of 29 patients (46.8%) received preoperative CChT/PBT, with one postoperative death. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for the surgical cohort was 28%, and the pCR and near CR rates (0%–1% residual cells) were 50%. While there were significantly fewer local-regional recurrences in the preoperative group (3/29) than in the definitive CChT/PBT group (16/33) (log–rank test, p = 0.005), there were no differences in distant metastatic (DM)-free interval or overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Conclusions: This is the first report of patients treated with PBT/CChT for esophageal cancer. Our data suggest that this modality is associated with a few severe toxicities, but the pathologic response and

  5. Review of 3D image data calibration for heterogeneity correction in proton therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jiahua; Penfold, Scott N.

    2016-01-01

    Correct modelling of the interaction parameters of patient tissues is of vital importance in proton therapy treatment planning because of the large dose gradients associated with the Bragg peak. Different 3D imaging techniques yield different information regarding these interaction parameters. Given the rapidly expanding interest in proton therapy, this review is written to make readers aware of the current challenges in accounting for tissue heterogeneities and the imaging systems that are proposed to tackle these challenges. A summary of the interaction parameters of interest in proton therapy and the current and developmental 3D imaging techniques used in proton therapy treatment planning is given. The different methods to translate the imaging data to the interaction parameters of interest are reviewed and a summary of the implementations in several commercial treatment planning systems is presented.

  6. Review of 3D image data calibration for heterogeneity correction in proton therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiahua; Penfold, Scott N

    2016-06-01

    Correct modelling of the interaction parameters of patient tissues is of vital importance in proton therapy treatment planning because of the large dose gradients associated with the Bragg peak. Different 3D imaging techniques yield different information regarding these interaction parameters. Given the rapidly expanding interest in proton therapy, this review is written to make readers aware of the current challenges in accounting for tissue heterogeneities and the imaging systems that are proposed to tackle these challenges. A summary of the interaction parameters of interest in proton therapy and the current and developmental 3D imaging techniques used in proton therapy treatment planning is given. The different methods to translate the imaging data to the interaction parameters of interest are reviewed and a summary of the implementations in several commercial treatment planning systems is presented.

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis of cochlear dose reduction by proton beam therapy for medulloblastoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Emi; Kawabuchi, Koichi; Fuji, Hiroshi; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Kumar, Vinay; Shirato, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of proton beam therapy with cochlear dose reduction compared with conventional X-ray radiotherapy for medulloblastoma in childhood. We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 6-year-old children with medulloblastoma after treatment with proton or X-ray radiotherapy. The risks of hearing loss were calculated on cochlear dose for each treatment. Three types of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of EQ-5D, HUI3 and SF-6D were used for estimation of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for proton beam therapy compared with X-ray radiotherapy was calculated for each HRQOL. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. The ICER for EQ-5D, HUI3 and SF-6D were $21 716/QALY, $11 773/QALY, and $20 150/QALY, respectively. One-way sensitivity analyses found that the results were sensitive to discount rate, the risk of hearing loss after proton therapy, and costs of proton irradiation. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curve analysis revealed a 99% probability of proton therapy being cost effective at a societal willingness-to-pay value. Proton beam therapy with cochlear dose reduction improves health outcomes at a cost that is within the acceptable cost-effectiveness range from the payer's standpoint. (author)

  8. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  9. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a 22 Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm 3 ) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The authors

  10. SU-E-J-201: Investigation of MRI Guided Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, JS [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy has been employed for cancer treatment to improve the tumor localization accuracy. Radiation therapy with proton beams requires more on this accuracy because the proton beam has larger uncertainty and dramatic dose variation along the beam direction. Among all the image modalities, magnetic-resonance image (MRI) is the best for soft tissue delineation and real time motion monitoring. In this work, we investigated the behavior of the proton beam in magnetic field with Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: A proton Monte Carlo platform, TOPAS, was used for this investigation. Dose calculations were performed with this platform in a 30cmx30cmx30cm water phantom for both pencil and broad proton beams with different energies (120, 150 and 180MeV) in different magnetic fields (0.5T, 1T and 3T). The isodose distributions, dose profiles in lateral and beam direction were evaluated. The shifts of the Bragg peak in different magnetic fields for different proton energies were compared and the magnetic field effects on the characters of the dose distribution were analyzed. Results: Significant effects of magnetic field have been observed on the proton beam dose distributions, especially for magnetic field of 1T and up. The effects are more significant for higher energy proton beam because higher energy protons travel longer distance in the magnetic field. The Bragg peak shift in the lateral direction is about 38mm for 180MeV and 11mm for 120MeV proton beams in 3T magnetic field. The peak positions are retracted back for 6mm and 2mm, respectively. The effect on the beam penumbra and dose falloff at the distal edge of the Bragg peak is negligible. Conclusion: Though significant magnetic effects on dose distribution have been observed for proton beams, MRI guided proton therapy is feasible because the magnetic effects on dose is predictable and can be considered in patient dose calculation.

  11. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  12. Optimization of personalized therapies for anticancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Alexei

    2013-04-12

    As today, there are hundreds of targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer, many of which have companion biomarkers that are in use to inform treatment decisions. If we would consider this whole arsenal of targeted therapies as a treatment option for every patient, very soon we will reach a scenario where each patient is positive for several markers suggesting their treatment with several targeted therapies. Given the documented side effects of anticancer drugs, it is clear that such a strategy is unfeasible. Here, we propose a strategy that optimizes the design of combinatorial therapies to achieve the best response rates with the minimal toxicity. In this methodology markers are assigned to drugs such that we achieve a high overall response rate while using personalized combinations of minimal size. We tested this methodology in an in silico cancer patient cohort, constructed from in vitro data for 714 cell lines and 138 drugs reported by the Sanger Institute. Our analysis indicates that, even in the context of personalized medicine, combinations of three or more drugs are required to achieve high response rates. Furthermore, patient-to-patient variations in pharmacokinetics have a significant impact in the overall response rate. A 10 fold increase in the pharmacokinetics variations resulted in a significant drop the overall response rate. The design of optimal combinatorial therapy for anticancer treatment requires a transition from the one-drug/one-biomarker approach to global strategies that simultaneously assign makers to a catalog of drugs. The methodology reported here provides a framework to achieve this transition.

  13. Proton Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouw, Kent W. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan V.; Yeap, Beow Y.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; Munzenrider, John E.; Adams, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Grabowski, Eric [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mukai, Shizuo [Retina Service, Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate long-term disease and toxicity outcomes for pediatric retinoblastoma patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 49 retinoblastoma patients (60 eyes) treated with PRT between 1986 and 2012. Results: The majority (84%) of patients had bilateral disease, and nearly half (45%) had received prior chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 8 years (range, 1-24 years), no patients died of retinoblastoma or developed metastatic disease. The post-PRT enucleation rate was low (18%), especially in patients with early-stage disease (11% for patients with International Classification for Intraocular Retinoblastoma [ICIR] stage A-B disease vs 23% for patients with ICIR stage C-D disease). Post-PRT ophthalmologic follow-up was available for 61% of the preserved eyes (30 of 49): 14 of 30 eyes (47%) had 20/40 visual acuity or better, 7 of 30 (23%) had moderate visual acuity (20/40-20/600), and 9 of 30 (30%) had little or no useful vision (worse than 20/600). Twelve of 60 treated eyes (20%) experienced a post-PRT event requiring intervention, with cataracts the most common (4 eyes). No patients developed an in-field second malignancy. Conclusions: Long-term follow-up of retinoblastoma patients treated with PRT demonstrates that PRT can achieve high local control rates, even in advanced cases, and many patients retain useful vision in the treated eye. Treatment-related ocular side effects were uncommon, and no radiation-associated malignancies were observed.

  14. Preparation of pediatric patients for treatment with proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Masashi; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Ayuzawa, Kaoru; Miyamoto, Toshio; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Fukushima, Takashi; Fukushima, Hiroko; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Anesthesia is often used in proton beam therapy (PBT) for pediatric patients and this may prolong the treatment time. The aim of the study was to examine preparation of pediatric patients to allow smooth performance of PBT. Material and methods: Preparation was initiated 1–2 days before treatment planning CT and continued for 10 days. The patient first visited the facility to become familiar with the treatment room and staff. As the second step, the patient stayed in the treatment bed for a certain time with their mother, and then stayed on the treatment bed alone. Special fixtures painted with characters, music, and gifts were also prepared. Results: From 2010 to 2014, 111 pediatric patients underwent PBT. These patients were divided into 3 groups: 40 who could follow instructions well (group A, median age: 13.6 years old), 60 who could communicate, but found it difficult to stay alone for a long time (group B, median age: 4.6 years old), and 11 who could not follow instructions (group C, median age: 1.6 years old). Preparation was used for patients in group B. The mean treatment times in groups A, B and C were 13.6, 17.1, and 15.6 min, respectively, on PBT treatment days 2–6, and 11.8, 13.0, and 16.9 min, respectively, for the last 5 days of PBT treatment. The time reduction was significant in group B (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Preparation is useful for pediatric patients who can communicate. This approach allows PBT to be conducted more smoothly over a shorter treatment time

  15. Proton beam therapy and accountable care: the challenges ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnahal, Shereef M; Kerstiens, John; Helsper, Richard S; Zietman, Anthony L; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2013-03-15

    Proton beam therapy (PBT) centers have drawn increasing public scrutiny for their high cost. The behavior of such facilities is likely to change under the Affordable Care Act. We modeled how accountable care reform may affect the financial standing of PBT centers and their incentives to treat complex patient cases. We used operational data and publicly listed Medicare rates to model the relationship between financial metrics for PBT center performance and case mix (defined as the percentage of complex cases, such as pediatric central nervous system tumors). Financial metrics included total daily revenues and debt coverage (daily revenues - daily debt payments). Fee-for-service (FFS) and accountable care (ACO) reimbursement scenarios were modeled. Sensitivity analyses were performed around the room time required to treat noncomplex cases: simple (30 minutes), prostate (24 minutes), and short prostate (15 minutes). Sensitivity analyses were also performed for total machine operating time (14, 16, and 18 h/d). Reimbursement under ACOs could reduce daily revenues in PBT centers by up to 32%. The incremental revenue gained by replacing 1 complex case with noncomplex cases was lowest for simple cases and highest for short prostate cases. ACO rates reduced this incremental incentive by 53.2% for simple cases and 41.7% for short prostate cases. To cover daily debt payments after ACO rates were imposed, 26% fewer complex patients were allowable at varying capital costs and interest rates. Only facilities with total machine operating times of 18 hours per day would cover debt payments in all scenarios. Debt-financed PBT centers will face steep challenges to remain financially viable after ACO implementation. Paradoxically, reduced reimbursement for noncomplex cases will require PBT centers to treat more such cases over cases for which PBT has demonstrated superior outcomes. Relative losses will be highest for those facilities focused primarily on treating noncomplex cases

  16. Proton Beam Therapy and Accountable Care: The Challenges Ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elnahal, Shereef M.; Kerstiens, John; Helsper, Richard S.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) centers have drawn increasing public scrutiny for their high cost. The behavior of such facilities is likely to change under the Affordable Care Act. We modeled how accountable care reform may affect the financial standing of PBT centers and their incentives to treat complex patient cases. Methods and Materials: We used operational data and publicly listed Medicare rates to model the relationship between financial metrics for PBT center performance and case mix (defined as the percentage of complex cases, such as pediatric central nervous system tumors). Financial metrics included total daily revenues and debt coverage (daily revenues − daily debt payments). Fee-for-service (FFS) and accountable care (ACO) reimbursement scenarios were modeled. Sensitivity analyses were performed around the room time required to treat noncomplex cases: simple (30 minutes), prostate (24 minutes), and short prostate (15 minutes). Sensitivity analyses were also performed for total machine operating time (14, 16, and 18 h/d). Results: Reimbursement under ACOs could reduce daily revenues in PBT centers by up to 32%. The incremental revenue gained by replacing 1 complex case with noncomplex cases was lowest for simple cases and highest for short prostate cases. ACO rates reduced this incremental incentive by 53.2% for simple cases and 41.7% for short prostate cases. To cover daily debt payments after ACO rates were imposed, 26% fewer complex patients were allowable at varying capital costs and interest rates. Only facilities with total machine operating times of 18 hours per day would cover debt payments in all scenarios. Conclusions: Debt-financed PBT centers will face steep challenges to remain financially viable after ACO implementation. Paradoxically, reduced reimbursement for noncomplex cases will require PBT centers to treat more such cases over cases for which PBT has demonstrated superior outcomes. Relative losses will be highest for those

  17. Magnetically scanned proton therapy beams: rationales and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.T.L.; Schreuder, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    Perhaps the most important advantages of beam scanning systems for proton therapy in comparison with conventional passive beam spreading systems are: (1) Intensity modulation and inverse planning are possible. (2) There is negligible reduction in the range of the beam. (3) Integral dose is reduced as dose conformation to the proximal edge of the lesion is possible. (4) In principle no field-specific modifying devices are required. (5) There is less activation of the surroundings. (6) Scanning systems axe almost infinitely flexible. The main disadvantages include: (1) Scanning systems are more complicated and therefore potentially less reliable and more dangerous. (2) The development of such systems is more demanding in terms of cost, time and manpower. (3) More stable beams are required. (4) Dose and beam position monitoring are more difficult. (5) The problems associated with patient and organ movement axe more severe. There are several techniques which can be used for scanning. For lateral beam spreading, circular scanning (wobbling) or linear scanning can be done. In the latter case the beam can be scanned continuously or in a discrete fashion (spot scanning). Another possibility is to undertake the fastest scan in one dimension (strip scanning) and translate the patient or the scanning magnet in the other dimension. Depth variation is achieved by interposing degraders in the beam (cyclotrons) or by changing the beam energy (synchrotrons). The aim of beam scanning is to deliver a predetermined dose at any point in the body. Special safety precautions must be taken because of the high instantaneous dose rates. The beam position and the dose delivered at each point must be accurately and redundantly determined. (author)

  18. Proton Beam Therapy and Accountable Care: The Challenges Ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elnahal, Shereef M., E-mail: selnahal@partners.org [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kerstiens, John [Proton Therapy Center, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States); Helsper, Richard S. [Genesis HealthCare System, Zanesville, OH (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Johnstone, Peter A.S. [Proton Therapy Center, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) centers have drawn increasing public scrutiny for their high cost. The behavior of such facilities is likely to change under the Affordable Care Act. We modeled how accountable care reform may affect the financial standing of PBT centers and their incentives to treat complex patient cases. Methods and Materials: We used operational data and publicly listed Medicare rates to model the relationship between financial metrics for PBT center performance and case mix (defined as the percentage of complex cases, such as pediatric central nervous system tumors). Financial metrics included total daily revenues and debt coverage (daily revenues − daily debt payments). Fee-for-service (FFS) and accountable care (ACO) reimbursement scenarios were modeled. Sensitivity analyses were performed around the room time required to treat noncomplex cases: simple (30 minutes), prostate (24 minutes), and short prostate (15 minutes). Sensitivity analyses were also performed for total machine operating time (14, 16, and 18 h/d). Results: Reimbursement under ACOs could reduce daily revenues in PBT centers by up to 32%. The incremental revenue gained by replacing 1 complex case with noncomplex cases was lowest for simple cases and highest for short prostate cases. ACO rates reduced this incremental incentive by 53.2% for simple cases and 41.7% for short prostate cases. To cover daily debt payments after ACO rates were imposed, 26% fewer complex patients were allowable at varying capital costs and interest rates. Only facilities with total machine operating times of 18 hours per day would cover debt payments in all scenarios. Conclusions: Debt-financed PBT centers will face steep challenges to remain financially viable after ACO implementation. Paradoxically, reduced reimbursement for noncomplex cases will require PBT centers to treat more such cases over cases for which PBT has demonstrated superior outcomes. Relative losses will be highest for those

  19. Proton Therapy Expansion Under Current United States Reimbursement Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstiens, John [Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Johnstone, Peter A.S., E-mail: pajohnst@iupui.edu [Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether all the existing and planned proton beam therapy (PBT) centers in the United States can survive on a local patient mix that is dictated by insurers, not by number of patients. Methods and Materials: We determined current and projected cancer rates for 10 major US metropolitan areas. Using published utilization rates, we calculated patient percentages who are candidates for PBT. Then, on the basis of current published insurer coverage policies, we applied our experience of what would be covered to determine the net number of patients for whom reimbursement is expected. Having determined the net number of covered patients, we applied our average beam delivery times to determine the total number of minutes needed to treat that patient over the course of their treatment. We then calculated our expected annual patient capacity per treatment room to determine the appropriate number of treatment rooms for the area. Results: The population of patients who will be both PBT candidates and will have treatments reimbursed by insurance is significantly smaller than the population who should receive PBT. Coverage decisions made by insurers reduce the number of PBT rooms that are economically viable. Conclusions: The expansion of PBT centers in the US is not sustainable under the current reimbursement model. Viability of new centers will be limited to those operating in larger regional metropolitan areas, and few metropolitan areas in the US can support multiple centers. In general, 1-room centers require captive (non–PBT-served) populations of approximately 1,000,000 lives to be economically viable, and a large center will require a population of >4,000,000 lives. In areas with smaller populations or where or a PBT center already exists, new centers require subsidy.

  20. Effects of Surgery and Proton Therapy on Cerebral White Matter of Craniopharyngioma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sabin, Noah D. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Ogg, Robert J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Boop, Frederick A. [Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Jane, John A. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine radiation dose effect on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in craniopharyngioma patients receiving surgery and proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients (2.1-19.3 years of age) with craniopharyngioma underwent surgery and proton therapy in a prospective therapeutic trial. Anatomical magnetic resonance images acquired after surgery but before proton therapy were inspected to identify white matter structures intersected by surgical corridors and catheter tracks. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to measure microstructural integrity changes in cerebral white matter. Fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from DTI was statistically analyzed for 51 atlas-based white matter structures of the brain to determine radiation dose effect. FA in surgery-affected regions in the corpus callosum was compared to that in its intact counterpart to determine whether surgical defects affect radiation dose effect. Results: Surgical defects were seen most frequently in the corpus callosum because of transcallosal resection of tumors and insertion of ventricular or cyst catheters. Longitudinal DTI data indicated reductions in FA 3 months after therapy, which was followed by a recovery in most white matter structures. A greater FA reduction was correlated with a higher radiation dose in 20 white matter structures, indicating a radiation dose effect. The average FA in the surgery-affected regions before proton therapy was smaller (P=.0001) than that in their non–surgery-affected counterparts with more intensified subsequent reduction of FA (P=.0083) after therapy, suggesting that surgery accentuated the radiation dose effect. Conclusions: DTI data suggest that mild radiation dose effects occur in patients with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy. Surgical defects present at the time of proton therapy appear to accentuate the radiation dose effect longitudinally

  1. Effects of Surgery and Proton Therapy on Cerebral White Matter of Craniopharyngioma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uh, Jinsoo; Merchant, Thomas E.; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu; Sabin, Noah D.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Ogg, Robert J.; Boop, Frederick A.; Jane, John A.; Hua, Chiaho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine radiation dose effect on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in craniopharyngioma patients receiving surgery and proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients (2.1-19.3 years of age) with craniopharyngioma underwent surgery and proton therapy in a prospective therapeutic trial. Anatomical magnetic resonance images acquired after surgery but before proton therapy were inspected to identify white matter structures intersected by surgical corridors and catheter tracks. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to measure microstructural integrity changes in cerebral white matter. Fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from DTI was statistically analyzed for 51 atlas-based white matter structures of the brain to determine radiation dose effect. FA in surgery-affected regions in the corpus callosum was compared to that in its intact counterpart to determine whether surgical defects affect radiation dose effect. Results: Surgical defects were seen most frequently in the corpus callosum because of transcallosal resection of tumors and insertion of ventricular or cyst catheters. Longitudinal DTI data indicated reductions in FA 3 months after therapy, which was followed by a recovery in most white matter structures. A greater FA reduction was correlated with a higher radiation dose in 20 white matter structures, indicating a radiation dose effect. The average FA in the surgery-affected regions before proton therapy was smaller (P=.0001) than that in their non–surgery-affected counterparts with more intensified subsequent reduction of FA (P=.0083) after therapy, suggesting that surgery accentuated the radiation dose effect. Conclusions: DTI data suggest that mild radiation dose effects occur in patients with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy. Surgical defects present at the time of proton therapy appear to accentuate the radiation dose effect longitudinally

  2. Monte Carlo characterisation of the Dose Magnifying Glass for proton therapy quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, A. H.; Guatelli, S.; Petesecca, M.; Jackson, M.; Rozenfeld, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    A Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation study was carried out to characterise a novel silicon strip detector, the Dose Magnifying Glass (DMG), for use in proton therapy Quality Assurance. We investigated the possibility to use DMG to determine the energy of the incident proton beam. The advantages of DMG are quick response, easy operation and high spatial resolution. In this work we theoretically proved that DMG can be used for QA in the determination of the energy of the incident proton beam, for ocular and prostate cancer therapy. The study was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations Experimental measurements are currently on their way to confirm the results of this simulation study.

  3. The first private-hospital based proton therapy center in Korea; Status of the proton therapy center at Samsung Medical Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Kwang Zoo; Han, Young Yih; Kim, Jin Sung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC-PTS) including the proton beam generator, irradiation system, patient positioning system, patient position verification system, respiratory gating system, and operating and safety control system, and review the current status of the SMC-PTS. The SMC-PTS has a cyclotron (230 MeV) and two treatment rooms: one treatment room is equipped with a multi-purpose nozzle and the other treatment room is equipped with a dedicated pencil beam scanning nozzle. The proton beam generator including the cyclotron and the energy selection system can lower the energy of protons down to 70 MeV from the maximum 230 MeV. The multi-purpose nozzle can deliver both wobbling proton beam and active scanning proton beam, and a multi-leaf collimator has been installed in the downstream of the nozzle. The dedicated scanning nozzle can deliver active scanning proton beam with a helium gas filled pipe minimizing unnecessary interactions with the air in the beam path. The equipment was provided by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., RayStation from RaySearch Laboratories AB is the selected treatment planning system, and data management will be handled by the MOSAIQ system from Elekta AB. The SMC-PTS located in Seoul, Korea, is scheduled to begin treating cancer patients in 2015

  4. The first private-hospital based proton therapy center in Korea; status of the Proton Therapy Center at Samsung Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Han, Youngyih; Kim, Jinsung; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sang Gyu; Jung, Sang Hoon; Chung, Yoonsun; Cho, Sungkoo; Jo, Kwanghyun; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Hong, Chae-Seon; Shin, Jung Suk; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Boram; Shibagaki, Gantaro; Nonaka, Hideki; Sasai, Kenzo; Koyabu, Yukio; Choi, Changhoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Ahn, Yong Chan; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Oh, Dong Ryul; Noh, Jae Myung; Yu, Jeong Il; Song, Sanghyuk; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Bomi; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC-PTS) including the proton beam generator, irradiation system, patient positioning system, patient position verification system, respiratory gating system, and operating and safety control system, and review the current status of the SMC-PTS. The SMC-PTS has a cyclotron (230 MeV) and two treatment rooms: one treatment room is equipped with a multi-purpose nozzle and the other treatment room is equipped with a dedicated pencil beam scanning nozzle. The proton beam generator including the cyclotron and the energy selection system can lower the energy of protons down to 70 MeV from the maximum 230 MeV. The multi-purpose nozzle can deliver both wobbling proton beam and active scanning proton beam, and a multi-leaf collimator has been installed in the downstream of the nozzle. The dedicated scanning nozzle can deliver active scanning proton beam with a helium gas filled pipe minimizing unnecessary interactions with the air in the beam path. The equipment was provided by Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., RayStation from RaySearch Laboratories AB is the selected treatment planning system, and data management will be handled by the MOSAIQ system from Elekta AB. The SMC-PTS located in Seoul, Korea, is scheduled to begin treating cancer patients in 2015.

  5. Range verification for eye proton therapy based on proton-induced x-ray emissions from implanted metal markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Vanessa; Kacperek, Andrzej; Royle, Gary; Gibson, Adam

    2014-06-01

    Metal fiducial markers are often implanted on the back of the eye before proton therapy to improve target localization and reduce patient setup errors. We aim to detect characteristic x-ray emissions from metal targets during proton therapy to verify the treatment range accuracy. Initially gold was chosen for its biocompatibility properties. Proton-induced x-ray emissions (PIXE) from a 15 mm diameter gold marker were detected at different penetration depths of a 59 MeV proton beam at the CATANA proton facility at INFN-LNS (Italy). The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was used to reproduce the experiment and to investigate the effect of different size markers, materials, and the response to both mono-energetic and fully modulated beams. The intensity of the emitted x-rays decreases with decreasing proton energy and thus decreases with depth. If we assume the range to be the depth at which the dose is reduced to 10% of its maximum value and we define the residual range as the distance between the marker and the range of the beam, then the minimum residual range which can be detected with 95% confidence level is the depth at which the PIXE peak is equal to 1.96 σbkg, which is the standard variation of the background noise. With our system and experimental setup this value is 3 mm, when 20 GyE are delivered to a gold marker of 15 mm diameter. Results from silver are more promising. Even when a 5 mm diameter silver marker is placed at a depth equal to the range, the PIXE peak is 2.1 σbkg. Although these quantitative results are dependent on the experimental setup used in this research study, they demonstrate that the real-time analysis of the PIXE emitted by fiducial metal markers can be used to derive beam range. Further analysis are needed to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique in a clinical setup.

  6. The Quest for Evidence for Proton Therapy: Model-Based Approach and Precision Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Joachim, E-mail: j.widder@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schaaf, Arjen van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Marijnen, Corrie A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rasch, Coen R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Reducing dose to normal tissues is the advantage of protons versus photons. We aimed to describe a method for translating this reduction into a clinically relevant benefit. Methods and Materials: Dutch scientific and health care governance bodies have recently issued landmark reports regarding generation of relevant evidence for new technologies in health care including proton therapy. An approach based on normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models has been adopted to select patients who are most likely to experience fewer (serious) adverse events achievable by state-of-the-art proton treatment. Results: By analogy with biologically targeted therapies, the technology needs to be tested in enriched cohorts of patients exhibiting the decisive predictive marker: difference in normal tissue dosimetric signatures between proton and photon treatment plans. Expected clinical benefit is then estimated by virtue of multifactorial NTCP models. In this sense, high-tech radiation therapy falls under precision medicine. As a consequence, randomizing nonenriched populations between photons and protons is predictably inefficient and likely to produce confusing results. Conclusions: Validating NTCP models in appropriately composed cohorts treated with protons should be the primary research agenda leading to urgently needed evidence for proton therapy.

  7. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 01: On the use of proton radiography to reduce beam range uncertainties and improve patient positioning accuracy in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins-Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Beaulieu, Luc; Seco, Joao [Université Laval/ CHU de Québec, Université Laval/CHU de Québec, Massachussetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2016-08-15

    To present two related developments of proton radiography (pRad) to minimize range uncertainty in proton therapy. The first combines a pRad with an X-ray CT to produce a patient-specific relative stopping power (RSP) map. The second aims to improve the pRad spatial resolution for accurate registration prior to the first. The enhanced-pRad can also be used in a novel proton-CT reconstruction algorithm. Monte Carlo pRad were computed from three phantoms; the Gammex, the Catphan and an anthropomorphic head. An optimized cubic-spline estimator derives the most likely path. The length crossed by the protons voxel-by-voxel was calculated by combining their estimated paths with the CT. The difference between the theoretical (length×RSP) and measured energy loss was minimized through a least squares optimization (LSO) algorithm yielding the RSP map. To increase pRad spatial resolution for registration with the CT, the phantom was discretized into voxels columns. The average column RSP was optimized to maximize the proton energy loss likelihood (MLE). Simulations showed precise RSP (<0.75%) for Gammex materials except low-density lung (<1.2%). For the head, accurate RSP were obtained (µ=−0.10%1.5σ=1.12%) and the range precision was improved (ΔR80 of −0.20±0.35%). Spatial resolution was increased in pRad (2.75 to 6.71 lp/cm) and pCT from MLE-enhanced pRad (2.83 to 5.86 lp/cm). The LSO decreases the range uncertainty (R80σ<1.0%) while the MLE-enhanced pRad spatial resolution (+244%) and is a great candidate for pCT reconstruction.

  8. Optimizing biological therapy in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gecse, Krisztina Barbara; Végh, Zsuzsanna; Lakatos, Péter László

    2016-01-01

    Anti-TNF therapy has revolutionized the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, including both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, a significant proportion of patients does not respond to anti-TNF agents or lose response over time. Recently, therapeutic drug monitoring has gained a major role in identifying the mechanism and management of loss of response. The aim of this review article is to summarize the predictors of efficacy and outcomes, the different mechanisms of anti-TNF/biological failure in Crohn's disease and identify strategies to optimize biological treatment.

  9. Faraday cup dosimetry in a proton therapy beam without collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grusell, Erik; Isacsson, Ulf; Montelius, Anders; Medin, Joakim

    1995-01-01

    A Faraday cup in a proton beam can give an accurate measurement of the number of protons collected by the cup. It is shown that the collection efficiency with a proper design can be close to unity. To be able to calibrate an ionization chamber from such a measurement, as is recommended in some dosimetry protocols, the energy spectrum of the proton beam must be accurately known. This is normally not the case when the lateral beam extension is defined by collimators. Therefore a method for relating an ionization chamber measurement in an uncollimated beam to the total number of protons in the beam has been developed and is described together with experimental results from calibrating an ionization chamber using this method in the therapeutic beam in Uppsala. This method is applicable to ionization chambers of any shape and the accuracy is estimated to be 1.6% (1 SD). (Author)

  10. SU-F-J-57: Effectiveness of Daily CT-Based Three-Dimensional Image Guided and Adaptive Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, S [University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Tachibana, H; Hotta, K; Baba, H; Kohno, R; Akimoto, T [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Nakamura, N [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Miyakawa, S; Kurosawa, T [Komazawa University, Setagaya, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Daily CT-based three-dimensional image-guided and adaptive (CTIGRT-ART) proton therapy system was designed and developed. We also evaluated the effectiveness of the CTIGRT-ART. Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed in three lung cancer patients: Proton treatment planning was performed using CT image datasets acquired by Toshiba Aquilion ONE. Planning target volume and surrounding organs were contoured by a well-trained radiation oncologist. Dose distribution was optimized using 180-deg. and 270-deg. two fields in passive scattering proton therapy. Well commissioned Simplified Monte Carlo algorithm was used as dose calculation engine. Daily consecutive CT image datasets was acquired by an in-room CT (Toshiba Aquilion LB). In our in-house program, two image registrations for bone and tumor were performed to shift the isocenter using treatment CT image dataset. Subsequently, dose recalculation was performed after the shift of the isocenter. When the dose distribution after the tumor registration exhibits change of dosimetric parameter of CTV D90% compared to the initial plan, an additional process of was performed that the range shifter thickness was optimized. Dose distribution with CTV D90% for the bone registration, the tumor registration only and adaptive plan with the tumor registration was compared to the initial plan. Results: In the bone registration, tumor dose coverage was decreased by 16% on average (Maximum: 56%). The tumor registration shows better coverage than the bone registration, however the coverage was also decreased by 9% (Maximum: 22%) The adaptive plan shows similar dose coverage of the tumor (Average: 2%, Maximum: 7%). Conclusion: There is a high possibility that only image registration for bone and tumor may reduce tumor coverage. Thus, our proposed methodology of image guidance and adaptive planning using the range adaptation after tumor registration would be effective for proton therapy. This research is partially supported

  11. Proton therapy Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most powerful feature of the Monte Carlo method is the possibility of simulating all individual particle interactions in three dimensions and performing numerical experiments with a preset error. These facts were the motivation behind the development of a general-purpose Monte Carlo SRNA program for proton transport simulation in technical systems described by standard geometrical forms (plane, sphere, cone, cylinder, cube. Some of the possible applications of the SRNA program are: (a a general code for proton transport modeling, (b design of accelerator-driven systems, (c simulation of proton scattering and degrading shapes and composition, (d research on proton detectors; and (e radiation protection at accelerator installations. This wide range of possible applications of the program demands the development of various versions of SRNA-VOX codes for proton transport modeling in voxelized geometries and has, finally, resulted in the ISTAR package for the calculation of deposited energy distribution in patients on the basis of CT data in radiotherapy. All of the said codes are capable of using 3-D proton sources with an arbitrary energy spectrum in an interval of 100 keV to 250 MeV.

  12. Direct Comparison of Biologically Optimized Spread-out Bragg Peaks for Protons and Carbon Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, Jan J.; Oelfke, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy with hadrons, it is anticipated that carbon ions are superior to protons, mainly because of their biological properties: the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for carbon ions is supposedly higher in the target than in the surrounding normal tissue, leading to a therapeutic advantage over protons. The purpose of this report is to investigate this effect by using biological model calculations. Methods and Materials: We compared spread-out Bragg peaks for protons and carbon ions by using physical and biological optimization. The RBE for protons and carbon ions was calculated according to published biological models. These models predict increased RBE values in regions of high linear energy transfer (LET) and an inverse dependency of the RBE on dose. Results: For pure physical optimization, protons yield a better dose distribution along the central axis. In biologically optimized plans, RBE variations for protons were relatively small. For carbon ions, high RBE values were found in the high-LET target region, as well as in the low-dose region outside the target. This means that the LET dependency and dose dependency of the RBE can cancel each other. We show this for radioresistant tissues treated with two opposing beams, for which the predicted carbon RBE within the target volume was lower than outside. Conclusions: For tissue parameters used in this study, the model used does not predict a biologic advantage of carbon ions. More reliable model parameters and clinical trials are necessary to explore the true potential of radiotherapy with carbon ions

  13. SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deffet, S; Macq, B; Farace, P; Righetto, R; Vander Stappen, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) to stopping powers is a major source of range uncertainty in proton therapy (PT). Our contribution shows how proton radiographs (PR) acquired with a multi-layer ionization chamber in a PT center can be used for accurate patient positioning and subsequently for patient-specific optimization of the conversion from HU to stopping powers. Methods: A multi-layer ionization chamber was used to measure the integral depth-dose (IDD) of 220 MeV pencil beam spots passing through several anthropomorphic phantoms. The whole area of interest was imaged by repositioning the couch and by acquiring a 45×45 mm"2 frame for each position. A rigid registration algorithm was implemented to correct the positioning error between the proton radiographs and the planning CT. After registration, the stopping power map obtained from the planning CT with the calibration curve of the treatment planning system was used together with the water equivalent thickness gained from two proton radiographs to generate a phantom-specific stopping power map. Results: Our results show that it is possible to make a registration with submillimeter accuracy from proton radiography obtained by sending beamlets separated by more than 1 mm. This was made possible by the complex shape of the IDD due to the presence of lateral heterogeneities along the path of the beam. Submillimeter positioning was still possible with a 5 mm spot spacing. Phantom specific stopping power maps obtained by minimizing the range error were cross-verified by the acquisition of an additional proton radiography where the phantom was positioned in a random but known manner. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a CT-PR registration algorithm together with range-error based optimization can be used to produce a patient-specific stopping power map. Sylvain Deffet reports financial funding of its PhD thesis by Ion Beam Applications (IBA) during the confines of the study and outside the

  14. SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deffet, S; Macq, B [Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Farace, P; Righetto, R [Trento Hospital / APSS, Trento (Italy); Vander Stappen, F [Ion Beam Applications (IBA), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) to stopping powers is a major source of range uncertainty in proton therapy (PT). Our contribution shows how proton radiographs (PR) acquired with a multi-layer ionization chamber in a PT center can be used for accurate patient positioning and subsequently for patient-specific optimization of the conversion from HU to stopping powers. Methods: A multi-layer ionization chamber was used to measure the integral depth-dose (IDD) of 220 MeV pencil beam spots passing through several anthropomorphic phantoms. The whole area of interest was imaged by repositioning the couch and by acquiring a 45×45 mm{sup 2} frame for each position. A rigid registration algorithm was implemented to correct the positioning error between the proton radiographs and the planning CT. After registration, the stopping power map obtained from the planning CT with the calibration curve of the treatment planning system was used together with the water equivalent thickness gained from two proton radiographs to generate a phantom-specific stopping power map. Results: Our results show that it is possible to make a registration with submillimeter accuracy from proton radiography obtained by sending beamlets separated by more than 1 mm. This was made possible by the complex shape of the IDD due to the presence of lateral heterogeneities along the path of the beam. Submillimeter positioning was still possible with a 5 mm spot spacing. Phantom specific stopping power maps obtained by minimizing the range error were cross-verified by the acquisition of an additional proton radiography where the phantom was positioned in a random but known manner. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a CT-PR registration algorithm together with range-error based optimization can be used to produce a patient-specific stopping power map. Sylvain Deffet reports financial funding of its PhD thesis by Ion Beam Applications (IBA) during the confines of the study and outside the

  15. Dose comparison according to Smooth Thickness application of Range compensator during proton therapy for brain tumor patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tase Woan; Kim, Dae Woong; Kim, Jae Weon; Jeong, Kyeong Sik [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Range Compensator used for proton therapy compensates the proton beam dose which delivers to the normal tissues according to the Target's Distal Margin dose. We are going to check the improvement of dose on the target part by comparing the dose of PTV and OAR according to applying in different method of Smooth Thickness of Range Compensator which is used in brain tumor therapy. For 10 brain tumor patients taking proton therapy in National Cancer Center, Apply Smooth Thickness applied in Range Compensator in order from one to five by using Compensator Editor of Eclipse Proton Planning System(Version 10.0, Varian, USA). The therapy plan algorithm used Proton Convolution Superposition(version 8.1.20 or 10.0.28), and we compared Dmax, Dmin, Homogeneity Index, Conformity Index and OAR dose around tumor by applying Smooth Thickness in phase. When Smooth Thickness was applied from one to five, the Dmax of PTV was decreased max 4.3%, minimum at 0.8 and average of 1.81%. Dmin increased max 1.8%, min 1.8% and average. Difference between max dose and minimum dose decreased at max 5.9% min 1.4% and average 2.6%. Homogeneity Index decreased average of 0.018 and Conformity Index didn't had a meaningful change. OAR dose decreased in Brain Stem at max 1.6%, min 0.1% and average 0.6% and in Optic Chiasm max 1.3%, min 0.3%, and average 0.5%. However, patient C and patient E had an increase each 0.3% and 0.6%. Additionally, in Rt. Optic Nerve, there was a decrease at max 1.5%, min 0.3%, and average 0.8%, however, patient B had 0.1% increase. In Lt. Optic Nerve, there was a decrease at max 1.8%, min 0.3%, and average 0.7%, however, patient H had 0.4 increase. As Smooth Thickness of Range Compensator which is used as the proton treatment for brain tumor patients is applied in stages, the resolution of Compensator increased and as a result the most optimized amount of proton beam dose can be delivered. This is considered to be able to irradiate the equal amount at PTV and

  16. Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thariat, Juliette; Maschi, Celia; Lanteri, Sara; Peyrichon, Marie Laure; Baillif, Stephanie; Herault, Joel; Salleron, Julia; Caujolle, Jean Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether proton therapy (PT) performs safely in superotemporal melanomas, in terms of risk of dry-eye syndrome (DES). Methods and Materials: Tumor location, DES grade, and dose to ocular structures were analyzed in patients undergoing PT (2005-2015) with 52 Gy (prescribed dose, not accounting for biologic effectiveness correction of 1.1). Prognostic factors of DES and severe DES (sDES, grades 2-3) were determined with Cox proportional hazard models. Visual acuity deterioration and enucleation rates were compared by sDES and tumor locations. Results: Median follow-up was 44 months (interquartile range, 18-60 months). Of 853 patients (mean age, 64 years), 30.5% had temporal and 11.4% superotemporal tumors. Five-year incidence of DES and sDES was 23.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19.0%-27.7%) and 10.9% (95% CI 8.2%-14.4%), respectively. Multivariable analysis showed a higher risk for sDES in superotemporal (hazard ratio [HR] 5.82, 95% CI 2.72-12.45) and temporal tumors (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.28-5.42), age ≥70 years (HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.09-3.32), distance to optic disk ≥5 mm (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.52-4.84), ≥35% of retina receiving 12 Gy (HR 2.98, 95% CI 1.54-5.77), and eyelid rim irradiation (HR 2.68, 95% CI 1.49-4.80). The same risk factors were found for DES. Visual acuity deteriorated more in patients with sDES (0.86 ± 1.10 vs 0.64 ± 0.98 logMAR, P=.034) but not between superotemporal/temporal and other locations (P=.890). Enucleation rates were independent of sDES (P=.707) and tumor locations (P=.729). Conclusions: Severe DES was more frequent in superotemporal/temporal melanomas. Incidence of vision deterioration and enucleation was no higher in patients with superotemporal melanoma than in patients with tumors in other locations. Tumor location should not contraindicate PT.

  17. Dry Eye Syndrome After Proton Therapy of Ocular Melanomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thariat, Juliette, E-mail: jthariat@gmail.com [Proton Therapy Unit, Department of Radiation Therapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Maschi, Celia; Lanteri, Sara [Department of Ophthalmology, Pasteur 2 Hospital, Eye University Clinic, Nice (France); Peyrichon, Marie Laure [Proton Therapy Unit, Department of Radiation Therapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Baillif, Stephanie [Department of Ophthalmology, Pasteur 2 Hospital, Eye University Clinic, Nice (France); Herault, Joel [Proton Therapy Unit, Department of Radiation Therapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Salleron, Julia [Department of Biostatistics, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Caujolle, Jean Pierre [Department of Ophthalmology, Pasteur 2 Hospital, Eye University Clinic, Nice (France)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether proton therapy (PT) performs safely in superotemporal melanomas, in terms of risk of dry-eye syndrome (DES). Methods and Materials: Tumor location, DES grade, and dose to ocular structures were analyzed in patients undergoing PT (2005-2015) with 52 Gy (prescribed dose, not accounting for biologic effectiveness correction of 1.1). Prognostic factors of DES and severe DES (sDES, grades 2-3) were determined with Cox proportional hazard models. Visual acuity deterioration and enucleation rates were compared by sDES and tumor locations. Results: Median follow-up was 44 months (interquartile range, 18-60 months). Of 853 patients (mean age, 64 years), 30.5% had temporal and 11.4% superotemporal tumors. Five-year incidence of DES and sDES was 23.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19.0%-27.7%) and 10.9% (95% CI 8.2%-14.4%), respectively. Multivariable analysis showed a higher risk for sDES in superotemporal (hazard ratio [HR] 5.82, 95% CI 2.72-12.45) and temporal tumors (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.28-5.42), age ≥70 years (HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.09-3.32), distance to optic disk ≥5 mm (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.52-4.84), ≥35% of retina receiving 12 Gy (HR 2.98, 95% CI 1.54-5.77), and eyelid rim irradiation (HR 2.68, 95% CI 1.49-4.80). The same risk factors were found for DES. Visual acuity deteriorated more in patients with sDES (0.86 ± 1.10 vs 0.64 ± 0.98 logMAR, P=.034) but not between superotemporal/temporal and other locations (P=.890). Enucleation rates were independent of sDES (P=.707) and tumor locations (P=.729). Conclusions: Severe DES was more frequent in superotemporal/temporal melanomas. Incidence of vision deterioration and enucleation was no higher in patients with superotemporal melanoma than in patients with tumors in other locations. Tumor location should not contraindicate PT.

  18. Accelerated prompt gamma estimation for clinical proton therapy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Brent F. B.; Létang, J. M.; Testa, É.; Sarrut, D.

    2016-11-01

    There is interest in the particle therapy community in using prompt gammas (PGs), a natural byproduct of particle treatment, for range verification and eventually dose control. However, PG production is a rare process and therefore estimation of PGs exiting a patient during a proton treatment plan executed by a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation converges slowly. Recently, different approaches to accelerating the estimation of PG yield have been presented. Sterpin et al (2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 4915-46) described a fast analytic method, which is still sensitive to heterogeneities. El Kanawati et al (2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 8067-86) described a variance reduction method (pgTLE) that accelerates the PG estimation by precomputing PG production probabilities as a function of energy and target materials, but has as a drawback that the proposed method is limited to analytical phantoms. We present a two-stage variance reduction method, named voxelized pgTLE (vpgTLE), that extends pgTLE to voxelized volumes. As a preliminary step, PG production probabilities are precomputed once and stored in a database. In stage 1, we simulate the interactions between the treatment plan and the patient CT with low statistic MC to obtain the spatial and spectral distribution of the PGs. As primary particles are propagated throughout the patient CT, the PG yields are computed in each voxel from the initial database, as a function of the current energy of the primary, the material in the voxel and the step length. The result is a voxelized image of PG yield, normalized to a single primary. The second stage uses this intermediate PG image as a source to generate and propagate the number of PGs throughout the rest of the scene geometry, e.g. into a detection device, corresponding to the number of primaries desired. We achieved a gain of around 103 for both a geometrical heterogeneous phantom and a complete patient CT treatment plan with respect to analog MC, at a convergence level of 2% relative

  19. Proton beam therapy: reliability of the synchrocyclotron at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisterson, J.M.; Cascio, E.; Koehler, A.M.; Johnson, K.N.

    1991-01-01

    The reliability of the synchrocyclotron at Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory has been studied over the period 1980-1989 to see if proton beam therapy can compare in reliability to linear accelerators used in radiation therapy departments. Breakdowns in relation to patient load are reviewed in outline. (U.K.)

  20. Proton therapy of uveal melanomas. Intercomparison of MRI-based and conventional treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, S.; Hinkelbein, W. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Charite Univ. Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Cordini, D.; Heufelder, J.; Simiantonakis, I.; Kluge, H. [Eye Tumor Therapy, Hahn-Meitner Inst., Berlin (Germany); Bendl, R. [Dept. of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Lemke, A.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Charite Univ. Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Bechrakis, N.E.; Foerster, M.H. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Charite Univ. Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Background and purpose: proton therapy for uveal melanoma provides high-conformal dose application to the target volume and, thus, an optimal saving of the organs at risk nearby. Treatment planning is done with the model-based treatment-planning system eyeplan. Tumor reconstruction is based only on a fundus composite, which often leads to an overestimation of the clinical target volume (CTV). The purpose was to exploit MRI on trial in a proton therapy-planning system by using the novel image-based treatment-planning system octopus. Patients and methods: ten patients with uveal melanomas received both a high-resolution planning CT and MRI of the eye. MR examinations were made with an eye coil. Eyeplan requires eye geometry data for modeling, and tantalum marker clips for submillimeter positioning and additional information from ultrasound and 3-D imaging. By contrast, octopus provides the full integration of 3-D imaging (e.g., CT, MRI). CTVs were delineated in each slice. For all patients, CTVs (eyeplan vs. octopus) were compared intraindividually. Results: octopus planning led to a mean reduction of the target volume by a factor of 1.7 (T1-weighted [T1w]) and 2.2 (T2w) without compromising safety. The corresponding field size could be scaled down on average by a factor of 1.2 (T1w) and 1.4 (T2w), respectively. Conclusion: compared with the conventional eyeplan, MRI-based treatment planning of ocular tumors with octopus could be a powerful tool for reducing the CTV and, consequently, the treatment volume and the field size. This might be translated into a better patient compliance during treatment and a decreased late toxicity. (orig.)

  1. Proton therapy of uveal melanomas. Intercomparison of MRI-based and conventional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marnitz, S.; Hinkelbein, W.; Cordini, D.; Heufelder, J.; Simiantonakis, I.; Kluge, H.; Bendl, R.; Lemke, A.J.; Bechrakis, N.E.; Foerster, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: proton therapy for uveal melanoma provides high-conformal dose application to the target volume and, thus, an optimal saving of the organs at risk nearby. Treatment planning is done with the model-based treatment-planning system eyeplan. Tumor reconstruction is based only on a fundus composite, which often leads to an overestimation of the clinical target volume (CTV). The purpose was to exploit MRI on trial in a proton therapy-planning system by using the novel image-based treatment-planning system octopus. Patients and methods: ten patients with uveal melanomas received both a high-resolution planning CT and MRI of the eye. MR examinations were made with an eye coil. Eyeplan requires eye geometry data for modeling, and tantalum marker clips for submillimeter positioning and additional information from ultrasound and 3-D imaging. By contrast, octopus provides the full integration of 3-D imaging (e.g., CT, MRI). CTVs were delineated in each slice. For all patients, CTVs (eyeplan vs. octopus) were compared intraindividually. Results: octopus planning led to a mean reduction of the target volume by a factor of 1.7 (T1-weighted [T1w]) and 2.2 (T2w) without compromising safety. The corresponding field size could be scaled down on average by a factor of 1.2 (T1w) and 1.4 (T2w), respectively. Conclusion: compared with the conventional eyeplan, MRI-based treatment planning of ocular tumors with octopus could be a powerful tool for reducing the CTV and, consequently, the treatment volume and the field size. This might be translated into a better patient compliance during treatment and a decreased late toxicity. (orig.)

  2. SU-E-T-124: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Brachytherapy and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Wu, H [IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Das, I [Indiana University- School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is known to be able to deliver more radiation dose to tumor while minimizing radiation dose to surrounding normal tissues. Proton therapy also provides superior dose distribution due to Bragg peak. Since both HDR and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) are beneficial for their quick dose drop off, our goal in this study is to compare the pace of dose gradient drop-off between HDR and IMPT plans based on the same CT image data-set. In addition, normal tissues sparing were also compared among HDR, IMPT and SBRT. Methods: Five cervical cancer cases treated with EBRT + HDR boost combination with Tandem and Ovoid applicator were used for comparison purpose. Original HDR plans with prescribed dose of 5.5 Gy x 5 fractions were generated and optimized. The 100% isodose line of HDR plans was converted to a dose volume, and treated as CTV for IMPT and SBRT planning. The same HDR CT scans were also used for IMPT plan and SBRT plan for direct comparison. The philosophy of the IMPT and SBRT planning was to create the same CTV coverage as HDR plans. All three modalities treatment plans were compared to each other with a set of predetermined criteria. Results: With similar target volume coverage in cervix cancer boost treatment, HDR provides a slightly sharper dose drop-off from 100% to 50% isodose line, averagely in all directions compared to IMPT. However, IMPT demonstrated more dose gradient drop-off at the junction of the target and normal tissues by providing more normal tissue sparing and superior capability to reduce integral dose. Conclusion: IMPT is capable of providing comparable dose drop-off as HDR. IMPT can be explored as replacement for HDR brachytherapy in various applications.

  3. The proton therapy system for MGH's NPTC: equipment description and progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.; Beeckman, W.; Cohilis, P.

    1996-01-01

    At the beginning of 1994, the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) of the Harvard Medical School in Boston (MA, USA) a pioneer in proton therapy since 1959, selected a team led by Ion Beam Applications SA (IBA) to supply the proton therapy equipment of its new Northeast Proton Therapy Centre (NPTC),. The IBA integrated system includes a compact 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron, a short energy selection transforming the fixed energy beam extracted form the cyclotron into a variable energy beam, one or more isocentric gantries fitted with a nozzle, a system consisting of one or more horizontal beam lines, a global control system including an accelerator control unit and several independent but networked therapy control stations, a global safety management system, and a robotic patient positioning system. The present paper presents the equipment being built for the NPTC. (author)

  4. WE-EF-303-09: Proton-Acoustic Range Verification in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Xiang, L [University of Oklahoma (OK), Norman, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We investigated proton-acoustic signals detection for range verification with current ultrasound instruments in typical clinical scenarios. Using simulations that included a realistic noise model, we determined the theoretical minimum dose required to generate detectable proton-acoustic signals. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distributions and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. The acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were modeled by the general 3D pressure wave equation and convolved with Gaussian kernels to simulate various proton pulse widths (0.1 – 10 ms). A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth band-pass filter, and ii) randomly generated noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons and dose required per pulse. The maximum spatial resolution was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer center frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons were on the order of 0.6–6 million per pulse, leading to 3–110 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak, depending on the spot size. The acoustic signal consisted of lower frequencies for wider pulses, leading to lower noise levels, but also worse spatial resolution. The resolution was 1-mm for a 0.1-µs pulse width, but increased to 5-mm for a 10-µs pulse width. Conclusion: We have established minimum dose detection limits for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a large detector with no losses and only detector thermal noise. Feasible proton-acoustic range detection will require at least 10{sup 7} protons per pulse and pulse widths ≤ 1-µs.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary neutron dose for scanning proton therapy using FLUKA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaeyeong Lee

    Full Text Available Proton therapy is a rapidly progressing field for cancer treatment. Globally, many proton therapy facilities are being commissioned or under construction. Secondary neutrons are an important issue during the commissioning process of a proton therapy facility. The purpose of this study is to model and validate scanning nozzles of proton therapy at Samsung Medical Center (SMC by Monte Carlo simulation for beam commissioning. After the commissioning, a secondary neutron ambient dose from proton scanning nozzle (Gantry 1 was simulated and measured. This simulation was performed to evaluate beam properties such as percent depth dose curve, Bragg peak, and distal fall-off, so that they could be verified with measured data. Using the validated beam nozzle, the secondary neutron ambient dose was simulated and then compared with the measured ambient dose from Gantry 1. We calculated secondary neutron dose at several different points. We demonstrated the validity modeling a proton scanning nozzle system to evaluate various parameters using FLUKA. The measured secondary neutron ambient dose showed a similar tendency with the simulation result. This work will increase the knowledge necessary for the development of radiation safety technology in medical particle accelerators.

  6. Analytical incorporation of fractionation effects in probabilistic treatment planning for intensity-modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Niklas; Hennig, Philipp; Wieser, Hans-Peter; Bangert, Mark

    2018-04-01

    We show that it is possible to explicitly incorporate fractionation effects into closed-form probabilistic treatment plan analysis and optimization for intensity-modulated proton therapy with analytical probabilistic modeling (APM). We study the impact of different fractionation schemes on the dosimetric uncertainty induced by random and systematic sources of range and setup uncertainty for treatment plans that were optimized with and without consideration of the number of treatment fractions. The APM framework is capable of handling arbitrarily correlated uncertainty models including systematic and random errors in the context of fractionation. On this basis, we construct an analytical dose variance computation pipeline that explicitly considers the number of treatment fractions for uncertainty quantitation and minimization during treatment planning. We evaluate the variance computation model in comparison to random sampling of 100 treatments for conventional and probabilistic treatment plans under different fractionation schemes (1, 5, 30 fractions) for an intracranial, a paraspinal and a prostate case. The impact of neglecting the fractionation scheme during treatment planning is investigated by applying treatment plans that were generated with probabilistic optimization for 1 fraction in a higher number of fractions and comparing them to the probabilistic plans optimized under explicit consideration of the number of fractions. APM enables the construction of an analytical variance computation model for dose uncertainty considering fractionation at negligible computational overhead. It is computationally feasible (a) to simultaneously perform a robustness analysis for all possible fraction numbers and (b) to perform a probabilistic treatment plan optimization for a specific fraction number. The incorporation of fractionation assumptions for robustness analysis exposes a dose to uncertainty trade-off, i.e., the dose in the organs at risk is increased for a

  7. TH-C-BRD-12: Robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Plan Can Eliminate Junction Shifts for Craniospinal Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, L; Jiang, S; Li, Y; Wang, X; Li, H; Zhu, X; Sahoo, N; Gillin, M; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D; Zhang, X; Lim, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) technique is the commonly used radiotherapy technique for craniospinal irradiation (CSI). However, PSPT involves many numbers of junction shifts applied over the course of treatment to reduce the cold and hot regions caused by field mismatching. In this work, we introduced a robust planning approach to develop an optimal and clinical efficient techniques for CSI using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) so that junction shifts can essentially be eliminated. Methods: The intra-fractional uncertainty, in which two overlapping fields shift in the opposite directions along the craniospinal axis, are incorporated into the robust optimization algorithm. Treatment plans with junction sizes 3,5,10,15,20,25 cm were designed and compared with the plan designed using the non-robust optimization. Robustness of the plans were evaluated based on dose profiles along the craniospinal axis for the plans applying 3 mm intra-fractional shift. The dose intra-fraction variations (DIV) at the junction are used to evaluate the robustness of the plans. Results: The DIVs are 7.9%, 6.3%, 5.0%, 3.8%, 2.8% and 2.2%, for the robustly optimized plans with junction sizes 3,5,10,15,20,25 cm. The DIV are 10% for the non-robustly optimized plans with junction size 25 cm. The dose profiles along the craniospinal axis exhibit gradual and tapered dose distribution. Using DIVs less than 5% as maximum acceptable intrafractional variation, the overlapping region can be reduced to 10 cm, leading to potential reduced number of the fields. The DIVs are less than 5% for 5 mm intra-fractional shifts with junction size 25 cm, leading to potential no-junction-shift for CSI using IMPT. Conclusion: This work is the first report of the robust optimization on CSI based on IMPT. We demonstrate that robust optimization can lead to much efficient carniospinal irradiation by eliminating the junction shifts

  8. Precise modelling of the eye for proton therapy of intra-ocular tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobler, B.; Bendl, R. [Medizinische Physik, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mails: b.dobler@dkfz-heidelberg.de; barbara.dobler@gmx.de; r.bendl@dkfz-heidelberg.de

    2002-02-21

    A new method is described that allows precise modelling of organs at risk and target volume for radiation therapy of intra-ocular tumours. The aim is to optimize the dose distribution and thus to reduce normal tissue complication probability. A geometrical 3D model based on elliptic shapes was developed that can be used for multimodal model-based segmentation of 3D patient data. The tumour volume cannot be clearly identified in CT and MR data, whereas the tumour outline can be discriminated very precisely in fundus photographs. Therefore, a multimodal 2D fundus diagram was developed, which allows us to correlate and display simultaneously information extracted from the eye model, 3D data and the fundus photograph. Thus, the connection of fundus diagram and 3D data is well-defined and the 3D volume can be calculated directly from the tumour outline drawn onto the fundus photograph and the tumour height measured by ultrasound. The method allows the calculation of a precise 3D eye model of the patient, including the different structures of the eye as well as the tumour volume. The method was developed as part of the new 3D treatment planning system OCTOPUS for proton therapy of ocular tumours within a national research project together with the Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin. (author)

  9. Secondary-electron-bremsstrahlung imaging for proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Nagao, Yuto [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Ando, Koki; Yamamoto, Seiichi [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-Ku, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, 1-1-1 Hirate-cho, Kita-Ku, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Kataoka, Jun [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Kawachi, Naoki [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 1233 Watanuki-Machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    2016-10-11

    A feasibility study on an imaging technique of a therapeutic proton-beam trajectory using a gamma camera by measuring secondary electron bremsstrahlung (SEB) was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations and a beam-irradiation experiment. From the simulation and experimental results, it was found that a significant amount of SEB yield exists between the beam-injection surface and the range position along the beam axis and the beam trajectory is clearly imaged by the SEB yield. It is concluded that the SEB imaging is a promising technique for monitoring of therapeutic proton-beam trajectories.

  10. Neutron field characterization and dosimetry at the TRIUMF proton therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In 1972 the 500 MeV H' Cyclotron of the TRIUMF (Tri University Meson Factory) located in Vancouver, Canada became operational. Beside Meson Physics, high-energy protons of various energy and beam current levels from the TRIUMF Cyclotron are used for scientific research and biomedical applications. Recently, a 500 MeV proton beam from the cyclotron was used as the booster beam for the radioactive ion beam facility, ISAC (Isotope Separator Accelerator) and a second beam as primary irradiation source for the Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF). The major commercial applications of the PIF are the provision of high-energy proton beams for radiation hardness testing of electronic components used in space applications (NASA) and proton therapy of ocular tumors (British Columbia Proton Therapy Facility). The PIF vault was constructed within the main accelerator hall of the TRIUMF using stacks of large concrete blocks. An intense field of fast neutrons is produced during the interaction of high-energy proton beam with target materials, such as, beam stops, collimators and beam energy degraders. The leakage of such neutrons due to insufficient radiological shielding or through the shielding discontinuities may constitute a major share of the personnel radiation exposure of the radiation workers. The neutron energy distribution and dose equivalent near a lead beam stopper bombarded with 116 MeV and 65 MeV collimated proton beams at the Ocular Tumor irradiation facility were evaluated using a Bonner-Sphere Spectrometer and a REM counter respectively. The results were utilized to investigate efficacy of the existing radiological shielding of the PIF. This paper highlights experimental methods to analyze the high-energy accelerator produced neutron beam and basic guideline for the radiological shielding designs of irradiation vault of Proton Therapy facilities

  11. Focused radiation hepatitis after Bragg-peak proton therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Toshiyuki; Itai, Yuji; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    Radiation hepatitis is clearly demonstrated by noncontrast and contrast enhanced CT following radiotherapy for liver diseases. Radiation hepatitis is dependent on dose distribution and is usually demonstrated as nonsegmental bandlike lesion after photon therapy. We report a case of focused, oval-shaped radiation hepatitis that was induced by photon therapy. The attenuation difference was localized in a high-dose area caused by Bragg-peak proton therapy. 17 refs., 2 figs

  12. Introducing an on-line adaptive procedure for prostate image guided intensity modulate proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Westerly, D C; Mackie, T R

    2011-08-07

    With on-line image guidance (IG), prostate shifts relative to the bony anatomy can be corrected by realigning the patient with respect to the treatment fields. In image guided intensity modulated proton therapy (IG-IMPT), because the proton range is more sensitive to the material it travels through, the realignment may introduce large dose variations. This effect is studied in this work and an on-line adaptive procedure is proposed to restore the planned dose to the target. A 2D anthropomorphic phantom was constructed from a real prostate patient's CT image. Two-field laterally opposing spot 3D-modulation and 24-field full arc distal edge tracking (DET) plans were generated with a prescription of 70 Gy to the planning target volume. For the simulated delivery, we considered two types of procedures: the non-adaptive procedure and the on-line adaptive procedure. In the non-adaptive procedure, only patient realignment to match the prostate location in the planning CT was performed. In the on-line adaptive procedure, on top of the patient realignment, the kinetic energy for each individual proton pencil beam was re-determined from the on-line CT image acquired after the realignment and subsequently used for delivery. Dose distributions were re-calculated for individual fractions for different plans and different delivery procedures. The results show, without adaptive, that both the 3D-modulation and the DET plans experienced delivered dose degradation by having large cold or hot spots in the prostate. The DET plan had worse dose degradation than the 3D-modulation plan. The adaptive procedure effectively restored the planned dose distribution in the DET plan, with delivered prostate D(98%), D(50%) and D(2%) values less than 1% from the prescription. In the 3D-modulation plan, in certain cases the adaptive procedure was not effective to reduce the delivered dose degradation and yield similar results as the non-adaptive procedure. In conclusion, based on this 2D phantom

  13. Using a knowledge-based planning solution to select patients for proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Alexander R; Dahele, Max; Tol, Jim P; Kuijper, Ingrid T; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2017-08-01

    Patient selection for proton therapy by comparing proton/photon treatment plans is time-consuming and prone to bias. RapidPlan™, a knowledge-based-planning solution, uses plan-libraries to model and predict organ-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume-histograms (DVHs). We investigated whether RapidPlan, utilizing an algorithm based only on photon beam characteristics, could generate proton DVH-predictions and whether these could correctly identify patients for proton therapy. Model PROT and Model PHOT comprised 30 head-and-neck cancer proton and photon plans, respectively. Proton and photon knowledge-based-plans (KBPs) were made for ten evaluation-patients. DVH-prediction accuracy was analyzed by comparing predicted-vs-achieved mean OAR doses. KBPs and manual plans were compared using salivary gland and swallowing muscle mean doses. For illustration, patients were selected for protons if predicted Model PHOT mean dose minus predicted Model PROT mean dose (ΔPrediction) for combined OARs was ≥6Gy, and benchmarked using achieved KBP doses. Achieved and predicted Model PROT /Model PHOT mean dose R 2 was 0.95/0.98. Generally, achieved mean dose for Model PHOT /Model PROT KBPs was respectively lower/higher than predicted. Comparing Model PROT /Model PHOT KBPs with manual plans, salivary and swallowing mean doses increased/decreased by <2Gy, on average. ΔPrediction≥6Gy correctly selected 4 of 5 patients for protons. Knowledge-based DVH-predictions can provide efficient, patient-specific selection for protons. A proton-specific RapidPlan-solution could improve results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An Analysis of Plan Robustness for Esophageal Tumors: Comparing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans and Spot Scanning Proton Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Anthony J.; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Planning studies to compare x-ray and proton techniques and to select the most suitable technique for each patient have been hampered by the nonequivalence of several aspects of treatment planning and delivery. A fair comparison should compare similarly advanced delivery techniques from current clinical practice and also assess the robustness of each technique. The present study therefore compared volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and single-field optimization (SFO) spot scanning proton therapy plans created using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for dose escalation in midesophageal cancer and analyzed the effect of setup and range uncertainties on these plans. Methods and Materials: For 21 patients, SIB plans with a physical dose prescription of 2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/fraction in 25 fractions to planning target volume (PTV)_5_0_G_y or PTV_6_2_._5_G_y (primary tumor with 0.5 cm margins) were created and evaluated for robustness to random setup errors and proton range errors. Dose–volume metrics were compared for the optimal and uncertainty plans, with P<.05 (Wilcoxon) considered significant. Results: SFO reduced the mean lung dose by 51.4% (range 35.1%-76.1%) and the mean heart dose by 40.9% (range 15.0%-57.4%) compared with VMAT. Proton plan robustness to a 3.5% range error was acceptable. For all patients, the clinical target volume D_9_8 was 95.0% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose and gross tumor volume (GTV) D_9_8 was 98.8% to 101%. Setup error robustness was patient anatomy dependent, and the potential minimum dose per fraction was always lower with SFO than with VMAT. The clinical target volume D_9_8 was lower by 0.6% to 7.8% of the prescribed dose, and the GTV D_9_8 was lower by 0.3% to 2.2% of the prescribed GTV dose. Conclusions: The SFO plans achieved significant sparing of normal tissue compared with the VMAT plans for midesophageal cancer. The target dose coverage in the SIB proton plans was less robust to random setup errors and might be

  15. An Analysis of Plan Robustness for Esophageal Tumors: Comparing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans and Spot Scanning Proton Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Anthony J. [Centre for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Planning studies to compare x-ray and proton techniques and to select the most suitable technique for each patient have been hampered by the nonequivalence of several aspects of treatment planning and delivery. A fair comparison should compare similarly advanced delivery techniques from current clinical practice and also assess the robustness of each technique. The present study therefore compared volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and single-field optimization (SFO) spot scanning proton therapy plans created using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for dose escalation in midesophageal cancer and analyzed the effect of setup and range uncertainties on these plans. Methods and Materials: For 21 patients, SIB plans with a physical dose prescription of 2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/fraction in 25 fractions to planning target volume (PTV){sub 50Gy} or PTV{sub 62.5Gy} (primary tumor with 0.5 cm margins) were created and evaluated for robustness to random setup errors and proton range errors. Dose–volume metrics were compared for the optimal and uncertainty plans, with P<.05 (Wilcoxon) considered significant. Results: SFO reduced the mean lung dose by 51.4% (range 35.1%-76.1%) and the mean heart dose by 40.9% (range 15.0%-57.4%) compared with VMAT. Proton plan robustness to a 3.5% range error was acceptable. For all patients, the clinical target volume D{sub 98} was 95.0% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose and gross tumor volume (GTV) D{sub 98} was 98.8% to 101%. Setup error robustness was patient anatomy dependent, and the potential minimum dose per fraction was always lower with SFO than with VMAT. The clinical target volume D{sub 98} was lower by 0.6% to 7.8% of the prescribed dose, and the GTV D{sub 98} was lower by 0.3% to 2.2% of the prescribed GTV dose. Conclusions: The SFO plans achieved significant sparing of normal tissue compared with the VMAT plans for midesophageal cancer. The target dose coverage in the SIB proton plans was less robust to random setup

  16. National Cancer Database Analysis of Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); O' Connell, Kelli [Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Yuan [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Gillespie, Theresa W. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); McDonald, Mark W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Pillai, Rathi N. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Patel, Kirtesh R.; Patel, Pretesh R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Owonikoko, Taofeek K. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Belani, Chandra P. [Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Pennsylvania University, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes and predictors associated with proton radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the National Cancer Database. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Database was queried to capture patients with stage I-IV NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation from 2004 to 2012. A logistic regression model was used to determine the predictors for utilization of proton radiation therapy. The univariate and multivariable association with overall survival were assessed by Cox proportional hazards models along with log–rank tests. A propensity score matching method was implemented to balance baseline covariates and eliminate selection bias. Results: A total of 243,822 patients (photon radiation therapy: 243,474; proton radiation therapy: 348) were included in the analysis. Patients in a ZIP code with a median income of <$46,000 per year were less likely to receive proton treatment, with the income cohort of $30,000 to $35,999 least likely to receive proton therapy (odds ratio 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.90]; P=.011). On multivariate analysis of all patients, non-proton therapy was associated with significantly worse survival compared with proton therapy (hazard ratio 1.21 [95% CI 1.06-1.39]; P<.01). On propensity matched analysis, proton radiation therapy (n=309) was associated with better 5-year overall survival compared with non-proton radiation therapy (n=1549), 22% versus 16% (P=.025). For stage II and III patients, non-proton radiation therapy was associated with worse survival compared with proton radiation therapy (hazard ratio 1.35 [95% CI 1.10-1.64], P<.01). Conclusions: Thoracic radiation with protons is associated with better survival in this retrospective analysis; further validation in the randomized setting is needed to account for any imbalances in patient characteristics, including positron emission tomography–computed tomography staging.

  17. Future of medical physics: Real-time MRI-guided proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oborn, Bradley M; Dowdell, Stephen; Metcalfe, Peter E; Crozier, Stuart; Mohan, Radhe; Keall, Paul J

    2017-08-01

    With the recent clinical implementation of real-time MRI-guided x-ray beam therapy (MRXT), attention is turning to the concept of combining real-time MRI guidance with proton beam therapy; MRI-guided proton beam therapy (MRPT). MRI guidance for proton beam therapy is expected to offer a compelling improvement to the current treatment workflow which is warranted arguably more than for x-ray beam therapy. This argument is born out of the fact that proton therapy toxicity outcomes are similar to that of the most advanced IMRT treatments, despite being a fundamentally superior particle for cancer treatment. In this Future of Medical Physics article, we describe the various software and hardware aspects of potential MRPT systems and the corresponding treatment workflow. Significant software developments, particularly focused around adaptive MRI-based planning will be required. The magnetic interaction between the MRI and the proton beamline components will be a key area of focus. For example, the modeling and potential redesign of a magnetically compatible gantry to allow for beam delivery from multiple angles towards a patient located within the bore of an MRI scanner. Further to this, the accuracy of pencil beam scanning and beam monitoring in the presence of an MRI fringe field will require modeling, testing, and potential further development to ensure that the highly targeted radiotherapy is maintained. Looking forward we envisage a clear and accelerated path for hardware development, leveraging from lessons learnt from MRXT development. Within few years, simple prototype systems will likely exist, and in a decade, we could envisage coupled systems with integrated gantries. Such milestones will be key in the development of a more efficient, more accurate, and more successful form of proton beam therapy for many common cancer sites. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  18. Projections onto the Pareto surface in multicriteria radiation therapy optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokrantz, Rasmus; Miettinen, Kaisa

    2015-10-01

    To eliminate or reduce the error to Pareto optimality that arises in Pareto surface navigation when the Pareto surface is approximated by a small number of plans. The authors propose to project the navigated plan onto the Pareto surface as a postprocessing step to the navigation. The projection attempts to find a Pareto optimal plan that is at least as good as or better than the initial navigated plan with respect to all objective functions. An augmented form of projection is also suggested where dose-volume histogram constraints are used to prevent that the projection causes a violation of some clinical goal. The projections were evaluated with respect to planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered by step-and-shoot and sliding window and spot-scanned intensity modulated proton therapy. Retrospective plans were generated for a prostate and a head and neck case. The projections led to improved dose conformity and better sparing of organs at risk (OARs) for all three delivery techniques and both patient cases. The mean dose to OARs decreased by 3.1 Gy on average for the unconstrained form of the projection and by 2.0 Gy on average when dose-volume histogram constraints were used. No consistent improvements in target homogeneity were observed. There are situations when Pareto navigation leaves room for improvement in OAR sparing and dose conformity, for example, if the approximation of the Pareto surface is coarse or the problem formulation has too permissive constraints. A projection onto the Pareto surface can identify an inaccurate Pareto surface representation and, if necessary, improve the quality of the navigated plan.

  19. Projections onto the Pareto surface in multicriteria radiation therapy optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokrantz, Rasmus; Miettinen, Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate or reduce the error to Pareto optimality that arises in Pareto surface navigation when the Pareto surface is approximated by a small number of plans. Methods: The authors propose to project the navigated plan onto the Pareto surface as a postprocessing step to the navigation. The projection attempts to find a Pareto optimal plan that is at least as good as or better than the initial navigated plan with respect to all objective functions. An augmented form of projection is also suggested where dose–volume histogram constraints are used to prevent that the projection causes a violation of some clinical goal. The projections were evaluated with respect to planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered by step-and-shoot and sliding window and spot-scanned intensity modulated proton therapy. Retrospective plans were generated for a prostate and a head and neck case. Results: The projections led to improved dose conformity and better sparing of organs at risk (OARs) for all three delivery techniques and both patient cases. The mean dose to OARs decreased by 3.1 Gy on average for the unconstrained form of the projection and by 2.0 Gy on average when dose–volume histogram constraints were used. No consistent improvements in target homogeneity were observed. Conclusions: There are situations when Pareto navigation leaves room for improvement in OAR sparing and dose conformity, for example, if the approximation of the Pareto surface is coarse or the problem formulation has too permissive constraints. A projection onto the Pareto surface can identify an inaccurate Pareto surface representation and, if necessary, improve the quality of the navigated plan

  20. Design and optimization of a compact laser-driven proton beamline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M; Migliorati, M; Palumbo, L; Antici, P

    2018-04-19

    Laser-accelerated protons, generated by irradiating a solid target with a short, energetic laser pulse at high intensity (I > 10 18  W·cm -2 ), represent a complementary if not outperforming source compared to conventional accelerators, due  to their intrinsic features, such as high beam charge and short bunch duration. However, the broadband energy spectrum of these proton sources is a bottleneck that precludes their use in applications requiring a more reduced energy spread. Consequently, in recent times strong effort has been put to overcome these limits and to develop laser-driven proton beamlines with low energy spread. In this paper, we report on beam dynamics simulations aiming at optimizing a laser-driven beamline - i.e. a laser-based proton source coupled to conventional magnetic beam manipulation devices - producing protons with a reduced energy spread, usable for applications. The energy range of investigation goes from 2 to 20 MeV, i.e. the typical proton energies that can be routinely obtained using commercial TW-power class laser systems. Our beamline design is capable of reducing the energy spread below 20%, still keeping the overall transmission efficiency around 1% and producing a proton spot-size in the range of 10 mm 2 . We briefly discuss the results in the context of applications in the domain of Cultural Heritage.

  1. Optimization of rotational arc station parameter optimized radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, P.; Ungun, B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Boyd, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Xing, L., E-mail: lei@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: To develop a fast optimization method for station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT) and show that SPORT is capable of matching VMAT in both plan quality and delivery efficiency by using three clinical cases of different disease sites. Methods: The angular space from 0° to 360° was divided into 180 station points (SPs). A candidate aperture was assigned to each of the SPs based on the calculation results using a column generation algorithm. The weights of the apertures were then obtained by optimizing the objective function using a state-of-the-art GPU based proximal operator graph solver. To avoid being trapped in a local minimum in beamlet-based aperture selection using the gradient descent algorithm, a stochastic gradient descent was employed here. Apertures with zero or low weight were thrown out. To find out whether there was room to further improve the plan by adding more apertures or SPs, the authors repeated the above procedure with consideration of the existing dose distribution from the last iteration. At the end of the second iteration, the weights of all the apertures were reoptimized, including those of the first iteration. The above procedure was repeated until the plan could not be improved any further. The optimization technique was assessed by using three clinical cases (prostate, head and neck, and brain) with the results compared to that obtained using conventional VMAT in terms of dosimetric properties, treatment time, and total MU. Results: Marked dosimetric quality improvement was demonstrated in the SPORT plans for all three studied cases. For the prostate case, the volume of the 50% prescription dose was decreased by 22% for the rectum and 6% for the bladder. For the head and neck case, SPORT improved the mean dose for the left and right parotids by 15% each. The maximum dose was lowered from 72.7 to 71.7 Gy for the mandible, and from 30.7 to 27.3 Gy for the spinal cord. The mean dose for the pharynx and larynx was

  2. Optimization of rotational arc station parameter optimized radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, P.; Ungun, B.; Boyd, S.; Xing, L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a fast optimization method for station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT) and show that SPORT is capable of matching VMAT in both plan quality and delivery efficiency by using three clinical cases of different disease sites. Methods: The angular space from 0° to 360° was divided into 180 station points (SPs). A candidate aperture was assigned to each of the SPs based on the calculation results using a column generation algorithm. The weights of the apertures were then obtained by optimizing the objective function using a state-of-the-art GPU based proximal operator graph solver. To avoid being trapped in a local minimum in beamlet-based aperture selection using the gradient descent algorithm, a stochastic gradient descent was employed here. Apertures with zero or low weight were thrown out. To find out whether there was room to further improve the plan by adding more apertures or SPs, the authors repeated the above procedure with consideration of the existing dose distribution from the last iteration. At the end of the second iteration, the weights of all the apertures were reoptimized, including those of the first iteration. The above procedure was repeated until the plan could not be improved any further. The optimization technique was assessed by using three clinical cases (prostate, head and neck, and brain) with the results compared to that obtained using conventional VMAT in terms of dosimetric properties, treatment time, and total MU. Results: Marked dosimetric quality improvement was demonstrated in the SPORT plans for all three studied cases. For the prostate case, the volume of the 50% prescription dose was decreased by 22% for the rectum and 6% for the bladder. For the head and neck case, SPORT improved the mean dose for the left and right parotids by 15% each. The maximum dose was lowered from 72.7 to 71.7 Gy for the mandible, and from 30.7 to 27.3 Gy for the spinal cord. The mean dose for the pharynx and larynx was

  3. Preparations for the next generation of clinical trials with proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newhauser, W.D.; Smith, A.R.; Fitzek, M.; Ibbott, G.; Munzenrider, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: As proton radiation therapy centers become more widely available, we anticipate an increase in clinical proton therapy research, e.g. clinical trials to compare the efficacy of proton therapy with that of conformal photon therapy. In this presentation, we explore some of the quality assurance (QA) work that will be necessary to support multi-institution clinical trials to include facilities in Europe, Asia and the United States. Specifically, we shall concentrate on three areas pertaining to practical clinical proton dosimetry for which clear, concise, and coherent guidance is needed. First, the existing proton therapy dosimetry protocols (e.g. ICRU Report 59, IAEA TRS-398) provide general methods that are well suited for adoption in proton therapy. Many additional techniques are required in order to implement dosimetry in a contemporary proton clinic. For example, special situations arise for small fields including those for radiosurgery and ocular treatments, and for rotational therapy. Fortunately, this additional information is emerging from various proton therapy centers. For example, Vatnitsky et al. described the dosimetry of small beams, Newhauser et al. described absolute proton dosimetry techniques for radiosurgery and for ocular beams. Newhauser et al. also reported on a general formalism and practical methods for dosimetry measurements in a rotational proton gantry. Our aim is to discuss some specific needs for the standardization of these tasks, which will be essential in achieving adequate uniformity in multi-institution clinical trials. Second, we will discuss means to standardize of writing the physics QA portion of protocols for multi-institution clinical trials, through which a statistically significant number of patient outcomes may be obtained more rapidly. Surprisingly, only two multi-institution proton clinical trials have been undertaken (a skull base sarcoma trial and a prostate cancer trial, both shared between MGH and Loma Linda

  4. Proton therapy of tumours and possibilities of its implementation in the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanula, M.; Ruzicka, J.; Combor, I.; Cesakova, H.

    2008-01-01

    Besides other modalities irradiation of tumours with a beam of ionizing particles is applied in the treatment of cancer. Currently treatment with photon and electron beams is a standard worldwide and in Slovakia as well. These particles exhibit exponential fall off in tissues. This results in the irradiation of large volume of healthy tissues, which are located in the beam's path. Radiotoxicity of normal tissues is the limiting factor in radiotherapy. Protons are characterized by loosing the most of their energy at the end of their path. The range of protons can be controlled by the proper selection of their initial energy. These properties of protons make it possible to achieve lower doses to the healthy tissues thereby allowing escalation of dose to the tumour. Higher doses to the tumour result in higher efficiency of the treatment. Proton therapy represents a modern and highly effective tool in the struggle against cancer. The present clinical outcomes have proved the benefit of the proton therapy for the improvement of the treatment success-fullness. Slovakia has created conditions allowing implementation of the depth proton therapy within the frame of the Cyclotron centre of the SR project in a relatively short period of time. (author)

  5. Proton Therapy: Ever Shifting Sands and the Opportunities and Obligations within

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Both, Stefan; Tochner, Zelig, E-mail: hill@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-09-06

    Proton therapy is associated with significant benefit in terms of normal tissue sparing and potential radiation dose escalation for many patients with malignant diseases. Due to recognition of these qualities, the availability of this technology is increasing rapidly, both through increased availability of large centers, and with the possibility of smaller, lower cost proton therapy centers. Such expansion is associated with increased opportunity to provide this beneficial technology to larger numbers of patients; however, the importance of careful treatment planning and delivery, deliberate patient selection, rigorous scientific investigation including comparison to other technologies when possible, and mindfulness of ethical issues and cost effectiveness must not be forgotten. The obligation to move forward responsibly rests on the shoulders of radiation oncologists around the world. In this article, we discuss current use of proton therapy worldwide, as well as many of the factors that must be taken into account during rapid expansion of this exciting technology.

  6. A hospital-based proton linac for neutron therapy and radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, A.J.

    1988-10-01

    Fermilab's Alvarez proton linac has been used routinely for neutron therapy since 1976. The Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) operates in a mode parasitic to the laboratory's high energy physics program, which uses the linac as an injector for a synchrotron. Parasitic operation is possible because the linac delivers /approximately/1.2 /times/ 10 13 protons per pulse at a 15 Hz rate, while the high energy physics program requires beam at a rate not greater than 0.5 Hz. Protons not needed for physics experiments strike a beryllium target to produce neutrons for neutron therapy. Encouraging clinical results from NTF have led to a study of the issues involved in providing hospitals with a neutron beam of the type available at Fermilab. This paper describes the issues addressed by that study. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. Overview of the MGH-Northeast Proton Therapy Center plans and progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanz, J.; Durlacher, S.; Goitein, M.; Levine, A.; Reardon, P.; Smith, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Northeast Proton Therapy Center (NPTC) is currently being designed and is scheduled for completion in 1998. The goal of the project is to provide the northeast region of the United States with a first class proton therapy facility which has the capabilities needed for the conduct of innovative research, and proven treatments using proton therapy. The NPTC will be built on the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) campus. MGH has contracted Bechtel Corporation to coordinate the design and building of the civil construction. Ion Beam Applications (IBA) who is teamed with General Atomics, is responsible for the equipment. The specifications for the facility are written in terms of the clinical performance requirements and will be presented. Aspects of the facility design, status and plans will also be presented. (orig.)

  8. Optimization of GEANT4 settings for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning simulations using GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevillot, Loic, E-mail: loic.grevillot@gmail.co [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); IBA, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Frisson, Thibault [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); Zahra, Nabil [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); IPNL, CNRS UMR 5822, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France); Bertrand, Damien; Stichelbaut, Frederic [IBA, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Freud, Nicolas [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); CNDRI, INSA-Lyon, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Sarrut, David [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Leon Berard, F-69373 Lyon (France)

    2010-10-15

    This study reports the investigation of different GEANT4 settings for proton therapy applications in the context of Treatment Planning System comparisons. The GEANT4.9.2 release was used through the GATE platform. We focused on the Pencil Beam Scanning delivery technique, which allows for intensity modulated proton therapy applications. The most relevant options and parameters (range cut, step size, database binning) for the simulation that influence the dose deposition were investigated, in order to determine a robust, accurate and efficient simulation environment. In this perspective, simulations of depth-dose profiles and transverse profiles at different depths and energies between 100 and 230 MeV have been assessed against reference measurements in water and PMMA. These measurements were performed in Essen, Germany, with the IBA dedicated Pencil Beam Scanning system, using Bragg-peak chambers and radiochromic films. GEANT4 simulations were also compared to the PHITS.2.14 and MCNPX.2.5.0 Monte Carlo codes. Depth-dose simulations reached 0.3 mm range accuracy compared to NIST CSDA ranges, with a dose agreement of about 1% over a set of five different energies. The transverse profiles simulated using the different Monte Carlo codes showed discrepancies, with up to 15% difference in beam widening between GEANT4 and MCNPX in water. A 8% difference between the GEANT4 multiple scattering and single scattering algorithms was observed. The simulations showed the inability of reproducing the measured transverse dose spreading with depth in PMMA, corroborating the fact that GEANT4 underestimates the lateral dose spreading. GATE was found to be a very convenient simulation environment to perform this study. A reference physics-list and an optimized parameters-list have been proposed. Satisfactory agreement against depth-dose profiles measurements was obtained. The simulation of transverse profiles using different Monte Carlo codes showed significant deviations. This point

  9. Range verification for eye proton therapy based on proton-induced x-ray emissions from implanted metal markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Vanessa La; Royle, Gary; Gibson, Adam; Kacperek, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Metal fiducial markers are often implanted on the back of the eye before proton therapy to improve target localization and reduce patient setup errors. We aim to detect characteristic x-ray emissions from metal targets during proton therapy to verify the treatment range accuracy. Initially gold was chosen for its biocompatibility properties. Proton-induced x-ray emissions (PIXE) from a 15 mm diameter gold marker were detected at different penetration depths of a 59 MeV proton beam at the CATANA proton facility at INFN-LNS (Italy). The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was used to reproduce the experiment and to investigate the effect of different size markers, materials, and the response to both mono-energetic and fully modulated beams. The intensity of the emitted x-rays decreases with decreasing proton energy and thus decreases with depth. If we assume the range to be the depth at which the dose is reduced to 10% of its maximum value and we define the residual range as the distance between the marker and the range of the beam, then the minimum residual range which can be detected with 95% confidence level is the depth at which the PIXE peak is equal to 1.96 σ bkg , which is the standard variation of the background noise. With our system and experimental setup this value is 3 mm, when 20 GyE are delivered to a gold marker of 15 mm diameter. Results from silver are more promising. Even when a 5 mm diameter silver marker is placed at a depth equal to the range, the PIXE peak is 2.1 σ bkg . Although these quantitative results are dependent on the experimental setup used in this research study, they demonstrate that the real-time analysis of the PIXE emitted by fiducial metal markers can be used to derive beam range. Further analysis are needed to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique in a clinical setup. (paper)

  10. Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG)accelerators and their medical application in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourrier, J.

    2008-10-01

    Radiotherapy uses particle beams to irradiate and kill cancer tumors while sparing healthy tissues. Bragg peak shape of the proton energy loss in matter allows a ballistic improvement of the dose deposition compared with X rays. Thus, the irradiated volume can be precisely adjusted to the tumour. This thesis, in the frame of the RACCAM project, aims to the study and the design of a proton therapy installation based on a fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator in order to build a spiral sector FFAG magnet for validation. First, we present proton therapy to define medical specifications leading to the technical specifications of a proton therapy installation. Secondly, we introduce FFAG accelerators through their past and on-going projects which are on their way around the world before developing the beam dynamic theories in the case of invariant focusing optics (scaling FFAG). We describe modelling and simulation tools developed to study the dynamics in a spiral scaling FFAG accelerator. Then we explain the spiral optic parameter search which has leaded to the construction of a magnet prototype. Finally, we describe the RACCAM project proton therapy installation starting from the injector cyclotron and ending with the extraction system. (author)

  11. Proton Therapy for Spinal Ependymomas: Planning, Acute Toxicities, and Preliminary Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amsbaugh, Mark J. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); McAleer, Mary Frances; Zhu, Ron; Wages, Cody; Crawford, Cody N.; Palmer, Matthew; De Gracia, Beth; Woo Shiao; Mahajan, Anita [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report acute toxicities and preliminary outcomes for pediatric patients with ependymomas of the spine treated with proton beam therapy at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: Eight pediatric patients received proton beam irradiation between October 2006 and September 2010 for spinal ependymomas. Toxicity data were collected weekly during radiation therapy and all follow-up visits. Toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: All patients had surgical resection of the tumor before irradiation (7 subtotal resection and 1 gross total resection). Six patients had World Health Organization Grade I ependymomas, and two had World Health Organization Grade II ependymomas. Patients had up to 3 surgical interventions before radiation therapy (range, 1-3; median, 1). Three patients received proton therapy after recurrence and five as part of their primary management. The entire vertebral body was treated in all but 2 patients. The mean radiation dose was 51.1 cobalt gray equivalents (range, 45 to 54 cobalt gray equivalents). With a mean follow-up of 26 months from the radiation therapy start date (range, 7-51 months), local control, event-free survival, and overall survival rates were all 100%. The most common toxicities during treatment were Grade 1 or 2 erythema (75%) and Grade 1 fatigue (38%). No patients had a Grade 3 or higher adverse event. Proton therapy dramatically reduced dose to all normal tissues anterior to the vertebral bodies in comparison to photon therapy. Conclusion: Preliminary outcomes show the expected control rates with favorable acute toxicity profiles. Proton beam therapy offers a powerful treatment option in the pediatric population, where adverse events related to radiation exposure are of concern. Extended follow-up will be required to assess for late recurrences and long-term adverse effects.

  12. A comparison of three optimization algorithms for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pflugfelder, D.; Wilkens, J.J.; Nill, S.; Oelfke, U.

    2008-01-01

    In intensity modulated treatment techniques, the modulation of each treatment field is obtained using an optimization algorithm. Multiple optimization algorithms have been proposed in the literature, e.g. steepest descent, conjugate gradient, quasi-Newton methods to name a few. The standard optimization algorithm in our in-house inverse planning tool KonRad is a quasi-Newton algorithm. Although this algorithm yields good results, it also has some drawbacks. Thus we implemented an improved optimization algorithm based on the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) routine. In this paper the improved optimization algorithm is described. To compare the two algorithms, several treatment plans are optimized using both algorithms. This included photon (IMRT) as well as proton (IMPT) intensity modulated therapy treatment plans. To present the results in a larger context the widely used conjugate gradient algorithm was also included into this comparison. On average, the improved optimization algorithm was six times faster to reach the same objective function value. However, it resulted not only in an acceleration of the optimization. Due to the faster convergence, the improved optimization algorithm usually terminates the optimization process at a lower objective function value. The average of the observed improvement in the objective function value was 37%. This improvement is clearly visible in the corresponding dose-volume-histograms. The benefit of the improved optimization algorithm is particularly pronounced in proton therapy plans. The conjugate gradient algorithm ranked in between the other two algorithms with an average speedup factor of two and an average improvement of the objective function value of 30%. (orig.)

  13. SU-F-J-194: Development of Dose-Based Image Guided Proton Therapy Workflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, R; Sun, B; Zhao, T; Li, H; Yang, D; Grantham, K; Goddu, S; Santanam, L; Bradley, J; Mutic, S; Kandlakunta, P; Zhang, T [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement image-guided proton therapy (IGPT) based on daily proton dose distribution. Methods: Unlike x-ray therapy, simple alignment based on anatomy cannot ensure proper dose coverage in proton therapy. Anatomy changes along the beam path may lead to underdosing the target, or overdosing the organ-at-risk (OAR). With an in-room mobile computed tomography (CT) system, we are developing a dose-based IGPT software tool that allows patient positioning and treatment adaption based on daily dose distributions. During an IGPT treatment, daily CT images are acquired in treatment position. After initial positioning based on rigid image registration, proton dose distribution is calculated on daily CT images. The target and OARs are automatically delineated via deformable image registration. Dose distributions are evaluated to decide if repositioning or plan adaptation is necessary in order to achieve proper coverage of the target and sparing of OARs. Besides online dose-based image guidance, the software tool can also map daily treatment doses to the treatment planning CT images for offline adaptive treatment. Results: An in-room helical CT system is commissioned for IGPT purposes. It produces accurate CT numbers that allow proton dose calculation. GPU-based deformable image registration algorithms are developed and evaluated for automatic ROI-delineation and dose mapping. The online and offline IGPT functionalities are evaluated with daily CT images of the proton patients. Conclusion: The online and offline IGPT software tool may improve the safety and quality of proton treatment by allowing dose-based IGPT and adaptive proton treatments. Research is partially supported by Mevion Medical Systems.

  14. Design and application of 3D-printed stepless beam modulators in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, C.; Kumlin, J.; Martinez, D. M.; Jirasek, A.; Hoehr, C.

    2016-06-01

    A new method for the design of stepless beam modulators for proton therapy is described and verified. Simulations of the classic designs are compared against the stepless method for various modulation widths which are clinically applicable in proton eye therapy. Three modulator wheels were printed using a Stratasys Objet30 3D printer. The resulting depth dose distributions showed improved uniformity over the classic stepped designs. Simulated results imply a possible improvement in distal penumbra width; however, more accurate measurements are needed to fully verify this effect. Lastly, simulations were done to model bio-equivalence to Co-60 cell kill. A wheel was successfully designed to flatten this metric.

  15. The potential of proton beam radiation therapy in lung cancer (including mesothelioma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjelkengren, Goeran [Univ. Hospital, Malmoe (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Glimelius, Bengt [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology and Pathology; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology

    2005-12-01

    A Swedish group of oncologists and hospital physicists have estimated the number of patients in Sweden suitable for proton beam therapy. The estimations have been based on current statistics of tumour incidence, number of patients potentially eligible for radiation treatment, scientific support from clinical trials and model dose planning studies and knowledge of the dose-response relations of different tumours and normal tissues. It is estimated that about 350 patients with lung cancer and about 20 patients with mesothelioma annually may benefit from proton beam therapy.

  16. Design study of a medical proton linac for neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, S.; Raparia, D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a design study which establishes the physical parameters of the low energy beam transport, radiofrequency quadrupole, and linac, using computer programs available at Fermilab. Beam dynamics studies verify that the desired beam parameters can be achieved. The machine described here meets the aforementioned requirements and can be built using existing technology. Also discussed are other technically feasible options which could be attractive to clinicians, though they would complicate the design of the machine and increase construction costs. One of these options would allow the machine to deliver 2.3 MeV protons to produce epithermal neutrons for treating brain tumors. A second option would provide 15 MeV protons for isotope production. 21 refs., 33 figs

  17. Nuclear data for fast neutron and proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Jones, D.T.L.; Barschall, H.H.

    2001-01-01

    ICRU Report 63 entitled 'Nuclear Data for Neutron and Proton Radiotherapy and for Radiation Protection' has recently been published. The present paper presents an overview of this report, along with examples of some of the results obtained for evaluated nuclear cross sections and kerma coefficients. These cross sections are evaluated using a combination of measured data and the GNASH nuclear model code for elements of importance for biological, dosimetric, beam modification and shielding purposes. In the case of hydrogen both R-matrix and phase-shift scattering theories are used. Neutron cross sections and kerma coefficients were evaluated up to 100 MeV and proton cross sections up to 250 MeV. (author)

  18. GPU-based fast pencil beam algorithm for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Rintaro; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Kurihara, Tsuneya

    2011-01-01

    Performance of a treatment planning system is an essential factor in making sophisticated plans. The dose calculation is a major time-consuming process in planning operations. The standard algorithm for proton dose calculations is the pencil beam algorithm which produces relatively accurate results, but is time consuming. In order to shorten the computational time, we have developed a GPU (graphics processing unit)-based pencil beam algorithm. We have implemented this algorithm and calculated dose distributions in the case of a water phantom. The results were compared to those obtained by a traditional method with respect to the computational time and discrepancy between the two methods. The new algorithm shows 5-20 times faster performance using the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 card in comparison with the Intel Core-i7 920 processor. The maximum discrepancy of the dose distribution is within 0.2%. Our results show that GPUs are effective for proton dose calculations.

  19. Project of compact accelerator for cancer proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, A.

    1995-04-01

    The status of the sub-projetc 'Compact Accelerator' in the framework of the Hadrontherapy Project leaded by Prof. Amaldi is described. Emphasis is given to the reasons of the use of protons for radiotherapy applications, to the results of the preliminary design studies of four types of accelerators as possible radiotherapy dedicated 'Compact Accelerator' and to the scenario of the fonts of financial resources

  20. Preliminary results of proton therapy in choroidal melanoma at the centre de proton therapy d'Orsay (C.P.O.): 464 initial cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desjardins, L.; Levy, C.; D'hermies, F.; Frau, E.; Schlienger, P.; Habrand, J.L.; Mammar, H.; Schwartz, L.; Mazal, A.; Delacroix, S.; Nauraye, C.; Ferrand, R.; Asselain, B.

    1997-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the treatment of choroidal melanoma with proton-therapy at the Centre de protontherapie d'Orsay, France. Between September 1991 and September 1995, 612 patients presenting with choroidal melanoma were treated by proton-therapy in Orsay. Following initial management of the first 464 patients, results were analyzed, as were results after a 1-year follow up for 305 patients, a 2-year follow-up for 169 patients, and a 3-year follow-up for 59 patients. Univariate analysis showed that the actuarial local recurrence rate was 5 %, the 3-year survival rate 88 %, and the overall metastatic rate 5%. The initial tumor volume was the most significant predictive factor for visual results and metastases. Multivariate analysis revealed that visual results were significantly related to the initial tumor volume, initial retinal detachment, and total dose delivered to the optic nerve and macula. Proton-therapy of choroidal melanoma allows in most cases conservation of the eye without modification of survival. Visual results mainly depend on the site and size of the tumor. (author)

  1. Minimizing treatment planning errors in proton therapy using failure mode and effects analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yuanshui, E-mail: yuanshui.zheng@okc.procure.com [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 W Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 and Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); Johnson, Randall; Larson, Gary [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 W Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used tool to evaluate safety or reliability in conventional photon radiation therapy. However, reports about FMEA application in proton therapy are scarce. The purpose of this study is to apply FMEA in safety improvement of proton treatment planning at their center. Methods: The authors performed an FMEA analysis of their proton therapy treatment planning process using uniform scanning proton beams. The authors identified possible failure modes in various planning processes, including image fusion, contouring, beam arrangement, dose calculation, plan export, documents, billing, and so on. For each error, the authors estimated the frequency of occurrence, the likelihood of being undetected, and the severity of the error if it went undetected and calculated the risk priority number (RPN). The FMEA results were used to design their quality management program. In addition, the authors created a database to track the identified dosimetric errors. Periodically, the authors reevaluated the risk of errors by reviewing the internal error database and improved their quality assurance program as needed. Results: In total, the authors identified over 36 possible treatment planning related failure modes and estimated the associated occurrence, detectability, and severity to calculate the overall risk priority number. Based on the FMEA, the authors implemented various safety improvement procedures into their practice, such as education, peer review, and automatic check tools. The ongoing error tracking database provided realistic data on the frequency of occurrence with which to reevaluate the RPNs for various failure modes. Conclusions: The FMEA technique provides a systematic method for identifying and evaluating potential errors in proton treatment planning before they result in an error in patient dose delivery. The application of FMEA framework and the implementation of an ongoing error tracking system at their

  2. Minimizing treatment planning errors in proton therapy using failure mode and effects analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Johnson, Randall; Larson, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used tool to evaluate safety or reliability in conventional photon radiation therapy. However, reports about FMEA application in proton therapy are scarce. The purpose of this study is to apply FMEA in safety improvement of proton treatment planning at their center. Methods: The authors performed an FMEA analysis of their proton therapy treatment planning process using uniform scanning proton beams. The authors identified possible failure modes in various planning processes, including image fusion, contouring, beam arrangement, dose calculation, plan export, documents, billing, and so on. For each error, the authors estimated the frequency of occurrence, the likelihood of being undetected, and the severity of the error if it went undetected and calculated the risk priority number (RPN). The FMEA results were used to design their quality management program. In addition, the authors created a database to track the identified dosimetric errors. Periodically, the authors reevaluated the risk of errors by reviewing the internal error database and improved their quality assurance program as needed. Results: In total, the authors identified over 36 possible treatment planning related failure modes and estimated the associated occurrence, detectability, and severity to calculate the overall risk priority number. Based on the FMEA, the authors implemented various safety improvement procedures into their practice, such as education, peer review, and automatic check tools. The ongoing error tracking database provided realistic data on the frequency of occurrence with which to reevaluate the RPNs for various failure modes. Conclusions: The FMEA technique provides a systematic method for identifying and evaluating potential errors in proton treatment planning before they result in an error in patient dose delivery. The application of FMEA framework and the implementation of an ongoing error tracking system at their

  3. Relative and absolute dosimetry of proton therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazal, A.; Delacroix, S.; Bridier, A.; Daures, J.; Dolo, J.M.; Nauraye, C.; Ferrand, R.; Cosgrave, V.; Habrand, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Different codes of practice are in use or under preparation by several groups and national or international societies, concerning the dosimetry of proton beams. In spite of a large number of experiences and the increasing interest on this field, there are still large incertitudes on some of the basic conversion and correction factors to get dose values from different measuring methods. In practice, dose uniformity between centers is searched and encouraged by intercomparisons using standard procedures. We present the characteristics and the results on proton dosimetry intercomparisons using calorimeters, Faraday cups and ion chambers, as well as on the use of other detectors like diodes, radiographic films and TLD. New detectors like diamond, scintillators, radiochromic films, alanine, gels, ... can give new solutions to particular problems, provided their response is not affected at the end of the proton range (higher LET region), and their resolution, range, linearity, cost, ... are well adapted to practical situations. Some examples of special challenges are non interfering measurements during treatments for quality control, in vivo measurements, small beams for stereotactic irradiations, scanned beams and correlations between dosimetry, microdosimetry and radiobiology

  4. Real-time beam monitoring in scanned proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimpki, G.; Eichin, M.; Bula, C.; Rechsteiner, U.; Psoroulas, S.; Weber, D. C.; Lomax, A.; Meer, D.

    2018-05-01

    When treating cancerous tissues with protons beams, many centers make use of a step-and-shoot irradiation technique, in which the beam is steered to discrete grid points in the tumor volume. For safety reasons, the irradiation is supervised by an independent monitoring system validating cyclically that the correct amount of protons has been delivered to the correct position in the patient. Whenever unacceptable inaccuracies are detected, the irradiation can be interrupted to reinforce a high degree of radiation protection. At the Paul Scherrer Institute, we plan to irradiate tumors continuously. By giving up the idea of discrete grid points, we aim to be faster and more flexible in the irradiation. But the increase in speed and dynamics necessitates a highly responsive monitoring system to guarantee the same level of patient safety as for conventional step-and-shoot irradiations. Hence, we developed and implemented real-time monitoring of the proton beam current and position. As such, we read out diagnostic devices with 100 kHz and compare their signals against safety tolerances in an FPGA. In this paper, we report on necessary software and firmware enhancements of our control system and test their functionality based on three exemplary error scenarios. We demonstrate successful implementation of real-time beam monitoring and, consequently, compliance with international patient safety regulations.

  5. Impact of dose engine algorithm in pencil beam scanning proton therapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, Francesco; Fellin, Francesco; Lorentini, Stefano; Farace, Paolo

    2018-06-01

    Proton therapy for the treatment of breast cancer is acquiring increasing interest, due to the potential reduction of radiation-induced side effects such as cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. While several in silico studies demonstrated the gain in plan quality offered by pencil beam scanning (PBS) compared to passive scattering techniques, the related dosimetric uncertainties have been poorly investigated so far. Five breast cancer patients were planned with Raystation 6 analytical pencil beam (APB) and Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation algorithms. Plans were optimized with APB and then MC was used to recalculate dose distribution. Movable snout and beam splitting techniques (i.e. using two sub-fields for the same beam entrance, one with and the other without the use of a range shifter) were considered. PTV dose statistics were recorded. The same planning configurations were adopted for the experimental benchmark. Dose distributions were measured with a 2D array of ionization chambers and compared to APB and MC calculated ones by means of a γ analysis (agreement criteria 3%, 3 mm). Our results indicate that, when using proton PBS for breast cancer treatment, the Raystation 6 APB algorithm does not allow obtaining sufficient accuracy, especially with large air gaps. On the contrary, the MC algorithm resulted into much higher accuracy in all beam configurations tested and has to be recommended. Centers where a MC algorithm is not yet available should consider a careful use of APB, possibly combined with a movable snout system or in any case with strategies aimed at minimizing air gaps. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. WE-FG-BRB-03: Challenges and Opportunities for Implementing Biological Optimization in Particle Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, D. [Yale University School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The physical pattern of energy deposition and the enhanced relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons and carbon ions compared to photons offer unique and not fully understood or exploited opportunities to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy. Variations in RBE within a pristine or spread out Bragg peak and between particle types may be exploited to enhance cell killing in target regions without a corresponding increase in damage to normal tissue structures. In addition, the decreased sensitivity of hypoxic tumors to photon-based therapies may be partially overcome through the use of more densely ionizing radiations. These and other differences between particle and photon beams may be used to generate biologically optimized treatments that reduce normal tissue complications. In this symposium, speakers will examine the impact of the RBE of charged particles on measurable biological endpoints, treatment plan optimization, and the prediction or retrospective assessment of treatment outcomes. In particular, an AAPM task group was formed to critically examine the evidence for a spatially-variant RBE in proton therapy. Current knowledge of proton RBE variation with respect to dose, biological endpoint, and physics parameters will be reviewed. Further, the clinical relevance of these variations will be discussed. Recent work focused on improving simulations of radiation physics and biological response in proton and carbon ion therapy will also be presented. Finally, relevant biology research and areas of research needs will be highlighted, including the dependence of RBE on genetic factors including status of DNA repair pathways, the sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, the role of charged particles in hypoxic tumors, and the importance of fractionation effects. In addition to the physical advantages of protons and more massive ions over photons, the future application of biologically optimized treatment plans and their potential to

  7. WE-F-16A-03: 3D Printer Application in Proton Therapy: A Novel Method to Deliver Passive-Scattering Proton Beams with a Fixed Range and Modulation for SRS and SRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, X; Witztum, A; Liang, X; Reiche, M; Lin, H; Teo, B; Yin, L; Fiene, J; McDonough, J; Kassaee, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel technique to deliver passive-scattering proton beam with fixed range and modulation using a 3D printed patient-specific bolus for proton stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. Methods: A CIRS head phantom was used to simulate a patient with a small brain lesion. A custom bolus was created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) to compensate for the different water equivalent depths from the patient surface to the target from multiple beam directions. To simulate arc therapy, a plan was created on the initial CT using three passive-scattering proton beams with a fixed range and modulations irradiating from different angles. The DICOM-RT structure file of the bolus was exported from the TPS and converted to STL format for 3D printing. The phantom was rescanned with the printed custom bolus and head cup to verify the dose distribution comparing to the initial plan. EBT3 films were placed in the sagital plane of the target to verify the delivered dose distribution. The relative stopping power of the printing material(ABSplus-P430) was measured using the Zebra multi-plate ion chamber. Results: The relative stopping power of the 3D printing material, ABSplus-P430 was 1.05 which is almost water equivalent. The dose difference between verification CT and Initial CT is almost negligible. Film measurement also confirmed the accuracy for this new proton delivery technique. Conclusion: Our method using 3D printed range modifiers simplify the treatment delivery of multiple passive-scattering beams in treatment of small lesion in brain. This technique makes delivery of multiple beam more efficient and can be extended to allow arc therapy with proton beams. The ability to create and construct complex patient specific bolus structures provides a new dimension in creating optimized quality treatment plans not only for proton therapy but also for electron and photon therapy

  8. WE-F-16A-03: 3D Printer Application in Proton Therapy: A Novel Method to Deliver Passive-Scattering Proton Beams with a Fixed Range and Modulation for SRS and SRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, X; Witztum, A; Liang, X; Reiche, M; Lin, H; Teo, B; Yin, L; Fiene, J; McDonough, J; Kassaee, A [University Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel technique to deliver passive-scattering proton beam with fixed range and modulation using a 3D printed patient-specific bolus for proton stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. Methods: A CIRS head phantom was used to simulate a patient with a small brain lesion. A custom bolus was created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) to compensate for the different water equivalent depths from the patient surface to the target from multiple beam directions. To simulate arc therapy, a plan was created on the initial CT using three passive-scattering proton beams with a fixed range and modulations irradiating from different angles. The DICOM-RT structure file of the bolus was exported from the TPS and converted to STL format for 3D printing. The phantom was rescanned with the printed custom bolus and head cup to verify the dose distribution comparing to the initial plan. EBT3 films were placed in the sagital plane of the target to verify the delivered dose distribution. The relative stopping power of the printing material(ABSplus-P430) was measured using the Zebra multi-plate ion chamber. Results: The relative stopping power of the 3D printing material, ABSplus-P430 was 1.05 which is almost water equivalent. The dose difference between verification CT and Initial CT is almost negligible. Film measurement also confirmed the accuracy for this new proton delivery technique. Conclusion: Our method using 3D printed range modifiers simplify the treatment delivery of multiple passive-scattering beams in treatment of small lesion in brain. This technique makes delivery of multiple beam more efficient and can be extended to allow arc therapy with proton beams. The ability to create and construct complex patient specific bolus structures provides a new dimension in creating optimized quality treatment plans not only for proton therapy but also for electron and photon therapy.

  9. SU-F-T-178: Optimized Design of a Diamond Detector Specifically Dedicated to the Dose Distribution Measurements in Clinical Proton Pencil Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moignier, C; Pomorski, M; Agelou, M; Hernandez, J Garcia; Lazaro, D; Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Mazal, A; Tromson, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In proton-therapy, pencil beam scanning (PBS) dosimetry presents a real challenge due to the small size of the beam (about 3 to 8 mm in FWHM), the pulsed high dose rate (up to 100 Gy/s) and the proton energy variation (about 30 MeV to 250 MeV). In the framework of French INSERM DEDIPRO project, a specifically dedicated single crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) was developed with the objective of obtaining accurate measurements of the dose distribution in PBS modality. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX were performed. A small proton beam of 5 mm in FWHM was simulated as well as diamond devices with various size, thickness and holder composition. The calculated doses-to-diamond were compared with the doses-to-water in order to reduce the perturbation effects. Monte-Carlo simulations lead to an optimized SCDDo design for small proton beams dosimetry. Following the optimized design, SCDDos were mounted in water-equivalent holders with electrical connection adapted to standard electrometer. First, SCDDos performances (stability, repeatability, signal-to-background ratio…) were evaluated with conventional photon beams. Then, characterizations (dose linearity, dose rate dependence…) with wide proton beams were performed at proton-therapy center (IC-CPO) from Curie Institute (France) with the passive proton delivery technique, in order to confirm dosimetric requirements. Finally, depth-dose distributions were measured in a water tank, for native and modulated Bragg Peaks with the collimator of 12 cm, and compared to a commercial PPC05 parallel-plate ionization chamber reference detector. Lateral-dose profiles were also measured with the collimator of 5 mm, and compared to a commercial SFD diode. Results: The results show that SCDDo design does not disturb the dose distributions. Conclusion: The experimental dose distributions with the SCDDo are in good agreement with the commercial detectors and no energy dependence was observed with this device

  10. SU-F-T-178: Optimized Design of a Diamond Detector Specifically Dedicated to the Dose Distribution Measurements in Clinical Proton Pencil Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moignier, C; Pomorski, M; Agelou, M; Hernandez, J Garcia; Lazaro, D [Institut CEA LIST, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Mazal, A [Institut Curie - Centre de Protontherapie d’Orsay, Orsay (France); Tromson, D

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In proton-therapy, pencil beam scanning (PBS) dosimetry presents a real challenge due to the small size of the beam (about 3 to 8 mm in FWHM), the pulsed high dose rate (up to 100 Gy/s) and the proton energy variation (about 30 MeV to 250 MeV). In the framework of French INSERM DEDIPRO project, a specifically dedicated single crystal diamond dosimeter (SCDDo) was developed with the objective of obtaining accurate measurements of the dose distribution in PBS modality. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX were performed. A small proton beam of 5 mm in FWHM was simulated as well as diamond devices with various size, thickness and holder composition. The calculated doses-to-diamond were compared with the doses-to-water in order to reduce the perturbation effects. Monte-Carlo simulations lead to an optimized SCDDo design for small proton beams dosimetry. Following the optimized design, SCDDos were mounted in water-equivalent holders with electrical connection adapted to standard electrometer. First, SCDDos performances (stability, repeatability, signal-to-background ratio…) were evaluated with conventional photon beams. Then, characterizations (dose linearity, dose rate dependence…) with wide proton beams were performed at proton-therapy center (IC-CPO) from Curie Institute (France) with the passive proton delivery technique, in order to confirm dosimetric requirements. Finally, depth-dose distributions were measured in a water tank, for native and modulated Bragg Peaks with the collimator of 12 cm, and compared to a commercial PPC05 parallel-plate ionization chamber reference detector. Lateral-dose profiles were also measured with the collimator of 5 mm, and compared to a commercial SFD diode. Results: The results show that SCDDo design does not disturb the dose distributions. Conclusion: The experimental dose distributions with the SCDDo are in good agreement with the commercial detectors and no energy dependence was observed with this device

  11. Microscopic Gold Particle-Based Fiducial Markers for Proton Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Young Kyung; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Dong Wook; Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Park, Soah; Kim, Jin Sung; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Shin, Jungwook; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong; Pyo, Hong Ryeol; Kim, Dae Yong M.D.; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the feasibility of using fiducial markers composed of microscopic gold particles and human-compatible polymers as a means to overcome current problems with conventional macroscopic gold fiducial markers, such as dose reduction and artifact generation, in proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We examined two types of gold particle fiducial marker interactions: that with diagnostic X-rays and with a therapeutic proton beam. That is, we qualitatively and quantitatively compared the radiographic visibility of conventional gold and gold particle fiducial markers and the CT artifacts and dose reduction associated with their use. Results: The gold particle fiducials could be easily distinguished from high-density structures, such as the pelvic bone, in diagnostic X-rays but were nearly transparent to a proton beam. The proton dose distribution was distorted <5% by the gold particle fiducials with a 4.9% normalized gold density; this was the case even in the worst configuration (i.e., parallel alignment with a single-direction proton beam). In addition, CT artifacts were dramatically reduced for the gold particle mixture. Conclusion: Mixtures of microscopic gold particles and human-compatible polymers have excellent potential as fiducial markers for proton therapy for prostate cancer. These include good radiographic visibility, low distortion of the depth-dose distribution, and few CT artifacts.

  12. Optimization of GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo code parameters for spot scanning proton beam based on simulation with FLUKA general-purpose code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosu, Keita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Moskvin, Vadim P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Spot scanning, owing to its superior dose-shaping capability, provides unsurpassed dose conformity, in particular for complex targets. However, the robustness of the delivered dose distribution and prescription has to be verified. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has the potential to generate significant advantages for high-precise particle therapy, especially for medium containing inhomogeneities. However, the inherent choice of computational parameters in MC simulation codes of GATE, PHITS and FLUKA that is observed for uniform scanning proton beam needs to be evaluated. This means that the relationship between the effect of input parameters and the calculation results should be carefully scrutinized. The objective of this study was, therefore, to determine the optimal parameters for the spot scanning proton beam for both GATE and PHITS codes by using data from FLUKA simulation as a reference. The proton beam scanning system of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was modeled in FLUKA, and the geometry was subsequently and identically transferred to GATE and PHITS. Although the beam transport is managed by spot scanning system, the spot location is always set at the center of a water phantom of 600 × 600 × 300 mm{sup 3}, which is placed after the treatment nozzle. The percentage depth dose (PDD) is computed along the central axis using 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm{sup 3} voxels in the water phantom. The PDDs and the proton ranges obtained with several computational parameters are then compared to those of FLUKA, and optimal parameters are determined from the accuracy of the proton range, suppressed dose deviation, and computational time minimization. Our results indicate that the optimized parameters are different from those for uniform scanning, suggesting that the gold standard for setting computational parameters for any proton therapy application cannot be determined consistently since the impact of setting parameters depends on the proton irradiation

  13. Optimization of GATE and PHITS Monte Carlo code parameters for spot scanning proton beam based on simulation with FLUKA general-purpose code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosu, Keita; Das, Indra J.; Moskvin, Vadim P.

    2016-01-01

    Spot scanning, owing to its superior dose-shaping capability, provides unsurpassed dose conformity, in particular for complex targets. However, the robustness of the delivered dose distribution and prescription has to be verified. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has the potential to generate significant advantages for high-precise particle therapy, especially for medium containing inhomogeneities. However, the inherent choice of computational parameters in MC simulation codes of GATE, PHITS and FLUKA that is observed for uniform scanning proton beam needs to be evaluated. This means that the relationship between the effect of input parameters and the calculation results should be carefully scrutinized. The objective of this study was, therefore, to determine the optimal parameters for the spot scanning proton beam for both GATE and PHITS codes by using data from FLUKA simulation as a reference. The proton beam scanning system of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center was modeled in FLUKA, and the geometry was subsequently and identically transferred to GATE and PHITS. Although the beam transport is managed by spot scanning system, the spot location is always set at the center of a water phantom of 600 × 600 × 300 mm 3 , which is placed after the treatment nozzle. The percentage depth dose (PDD) is computed along the central axis using 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm 3 voxels in the water phantom. The PDDs and the proton ranges obtained with several computational parameters are then compared to those of FLUKA, and optimal parameters are determined from the accuracy of the proton range, suppressed dose deviation, and computational time minimization. Our results indicate that the optimized parameters are different from those for uniform scanning, suggesting that the gold standard for setting computational parameters for any proton therapy application cannot be determined consistently since the impact of setting parameters depends on the proton irradiation technique

  14. Range uncertainties in proton therapy and the role of Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganetti, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The main advantages of proton therapy are the reduced total energy deposited in the patient as compared to photon techniques and the finite range of the proton beam. The latter adds an additional degree of freedom to treatment planning. The range in tissue is associated with considerable uncertainties caused by imaging, patient setup, beam delivery and dose calculation. Reducing the uncertainties would allow a reduction of the treatment volume and thus allow a better utilization of the advantages of protons. This paper summarizes the role of Monte Carlo simulations when aiming at a reduction of range uncertainties in proton therapy. Differences in dose calculation when comparing Monte Carlo with analytical algorithms are analyzed as well as range uncertainties due to material constants and CT conversion. Range uncertainties due to biological effects and the role of Monte Carlo for in vivo range verification are discussed. Furthermore, the current range uncertainty recipes used at several proton therapy facilities are revisited. We conclude that a significant impact of Monte Carlo dose calculation can be expected in complex geometries where local range uncertainties due to multiple Coulomb scattering will reduce the accuracy of analytical algorithms. In these cases Monte Carlo techniques might reduce the range uncertainty by several mm. (topical review)

  15. Predicted Rates of Secondary Malignancies From Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy for Stage I Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, Charles B., E-mail: csimone@alumni.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Kramer, Kevin [Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Rockville, Maryland (United States); O' Meara, William P. [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Belard, Arnaud [Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Rockville, Maryland (United States); McDonough, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); O' Connell, John [Radiation Oncology Service, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Photon radiotherapy has been the standard adjuvant treatment for stage I seminoma. Single-dose carboplatin therapy and observation have emerged as alternative options due to concerns for acute toxicities and secondary malignancies from radiation. In this institutional review board-approved study, we compared photon and proton radiotherapy for stage I seminoma and the predicted rates of excess secondary malignancies for both treatment modalities. Methods and Material: Computed tomography images from 10 consecutive patients with stage I seminoma were used to quantify dosimetric differences between photon and proton therapies. Structures reported to be at increased risk for secondary malignancies and in-field critical structures were contoured. Reported models of organ-specific radiation-induced cancer incidence rates based on organ equivalent dose were used to determine the excess absolute risk of secondary malignancies. Calculated values were compared with tumor registry reports of excess secondary malignancies among testicular cancer survivors. Results: Photon and proton plans provided comparable target volume coverage. Proton plans delivered significantly lower mean doses to all examined normal tissues, except for the kidneys. The greatest absolute reduction in mean dose was observed for the stomach (119 cGy for proton plans vs. 768 cGy for photon plans; p < 0.0001). Significantly more excess secondary cancers per 10,000 patients/year were predicted for photon radiation than for proton radiation to the stomach (4.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.22-5.01), large bowel (0.81; 95% CI, 0.39-1.01), and bladder (0.03; 95% CI, 0.01-0.58), while no difference was demonstrated for radiation to the pancreas (0.02; 95% CI, -0.01-0.06). Conclusions: For patients with stage I seminoma, proton radiation therapy reduced the predicted secondary cancer risk compared with photon therapy. We predict a reduction of one additional secondary cancer for every 50 patients

  16. Online advertising and marketing claims by providers of proton beam therapy: are they guideline-based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkum, Mark T; Liu, Wei; Palma, David A; Bauman, Glenn S; Dinniwell, Robert E; Warner, Andrew; Mishra, Mark V; Louie, Alexander V

    2018-03-15

    Cancer patients frequently search the Internet for treatment options, and hospital websites are seen as reliable sources of knowledge. Guidelines support the use of proton radiotherapy in specific disease sites or on clinical trials. This study aims to evaluate direct-to-consumer advertising content and claims made by proton therapy centre (PTC) websites worldwide. Operational PTC websites in English were identified through the Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group website. Data abstraction of website content was performed independently by two investigators. Eight international guidelines were consulted to determine guideline-based indications for proton radiotherapy. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the characteristics of PTC websites that indicated proton radiotherapy offered greater disease control or cure rates. Forty-eight PTCs with 46 English websites were identified. 60·9% of PTC websites claimed proton therapy provided improved disease control or cure. U.S. websites listed more indications than international websites (15·5 ± 5·4 vs. 10·4 ± 5·8, p = 0·004). The most common disease sites advertised were prostate (87·0%), head and neck (87·0%) and pediatrics (82·6%), all of which were indicated in least one international guideline. Several disease sites advertised were not present in any consensus guidelines, including pancreatobiliary (52·2%), breast (50·0%), and esophageal (43·5%) cancers. Multivariate analysis found increasing number of disease sites and claiming their centre was a local or regional leader in proton radiotherapy was associated with indicating proton radiotherapy offers greater disease control or cure. Information from PTC websites often differs from recommendations found in international consensus guidelines. As online marketing information may have significant influence on patient decision-making, alignment of such information with accepted guidelines and consensus

  17. Monte Carlo characterisation of the Dose Magnifying Glass for proton therapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, A H; Guatelli, S; Petesecca, M; Jackson, M; Rozenfeld, A B

    2017-01-01

    A Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation study was carried out to characterise a novel silicon strip detector, the Dose Magnifying Glass (DMG), for use in proton therapy Quality Assurance. We investigated the possibility to use DMG to determine the energy of the incident proton beam. The advantages of DMG are quick response, easy operation and high spatial resolution. In this work we theoretically proved that DMG can be used for QA in the determination of the energy of the incident proton beam, for ocular and prostate cancer therapy. The study was performed by means of Monte Carlo simulations Experimental measurements are currently on their way to confirm the results of this simulation study. (paper)

  18. Role of Acid and Weakly Acidic Reflux in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Off Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Hea Jung; Cho, Yu Kyung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. T...

  19. Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Malignancies of the Base of Skull: Treatment Planning, Acute Toxicities, and Preliminary Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald; Melancon, Adam [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Poenisch, Falk; Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McAleer, Mary Frances; McGovern, Susan L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); DeMonte, Franco [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brown, Paul D.; Mahajan, Anita [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To describe treatment planning techniques and early clinical outcomes in patients treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma or chondrosarcoma of the skull base. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 through August 2011, 15 patients were treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma (n=10) or chondrosarcoma (n=5) at a single institution. Toxicity was prospectively evaluated and scored weekly and at all follow-up visits according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Treatment planning techniques and dosimetric data were recorded and compared with those of passive scattering plans created with clinically applicable dose constraints. Results: Ten patients were treated with single-field-optimized scanning beam plans and 5 with multifield-optimized intensity modulated proton therapy. All but 2 patients received a simultaneous integrated boost as well. The mean prescribed radiation doses were 69.8 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range, 68-70 Gy [RBE]) for chordoma and 68.4 Gy (RBE) (range, 66-70) for chondrosarcoma. In comparison with passive scattering plans, spot scanning plans demonstrated improved high-dose conformality and sparing of temporal lobes and brainstem. Clinically, the most common acute toxicities included fatigue (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 8 patients) and nausea (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 6 patients). No toxicities of grades 3 to 5 were recorded. At a median follow-up time of 27 months (range, 13-42 months), 1 patient had experienced local recurrence and a second developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients had magnetic resonance imaging-documented temporal lobe changes, and a third patient developed facial numbness. No other subacute or late effects were recorded. Conclusions: In comparison to passive scattering, treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy displayed improved high-dose conformality. Clinically, the treatment was well tolerated, and

  20. Beam dynamics study in the C235 cyclotron for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamysheva, G.A.; Kostromin, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Study of the beam dynamics in the C235 cyclotron dedicated to the proton therapy is presented. Results of the computer simulations of the particle motion in the measured magnetic field are given. Study of the resonance influence on the acceleration process was carried out. The corresponding tolerances on the magnetic field imperfections and transverse beam parameters were defined using these simulations

  1. FEASIBILITY OF POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY OF DOSE DISTRIBUTION IN PROTON BEAM CANCER THERAPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEEBE-WANG, J.J.; DILMANIAN, F.A.; PEGGS, S.G.; SCHLYEER, D.J.; VASKA, P.

    2002-01-01

    Proton therapy is a treatment modality of increasing utility in clinical radiation oncology mostly because its dose distribution conforms more tightly to the target volume than x-ray radiation therapy. One important feature of proton therapy is that it produces a small amount of positron-emitting isotopes along the beam-path through the non-elastic nuclear interaction of protons with target nuclei such as 12 C, 14 N, and 16 O. These radioisotopes, mainly 11 C, 13 N and 15 O, allow imaging the therapy dose distribution using positron emission tomography (PET). The resulting PET images provide a powerful tool for quality assurance of the treatment, especially when treating inhomogeneous organs such as the lungs or the head-and-neck, where the calculation of the dose distribution for treatment planning is more difficult. This paper uses Monte Carlo simulations to predict the yield of positron emitters produced by a 250 MeV proton beam, and to simulate the productions of the image in a clinical PET scanner

  2. TOF-PET scanner configurations for quality assurance in proton therapy: a patient case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dendooven, Peter; Diblen, Faruk; Buitenhuis, H.J.T.; Oxley, D.C.; Biegun, A.K.; van der Borden, A.J.; Brandenburg, Sijtze; Cambraia Lopes, P.; van der Schaaf, A.; Schaart, D.R.; Vandenberghe, S.; van 't Veld, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the clinical benefit of positron emission tomography (PET) for dose delivery verification in proton therapy, we performed a patient case study comparing in-situ with in-room time-of-flight (TOF) PET. For the in-situ option, we consider both a (limited-angle) clinical scanner

  3. A proton therapy model using discrete difference equations with an example of treating hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodine, Erin N; Monia, K Lars

    2017-08-01

    Proton therapy is a type of radiation therapy used to treat cancer. It provides more localized particle exposure than other types of radiotherapy (e.g., x-ray and electron) thus reducing damage to tissue surrounding a tumor and reducing unwanted side effects. We have developed a novel discrete difference equation model of the spatial and temporal dynamics of cancer and healthy cells before, during, and after the application of a proton therapy treatment course. Specifically, the model simulates the growth and diffusion of the cancer and healthy cells in and surrounding a tumor over one spatial dimension (tissue depth) and the treatment of the tumor with discrete bursts of proton radiation. We demonstrate how to use data from in vitro and clinical studies to parameterize the model. Specifically, we use data from studies of Hepatocellular carcinoma, a common form of liver cancer. Using the parameterized model we compare the ability of different clinically used treatment courses to control the tumor. Our results show that treatment courses which use conformal proton therapy (targeting the tumor from multiple angles) provides better control of the tumor while using lower treatment doses than a non-conformal treatment course, and thus should be recommend for use when feasible.

  4. Use of a two-dimensional ionization chamber array for proton therapy beam quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Ding Xiaoning; Gillin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional ion chamber arrays are primarily used for conventional and intensity modulated radiotherapy quality assurance. There is no commercial device of such type available on the market that is offered for proton therapy quality assurance. We have investigated suitability of the MatriXX, a commercial two-dimensional ion chamber array detector for proton therapy QA. This device is designed to be used for photon and electron therapy QA. The device is equipped with 32x32 parallel plate ion chambers, each with 4.5 mm diam and 7.62 mm center-to-center separation. A 250 MeV proton beam was used to calibrate the dose measured by this device. The water equivalent thickness of the buildup material was determined to be 3.9 mm using a 160 MeV proton beam. Proton beams of different energies were used to measure the reproducibility of dose output and to evaluate the consistency in the beam flatness and symmetry measured by MatriXX. The output measurement results were compared with the clinical commissioning beam data that were obtained using a 0.6 cc Farmer chamber. The agreement was consistently found to be within 1%. The profiles were compared with film dosimetry and also with ion chamber data in water with an excellent agreement. The device is found to be well suited for quality assurance of proton therapy beams. It provides fast two-dimensional dose distribution information in real time with the accuracy comparable to that of ion chamber measurements and film dosimetry

  5. WE-E-BRB-01: Personalized Motion Management Strategies for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, X.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for treating thoracic and liver tumors using pencil beam scanning proton therapy Thoracic and liver tumors have not been treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy until recently. This is because of concerns about the significant interplay effects between proton spot scanning and patient’s respiratory motion. However, not all tumors have unacceptable magnitude of motion for PBS proton therapy. Therefore it is important to analyze the motion and understand the significance of the interplay effect for each patient. The factors that affect interplay effect and its washout include magnitude of motion, spot size, spot scanning sequence and speed. Selection of beam angle, scanning direction, repainting and fractionation can all reduce the interplay effect. An overview of respiratory motion management in PBS proton therapy including assessment of tumor motion and WET evaluation will be first presented. As thoracic tumors have very different motion patterns from liver tumors, examples would be provided for both anatomic sites. As thoracic tumors are typically located within highly heterogeneous environments, dose calculation accuracy is a concern for both treatment target and surrounding organs such as spinal cord or esophagus. Strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in PBS will be presented and the pros and cons of various motion mitigation strategies will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Motion analysis for individual patients with respect to interplay effect Interplay effect and mitigation strategies for treating thoracic/liver tumors with PBS Treatment planning margins for PBS The impact of proton dose calculation engines over heterogeneous treatment target and surrounding organs I have a current research funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian; L. Lin, I have a current funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and

  6. WE-E-BRB-00: Motion Management for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for treating thoracic and liver tumors using pencil beam scanning proton therapy Thoracic and liver tumors have not been treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy until recently. This is because of concerns about the significant interplay effects between proton spot scanning and patient’s respiratory motion. However, not all tumors have unacceptable magnitude of motion for PBS proton therapy. Therefore it is important to analyze the motion and understand the significance of the interplay effect for each patient. The factors that affect interplay effect and its washout include magnitude of motion, spot size, spot scanning sequence and speed. Selection of beam angle, scanning direction, repainting and fractionation can all reduce the interplay effect. An overview of respiratory motion management in PBS proton therapy including assessment of tumor motion and WET evaluation will be first presented. As thoracic tumors have very different motion patterns from liver tumors, examples would be provided for both anatomic sites. As thoracic tumors are typically located within highly heterogeneous environments, dose calculation accuracy is a concern for both treatment target and surrounding organs such as spinal cord or esophagus. Strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in PBS will be presented and the pros and cons of various motion mitigation strategies will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Motion analysis for individual patients with respect to interplay effect Interplay effect and mitigation strategies for treating thoracic/liver tumors with PBS Treatment planning margins for PBS The impact of proton dose calculation engines over heterogeneous treatment target and surrounding organs I have a current research funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian; L. Lin, I have a current funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and

  7. WE-E-BRB-01: Personalized Motion Management Strategies for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Strategies for treating thoracic and liver tumors using pencil beam scanning proton therapy Thoracic and liver tumors have not been treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy until recently. This is because of concerns about the significant interplay effects between proton spot scanning and patient’s respiratory motion. However, not all tumors have unacceptable magnitude of motion for PBS proton therapy. Therefore it is important to analyze the motion and understand the significance of the interplay effect for each patient. The factors that affect interplay effect and its washout include magnitude of motion, spot size, spot scanning sequence and speed. Selection of beam angle, scanning direction, repainting and fractionation can all reduce the interplay effect. An overview of respiratory motion management in PBS proton therapy including assessment of tumor motion and WET evaluation will be first presented. As thoracic tumors have very different motion patterns from liver tumors, examples would be provided for both anatomic sites. As thoracic tumors are typically located within highly heterogeneous environments, dose calculation accuracy is a concern for both treatment target and surrounding organs such as spinal cord or esophagus. Strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in PBS will be presented and the pros and cons of various motion mitigation strategies will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Motion analysis for individual patients with respect to interplay effect Interplay effect and mitigation strategies for treating thoracic/liver tumors with PBS Treatment planning margins for PBS The impact of proton dose calculation engines over heterogeneous treatment target and surrounding organs I have a current research funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian; L. Lin, I have a current funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and

  8. WE-E-BRB-00: Motion Management for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Strategies for treating thoracic and liver tumors using pencil beam scanning proton therapy Thoracic and liver tumors have not been treated with pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy until recently. This is because of concerns about the significant interplay effects between proton spot scanning and patient’s respiratory motion. However, not all tumors have unacceptable magnitude of motion for PBS proton therapy. Therefore it is important to analyze the motion and understand the significance of the interplay effect for each patient. The factors that affect interplay effect and its washout include magnitude of motion, spot size, spot scanning sequence and speed. Selection of beam angle, scanning direction, repainting and fractionation can all reduce the interplay effect. An overview of respiratory motion management in PBS proton therapy including assessment of tumor motion and WET evaluation will be first presented. As thoracic tumors have very different motion patterns from liver tumors, examples would be provided for both anatomic sites. As thoracic tumors are typically located within highly heterogeneous environments, dose calculation accuracy is a concern for both treatment target and surrounding organs such as spinal cord or esophagus. Strategies for mitigating the interplay effect in PBS will be presented and the pros and cons of various motion mitigation strategies will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Motion analysis for individual patients with respect to interplay effect Interplay effect and mitigation strategies for treating thoracic/liver tumors with PBS Treatment planning margins for PBS The impact of proton dose calculation engines over heterogeneous treatment target and surrounding organs I have a current research funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and Varian; L. Lin, I have a current funding from Varian Medical System under the master agreement between University of Pennsylvania and

  9. SU-D-304-04: Pre-Clinical Feasibility Study for Intensity Modulated Grid Proton Therapy (IMgPT) Using a Newly Developed Delivery System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiamas, P; Moskvin, V; Shin, J; Axente, M; Pirlepesov, F; Krasin, M; Merchant, T; Farr, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to characterize and evaluate intensity-modulated proton grid therapy (IMgPT) using a clinical proton beam. Methods: A TOPAS MC model of a new developmental mode (pre-clinical) of the Hitachi proton therapy system (PROBEAT) was used for simulation and characterization of proton grid therapy. TOPAS simulations of different energy ranges, depths and spot separation distances were performed. LET spectra for various energies and depths were produced with FLUKA MC code for evaluation potential interplay between planning parameters and their effect on the characterization of areas (valley) between spots. IMgPT planning aspects (spot spacing, skin dose, peak-to-valley ratios, beam selection, etc.) were evaluated for different phantom and patient cases. Raysearch software (v4.51) was used to perform the evaluation. Results: Calculated beam peak-to-valley ratios scenarios showed strong energy and depth dependence with ratios to be larger for higher energies and shallower depths. Peak-to-valley ratios for R90 range and for spot spacing of 1cm varied from 30% (E = 221.3 MeV, depth 30.6 cm) to 80% (E = 70.3 MeV, depth 4 cm). LET spectra calculations showed spectral hardening with depth, which might potential increase, spot separation distance and improve peak-to-valley ratios. IMgPT optimization, using constant spot spacing, showed skin dose reduction between peak regions of dose due to the irradiation of less skin. Single beam for bulky shallower tumors might be a potential candidate for proton grid therapy. Conclusions: Proton grid therapy using a clinical beam is a promising technique that reduces skin dose between peak regions of dose and may be suitable for the treatment of shallow tumors. IMgPT may be considered for use when bystander effects in off peak regions would be appropriate

  10. SU-D-304-04: Pre-Clinical Feasibility Study for Intensity Modulated Grid Proton Therapy (IMgPT) Using a Newly Developed Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiamas, P; Moskvin, V; Shin, J; Axente, M; Pirlepesov, F; Krasin, M; Merchant, T; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to characterize and evaluate intensity-modulated proton grid therapy (IMgPT) using a clinical proton beam. Methods: A TOPAS MC model of a new developmental mode (pre-clinical) of the Hitachi proton therapy system (PROBEAT) was used for simulation and characterization of proton grid therapy. TOPAS simulations of different energy ranges, depths and spot separation distances were performed. LET spectra for various energies and depths were produced with FLUKA MC code for evaluation potential interplay between planning parameters and their effect on the characterization of areas (valley) between spots. IMgPT planning aspects (spot spacing, skin dose, peak-to-valley ratios, beam selection, etc.) were evaluated for different phantom and patient cases. Raysearch software (v4.51) was used to perform the evaluation. Results: Calculated beam peak-to-valley ratios scenarios showed strong energy and depth dependence with ratios to be larger for higher energies and shallower depths. Peak-to-valley ratios for R90 range and for spot spacing of 1cm varied from 30% (E = 221.3 MeV, depth 30.6 cm) to 80% (E = 70.3 MeV, depth 4 cm). LET spectra calculations showed spectral hardening with depth, which might potential increase, spot separation distance and improve peak-to-valley ratios. IMgPT optimization, using constant spot spacing, showed skin dose reduction between peak regions of dose due to the irradiation of less skin. Single beam for bulky shallower tumors might be a potential candidate for proton grid therapy. Conclusions: Proton grid therapy using a clinical beam is a promising technique that reduces skin dose between peak regions of dose and may be suitable for the treatment of shallow tumors. IMgPT may be considered for use when bystander effects in off peak regions would be appropriate.

  11. Modeling and operation optimization of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system for maximum efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, In-Su; Park, Sang-Kyun; Chung, Chang-Bock

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A proton exchange membrane fuel cell system is operationally optimized. • A constrained optimization problem is formulated to maximize fuel cell efficiency. • Empirical and semi-empirical models for most system components are developed. • Sensitivity analysis is performed to elucidate the effects of major operating variables. • The optimization results are verified by comparison with actual operation data. - Abstract: This paper presents an operation optimization method and demonstrates its application to a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system. A constrained optimization problem was formulated to maximize the efficiency of a fuel cell system by incorporating practical models derived from actual operations of the system. Empirical and semi-empirical models for most of the system components were developed based on artificial neural networks and semi-empirical equations. Prior to system optimizations, the developed models were validated by comparing simulation results with the measured ones. Moreover, sensitivity analyses were performed to elucidate the effects of major operating variables on the system efficiency under practical operating constraints. Then, the optimal operating conditions were sought at various system power loads. The optimization results revealed that the efficiency gaps between the worst and best operation conditions of the system could reach 1.2–5.5% depending on the power output range. To verify the optimization results, the optimal operating conditions were applied to the fuel cell system, and the measured results were compared with the expected optimal values. The discrepancies between the measured and expected values were found to be trivial, indicating that the proposed operation optimization method was quite successful for a substantial increase in the efficiency of the fuel cell system.

  12. Optimal conditions for high current proton irradiations at the university of Wisconsin's ion beam laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetteland, C. J.; Field, K. G.; Gerczak, T. J.; Eiden, T. J.; Maier, B. R.; Albakri, O.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    The National Electrostatics Corporation's (NEC) Toroidal Volume Ion Source (TORVIS) source is known for exceptionally high proton currents with minimal service downtime as compared to traditional sputter sources. It has been possible to obtain over 150μA of proton current from the source, with over 70μA on the target stage. However, beam fluxes above ∼1×10 17 /m2-s may have many undesirable effects, especially for insulators. This may include high temperature gradients at the surface, sputtering, surface discharge, cracking or even disintegration of the sample. A series of experiments were conducted to examine the role of high current fluxes in a suite of ceramics and insulating materials. Results will show the optimal proton irradiation conditions and target mounting strategies needed to minimize unwanted macro-scale damage, while developing a procedure for conducting preliminary radiation experiments.

  13. Efficiency of analytical and sampling-based uncertainty propagation in intensity-modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, N.; Hennig, P.; Wieser, H. P.; Bangert, M.

    2017-07-01

    The sensitivity of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans to uncertainties can be quantified and mitigated with robust/min-max and stochastic/probabilistic treatment analysis and optimization techniques. Those methods usually rely on sparse random, importance, or worst-case sampling. Inevitably, this imposes a trade-off between computational speed and accuracy of the uncertainty propagation. Here, we investigate analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) as an alternative for uncertainty propagation and minimization in IMPT that does not rely on scenario sampling. APM propagates probability distributions over range and setup uncertainties via a Gaussian pencil-beam approximation into moments of the probability distributions over the resulting dose in closed form. It supports arbitrary correlation models and allows for efficient incorporation of fractionation effects regarding random and systematic errors. We evaluate the trade-off between run-time and accuracy of APM uncertainty computations on three patient datasets. Results are compared against reference computations facilitating importance and random sampling. Two approximation techniques to accelerate uncertainty propagation and minimization based on probabilistic treatment plan optimization are presented. Runtimes are measured on CPU and GPU platforms, dosimetric accuracy is quantified in comparison to a sampling-based benchmark (5000 random samples). APM accurately propagates range and setup uncertainties into dose uncertainties at competitive run-times (GPU ≤slant {5} min). The resulting standard deviation (expectation value) of dose show average global γ{3% / {3}~mm} pass rates between 94.2% and 99.9% (98.4% and 100.0%). All investigated importance sampling strategies provided less accuracy at higher run-times considering only a single fraction. Considering fractionation, APM uncertainty propagation and treatment plan optimization was proven to be possible at constant time complexity

  14. First experiences in treatment of low-grade glioma grade I and II with proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauswald, Henrik; Rieken, Stefan; Ecker, Swantje; Kessel, Kerstin A; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2012-01-01

    To retrospectively assess feasibility and toxicity of proton therapy in patients with low-grade glioma (WHO °I/II). Proton beam therapy only administered in 19 patients (median age 29 years; 9 female, 10 male) for low-grade glioma between 2010 and 2011 was reviewed. In 6 cases proton therapy was performed due to tumor progression after biopsy, in 8 cases each due to tumor progression after (partial-) resection, and in 5 cases due to tumor progression after chemotherapy. Median total dose applied was 54 GyE (range, 48,6-54 GyE) in single fractions of median 1.8 GyE. Median clinical target volume was 99 cc (range, 6–463 cc) and treated using median 2 beams (range, 1–2). Proton therapy was finished as planned in all cases. At end of proton therapy, 13 patients showed focal alopecia, 6 patients reported mild fatigue, one patient with temporal tumor localization concentration deficits and speech errors and one more patient deficits in short-term memory. Four patients did not report any side effects. During follow-up, one patient presented with pseudo-progression showing worsening of general condition and brain edema 1–2 months after last irradiation and restitution after 6 months. In the present MR imaging (median follow-up 5 months; range 0–22 months) 12 patients had stable disease, 2 (1) patients partial (complete) remission, one more patient pseudo-progression (differential diagnosis: tumor progression) 4 weeks after irradiation without having had further follow-up imaging so far, and one patient tumor progression approximately 9 months after irradiation. Regarding early side effects, mild alopecia was the predominant finding. The rate of alopecia seems to be due to large treatment volumes as well as the anatomical locations of the target volumes and might be avoided by using multiple beams and the gantry in the future. Further evaluations including neuropsychological testing are in preparation

  15. Transarterial Fiducial Marker Placement for Image-guided Proton Therapy for Malignant Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Kengo; Shimohira, Masashi; Sasaki, Shigeru; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Nishikawa, Hiroko; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Hara, Masaki; Hashizume, Takuya; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe aim of this study is to analyze the technical and clinical success rates and safety of transarterial fiducial marker placement for image-guided proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.Methods and MaterialsFifty-five patients underwent this procedure as an interventional treatment. Five patients had 2 tumors, and 4 tumors required 2 markers each, so the total number of procedures was 64. The 60 tumors consisted of 46 hepatocellular carcinomas and 14 liver metastases. Five-mm-long straight microcoils of 0.018 inches in diameter were used as fiducial markers and placed in appropriate positions for each tumor. We assessed the technical and clinical success rates of transarterial fiducial marker placement, as well as the complications associated with it. Technical success was defined as the successful delivery and placement of the fiducial coil, and clinical success was defined as the completion of proton therapy.ResultsAll 64 fiducial coils were successfully installed, so the technical success rate was 100 % (64/64). Fifty-four patients underwent proton therapy without coil migration. In one patient, proton therapy was not performed because of obstructive jaundice due to bile duct invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, the clinical success rate was 98 % (54/55). Slight bleeding was observed in one case, but it was stopped immediately and then observed. None of the patients developed hepatic infarctions due to fiducial marker migration.ConclusionTransarterial fiducial marker placement appears to be a useful and safe procedure for proton therapy for malignant liver tumors

  16. Transarterial Fiducial Marker Placement for Image-guided Proton Therapy for Malignant Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Kengo, E-mail: yesterday.is.yesterday@gmail.com; Shimohira, Masashi, E-mail: mshimohira@gmail.com [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sasaki, Shigeru, E-mail: ssasaki916@yahoo.co.jp; Iwata, Hiromitsu, E-mail: h-iwa-ncu@nifty.com; Nishikawa, Hiroko, E-mail: piroko1018@gmail.com; Ogino, Hiroyuki, E-mail: oginogio@gmail.com; Hara, Masaki, E-mail: mhara@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Nagoya City West Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center (Japan); Hashizume, Takuya, E-mail: tky300@gmail.com; Shibamoto, Yuta, E-mail: yshiba@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study is to analyze the technical and clinical success rates and safety of transarterial fiducial marker placement for image-guided proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.Methods and MaterialsFifty-five patients underwent this procedure as an interventional treatment. Five patients had 2 tumors, and 4 tumors required 2 markers each, so the total number of procedures was 64. The 60 tumors consisted of 46 hepatocellular carcinomas and 14 liver metastases. Five-mm-long straight microcoils of 0.018 inches in diameter were used as fiducial markers and placed in appropriate positions for each tumor. We assessed the technical and clinical success rates of transarterial fiducial marker placement, as well as the complications associated with it. Technical success was defined as the successful delivery and placement of the fiducial coil, and clinical success was defined as the completion of proton therapy.ResultsAll 64 fiducial coils were successfully installed, so the technical success rate was 100 % (64/64). Fifty-four patients underwent proton therapy without coil migration. In one patient, proton therapy was not performed because of obstructive jaundice due to bile duct invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, the clinical success rate was 98 % (54/55). Slight bleeding was observed in one case, but it was stopped immediately and then observed. None of the patients developed hepatic infarctions due to fiducial marker migration.ConclusionTransarterial fiducial marker placement appears to be a useful and safe procedure for proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.

  17. Technical assessment of the Loma Linda University proton therapy accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    In April 1986, officials of Loma Linda University requested that Fermilab design and construct a 250 MeV proton synchrotron for radiotherapy, to be located at the Loma Linda University Medical Center. In June 1986 the project, having received all necessary approvals, commenced. In order to meet a desirable schedule providing for operation in early 1990, it was decided to erect such parts of the accelerator as were complete at Fermilab and conduct a precommissioning activity prior to the completion of the building at Loma Linda which will house the final radiotherapy facility. It was hoped that approximately one year would be saved by the precommissioning, and that important information would be obtained about the system so that improvements could be made during installation at Loma Linda. This report contains an analysis by Fermilab staff members of the information gained in the precommissioning activity and makes recommendations about steps to be taken to enhance the performance of the proton synchrotron at Loma Linda. In the design of the accelerator, effort was made to employ commercially available components, or to industrialize the products developed so that later versions of the accelerator could be produced industrially. The magnets could only be fabricated at Fermilab if the schedule was to be met, but efforts were made to transfer that technology to industry. Originally, it was planned to use a 1.7 MeV RFQ fabricated at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory as injector, but LBL would have found it difficult to meet the project schedule. After consideration of other options, for example a 3.4 MeV tandem accelerator, a supplier (AccSys Inc.) qualified itself to provide a 2 MeV RFQ on a schedule well matched to the project schedule. This choice was made, but a separate supplier was selected to develop and provide the 425 MHz power amplifier for the RFQ

  18. Electromagnetic design of a pos-accelerator of protons for ocular neoplasm therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabelo, Luísa de Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Proton therapy is an effective technique in the treatment and control of cancer, which is not available in most countries. The low number of specialized centers for this type of treatment is because of the high cost of implementing and maintaining the accelerators. This study presents a model for the Electromagnetic (EM) acceleration of protons to sufficient energies for the treatment of ocular tumors. This is the scientific possibility of a compact technology that uses cyclotrons to produce radioisotopes (present in various countries) as accelerator guns via an analytical assessment of the physical parameters of the beam and a simulation of the electromagnetic equipment structures, acceleration, and movement of the proton beam using CST STUDIO® 3D 2015 (Computer Simulation Technology) software. In addition, the geometry required to provide synchronization between the acceleration and beam path was analyzed using the motion equations of the protons. The simulations show a final model that is compact and simplified as compared with the isochronic cyclotron and synchrotron (used for proton therapy). The synchronism requirements of a circular accelerator are fulfilled in this model so that in all orbits the beam has the same movement time. The extraction energy of the presented model is sufficient for the treatment of ocular tumors. This is an alternative method that could improve the quality of life for patients with ocular tumors in developing countries. Future studies will be conducted to complete the technical design presentation and evaluate the accelerated beam's interaction with neoplastic tissues. (author)

  19. Proton therapy radiation pneumonitis local dose–response in esophagus cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverria, Alfredo E.; McCurdy, Matthew; Castillo, Richard; Bernard, Vincent; Ramos, Natalia Velez; Buckley, William; Castillo, Edward; Liu, Ping; Martinez, Josue; Guerrero, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies pulmonary radiation toxicity in patients who received proton therapy for esophagus cancer. Materials/methods: We retrospectively studied 100 esophagus cancer patients treated with proton therapy. The linearity of the enhanced FDG uptake vs. proton dose was evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Pneumonitis symptoms (RP) were assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv4). The interaction of the imaging response with dosimetric parameters and symptoms was evaluated. Results: The RP scores were: 0 grade 4/5, 7 grade 3, 20 grade 2, 37 grade 1, and 36 grade 0. Each dosimetric parameter was significantly higher for the symptomatic group. The AIC winning models were 30 linear, 52 linear quadratic, and 18 linear logarithmic. There was no significant difference in the linear coefficient between models. The slope of the FDG vs. proton dose response was 0.022 for the symptomatic and 0.012 for the asymptomatic (p = 0.014). Combining dosimetric parameters with the slope did not improve the sensitivity or accuracy in identifying symptomatic cases. Conclusions: The proton radiation dose response on FDG PET/CT imaging exhibited a predominantly linear dose response on modeling. Symptomatic patients had a higher dose response slope

  20. Calculation of primary and secondary dose in proton therapy of brain tumors using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghbel Esfahani, F.; Alamatsaz, M.; Karimian, A.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy beams of protons offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum - Bragg peak - near the end of range with a sharp falloff at the distal edge. Therefore, research must be done to investigate the possible negative and positive effects of using proton therapy as a treatment modality. In proton therapy, protons do account for the vast majority of dose. However, when protons travel through matter, secondary particles are created by the interactions of protons and matter en route to and within the patient. It is believed that secondary dose can lead to secondary cancer, especially in pediatric cases. Therefore, the focus of this work is determining both primary and secondary dose. Dose calculations were performed by MCNPX in tumoral and healthy parts of brain. The brain tumor has a 10 mm diameter and is located 16 cm under the skin surface. The brain was simulated by a cylindrical water phantom with the dimensions of 19 x 19cm 2 (length x diameter), with 0.5 cm thickness of plexiglass (C 4 H 6 O 2 ). Then beam characteristics were investigated to ensure the accuracy of the model. Simulations were initially validated with against packages such as SRIM/TRIM. Dose calculations were performed using different configurations to evaluate depth-dose profiles and dose 2D distributions.The results of the simulation show that the best proton energy interval, to cover completely the brain tumor, is from 152 to 154 MeV. (authors)

  1. ON THE BENEFITS AND RISKS OF PROTON THERAPY IN PEDIATRIC CRANIOPHARYNGIOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Chris; Roca, Monica; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Craniopharyngioma is a pediatric brain tumor whose volume is prone to change during radiation therapy. We compared photon- and proton-based irradiation methods to determine the effect of tumor volume change on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation in these patients. Methods and Materials For this retrospective study, we acquired imaging and treatment-planning data from 14 children with craniopharyngioma (mean age, 5.1 years) irradiated with photons (54 Gy) and monitored by weekly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations during radiation therapy. Photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), double-scatter proton (DSP) therapy, and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were created for each patient based on his or her pre-irradiation MRI. Target volumes were contoured on each weekly MRI scan for adaptive modeling. The measured differences in conformity index (CI) and normal tissue doses, including functional sub-volumes of the brain, were compared across the planning methods, as was target coverage based on changes in target volumes during treatment. Results CI and normal tissue dose values of IMPT plans were significantly better than those of the IMRT and DSP plans (p craniopharyngioma. IMPT is the most conformal method and spares the most normal tissue; however, it is highly sensitive to target volume changes, whereas the DSP method is not. PMID:21570209

  2. Poster - 40: Treatment Verification of a 3D-printed Eye Phantom for Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, Chelsea; Lindsay, Clay; Unick, Nick; Sossi, Vesna; Martinez, Mark; Hoehr, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Ocular melanoma is a form of eye cancer which is often treated using proton therapy. The benefit of the steep proton dose gradient can only be leveraged for accurate patient eye alignment. A treatment-planning program was written to plan on a 3D-printed anatomical eye-phantom, which was then irradiated to demonstrate the feasibility of verifying in vivo dosimetry for proton therapy using PET imaging. Methods: A 3D CAD eye model with critical organs was designed and voxelized into the Monte-Carlo transport code FLUKA. Proton dose and PET isotope production were simulated for a treatment plan of a test tumour, generated by a 2D treatment-planning program developed using NumPy and proton range tables. Next, a plastic eye-phantom was 3D-printed from the CAD model, irradiated at the TRIUMF Proton Therapy facility, and imaged using a PET scanner. Results: The treatment-planning program prediction of the range setting and modulator wheel was verified in FLUKA to treat the tumour with at least 90% dose coverage for both tissue and plastic. An axial isotope distribution of the PET isotopes was simulated in FLUKA and converted to PET scan counts. Meanwhile, the 3D-printed eye-phantom successfully yielded a PET signal. Conclusions: The 2D treatment-planning program can predict required parameters to sufficiently treat an eye tumour, which was experimentally verified using commercial 3D-printing hardware to manufacture eye-phantoms. Comparison between the simulated and measured PET isotope distribution could provide a more realistic test of eye alignment, and a variation of the method using radiographic film is being developed.

  3. Preliminary results of an in-beam PET prototype for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attanasi, F.; Belcari, N.; Camarda, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Di Rosa, F.; Lanconelli, N.; Rosso, V.; Russo, G.; Vecchio, S.

    2008-01-01

    Proton therapy can overcome the limitations of conventional radiotherapy due to the more selective energy deposition in depth and to the increased biological effectiveness. Verification of the delivered dose is desirable, but the complete stopping of the protons in patient prevents the application of electronic portal imaging methods that are used in conventional radiotherapy During proton therapy β + emitters like 11 C, 15 O, 10 C are generated in irradiated tissues by nuclear reactions. The measurement of the spatial distribution of this activity, immediately after patient irradiation, can lead to information on the effective delivered dose. First, results of a feasibility study of an in-beam PET for proton therapy are reported. The prototype is based on two planar heads with an active area of about 5x5 cm 2 . Each head is made up of a position sensitive photomultiplier coupled to a square matrix of same size of LYSO scintillating crystals (2x2x18 mm 3 pixel dimensions). Four signals from each head are acquired through a dedicated electronic board that performs signal amplification and digitization. A 3D reconstruction of the activity distribution is calculated using an expectation maximization algorithm. To characterize the PET prototype, the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution were measured using a point-like radioactive source. The validation of the prototype was performed using 62 MeV protons at the CATANA beam line of INFN LNS and PMMA phantoms. Using the full energy proton beam and various range shifters, a good correlation between the position of the activity distal edge and the thickness of the beam range shifter was found along the axial direction

  4. Preliminary results of an in-beam PET prototype for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasi, F.; Belcari, N.; Camarda, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Di Rosa, F.; Lanconelli, N.; Rosso, V.; Russo, G.; Vecchio, S.

    2008-06-01

    Proton therapy can overcome the limitations of conventional radiotherapy due to the more selective energy deposition in depth and to the increased biological effectiveness. Verification of the delivered dose is desirable, but the complete stopping of the protons in patient prevents the application of electronic portal imaging methods that are used in conventional radiotherapy During proton therapy β + emitters like 11C, 15O, 10C are generated in irradiated tissues by nuclear reactions. The measurement of the spatial distribution of this activity, immediately after patient irradiation, can lead to information on the effective delivered dose. First, results of a feasibility study of an in-beam PET for proton therapy are reported. The prototype is based on two planar heads with an active area of about 5×5 cm 2. Each head is made up of a position sensitive photomultiplier coupled to a square matrix of same size of LYSO scintillating crystals (2×2×18 mm 3 pixel dimensions). Four signals from each head are acquired through a dedicated electronic board that performs signal amplification and digitization. A 3D reconstruction of the activity distribution is calculated using an expectation maximization algorithm. To characterize the PET prototype, the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution were measured using a point-like radioactive source. The validation of the prototype was performed using 62 MeV protons at the CATANA beam line of INFN LNS and PMMA phantoms. Using the full energy proton beam and various range shifters, a good correlation between the position of the activity distal edge and the thickness of the beam range shifter was found along the axial direction.

  5. Preliminary results of an in-beam PET prototype for proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attanasi, F.; Belcari, N.; Camarda, M. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Del Guerra, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Di Rosa, F. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Lanconelli, N. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Rosso, V. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: valeria.rosso@pi.infn.it; Russo, G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Vecchio, S. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-06-11

    Proton therapy can overcome the limitations of conventional radiotherapy due to the more selective energy deposition in depth and to the increased biological effectiveness. Verification of the delivered dose is desirable, but the complete stopping of the protons in patient prevents the application of electronic portal imaging methods that are used in conventional radiotherapy During proton therapy {beta}{sup +} emitters like {sup 11}C, {sup 15}O, {sup 10}C are generated in irradiated tissues by nuclear reactions. The measurement of the spatial distribution of this activity, immediately after patient irradiation, can lead to information on the effective delivered dose. First, results of a feasibility study of an in-beam PET for proton therapy are reported. The prototype is based on two planar heads with an active area of about 5x5 cm{sup 2}. Each head is made up of a position sensitive photomultiplier coupled to a square matrix of same size of LYSO scintillating crystals (2x2x18 mm{sup 3} pixel dimensions). Four signals from each head are acquired through a dedicated electronic board that performs signal amplification and digitization. A 3D reconstruction of the activity distribution is calculated using an expectation maximization algorithm. To characterize the PET prototype, the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution were measured using a point-like radioactive source. The validation of the prototype was performed using 62 MeV protons at the CATANA beam line of INFN LNS and PMMA phantoms. Using the full energy proton beam and various range shifters, a good correlation between the position of the activity distal edge and the thickness of the beam range shifter was found along the axial direction.

  6. Poster - 40: Treatment Verification of a 3D-printed Eye Phantom for Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, Chelsea; Lindsay, Clay; Unick, Nick; Sossi, Vesna; Martinez, Mark; Hoehr, Cornelia [University of British Columbia, University of Victoria, University of British Columbia, University of British Columbia, University of British Columbia, TRIUMF (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Ocular melanoma is a form of eye cancer which is often treated using proton therapy. The benefit of the steep proton dose gradient can only be leveraged for accurate patient eye alignment. A treatment-planning program was written to plan on a 3D-printed anatomical eye-phantom, which was then irradiated to demonstrate the feasibility of verifying in vivo dosimetry for proton therapy using PET imaging. Methods: A 3D CAD eye model with critical organs was designed and voxelized into the Monte-Carlo transport code FLUKA. Proton dose and PET isotope production were simulated for a treatment plan of a test tumour, generated by a 2D treatment-planning program developed using NumPy and proton range tables. Next, a plastic eye-phantom was 3D-printed from the CAD model, irradiated at the TRIUMF Proton Therapy facility, and imaged using a PET scanner. Results: The treatment-planning program prediction of the range setting and modulator wheel was verified in FLUKA to treat the tumour with at least 90% dose coverage for both tissue and plastic. An axial isotope distribution of the PET isotopes was simulated in FLUKA and converted to PET scan counts. Meanwhile, the 3D-printed eye-phantom successfully yielded a PET signal. Conclusions: The 2D treatment-planning program can predict required parameters to sufficiently treat an eye tumour, which was experimentally verified using commercial 3D-printing hardware to manufacture eye-phantoms. Comparison between the simulated and measured PET isotope distribution could provide a more realistic test of eye alignment, and a variation of the method using radiographic film is being developed.

  7. Design of radiation shielding for the proton therapy facility at the National Cancer Center in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. W.; Kwon, J. W.; Lee, J.

    2005-01-01

    The design of radiation shielding was evaluated for a proton therapy facility being established at the National Cancer Center in Korea. The proton beam energy from a 230 MeV cyclotron is varied for therapy using a graphite target. This energy variation process produces high radiation and thus thick shielding walls surround the region. The evaluation was first carried out using analytical expressions at selected locations. Further detailed evaluations have been performed using the Monte Carlo method. Dose equivalent values were calculated to be compared with analytical results. The analytical method generally yielded more conservative values. With consideration of adequate occupancy factors annual dose equivalent rates are kept -1 in all areas. Construction of the building is expected to be completed near the end of 2004 and the installation of therapy equipments will begin a few months later. (authors)

  8. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Abigail T.; James, Sara St.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning

  9. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail T. Berman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT, through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  10. Report on proton therapy according to good clinical practice at Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Masao; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    2002-01-01

    The Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center (HIBMC) is a hospital-based charged particle treatment facility. Having two treatment ion beams (proton and carbon) and five treatment rooms, it is a pioneer among particle institutes worldwide. In May 2001, proton therapy was started as a clinical study for patients with localized cancer originating in the head and neck, lung, liver, and prostate. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety, effectiveness, and stability of the treatment units and systems based on the evaluation of acute toxicity, tumor response, and working ratio of the machine, respectively. Six patients, including liver cancer in three, prostate cancer in two, and lung cancer in one, were treated. There was no cessation of therapy owing to machine malfunction. Full courses of proton therapy consisting of 154 portals in all six patients were given exactly as scheduled. None of the patients experienced severe acute reactions of more than grade 3 according to NCI-CTC criteria. Tumor response one month post-treatment was evaluable in five of the six patients, and was CR in 1 (prostate cancer), PR in 2 (lung cancer: 1, liver cancer: 1), and NC in 2 (liver cancer: 2). These results indicate that our treatment units and systems are safe and reliable enough for proton irradiation to be used for several malignant tumors localized in the body. (author)

  11. Quality assurance in proton therapy: a systematic approach in progress at Orsay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazal, A.; Habrand, J.L.; Laforture, F.; Breteau, N.; Mazal, A.; Habrand, J.L.; Breteau, N.

    1996-01-01

    The degree of accuracy and reliability required in proton therapy can only be guaranteed of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) programme is established. Such a programme obviously has common features with general QA in radiotherapy, but some aspects are specific to the use of protons and particularly to the characteristics of each facility. A study is in progress at Orsay to convert a series of quality controls into a systematic quality assurance programme. It includes some basic steps on organisation, setting up a QA committee and QA task groups, organizing meetings, policies, procedures, records qualifications, and determining some examples of tolerance in controls. Among some critical and specific points identified in this process are the combined treatment with photons at different institutions, the specificity of a non-hospital and complex facility, the high degree of precision required for the patient setup, and the need to develop in-house basic tools such as the treatment planning system. The inclusion of all the patients in prospective well-defined clinical trials, the comparison with alternative techniques and the radiobiological studies are considered as fundamentals for the QA programme. Present dosimetric and radiobiological intercomparisons between proton-therapy centres are considered as partial audits. A study is in progress to establish common dosimetric and clinical protocols, radiological models and dose and volume specifications. In spite of the differences between the existing facilities, it should be possible to obtain international consensus on general guidelines for a QA programme in proton therapy. (author)

  12. Feasibility study of using statistical process control to customized quality assurance in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Shin, Dongho; Oh, Do Hoon; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Gwe-Ya

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate and improve the reliability of proton quality assurance (QA) processes and, to provide an optimal customized tolerance level using the statistical process control (SPC) methodology. The authors investigated the consistency check of dose per monitor unit (D/MU) and range in proton beams to see whether it was within the tolerance level of the daily QA process. This study analyzed the difference between the measured and calculated ranges along the central axis to improve the patient-specific QA process in proton beams by using process capability indices. The authors established a customized tolerance level of ±2% for D/MU and ±0.5 mm for beam range in the daily proton QA process. In the authors' analysis of the process capability indices, the patient-specific range measurements were capable of a specification limit of ±2% in clinical plans. SPC methodology is a useful tool for customizing the optimal QA tolerance levels and improving the quality of proton machine maintenance, treatment delivery, and ultimately patient safety.

  13. Feasibility study of using statistical process control to customized quality assurance in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Oh, Do Hoon; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Gwe-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and improve the reliability of proton quality assurance (QA) processes and, to provide an optimal customized tolerance level using the statistical process control (SPC) methodology. Methods: The authors investigated the consistency check of dose per monitor unit (D/MU) and range in proton beams to see whether it was within the tolerance level of the daily QA process. This study analyzed the difference between the measured and calculated ranges along the central axis to improve the patient-specific QA process in proton beams by using process capability indices. Results: The authors established a customized tolerance level of ±2% for D/MU and ±0.5 mm for beam range in the daily proton QA process. In the authors’ analysis of the process capability indices, the patient-specific range measurements were capable of a specification limit of ±2% in clinical plans. Conclusions: SPC methodology is a useful tool for customizing the optimal QA tolerance levels and improving the quality of proton machine maintenance, treatment delivery, and ultimately patient safety

  14. A new target concept for proton accelerator driven boron neutron capture therapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new target concept termed Discs Incorporating Sector Configured Orbiting Sources (DISCOS), is proposed for spallation applications, including BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). In the BNCT application a proton beam impacts a sequence of ultra thin lithium DISCOS targets to generate neutrons by the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be reaction. The proton beam loses only a few keV of its ∼MeV energy as it passes through a given target, and is re-accelerated to its initial energy, by a DC electric field between the targets

  15. Online monitoring for proton therapy: A real-time procedure using a planar PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, A. C.; Battistoni, G.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Ciocca, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferretti, S.; Mairani, A.; Molinelli, S.; Pullia, M.; Sala, P.; Sportelli, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Rosso, V.

    2015-06-01

    In this study a procedure for range verification in proton therapy by means of a planar in-beam PET system is presented. The procedure consists of two steps: the measurement of the β+-activity induced in the irradiated body by the proton beam and the comparison of these distributions with simulations. The experimental data taking was performed at the CNAO center in Pavia, Italy, irradiating plastic phantoms. For two different cases we demonstrate how a real-time feedback of the delivered treatment plan can be obtained with in-beam PET imaging.

  16. Online monitoring for proton therapy: A real-time procedure using a planar PET system

    CERN Document Server

    Kraan, A C; Belcari, N; Camarlinghi, N; Ciocca, M; Ferrari, A; Ferretti, S; Mairani, A; Molinelli, S; Pullia, M; Sala, P; Sportelli, G; Del Guerra, A; Rosso, V

    2015-01-01

    In this study a procedure for range verification in proton therapy by means of a planar in-beam PET system is presented. The procedure consists of two steps: the measurement of the β+-activity induced in the irradiated body by the proton beam and the comparison of these distributions with simulations. The experimental data taking was performed at the CNAO center in Pavia, Italy, irradiating plastic phantoms. For two different cases we demonstrate how a real-time feedback of the delivered treatment plan can be obtained with in-beam PET imaging.

  17. On the Benefits and Risks of Proton Therapy in Pediatric Craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Chris; Roca, Monica; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Craniopharyngioma is a pediatric brain tumor whose volume is prone to change during radiation therapy. We compared photon- and proton-based irradiation methods to determine the effect of tumor volume change on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation in these patients. Methods and Materials: For this retrospective study, we acquired imaging and treatment-planning data from 14 children with craniopharyngioma (mean age, 5.1 years) irradiated with photons (54 Gy) and monitored by weekly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations during radiation therapy. Photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), double-scatter proton (DSP) therapy, and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were created for each patient based on his or her pre-irradiation MRI. Target volumes were contoured on each weekly MRI scan for adaptive modeling. The measured differences in conformity index (CI) and normal tissue doses, including functional sub-volumes of the brain, were compared across the planning methods, as was target coverage based on changes in target volumes during treatment. Results: CI and normal tissue dose values of IMPT plans were significantly better than those of the IMRT and DSP plans (p 3 , and the mean increase in PTV was 11.3% over the course of treatment. The dose to 95% of the PTV was correlated with a change in the PTV; the R 2 values for all models, 0.73 (IMRT), 0.38 (DSP), and 0.62 (IMPT), were significant (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Compared with photon IMRT, proton therapy has the potential to significantly reduce whole-brain and -body irradiation in pediatric patients with craniopharyngioma. IMPT is the most conformal method and spares the most normal tissue; however, it is highly sensitive to target volume changes, whereas the DSP method is not.

  18. MCNPX proton transport simulations for a therapy set-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herault, J.; Iborra, N.; Chauvel, P.; Serrano, B.

    2005-01-01

    Patients with ocular melanoma have been treated since June 1991 at the medical cyclotron of the Centre Antoine Lacassagne (CAL). Positions and sizes of the ocular nozzle elements were initially defined based on experimental work, taking as a pattern functional existing facilities. Nowadays Monte Carlo (MC) calculation offers a tool to refine this geometry by adjusting size and place of beam modelling devices. Moreover, the MC tool is a useful way to calculate the dose and to evaluate the impact of secondary particles in the field of radiotherapy or radiation protection. Both LINAC and cyclotron producing X-rays, electrons, protons and neutrons are available in CAL, which suggests choosing MCNPX for its particle versatility. As a first step, the existing installation was input in MCNPX to check its aptitude to reproduce experimentally measured depth-dose profile, lateral profile. Relative comparisons of percentage depth-dose and lateral profiles, performed between measured data and simulations, show an agreement of the order of 2% in dose and 0.1 mm in range accuracy. These comparisons carried out with and without beam-modifying device, yield results compatible to the required precision in ocular melanoma treatments, as long as adequate choices are made on MCNPX input decks for physics card. (authors)

  19. TU-G-BRB-00: Clinical Trials in Proton and Particle Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  20. Neutron, Proton, and Photonuclear Cross Sections for Radiation Therapy and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.

    1998-01-01

    The authors review recent work at Los Alamos to evaluate neutron, proton, and photonuclear cross section up to 150 MeV (to 250 MeV for protons), based on experimental data and nuclear model calculations. These data are represented in the ENDF format and can be used in computer codes to simulate radiation transport. They permit calculations of absorbed dose in the body from therapy beams, and through use of kerma coefficients allow absorbed dose to be estimated for a given neutron energy distribution. For radiation protection, these data can be used to determine shielding requirements in accelerator environments, and to calculate neutron, proton, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production. Illustrative comparisons of the evaluated cross section and kerma coefficient data with measurements are given

  1. Multi-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor for ocular proton therapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, K.W.; Yoo, W.J.; Moon, J.; Han, K.T.; Park, B.G.; Shin, D.; Park, S-Y.; Lee, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a multi-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor, which consists of organic scintillators, plastic optical fibers and a water phantom with a polymethyl methacrylate structure for the ocular proton therapy dosimetry. For the purpose of sensor characterization, we measured the spread out Bragg-peak of 120 MeV proton beam using a one-dimensional sensor array, which has 30 fiber-optic radiation sensors with a 1.5 mm interval. A uniform region of spread out Bragg-peak using the one-dimensional fiber-optic radiation sensor was obtained from 20 to 25 mm depth of a phantom. In addition, the Bragg-peak of 109 MeV proton beam was measured at the depth of 11.5 mm of a phantom using a two-dimensional sensor array, which has 10×3 sensor array with a 0.5 mm interval.

  2. Assessment of doses due to secondary neutrons received by patient treated by proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayah, R.; Martinetti, F.; Donadille, L.; Clairand, I.; Delacroix, S.; De Oliveira, A.; Herault, J.

    2010-01-01

    Proton therapy is a specific technique of radiotherapy which aims at destroying cancerous cells by irradiating them with a proton beam. Nuclear reactions in the device and in the patient himself induce secondary radiations involving mainly neutrons which contribute to an additional dose for the patient. The author reports a study aimed at the assessment of these doses due to secondary neutrons in the case of ophthalmological and intra-cranial treatments. He presents a Monte Carlo simulation of the room and of the apparatus, reports the experimental validation of the model (dose deposited by protons in a water phantom, ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons in the treatment room, absorbed dose due to secondary particles in an anthropomorphic phantom), and the assessment with a mathematical phantom of doses dues to secondary neutrons received by organs during an ophthalmological treatment. He finally evokes current works of calculation of doses due to secondary neutrons in the case of intra-cranial treatments

  3. Characterization o