WorldWideScience

Sample records for optimizing geologic co2

  1. Optimization geological sequestration of CO2 by capillary trapping mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildenschild, D.; Harper, E.; Herring, A. L.; Armstrong, R. T.

    2012-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration, as a method of atmospheric greenhouse gas reduction, is at the technological forefront of the climate change movement. Sequestration is achieved by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) gas effluent from coal fired power plants and injecting it into saline aquifers. In an effort to fully understand and optimize CO2 trapping efficiency, the capillary trapping mechanisms that immobilize subsurface CO2 were analyzed at the pore scale. Pairs of analogous fluids representing the range of in situ supercritical CO2 and brine conditions were used during experimentation. The two fluids (identified as wetting and non wetting) were imbibed and drained from a flow cell apparatus containing a sintered glass bead column. Experimental and fluid parameters, such as interfacial tension, non-wetting fluid viscosity, and flow rate, were altered to characterize their impact on capillary trapping. Through the use of computed x-ray microtomography (CMT), we were able to quantify distinct differences between initial (post NW phase imbibition) and residual (post wetting fluid flood) non-wetting phase saturations. Alterations to the viscosity of the non-wetting and wetting fluid phases were made during experimentation; results indicate that the viscosity of the non-wetting fluid is the parameter of interest as residual saturations increased with increasing viscosity. These observed trends will be used to identify optimal conditions for trapping CO2 during subsurface sequestration.

  2. Optimization System and Evaluation of CO2 Geological Storage Target Area%CO2地质埋存目标区优选体系与评价方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李武广; 杨胜来; 娄毅

    2011-01-01

    在中国对CO2地质埋存的研究已有10多年的历程,但至今尚未建立完善的CO2地质埋存目标区优选体系,这也制约了我国CO2地质埋存应用的发展步伐。在收集国内外大量的CO2埋存基础资料和借鉴前人研究成果的基础上,详细分析了盆地特征条件、盆地资源条件和储层特征条件等因素对CO2地质埋存的影响,建立了相应的CO2地质埋存评价指标体系。通过层次分析法确定权重,利用无量纲化指标处理方法对指标进行标准化处理,采用加权平均模型对目标区进行模糊综合评价。最后以中国部分CO2地质埋存试验区为例进行了综合评价、排序,实际应用效果良好,同时研究结果还能够有效地指导利用CO2地质埋存技术提高油气藏开采效率。%The study for geological storage of CO2 has been more than ten years in China,but the optimization system of CO2 geological storage target area is not established yet. This embarrass situation has been restricting the development of the applications of geological storage of CO2. Based on the references of CO2 geological storage and the previous research results, we analyze the effect of the geological background, basinal resource and reservoir characteristics upon the CO2 geological storage,and establish the evaluation system for the CO2 geological storage. By AHP to determine weights,we make the indicator standardization using dimensionless index approach, and evaluate the target areas using the weighted average model. Final- ly,we evaluate and sort some CO2 geological storage areas in China. The application results show optimization system can effectively guide the use of CO2 geological storage to improve the efficiency of reservoir exploitation.

  3. Mathematical programming (MP) model to determine optimal transportation infrastructure for geologic CO2 storage in the Illinois basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmer, Donald E.

    Analysis of results from a mathematical programming model were examined to 1) determine the least cost options for infrastructure development of geologic storage of CO2 in the Illinois Basin, and 2) perform an analysis of a number of CO2 emission tax and oil price scenarios in order to implement development of the least-cost pipeline networks for distribution of CO2. The model, using mixed integer programming, tested the hypothesis of whether viable EOR sequestration sites can serve as nodal points or hubs to expand the CO2 delivery infrastructure to more distal locations from the emissions sources. This is in contrast to previous model results based on a point-to- point model having direct pipeline segments from each CO2 capture site to each storage sink. There is literature on the spoke and hub problem that relates to airline scheduling as well as maritime shipping. A large-scale ship assignment problem that utilized integer linear programming was run on Excel Solver and described by Mourao et al., (2001). Other literature indicates that aircraft assignment in spoke and hub routes can also be achieved using integer linear programming (Daskin and Panayotopoulos, 1989; Hane et al., 1995). The distribution concept is basically the reverse of the "tree and branch" type (Rothfarb et al., 1970) gathering systems for oil and natural gas that industry has been developing for decades. Model results indicate that the inclusion of hubs as variables in the model yields lower transportation costs for geologic carbon dioxide storage over previous models of point-to-point infrastructure geometries. Tabular results and GIS maps of the selected scenarios illustrate that EOR sites can serve as nodal points or hubs for distribution of CO2 to distal oil field locations as well as deeper saline reservoirs. Revenue amounts and capture percentages both show an improvement over solutions when the hubs are not allowed to come into the solution. Other results indicate that geologic

  4. Public Acceptance for Geological CO2-Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, F.; Ossing, F.; Würdemann, H.; Co2SINK Team

    2009-04-01

    Public acceptance is one of the fundamental prerequisites for geological CO2 storage. In highly populated areas like central Europe, especially in the vicinity of metropolitan areas like Berlin, underground operations are in the focus of the people living next to the site, the media, and politics. To gain acceptance, all these groups - the people in the neighbourhood, journalists, and authorities - need to be confident of the security of the planned storage operation as well as the long term security of storage. A very important point is to show that the technical risks of CO2 storage can be managed with the help of a proper short and long term monitoring concept, as well as appropriate mitigation technologies e.g adequate abandonment procedures for leaking wells. To better explain the possible risks examples for leakage scenarios help the public to assess and to accept the technical risks of CO2 storage. At Ketzin we tried the following approach that can be summed up on the basis: Always tell the truth! This might be self-evident but it has to be stressed that credibility is of vital importance. Suspiciousness and distrust are best friends of fear. Undefined fear seems to be the major risk in public acceptance of geological CO2-storage. Misinformation and missing communication further enhance the denial of geological CO2 storage. When we started to plan and establish the Ketzin storage site, we ensured a forward directed communication. Offensive information activities, an information centre on site, active media politics and open information about the activities taking place are basics. Some of the measures were: - information of the competent authorities through meetings (mayor, governmental authorities) - information of the local public, e.g. hearings (while also inviting local, regional and nation wide media) - we always treated the local people and press first! - organizing of bigger events to inform the public on site, e.g. start of drilling activities (open

  5. SUBSURFACE PROPERTY RIGHTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR GEOLOGIC CO2 STORAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses subsurface property rights as they apply to geologic sequestration (GS) of carbon dioxide (CO2). GS projects inject captured CO2 into deep (greater than ~1 km) geologic formations for the explicit purpose of avoiding atmospheric emission of CO2. Because of the...

  6. SUBSURFACE PROPERTY RIGHTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR GEOLOGIC CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chapter discusses subsurface property rights as they apply to geologic sequestration (GS) of carbon dioxide (CO2). GS projects inject captured CO2 into deep (greater than ~1 km) geologic formations for the explicit purpose of avoiding atmospheric emission of CO2. Because of t...

  7. SUBSURFACE PROPERTY RIGHTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR GEOLOGIC CO2 SEQUESTRATION (PRESENTATION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses subsurface property rights as they apply to geologic sequestration (GS) of carbon dioxide (CO2). GS projects inject captured CO2 into deep (greater than ~1 km) geologic formations for the explicit purpose of avoiding atmospheric emission of CO2. Because of the...

  8. On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-14

    Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

  9. Simulation of the crosshole ERT monitoring of the CO2 migration at the Research Laboratory on Geological Storage of CO2 in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain): assessing its feasibility and the optimal configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilamajó, Eloi; Bellmunt, Fabian; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Álex; Ledo, Juanjo

    2013-04-01

    The Research Laboratory on Geological Storage of CO2 located in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain) is a multidisciplinary Technological Demonstration Plant oriented to test the geological storage of carbon dioxide in an onshore saline reservoir. Due to its academic orientation, it will provide a wide set of data obtained with complementary geophysical techniques. In order to allow the integration of the respective results, several geophysical methods will be used on the monitoring process of the storage of CO2 into a deep saline aquifer. The resistivity of the storage formation will be one of the geophysical properties most affected by the replacement of the conductive brine by resistive carbon dioxide. As the electrical and electromagnetic methods are the techniques most sensitive to such change, their use on the monitoring process of the Hontomín TDP will provide important insights on the migration of CO2. The current work is integrated in the electric and electromagnetic monitoring of the CO2 storage at Hontomín, where two boreholes (injection and monitoring) will be drilled beneath the injection depth. A set of electrodes is planned to be installed at the two wells allowing advantageous experiments in order to determine the resistivity variation into the reservoir. Crosshole ERT and CSEM experiments will be carried out previously to the injection of carbon dioxide and repeated systematically once the storage has started. The feasibility of the crosshole ERT monitoring is evaluated in the current work. Realistic pre-injection and post-injection experiments have been modeled to assess the potentiality and benefits of the crosshole ERT in order to monitor the stored CO2. A geoelectrical model obtained from previous characterization works has been used to describe the geoelectrical structure. The metallic casings planned to be installed at the two wells are considered in the simulations, given their possible effect on the experiments. Sets of synthetic data are generated

  10. Some geomechanical aspects of geological CO2 sequestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.

    2008-01-01

    Reservoir depletion and subsequent CO 2 injection into the depleted geological reservoir induce stress changes that may mechanically damage top seal and wells, or trigger existing faults, creating the leakage pathways for CO 2 escape from the reservoir. The role of geomechanics is to assess the mech

  11. Some geomechanical aspects of geological CO2 sequestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.

    2009-01-01

    Reservoir depletion and subsequent CO2 injection into the depleted geological reservoir induce stress changes that may mechanically damage top seal and wells, or trigger existing faults, creating the leakage pathways for CO2 escape from the reservoir. The role of geomechanics is to assess the mechan

  12. System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2006-04-24

    One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

  13. Natural Analogues of CO2 Geological Storage; Analogos Naturales del Almacenamiento Geologico de CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez del Villar, L.; Pelayo, M.; Recreo, F.

    2007-07-20

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide is nowadays, internationally considered as the most effective method for greenhouse gas emission mitigation, in order to minimize the global climate change universally accepted. Nevertheless, the possible risks derived of this long-term storage have a direct influence on its public acceptance. Among the favourable geological formations to store CO2, depleted oil and gas fields, deep saline reservoirs, and unamiable coal seams are highlighted. One of the most important objectives of the R and D projects related to the CO2 geological storage is the evaluation of the CO2 leakage rate through the above mentioned geological formations. Therefore, it is absolutely necessary to increase our knowledge on the interaction among CO2, storage and sealing formations, as well as on the flow paths and the physical resistance of the sealing formation. The quantification of the CO2 leakage rate is essential to evaluate the effects on the human and animal health, as well as for the ecosystem and water quality. To achieve these objectives, the study of the natural analogues is very useful in order to know the natural leakage rate to the atmosphere, its flow paths, the physical, chemical and mineralogical modifications due to the long term interaction processes among the CO2 and the storage and sealing formations, as well as the effects on the groundwaters and ecosystems. In this report, we have tried to summarise the main characteristics of the natural reservoirs and surficial sources of CO2, which are both natural analogues of the geological storage and CO2 leakage, studied in EEUU, Europe and Australia. The main objective of this summary is to find the possible applications for long-term risk prediction and for the performance assessment by means of conceptual and numerical modelling, which will allow to validate the predictive models of the CO2 storage behaviour, to design and develop suitable monitoring techniques to control the CO2 behaviour

  14. Behavior of CO2/water flow in porous media for CO2 geological storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Yu, Minghao; Liu, Yu; Yang, Mingjun; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Ziqiu; Suekane, Tetsuya; Song, Yongchen

    2017-04-01

    A clear understanding of two-phase fluid flow properties in porous media is of importance to CO2 geological storage. The study visually measured the immiscible and miscible displacement of water by CO2 using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and investigated the factor influencing the displacement process in porous media which were filled with quartz glass beads. For immiscible displacement at slow flow rates, the MR signal intensity of images increased because of CO2 dissolution; before the dissolution phenomenon became inconspicuous at flow rate of 0.8mLmin(-1). For miscible displacement, the MR signal intensity decreased gradually independent of flow rates, because supercritical CO2 and water became miscible in the beginning of CO2 injection. CO2 channeling or fingering phenomena were more obviously observed with lower permeable porous media. Capillary force decreases with increasing particle size, which would increase permeability and allow CO2 and water to invade into small pore spaces more easily. The study also showed CO2 flow patterns were dominated by dimensionless capillary number, changing from capillary finger to stable flow. The relative permeability curve was calculated using Brooks-Corey model, while the results showed the relative permeability of CO2 slightly decreases with the increase of capillary number.

  15. Managing geological uncertainty in CO2-EOR reservoir assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welkenhuysen, Kris; Piessens, Kris

    2014-05-01

    Recently the European Parliament has agreed that an atlas for the storage potential of CO2 is of high importance to have a successful commercial introduction of CCS (CO2 capture and geological storage) technology in Europe. CO2-enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) is often proposed as a promising business case for CCS, and likely has a high potential in the North Sea region. Traditional economic assessments for CO2-EOR largely neglect the geological reality of reservoir uncertainties because these are difficult to introduce realistically in such calculations. There is indeed a gap between the outcome of a reservoir simulation and the input values for e.g. cost-benefit evaluations, especially where it concerns uncertainty. The approach outlined here is to turn the procedure around, and to start from which geological data is typically (or minimally) requested for an economic assessment. Thereafter it is evaluated how this data can realistically be provided by geologists and reservoir engineers. For the storage of CO2 these parameters are total and yearly CO2 injection capacity, and containment or potential on leakage. Specifically for the EOR operation, two additional parameters can be defined: the EOR ratio, or the ratio of recovered oil over injected CO2, and the CO2 recycling ratio of CO2 that is reproduced after breakthrough at the production well. A critical but typically estimated parameter for CO2-EOR projects is the EOR ratio, taken in this brief outline as an example. The EOR ratio depends mainly on local geology (e.g. injection per well), field design (e.g. number of wells), and time. Costs related to engineering can be estimated fairly good, given some uncertainty range. The problem is usually to reliably estimate the geological parameters that define the EOR ratio. Reliable data is only available from (onshore) CO2-EOR projects in the US. Published studies for the North Sea generally refer to these data in a simplified form, without uncertainty ranges, and are

  16. Economic optimization of CO2 pipeline configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoope, M.M.J.; Ramirez, C.A.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an economic optimization tool is developed taking into account different steel grades, inlet pressure, diameter and booster stations for point-to-point pipelines as well as for simple networks. Preliminary results show that gaseous CO2 transport is cost effective for relatively smal

  17. CO2GeoNet, the unique role of the European scientific body on CO2 geological storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czernichowski-Lauriol, I.; Arts, R.; Durand, D.; Durucan, S.; Johannessen, P.; May, F.; Olivier, M.-L.; Persoglia, S.; Riley, N.; Sohrabi, M.; Stokka, S.; Vercelli, S.; Vizika-Kavvadias, O.

    2009-01-01

    CO2GeoNet is a Network of Excellence on the geological storage of CO2, initiated by the EC's 6th research framework programme in 2004 and integrating Europe's key research institutes to create a scientific reference body dedicated to the development of CO2 geological storage as a viable option for m

  18. Gas condensate reservoir characterisation for CO2 geological storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivakhnenko, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    During oil and gas production hydrocarbon recovery efficiency is significantly increased by injecting miscible CO2 gas in order to displace hydrocarbons towards producing wells. This process of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) might be used for the total CO2 storage after complete hydrocarbon reservoir depletion. This kind of potential storage sites was selected for detailed studies, including generalised development study to investigate the applicability of CO2 for storages. The study is focused on compositional modelling to predict the miscibility pressures. We consider depleted gas condensate field in Kazakhstan as important target for CO2 storage and EOR. This reservoir being depleted below the dew point leads to retrograde condensate formed in the pore system. CO2 injection in the depleted gas condensate reservoirs may allow enhanced gas recovery by reservoir pressurisation and liquid re-vaporisation. In addition a number of geological and petrophysical parameters should satisfy storage requirements. Studied carbonate gas condensate and oil field has strong seal, good petrophysical parameters and already proven successful containment CO2 and sour gas in high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions. The reservoir is isolated Lower Permian and Carboniferous carbonate platform covering an area of about 30 km. The reservoir contains a gas column about 1.5 km thick. Importantly, the strong massive sealing consists of the salt and shale seal. Sour gas that filled in the oil-saturated shale had an active role to form strong sealing. Two-stage hydrocarbon saturation of oil and later gas within the seal frame were accompanied by bitumen precipitation in shales forming a perfect additional seal. Field hydrocarbon production began three decades ago maintaining a strategy in full replacement of gas in order to maintain pressure of the reservoir above the dew point. This was partially due to the sour nature of the gas with CO2 content over 5%. Our models and

  19. Potential environmental impacts of offshore UK geological CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Kit; Wilkinson, Mark; Butler, Ian B.

    2016-04-01

    Geological carbon dioxide storage in the United Kingdom (UK) will almost certainly be entirely offshore, with storage for over 100 years' worth of UK CO2 output from industry and power generation in offshore depleted hydrocarbon fields and sandstone formations. Storage capacity can be limited by the increase in formation water pressure upon CO2 injection, therefore removal and disposal of formation waters ('produced waters') can control formation water pressures, and increase CO2 storage capacity. Formation waters could also be produced during CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery (CO2-EOR). The precedent from current UK North Sea hydrocarbon extraction is to 'overboard' produced waters into the ocean, under current regulations. However, laboratory and field scale studies, with an emphasis on the effects on onshore shallow potable groundwaters, have shown that CO2 dissolution in formation waters during injection and storage acidifies the waters and promotes mobilisation from the reservoir sandstones of major and trace elements into solution, including heavy metals. Eight of these elements are specifically identified in the UK as potentially hazardous to the marine environment (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Zn). A comparison was made between the concentrations of these eight trace elements in the results of laboratory batch leaching experiments of reservoir rock in CO2-rich saline solutions and overboarded waters from current offshore UK hydrocarbon production. This showed that, taking the North Sea as a whole, the experimental results fall within the range of concentrations of current oil and gas activities. However, on a field-by-field basis, concentrations may be enhanced with CO2 storage, such that they are higher than waters normally produced from a particular field. Lead, nickel and zinc showed the greatest concentration increases in the experiments with the addition of CO2, with the other five elements of interest not showing any strong trends with respect to enhanced CO2

  20. The Wettability of Shale by CO2 and Its Impact on Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiltinan, E. J.; Cardenas, M. B.; Espinoza, D. N.; Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    The geologic sequestration of CO2 is widely considered as a potential solution for decreasing anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 emissions. Wettability of fluids within reservoir materials is a critical factor in determining the efficiency of structural and residual trapping, two major mechanisms of geologic sequestration. Individual reservoir minerals are often targeted for wettability studies. Current practice applies these results, recorded under laboratory conditions, to in-situ reservoir rock; however the wide variety of measured contact angles reported in the literature calls this practice into question. To address these issues and to study the wettability of shale caprock, resedimentation techniques are employed. These techniques allow for the creation of synthetic shales with controlled, homogeneous mineralogies. In addition, the systematic variation of the mineralogy allows for the characterization of shale wettability as a function of mineralogical composition. A novel design has been developed and used to conduct wettability experiments at reservoir conditions using high resolution X-ray computer tomography. Using this technique the wettability of resedimented shales and natural shales are compared at different reservoir conditions. Next, Lattice Boltzmann modelling methods are used to simulate capillary entry pressure into a shale capillary. Adhesion parameters along the wall are tuned to the results of the synthetic shales and heterogeneity is incorporated to estimate the capillary entry pressure into a natural shale. Understanding the mineralogical components of shale wetting allows for the prediction of capillary entry pressure based on shale mineralogy which can be used to help select secure CO2 storage sites.

  1. Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James J.

    2011-06-08

    This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

  2. Classification of CO2 Geologic Storage: Resource and Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frailey, S.M.; Finley, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The use of the term capacity to describe possible geologic storage implies a realistic or likely volume of CO2 to be sequestered. Poor data quantity and quality may lead to very high uncertainty in the storage estimate. Use of the term "storage resource" alleviates the implied certainty of the term "storage capacity". This is especially important to non- scientists (e.g. policy makers) because "capacity" is commonly used to describe the very specific and more certain quantities such as volume of a gas tank or a hotel's overnight guest limit. Resource is a term used in the classification of oil and gas accumulations to infer lesser certainty in the commercial production of oil and gas. Likewise for CO2 sequestration, a suspected porous and permeable zone can be classified as a resource, but capacity can only be estimated after a well is drilled into the formation and a relatively higher degree of economic and regulatory certainty is established. Storage capacity estimates are lower risk or higher certainty compared to storage resource estimates. In the oil and gas industry, prospective resource and contingent resource are used for estimates with less data and certainty. Oil and gas reserves are classified as Proved and Unproved, and by analogy, capacity can be classified similarly. The highest degree of certainty for an oil or gas accumulation is Proved, Developed Producing (PDP) Reserves. For CO2 sequestration this could be Proved Developed Injecting (PDI) Capacity. A geologic sequestration storage classification system is developed by analogy to that used by the oil and gas industry. When a CO2 sequestration industry emerges, storage resource and capacity estimates will be considered a company asset and consequently regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission. Additionally, storage accounting and auditing protocols will be required to confirm projected storage estimates and assignment of credits from actual injection. An example illustrates the use of

  3. Geologic Storage of CO2: Leakage Pathways and Environmental Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celia, M. A.; Peters, C. A.; Bachu, S.

    2002-05-01

    Geologic storage of CO2 appears to be an attractive option for carbon mitigation because it offers sufficient capacity to solve the problem, and it can be implemented with existing technology. Among the list of options for storage sites, depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs and deep saline aquifers are two major categories. While injection into hydrocarbon reservoirs offers immediate possibilities, especially in the context of enhanced oil recovery, it appears that deep saline aquifers provide the extensive capacity necessary to solve the problem over the decade to century time scale. Capacity and technology argue favorably for this option, but remaining obstacles to implementation include capture technologies, overall economic considerations, and potential environmental consequences of the injection. Of these, the environmental questions may be most difficult to solve. Experience from CO2 floods for enhanced oil recovery and from CO2 and acid gas disposal operations indicates that geological storage of CO2 is safe over the short term for comparatively small amounts of CO2. However, there is no experience to date regarding the long-term fate and safety of the large volumes of CO2 that must be injected to significantly reduce atmospheric emissions. In order to make proper evaluation of environmental risks, the full range of possible environmental consequences must be considered. Most of these environmental concerns involve migration and leakage of CO2 into shallow portions of the subsurface and eventually into the atmosphere. In shallow subsurface zones, elevated levels of carbon dioxide can cause pH changes, leading to possible mobilization of ground-water contaminants including metals. In the unsaturated zone, vegetation can be adversely affected, as can other ecosystem components. At the land surface, elevated levels of CO2 can lead to asphyxiation in humans and other animals. And finally, in the atmosphere, CO2 that leaks from underground diminishes the effectiveness

  4. Effects of CO2 adsorption on coal deformation during geological sequestration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kan Yang; Xiancai Lu; Yangzheng Lin; Alexander V. Neimark

    2011-01-01

      CO2 adsorption capacity in coals is determined CO2 adsorption-induced coal deformation is evaluated Geological sequestration of CO2 is deeply discussed Adsorption-induced deformation of coal during...

  5. Density-driven enhanced dissolution of injected CO2 during long-term CO2 geological storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wei Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in deep saline formations is increasingly seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. However, possible leakage of injected CO2 from the storage formation through vertical pathways such as fractures, faults and abandoned wells is a huge challenge for CO2 geological storage projects. Thus, the density-driven fluid flow as a process that can accelerate the phase change of injected CO2 from supercritical phase into aqueous phase is receiving more and more attention. In this paper, we performed higher-resolution reactive transport simulations to investigate the possible density-driven fluid flow process under the ‘real’ condition of CO2 injection and storage. Simulation results indicated that during CO2 injection and geological storage in deep saline formations, the higher-density CO2-saturated aqueous phase within the lower CO2 gas plume migrates downward and moves horizontally along the bottom of the formation, and the higher-density fingers within the upper gas plume propagate downward. These density-driven fluid flow processes can significantly enhance the phase transition of injected CO2 from supercritical phase into aqueous phase, consequently enhancing the effective storage capacity and long-term storage security of injected CO2 in saline formations.

  6. International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2006-02-23

    Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

  7. Our trial to develop a risk assessment tool for CO2 geological storage (GERAS-CO2GS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A.; Sakamoto, Y.; Komai, T.

    2012-12-01

    We will introduce our researches about to develop a risk assessment tool named 'GERAS-CO2GS' (Geo-environmental Risk Assessment System, CO2 Geological Storage Risk Assessment System) for 'Carbon Dioxide Geological Storage (Geological CCS)'. It aims to facilitate understanding of size of impact of risks related with upper migration of injected CO2. For gaining public recognition about feasibility of Geological CCS, quantitative estimation of risks is essential, to let public knows the level of the risk: whether it is negligible or not. Generally, in preliminary hazard analysis procedure, potential hazards could be identified within Geological CCS's various facilities such as: reservoir, cap rock, upper layers, CO2 injection well, CO2 injection plant and CO2 transport facilities. Among them, hazard of leakage of injected C02 is crucial, because it is the clue to estimate risks around a specific injection plan in terms of safety, environmental protection effect and economy. Our risk assessment tool named GERAS-CO2GS evaluates volume and rate of retention and leakage of injected CO2 in relation with fractures and/or faults, and then it estimates impact of seepages on the surface of the earth. GERAS-CO2GS has four major processing segments: (a) calculation of CO2 retention and leakage volume and rate, (b) data processing of CO2 dispersion on the surface and ambient air, (c) risk data definition and (d) evaluation of risk. Concerning to the injection site, we defined a model, which is consisted from an injection well and a geological strata model: which involves a reservoir, a cap rock, an upper layer, faults, seabed, sea, the surface of the earth and the surface of the sea. For retention rate of each element of CO2 injection site model, we use results of our experimental and numerical studies on CO2 migration within reservoirs and faults with specific lithological conditions. For given CO2 injection rate, GERAS-CO2GS calculates CO2 retention and leakage of each segment

  8. Multiwell CO2 injectivity: impact of boundary conditions and brine extraction on geologic CO2 storage efficiency and pressure buildup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Jason E; McKenna, Sean A; Dewers, Thomas A; Roach, Jesse D; Kobos, Peter H

    2014-01-21

    CO2 storage efficiency is a metric that expresses the portion of the pore space of a subsurface geologic formation that is available to store CO2. Estimates of storage efficiency for large-scale geologic CO2 storage depend on a variety of factors including geologic properties and operational design. These factors govern estimates on CO2 storage resources, the longevity of storage sites, and potential pressure buildup in storage reservoirs. This study employs numerical modeling to quantify CO2 injection well numbers, well spacing, and storage efficiency as a function of geologic formation properties, open-versus-closed boundary conditions, and injection with or without brine extraction. The set of modeling runs is important as it allows the comparison of controlling factors on CO2 storage efficiency. Brine extraction in closed domains can result in storage efficiencies that are similar to those of injection in open-boundary domains. Geomechanical constraints on downhole pressure at both injection and extraction wells lower CO2 storage efficiency as compared to the idealized scenario in which the same volumes of CO2 and brine are injected and extracted, respectively. Geomechanical constraints should be taken into account to avoid potential damage to the storage site.

  9. Geological Storage of CO2. Site Selection Criteria; Almacenamiento Geologico de CO2. Criterios de Selecci0n de Emplazamientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, C.; Martinez, R.; Recreo, F.; Prado, P.; Campos, R.; Pelayo, M.; Losa, A. de la; Hurtado, A.; Lomba, L.; Perez del Villar, L.; Ortiz, G.; Sastre, J.; Zapatero, M. A.; Suarez, I.; Arenillas, A.

    2007-09-18

    In year 2002 the Spanish Parliament unanimously passed the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, signed December 1997, compromising to limiting the greenhouse gas emissions increase. Later on, the Environment Ministry submitted the Spanish National Assignment Emissions Plan to the European Union and in year 2005 the Spanish Greenhouse Gas market started working, establishing taxes to pay in case of exceeding the assigned emissions limits. So, the avoided emissions of CO2 have now an economic value that is promoting new anthropogenic CO2 emissions reduction technologies. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) are among these new technological developments for mitigating or eliminate climate change. CO2 can be stored in geological formations such as depleted oil or gas fields, deep permeable saline water saturated formations and unmailable coal seams, among others. This report seeks to establish the selection criteria for suitable geological formations for CO2 storage in the Spanish national territory, paying attention to both the operational and performance requirements of these storage systems. The report presents the physical and chemical properties and performance of CO2 under storage conditions, the transport and reaction processes of both supercritical and gaseous CO2, and CO2 trapping mechanisms in geological formations. The main part of the report is devoted to geological criteria at watershed, site and formation scales. (Author) 100 refs.

  10. Geological Storage of CO2. Site Selection Criteria; Almacenamiento Geologico de CO2. Criterios de Seleccion de Emplazamientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, C.; Martinez, R.; Recreo, F.; Prado, P.; Campos, R.; Pelayo, M.; Losa, A. de la; Hurtado, A.; Lomba, L.; Perez del Villar, L.; Ortiz, G.; Sastre, J.

    2006-07-01

    In year 2002 the Spanish Parliament unanimously passed the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, signed December 1997, compromising to limiting the greenhouse gas emissions increase. Later on, the Environment Ministry submitted the Spanish National Assignment Emissions Plan to the European Union and in year 2005 the Spanish Greenhouse Gas market started working, establishing taxes to pay in case of exceeding the assigned emissions limits. So, the avoided emissions of CO2 have now an economic value that is promoting new anthropogenic CO2 emissions reduction technologies. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) are among these new technological developments for mitigating or eliminate climate change. CO2 can be stored in geological formations such as depleted oil or gas fields, deep permeable saline water saturated formations and unmineable coal seams, among others. This report seeks to establish the selection criteria for suitable geological formations for CO2 storage in the Spanish national territory, paying attention to both the operational and performance requirements of these storage systems. The report presents the physical and chemical properties and performance of CO2 under storage conditions, the transport and reaction processes of both supercritical and gaseous CO2, and CO2 trapping mechanisms in geological formations. The main part of the report is devoted to geological criteria at watershed, site and formation scales. (Author) 100 ref.

  11. Geologic CO2 Sequestration: Predicting and Confirming Performance in Oil Reservoirs and Saline Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. W.; Nitao, J. J.; Newmark, R. L.; Kirkendall, B. A.; Nimz, G. J.; Knauss, K. G.; Ziagos, J. P.

    2002-05-01

    Reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions ranks high among the grand scientific challenges of this century. In the near-term, significant reductions can only be achieved through innovative sequestration strategies that prevent atmospheric release of large-scale CO2 waste streams. Among such strategies, injection into confined geologic formations represents arguably the most promising alternative; and among potential geologic storage sites, oil reservoirs and saline aquifers represent the most attractive targets. Oil reservoirs offer a unique "win-win" approach because CO2 flooding is an effective technique of enhanced oil recovery (EOR), while saline aquifers offer immense storage capacity and widespread distribution. Although CO2-flood EOR has been widely used in the Permian Basin and elsewhere since the 1980s, the oil industry has just recently become concerned with the significant fraction of injected CO2 that eludes recycling and is therefore sequestered. This "lost" CO2 now has potential economic value in the growing emissions credit market; hence, the industry's emerging interest in recasting CO2 floods as co-optimized EOR/sequestration projects. The world's first saline aquifer storage project was also catalyzed in part by economics: Norway's newly imposed atmospheric emissions tax, which spurred development of Statoil's unique North Sea Sleipner facility in 1996. Successful implementation of geologic sequestration projects hinges on development of advanced predictive models and a diverse set of remote sensing, in situ sampling, and experimental techniques. The models are needed to design and forecast long-term sequestration performance; the monitoring techniques are required to confirm and refine model predictions and to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. We have developed a unique reactive transport modeling capability for predicting sequestration performance in saline aquifers, and used it to simulate CO2 injection at Sleipner; we are now

  12. Numerical Simulation of Natural Convection in Heterogeneous Porous media for CO2 Geological Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranganathan, P.; Farajzadeh, R.; Bruining, J.; Zitha, P.L.J.

    2012-01-01

    We report a modeling and numerical simulation study of density-driven natural convection during geological CO2 storage in heterogeneous formations. We consider an aquifer or depleted oilfield overlain by gaseous CO2, where the water density increases due to CO2 dissolution. The heterogeneity of the

  13. Geological Sequestration of CO2 A Brief Overview and Potential for Application for Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is a component of C capture and storage (CCS), an emerging technology for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, and involves injection of captured CO2 into deep subsurface formations. Similar to the injection of hazardous wastes, before injection...

  14. Monitoring of CO2 geological storage based on the passive surface waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Kaoshan; Li Xiaofeng; Song Xuehang; Chen Gen; Pan Yongdong; Huang Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and geological storage (CCS) is one of promising technologies for greenhouse gas effect mitigation. Many geotechnical challenges remain during carbon dioxide storage field practices, among which effectively detecting CO2 from deep underground is one of engineering problems. This paper reviews monitoring techniques currently used during CO2 injection and storage. A method developed based on measuring seismic microtremors is of main interest. This method was first successfully used to characterize a site in this paper. To explore its feasibility in CO2 storage monitoring, numerical simulations were conducted to investigate detectable changes in elastic wave signatures due to injection and geological storage of CO2. It is found that, although it is effective for shallow earth profile estimation, the surface wave velocity is not sensitive to the CO2 layer physical parameter variations, especially for a thin CO2 geological storage layer in a deep underground reservoir.

  15. The key to commercial-scale geological CO2 sequestration: Displaced fluid management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdam, R.C.; Jiao, Z.; Stauffer, P.; Miller, T.

    2011-01-01

    The Wyoming State Geological Survey has completed a thorough inventory and prioritization of all Wyoming stratigraphic units and geologic sites capable of sequestering commercial quantities of CO2 (5-15 Mt CO 2/year). This multi-year study identified the Paleozoic Tensleep/Weber Sandstone and Madison Limestone (and stratigraphic equivalent units) as the leading clastic and carbonate reservoir candidates for commercial-scale geological CO2 sequestration in Wyoming. This conclusion was based on unit thickness, overlying low permeability lithofacies, reservoir storage and continuity properties, regional distribution patterns, formation fluid chemistry characteristics, and preliminary fluid-flow modeling. This study also identified the Rock Springs Uplift in southwestern Wyoming as the most promising geological CO2 sequestration site in Wyoming and probably in any Rocky Mountain basin. The results of the WSGS CO2 geological sequestration inventory led the agency and colleagues at the UW School of Energy Resources Carbon Management Institute (CMI) to collect available geologic, petrophysical, geochemical, and geophysical data on the Rock Springs Uplift, and to build a regional 3-D geologic framework model of the Uplift. From the results of these tasks and using the FutureGen protocol, the WSGS showed that on the Rock Springs Uplift, the Weber Sandstone has sufficient pore space to sequester 18 billion tons (Gt) of CO2, and the Madison Limestone has sufficient pore space to sequester 8 Gt of CO2. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Experimental evaluation of in situ CO2-water-rock reactions during CO2 injection in basaltic rocks: Implications for geological CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Juerg M.; Takahashi, Taro; Goldberg, David

    2007-02-01

    Deep aquifers are potential long-term storage sites for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The retention time and environmental safety of the injected CO2 depend on geologic and physical factors and on the chemical reactions between the CO2, the aquifer water, and the host rocks. The pH buffer capacity of the aquifer water and the acid neutralization potential of the host rocks are important factors for the permanent stabilization of the injected CO2. Mafic rocks, such as basalt, which primarily consists of Ca, Mg silicate minerals, have a high acid neutralization capacity by providing alkaline earth elements that form stable carbonate minerals. The carbonate minerals formed thus sequester CO2 in a chemically stable and environmentally benign form. In this study, we present results from a small-scale CO2 injection test in mafic and metasedimentary rocks. The injection test was conducted using a single-well push-pull test strategy. CO2 saturated water (pH = 3.5) was injected into a hydraulically isolated and permeable aquifer interval to study the acid neutralization capacity of Ca, Mg silicate rocks and to estimate in situ cation release rates. Release rates for Ca, Mg, and Na were calculated by use of solute compositions of water samples retrieved after the CO2 injection, the incubation time of the injected solution within the aquifer, and geometric estimates of the reactive surface area of the host rocks. Our results confirm rapid acid neutralization rates and water-rock reactions sufficient for safe and permanent storage of CO2. Carbonic acid was neutralized within hours of injection into a permeable mafic aquifer by two processes: mixing between the injected solution and the aquifer water, and water-rock reactions. Calculated cation release rates decrease with increasing pH that is confirmed by laboratory-based experiments. Large differences between release rates obtained from the field and laboratory experiments may be mainly due to uncertainties in the estimation

  17. Self-Potential Monitoring for Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Y.; Tosha, T.; Ishido, T.

    2009-12-01

    To appraise the utility of geophysical techniques for monitoring CO2 injected into aquifers, we carried out numerical simulations of an aquifer system underlying a portion of Tokyo Bay and calculated the temporal changes in geophysical observables caused by changing underground conditions as computed by the reservoir simulation. We used the STAR general-purpose reservoir simulator with the CO2SQS equation-of-state package (Pritchett, 2005) which treats three fluid phases (liquid- and gaseous-phase CO2 and an aqueous liquid phase) to calculate the evolution of reservoir conditions, and then used various “geophysical postprocessors” to calculate the resulting temporal changes in the earth-surface distributions of microgravity, apparent resistivity (from either DC or MT surveys), seismic observables and electrical self-potential (SP). The applicability of any particular method is likely to be highly site-specific, but these calculations indicate that none of these techniques should be ruled out altogether. In case of SP, CO2 injection does not create large electric signals through electrokinetic coupling within the saline aquifer owing to small coupling coefficients under the high salinity conditions. However, if a substantial pressure disturbance is induced to shallower levels where the interface between shallower fresh- and deeper saline-waters (which works as the boundary between regions of differing streaming potential coefficient) is present, obvious SP changes can appear on the ground surface. Continuous and/or repeat SP measurements are thought to be a promising geophysical technique to monitor pressure changes in shallower levels than the saline aquifer where CO2 is injected. In addition to SP measurements in a relatively wide area like covering the horizontal extent of CO2 plume, SP monitoring in a local area around a deep well is thought to be worthwhile from a different angle. SP anomalies of negative polarity are frequently observed near deep wells

  18. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2009-07-21

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  19. Simple dielectric mixing model in the monitoring of CO2 leakage from geological storage aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidoye, L. K.; Bello, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The principle of the dielectric mixing for multiphase systems in porous media has been employed to investigate CO2-water-porous media system and monitor the leakage of CO2, in analogy to scenarios that can be encountered in geological carbon sequestration. A dielectric mixing model was used to relate the relative permittivity for different subsurface materials connected with the geological carbon sequestration. The model was used to assess CO2 leakage and its upward migration, under the influences of the depth-dependent characteristics of the subsurface media as well as the fault-connected aquifers. The results showed that for the upward migration of CO2 in the subsurface, the change in the bulk relative permittivity (εb) of the CO2-water-porous media system clearly depicts the leakage and movement of CO2, especially at depth shallower than 800 m. At higher depth, with higher pressure and temperature, the relative permittivity of CO2 increases with pressure, while that of water decreases with temperature. These characteristics of water and supercritical CO2, combine to limit the change in the εb, at higher depth. Furthermore, it was noticed that if the pore water was not displaced by the migrating CO2, the presence of CO2 in the system increases the εb. But, with the displacement of pore water by the migrating CO2, it was shown how the εb profile decreases with time. Owing to its relative simplicity, composite dielectric behaviour of multiphase materials can be effectively deployed for monitoring and enhancement of control of CO2 movement in the geological carbon sequestration.

  20. On CO2 Behavior in the Subsurface, Following Leakage from aGeologic Storage Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, Karsten

    2006-02-09

    The amounts of CO2 that would need to be injected intogeologic storage reservoirs to achieve a significant reduction ofatmospheric emissions are very large. A 1000 MWe coal-fired power plantemits approximately 30,000 tonnes of CO2 per day, 10 Mt per year(Hitchon, 1996). When injected underground over a typical lifetime of 30years of such a plant, the CO2 plume may occupy a large area of order 100km2 or more, and fluid pressure increase in excess of 1 bar(corresponding to 10 m water head) may extend over an area of more than2,500 km2 (Pruess, et al., 2003). The large areal extent expected for CO2plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered,such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape fromthe primary storage reservoir. Under most subsurface conditions oftemperature and pressure, CO2 is buoyant relative to groundwaters. If(sub-)vertical pathways are available, CO2 will tend to flow upward and,depending on geologic conditions, may eventually reach potablegroundwater aquifers or even the land surface. Leakage of CO2 could alsooccur along wellbores, including pre-existing and improperly abandonedwells, or wells drilled in connection with the CO2 storage operations.The pressure increases accompanying CO2 injection will give rise tochanges in effective stress that could cause movement along faults,increasing permeability and potential for leakage.Escape of CO2 from aprimary geologic storage reservoir and potential hazards associated withits discharge at the land surface raise a number of concerns, including(1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard whenleaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase inatmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy,eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In orderto gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address theseissues

  1. Numerical simulation of CO2 geological storage in saline aquifers - case study of Utsira formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheming Zhang, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 geological storage (CGS is one of the most promising technologies to address the issue of excessive anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the atmosphere due to fossil fuel combustion for electricity generation. In order to fully exploit the storage potential, numerical simulations can help in determining injection strategies before the deployment of full scale sequestration in saline aquifers. This paper presents the numerical simulations of CO2 geological storage in Utsira saline formation where the sequestration is currently underway. The effects of various hydrogeological and numerical factors on the CO2 distribution in the topmost hydrogeological layer of Utsira are discussed. The existence of multiple pathways for upward mobility of CO2 into the topmost layer of Utsira as well as the performance of the top seal are also investigated.

  2. Numerical simulation of CO2 geological storage in saline aquifers – case study of Utsira formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zheming; Agarwal, Ramesh K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    CO2 geological storage (CGS) is one of the most promising technologies to address the issue of excessive anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the atmosphere due to fossil fuel combustion for electricity generation. In order to fully exploit the storage potential, numerical simulations can help in determining injection strategies before the deployment of full scale sequestration in saline aquifers. This paper presents the numerical simulations of CO2 geological storage in Utsira saline formation where the sequestration is currently underway. The effects of various hydrogeological and numerical factors on the CO2 distribution in the topmost hydrogeological layer of Utsira are discussed. The existence of multiple pathways for upward mobility of CO2 into the topmost layer of Utsira as well as the performance of the top seal are also investigated.

  3. Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondaryaccumulation at shallow depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.

    2007-05-31

    Geologic storage of CO2 can be a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases only if it can bedemonstrated that leakage from proposed storage reservoirs and associatedhazards are small or can be mitigated. Risk assessment must evaluatepotential leakage scenarios and develop a rational, mechanisticunderstanding of CO2 behavior during leakage. Flow of CO2 may be subjectto positive feedbacks that could amplify leakage risks and hazards,placing a premium on identifying and avoiding adverse conditions andmechanisms. A scenario that is unfavorable in terms of leakage behavioris formation of a secondary CO2 accumulation at shallow depth. This paperdevelops a detailed numerical simulation model to investigate CO2discharge from a secondary accumulation, and evaluates the role ofdifferent thermodynamic and hydrogeologic conditions. Our simulationsdemonstrate self-enhancing as well as self-limiting feedbacks.Condensation of gaseous CO2, 3-phase flow of aqueous phase -- liquid CO2-- gaseous CO2, and cooling from Joule-Thomson expansion and boiling ofliquid CO2 are found to play important roles in the behavior of a CO2leakage system. We find no evidence that a subsurface accumulation of CO2at ambient temperatures could give rise to a high-energy discharge, aso-called "pneumatic eruption."

  4. Rising CO2 widens the transpiration-photosynthesis optimality space

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Hugo J.; Eppinga, Maarten B.; Dekker, Stefan C.

    2016-04-01

    Stomatal conductance (gs) and photosynthetic biochemistry, typically expressed by the temperature-adjusted maximum rates of carboxylation (V cmax) and electron transport (Jmax), are key traits in land ecosystem models. Contrary to the many approaches available for simulating gs responses, the biochemical parameters V cmax and Jmax are often treated as static traits in ecosystem models. However, observational evidence indicates that V cmax and Jmax respond to persistent changes in atmospheric CO2. Hence, ecosystem models may be improved by incorporating coordinated responses of photosynthetic biochemistry and gs to atmospheric CO2. Recently, Prentice et al. (2014) proposed an optimality framework (referred to as the Prentice framework from here on) to predict relationships between V cmax and gs based on Fick's law, Rubisco-limited photosynthesis and the carbon costs of transpiration and photosynthesis. Here we show that this framework is, in principle, suited to predict CO2-induced changes in the V cmax -gs relationships. The framework predicts an increase in the V cmax:gs-ratio with higher atmospheric CO2, whereby the slope of this relationship is determined by the carbon costs of transpiration and photosynthesis. For our empirical analyses we consider that the carbon cost of transpiration is positively related to the plant's Huber value (sapwood area/leaf area), while the carbon cost of photosynthesis is positively related to the maintenance cost of the photosynthetic proteins. We empirically tested the predicted effect of CO2 on the V cmax:gs-ratio in two genotypes of Solanum dulcamara (bittersweet) that were grown from seeds to maturity under 200, 400 and 800 ppm CO2 in walk-in growth chambers with tight control on light, temperature and humidity. Seeds of the two Solanum genotypes were obtained from two distinct natural populations; one adapted to well-drained sandy soil (the 'dry' genotype) and one adapted to poorly-drained clayey soil (the 'wet' genotype

  5. Intercomparison of numerical simulation codes for geologic disposal of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, Karsten; Garcia, Julio; Kovscek, Tony; Oldenburg, Curt; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl; Xu, Tianfu

    2002-11-27

    Numerical simulation codes were exercised on a suite of eight test problems that address CO2 disposal into geologic storage reservoirs, including depleted oil and gas reservoirs, and brine aquifers. Processes investigated include single- and multi-phase flow, gas diffusion, partitioning of CO2 into aqueous and oil phases, chemical interactions of CO2 with aqueous fluids and rock minerals, and mechanical changes due to changes in fluid pressures. Representation of fluid properties was also examined. In most cases results obtained from different simulation codes were in satisfactory agreement, providing confidence in the ability of current numerical simulation approaches to handle the physical and chemical processes that would be induced by CO2 disposal in geologic reservoirs. Some discrepancies were also identified and can be traced to differences in fluid property correlations, and space and time discretization.

  6. Use of comparative assessment framework for comparison of geological nuclear waste and CO2 disposal technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streimikiene, Dalia

    2010-09-15

    Comparative assessment of few future energy and climate change mitigation options for Lithuania in 2020 performed indicated that nuclear and combined cycle gas turbine technologies are very similar energy options in terms of costs taking into account GHG emission reduction costs. Comparative assessment of these energy options requires evaluation of the potentials and costs for geological CO2 and nuclear waste storage as the main uncertainties in comparative assessment of electricity generation technologies are related with these back-end technologies. The paper analyses the main characteristics of possible geological storage of CO2 and NW options in Lithuania.

  7. Application of simplified models to CO2 migration and immobilization in large-scale geological systems

    KAUST Repository

    Gasda, Sarah E.

    2012-07-01

    Long-term stabilization of injected carbon dioxide (CO 2) is an essential component of risk management for geological carbon sequestration operations. However, migration and trapping phenomena are inherently complex, involving processes that act over multiple spatial and temporal scales. One example involves centimeter-scale density instabilities in the dissolved CO 2 region leading to large-scale convective mixing that can be a significant driver for CO 2 dissolution. Another example is the potentially important effect of capillary forces, in addition to buoyancy and viscous forces, on the evolution of mobile CO 2. Local capillary effects lead to a capillary transition zone, or capillary fringe, where both fluids are present in the mobile state. This small-scale effect may have a significant impact on large-scale plume migration as well as long-term residual and dissolution trapping. Computational models that can capture both large and small-scale effects are essential to predict the role of these processes on the long-term storage security of CO 2 sequestration operations. Conventional modeling tools are unable to resolve sufficiently all of these relevant processes when modeling CO 2 migration in large-scale geological systems. Herein, we present a vertically-integrated approach to CO 2 modeling that employs upscaled representations of these subgrid processes. We apply the model to the Johansen formation, a prospective site for sequestration of Norwegian CO 2 emissions, and explore the sensitivity of CO 2 migration and trapping to subscale physics. Model results show the relative importance of different physical processes in large-scale simulations. The ability of models such as this to capture the relevant physical processes at large spatial and temporal scales is important for prediction and analysis of CO 2 storage sites. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. On the statistical optimality of CO2 atmospheric inversions assimilating CO2 column retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chevallier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The extending archive of the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT measurements (now covering about six years allows increasingly robust statistics to be computed, that document the performance of the corresponding retrievals of the column-average dry air-mole fraction of CO2 (XCO2. Here, we compare a model simulation constrained by surface air-sample measurements with one of the GOSAT retrieval products (NASA's ACOS. The retrieval-minus-model differences result from various error sources, both in the retrievals and in the simulation: we discuss the plausibility of the origin of the major patterns. We find systematic retrieval errors over the dark surfaces of high-latitude lands and over African savannahs. More importantly, we also find a systematic over-fit of the GOSAT radiances by the retrievals over land for the high-gain detector mode, which is the usual observation mode. The over-fit is partially compensated by the retrieval bias-correction. These issues are likely common to other retrieval products and may explain some of the surprising and inconsistent CO2 atmospheric inversion results obtained with the existing GOSAT retrieval products. We suggest that reducing the observation weight in the retrieval schemes (for instance so that retrieval increments to the retrieval prior values are halved for the studied retrieval product would significantly improve the retrieval quality and reduce the need for (or at least reduce the complexity of ad-hoc retrieval bias correction. More generally, we demonstrate that atmospheric inversions cannot be rigorously optimal when assimilating XCO2 retrievals, even with averaging kernels.

  9. Investigation into optimal CO2 concentration for CO2 capture from aluminium production

    OpenAIRE

    Mathisen, Anette; Sørensen, Henriette; Melaaen, Morten Christian; Müller, Gunn-Iren

    2013-01-01

    Capture of CO2 from aluminum production has been simulated using Aspen Plus and Aspen Hysys. The technology used for aluminum production is the Hall-Héroult and the current cell design necessitates that large amounts of false air is supplied to the cells. This results in a CO2 concentration in the process gas at around 1 vol%, which is considered uneconomical for CO2 capture. Therefore, the aim of this investigation is to evaluate the CO2 capture from aluminum production when the process g...

  10. Simulation of muon radiography for monitoring CO$_2$ stored in a geological reservoir

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, J; Coleman, M; Gluyas, J G; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lincoln, D L; Pal, S; Paling, S M; Spooner, N J C; Telfer, S; Thompson, L F; Woodward, D

    2015-01-01

    Current methods of monitoring subsurface CO$_2$, such as repeat seismic surveys, are episodic and require highly skilled personnel to acquire the data. Simulations based on simplified models have previously shown that muon radiography could be automated to continuously monitor CO$_2$ injection and migration, in addition to reducing the overall cost of monitoring. In this paper, we present a simulation of the monitoring of CO$_2$ plume evolution in a geological reservoir using muon radiography. The stratigraphy in the vicinity of a nominal test facility is modelled using geological data, and a numerical fluid flow model is used to describe the time evolution of the CO$_2$ plume. A planar detection region with a surface area of 1000 m$^2$ is considered, at a vertical depth of 776 m below the seabed. We find that one year of constant CO$_2$ injection leads to changes in the column density of $\\lesssim 1\\%$, and that the CO$_2$ plume is already resolvable with an exposure time of less than 50 days.

  11. Effects of CO2 gas as leaks from geological storage sites on agro-ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Ravi; Colls, Jeremy J; Steven, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage in geological formations has potential risks in the long-term safety because of the possibility of CO2 leakage. Effects of leaking gas, therefore, on vegetation, soil, and soil-inhabiting organisms are critical to understand. An artificial soil gassing and response...

  12. Developments since 2005 in understanding potential environmental impacts of CO2 leakage from geological storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, D.G.; Beaubien, S.E.; Blackford, J.C.; Foekema, E.M.; Lions, J.; Vittor, de C.; West, J.M.; Widdicombe, S.; Hauton, C.; Queiros, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews research into the potential environmental impacts of leakage from geological storage of CO2 since the publication of the IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in 2005. Possible impacts are considered on onshore (including drinking water aquifers) and offshore e

  13. Monitoring CO2 invasion processes at the pore scale using geological labs on chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, S; Liu, N; Diouf, A; Bernard, D; Lecoutre, C; Garrabos, Y; Marre, S

    2016-09-21

    In order to investigate at the pore scale the mechanisms involved during CO2 injection in a water saturated pore network, a series of displacement experiments is reported using high pressure micromodels (geological labs on chip - GLoCs) working under real geological conditions (25 < T (°C) < 75 and 4.5 < p (MPa) < 8). The experiments were focused on the influence of three experimental parameters: (i) the p, T conditions, (ii) the injection flow rates and (iii) the pore network characteristics. By using on-chip optical characterization and imaging approaches, the CO2 saturation curves as a function of either time or the number of pore volume injected were determined. Three main mechanisms were observed during CO2 injection, namely, invasion, percolation and drying, which are discussed in this paper. Interestingly, besides conventional mechanisms, two counterintuitive situations were observed during the invasion and drying processes.

  14. Measurement of residual CO2 saturation at a geological storage site using hydraulic tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rötting, T. S.; Martinez-Landa, L.; Carrera, J.; Russian, A.; Dentz, M.; Cubillo, B.

    2012-12-01

    Estimating long term capillary trapping of CO2 in aquifers remains a key challenge for CO2 storage. Zhang et al. (2011) proposed a combination of thermal, tracer, and hydraulic experiments to estimate the amount of CO2 trapped in the formation after a CO2 push and pull test. Of these three types of experiments, hydraulic tests are the simplest to perform and possibly the most informative. However, their potential has not yet been fully exploited. Here, a methodology is presented to interpret these tests and analyze which parameters can be estimated. Numerical and analytical solutions are used to simulate a continuous injection in a porous medium where residual CO2 has caused a reduction in hydraulic conductivity and an increase in storativity over a finite thickness (a few meters) skin around the injection well. The model results are interpreted using conventional pressure build-up and diagnostic plots (a plot of the drawdown s and the logarithmic derivative d s / d ln t of the drawdown as a function of time). The methodology is applied using the hydraulic parameters estimated for the Hontomin site (Northern Spain) where a Technology Demonstration Plant (TDP) for geological CO2 storage is planned to be set up. The reduction of hydraulic conductivity causes an increase in observed drawdowns, the increased storativity in the CO2 zone causes a delay in the drawdown curve with respect to the reference curve measured before CO2 injection. The duration (characteristic time) of these effects can be used to estimate the radius of the CO2 zone. The effects of reduced permeability and increased storativity are well separated from wellbore storage and natural formation responses, even if the CO2-brine interface is inclined (i.e. the CO2 forms a cone around the well). We find that both skin hydraulic conductivity and storativity (and thus residual CO2 saturation) can be obtained from the water injection test provided that water flow rate is carefully controlled and head build

  15. A feasibility study of geological CO2 sequestration in the Ordos Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Z.; Surdam, R.C.; Zhou, L.; Stauffer, P.H.; Luo, T.

    2011-01-01

    The Shaanxi Province/Wyoming CCS Partnership (supported by DOE NETL) aims to store commercial quantities of CO2 safely and permanently in the Ordovician Majiagou Formation in the northern Ordos Basin, Shaanxi Province, China. This objective is imperative because at present, six coal-to-liquid facilities in Shaanxi Province are capturing and venting significant quantities of CO2. The Wyoming State Geological Survey and the Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Energy Resource and Chemical Engineering conducted a feasibility study to determine the potential for geological CO2 sequestration in the northern Ordos Basin near Yulin. The Shaanbei Slope of the Ordos Basin is a huge monoclinal structure with a high-priority sequestration reservoir (Majiagou Formation) that lies beneath a 2,000+ meter-thick sequence of Mesozoic rocks containing a multitude of lowpermeability lithologies. The targeted Ordovician Majiagou Formation in the location of interest is more than 700 meters thick. The carbonate reservoir is located at depths where pressures and temperatures are well above the supercritical point of CO2. The targeted reservoir contains high-salinity brines (20,000-50,000 ppm) that have little or no economic value. The targeted reservoir is continuous as inferred from well logs, and cores show that porosity ranges from 1 to 15% with average measured porosity of 8%, and that permeability ranges from 1-35 md. This paper focuses on calculations that will help evaluate the capacity estimates through the use of high-resolution multiphase numerical simulation models, as well as a more simple volumetric approach. The preliminary simulation results show that the Ordovician Majiagou Formation in the Ordos Basin has excellent potential for geological CO2 sequestration and could store the CO2 currently emitted by coal-to-liquid facilities in Shaanxi Province for hundreds of years (i.e., 9 Mt/year CO2; 450 Mt over a 50-year period at one injection site). ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Tracing the CO2 source and migration in natural analogues from different geological contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battani, A.; Jean Luc, F.; Philippe, S.; Nadine, E.; Olivier, V.; Elodie, J.

    2009-12-01

    Naturally occurring CO2 fields allow studying long-term fluid-rock interactions, and the processes of CO2 migration, useful for the prediction of CO2 behavior in industrial storage sites. Two different provinces showing both leaking systems (hydrothermal areas) and well confined systems (stable sedimentary basins) have been studied. The first province concerns the French CO2 province of Massif Central (volcanic events, seismic activity, high geothermal gradient) and the stable Valence basin. The other study was devoted to the Basin and Range province, USA, with hydrothermal, high seismic and volcanic activity, a high geothermal gradient (Soda Springs; Idaho, Sevier basin), and the non-hydrothermal stable area of the Colorado plateau (Green River, San Rafael anticline and Springerville). The aim is to link the CO2 sources and its subsurface migration to the geological context. In hydrothermal areas, the mesured helium isotopic ratio (R/Ra) is high (close to the mantle ratio), while the CO2/3He ratios move dramatically towards crustal values. In this context, isotopic and elemental noble gas data show that the gas migrates very fast from depth. In more confined areas (natural CO2 fields), the CO2 shows a more important proportion of radiogenic gases (4He) (crustal helium isotopic ratios) and the associated CO2/3He ratios are in the MORB range, or “mantle derived”. We try to explain the apparent discrepancy between the CO2/3He and the R/Ra values in both areas. As a primary assumption, the source of CO2 could be localized in the extensional zones of high geothermal gradient with important seismicity. We suggest that the pseudotachylites formed by frictional melting associated with each seismic event supply an instantaneous crustal CO2.amount to the initial magmatic CO2. This justifies the coeval increase of the CO2/3He ratios without any significant modification in the helium isotopic ratios (instantaneous, no time for 4He production). Moreover, the contact

  17. Considerations for monitoring, verification, and accounting for geologic storage of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monea, Mike; Knudsen, Ray; Worth, Kyle; Chalaturnyk, Rick; White, Don; Wilson, Malcolm; Plasynski, Sean; McIlvried, Howard G.; Srivastava, Rameshwar D.

    Growing concern over the impact of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs), especially carbon dioxide (CO2), in the atmosphere has led to suggested mitigation techniques. One proposal that is attracting widespread attention is carbon capture and storage (CCS). This mitigation approach involves capture of CO2 and permanent storage in geologic formations, such as oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and unmineable coal seams. Critical to the successful implementation of this approach is the development of a robust monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) program. Defining the site characteristics of a proposed geologic storage project is the first step in developing a monitoring program. Following site characterization, the second step involves developing hypothetical models describing important mechanisms that control the behavior of injected CO2. A wide array of advanced monitoring technologies is currently being evaluated by the Weyburn-Midale Project, the Frio Project, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program. These efforts are evaluating and determining which monitoring techniques are most effective and economic for specific geologic situations, information that will be vital in guiding future projects. Although monitoring costs can run into millions of dollars, they are typically only a small part of the overall cost of a CO2 storage project. Ultimately, a robust MVA program will be critical in establishing CCS as a viable GHG mitigation strategy.

  18. Risk assessment of geo-microbial assosicated CO2 Geological Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, A.; Sakamoto, Y.; Higashino, H.; Mayumi, D.; Sakata, S.; Kano, Y.; Nishi, Y.; Nakao, S.

    2014-12-01

    If we maintain preferable conditions for methanogenesis archaea during geological CCS, we will be able to abate greenhouse gas emission and produce natural gas as natural energy resource at the same time. Assuming Bio-CCS site, CO2 is injected from a well for to abate greenhouse gas emission and cultivate methanogenic geo-microbes, and CH4 is produced from another well. The procedure is similar to the Enhanced Oil/Gas Recovery (EOR/EGR) operation, but in Bio-CCS, the target is generation and production of methane out of depleted oil/gas reservoir during CO2 abatement. Our project aims to evaluate the basic practicability of Bio-CCS that cultivate methanogenic geo-microbes within depleted oil/gas reservoirs for geological CCS, and produce methane gas as fuel resources on the course of CO2 abatement for GHG control. To evaluate total feasibility of Bio-CCS concept, we have to estimate: CH4 generation volume, environmental impact along with life cycle of injection well, and risk-benefit balance of the Bio-CCS. We are modifying the model step by step to include interaction of oil/gas-CO2-geomicrobe within reservoir more practically and alternation of geo-microbes generation, so that we will be able to estimate methane generation rate more precisely. To evaluate impacts of accidental events around Bio-CCS reservoir, we estimated CO2 migration in relation with geological properties, condition of faults and pathways around well, using TOUGH2-CO2 simulator. All findings will be integrated in to it: cultivation condition of methanogenic geo-microbes, estimation method of methane generation quantities, environmental impacts of various risk scenarios, and benefit analysis of schematic site of Bio-CCS.

  19. The geological risks of drilling a borehole for CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Changyou; Wilkinson, Mark

    2017-04-01

    A hydrocarbon exploration borehole may be unsuccessful because the target reservoir is of low porosity, is too thin or has no seal, even when drilled in an area of well-known geology, such as the North Sea. The same geological problems could cause a new CO2 storage borehole or project to be unsuccessful, especially when drilled into a previously untried structure in a saline aquifer. As experience worldwide of developing new CO2 storage projects is limited, hydrocarbon exploration provides a useful analogue to assess both the absolute range of risk factors, and their historical occurrence. In this study, we reviewed the results of 382 unsuccessful hydrocarbon boreholes in the UK North Sea to analyse the geological risks of drilling. We found that absence of the target reservoir (19 ± 3 % of cases), low reservoir quality (16 ± 5 %) and lack of trap (16 ± 3 %) are the most significant risk for a new borehole. We suggest that boreholes drilled for CO2 storage will have a similar risk profile, even when drilled into a highly explored area such as the North Sea. From the drilling records, we estimate that the probability of a reservoir having an effective caprock is 95 ± 2%; and for any bounding faults to provide an effective seal to be 82 ± 4 %. Based on the probability data, 48 ± 8 % of subsurface structures, which appear to be suitable for CO2 storage on pre-drill prognosis, are predicted to actually be suitable for the storage of CO2. For storage sites that have been penetrated by existing boreholes, then the geological risks are greatly reduced. The most significant remaining risk is reservoir compartmentalization.

  20. Status of Geological Storage of CO2 as Part of Negative Emissions Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent analyses show that many GHG stabilization scenarios require technologies that permanently extract CO2 from the atmosphere -so-called "net negative emissions." Among the most promising negative emissions approaches is bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS). The most mature options for CO2 storage are in sedimentary rocks located in thick sedimentary basins. Within those basins, CO2 can be stored either in depleted or depleting hydrocarbon formations or in so-called saline aquifers. In addition to the economic costs of bioenergy with CO2 capture, key to the success of and scale at which BECCS can contribute to negative emissions is the ability to store quantities on the order of 1 Gt per year of CO2. Today, about 65 Mt of CO2 per year are injected underground for the purposes of enhancing oil recovery (CO2-EOR) or for CO2 storage, the vast majority being for CO2-EOR. Achieving 1 Gt per year of negative emissions will require a 15-fold scale up of the current injection operations. This paper will review the conditions necessary for storage at this scale, identify what has been learned from nearly 2 decades of experience with CO2 storage that provides insight into the feasibility of CO2 storage on this scale, and identify critical issues that remain to be resolved to meet these ambitious negative emissions targets. Critical technological issues include but are not limited to: the amount of CO2 storage capacity that is available and where it is located in relation to biomass energy resources; identification of sustainable injection rates and how this depends on the properties of the geological formation; the extent to which water extraction will be required to manage the magnitude of pressure buildup; identification of regions at high risk for induced seismicity that could damage structures and infrastructure; and selection of sites with a adequate seals to permanently contain CO2. Social, economic and political issues are also important: including the

  1. Framework for the assessment of interaction between CO2 geological storage and other sedimentary basin resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, K; Whittaker, S; Varma, S; Bekele, E; Langhi, L; Hodgkinson, J; Harris, B

    2016-02-01

    Sedimentary basins around the world considered suitable for carbon storage usually contain other natural resources such as petroleum, coal, geothermal energy and groundwater. Storing carbon dioxide in geological formations in the basins adds to the competition for access to the subsurface and the use of pore space where other resource-based industries also operate. Managing potential impacts that industrial-scale injection of carbon dioxide may have on other resource development must be focused to prevent potential conflicts and enhance synergies where possible. Such a sustainable coexistence of various resource developments can be accomplished by implementing a Framework for Basin Resource Management strategy (FBRM). The FBRM strategy utilizes the concept of an Area of Review (AOR) for guiding development and regulation of CO2 geological storage projects and for assessing their potential impact on other resources. The AOR is determined by the expected physical distribution of the CO2 plume in the subsurface and the modelled extent of reservoir pressure increase resulting from the injection of the CO2. This information is used to define the region to be characterised and monitored for a CO2 injection project. The geological characterisation and risk- and performance-based monitoring will be most comprehensive within the region of the reservoir containing the carbon dioxide plume and should consider geological features and wells continuously above the plume through to its surface projection; this region defines where increases in reservoir pressure will be greatest and where potential for unplanned migration of carbon dioxide is highest. Beyond the expanse of the carbon dioxide plume, geological characterisation and monitoring should focus only on identified features that could be a potential migration conduit for either formation water or carbon dioxide.

  2. Southern Adriatic Sea as a Potential Area for CO2 Geological Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volpi V.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Southern Adriatic Sea is one of the five prospective areas for CO2 storage being evaluated under the three year (FP7 European SiteChar project dedicated to the characterization of European CO2 storage sites. The potential reservoir for CO2 storage is represented by a carbonate formation, the wackstones and packstones of the Scaglia Formation (Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene. In this paper, we present the geological characterization and the 3D modeling that led to the identification of three sites, named Grazia, Rovesti and Grifone, where the Scaglia Formation, with an average thickness of 50 m, reveals good petrophysical characteristics and is overlain by an up to 1 200 thick caprock. The vicinity of the selected sites to the Enel - Federico II power plant (one of the major Italian CO2 emittor where a pilot plant for CO2 capture has been already started in April 2010, represents a good opportunity to launch the first Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS pilot project in Italy and to apply this technology at industrial level, strongly contributing at the same time at reducing the national CO2 emissions.

  3. Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2012-07-09

    Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

  4. Silicate Carbonation Processes in Water-Bearing Supercritical CO2 Fluids: Implications for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Q. R.; Schaef, T.; Thompson, C.; Loring, J. S.; Windisch, C. F.; Bowden, M. E.; Arey, B. W.; McGrail, P.

    2012-12-01

    Global climate change is viewed by many as an anthropogenic phenomenon that could be mitigated through a combination of conservation efforts, alternative energy sources, and the development of technologies capable of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Continued increases of atmospheric CO2 concentrations are projected over the next decade, due to developing nations and growing populations. One economically favorable option for managing CO2 involves subsurface storage in deep basalt formations. The silicate minerals and glassy mesostasis basalt components act as metal cation sources, reacting with the CO2 to form carbonate minerals. Most prior work on mineral reactivity in geologic carbon sequestration settings involves only aqueous dominated reactions. However, in most sequestration scenarios, injected CO2 will reside as a buoyant fluid in contact with the sealing formation (caprock) and slowly become water bearing. Comparatively little laboratory research has been conducted on reactions occurring between minerals in the host rock and the wet scCO2. In this work, we studied the carbonation of wollastonite [CaSiO3] exposed to variably wet supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at a range of temperatures (50, 55 and 70 °C) and pressures (90,120 and 160 bar) in order to gain insight into reaction processes. Mineral transformation reactions were followed by two novel in situ high pressure techniques, including x-ray diffraction that tracked the rate and extents of wollastonite conversion to calcite. Increased dissolved water concentrations in the scCO2 resulted in increased carbonation approaching ~50 wt. %. Development of thin water films on the mineral surface were directly observed with infrared (IR) spectroscopy and indirectly with 18O isotopic labeling techniques (Raman spectroscopy). The thin water films were determined to be critical for facilitating carbonation processes in wet scCO2. Even in extreme low water conditions, the IR technique detected the formation of

  5. Geochemical modeling of fluid-fluid and fluid-mineral interactions during geological CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C.; Ji, X.; Lu, P.

    2013-12-01

    The long time required for effective CO2 storage makes geochemical modeling an indispensable tool for CCUS. One area of geochemical modeling research that is in urgent need is impurities in CO2 streams. Permitting impurities, such as H2S, in CO2 streams can lead to potential capital and energy savings. However, predicting the consequences of co-injection of CO2 and impurities into geological formations requires the understanding of the phase equilibrium and fluid-fluid interactions. To meet this need, we developed a statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT)-based equation of state (EOS) for the H2S-CO2-H2O-NaCl system at 373.15 dew pressures decrease with increasing H2S content, while the mass density increases at low pressures and decreases at high pressures. Furthermore, the EoS can be incorporated into reservoir simulators so that the dynamic development of mixed fluid plumes in the reservoir can be simulated. Accurate modeling of fluid-mineral interactions must confront unresolved uncertainties of silicate dissolution - precipitation reaction kinetics. Most prominent among these uncertainties is the well-known lab-field apparent discrepancy in dissolution rates. Although reactive transport models that simulate the interactions between reservoir rocks and brine, and their attendant effects on porosity and permeability changes, have proliferated, whether these results have acceptable uncertainties are unknown. We have conducted a series of batch experiments at elevated temperatures and numerical simulations of coupled dissolution and precipitation reactions. The results show that taking into account of reaction coupling is able to reduce the gap between the field and lab rates by about two orders of magnitude at elevated temperatures of 200-300 oC. Currently, we are using Si isotopes as a new tool to unravel the coupled reactions in ambient temperature laboratory experiments. These new experimental data, together with coupled reactive mass transport modeling

  6. Assisting Gas Optimization in CO2 Laser Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1996-01-01

    High quality laser welding is achieved under the condition of optimizing all process parameters. Assisting gas plays an important role for sound welds. In the conventional welding process assisting gas is used as a shielding gas to prevent that the weld seam oxidates. In the laser welding process...... assisting gas is also needed to control the laser induced plasma.Assisting gas is one of the most important parameters in the laser welding process. It is responsible for obtaining a quality weld which is characterized by deep penetration, no interior imperfections, i.e. porosity, no crack, homogeneous seam...... are applied with three different flow rates for each of the gases. A number of systematic laboratory experiments is carried out by employing various experimental designs, 33 and 32 Factorial Design. In the experiments a CO2 laser is used to weld thin sheets of mild steel. The welding specimens are evaluated...

  7. IN SITU MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING NMR FOR STUDYING GEOLOGICAL CO(2) SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2011-03-27

    Geological carbon sequestration (GCS) is one of the most promising ways of mitigating atmospheric greenhouse gases (1-3). Mineral carbonation reactions are potentially important to the long-term sealing effectiveness of caprock but remain poorly predictable, particularly in low-water supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-dominated environments where the chemistry has not been adequately explored. In situ probes that provide molecular-level information is desirable for investigating mechanisms and rates of GCS mineral carbonation reactions. MAS-NMR is a powerful tool for obtaining detailed molecular structure and dynamics information of a system regardless whether the system is in a solid, a liquid, a gaseous, or a supercritical state, or a mixture thereof (4,5). However, MAS NMR under scCO2 conditions has never been realized due to the tremendous technical difficulties of achieving and maintaining high pressure within a fast spinning MAS rotor (6,7), where non-metal materials must be used. In this work, we report development of a unique high pressure MAS NMR capability, and its application to mineral carbonation chemistry in scCO2 under geologically relevant temperatures and pressures.

  8. CO2地质储存的地震监测%A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF SEISMIC MONITORING IN CO2 GEOLOGICAL STORAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    由荣军; 李德春; 武俊文

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the basic idea of isolation technology of CO2and the main mode of isolation of CO2. On such a basis, the authors proposed the feasibility of seam separation and isolation of the mechanism for CO, and analyzed the key research questions and research ideas of geological storage of CO2 in seam, with emphasis placed on the availability of seismic monitoring in CO2 storage.%主要阐述了CO2隔离技术的基本思路和CO2地中隔离的主要方式,在此基础上提出了CO2煤层中隔离的可行性和隔离机制的分析方法,分析了CO2地质储存的重点研究问题及研究思路,评价了地震监测方法在CO2地质储存检测中的有效性.

  9. Mixing and trapping of dissolved CO2 in deep geologic formations with shale layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agartan, Elif; Cihan, Abdullah; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2017-07-01

    For dissolution trapping, the spatial variability of the geologic properties of naturally complex storage formations can significantly impact flow patterns and storage mechanisms of dissolved CO2. The significance of diffusive mixing that occurs in low permeability layers embedded between relatively higher permeability materials was highlighted by Agartan et al. (2015) using a highly controlled laboratory experimental study on trapping of dissolved CO2 in multilayered systems. In this paper, we present a numerical modeling study on the impacts of low permeability layers on flow and storage of dissolved CO2 in realistic field-scale settings. The simulator of variable-density flow used in this study was first verified using the experimental data in Agartan et al. (2015) to capture the observed processes. The simulator was then applied to a synthetic, field-scale multilayered system, with 19 sensitivity cases having variable permeability and thickness of the shale layers as well as the source strength and geometry of the source zone of dissolved CO2. Simulation results showed that the presence of continuous shale layers in the storage system disrupts the convective mixing by enhancing lateral spreading of dissolved CO2 in sandstone layers and retarding the vertical mixing of dissolved CO2. The effectiveness of trapping of dissolved CO2 depends on the physical properties of the shale layers and configurations of the source zone. The comparison to homogeneous cases with effective vertical permeability shows that it is important to capture these continuous thin shale layers in a storage formation and include them in the models to enhance dissolution trapping.

  10. Geological safety evaluation method for CO2 geological storage in deep saline aquifer%深部咸水层CO2地质储存地质安全性评价方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁玉杰; 张森琦; 郭建强; 李旭峰; 张徽

    2011-01-01

    CO2地质储存工程属于环保型工程项目,地质安全性是影响CO2长期封存的首要因素.深部咸水层CO2地质储存地质安全性影响因素主要包括盖层适宜性、场地地震安全性、水文地质条件、地面场地地质条件四个方面,其中盖层适宜性是CO2安全储存的最关键因素,场地地震安全性和水文地质条件次之,而地面场地地质条件也是影响工程施工的重要因素.本文基于CO2地质储存的地质安全性影响因素分析,建立了层次分析结构的地质安全性评价指标体系,并初步计算了评价指标的权重;提出可以利用模糊综合评价方法进行深部咸水层CO2地质储存地质安全性综合评价,为中国深部咸水层CO2地质储存的地质安全性评价方法和安全选址指明了方向.%CO2 geological storage projects belong to environmental protection projects, and geological safety is the primary factor for CO2 sequestration for a long time.Geological safety influencing factors of CO2 geological storage include cap rock suitability, site safety for earthquake, hydrogeological condition and geological condition of the ground site, of which cap rock suitability is the most important factor, and geological condition of the ground site is the main factor influencing project construction.According to an analysis of CO2 geological storage safety influencing factors, the authors built geological safety evaluation indexes system on the basis of the AHP structure and tentatively calculated the weights.It is held that CO2 geological storage safety could be evaluated comprehensively by fuzzy synthetic evaluation method.In addition, the geological safety evaluation method of CO2 geological storage and the means for safe project site selection in China's deep saline aquifer are put forward in this paper.

  11. Vertical equilibrium with sub-scale analytical methods for geological CO2 sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Gasda, S. E.

    2009-04-23

    Large-scale implementation of geological CO2 sequestration requires quantification of risk and leakage potential. One potentially important leakage pathway for the injected CO2 involves existing oil and gas wells. Wells are particularly important in North America, where more than a century of drilling has created millions of oil and gas wells. Models of CO 2 injection and leakage will involve large uncertainties in parameters associated with wells, and therefore a probabilistic framework is required. These models must be able to capture both the large-scale CO 2 plume associated with the injection and the small-scale leakage problem associated with localized flow along wells. Within a typical simulation domain, many hundreds of wells may exist. One effective modeling strategy combines both numerical and analytical models with a specific set of simplifying assumptions to produce an efficient numerical-analytical hybrid model. The model solves a set of governing equations derived by vertical averaging with assumptions of a macroscopic sharp interface and vertical equilibrium. These equations are solved numerically on a relatively coarse grid, with an analytical model embedded to solve for wellbore flow occurring at the sub-gridblock scale. This vertical equilibrium with sub-scale analytical method (VESA) combines the flexibility of a numerical method, allowing for heterogeneous and geologically complex systems, with the efficiency and accuracy of an analytical method, thereby eliminating expensive grid refinement for sub-scale features. Through a series of benchmark problems, we show that VESA compares well with traditional numerical simulations and to a semi-analytical model which applies to appropriately simple systems. We believe that the VESA model provides the necessary accuracy and efficiency for applications of risk analysis in many CO2 sequestration problems. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  12. CO2-brine-mineral Reactions in Geological Carbon Storage: Results from an EOR Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, H.; Wigley, M.; Bickle, M.; Kampman, N.; Dubacq, B.; Galy, A.; Ballentine, C.; Zhou, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Dissolution of CO2 in brines and reactions of the acid brines ultimately dissolving silicate minerals and precipitating carbonate minerals are the prime long-term mechanisms for stabilising the light supercritical CO2 in geological carbon storage. However the rates of dissolution are very uncertain as they are likely to depend on the heterogeneity of the flow of CO2, the possibility of convective instability of the denser CO2-saturated brines and on fluid-mineral reactions which buffer brine acidity. We report the results of sampling brines and gases during a phase of CO2 injection for enhanced oil recovery in a small oil field. Brines and gases were sampled at production wells daily for 3 months after initiation of CO2 injection and again for two weeks after 5 months. Noble gas isotopic spikes were detected at producing wells within days of initial CO2 injection but signals continued for weeks, and at some producers for the duration of the sampling period, attesting to the complexity of gas-species pathways. Interpretations are complicated by the previous history of the oil field and re-injection of produced water prior to injection of CO2. However water sampled from some producing wells during the phase of CO2 injection showed monotonic increases in alkalinity and in concentrations of major cations to levels in excess of those in the injected water. The marked increase in Na, and smaller increases in Ca, Mg, Si, K and Sr are interpreted primarily to result from silicate dissolution as the lack of increase in S and Cl concentrations preclude additions of more saline waters. Early calcite dissolution was followed by re-precipitation. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the waters apparently exceed the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of acetic and hydrochloric acid leaches of carbonate fractions of the reservoir rocks and the silicate residues from the leaching. This may indicate incongruent dissolution of Sr or larger scale isotopic heterogeneity of the reservoir. This is being investigated

  13. The potential of geological storage of CO2 in Austria: a techno-economic assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüstle, Anna Katharina; Welkenhuysen, Kris; Bottig, Magdalena; Piessens, Kris; Ramirez, Andrea; Swenner, Rudy

    2014-05-01

    An impressive two-third or about 40GWh/y of electricity in Austria is produced from renewable energy sources, in particular hydro energy. For the remaining part the country depends on fossil fuels, which together with iron & steel production form the most CO2 intensive industries in Austria with a combined emission of just over 20Mt/y. According to the IEA, CO2 capture and geological storage (CCS) can reduce the global CO2 emission until 2050 by 17%. A correct assessment of CCS needs to start with the storage potential. Prior to this study, only general estimates of the theoretical capacity of Austrian reservoirs were available, thus, up until now, the realistic potential for CCS technology has not been assessed. Both for policy and industry, an assessment of the matched capacity is required, which is the capacity that actually will be used in CCS projects. This hurdle can be taken by applying a recently developed methodology (Welkenhuysen et al., 2013). This policy support system (PSS) consists of two parts, PSS Explorer and PSS III simulator. In brief, the methodology is based on expert judgements of potential reservoirs. These assessments can provide the best available data, including the expert's experience and possibly confidential data, without disclosing specific data. The geo-techno-economic calculation scheme PSS Explorer uses the expert input to calculate for each individual reservoir an assessment of the practical capacity (as probability density functions), in function of an acceptable price for storage. This practical capacity can then be used by the techno-economic PSS III simulator to perform advanced source-sink matching until 2050 and thus provide the matched reservoir capacity. The analysed reservoirs are 7 active or abandoned oil and gas reservoirs in Austria. The simulation of the electricity and iron & steel sector of Austria resulted in the estimation of the geological storage potential, taking into account geological, technological and

  14. Monetizing Leakage Risk of Geologic CO2 Storage using Wellbore Permeability Frequency Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, Jeffrey; Fitts, Jeffrey; Peters, Catherine; Wilson, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) may be captured from large point sources (e.g., coal-fired power plants, oil refineries, cement manufacturers) and injected into deep sedimentary basins for storage, or sequestration, from the atmosphere. This technology—CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS)—may be a significant component of the portfolio of technologies deployed to mitigate climate change. But injected CO2, or the brine it displaces, may leak from the storage reservoir through a variety of natural and manmade pathways, including existing wells and wellbores. Such leakage will incur costs to a variety of stakeholders, which may affect the desirability of potential CO2 injection locations as well as the feasibility of the CCS approach writ large. Consequently, analyzing and monetizing leakage risk is necessary to develop CCS as a viable technological option to mitigate climate change. Risk is the product of the probability of an outcome and the impact of that outcome. Assessment of leakage risk from geologic CO2 storage reservoirs requires an analysis of the probabilities and magnitudes of leakage, identification of the outcomes that may result from leakage, and an assessment of the expected economic costs of those outcomes. One critical uncertainty regarding the rate and magnitude of leakage is determined by the leakiness of the well leakage pathway. This leakiness is characterized by a leakage permeability for the pathway, and recent work has sought to determine frequency distributions for the leakage permeabilities of wells and wellbores. We conduct a probabilistic analysis of leakage and monetized leakage risk for CO2 injection locations in the Michigan Sedimentary Basin (USA) using empirically derived frequency distributions for wellbore leakage permeabilities. To conduct this probabilistic risk analysis, we apply the RISCS (Risk Interference of Subsurface CO2 Storage) model (Bielicki et al, 2013a, 2012b) to injection into the Mt. Simon Sandstone. RISCS monetizes leakage risk

  15. Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    ABSTRACT Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage Rebecca Allen Geological CO2 storage is an engineering feat that has been undertaken around the world for more than two decades, thus accurate modeling of flow and transport behavior is of practical importance. Diffusive and convective transport are relevant processes for buoyancy-driven convection of CO2 into underlying fluid, a scenario that has received the attention of numerous modeling studies. While most studies focus on Darcy-scale modeling of this scenario, relatively little work exists at the pore-scale. In this work, properties evaluated at the pore-scale are used to investigate the transport behavior modeled at the Darcy-scale. We compute permeability and two different forms of tortuosity, namely hydraulic and diffusive. By generating various pore ge- ometries, we find hydraulic and diffusive tortuosity can be quantitatively different in the same pore geometry by up to a factor of ten. As such, we emphasize that these tortuosities should not be used interchangeably. We find pore geometries that are characterized by anisotropic permeability can also exhibit anisotropic diffusive tortuosity. This finding has important implications for buoyancy-driven convection modeling; when representing the geological formation with an anisotropic permeabil- ity, it is more realistic to also account for an anisotropic diffusivity. By implementing a non-dimensional model that includes both a vertically and horizontally orientated 5 Rayleigh number, we interpret our findings according to the combined effect of the anisotropy from permeability and diffusive tortuosity. In particular, we observe the Rayleigh ratio may either dampen or enhance the diffusing front, and our simulation data is used to express the time of convective onset as a function of the Rayleigh ratio. Also, we implement a lattice Boltzmann model for thermal convective flows, which we treat as an analog for

  16. Super-optimal CO2 reduces seed yield but not vegetative growth in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotenhuis, T. P.; Bugbee, B.

    1997-01-01

    Although terrestrial atmospheric CO2 levels will not reach 1000 micromoles mol-1 (0.1%) for decades, CO2 levels in growth chambers and greenhouses routinely exceed that concentration. CO2 levels in life support systems in space can exceed 10000 micromoles mol-1(1%). Numerous studies have examined CO2 effects up to 1000 micromoles mol-1, but biochemical measurements indicate that the beneficial effects of CO2 can continue beyond this concentration. We studied the effects of near-optimal (approximately 1200 micromoles mol-1) and super-optimal CO2 levels (2400 micromoles mol-1) on yield of two cultivars of hydroponically grown wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in 12 trials in growth chambers. Increasing CO2 from sub-optimal to near-optimal (350-1200 micromoles mol-1) increased vegetative growth by 25% and seed yield by 15% in both cultivars. Yield increases were primarily the result of an increased number of heads per square meter. Further elevation of CO2 to 2500 micromoles mol-1 reduced seed yield by 22% (P seeds per head by 10% and mass per seed by 11%. The toxic effect of CO2 was similar over a range of light levels from half to full sunlight. Subsequent trials revealed that super-optimal CO2 during the interval between 2 wk before and after anthesis mimicked the effect of constant super-optimal CO2. Furthermore, near-optimal CO2 during the same interval mimicked the effect of constant near-optimal CO2. Nutrient concentration of leaves and heads was not affected by CO2. These results suggest that super-optimal CO2 inhibits some process that occurs near the time of seed set resulting in decreased seed set, seed mass, and yield.

  17. Modelling CO2 flow in naturally fractured geological media using MINC and multiple subregion upscaling procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatomir, Alexandru Bogdan A. C.; Flemisch, Bernd; Class, Holger; Helmig, Rainer; Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Geological storage of CO2 represents one viable solution to reduce greenhouse gas emission in the atmosphere. Potential leakage of CO2 storage can occur through networks of interconnected fractures. The geometrical complexity of these networks is often very high involving fractures occurring at various scales and having hierarchical structures. Such multiphase flow systems are usually hard to solve with a discrete fracture modelling (DFM) approach. Therefore, continuum fracture models assuming average properties are usually preferred. The multiple interacting continua (MINC) model is an extension of the classic double porosity model (Warren and Root, 1963) which accounts for the non-linear behaviour of the matrix-fracture interactions. For CO2 storage applications the transient representation of the inter-porosity two phase flow plays an important role. This study tests the accuracy and computational efficiency of the MINC method complemented with the multiple sub-region (MSR) upscaling procedure versus the DFM. The two phase flow MINC simulator is implemented in the free-open source numerical toolbox DuMux (www.dumux.org). The MSR (Gong et al., 2009) determines the inter-porosity terms by solving simplified local single-phase flow problems. The DFM is considered as the reference solution. The numerical examples consider a quasi-1D reservoir with a quadratic fracture system , a five-spot radial symmetric reservoir, and a completely random generated fracture system. Keywords: MINC, upscaling, two-phase flow, fractured porous media, discrete fracture model, continuum fracture model

  18. Chemical Processes with Supercritical CO2 in Engineered Geologic Systems: Significance, Previous Study, and Path Forward (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T.; Pruess, K.

    2009-12-01

    Chemical reactions with dissolved CO2 in the aqueous phase have long been considered in fundamental geosciences and practical applications. Recently, studies on geologic carbon sequestration and enhanced geothermal systems using CO2 as heat transmission fluid have brought new interests in chemical reaction processes directly with supercritical CO2 (scCO2, or gas phase). In the vicinity of a CO2 injection well, the aqueous fluid initially present in a geological formation would be quickly removed by dissolution (evaporation) into the flowing gas stream and by immiscible displacement by the scCO2, creating a gas phase dominant zone. In this zone, the water evaporation could cause formation dry-out and precipitation of salt near the injection well, reducing formation porosity, permeability, and injectivity. The scCO2 may directly attack well construction materials such as cement. Over time, the gas phase will tend to migrate upwards towards the caprock because the density of the scCO2 is lower than that of the aqueous phase. In the upper portions of the reservoir, the scCO2 will directly react with caprock minerals and alter the hydrological properties and mechanical strength. On the other hand, the scCO2 phase will maintain the dissolution into the aqueous phase, lowering pH, inducing mineral dissolution, complexing with dissolved cations, increasing CO2 solubility, increasing the density of the aqueous phase, and promoting “convective mixing”. Chemical processes are quite different in the scCO2 dominant geologic systems. The absence of an aqueous phase poses unique questions, as little is presently known about the chemistry of non-aqueous systems. Additional issues arise from the reactivity of water that is dissolved in the ScCO2 phase. In this presentation, the author will discuss the importance, state of the studies performed, and future research directions.

  19. 清洁煤技术与CO2地质封存%Clean coal technology and CO2 geological storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳迎红; 马丽

    2014-01-01

    To improve the utilization rate of coal and speed up clean,efficiency and low carbonization of coal industry,provide that the tra-ditional coal conversion technologies should be replaced by efficient and clean technologies.Investigate the clean coal technologies and CO2 geological storage technologies,especially the technologies of CO2 storage in saline formation.The way stores large quantities of CO2 safely and stably.The method also solves the problems of CO2 emissions due to China̓s energy structure.%中国能源资源特点决定现在以煤为主的消费结构,但煤炭在消费过程中存在高污染和低效率的问题,因此为提高资源利用率,煤炭行业面临结构调整。煤炭行业的清洁化、高效化、低碳化将是产业发展方向,煤炭高效洁净转化将取代传统的转化技术,如何解决煤炭利用过程中产生的CO2是清洁煤技术面临的新问题。通过研究清洁煤技术与CO2地质封存技术,特别是深部盐水层封存技术,为煤炭利用中产生的CO2排放提供了一种大规模、安全、稳定的存储方式,从而解决目前中国能源结构造成的CO2排放问题。

  20. How CO2 Leakage May Impact the Role of Geologic Carbon Storage in Climate Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C. A.; Deng, H.; Bielicki, J. M.; Fitts, J. P.; Oppenheimer, M.

    2014-12-01

    Among CCUS technologies (Carbon Capture Utilization and Sequestration), geological storage of CO2 has a large potential to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, but confidence in its deployment is often clouded by the possibility and cost of leakage. In this study, we took the Michigan sedimentary basin as an example to investigate the monetized risks associated with leakage, using the Risk Interference of Subsurface CO2 Storage (RISCS) model. The model accounts for spatial heterogeneity and variability of hydraulic properties of the subsurface system and permeability of potential leaking wells. In terms of costs, the model quantifies the financial consequences of CO2 escaping back to the atmosphere as well as the costs incurred if CO2 or brine leaks into overlying formations and interferes with other subsurface activities or resources. The monetized leakage risks derived from the RISCS model were then used to modify existing cost curves by shifting them upwards and changing their curvatures. The modified cost curves were used in the integrated assessment model - GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model), which provides policy-relevant results to help inform the potential role of CCUS in future energy systems when carbon mitigation targets and incentives are in place. The results showed that the extent of leakage risks has a significant effect on the extent of CCUS deployment. Under more stringent carbon mitigation policies such as a high carbon tax, higher leakage risks can be afforded and incorporating leakage risks will have a smaller impact on CCUS deployment. Alternatively, if the leakage risks were accounted for by charging a fixed premium, similar to how the risk of nuclear waste disposal is treated, the contribution of CCUS in mitigating climate change varies, depending on the value of the premium.

  1. CO2 leakage up from a geological storage site to shallow fresh groundwater: CO2-water-rock interaction assessment and development of sensitive monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humez, Pauline; Audigane, Pascal; Lions, Julie; Négrel, Philippe; Lagneau, Vincent

    2010-05-01

    The assessment of environmental impacts of carbon dioxide storage in geological repository requires the investigation of the potential CO2 leakage back into fresh groundwater, particularly with respect to protected groundwater reserves. We are starting a new project with the aims of developing sensitive monitoring techniques in order to detect potential CO2 leaks and their magnitude as well as their geochemical impacts on the groundwater. In a predictive approach goal, a modelling study of the geochemical impact on fresh groundwaters of a CO2 intrusion during geological storage was performed and serves as a basis for the development of sensitive monitoring techniques (e.g. isotope tracing). Then, isotopic monitoring opportunities will be explored. A modeling study of the geochemical impact on fresh groundwaters of the ingress of CO2 during geological storage was conducted. The 3D model includes (i) storage saline aquifer, (ii) impacted overlying aquifer containing freshwater and (iii) a leakage path way up through an abandoned well represented as 1D porous medium and corresponding to the cement-rock formation interface. This model was used to simulate the supercritical CO2 migration path and the interaction between the fluid and the host rock. The model uses the carbonate saline Dogger aquifer in the Paris Basin as the storage reservoir and the Albian formation (located above the Dogger) as the fresh groundwater aquifer. The principal geochemical process simulated is the acidification of groundwaters due to CO2 dissolution, inducing the dissolution of minerals in the Albian formation. Knowing the mineralogical composition of the impacted aquifer is therefore crucial if we are to correctly determine which elements might be release during the arrival of CO2 in freshwater. Estimates of increases in element concentrations are proposed along with a direct control of the injection procedure. This predictive modeling approach impact of CO2 intrusion to fresh groundwaters

  2. A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capturefrom Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 GeologicStorage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, J.A.

    2006-02-23

    Conventional coal-burning power plants are major contributors of excess CO2 to the atmospheric inventory. Because such plants are stationary, they are particularly amenable to CO2 capture and disposal by deep injection into confined geologic formations. However, the energy penalty for CO2 separation and compression is steep, and could lead to a 30-40 percent reduction in useable power output. Integrated gas combined cycle (IGCC) plants are thermodynamically more efficient, i.e.,produce less CO2 for a given power output, and are more suitable for CO2 capture. Therefore, if CO2 capture and deep subsurface disposal were to be considered seriously, the preferred approach would be to build replacement IGCC plants with integrated CO2 capture, rather than retrofit existing conventional plants. Coal contains minor quantities of sulfur and nitrogen compounds, which are of concern, as their release into the atmosphere leads to the formation of urban ozone and acid rain, the destruction of stratospheric ozone, and global warming. Coal also contains many trace elements that are potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. During CO2 separation and capture, these constituents could inadvertently contaminate the separated CO2 and be co-injected. The concentrations and speciation of the co-injected contaminants would differ markedly, depending on whether CO2 is captured during the operation of a conventional or an IGCC plant, and the specific nature of the plant design and CO2 separation technology. However, regardless of plant design or separation procedures, most of the hazardous constituents effectively partition into the solid waste residue. This would lead to an approximately two order of magnitude reduction in contaminant concentration compared with that present in the coal. Potential exceptions are Hg in conventional plants, and Hg and possibly Cd, Mo and Pb in IGCC plants. CO2 capture and injection disposal could afford an opportunity to deliberately capture

  3. Mesoscale Assessment of CO2 Storage Potential and Geological Suitability for Target Area Selection in the Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Diao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In China, south of the Yangtze River, there are a large number of carbon sources, while the Sichuan Basin is the largest sedimentary basin; it makes sense to select the targets for CO2 geological storage (CGUS early demonstration. For CO2 enhanced oil and gas, coal bed methane recovery (CO2-EOR, EGR, and ECBM, or storage in these depleted fields, the existing oil, gas fields, or coal seams could be the target areas in the mesoscale. This paper proposed a methodology of GIS superimposed multisource information assessment of geological suitability for CO2 enhanced water recovery (CO2-EWR or only storage in deep saline aquifers. The potential per unit area of deep saline aquifers CO2 storage in Central Sichuan is generally greater than 50 × 104 t/km2 at P50 probability level, with Xujiahe group being the main reservoir. CO2 storage potential of depleted gas fields is 53.73 × 108 t, while it is 33.85 × 108 t by using CO2-EGR technology. This paper recommended that early implementation of CGUS could be carried out in the deep saline aquifers and depleted gas fields in the Sichuan Basin, especially that of the latter because of excellent traps, rich geological data, and well-run infrastructures.

  4. Influence of Chemical, Mechanical, and Transport Processes on Wellbore Leakage from Geologic CO2 Storage Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Susan A; Iyer, Jaisree; Walsh, Stuart D C

    2017-08-15

    Wells are considered to be high-risk pathways for fluid leakage from geologic CO2 storage reservoirs, because breaches in this engineered system have the potential to connect the reservoir to groundwater resources and the atmosphere. Given these concerns, a few studies have assessed leakage risk by evaluating regulatory records, often self-reported, documenting leakage in gas fields. Leakage is thought to be governed largely by initial well-construction quality and the method of well abandonment. The geologic carbon storage community has raised further concerns because acidic fluids in the CO2 storage reservoir, alkaline cement meant to isolate the reservoir fluids from the overlying strata, and steel casings in wells are inherently reactive systems. This is of particular concern for storage of CO2 in depleted oil and gas reservoirs with numerous legacy wells engineered to variable standards. Research suggests that leakage risks are not as great as initially perceived because chemical and mechanical alteration of cement has the capacity to seal damaged zones. Our work centers on defining the coupled chemical and mechanical processes governing flow in damaged zones in wells. We have developed process-based models, constrained by experiments, to better understand and forecast leakage risk. Leakage pathways can be sealed by precipitation of carbonate minerals in the fractures and deformation of the reacted cement. High reactivity of cement hydroxides releases excess calcium that can precipitate as carbonate solids in the fracture network under low brine flow rates. If the flow is fast, then the brine remains undersaturated with respect to the solubility of calcium carbonate minerals, and zones depleted in calcium hydroxides, enriched in calcium carbonate precipitates, and made of amorphous silicates leached of original cement minerals are formed. Under confining pressure, the reacted cement is compressed, which reduces permeability and lowers leakage risks. The

  5. Pore scale modeling of reactive transport involved in geologic CO2 sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Qinjin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lichtner, Peter C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Viswanathan, Hari S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdel-fattah, Amr I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We apply a multi-component reactive transport lattice Boltzmann model developed in previolls studies to modeling the injection of a C02 saturated brine into various porous media structures at temperature T=25 and 80 C. The porous media are originally consisted of calcite. A chemical system consisting of Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H+, CO2(aq), and CI-is considered. The fluid flow, advection and diHusion of aqueous species, homogeneous reactions occurring in the bulk fluid, as weB as the dissolution of calcite and precipitation of dolomite are simulated at the pore scale. The effects of porous media structure on reactive transport are investigated. The results are compared with continuum scale modeling and the agreement and discrepancy are discussed. This work may shed some light on the fundamental physics occurring at the pore scale for reactive transport involved in geologic C02 sequestration.

  6. A contribution to risk analysis for leakage through abandoned wells in geological CO2 storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Andreas; Binning, Philip John; Johannsen, K.;

    2010-01-01

    reservoir database, holding data from over 1200 reservoirs An analytical risk equation is given, allowing the calculation of average risk due to multiple leaky wells with varying distance in the surrounding of the injection well. The reservoir parameters most affecting risk are identified. Using...... these results, the placement of an injection well can be optimized with respect to risk and uncertainty of leakage The risk and uncertainty assessment can be used to determine whether a site, compared to others, should be considered for further investigations or rejected for CO2 storage...

  7. Wettability-Water/brine Film Thickness Relationship and the Effect of Supercritical CO2 Pre-contact for CO2/brine/mineral Systems under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Song, Y.; Li, W.

    2016-12-01

    Injection CO2 into deep saline aquifers is one of the main options for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS). A successful GCS in saline aquifers requires full knowledge about CO2/brine/mineral systems under sequestration conditions to reduce uncertainties during subsurface storage of CO2. Adsorbed water film thickness and wettability on mineral surfaces are two key characteristics for CO2/brine/mineral systems. Wettability and water/brine film thickness have been measured experimentally and predicted by molecular simulation (MD) studies. However, these studies only consider the films apart from contact angles. Investigations on wettability for CO2/brine/mineral systems only consider contact angles without measurements on film thickness. The relationship between film thicknesses with water contact angles is open to questions. In this paper, MD simulations have been performed to investigate the interrelationship between water film thicknesses and water contact angles. Three silica surfaces with different silanol group number densities (Q3, Q3-50%, Q3/Q4) were selected to represent silica surfaces with different wettabilities. We found that as water contact angle increases, the film thickness decreases. We also studied the effect of CO2-mineral pre-contact and found that: on Q3 surface, if a CO2 bubble was pre-contacted with the surface, it can remain on the surface without forming a water film; however, if a CO2 bubble was placed certain distances away from the surface, it formed a water film. Wettability analysis revealed that on the same surface, water contact angle was larger when there was no water film. These findings show that on some silica surfaces, water film may be destroyed by supercritical CO2 even the silica surfaces are hydrophilic. A water film rupture mechanism was propsed for CO2 adhesion on mineral surfaces [Wang (2013) Environ. Sci. Technol. 47, 11858; Zhang (2016) Environ. Sci. Technol. Lett. 10.1021/acs.estlett.5b00359]. The rupture of water film

  8. Highly optimized CO2 capture by inexpensive nanoporous covalent organic polymers and their amine composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage and utilization requires effective capture strategies that limit energy penalties. Polyethylenimine (PEI)-impregnated covalent organic polymers (COPs) with a high CO2 adsorption capacity are successfully prepared in this study. A low cost COP with a high specific surface area is suitable for PEI loading to achieve high CO2 adsorption, and the optimal PEI loading is 36 wt%. Though the adsorbed amount of CO2 on amine impregnated COPs slightly decreased with increasing adsorption temperature, CO2/N2 selectivity is significantly improved at higher temperatures. The adsorption of CO2 on the sorbent is very fast, and a sorption equilibrium (10% wt) was achieved within 5 min at 313 K under the flow of simulated flue gas streams. The CO2 capture efficiency of this sorbent is not affected under repetitive adsorption-desorption cycles. The highest CO2 capture capacity of 75 mg g(-1) at 0.15 bar is achieved under dry CO2 capture however it is enhanced to 100 mg g(-1) in the mixed gas flow containing humid 15% CO2. Sorbents were found to be thermally stable up to at least 200 °C. TGA and FTIR studies confirmed the loading of PEIs on COPs. This sorbent with high and fast CO2 sorption exhibits a very promising application in direct CO2 capture from flue gas.

  9. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Helen Kerr

    2003-08-01

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making

  10. CO2 reaction with hydrated class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions: effects of flyash admixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutchko, Barbara G; Strazisar, Brian R; Huerta, Nicolas; Lowry, Gregory V; Dzombak, David A; Thaulow, Niels

    2009-05-15

    The rate and mechanism of reaction of pozzolan-amended Class H cement exposed to both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine were determined under geologic sequestration conditions to assess the potential impact of cement degradation in existing, wells on CO2 storage integrity. The pozzolan additive chosen, Type F flyash, is the most common additive used in cements for well sealing in oil-gas field operations. The 35:65 and 65:35 (v/v) pozzolan-cement blends were exposed to supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine and underwent cement carbonation. Extrapolation of the carbonation rate for the 35:65 case suggests a penetration depth of 170-180 mm for both the CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2 after 30 years. Despite alteration in both pozzolan systems, the reacted cement remained relatively impermeable to fluid flow after exposure to brine solution saturated with CO2, with values well below the American Petroleum Institute recommended maximum well cement permeability of 200 microD. Analyses of 50: 50 pozzolan-cement cores from a production well in a sandstone reservoir exhibited carbonation and low permeability to brine solution saturated with CO2, which are consistent with our laboratory findings.

  11. Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon SequestrationSites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2005-06-17

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. One of the concerns of geologic carbon sequestration is that injected CO{sub 2} may leak out of the intended storage formation, migrate to the near-surface environment, and seep out of the ground or into surface water. In this research, we investigate the process of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage into saturated sediments and overlying surface water bodies such as rivers, lakes, wetlands, and continental shelf marine environments. Natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are well studied and provide insight into the expected transport mechanisms and fate of seepage fluxes of similar magnitude. Also, natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are pervasive in surface water environments at levels that may mask low-level carbon sequestration leakage and seepage. Extreme examples are the well known volcanic lakes in Cameroon where lake water supersaturated with respect to CO{sub 2} overturned and degassed with lethal effects. Standard bubble formation and hydrostatics are applicable to CO{sub 2} bubbles in surface water. Bubble-rise velocity in surface water is a function of bubble size and reaches a maximum of approximately 30 cm s{sup -1} at a bubble radius of 0.7 mm. Bubble rise in saturated porous media below surface water is affected by surface tension and buoyancy forces, along with the solid matrix pore structure. For medium and fine grain sizes, surface tension forces dominate and gas transport tends to occur as channel flow rather than bubble flow. For coarse porous media such as gravels and coarse sand, buoyancy dominates and the maximum bubble rise velocity is predicted to be approximately 18 cm s{sup -1}. Liquid CO{sub 2} bubbles rise slower in water than gaseous CO{sub 2} bubbles due to the smaller density contrast. A comparison of ebullition (i.e., bubble formation) and resulting bubble flow versus dispersive gas transport for CO

  12. Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon SequestrationSites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2005-06-17

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. One of the concerns of geologic carbon sequestration is that injected CO{sub 2} may leak out of the intended storage formation, migrate to the near-surface environment, and seep out of the ground or into surface water. In this research, we investigate the process of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage into saturated sediments and overlying surface water bodies such as rivers, lakes, wetlands, and continental shelf marine environments. Natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are well studied and provide insight into the expected transport mechanisms and fate of seepage fluxes of similar magnitude. Also, natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are pervasive in surface water environments at levels that may mask low-level carbon sequestration leakage and seepage. Extreme examples are the well known volcanic lakes in Cameroon where lake water supersaturated with respect to CO{sub 2} overturned and degassed with lethal effects. Standard bubble formation and hydrostatics are applicable to CO{sub 2} bubbles in surface water. Bubble-rise velocity in surface water is a function of bubble size and reaches a maximum of approximately 30 cm s{sup -1} at a bubble radius of 0.7 mm. Bubble rise in saturated porous media below surface water is affected by surface tension and buoyancy forces, along with the solid matrix pore structure. For medium and fine grain sizes, surface tension forces dominate and gas transport tends to occur as channel flow rather than bubble flow. For coarse porous media such as gravels and coarse sand, buoyancy dominates and the maximum bubble rise velocity is predicted to be approximately 18 cm s{sup -1}. Liquid CO{sub 2} bubbles rise slower in water than gaseous CO{sub 2} bubbles due to the smaller density contrast. A comparison of ebullition (i.e., bubble formation) and resulting bubble flow versus dispersive gas transport for CO

  13. Review on the Present and Future Prospects for CO2 Geological Storage in the Foreign Countries%国外 CO2地质储存现状与展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛秀珍

    2012-01-01

      Emission of greenhouse gas CO2 have given the powerful impact on the global climate as environment as well, which has got the great attention of the countries all over the world. Mitigation of CO2 emission to the at-mosphere is extremely important for the sustainable development. CO2 geological storage is one of the effective methods to mitigate such emission. This article summarizes the present and future prospects of the CO2 geologi-cal storage in the foreign countries through the following respects:1) CO2 trapping mechanism, 2) CO2 geological storage, 3) current situation and future of the storage projects, 4) capacity estimation of the storage sites, 5) moni-toring techniques, 6) simulation tools and 7) cost of the storage.%  温室气体CO2的大量排放给全球气候和环境带来的巨大影响,受到了世界各国的关注.实现CO2的深度减排是人类可持续发展的必由之路.CO2地质储存是缓解碳排放行之有效的方法之一.本文通过以下几方面论述了国外CO2地质储存的现状以及对未来的展望:1)CO2捕集机理,2)CO2地质储存,3)CO2地质储存项目现状与未来预测,4) CO2地质储存场地储量评估,5)CO2地质储存监测技术,6)CO2地质储存模拟工具,7)CO2地质存储经费等.

  14. Geometry-coupled reactive fluid transport at the fracture scale -Application to CO 2 geologic storage

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Seunghee

    2015-08-19

    Water acidification follows CO2 injection and leads to reactive fluid transport through pores and rock fractures, with potential implications to reservoirs and wells in CO2 geologic storage and enhanced oil recovery. Kinetic rate laws for dissolution reactions in calcite and anorthite are combined with Navier-Stokes law and advection-diffusion transport to perform geometry-coupled numerical simulations in order to study the evolution of chemical reactions, species concentration and fracture morphology. Results are summarized as a function of two dimensionless parameters: the Damköhler number Da which is the ratio between advection and reaction times, and the transverse Peclet number Pe defined as the ratio between the time for diffusion across the fracture and the time for advection along the fracture. Reactant species are readily consumed near the inlet in a carbonate reservoir when the flow velocity is low (low transverse Peclet number and Da>10-1). At high flow velocities, diffusion fails to homogenize the concentration field across the fracture (high transverse Peclet number Pe>10-1). When the reaction rate is low as in anorthite reservoirs (Da<10-1) reactant species are more readily transported towards the outlet. At a given Peclet number, a lower Damköhler number causes the flow channel to experience a more uniform aperture enlargement along the length of the fracture. When the length-to-aperture ratio is sufficiently large, say l/d>30, the system response resembles the solution for 1-D reactive fluid transport. A decreased length-to-aperture ratio slows the diffusive transport of reactant species to the mineral fracture surface, and analyses of fracture networks must take into consideration both the length and slenderness of individual fractures in addition to Pe and Da numbers.

  15. A Numerical Modeling Study of Effect of Heterogeneity on Capillary Trapping of Geologically Sequestrated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Zhou, Q.; Trevisan, L.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Rodriguez, D.; Sakaki, T.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneities at multiple scales influence migration and trapping of geologically sequestrated CO2 during injection and post-injection periods. Understanding of small-scale processes is crucial to device upscaling methodologies for incorporating them into macroscopic-scale models. The upscaled models are in turn used to get insights into the complex field-scale processes involved in the migration of supercritical CO2. Theoretical research based on numerical model analysis presented in this study focuses on capillary entrapment in homogeneous and heterogeneous small-scale and intermediate-scale laboratory experiments with surrogate fluids, presented in a companion presentation (Treviso et al., 2011). An improved understanding of pore-scale and larger scale processes on capillary entrapment may be achieved by combining pore-scale and macroscopic-scale modeling approaches. Capillarity controlled entrapped non-wetting phase saturation in macroscopic-scale models is generally either provided as an input parameter after laboratory scale measurements or estimated empirically. A particle trajectory modeling approach with pore-scale physics included is used to gain insights to development of physically-based models for the capillary entrapment in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. The particle trajectory modeling generates functional relationships between phase saturation, entrapped phase saturation, hydraulic properties of the medium, and velocity of injected phase, which eventually are planned to be used for developing macroscopic scale models of capillary entrapment. The predictions of entrapped fluid saturation from the particle trajectory model are verified with measurements from the small scale experimental test systems. Macroscopic two-phase flow modeling approach with existing and modified constitutive models is tested by comparisons with both small-scale and intermediate-scale experimental results. T2VOC module based on TOUGH2 is used to simulate two

  16. Interactions between CO2, minerals, and toxic ions: Implications for CO2 leakage from deep geological storage (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, F.; Montes-Hernandez, G.

    2013-12-01

    The long-term injection of carbon dioxide into geological underground reservoirs may lead to leakage events that will enhance fluid-rock interactions and question the safety of these repositories. If injection of carbon dioxide into natural reservoirs has been shown to mobilize some species into the pore fluid, including heavy metals and other toxic ions, the detailed interactions remain still debated because two main processes could interact and modify fluid composition: on the one hand dissolution/precipitation reactions may release/incorporate trace elements, and on the other hand adsorption/desorption reactions on existing mineral surfaces may also mobilize or trap these elements. We analyze here, through laboratory experiments, a scenario of a carbon dioxide reservoir that leaks into a fresh water aquifer through a localized leakage zone such as a permeable fault zone localized in the caprock and enhance toxic ions mobilization. Our main goal is to evaluate the potential risks on potable water quality. In a series of experiments, we have injected carbon dioxide into a fresh water aquifer-like medium that contained carbonate and/or iron oxide particles, pure water, and various concentrations of trace elements (copper, arsenic, cadmium, and selenium, in various states of oxidation). This analogue and simplified medium has been chosen because it contains two minerals (calcite, goethite) widespread found in freshwater aquifers. The surface charge of these minerals may vary with pH and therefore control how trace elements are adsorbed or desorbed, depending on fluid composition. Our experiments show that these minerals could successfully prevent the remobilization of adsorbed Cu(II), Cd(II), Se(IV), and As(V) if carbon dioxide is intruded into a drinking water aquifer. Furthermore, a decrease in pH resulting from carbon dioxide intrusion could reactivate the adsorption of Se(IV) and As(V) if goethite and calcite are sufficiently available in the aquifer. Our

  17. CO2地质封存工程的潜在地质环境灾害风险及防范措施%Potential Geological and Environmental Risks and Its Prevention Measures for CO2 Geological Storage Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔振东; 刘大安; 曾荣树; 牛晶蕊

    2011-01-01

    CO2地质封存技术虽是有效减排CO2和提高石油、天然气等能源采收率的技术手段,但目前该技术尚处于发展阶段.CO2地质封存工程可能诱发一些潜在的地质环境灾害风险,如浅层地表垂向差异变形、可能诱发的断层活化及地震事件、CO2逃逸导致淡水含水层的污染、CO2泄漏富集危害附近人类健康和局部生态系统等.本文分析了上述潜在地质环境灾害风险及灾害诱发模式,并从科学选址、风险评估、工程监管、监测预警、应急补救等角度提出了具体的防范措施和工程指导原则,对CO2地质封存技术的安全性评估和工程实施阶段的风险管理具有重要的现实意义.%The CO2 geological storage technology has been considered as a promising way to effectively reduce CO2 emission and enhance the recovery rate of oil or gas. However, this technology is still in a developing stage and CO2 geological storage project may induce some potential geological and environmental risks, such as vertical deformation differences of the shallow surface, fault activation for triggering earthquakes, the pollution of freshwater aquifers, harms for human health and local ecosystems, and so on. The mentioned potential risks and its induction modes have been analyzed respectively. Then corresponding prevention principles and measures are suggested from such aspects as scientific site selection, risk assessment, project supervision, monitoring and pre-warning, and emergency reliefs. And this provides important practical implications for risk assessment and management of CO2 geological storage project.

  18. Accounting for geochemical alterations of caprock fracture permeability in basin-scale models of leakage from geologic CO2 reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B.; Fitts, J. P.; Dobossy, M.; Bielicki, J. M.; Peters, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Climate mitigation, public acceptance and energy, markets demand that the potential CO2 leakage rates from geologic storage reservoirs are predicted to be low and are known to a high level of certainty. Current approaches to predict CO2 leakage rates assume constant permeability of leakage pathways (e.g., wellbores, faults, fractures). A reactive transport model was developed to account for geochemical alterations that result in permeability evolution of leakage pathways. The one-dimensional reactive transport model was coupled with the basin-scale Estimating Leakage Semi-Analytical (ELSA) model to simulate CO2 and brine leakage through vertical caprock pathways for different CO2 storage reservoir sites and injection scenarios within the Mt. Simon and St. Peter sandstone formations of the Michigan basin. Mineral dissolution in the numerical reactive transport model expands leakage pathways and increases permeability as a result of calcite dissolution by reactions driven by CO2-acidified brine. A geochemical model compared kinetic and equilibrium treatments of calcite dissolution within each grid block for each time step. For a single fracture, we investigated the effect of the reactions on leakage by performing sensitivity analyses of fracture geometry, CO2 concentration, calcite abundance, initial permeability, and pressure gradient. Assuming that calcite dissolution reaches equilibrium at each time step produces unrealistic scenarios of buffering and permeability evolution within fractures. Therefore, the reactive transport model with a kinetic treatment of calcite dissolution was coupled to the ELSA model and used to compare brine and CO2 leakage rates at a variety of potential geologic storage sites within the Michigan basin. The results are used to construct maps based on the susceptibility to geochemically driven increases in leakage rates. These maps should provide useful and easily communicated inputs into decision-making processes for siting geologic CO2

  19. A data driven model for the impact of IFT and density variations on CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomeli, Mohammad A.; Riaz, Amir

    2017-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs and deep saline aquifers is one of the most promising solutions for decreasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. One of the important issues for CO2 storage in subsurface environments is the sealing efficiency of low-permeable cap-rocks overlying potential CO2 storage reservoirs. Though we focus on the effect of IFT in this study as a factor influencing sealing efficiency or storage capacity, other factors such as interfacial interactions, wettability, pore radius and interfacial mass transfer also affect the mobility and storage capacity of CO2 phase in the pore space. The study of the variation of IFT is however important because the pressure needed to penetrate a pore depends on both the pore size and the interfacial tension. Hence small variations in IFT can affect flow across a large population of pores. A novel model is proposed to find the IFT of the ternary systems (CO2/brine-salt) in a range of temperatures (300-373 K), pressures (50-250 bar), and up to 6 molal salinity applicable to CO2 storage in geological formations through a multi-variant non-linear regression of experimental data. The method uses a general empirical model for the quaternary system CO2/brine-salts that can be made to coincide with experimental data for a variety of solutions. We introduce correction parameters into the model, which compensates for uncertainties, and enforce agreement with experimental data. The results for IFT show a strong dependence on temperature, pressure, and salinity. The model has been found to describe the experimental data in the appropriate parameter space with reasonable precision. Finally, we use the new model to evaluate the effects of formation depth on the actual efficiency of CO2 storage. The results indicate that, in the case of CO2 storage in deep subsurface environments as a global-warming mitigation strategy, CO2 storage capacity increases with reservoir depth.

  20. Pore-scale Modeling on the Characterization of Kyeongsang Basin, South Korea for the Geological CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J.; Keehm, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is a green-house gas and is believed to be responsible for global warming and climate change. Many countries are looking for various techniques for effective storage of CO2 and the geological sequestration is regarded as the most economical and efficient option. For successful geological sequestration, accurate evaluation of physical properties of the target formation and their changes when CO2 is injected, is essential. Since physical property changes during CO2 injection are strongly dependent on the pore-scale details of the target formation, we used a series of pore-scale simulation techniques including CO2 injection simulation to estimate physical properties of CO2 bearing formations. The study area, Kyeongsang basin is located in southeastern part of Korea, which has many industrial complexes including power plants. We first obtained high-resolution 3D microstructures from core samples of the prospective formation. We performed a set of pore-scale simulation and estimated physical properties, such as porosity, permeability, electrical conductivity and velocity. Then we used lattice-Boltzmann two-phase flow simulation to mimic CO2 injection into the formation. During this simulation, a variety of microstructures with different CO2 saturation were obtained and we again performed pore-scale simulation to estimate the changes of physical properties as CO2 saturation increases. These quantitative interrelations between physical properties and CO2 saturation would be a valuable piece of information to evaluate the performance of the target formation. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Energy Resources R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 2010201020001A)

  1. Mineral Chemistry and Precipitation Kinetics of Dawsonite in the Geological Sequestration of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, R.; Carey, J. W.; Kaszuba, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    Dawsonite [NaAl(OH)2CO3] is a relatively rare mineral that may play an important role in the geological sequestration of CO2: thermodynamic and reactive transport calculations predict that dawsonite should precipitate under a variety of CO2 injection scenarios by dissolution of Al-bearing minerals in Na-bearing brine. The precipitation of dawsonite is potentially beneficial as a means of fixing the CO2 in solid form but could also modify porosity and permeability. The relative rarity of natural dawsonite occurrences, however, indicates that either appropriate CO2-rich environments are rare in nature or that dawsonite formation is inhibited or more complex than the simplified geochemical systems used in the model calculations. We have conducted synthesis experiments and dissolution studies to help understand precipitation dynamics, Na-K substitution, and solubility. Both Na- and K-dawsonite were readily synthesized from mixtures of (Na,K)HCO3 and gibbsite [Al(OH)3] at 150°C for 24 hours. [Syntheses were made in unstirred, closed ParrTM reaction vessels and consisted generally of 15 ml of H2O with 6 g (Na,K)HCO3 and sufficient Al-bearing mineral to achieve a (Na,K)/Al ratio of 8.] At lower temperatures, a 41% yield of dawsonite was achieved at 120°C; 1% at 94°C; and no reaction was observed at ≤75°C. In contrast, other Al-bearing minerals including albite, analcime and pyrophyllite at 150°C (28 days) and albite, pyrophyllite, and clinoptilolite at 200°C (66 days) showed no evidence of dawsonite formation but did yield analcime. Kaolinite, however, did produce 1% dawsonite at 75°C (40 days), 37% at 150°C (90 days), and some dawsonite in addition to a complex mixture of albite, cancrisilite, and other phases at 200°C (66 days). Thermodynamic calculations suggest that silica activity restricts the range of dawsonite stability and synthesis experiments with gibbsite-quartz and gibbsite-opal-CT were significantly different than gibbsite alone. At 150°C, the

  2. CO 2 Capture Rate Sensitivity Versus Purchase of CO 2 Quotas. Optimizing Investment Choice for Electricity Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Coussy Paula; Raynal Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Carbon capture technology (and associated storage), applied to power plants, reduces atmospheric CO2 emissions. This article demonstrates that, in the particular case of the deployment phase of CO2 capture technology during which CO2 quota price may be low, capturing less than 90% of total CO2 emissions from power plants can be economically attractive. Indeed, for an electric power company capture technology is interesting, only if the discounted marginal cost of captu...

  3. Heterogeneity-enhanced gas phase formation in shallow aquifers during leakage of CO2-saturated water from geologic sequestration sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plampin, Michael R.; Lassen, Rune N.; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Porter, Mark L.; Pawar, Rajesh J.; Jensen, Karsten H.; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2014-12-01

    A primary concern for geologic carbon storage is the potential for leakage of stored carbon dioxide (CO2) into the shallow subsurface where it could degrade the quality of groundwater and surface water. In order to predict and mitigate the potentially negative impacts of CO2 leakage, it is important to understand the physical processes that CO2 will undergo as it moves through naturally heterogeneous porous media formations. Previous studies have shown that heterogeneity can enhance the evolution of gas phase CO2 in some cases, but the conditions under which this occurs have not yet been quantitatively defined, nor tested through laboratory experiments. This study quantitatively investigates the effects of geologic heterogeneity on the process of gas phase CO2 evolution in shallow aquifers through an extensive set of experiments conducted in a column that was packed with layers of various test sands. Soil moisture sensors were utilized to observe the formation of gas phase near the porous media interfaces. Results indicate that the conditions under which heterogeneity controls gas phase evolution can be successfully predicted through analysis of simple parameters, including the dissolved CO2 concentration in the flowing water, the distance between the heterogeneity and the leakage location, and some fundamental properties of the porous media. Results also show that interfaces where a less permeable material overlies a more permeable material affect gas phase evolution more significantly than interfaces with the opposite layering.

  4. Integrated optimization of temperature, CO2, screen use and artificial lighting in greenhouse crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaslyng, J.M.; Körner, O.; Andreassen, A.U.;

    2005-01-01

    A leaf photosynthesis model is suggested for integrated optimization of temperature, CO2, screen use and artificial lighting in greenhouse crops. Three different approaches for the optimization are presented. First, results from greenhouse experiments with model based optimization are presented....... Second, a model-based analysis of a commercial grower's production possibility is shown. Third, results from a simulation of the effect of a new lighting strategy are demonstrated. The results demonstrate that it is possible to optimize plant production by using a model-based integrated optimization...... of temperature, CO2, and light in the greenhouse...

  5. Caprock and overburden processes in geological CO2 storage: An experimental study on sealing efficiency and mineral alterations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wollenweber, J.; Alles, S.a.; Kronimus, A.; Busch, A.; Stanjek, H.; Krooss, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive set of experimental and analytical methods has been used to characterise the sealing and fluid -transport properties of fine-grained (pelitic) sedimentary rocks under the pressure and temperature conditions of geological CO2 storage. The flow experiments were carried out on

  6. Caprock and overburden processes in geological CO2 storage: An experimental study on sealing efficiency and mineral alterations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wollenweber, J.; Alles, S.a.; Kronimus, A.; Busch, A.; Stanjek, H.; Krooss, B.M.

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive set of experimental and analytical methods has been used to characterise the sealing and fluid -transport properties of fine-grained (pelitic) sedimentary rocks under the pressure and temperature conditions of geological CO2 storage. The flow experiments were carried out on cylindric

  7. Summary Report on 2011 CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop, Berkeley, June 1-2, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help with the research planning and prioritization, EPA and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on “CO2 Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources.” The objective of the workshop, held at LBNL on June 1–2, 2011, was to evaluate the current s...

  8. Economic CO2 network optimization model COCATE European project (2010-2013)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coussy, P.; Roussanaly, S.; Bureau-Cauchois, G.; Wildenborg, T.

    2013-01-01

    The COCATE project is a three-year collaboration project under the EU 7th framework program for research. One of the objective of COCATE project is to tackle the problems of rolling out a shared transportation infrastructure capable of connecting geological storage sites with various CO2 emitting

  9. CO2-Brine-Iron-bearing Clay Mineral Interactions: Surface Area Changes and Fracture-Filling Potentials in Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Y.; Hu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) is a promising option to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emission from coal-fired power plants. The injected CO2 in GCS sites can induce dissolution of rocks and secondary mineral formation, potentially change the physical properties of the geological formations, and thus influence the transport and injectivity of CO2. However, most of the relevant studies are based on hydrological transport, using simulation models rather than studying actual interfacial chemical reactions. The mechanisms and kinetics of interfacial reactions among supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-saline water-rock surfaces at the molecular scale and their impacts on CO2 leakage have not been well understood. This research investigated the effects of various environmental factors (such as temperature, pressure, salinity, and different metal ion and organic-containing brine) on the dissolution and surface morphological changes of clay minerals. In this work, iron-bearing clay mineral, biotite [K(Mg,Fe)3AlSi3O10(OH,F)2], was used for model clay minerals in potential GCS sites. Both fluid/solid chemistry analysis and interfacial topographic studies were conducted to investigate the dissolution/precipitation on clay mineral surfaces under GCS conditions in high salinity systems. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the interfacial surface morphology changes were observed. Shortly after a CO2 pressure of 102 atm is applied at 95oC, in situ pH of solutions was 3.15 ± 0.10. The early intrinsic dissolution rates of biotite were 8.4 ± 2.8 × 10-13 and 11.2 ± 3.0 × 10-13 mol Si m-2s-1 in water and NaCl solution, respectively. At the early stage of reaction, fast growth of fibrous illite on biotite basal planes was observed. After 22-70 h reaction, the biotite basal surface cracked, resulting in illite detaching from the surfaced. Later, the cracked surface layer was released into solution, thus the inner layer was exposed as a renewed

  10. Study of optimal discharge pressure of compressor in CO2 refrigerating trans-critical cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Liehu; Wang Ruixiang; Li Qingdong; Wu Yezheng

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a carbon dioxide trans-critical refrigerating system which is different from a conventional subcritical refrigerating cycle was studied. The trans-critical carbon dioxide refrigerating systems are based on the Gustav Lorntzen cycle. Emphasis was focused on how to determine the optimal discharge pressure of compressor in CO2 trans-critical cycle. The factors related with the optimal discharge pressure were analyzed. A formula was developed based on cycle simulation, which could be used to predict the optimal discharge pressure of a basic CO2 trans-critical cycle. After further studies on CO2 trans-critical cycles with a regenerator or expander, two more formulas were also developed. These formulas could provide an access to improve the COP of CO2 trans-critical cycle.

  11. [Optimization for supercritical CO2 extraction with response surface methodology of Prunus armeniaca oil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei-Fei; Wu, Yan; Ge, Fa-Huan

    2012-03-01

    To optimize the extraction conditions of Prunus armeniaca oil by Supercritical CO2 extraction and identify its components by GC-MS. Optimized of SFE-CO extraction by response surface methodology and used GC-MS to analysis Prunus armeniaca oil compounds. Established the model of an equation for the extraction rate of Prunus armeniaca oil by supercritical CO2 extraction, and the optimal parameters for the supercritical CO2 extraction determined by the equation were: the extraction pressure was 27 MPa, temperature was 39 degrees C, the extraction rate of Prunus armeniaca oil was 44.5%. 16 main compounds of Prunus armeniaca oil extracted by supercritical CO2 were identified by GC-MS, unsaturated fatty acids were 92.6%. This process is simple, and can be used for the extraction of Prunus armeniaca oil.

  12. [The optimation of extraction technology of chuanxiong and xiangfu compatibility by SFE-CO2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing; Li, Yuan; Li, Mei; Huang, Kai-Ming

    2013-02-01

    To optimize the extraction conditions of Chuanxiong and Xiangfu compatibility by supercritical CO2 and control the quality of the extract. The orthogonal design experiments were used to select the optimal conditions and the factors were extraction pressure, extraction temperature, extraction time and flow rate of CO2. The extraction rate was used as inspection index. The contents of alpha-cyperolone and butenyl were detected by HPLC. The optimal conditions were as follows: extraction pressure 25 Mpa, extraction temperature 45 degrees C, extraction time 2 h, flow rate of CO2 20 Kg/h. The average content of alpha-cyperolone, butenyl was 3.26%, 1.50% respectively. The method of supercritical CO2 extraction is reliable and feasible and can be used in industry. The quality of the extract is stable and controlled.

  13. The European FP7 ULTimateCO2 project: A comprehensive approach to study the long term fate of CO2 geological storage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audigane, P.; Brown, S.; Dimier, A.; Pearce, J.; Frykman, P.; Maurand, N.; Le Gallo, Y.; Spiers, C. J.; Cremer, H.; Rutters, H.; Yalamas, T.

    2013-12-01

    The European FP7 ULTimateCO2 project aims at significantly advance our knowledge of specific processes that could influence the long-term fate of geologically stored CO2: i) trapping mechanisms, ii) fluid-rock interactions and effects on mechanical integrity of fractured caprock and faulted systems and iii) leakage due to mechanical and chemical damage in the well vicinity, iv) brine displacement and fluid mixing at regional scale. A realistic framework is ensured through collaboration with two demonstration sites in deep saline sandstone formations: the onshore former NER300 West Lorraine candidate in France (ArcelorMittal GeoLorraine) and the offshore EEPR Don Valley (former Hatfield) site in UK operated by National Grid. Static earth models have been generated at reservoir and basin scale to evaluate both trapping mechanisms and fluid displacement at short (injection) and long (post injection) time scales. Geochemical trapping and reservoir behaviour is addressed through experimental approaches using sandstone core materials in batch reactive mode with CO2 and impurities at reservoir pressure and temperature conditions and through geochemical simulations. Collection of data has been generated from natural and industrial (oil industry) analogues on the fluid flow and mechanical properties, structure, and mineralogy of faults and fractures that could affect the long-term storage capacity of underground CO2 storage sites. Three inter-related lines of laboratory experiments investigate the long-term evolution of the mechanical properties and sealing integrity of fractured and faulted caprocks using Opalinus clay of Mont Terri Gallery (Switzerland) (OPA), an analogue for caprock well investigated in the past for nuclear waste disposal purpose: - Characterization of elastic parameters in intact samples by measuring strain during an axial experiment, - A recording of hydraulic fracture flow properties by loading and shearing samples in order to create a 'realistic

  14. CO2 Capture Rate Sensitivity Versus Purchase of CO2 Quotas. Optimizing Investment Choice for Electricity Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coussy Paula

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon capture technology (and associated storage, applied to power plants, reduces atmospheric CO2 emissions. This article demonstrates that, in the particular case of the deployment phase of CO2 capture technology during which CO2 quota price may be low, capturing less than 90% of total CO2 emissions from power plants can be economically attractive. Indeed, for an electric power company capture technology is interesting, only if the discounted marginal cost of capture is lower than the discounted marginal cost of purchased quotas. When CO2 price is low, it is interesting to have flexibility and reduce the overall capture rate of the site, by stopping the capture system of one of the combustion trains if the site has multiple ones, or by adopting less than 90% CO2 capture rate.

  15. Gas Membrane Sensor Technique for in-situ Downhole Detection of Gases Applied During Geological Storage of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, M.; Erzinger, J.; Kujawa, C.; Group, C.

    2008-12-01

    The geological storage of CO2 in deep saline aquifers is regarded as a possible technology for the reduction of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. However, comprehensive research is still needed to better understand the behaviour of CO2 during and after storage. Therefore, we developed and applied a new, innovative geochemical monitoring tool for the real time and in-situ determination of CO2 and other gases in the underground and in bore holes. The method uses a phase separating silicone membrane, permeable for gases, in order to separate gases dissolved in borehole fluids, water and brines. Argon is used as a carrier gas to conduct the collected gases through capillaries to the surface. Here, the gas phase is analyzed in real-time with a portable mass spectrometer for all permanent gases. In addition, gas samples may be collected for detailed investigations in the laboratory. Downhole extraction and on-line determination of gases dissolved in brines using this gas membrane sensor (GMS) technique was successful applied at the scientific CO2SINK test site in Ketzin, Germany (sandstone aquifer). GMSs together with temperature and pressure probes were installed in two approx. 700m deep observation holes, drilled in 50m and 100m distance from the CO2 injection well. Hydraulic pressure in the observation wells rose gradually during injection of CO2. Increasing reservoir gas concentrations of helium, hydrogen, methane, and nitrogen as well as the arrival of the added krypton tracer were determined shortly before the injected CO2 appeared. The breakthrough of CO2 into the observation well, in 50m distance, was recorded after 531.5 tons of CO2 were injected.

  16. Parameter Optimization on Experimental Study to Reduce Ammonia Escape in CO2 Absorption by Ammonia Scrubbing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Leng; Jianmin Gao; Mingyue He; Min Xie; Qian Du; Rui Sun; Shaohua Wu

    2016-01-01

    In order to research ammonia escape in CO2 absorption by ammonia scrubbing, ammonia escape was studied in CO2 absorption process using the bubbling reactor in different conditions as gas flow rate, CO2 ratio, absorbent temperature and ammonia concentration and quantity of escaped ammonia was measured by chemical titration. The results indicated that, the amount of ammonia escape can be around 20% of original amount in 90 min and the escaped amount will increase with the rise of gas flow rate, absorbent temperature, concentration of ammonia while decrease as CO2 ratio goes up. Through the analysis of the law of ammonia escape, at the same time, combined with ammonia escape and the influence of the relationship between the CO2 absorption efficiency, reducing ammonia escape working condition parameter optimization is given.

  17. Geological characterization of Italian reservoirs and numerical 3D modelling of CO2 storage scenarios into saline aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, S.; Moia, F.; Guandalini, R.; Cappelletti, F.

    2012-04-01

    The research activities carried out by the Environment and Sustainable Development Department of RSE S.p.A. aim to evaluate the feasibility of CO2 geological sequestration in Italy, with particular reference to the storage into saline aquifers. The identification and geological characterization of the Italian potential storage sites, together with the study of the temporal and spatial evolution of the CO2 plume within the caprock-reservoir system, are performed using different modelling tools available in the Integrated Analysis Modelling System (SIAM) entirely powered in RSE. The numerical modelling approach is the only one that allows to investigate the behaviour of the injected CO2 regarding the fluid dynamic, geochemical and geomechanical aspects and effects due to its spread, in order to verify the safety of the process. The SIAM tools allow: - Selection of potential Italian storage sites through geological and geophysical data collected in the GIS-CO2 web database; - Characterization of caprock and aquifer parameters, seismic risk and environmental link for the selected site; - Creation of the 3D simulation model for the selected domain, using the modeller METHODRdS powered by RSE and the mesh generator GMSH; - Simulation of the injection and the displacement of CO2: multiphase fluid 3D dynamics is based on the modified version of TOUGH2 model; - Evaluation of geochemical reaction effects; - Evaluation of geomechanic effects, using the coupled 3D CANT-SD finite elements code; - Detailed local analysis through the use of open source auxiliary tools, such as SHEMAT and FEHM. - 3D graphic analysis of the results. These numerical tools have been successfully used for simulating the injection and the spread of CO2 into several real Italian reservoirs and have allowed to achieve accurate results in terms of effective storage capacity and safety analysis. The 3D geological models represent the high geological complexity of the Italian subsoil, where reservoirs are

  18. Best practice guidance for environmental risk assessment for offshore CO2 geological storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallmann, K.; Haeckel, M.; Linke, P.; Haffert, L.; Schmidt, M.; Buenz, S.; James, R.; Hauton, C.; Tsimplis, M.; Widdicombe, S.; Blackford, J.; Queiros, A.M.; Connelly, D.; Lichtschlag, A.; Dewar, M.; Chen, B.; Baumberger, T.; Beaubin, S.; Vercelli, S.; Proells, A.; Wildenborg, A.F.B.; Mikunda, T.; Nepveu, M.; Maynard, C.; Finnerty, S.; Flach, T.; Ahmed, N.; Ulfsnes, A.; Brooks, L.; Moskeland, T.; Purcll, M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) separated from natural gas has been stored successfully below the seabed off Norway for almost two decades. Based on these experiences several demonstration projects supported by the EU and its member states are now setting out to store CO2 captured at power plants in offshore g

  19. TheU-Tube: A Novel System for Acquiring Borehole Fluid Samplesfrom a Deep Geologic CO2 Sequestration Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Myer, Larry R.; Hovorka, Susan D.; Collins, Daniel J.

    2005-03-17

    A novel system has been deployed to obtain geochemical samples of water and gas, at in situ pressure, during a geologic CO2 sequestration experiment conducted in the Frio brine aquifer in Liberty County, Texas. Project goals required high-frequency recovery of representative and uncontaminated aliquots of a rapidly changing two-phase (supercritical CO2-brine) fluid from 1.5 km depth. The datasets collected, using both the liquid and gas portions of the downhole samples, provide insights into the coupled hydro-geochemical issues affecting CO2 sequestration in brine-filled formations. While the basic premise underlying the U-Tube sampler is not new, the system is unique because careful consideration was given to the processing of the recovered two-phase fluids. In particular, strain gauges mounted beneath the high-pressure surface sample cylinders measured the ratio of recovered brine to supercritical CO2. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time gas analysis for perfluorocarbon and noble gas tracers that were injected along with the CO2. The U-Tube successfully acquired frequent samples, facilitating accurate delineation of the arrival of the CO2 plume, and on-site analysis revealed rapid changes in geochemical conditions.

  20. The Role of Water Activity and Capillarity in Partially Saturated Porous Media at Geologic CO2 Storage Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, J. E.; Bryan, C. R.; Matteo, E. N.; Dewers, T. A.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The activity of water in supercritical CO2 may affect performance of geologic CO2 storage, including CO2 injectivity, and shrink-swell properties and sealing efficiency of clayey caprocks. We present a pore-scale unit cell model of water film adsorption and capillary condensation as an explicit function of water activity in supercritical CO2. This model estimates water film configuration in slit to other pore shapes with edges and corners. With the model, we investigate water saturation in porous media in mineral-CO2-water systems under different water activities. Maximum water activities in equilibrium with an aqueous phase are significantly less than unity due to dissolution of CO2 in water (i.e., the mole fraction of water in the aqueous phase is much less than one) and variable dissolved salt concentration. The unit cell approach is used to upscale from the single pore to the core-sample-scale, giving saturation curves as a function of water activity in the supercritical phase and the texture of the porous media. We evaluate the model and the importance of water activity through ongoing small angle neutron scattering experiments and other column experiments, which investigate shrink-swell properties and capillarity under realistic in situ stresses. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. TheU-Tube: A Novel System for Acquiring Borehole Fluid Samplesfrom a Deep Geologic CO2 Sequestration Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.; Kharaka, Yousif K.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Myer, Larry R.; Hovorka, Susan D.; Collins, Daniel J.

    2005-03-17

    A novel system has been deployed to obtain geochemical samples of water and gas, at in situ pressure, during a geologic CO2 sequestration experiment conducted in the Frio brine aquifer in Liberty County, Texas. Project goals required high-frequency recovery of representative and uncontaminated aliquots of a rapidly changing two-phase (supercritical CO2-brine) fluid from 1.5 km depth. The datasets collected, using both the liquid and gas portions of the downhole samples, provide insights into the coupled hydro-geochemical issues affecting CO2 sequestration in brine-filled formations. While the basic premise underlying the U-Tube sampler is not new, the system is unique because careful consideration was given to the processing of the recovered two-phase fluids. In particular, strain gauges mounted beneath the high-pressure surface sample cylinders measured the ratio of recovered brine to supercritical CO2. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time gas analysis for perfluorocarbon and noble gas tracers that were injected along with the CO2. The U-Tube successfully acquired frequent samples, facilitating accurate delineation of the arrival of the CO2 plume, and on-site analysis revealed rapid changes in geochemical conditions.

  2. Study on self-optimizing function for intelligent control of CO2 welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the analysis data from a great deal welding tests, a quantitative synthetic evaluation function has been built to describe and evaluate the short-circuit transfer processes of CO2 arc welding. Then a self-optimizing objective function has been presented for developing the intelligent control system of CO2 arc welding machine by choosing 4 main measurable parameters in the evaluation function and regulating the range of the arc welding voltage and the current waveform controllable parameters. The simulation tests show that this function can be used for the microcomputer control system of CO2 arc welding machine to improve its performance and reduce the welding spatter greatly.

  3. Dissolution of CO2 in Brines and Mineral Reactions during Geological Carbon Storage: AN Eor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickle, M. J.; Chapman, H.; Galy, A.; Kampman, N.; Dubacq, B.; Ballentine, C. J.; Zhou, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolution of CO2 in formation brines is likely to be a major process which stabilises stored CO2 on longer time scales and mitigates CO2 migrating through storage complexes. However very little is known about the likely rates of CO2 dissolution as CO2 flows through natural heterogeneous brine filled reservoirs. Here we report the results of sampling fluids over 6 months after a phase of CO2 injection commenced for enhanced oil recovery coupled with injection of isotopically enriched 3He and 129Xe. Modelling of the changes in fluid chemistry has previously been interpreted to indicate significant dissolution of silicate minerals where fluids remained close to saturation with calcite. These calculations, which are based on modal decomposition of changes in cation concentrations, are supported by changes in the isotopic compositions of Sr, Li and Mg. Analysis of Sr-isotopic compositions of samples from outcrops of the Frontier Formation, which forms the reservoir sampled by the EOR experiment, reveals substantial heterogeneity. Silicate mineral compositions have 87Sr/86Sr ratios between 0.709 and 0.719 whereas carbonate cements have values around 0.7076. Calculation of CO2 dissolution based on simplified 2-D flow models shows that fluids likely sample reservoir heterogeneities present on a finer scale with CO2 fingers occupying the most permeable horizons and most water flow in the adjacent slightly less permeable zones. Smaller time scale variations in 87Sr/86Sr ratios are interpreted to reflect variations in flow paths on small length scales driven by invading CO2.

  4. Geological Sequestration of CO2 by Hydrous Carbonate Formation with Reclaimed Slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von L. Richards; Kent Peaslee; Jeffrey Smith

    2008-02-06

    The concept of this project is to develop a process that improves the kinetics of the hydrous carbonate formation reaction enabling steelmakers to directly remove CO2 from their furnace exhaust gas. It is proposed to bring the furnace exhaust stream containing CO2 in contact with reclaimed steelmaking slag in a reactor that has an environment near the unit activity of water resulting in the production of carbonates. The CO2 emissions from the plant would be reduced by the amount sequestered in the formation of carbonates. The main raw materials for the process are furnace exhaust gases and specially prepared slag.

  5. Optimization of antitumor treatment conditions for transcutaneous CO2 application: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueha, Takeshi; Kawamoto, Teruya; Onishi, Yasuo; Harada, Risa; Minoda, Masaya; Toda, Mitsunori; Hara, Hitomi; Fukase, Naomasa; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Akisue, Toshihiro; Sakai, Yoshitada

    2017-06-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) therapy can be applied to treat a variety of disorders. We previously found that transcutaneous application of CO2 with a hydrogel decreased the tumor volume of several types of tumors and induced apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. However, only one condition of treatment intensity has been tested. For widespread application in clinical antitumor therapy, the conditions must be optimized. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the duration, frequency, and treatment interval of transcutaneous CO2 application and antitumor effects in murine xenograft models. Murine xenograft models of three types of human tumors (breast cancer, osteosarcoma, and malignant fibrous histiocytoma/undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma) were used to assess the antitumor effects of transcutaneous CO2 application of varying durations, frequencies, and treatment intervals. In all human tumor xenografts, apoptosis was significantly induced by CO2 treatment for ≥10 min, and a significant decrease in tumor volume was observed with CO2 treatments of >5 min. The effect on tumor volume was not dependent on the frequency of CO2 application, i.e., twice or five times per week. However, treatment using 3- and 4-day intervals was more effective at decreasing tumor volume than treatment using 2- and 5-day intervals. The optimal conditions of transcutaneous CO2 application to obtain the best antitumor effect in various tumors were as follows: greater than 10 min per application, twice per week, with 3- and 4-day intervals, and application to the site of the tumor. The results suggest that this novel transcutaneous CO2 application might be useful to treat primary tumors, while mitigating some side effects, and therefore could be safe for clinical trials.

  6. Developing a Comprehensive Risk Assessment Framework for Geological Storage CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, Ian

    2014-08-31

    The operational risks for CCS projects include: risks of capturing, compressing, transporting and injecting CO₂; risks of well blowouts; risk that CO₂ will leak into shallow aquifers and contaminate potable water; and risk that sequestered CO₂ will leak into the atmosphere. This report examines these risks by using information on the risks associated with analogue activities such as CO2 based enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), natural gas storage and acid gas disposal. We have developed a new analysis of pipeline risk based on Bayesian statistical analysis. Bayesian theory probabilities may describe states of partial knowledge, even perhaps those related to non-repeatable events. The Bayesian approach enables both utilizing existing data and at the same time having the capability to adsorb new information thus to lower uncertainty in our understanding of complex systems. Incident rates for both natural gas and CO2 pipelines have been widely used in papers and reports on risk of CO2 pipelines as proxies for the individual risk created by such pipelines. Published risk studies of CO2 pipelines suggest that the individual risk associated with CO2 pipelines is between 10-3 and 10-4, which reflects risk levels approaching those of mountain climbing, which many would find unacceptably high. This report concludes, based on a careful analysis of natural gas pipeline failures, suggests that the individual risk of CO2 pipelines is likely in the range of 10-6 to 10-7, a risk range considered in the acceptable to negligible range in most countries. If, as is commonly thought, pipelines represent the highest risk component of CCS outside of the capture plant, then this conclusion suggests that most (if not all) previous quantitative- risk assessments of components of CCS may be orders of magnitude to high. The potential lethality of unexpected CO2 releases from pipelines or wells are arguably the highest risk aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR), carbon capture

  7. Density-Driven Flow Simulation in Anisotropic Porous Media: Application to CO2 Geological Sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Negara, Ardiansyah

    2014-04-21

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in saline aquifers is considered as one of the most viable and promising ways to reduce CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. CO2 is injected into deep saline formations at supercritical state where its density is smaller than the hosting brine. This motivates an upward motion and eventually CO2 is trapped beneath the cap rock. The trapped CO2 slowly dissolves into the brine causing the density of the mixture to become larger than the host brine. This causes gravitational instabilities that is propagated and magnified with time. In this kind of density-driven flows, the CO2-rich brines migrate downward while the brines with low CO2 concentration move upward. With respect to the properties of the subsurface aquifers, there are instances where saline formations can possess anisotropy with respect to their hydraulic properties. Such anisotropy can have significant effect on the onset and propagation of flow instabilities. Anisotropy is predicted to be more influential in dictating the direction of the convective flow. To account for permeability anisotropy, the method of multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) in the framework of finite differences schemes is used. The MPFA method requires more point stencil than the traditional two-point flux approximation (TPFA). For example, calculation of one flux component requires 6-point stencil and 18-point stencil in 2-D and 3-D cases, respectively. As consequence, the matrix of coefficient for obtaining the pressure fields will be quite complex. Therefore, we combine the MPFA method with the experimenting pressure field technique in which the problem is reduced to solving multitude of local problems and the global matrix of coefficients is constructed automatically, which significantly reduces the complexity. We present several numerical scenarios of density-driven flow simulation in homogeneous, layered, and heterogeneous anisotropic porous media. The numerical results emphasize the

  8. Optimal Control of Partially Miscible Two-Phase Flow with Applications to Subsurface CO2 Sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Simon, Moritz

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by applications in subsurface CO2 sequestration, we investigate constrained optimal control problems with partially miscible two-phase flow in porous media. The objective is, e.g., to maximize the amount of trapped CO2 in an underground reservoir after a fixed period of CO2 injection, where the time-dependent injection rates in multiple wells are used as control parameters. We describe the governing two-phase two-component Darcy flow PDE system and formulate the optimal control problem. For the discretization we use a variant of the BOX method, a locally conservative control-volume FE method. The timestep-wise Lagrangian of the control problem is implemented as a functional in the PDE toolbox Sundance, which is part of the HPC software Trilinos. The resulting MPI parallelized Sundance state and adjoint solvers are linked to the interior point optimization package IPOPT. Finally, we present some numerical results in a heterogeneous model reservoir.

  9. An Optimization System for Concrete Life Cycle Cost and Related CO2 Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyoung Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An optimization system that supports the production of concrete while minimizing carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions or costs is presented that incorporates an evolution algorithm for the materials’ mix design stage, a trigonometric function for the transportation stage, and a stochastic model for the manufacturing stage. A case study demonstrates that applying the optimization system reduced CO2 emissions by 34% compared to the standard concrete production processes typically used. When minimizing the cost of concrete production was prioritized, the cost dropped by 1% compared to the cost of conventional concrete production. These findings confirm that this optimization system helps with the design of the concrete mix and the choice of a material supplier, thus reducing both CO2 emissions and costs.

  10. Impact of Siberian observations on the optimization of surface CO2 flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinwoong; Kim, Hyun Mee; Cho, Chun-Ho; Boo, Kyung-On; Jacobson, Andrew R.; Sasakawa, Motoki; Machida, Toshinobu; Arshinov, Mikhail; Fedoseev, Nikolay

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of additional CO2 observations in the Siberia region on the Asian and global surface CO2 flux analyses, two experiments using different observation data sets were performed for 2000-2009. One experiment was conducted using a data set that includes additional observations of Siberian tower measurements (Japan-Russia Siberian Tall Tower Inland Observation Network: JR-STATION), and the other experiment was conducted using a data set without the above additional observations. The results show that the global balance of the sources and sinks of surface CO2 fluxes was maintained for both experiments with and without the additional observations. While the magnitude of the optimized surface CO2 flux uptake and flux uncertainty in Siberia decreased from -1.17 ± 0.93 to -0.77 ± 0.70 Pg C yr-1, the magnitude of the optimized surface CO2 flux uptake in the other regions (e.g., Europe) of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) land increased for the experiment with the additional observations, which affect the longitudinal distribution of the total NH sinks. This change was mostly caused by changes in the magnitudes of surface CO2 flux in June and July. The observation impact measured by uncertainty reduction and self-sensitivity tests shows that additional observations provide useful information on the estimated surface CO2 flux. The average uncertainty reduction of the conifer forest of Eurasian boreal (EB) is 29.1 % and the average self-sensitivities at the JR-STATION sites are approximately 60 % larger than those at the towers in North America. It is expected that the Siberian observations play an important role in estimating surface CO2 flux in the NH land (e.g., Siberia and Europe) in the future.

  11. Methods to Assess Geological CO2 Storage Capacity: Status and Best Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-01

    To understand the emission reduction potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS), decision makers need to understand the amount of CO2 that can be safely stored in the subsurface and the geographical distribution of storage resources. Estimates of storage resources need to be made using reliable and consistent methods. Previous estimates of CO2 storage potential for a range of countries and regions have been based on a variety of methodologies resulting in a correspondingly wide range of estimates. Consequently, there has been uncertainty about which of the methodologies were most appropriate in given settings, and whether the estimates produced by these methods were useful to policy makers trying to determine the appropriate role of CCS. In 2011, the IEA convened two workshops which brought together experts for six national surveys organisations to review CO2 storage assessment methodologies and make recommendations on how to harmonise CO2 storage estimates worldwide. This report presents the findings of these workshops and an internationally shared guideline for quantifying CO2 storage resources.

  12. A review on optimization production and upgrading biogas through CO2 removal using various techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriani, Dian; Wresta, Arini; Atmaja, Tinton Dwi; Saepudin, Aep

    2014-02-01

    Biogas from anaerobic digestion of organic materials is a renewable energy resource that consists mainly of CH4 and CO2. Trace components that are often present in biogas are water vapor, hydrogen sulfide, siloxanes, hydrocarbons, ammonia, oxygen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen. Considering the biogas is a clean and renewable form of energy that could well substitute the conventional source of energy (fossil fuels), the optimization of this type of energy becomes substantial. Various optimization techniques in biogas production process had been developed, including pretreatment, biotechnological approaches, co-digestion as well as the use of serial digester. For some application, the certain purity degree of biogas is needed. The presence of CO2 and other trace components in biogas could affect engine performance adversely. Reducing CO2 content will significantly upgrade the quality of biogas and enhancing the calorific value. Upgrading is generally performed in order to meet the standards for use as vehicle fuel or for injection in the natural gas grid. Different methods for biogas upgrading are used. They differ in functioning, the necessary quality conditions of the incoming gas, and the efficiency. Biogas can be purified from CO2 using pressure swing adsorption, membrane separation, physical or chemical CO2 absorption. This paper reviews the various techniques, which could be used to optimize the biogas production as well as to upgrade the biogas quality.

  13. CO2 emission optimization for a blast furnace considering plastic injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Liu, Xiaoyong Qin, Lingen Chen, Fengrui Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimization model based on mass balance and energy balance for a blast furnace process is established by using a nonlinear programming method. The model takes the minimum CO2 emission of a blast furnace as optimization objective function, and takes plastic injection or pulverized coal injection into account. The model includes sixteen optimal design variables, six linear equality constraints, one linear inequality constraint, six nonlinear equality constraints, one nonlinear inequality constraint, and thirteen upper and lower bound constraints of optimal design variables. The optimization results are obtained by using the Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP method. Comparative analyses for the effects of plastic injection and pulverized coal injection on the CO2 emission of a blast furnace are performed.

  14. The Baltic Basin: structure, properties of reservoir rocks, and capacity for geological storage of CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaher, Rein

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Baltic countries are located in the limits of the Baltic sedimentary basin, a 700 km long and 500 km wide synclinal structure. The axis of the syneclise plunges to the southwest. In Poland the Precambrian basement occurs at a depth of 5 km. The Baltic Basin includes the Neoproterozoic Ediacaran (Vendian at the base and all Phanerozoic systems. Two aquifers, the lower Devonian and Cambrian reservoirs, meet the basic requirements for CO2 storage. The porosity and permeability of sandstone decrease with depth. The average porosity of Cambrian sandstone at depths of 80–800, 800–1800, and 1800–2300 m is 18.6, 14.2, and 5.5%, respectively. The average permeability is, respectively, 311, 251, and 12 mD. Devonian sandstone has an average porosity of 26% and permeability in the range of 0.5–2 D. Prospective Cambrian structural traps occur only in Latvia. The 16 largest ones have CO2 storage capacity in the range of 2–74 Mt, with total capacity exceeding 400 Mt. The structural trapping is not an option for Lithuania as the uplifts there are too small. Another option is utilization of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR. The estimated total EOR net volume of CO2 (part of CO2 remaining in the formation in Lithuania is 5.6 Mt. Solubility and mineral trapping are a long-term option. The calculated total solubility trapping capacity of the Cambrian reservoir is as high as 11 Gt of CO2 within the area of the supercritical state of carbon dioxide.

  15. Geochemical monitoring for potential environmental impacts of geologic sequestration of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Cole, David R.; Thordsen, James J.; Gans, Kathleen D.; Thomas, Randal B.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration is now considered an important component of the portfolio of options for reducing greenhouse gas emissions to stabilize their atmospheric levels at values that would limit global temperature increases to the target of 2 °C by the end of the century (Pacala and Socolow 2004; IPCC 2005, 2007; Benson and Cook 2005; Benson and Cole 2008; IEA 2012; Romanak et al. 2013). Increased anthropogenic emissions of CO2 have raised its atmospheric concentrations from about 280 ppmv during pre-industrial times to ~400 ppmv today, and based on several defined scenarios, CO2 concentrations are projected to increase to values as high as 1100 ppmv by 2100 (White et al. 2003; IPCC 2005, 2007; EIA 2012; Global CCS Institute 2012). An atmospheric CO2 concentration of 450 ppmv is generally the accepted level that is needed to limit global temperature increases to the target of 2 °C by the end of the century. This temperature limit likely would moderate the adverse effects related to climate change that could include sea-level rise from the melting of alpine glaciers and continental ice sheets and from the ocean warming; increased frequency and intensity of wildfires, floods, droughts, and tropical storms; and changes in the amount, timing, and distribution of rain, snow, and runoff (IPCC 2007; Sundquist et al. 2009; IEA 2012). Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations are also increasing the amount of CO2 dissolved in ocean water lowering its pH from 8.1 to 8.0, with potentially disruptive effects on coral reefs, plankton and marine ecosystems (Adams and Caldeira 2008; Schrag 2009; Sundquist et al. 2009). Sedimentary basins in general and deep saline aquifers in particular are being investigated as possible repositories for the large volumes of anthropogenic CO2 that must be sequestered to mitigate global warming and related climate changes (Hitchon 1996; Benson and Cole 2008; Verma and Warwick 2011).

  16. Optimization of selection of chain amine scrubbers for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Marri, Mohammed J; Khader, Mahmoud M; Giannelis, Emmanuel P; Shibl, Mohamed F

    2014-12-01

    In order to optimize the selection of a suitable amine molecule for CO2 scrubbers, a series of ab initio calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Diethylenetriamine was used as a simple chain amine. Methyl and hydroxyl groups served as examples of electron donors, and electron withdrawing groups like trifluoromethyl and nitro substituents were also evaluated. Interaction distances and binding energies were employed as comparison operators. Moreover, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, namely the second order perturbation approach, was applied to determine whether the amine-CO2 interaction is chemical or physical. Different sizes of substituents affect the capture ability of diethylenetriamine. For instance, trifluoromethyl shields the nitrogen atom to which it attaches from the interaction with CO2. The results presented here provide a means of optimizing the choice of amine molecules for developing new amine scrubbers.

  17. Preliminary reactive geochemical transport simulation study on CO2 geological sequestration at the Changhua Coastal Industrial Park Site, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, R.; Li, M.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral trapping by precipitated carbonate minerals is one of critical mechanisms for successful long-term geological sequestration (CGS) in deep saline aquifer. Aquifer acidification induced by the increase of carbonic acid (H2CO3) and bicarbonate ions (HCO3-) as the dissolution of injected CO2 may induce the dissolution of minerals and hinder the effectiveness of cap rock causing potential risk of CO2 leakage. Numerical assessments require capabilities to simulate complicated interactions of thermal, hydrological, geochemical multiphase processes. In this study, we utilized TOUGHREACT model to demonstrate a series of CGS simulations and assessments of (1) time evolution of aquifer responses, (2) migration distance and spatial distribution of CO2 plume, (3) effects of CO2-saline-mineral interactions, and (4) CO2 trapping components at the Changhua Costal Industrial Park (CCIP) Site, Taiwan. The CCIP Site is located at the Southern Taishi Basin with sloping and layered heterogeneous formations. At this preliminary phase, detailed information of mineralogical composition of reservoir formation and chemical composition of formation water are difficult to obtain. Mineralogical composition of sedimentary rocks and chemical compositions of formation water for CGS in deep saline aquifer from literatures (e.g. Xu et al., 2004; Marini, 2006) were adopted. CGS simulations were assumed with a constant CO2 injection rate of 1 Mt/yr at the first 50 years. Hydrogeological settings included porosities of 0.103 for shale, 0.141 for interbedding sandstone and shale, and 0.179 for sandstone; initial pore pressure distributions of 24.5 MPa to 28.7 MPa, an ambient temperature of 70°C, and 0.5 M of NaCl in aqueous solution. Mineral compositions were modified from Xu et al. (2006) to include calcite (1.9 vol. % of solid), quartz (57.9 %), kaolinite (2.0 %), illite (1.0 %), oligoclase (19.8 %), Na-smectite (3.9 %), K-feldspar (8.2 %), chlorite (4.6 %), and hematite (0.5 %) and were

  18. The potential of geological storage of CO2 in Austria: a techno-economic assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüstle, Anna Katharina; Welkenhuysen, Kris; Bottig, Magdalena; Piessens, Kris; Ramirez, Andrea|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/284852414; Swenner, Rudy

    An impressive two-third or about 40GWh/y of electricity in Austria is produced from renewable energy sources, in particular hydro energy. For the remaining part the country depends on fossil fuels, which together with iron & steel production form the most CO2 intensive industries in Austria with a

  19. The potential of geological storage of CO2 in Austria: a techno-economic assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüstle, Anna Katharina; Welkenhuysen, Kris; Bottig, Magdalena; Piessens, Kris; Ramirez, Andrea; Swenner, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    An impressive two-third or about 40GWh/y of electricity in Austria is produced from renewable energy sources, in particular hydro energy. For the remaining part the country depends on fossil fuels, which together with iron & steel production form the most CO2 intensive industries in Austria with a c

  20. Probabilistic modeling and global sensitivity analysis for CO 2 storage in geological formations: a spectral approach

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Bilal M.

    2017-09-18

    This work focuses on the simulation of CO2 storage in deep underground formations under uncertainty and seeks to understand the impact of uncertainties in reservoir properties on CO2 leakage. To simulate the process, a non-isothermal two-phase two-component flow system with equilibrium phase exchange is used. Since model evaluations are computationally intensive, instead of traditional Monte Carlo methods, we rely on polynomial chaos (PC) expansions for representation of the stochastic model response. A non-intrusive approach is used to determine the PC coefficients. We establish the accuracy of the PC representations within a reasonable error threshold through systematic convergence studies. In addition to characterizing the distributions of model observables, we compute probabilities of excess CO2 leakage. Moreover, we consider the injection rate as a design parameter and compute an optimum injection rate that ensures that the risk of excess pressure buildup at the leaky well remains below acceptable levels. We also provide a comprehensive analysis of sensitivities of CO2 leakage, where we compute the contributions of the random parameters, and their interactions, to the variance by computing first, second, and total order Sobol’ indices.

  1. Geochemical Impact on the Caprock Porous Structure during CO2 Geological Storage : A Laboratory and Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhenals Garrido, D. R.; Lafortune, S.; Souli, H.; Dubujet, P.

    2013-12-01

    CO2 storage is envisioned as a technique which reduces large quantities of CO2 rejected in the atmosphere because of many human activities. The effectiveness of this technique is mainly related to the storage capacity as well as its safety. The safety of this operation is primarily based on the conservation of petro-physical properties of the caprock, which prevents the transport of CO2 towards the surface. However when CO2 reaches the reservoir/caprock interface due to buoyancy effects, the interaction between interstitial fluid and injected fluid creates a serie of dissolution/precipitation reactions affecting the properties of containment of the caprock, which is generally characterized by low transport properties. This study aims to assess the impact caused by CO2/interstitial fluid interaction on the nanostructure of a caprock under geological storage conditions. In order to do this, degradation experiments at high pressure of CO2 (88 bar) and isothermal (55°C) conditions have been conducted using batch reactors for 3.5 months. The sample used for these experiments is a well characterized shale, from the Tournemire formation (Aveyron-France). Porosity evolution has been followed by using volumetric adsorption at low pressure, from advanced NLFDT and classical theories based on the micropores filling, and capillary condensation phenomena. Results showed a slight variation in both mesopores and micropores size distributions, as a result of dissolution processes, which dominated at laboratoty time scale. Furthermore, chemical analysis from the water sampled showed an overall increase in Ca,Mg,K,Si,Na. The results obtained by physical adsorption and water chemistry analysis were consistent, with geochemical modeling, which suggested reaction paths with calcite dissolution as the main mineral, by producing porosity at short term and (clays, feldspars) dissolution of aluminosilicates dominating at long term.

  2. Laboratory measurements of density-driven convection in analogy with solubility trapping of geologically sequestered CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmusson, Maria; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Rasmusson, Kristina; Niemi, Auli

    2016-04-01

    Density-driven convection is of interest to several areas of groundwater-science: nuclear waste storage, industrial waste disposal, deep geothermal energy extraction, and seawater intrusion into coastal aquifers. Lately it has been identified to accelerate the rate of CO2 solubility trapping for geological CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers. We present an experimental method based on the light transmission technique and an analogue system design that enable comprehensive study of solutally induced density-driven convection in saturated porous media. The system design affords an examination of the convective process in general as well as a two-dimensional laboratory analogue for field phenomena. Furthermore, the method can be used to verify numerical results from density-driven flow simulation codes as part of benchmarking. With application to geological CO2 storage, we show how the method is used to measure density-driven convection in both homogenous and heterogeneous porous media and for different Rayleigh numbers. The results demonstrate that the solute concentration distribution in the system can be accurately determined with high spatial and temporal resolution. Thus, the onset time of convection, mass flux and flow dynamics can be quantified for different systems under well-controlled conditions.

  3. Tagging CO2 to Enable Quantitative Inventories of Geological Carbon Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Klaus; Matter, Juerg; Park, Ah-Hyung; Stute, Martin; Carson, Cantwell; Ji, Yinghuang

    2014-06-30

    In the wake of concerns about the long term integrity and containment of sub-surface CO2 sequestration reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification, and accounting methods for geo-sequestered CO2. Our project aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a system designed to tag CO2 with carbon isotope 14C immediately prior to sequestration to a level that is normal on the surface (one part per trillion). Because carbon found at depth is naturally free of 14C, this tag would easily differentiate pre-existing carbon from anthropogenic injected carbon and provide an excellent handle for monitoring its whereabouts in the subsurface. It also creates an excellent handle for adding up anthropogenic carbon inventories. Future inventories in effect count 14C atoms. Accordingly, we have developed a 14C tagging system suitable for use at the part-per-trillion level. This system consists of a gas-exchange apparatus to make disposable cartridges ready for controlled injection into a fast flowing stream of pressurized CO2. We built a high-pressure injection and tagging system, and a 14C detection system. The disposable cartridge and injection system have been successfully demonstrated in the lab with a high-pressure flow reactor, as well as in the field at the CarbFix CO2 sequestration site in Iceland. The laser-based 14C detection system originally conceived has been shown to possess inadequate sensitivity for ambient levels. Alternative methods for detecting 14C, such as saturated cavity absorption ringdown spectroscopy and scintillation counting, may still be suitable. KEYWORDS

  4. Study of optimal discharge pressure of compressor in CO_2 refrigerating trans-critical cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a carbon dioxide trans-critical refrigerating system which is different from a conventional subcritical refrigerating cycle was studied. The trans-critical carbon dioxide refrigerating systems are based on the Gustav Lorntzen cycle. Emphasis was focused on how to determine the optimal discharge pressure of compressor in CO2 trans-critical cycle. The factors related with the optimal discharge pressure were analyzed. A formula was developed based on cycle simulation, which could be used to pred...

  5. Effect of modeling factors on the dissolution-diffusion-convection process during CO2 geological storage in deep saline formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that during CO2 geological storage,density-driven convective activity can significantly accelerate the dissolution of injected CO2 into water.This action could limit the escape of supercritical CO2 from the storage formation through vertical pathways such as fractures,faults and abandoned wells,consequently increasing permanence and security of storage.First,we investigated the effect of numerical perturbation caused by time and grid resolution and the convergence criteria on the dissolution-diffusion-convection (DDC) process.Then,using the model with appropriate spatial and temporal resolution,some uncertainty parameters investigated in our previous paper such as initial gas saturation and model boundaries,and other factors such as relative liquid permeability and porosity modification were used to examine their effects on the DDC process.Finally,we compared the effect of 2D and 3D models on the simulation of the DDC process.The above modeling results should contribute to clear understanding and accurate simulation of the DDC process,especially the onset of convective activity,and the CO2 dissolution rate during the convection-dominated stage.

  6. Optimising geological storage of CO2 by development of multiple injection sites in regionally extensive storage sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhurst, Maxine; McDermott, Christopher; Williams, John; Mackay, Eric; Jin, Min; Tucker, Owain; Mallows, Tom; Hannis, Sarah; Pearce, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Carbon capture, transport and storage (CCS) is considered a key technology to provide secure, low-carbon energy supply and industrial processes to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to the adverse effects of climatic change. Geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), captured during hydrocarbon production at the Sleipner Field, in strata beneath the Norwegian sector of the North Sea has been in operation since 1996. Projects to store CO2 captured at power plants in strata underlying the North Sea are currently in design. Storage of the CO2 is planned in depleted hydrocarbon fields or regionally extensive sandstones containing brine (saline aquifer sandstones). The vast majority of the UK potential storage resource is within brine-saturated sandstone formations. The sandstone formations are each hundreds to thousands of square kilometres in extent and underlie all sectors of the North Sea. The immense potential to store CO2 in these rocks can only be fully achieved by the operation of more than one injection site within each formation. Here we report an investigation into the operation of more than one injection site within a storage formation using a UK North Sea case study of the Captain Sandstone and the included Goldeneye Field, which is part of the mature hydrocarbon province offshore Scotland. Research by the CO2MultiStore project was targeted to increase understanding and confidence in the operation of two sites within the Captain Sandstone. Methods were implemented to reduce the effort and resources needed to characterise the sandstone, and increase understanding of its stability and performance during operation of more than one injection site. Generic learning was captured throughout the research relevant to the characterisation of extensive storage sandstones, management of the planned injection operations and monitoring of CO2 injection at two (or more) sites within any connected sandstone formation. The storage of CO2 can be optimised

  7. CO2的地质埋存与资源化利用进展%Geological Storage of CO2 and Commercial Utilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许志刚; 陈代钊; 曾荣树

    2007-01-01

    CO2注入油气藏、煤层提高油气采收率的方法(CO2-EOR、CO2-EGR、CO2-ECBM),因其在提高石油、天然气和煤层气采收率的同时,又能使一部分CO2永久地埋存于地下,实现油气增产和CO2减排的双赢效果,而成为当今CO2减排最具潜力的现实选择.CO2-EOR(Enhanced Oil Recovery)方法适用于油田开发晚期,通过把CO2注入到比较稳定的油藏,一般可提高油藏采收率达10%~15%;另外把CO2注入到气田中,实施CO2-EGR(Enhanced Gas Recovery).一方面,接近枯竭的气田在没有地层水入侵之前具有巨大的埋存能力,为CO2提供巨大的埋存空间;另一方面注入CO2后,使地层重新增压保持储层中原始的压力,可以保持储层的完整性和安全性.同时,原有的油气圈闭可作为良好的埋存箱能有效地阻止CO2泄漏,使部分CO2能永久地埋存于地下.此外,也可以把CO2注入到煤层中,实施CO2-ECBM(Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery),利用煤层对CO2和煤层气(主要为甲烷)吸附能力的差异,实现CO2排替CH4,提高CH4的采收率.

  8. CO2地质储存泄露安全风险评价方法初探%Preliminary Research on CO2 Leakage Safety Risk Assessment Method of Geological Storage Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁玉杰; 张森琦; 郭建强; 任妹娟; 李旭峰

    2012-01-01

    CO2地质储存作为一项有效、直接的碳减排技术,本质上属于环保型工程项目.在总结国内外已有的风险评价方法的基础上,结合CO2地质储存机理及工作属性,借鉴国际风险评价经验,以及我国核废料、一般工业固体废弃物填埋等类似工程项目风险评价工作方法,对适用于我国的CO2地质储存安全风险评价的定义进行了探讨,并将CO2地质储存泄露风险评价分为风险评价、风险评估与风险控制三部分内容.通过CO2地质储存泄露通道及泄露后可能产生的环境危害分析,建立了由地质因素、工程单元因素、施工因素及其它因素四个风险因子指标层及其亚层组成的CO2地质储存泄露的安全风险层次指标体系,初步提出了风险评估方法以及CO2泄露可接受的安全风险标准;最后根据CO2地质储存泄露风险提出了不同风险的控制方法及建议,对CO2地质储存场地选址中的安全风险评价、工程实施及监测具有一定意义.%As a direct and effective carbon abatement technology, CO2 geological storage belongs to environmental protection projects. On the basis of generalization of the existing methods of CO2 geological storage risk assessment at home and abroad, the definition of CO2 geological storage safety risk assessment suitable for China was discussed in this paper, combined with CO2 geological storage mechanism and property, international experience as well as the risk assessment methods on engineering project such as the landfill of nuclear waste and industrial solid waste in China. The main contents of CO2 geological storage safety risk assessment were divided into risk identification, risk evaluation and risk control. On the basis of the research on CO2 leakage channels and possible environmental hazards, hierarchy indicators system for safety risk of CO2 leakage composed of four risk factors of index layers and its sublayers involved with geological, engineering

  9. Technical method for selection of CO2 geological storage project sites in deep saline aquifers%规模化深部咸水含水层CO2地质储存选址方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张森琦; 郭建强; 刁玉杰; 张徽; 贾小丰; 张杨

    2011-01-01

    According to the potential evaluation result of CO2 geological storage in China' s sedimentary basins, the authors consider that the deep saline aquifer is the main body for realizing CO2 geological storage. The properties of the appropriate CO2 geological storage in deep saline aquifers are defined and analyzed. This paper presents principles of geological storage site selection in deep saline aquifers, and reasonably divide the stages of site selection. The evaluation index system can be established on the basis of four indicator layers and more than 60 special indicators from the conditions of location technology, security, economic suitability and land geology-social environment. Ranking multi- factor index method on the basis of AHP could be used for CO2 geological storage project site selection. The result of this study will provide a guidance for CO2 geological storage project site selection in deep saline aquifers of China .%本文依据中国沉积盆地CO2地质储存潜力评价结果,认为深部咸水含水层是实现规模化CO2地质储存的主体,进而对适宜CO2地质储存的深部咸水含水层属性进行了界定.提出了深部咸水含水层CO2地质储存选址原则,合理划分了选址工作阶段.建立了选址技术指标、安全性评价指标、经济适宜性和地面地质-社会环境选址指标4个指标层,60余个指标的选址指标体系,提出了基于层次分析(AHP)的多因子排序选址评价方法.本文的研究成果对中国深部咸水含水层CO2地质储存场地选址具有一定的指导意义.

  10. Optimizing Blendstock Composition and Ethanol Feedstock to Reduce Gasoline Well-to-Pump CO 2 Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Bo

    2017-06-02

    Lifecycle CO2 emission of ethanol blended gasoline was simulated to investigate how fuel properties and composition affect overall emission. Fuel research octane number (RON), octane sensitivity and ethanol content (derived from sugarcane and corn) were varied in the simulations to formulate blended fuels that economically achieve target specifications. The well-to-pump (WTP) simulation results were then analyzed to understand the effects of fuel composition on emission. Elevated ethanol content displaces aromatics and olefins required in gasoline blendstock to reach a target fuel specification. The addition of greater sugarcane-based ethanol percentage in constant aromatics and olefins fuel reduces its WTP CO2 emission. Corn-based ethanol blending does not offer CO2 emission offset due to its high production emissions. The mixing of sugarcane-based with corn-based ethanol is shown to be a potentially effective method for achieving a blended fuel with a lower lifecycle CO2 emission. Besides CO2 emission, the total greenhouse gas (GHG) emission from land-use conversions (LUC), CH4, and N2O are also significant in determining the optimal fuel blend. Herein, we present preliminary results showing that total GHG emissions significantly increase when either corn or sugarcane ethanol is blended at even small percentages; detailed results will be addressed in future communications.

  11. CO2地质封存和提高天然气采收率%Geological Storage of CO2 and Enhanced Gas Recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓岭; 曾凡桂; 刘贺娟

    2012-01-01

    The CCS technology (CO2 capture and storage)that was addressed by developed countries , such as USA, Canada, Germany, Holland and so on demonstrating that the C02 can be injected underground or deep sea to reduce the emission of CO2 into atmosphere. These sites include saline aquifer, unmineral coal seam (CO2—ECBM), depleted oil or gas field (CO2-EOR/EGR). The CCS technology seems like become the most important way to solve the CO2 emission problem and at the same time, which can also produce some commercial belief. In this paper, as one kind of the CCS technology, CO2-EGR technology has been summarized, including the projects in the world, the critical issues, challenges and the prospect.%目前发达国家,如美国、加拿大、德国、荷兰等兴起的CCS(CO2 capture and storage)技术,即将CO2储存到地下或深海中,包括盐水层、不可开采煤层(CO2-ECBM)、废弃油田(CO2-EOR)、废弃气田(CO2-EGR),已成为解决CO2排放和保护环境的重要举措,而且也可能产生相应的商业利益.本文从CO2提高天然气的采收率角度就这一技术进行概括,研究世界上该类工程的开展情况、技术的关键问题、面临的挑战以及发展前景.

  12. Mechanisms for CO2 Sequestration in Geological Formations and Enhanced Gas Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khosrokhavar, R.

    2014-01-01

    The work described in this thesis deals with a variety of aspects related to the storage of carbon dioxide in geological formations. In particular we focus on the transfer between the gas phase to a fluid (liquid) or solid phase. This thesis limits its interest to study the sequestration capacity of

  13. National Geologic Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sequestration Assessment Project: Bighorn Basin (C5034) Well Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Drilling-density cell maps show the number of wells that have been drilled into the storage assessment unit (SAU). Each 1-square-mile cell has a count for the number...

  14. Mechanisms for CO2 Sequestration in Geological Formations and Enhanced Gas Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khosrokhavar, R.

    2014-01-01

    The work described in this thesis deals with a variety of aspects related to the storage of carbon dioxide in geological formations. In particular we focus on the transfer between the gas phase to a fluid (liquid) or solid phase. This thesis limits its interest to study the sequestration capacity of

  15. Experimental determination of trace element mobility in UK North Sea sandstones under conditions of geological CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Kit; Wilkinson, Mark; Butler, Ian B.

    2016-04-01

    Offshore UK geological formations have the capacity to store > 100 years' worth of UK CO2 output from industry and power generation, if utilised for carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes. During CO2 storage or CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery (CO2-EOR), formation waters may be produced at the surface to be disposed of into the marine environment. Laboratory and field scale studies, with an emphasis on the effects on onshore shallow potable groundwaters, have shown that CO2 dissolution in formation waters during injection and storage acidifies the waters and promotes mobilisation from the reservoir sandstones of major and trace elements into solution. Of relevance to the UK context, eight of these elements are specifically identified as potentially hazardous to the marine environment: As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Zn. Batch experiments using simple borosilicate flasks sat on heating mantles were used in this study to determine concentrations of these 8 elements which could be leached from selected North Sea sandstones with bubbled CO2 and saline solutions, at formation temperatures. These concentration data were compared with produced water data from current UK offshore hydrocarbon extraction activities. The comparison showed that, taking the North Sea as a whole, the experimental results fall within the range of concentrations of current oil and gas activities. However, on a field-by-field basis, concentrations may be enhanced with CO2 storage, such that they are higher than waters normally produced from a particular field. Lead, nickel and zinc showed the greatest concentration increases in the experiments with the addition of CO2, with the other five elements of interest not showing any strong trends with respect to enhanced CO2. The origin of the increased trace element concentrations was investigated using sequential leaching experiments. A six step method of increasingly aggressive leaching was developed, based on modification of methods outlined by Tessier et al

  16. Damage evaluation for crops exposed to a simulated leakage of geologically stored CO2 using hyperspectral imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burud, Ingunn; Moni, Christophe; Flø, Andreas; Rolstad Denby, Cecilie; Rasse, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Facilities for the geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes will be designed to prevent any leakage from the defined 'storage complex'. However, even though the risk is of low probability, the precautionary principle requires that near surface environments that might be at risk be thoroughly monitored to detect a leak, were it to happen. Among all currently proposed monitoring methods, only hyperspectral imaging of vegetation stress response allows one to scan large areas rapidly and in detail. Until now, however, only a handful of studies have been carried out on using this novel technology. The aim of the present communication was to characterize the impacts that a simulated CO2 leak might have on the hyperspectral signature of a Norwegian oats crop. In order to test the effects of different intensity of leakage, a CO2 exposure field experiment was designed to create a longitudinal CO2 gradient. For this purpose a gas supply pipe was inserted at one end of a 6m by 3m experimental plot at the base of a 45 cm thick layer of sand buried 40 cm below the surface under a silt loam plough layer. CO2 was then injected at a rate of 2l.min-1 just after the oats had germinated at the end of June, and Facilities for the geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes will be designed to prevent any leakage from the defined 'storage complex'. However, even though the risk is of low probability, the precautionary principle requires that near surface environments that might be at risk be thoroughly monitored to detect a leak, were it to happen. Among all currently proposed monitoring methods, only hyperspectral imaging of vegetation stress response allows one to scan large areas rapidly and in detail. Until now, however, only a handful of studies have been carried out on using this novel technology. The aim of the present communication was to characterize the impacts that a

  17. Geologic constraints on earth system sensitivity to CO2 during the Cretaceous and early Paleogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Beerling

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Earth system sensitivity (ESS is the long-term (>103 yr equilibrium temperature response to doubled CO2. ESS has climate policy implications because global temperatures are not expected to decline appreciably for at least 103 yr, even if anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions drop to zero. We report quantitative ESS estimates of 3 °C or higher for much of the Cretaceous and early Paleogene based on paleo-reconstructions of CO2 and temperature. These estimates are generally higher than climate sensitivities simulated from global climate models for the same ancient periods (~3 °C. We conclude that climate models do not capture the full suite of positive climate feedbacks during greenhouse worlds. These absent feedbacks are probably related to clouds, trace greenhouse gases, seasonal snow cover, and/or vegetation, especially in polar regions. Continued warming in the coming decades as anthropogenic greenhouse gases accumulate in the atmosphere ensures that characterizing and quantifying these positive climate feedbacks will become a scientific challenge of increasing priority.

  18. Optimization of CO2 Laser Cutting Process using Taguchi and Dual Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Madić

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Selection of optimal cutting parameter settings for obtaining high cut quality in CO2 laser cutting process is of great importance. Among various analytical and experimental optimization methods, the application of Taguchi and response surface methodology is one of most commonly used for laser cutting process optimization. Although the concept of dual response surface methodology for process optimization has been used with success, till date, no experimental study has been reported in the field of laser cutting. In this paper an approach for optimization of CO2 laser cutting process using Taguchi and dual response surface methodology is presented. The goal was to determine the near optimal laser cutting parameter values in order to ensure robust condition for minimization of average surface roughness. To obtain experimental database for development of response surface models, Taguchi’s L25 orthogonal array was implemented for experimental plan. Three cutting parameters, the cutting speed (3, 4, 5, 6, 7 m/min, the laser power (0.7, 0.9, 1.1, 1.3, 1.5 kW, and the assist gas pressure (3, 4, 5, 6, 7 bar, were used in the experiment. To obtain near optimal cutting parameters settings, multi-stage Monte Carlo simulation procedure was performed on the developed response surface models.

  19. The CO2 Geological Sealing Conditions and Potential Evaluation in Coal Seams in Jiangsu Province%江苏省CO2煤层地质封存条件与潜力评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚素平; 汤中一; 谭丽华; 裴文明

    2012-01-01

    The geological conditions of CO2 sequestration in coal seams in Jiangsu Province contain the distribution of Carboniferous-Permian coal measures,coal resources and coal seam reservoir conditions. According to the comprehensive research about the geological conditions of CO2 sequestration in coal seams, the preliminary assessments of the storage potential are made for the coal fields in southern Jiangsu, Xuzhou and Fengpei, respectively. The results show that the coal seams in these coal fields have considerable potential and disposal prospect for CO2 sequestration. The estimate of CO2 storage resources in coal seams in Jiangsu Province is over three hundred million tons of CO2. Among these coal seams .southern Jiangsu coal area could sequester 81 million tons of CO2,Xuzhou coal area of nearly 150 million tons of CO2 and Fengpei coal area of 87 million tons of CO2. The prospect of typical coal-seam CO2 sequestration can be divided into three categories : suitable storage area( Class A), less suitable storage area ( B), and poor storage area ( Class C).%根据江苏省石炭—二叠纪煤系的分布、煤炭资源量和煤层的储集条件等煤封存CO2地质条件的综合研究,分别对苏南煤田、徐州煤田、丰沛煤田煤层封存CO2的潜力进行了初步评估,认为该区CO2煤层封存具有一定的潜力和前景.评估结果表明江苏省煤层可存储CO2总量超过3×108t,其中苏南含煤区可存储CO2容量为8.1×107 t,徐州煤矿区可存储容量近1.5×108t,丰沛煤矿区为8.7× 107t.并对各典型含煤区块CO2煤封存前景进行分类:适合存储区(A类)、较适合存储区(B类)和较差存储区(C类).

  20. Multi-Objective Optimization for Solid Amine CO2 Removal Assembly in Manned Spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong A

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA is one of the most important systems in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS for a manned spacecraft. With the development of adsorbent and CDRA technology, solid amine is increasingly paid attention due to its obvious advantages. However, a manned spacecraft is launched far from the Earth, and its resources and energy are restricted seriously. These limitations increase the design difficulty of solid amine CDRA. The purpose of this paper is to seek optimal design parameters for the solid amine CDRA. Based on a preliminary structure of solid amine CDRA, its heat and mass transfer models are built to reflect some features of the special solid amine adsorbent, Polyethylenepolyamine adsorbent. A multi-objective optimization for the design of solid amine CDRA is discussed further in this paper. In this study, the cabin CO2 concentration, system power consumption and entropy production are chosen as the optimization objectives. The optimization variables consist of adsorption cycle time, solid amine loading mass, adsorption bed length, power consumption and system entropy production. The Improved Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II is used to solve this multi-objective optimization and to obtain optimal solution set. A design example of solid amine CDRA in a manned space station is used to show the optimal procedure. The optimal combinations of design parameters can be located on the Pareto Optimal Front (POF. Finally, Design 971 is selected as the best combination of design parameters. The optimal results indicate that the multi-objective optimization plays a significant role in the design of solid amine CDRA. The final optimal design parameters for the solid amine CDRA can guarantee the cabin CO2 concentration within the specified range, and also satisfy the requirements of lightweight and minimum energy consumption.

  1. Application of Factorial Design for Gas Parameter Optimization in CO2 Laser Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Dragsted, Birgitte; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1997-01-01

    The effect of different gas process parameters involved in CO2 laser welding has been studied by applying two-set of three-level complete factorial designs. In this work 5 gas parameters, gas type, gas flow rate, gas blowing angle, gas nozzle diameter, gas blowing point-offset, are optimized...... to be a very useful tool for parameter optimi-zation in laser welding process. Keywords: CO2 laser welding, gas parameters, factorial design, Analysis of Variance........ The bead-on-plate welding specimens are evaluated by a number of quality char-acteristics, such as the penetration depth and the seam width. The significance of the gas pa-rameters and their interactions are based on the data found by the Analysis of Variance-ANOVA. This statistic methodology is proven...

  2. Contribution of terrigenous rocks of South Belgian coal deposits in geological storage of CO2 : the sandstones case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, N.; Baele, J.-M.

    2009-04-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in unmined coal seams is one of the different options for storing CO2 in geological reservoirs. In favorable situations, it could be coupled with the retrieving of adsorbed methane from coal (ECBM), which can make this solution economically more attractive. However, in the case of South Belgian coal measures, both weak permeability of the coal and frequent faulting/folding of the seams are likely to decrease the efficiency of this technique. Westphalian A and B sediments from South Belgium are containing only about 2.5% vol. of coal; the other rocks consisting of shales/siltstones (~80%) and sandstones (~20%). For all these lithologies, the main processes of CO2 sequestration are 1) adsorption in coal and clay minerals that are partly forming shales, and within rock porosity in the case of sandstones and, to a lesser extent, in the shales/siltstone porosity. In a previous assessment of the sequestration potential in Westphalian coal measures of South Belgium, Baele et al. (2007) showed that coal and shales each account for 25% of the total sequestration potential, and the rest, i.e. 50%, is related to sandstones on a basis of 2% porosity. Beside their significant additional storage capacity, sandstones have also a better permeability than the other finer-grained and organic lithologies. Additionally, sandstones are known to occasionally cut the coal seams (wash-out), thus providing insights in increasing accessibility of injected CO2 into the coal. On the other hand, some sandstone banks are fossil braided rivers that induced peripheral fractures by differential compaction during burial diagenesis (Van Tongeren et al., 2000). These fractures are thus likely to have increased accessibility from high-injectivity sandstones to surrounding lithologies that could significantly contribute to storage capacity. The aim of this study is to refine the contribution of the westphalian South Belgium sandstones to the geological storage of CO2. Measurements

  3. 3D Seismic Imaging of a Geological Storage of CO2 Site: Hontomín (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Juan; Martí, David; Juhlin, Christopher; Malehmir, Alireza; Sopher, Daniel; Marzán, Ignacio; Calahorrano, Alcinoe; Ayarza, Puy; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Carbonell, Ramon

    2013-04-01

    A 3D seismic reflection survey was acquired in the summer of 2010 over the Hontomín CO2 storage site (Spain), with the aim of imaging its internal structure and to provide a 3D seismic baseline model prior to CO2 injection. The 36 km2 survey utilised 25 m source and receiver point spacing and 5000 shotpoints recorded with mixed source (Vibroseis and explosives). The target reservoir is a saline aquifer located at approximately 1450 m, within Lower Jurassic carbonates (Lias). The main seal is formed by inter-layered marls and marly limestones of Early to Middle Jurassic age (Dogger and Lias). The relatively complex geology and the rough topography strongly influenced the selection of parameters for the data processing. Static corrections and post stack migration were shown to be the most important processes affecting the quality of the final image. The match between the differing source wavelets is also studied here. The resulting 3D image provides information of all the relevant geological features of the storage site, including position and shape of the main underground formations. The target structure is an asymmetric dome. The steepest flank of the structure was selected as the optimum location for CO2 injection, where the updip migration of the plume is anticipated. A major strike slip fault (the South fault), crossing the study area W-E, has been mapped through the whole seismic volume. The injection position and the expected migration plume are located to the north of this main fault and away from its influence.

  4. Permeability reduction produced by grain reorganization and accumulation of exsolved CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration: a new CO2 trapping mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Andrew J; Kong, Xiang-Zhao; Tutolo, Benjamin M; Ding, Kang; Saar, Martin O; Seyfried, William E

    2013-01-01

    Carbon sequestration experiments were conducted on uncemented sediment and lithified rock from the Eau Claire Formation, which consisted primarily of K-feldspar and quartz. Cores were heated to accentuate reactivity between fluid and mineral grains and to force CO(2) exsolution. Measured permeability of one sediment core ultimately reduced by 4 orders of magnitude as it was incrementally heated from 21 to 150 °C. Water-rock interaction produced some alteration, yielding sub-μm clay precipitation on K-feldspar grains in the core's upstream end. Experimental results also revealed abundant newly formed pore space in regions of the core, and in some cases pores that were several times larger than the average grain size of the sediment. These large pores likely formed from elevated localized pressure caused by rapid CO(2) exsolution within the core and/or an accumulating CO(2) phase capable of pushing out surrounding sediment. CO(2) filled the pores and blocked flow pathways. Comparison with a similar experiment using a solid arkose core indicates that CO(2) accumulation and grain reorganization mainly contributed to permeability reduction during the heated sediment core experiment. This suggests that CO(2) injection into sediments may store more CO(2) and cause additional permeability reduction than is possible in lithified rock due to grain reorganization.

  5. Rock Physics Analysis for the Characterization of the Geological CO2 Storage Prospect in Southwestern Ulleung Basin, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, G.; Han, J.; Lee, M.; Keehm, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We performed rock physical analysis for the characterization of the CO2 storage site in Ulleung basin, Korea. We obtained the characteristics of target formation from the previous work, which contains comprehensive analyses on key horizons and stratigraphy. After verifying the previous work with well-log data, we performed rock physics modeling to obtain the interrelations between reservoir properties and seismic property for key units, such as shale volume-impedance and porosity-impedance relations. We applied the relations to inverted acoustic impedance from 3D seismic data, and obtained 3D distribution maps for shale volume and porosity. We found around 10-meter-thick cap rock unit (Unit 2-3) and two reservoir units (Unit 3-1 & 3-2) with thickness of a few hundred meters. Unit 2-3 has consistently high shale volume throughout the study area, which implies that it can be a good cap rock. Unit 3-1 and 3-2 seem to be good reservoir layers and their average sand thicknesses are 60 m and 150 m, respectively. From this preliminary analysis, the pore volume of the sand intervals of two reservoirs units is estimated to be 20 billion cubic meters. If we assume that one percent of sand pore volume can be replaced by injected CO2, the injectable amount of CO2 would be 136 million metric tonne. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine Geological Storage" funded by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, Korea (No. 20052004), and "Energy Efficiency & Resources of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant" funded by the Ministry of Trade, Industry & energy (No. 20132010201760).

  6. Carbon and oxygen isotope analysis of leaf biomass reveals contrasting photosynthetic responses to elevated CO2 near geologic vents in Yellowstone National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sharma

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we explore the use of natural CO2 emissions in Yellowstone National Park (YNP in Wyoming, USA to study responses of natural vegetation to elevated CO2 levels. Radiocarbon (14C analysis of leaf biomass from a conifer (Pinus contortus; lodgepole pine and an invasive, non-native herb (Linaria dalmatica; Dalmation toadflax was used to trace the inputs of vent CO2 and quantify assimilation-weighted CO2 concentrations experienced by individual plants near vents and in comparable locations with no geologic CO2 exposure. The carbon and oxygen isotopic composition and nitrogen percent of leaf biomass from the same plants was used to investigate photosynthetic responses of these plants to naturally elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The coupled shifts in carbon and oxygen isotope values suggest that dalmation toadflax responded to elevated CO2 exposure by increasing stomatal conductance with no change in photosynthetic capacity and lodgepole pine apparently responded by decreasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Lodgepole pine saplings exposed to elevated levels of CO2 likewise had reduced leaf nitrogen concentrations compared to plants with no enhanced CO2 exposure, further suggesting that this widespread and dominant conifer down-regulated photosynthetic capacity under elevated CO2 levels near geologic vents.

  7. Carbon and oxygen isotope analysis of leaf biomass reveals contrasting photosynthetic responses to elevated CO2 near geologic vents in Yellowstone National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Williams

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we explore the use of natural CO2 emissions in Yellowstone National Park (YNP in Wyoming, USA to study responses of natural vegetation to elevated CO2 levels. Radiocarbon (14C analysis of leaf biomass from a conifer (Pinus contortus; lodgepole pine and an invasive, non-native herb (Linaria dalmatica; Dalmation toadflax was used to trace the inputs of vent CO2 and quantify assimilation-weighted CO2 concentrations experienced by individual plants near vents and in comparable locations with no geologic CO2 exposure. The carbon and oxygen isotopic composition and nitrogen percent of leaf biomass from the same plants was used to investigate photosynthetic responses of these plants to naturally elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The coupled shifts in carbon and oxygen isotope values suggest that dalmation toadflax responded to elevated CO2 exposure by increasing stomatal conductance with no change in photosynthetic capacity and lodgepole pine apparently responded by decreasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Lodgepole pine saplings exposed to elevated levels of CO2 likewise had reduced leaf nitrogen concentrations compared to plants with no enhanced CO2 exposure, further suggesting widespread and dominant conifer down-regulated photosynthetic capacity under elevated CO2 levels near geologic vents.

  8. Analysis of GHG Emission Reduction in South Korea Using a CO2 Transportation Network Optimization Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Ho Jin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Korea’s national carbon capture and storage (CCS master plan aims to commercialize CCS projects by 2030. Furthermore, the Korean government is forced to reduce emissions from various sectors, including industries and power generation, by 219 million tons by 2030. This study analyzes a few scenarios of Korean CCS projects with a CO2 pipeline transportation network optimization model for minimizing the total facility cost and pipeline cost. Our scenarios are based on the “2030 asic roadmap for reducing greenhouse gases” established by the government. The results for each scenario demonstrate that the effective design and implementation of CO2 pipeline network enables the lowering of CO2 units cost. These suggest that CO2 transportation networks, which connect the capture and sequestration parts, will be more important in the future and can be used to substitute and supplement the emission reduction target in case the execution of other reduction options faces uncertainty. Our mathematical model and scenario designs will be helpful for various countries which plan to introduce CCS technology.

  9. Combinatorial optimization of CO2 transport and fixation to improve succinate production by promoter engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun-Han; Zhu, Li-Wen; Xia, Shi-Tao; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Ling; Liang, Xin-Hua; Chen, Tao; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2016-07-01

    To balance the flux of an engineered metabolic pathway to achieve high yield of target product is a major challenge in metabolic engineering. In previous work, the collaborative regulation of CO2 transport and fixation was investigated with co-overexpressing exogenous genes regulating both CO2 transport (sbtA and bicA) and PEP carboxylation (phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (ppc) and carboxykinase (pck)) under trc promoter in Escherichia coli for succinate biosynthesis. For balancing metabolic flux to maximize succinate titer, a combinatorial optimization strategy to fine-tuning CO2 transport and fixation process was implemented by promoter engineering in this study. Firstly, based on the energy matrix a synthetic promoter library containing 20 rationally designed promoters with strengths ranging from 0.8% to 100% compared with the widely used trc promoter was generated. Evaluations of rfp and cat reporter genes provided evidence that the synthetic promoters were stably and had certain applicability. Secondly, four designed promoters with different strengths were used for combinatorial assembly of single CO2 transport gene (sbtA or bicA) and single CO2 fixation gene (ppc or pck) expression. Three combinations, such as Tang1519 (P4 -bicA + pP19 -pck), Tang1522 (P4 -sbtA + P4 -ppc), Tang1523 (P4 -sbtA + P17 -ppc) with a more than 10% increase in succinate production were screened in bioreactor. Finally, based on the above results, co-expression of the four transport and fixation genes were further investigated. Co-expression of sbtA, bicA, and ppc with weak promoter P4 and pck with strong promoter P19 (AFP111/pT-P4 -bicA-P4 -sbtA + pACYC-P19 -pck-P4 -ppc) provided the best succinate production among all the combinations. The highest succinate production of 89.4 g/L was 37.5% higher than that obtained with empty vector control. This work significantly enhanced succinate production through combinatorial optimization of CO2 transport and fixation

  10. Waterflooding optimization in uncertain geological scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capolei, Andrea; Suwartadi, Eka; Foss, Bjarne;

    2013-01-01

    In conventional waterflooding of an oil field, feedback based optimal control technologies may enable higher oil recovery than with a conventional reactive strategy in which producers are closed based on water breakthrough. To compensate for the inherent geological uncertainties in an oil field, ...

  11. Optimization of a prognostic biosphere model for terrestrial biomass and atmospheric CO2 variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saito

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the capacity of a prognostic biosphere model to simulate global variability in atmospheric CO2 concentrations and vegetation carbon dynamics under current environmental conditions. Global data sets of atmospheric CO2 concentrations, above-ground biomass (AGB, and net primary productivity (NPP in terrestrial vegetation were assimilated into the biosphere model using an inverse modeling method combined with an atmospheric transport model. In this process, the optimal physiological parameters of the biosphere model were estimated by minimizing the misfit between observed and modeled values, and parameters were generated to characterize various biome types. Results obtained using the model with the optimized parameters correspond to the observed seasonal variations in CO2 concentration and their annual amplitudes in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In simulating the mean annual AGB and NPP, the model shows improvements in estimating the mean magnitudes and probability distributions for each biome, as compared with results obtained using prior simulation parameters. However, the model is less efficient in its simulation of AGB for forest type biomes. This misfit suggests that more accurate values of input parameters, specifically, grid mean AGB values and seasonal variabilities in physiological parameters, are required to improve the performance of the simulation model.

  12. Multi-criteria optimization in CO2 laser ablation of multimode polymer waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrin, K. F.; Zakariyah, S. S.; Sheikh, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    High interconnection density associated with current electronics products poses certain challenges in designing circuit boards. Methods, including laser-assisted microvia drilling and surface mount technologies for example, are being used to minimize the impacts of the problems. However, the bottleneck is significantly pronounced at bit data rates above 10 Gbit/s where losses, especially those due to crosstalk, become high. One solution is optical interconnections (OI) based on polymer waveguides. Laser ablation of the optical waveguides is viewed as a very compatible technique with ultraviolet laser sources, such as excimer and UV Nd:YAG lasers, being used due to their photochemical nature and minimal thermal effect when they interact with optical materials. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the application of grey relational analysis to determine the optimized processing parameters concerning fabrication of multimode optical polymer waveguides by using infra-red 10.6 μm CO2 laser micromachining to etch acrylate-based photopolymer (Truemode™). CO2 laser micromachining offers a low cost and high speed fabrication route needed for high volume productions as the wavelength of CO2 lasers can couple well with a variety of polymer substrates. Based on the highest grey relational grade, the optimized processing parameters are determined at laser power of 3 W and scanning speed of 100 mm/s.

  13. Cost Optimal Reliability Based Inspection and Replacement Planning of Piping Subjected to CO2 Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellevik, S. G.; Langen, I.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1999-01-01

    A methodology for cost optimal reliability based inspection and replacement planning of piping subjected to CO2 corrosion is described. Both initial (design phase) and in-service planning are dealt with. The methodology is based on the application of methods for structural reliability analysis...... within the framework of Bayesian decision theory. The planning problem is formulated as an optimization problem where the expected lifetime costs are minimized with a constraint on the minimum acceptable reliability level. The optimization parameters are the number of inspections in the expected lifetime......, the inspection times and methods. In the design phase the nominal design wall thickness is also treated as an optimization parameter. The most important benefits gained through the application of the methodology are consistent evaluation of the consequences of different inspection and replacement plans...

  14. Evaluation of Optimal Pore Size of (3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane Grafted MCM-41 for Improved CO2 Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An array of new MCM-41 with substantially larger average pore diameters was synthesized through adding 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB as the swelling agent to explore the effect of pore size on final adsorbent properties. The pore expanded MCM-41 was also grafted with (3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES to determine the optimal pore size for CO2 adsorption. The pore-expanded mesoporous MCM-41s showed relatively less structural regularity but significant increments of pore diameter (4.64 to 7.50 nm; the fraction of mesopore volume also illustrated an increase. The adsorption heat values were correlated with the order of the adsorption capacities for pore expanded MCM-41s. After amine functionalization, the adsorption capacities and heat values showed a significant increase. APTES-grafted pore-expanded MCM-41s depicted a high potential for CO2 capture regardless of the major drawback of the high energy required for regeneration.

  15. Optimal control system design for IGCC power plants with CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Designing an optimal control system for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture addresses the challenge of efficiently operating and controlling a coal-fed IGCC plant with the desired extent of CO2 capture in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. The control system design needs to optimize a desired scalar objective function while satisfying all the operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. Various objective functions can be considered for the control system design such as maximization of profit, maximization of the power produced, or minimization of the auxiliary power. The design of such a control system makes the plant suitable to play an active role in the smart grid era as the plant will have the required agility. In addition, other penalty function(s) such as emission penalties for CO2 or other criteria pollutants can be considered in the framework as well as losses associated with any hydrogen or carbon monoxide loses. The proposed control system design is performed in two stages. In the first stage, a top-down analysis is performed to generate a list of controlled, manipulated, and disturbance variables considering a scalar operational objective and other process constraints. In the second stage, a bottom-up approach for simultaneous design of the control structure and the controllers is used. In this paper, the first stage of the two-stage approach is applied to the IGCC’s acid gas removal (AGR) process which removes both H2S and CO2 from the shifted synthesis gas. While these results are still preliminary, they demonstrate the application of the proposed approach for a commercial-scale plant and show some interesting results related to controlled variable selection. Such an approach can be followed not only to design control systems for new power plants, but also to retrofit control systems for existing plants

  16. Characterization of the Helderberg Group as a geologic seal for CO 2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J.E.; McDowell, R.R.; Avary, K.L.; Carter, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership recognizes that both the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone and the Silurian Salina Group offer potential for subsurface carbon dioxide storage in northern West Virginia. The Silurian-Devonian Helderberg Group lies stratigraphically between these two units, and consequendy, its potential as a geologic seal must be evaluated. Predominantly a carbonate interval with minor interbedded siliciclastics and chert, the Helderberg Group was deposited in an ancient epeiric sea. Although most previous investigations of this unit have concentrated on outcrops in eastern West Virginia, new information is available from an injection well drilled along the Ohio River at First Energy's R. E. Burger electric power plant near Shadyside, Ohio. Geophysical, seismic, and core data from this well have been combined with existing outcrop information to evaluate the Helderberg Group's potential as a seal. The data collected suggest that only secondary porosity remains, and permeability, if it exists, most likely occurs along faults or within fractures. ?? 2009. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  17. Using the Choquet integral for screening geological CO2 storage sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.

    2011-03-01

    For geological CO{sub 2} storage site selection, it is desirable to reduce the number of candidate sites through a screening process before detailed site characterization is performed. Screening generally involves defining a number of criteria which then need to be evaluated for each site. The importance of each criterion to the final evaluation will generally be different. Weights reflecting the relative importance of these criteria can be provided by experts. To evaluate a site, each criterion must be evaluated and scored, and then aggregated, taking into account the importance of the criteria. We propose the use of the Choquet integral for aggregating the scores. The Choquet integral considers the interactions among criteria, i.e. whether they are independent, complementary to each other, or partially repetitive. We also evaluate the Shapley index, which demonstrates how the importance of a given piece of information may change if it is considered by itself or together with other available information. An illustrative example demonstrates how the Choquet integral properly accounts for the presence of redundancy in two site-evaluation criteria, making the screening process more defensible than the standard weighted-average approach.

  18. Genesis of oH-associated CO2 and its significance in petroleum geology%油伴生CO2气的成因及其石油地质意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲希玉; 刘立; 杨会东; 刘娜; 张立东; 王卫学

    2011-01-01

    以松辽盆地南部油伴生CO2气为研究对象,通过组分分析及碳、氧及氮同位素分析,结合中国已有伴生CO2气的含量及同位素数据,研究油伴生CO2气的成因及其意义.结果表明:中国油伴生气中CO2的含量为0~99.53%,大部分在5%以下;油伴生CO2气的δ13 CcO2值为-15.91‰+6.49‰,集中分布于-13‰~ -4‰,以无机成因气为主;松辽盆地南部油伴生CO2气的含量为1.43% ~54.22%,δ13CcO2值为-5.32‰~ -6.76‰,为幔源-岩浆成因;幔源-岩浆成因油伴生CO2气与气藏中的CO2气成因一致,注入时间一般晚于油气大规模充注时间,CO2充注驱油普遍存在;在幔源-岩浆CO2与油气混合成藏地区(如松辽盆地南部)寻找幔源-岩浆CO2充注驱油成因的次生油气藏将是一个新的勘探思路.%Taking the oil-associated CO, samples from southern Songliao Basin as the research object, the genesis and significance of the oil-associated CO2 were studied through component analysis, carbon, oxygen and helium isotopic analysis and combining with the existent oil-associated CO2 content and isotopic data in China. The results show that the CO2 content of oil-associated gas in China is 0-99. 53% , most of which is less than 5%. Carbon stable isotopic value for CO2 ranges from -15. 91‰ to 6.49‰, which mainly distributes in the section of -13‰ to -4‰, indicates that most of CO2 has an inorganic origin. The content and the carbon stable isotopic value for the oil-associated CO2 in southern Songliao Basin range from 1.43‰ to 54.22‰ and -5. 23‰ to -6.76‰, respectively, suggesting a mantle-magmatic origin. As the oil-associated CO2 and CO2 in gas reservoir had the same origin, and the injected-time for oil-associated CO2 was later than the large scale oil and gas generation. The C02 flooding was common in geologic history. In the mixed-reservoir contained mantle-magmatic CO2 and oil, such as the southern Songliao Basin, secondary oil and gas

  19. Numerical investigation for the impact of CO2 geologic sequestration on regional groundwater flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H.; Zhang, K.; Karasaki, K.; Marui, A.; Uehara, H.; Nishikawa, N.

    2009-04-15

    Large-scale storage of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers may cause considerable pressure perturbation and brine migration in deep rock formations, which may have a significant influence on the regional groundwater system. With the help of parallel computing techniques, we conducted a comprehensive, large-scale numerical simulation of CO{sub 2} geologic storage that predicts not only CO{sub 2} migration, but also its impact on regional groundwater flow. As a case study, a hypothetical industrial-scale CO{sub 2} injection in Tokyo Bay, which is surrounded by the most heavily industrialized area in Japan, was considered, and the impact of CO{sub 2} injection on near-surface aquifers was investigated, assuming relatively high seal-layer permeability (higher than 10 microdarcy). A regional hydrogeological model with an area of about 60 km x 70 km around Tokyo Bay was discretized into about 10 million gridblocks. To solve the high-resolution model efficiently, we used a parallelized multiphase flow simulator TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N on a world-class high performance supercomputer in Japan, the Earth Simulator. In this simulation, CO{sub 2} was injected into a storage aquifer at about 1 km depth under Tokyo Bay from 10 wells, at a total rate of 10 million tons/year for 100 years. Through the model, we can examine regional groundwater pressure buildup and groundwater migration to the land surface. The results suggest that even if containment of CO{sub 2} plume is ensured, pressure buildup on the order of a few bars can occur in the shallow confined aquifers over extensive regions, including urban inlands.

  20. One-knob self-optimizing fuzzy control of CO2 arc welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞建荣; 蒋力培

    2002-01-01

    A new one-knob self-optimizing fuzzy control system of CO2 arc welding is established based on the synthetic performance evaluation of droplet transfer process. It includes two kinds of self-optimizing fuzzy controllers: the arc voltage controller and the current waveform controller. The fuzzy control principle and the key points of the control patterns are presented. Through on-line detecting, computing of characteristic parameters and one-knob self-optimizing adjusting, the characteristic parameters and welding variables can be adjusted to suitable ranges under the control of the arc voltage controller. Meanwhile the current waveform controller is active in the rear-time stage of the short-circuiting and the instant of re-triggering arc. The experiment results show that the control and its algorithm can improve the synthetic performance of arc welding process apparently.

  1. Optimization of Supercritical CO2 Extraction of Fish Oil from Viscera of African Catfish (Clarias gariepinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zaidul Islam Sarker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fish oil was extracted from the viscera of African Catfish using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2. A Central Composite Design of Response Surface methodology (RSM was employed to optimize the SC-CO2 extraction parameters. The oil yield (Y as response variable was executed against the four independent variables, namely pressure, temperature, flow rate and soaking time. The oil yield varied with the linear, quadratic and interaction of pressure, temperature, flow rate and soaking time. Optimum points were observed within the variables of temperature from 35 °C to 80 °C, pressure from 10 MPa to 40 MPa, flow rate from 1 mL/min to 3 mL/min and soaking time from 1 h to 4 h. However, the extraction parameters were found to be optimized at temperature 57.5 °C, pressure 40 MPa, flow rate 2.0 mL/min and soaking time 2.5 h. At this optimized condition, the highest oil yields were found to be 67.0% (g oil/100 g sample on dry basis in the viscera of catfish which was reasonable to the yields of 78.0% extracted using the Soxhlet method.

  2. ULTimateCO2 project: Field experiment in an underground rock laboratory to study the well integrity in the context of CO2 geological storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manceau, J.C.; Audigane, P.; Claret, F.; Parmentier, M.; Tambach, T.J.; Wasch, L.; Gherardi, F.; Dimier, A.; Ukelis, O.; Jeandel, E.; Cladt, F.; Zorn, R.; Yalamas, T.; Nussbaum, C.; Laurent, A.; Fierz, T.; Pieedevache, M.

    2013-01-01

    Wells drilled through low-permeable caprock are potential connections between the CO2 storage reservoir and overlying sensitive targets like aquifers and targets located at the surface. The wellbore integrity can be compromised due to in situ operations, including drilling, completion, operations

  3. Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-04-01

    when low-carbon energy is considered cheap enough to replace fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one such bridging technology (1). CCS has been the focus of an increasing amount of research over the last 15-20 years and is the subject of a comprehensive IPCC report that thoroughly covers the subject (1). CCS is currently being carried out in several countries around the world in conjunction with natural gas extraction (e.g., 2, 3) and enhanced oil recovery (17). Despite this progress, widespread deployment of CCS remains the subject of research and future plans rather than present action on the scale needed to mitigate emissions from the perspective of climate change. The reasons for delay in deploying CCS more widely are concerns about cost (18), regulatory and legal uncertainty (19), and potential environmental impacts (21). This chapter discusses the long-term (decadal) sustainability and environmental hazards associated with the geologic CO{sub 2} storage (GCS) component of large-scale CCS (e.g., 20). Discussion here barely touches on capture and transport of CO{sub 2} which will occur above ground and which are similar to existing engineering, chemical processing, and pipeline transport activities and are therefore easier to evaluate with respect to risk assessment and feasibility. The focus of this chapter is on the more uncertain part of CCS, namely geologic storage. The primary concern for sustainability of GCS is whether there is sufficient capacity in sedimentary basins worldwide to contain the large of amounts of CO{sub 2} needed to address climate change. But there is also a link between sustainability and environmental impacts. Specifically, if GCS is found to cause unacceptable impacts that are considered worse than its climate-change mitigation benefits, the approach will not be widely adopted. Hence, GCS has elements of sustainability insofar as capacity of the subsurface for CO{sub 2} is concerned, and also in terms of whether the

  4. Application of numerical simulation to pilot project of CO2 geological sequestration%数值模拟在CO2地质封存示范项目中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    The geological sequestration of CO2 in deep saline aquifer is an effective countermeasure for reducing global warming and greenhouse effect. Based on the Shenhua Ordos CO2 capture and storage (CCS) pilot project, the behavior of CO2 in deep saline aquifers is investigated. The transport process of CO2 fluid, the pressure buildup of system and the reserves potential of sequestration are analyzed. This model can provide technological support and save human and financial resources for Shenhua CCS engineering project. First, the model is calibrated by comparing simulated results and measured pressure values. The suitable pressure curve is obtained and the main hydrological parameters are determined at this stage. Then an assumption of CO2 continuing injection for 3 years is simulated based on the former model. The CO2 diffusion, solution behavior, pressure variation and total reserves of strata are analyzed. The conclusions are drawn as follows: the largest distance of CO2 migration is about 350 m; hydraulic fracturing can improve CO2 injectivity obviously; cap rock can effectively prevent the escape of CO2. Simulation results demonstrate that even though the deep saline aquifers of Ordos basin has low penetrability, it is also suitable for CO2 sequestration.%  CO2深部咸水层地质封存被认为是减缓温室效应的一种有效的工程技术手段。针对神华鄂尔多斯105 t/a CO2捕集与封存(CCS)示范项目,用数值模拟方法对CO2在地层中的运移过程进行了详细地刻画,分析了CO2的流动迁移、地层压力积聚过程及地层封存潜力。数值模型不但可以为工程的顺利进行提供技术支撑,而且可以节省人力财力。首先,根据实际监测数据对模拟参数进行校准,得到了合适的压力拟合曲线,确定了主要的水文地质参数。然后,对为期3 a的CO2续注工程进行预测,详细分析了CO2的晕扩散、溶解情况、地层压力变化情况、储层封存潜

  5. CO2地质封存机理--从实验研究角度综述%A Review of Laboratory Investigation for Mechanisms of CO2 Capture and Geologic Storage (CCGS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢健; 赵可英; 曾小雪

    2016-01-01

    CO2 capture and geologic storage (CCGS) is regarded as an effective strategy for reduction of anthropogenic carbon release and mitigation of global warming. Typical methodologies and theories regarding CCGS laboratory investigation are reviewed. The coupled physical-geochemical processes in relation to four mechanisms of CO2 geologic sequestration are introduced. Findings from core flood experiments such as relationship between CO2 saturation and permeability are included. Multiphase flow apparatus with procedures for laboratory investigation are introduced. A collection of methodologies (equations) for calculation of CCGS-related physical parameters are presented, followed by a brief introduction of petrophysical characterization and geochemical tests. Problems or research opportunities are discussed regarding the current CCGS laboratory work. The paper ends up with suggestion remarks.%CO2地质封存是减少碳排放和减缓气候变暖的一种有效措施。本文综述了CO2地质封存研究的内容、方法、手段及其相关理论和研究成果。阐述 CO2地质封存的四种碳封存机制背后的物理、地球化学过程,CO2注入试验饱和度分布和渗透率的关系等;简要介绍了岩心驱替试验装置和岩石物理分析和化学分析方法及有关参数的计算。指出现有研究存在岩心–次岩心尺度的微观实验研究和反应性迁移模拟研究不足等问题。

  6. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  7. Robust optimization of well location to enhance hysteretical trapping of CO2: Assessment of various uncertainty quantification methods and utilization of mixed response surface surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Masoud; Pan, Indranil; Alkhatib, Ali

    2015-12-01

    The paper aims to solve a robust optimization problem (optimization in presence of uncertainty) for finding the optimal locations of a number of CO2 injection wells for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide in a saline aquifer. The parametric uncertainties are the interfacial tension between CO2 and aquifer brine, the Land's trapping coefficient and the boundary aquifer's absolute permeability. The spatial uncertainties are due to the channelized permeability field which exhibits a binary channel-non-channel system. The objective function of the optimization is the amount of residually trapped CO2 due to the hysteresis of the relative permeability curves. A risk-averse value derived from the cumulative density function of the distribution of the amount of trapped gas is chosen as the objective function value. In order to ensure that the uncertainties are effectively taken into account, Monte Carlo simulation and Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE)-based methods are used and compared with each other. For different cases of parametric and spatial uncertainties, the most accurate uncertainty quantification (UQ) method is chosen to be integrated within the optimization algorithm. While for parametric uncertainty cases of up to two uncertain variables, PCE-based methods computationally outperform Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that for the multimodal distributions of the function of trapped gas occurring for the spatial uncertainty case, Monte Carlo simulations are more reliable than PCE-based UQ methods. For the discrete (integer) optimization problem, various mixed response surface surrogate models are tested and the robust optimization resulted in optimal CO2 injection well locations.

  8. sRecovery Act: Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO2 Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, Michael

    2014-09-30

    This study focuses on evaluating the feasibility and suitability of using the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sediments of the South Georgia Rift basin (SGR) for CO2 storage in southern South Carolina and southern Georgia The SGR basin in South Carolina (SC), prior to this project, was one of the least understood rift basin along the east coast of the U.S. In the SC part of the basin there was only one well (Norris Lightsey #1) the penetrated into J/TR. Because of the scarcity of data, a scaled approach used to evaluate the feasibility of storing CO2 in the SGR basin. In the SGR basin, 240 km (~149 mi) of 2-D seismic and 2.6 km2 3-D (1 mi2) seismic data was collected, process, and interpreted in SC. In southern Georgia 81.3 km (~50.5 mi) consisting of two 2-D seismic lines were acquired, process, and interpreted. Seismic analysis revealed that the SGR basin in SC has had a very complex structural history resulting the J/TR section being highly faulted. The seismic data is southern Georgia suggest SGR basin has not gone through a complex structural history as the study area in SC. The project drilled one characterization borehole (Rizer # 1) in SC. The Rizer #1 was drilled but due to geologic problems, the project team was only able to drill to 1890 meters (6200 feet) instead of the proposed final depth 2744 meters (9002 feet). The drilling goals outlined in the original scope of work were not met. The project was only able to obtain 18 meters (59 feet) of conventional core and 106 rotary sidewall cores. All the conventional core and sidewall cores were in sandstone. We were unable to core any potential igneous caprock. Petrographic analysis of the conventional core and sidewall cores determined that the average porosity of the sedimentary material was 3.4% and the average permeability was 0.065 millidarcy. Compaction and diagenetic studies of the samples determined there would not be any porosity or permeability at depth in SC. In Georgia there appears to be porosity in

  9. [Optimization of extraction process for tannins from Geranium orientali-tibeticum by supercritical CO2 method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Song; Tong, Zhi-Ping; Tan, Rui; Liu, Xiao-Zhen

    2014-08-01

    In order to optimize extraction process conditions of tannins from Geranium orientali-tibeticum by supercritical CO2, the content of tannins was determined by phosphomolybdium tungsten acid-casein reaction, with extraction pressure, extraction temper- ature and extraction time as factors, the content of tannins from extract of G. orientali-tibeticum as index, technology conditions were optimized by orthogonal test. Optimum technology conditions were as follows: extraction pressure was 25 MPa, extraction temperature was 50 °C, extracted 1.5 h. The content of tannins in extract was 12.91 mg x g(-1), extract rate was 3.67%. The method established could be used for assay the contents of tannin in G. orientali-tibeticum. The circulated extraction was an effective extraction process that was stable and feasible, and that provides a way of the extraction process conditions of tannin from G. orientali-tibeticum.

  10. [Optimization of extraction process for tannins from Geranium orientali-tibeticum by supercritical CO2 method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Song; Tong, Zhi-Ping; Tan, Rui; Liu, Xiao-Zhen

    2014-08-01

    In order to optimize extraction process conditions of tannins from Geranium orientali-tibeticum by supercritical CO2, the content of tannins was determined by phosphomolybdium tungsten acid-casein reaction, with extraction pressure, extraction temper- ature and extraction time as factors, the content of tannins from extract of G. orientali-tibeticum as index, technology conditions were optimized by orthogonal test. Optimum technology conditions were as follows: extraction pressure was 25 MPa, extraction temperature was 50 °C, extracted 1.5 h. The content of tannins in extract was 12.91 mg x g(-1), extract rate was 3.67%. The method established could be used for assay the contents of tannin in G. orientali-tibeticum. The circulated extraction was an effective extraction process that was stable and feasible, and that provides a way of the extraction process conditions of tannin from G. orientali-tibeticum.

  11. Selection of Near Optimal Laser Cutting Parameters in CO2 Laser Cutting by the Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš MADIĆ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification of laser cutting conditions that are insensitive to parameter variations and noise is of great importance. This paper demonstrates the application of Taguchi method for optimization of surface roughness in CO2 laser cutting of stainless steel. The laser cutting experiment was planned and conducted according to the Taguchi’s experimental design using the L27 orthogonal array. Four laser cutting parameters such as laser power, cutting speed, assist gas pressure, and focus position were considered in the experiment. Using the analysis of means and analysis of variance, the significant laser cutting parameters were identified, and subsequently the optimal combination of laser cutting parameter levels was determined. The results showed that the cutting speed is the most significant parameter affecting the surface roughness whereas the influence of the assist gas pressure can be neglected. It was observed, however, that interaction effects have predominant influence over the main effects on the surface roughness.

  12. Capillary pressure-saturation relations for supercritical CO2 and brine in limestone/dolomite sands: implications for geologic carbon sequestration in carbonate reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shibo; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2015-06-16

    In geologic carbon sequestration, capillary pressure (Pc)-saturation (Sw) relations are needed to predict reservoir processes. Capillarity and its hysteresis have been extensively studied in oil-water and gas-water systems, but few measurements have been reported for supercritical (sc) CO2-water. Here, Pc-Sw relations of scCO2 displacing brine (drainage), and brine rewetting (imbibition) were studied to understand CO2 transport and trapping behavior under reservoir conditions. Hysteretic drainage and imbibition Pc-Sw curves were measured in limestone sands at 45 °C under elevated pressures (8.5 and 12.0 MPa) for scCO2-brine, and in limestone and dolomite sands at 23 °C (0.1 MPa) for air-brine using a new computer programmed porous plate apparatus. scCO2-brine drainage and imbibition curves shifted to lower Pc relative to predictions based on interfacial tension, and therefore deviated from capillary scaling predictions for hydrophilic interactions. Fitting universal scaled drainage and imbibition curves show that wettability alteration resulted from scCO2 exposure over the course of months-long experiments. Residual trapping of the nonwetting phases was determined at Pc = 0 during imbibition. Amounts of trapped scCO2 were significantly larger than for those for air, and increased with pressure (depth), initial scCO2 saturation, and time. These results have important implications for scCO2 distribution, trapping, and leakage potential.

  13. U.S. Department of Energy's site screening, site selection, and initial characterization for storage of CO2 in deep geological formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodosta, T.D.; Litynski, J.T.; Plasynski, S.I.; Hickman, S.; Frailey, S.; Myer, L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead Federal agency for the development and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. As part of its mission to facilitate technology transfer and develop guidelines from lessons learned, DOE is developing a series of best practice manuals (BPMs) for carbon capture and storage (CCS). The "Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations" BPM is a compilation of best practices and includes flowchart diagrams illustrating the general decision making process for Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization. The BPM integrates the knowledge gained from various programmatic efforts, with particular emphasis on the Characterization Phase through pilot-scale CO2 injection testing of the Validation Phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Initiative. Key geologic and surface elements that suitable candidate storage sites should possess are identified, along with example Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization protocols for large-scale geologic storage projects located across diverse geologic and regional settings. This manual has been written as a working document, establishing a framework and methodology for proper site selection for CO2 geologic storage. This will be useful for future CO2 emitters, transporters, and storage providers. It will also be of use in informing local, regional, state, and national governmental agencies of best practices in proper sequestration site selection. Furthermore, it will educate the inquisitive general public on options and processes for geologic CO2 storage. In addition to providing best practices, the manual presents a geologic storage resource and capacity classification system. The system provides a "standard" to communicate storage and capacity estimates, uncertainty and project development risk, data guidelines and analyses for adequate site characterization, and

  14. Risk Assessment and Management for Long-Term Storage of CO2 in Geologic Formations — United States Department of Energy R&D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Deel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Concern about increasing atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHG and their impact on the earth's climate has grown significantly over the last decade. Many countries, including the United States, wrestle with balancing economic development and meeting critical near-term environmental goals while minimizing long-term environmental risks. One promising solution to the buildup of GHGs in the atmosphere, being pursued by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL and its industrial and academic partners, is carbon sequestration—a process of permanent storage of CO2 emissions in underground geologic formations, thus avoiding CO2 release to the atmosphere. This option looks particularly attractive for point source emissions of GHGs, such as fossil fuel fired power plants. CO2 would be captured, transported to a sequestration site, and injected into an appropriate geologic formation. However, sequestration in geologic formations cannot achieve a significant role in reducing GHG emissions unless it is acceptable to stakeholders, regulators, and the general public, i.e., unless the risks involved are judged to be acceptable. One tool that can be used to achieve acceptance of geologic sequestration of CO2 is risk assessment, which is a proven method to objectively manage hazards in facilities such as oil and natural gas fields, pipelines, refineries, and chemical plants. Although probabilistic risk assessment (PRA has been applied in many areas, its application to geologic CO2 sequestration is still in its infancy. The most significant risk from geologic carbon sequestration is leakage of CO2. Two types of CO2 releases are possible—atmospheric and subsurface. High concentrations of CO2 caused by a release to the atmosphere would pose health risks to humans and animals, and any leakage of CO2 back into the atmosphere negates the effort expended to sequester the CO2

  15. Optimal Renewable Energy Integration into Refinery with CO2 Emissions Consideration: An Economic Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnifro, M.; Taqvi, S. T.; Ahmad, M. S.; Bensaida, K.; Elkamel, A.

    2017-08-01

    With increasing global energy demand and declining energy return on energy invested (EROEI) of crude oil, global energy consumption by the O&G industry has increased drastically over the past few years. In addition, this energy increase has led to an increase GHG emissions, resulting in adverse environmental effects. On the other hand, electricity generation through renewable resources have become relatively cost competitive to fossil based energy sources in a much ‘cleaner’ way. In this study, renewable energy is integrated optimally into a refinery considering costs and CO2 emissions. Using Aspen HYSYS, a refinery in the Middle East was simulated to estimate the energy demand by different processing units. An LP problem was formulated based on existing solar energy systems and wind potential in the region. The multi-objective function, minimizing cost as well as CO2 emissions, was solved using GAMS to determine optimal energy distribution from each energy source to units within the refinery. Additionally, an economic feasibility study was carried out to determine the viability of renewable energy technology project implementation to overcome energy requirement of the refinery. Electricity generation through all renewable energy sources considered (i.e. solar PV, solar CSP and wind) were found feasible based on their low levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). The payback period for a Solar CSP project, with an annual capacity of about 411 GWh and a lifetime of 30 years, was found to be 10 years. In contrast, the payback period for Solar PV and Wind were calculated to be 7 and 6 years, respectively. This opens up possibilities for integrating renewables into the refining sector as well as optimizing multiple energy carrier systems within the crude oil industry

  16. Multi-Objective Optimization of Pulse Testing Results Using Parallel Compositional Simulations for Reservoir Characterization of a CO2-EOR Field in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, B.; Wheeler, M.; Sun, A. Y.

    2016-12-01

    This study aims at calibrating subsurface models by reproducing pulse testing results carried out at a CO2-EOR field located in Mississippi. Pulse testing is a cost-effective tool to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of rock formation for geological carbon sequestration projects because the periodic injection of CO2 reduces the interference on reservoir operations. The pressure perturbation induced by the injection is recorded at two monitoring wells at the test area of the field. The observed pressure pulse patterns are reproduced by running compositional simulations. The computational cost associated with the numerical simulations is reduced using high-performance parallel computing. For efficient history matching, the observed and simulated pulse patterns in the time domain are transformed into the frequency domain using fast Fourier transform. The CO2 injection responses are assimilated using an evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm in order to improve the matching process and to quantify the posterior uncertainty. A tradeoff relationship between the matching qualities measured at the monitoring wells is detected by invoking multi-objective optimization. The posterior ensemble composed of non-dominated subsurface models reduces the bias in the uncertainty models as compared to conventional global-objective optimization algorithms, indicating that the model calibration based on Pareto-optimality can yield rigorous uncertainty quantification.

  17. Distributionally Robust Self-Scheduling Optimization with CO2 Emissions Constraints under Uncertainty of Prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minru Bai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a major energy-saving industry, power industry has implemented energy-saving generation dispatching. Apart from security and economy, low carbon will be the most important target in power dispatch mechanisms. In this paper, considering a power system with many thermal power generators which use different petrochemical fuels (such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas to produce electricity, respectively, we establish a self-scheduling model based on the forecasted locational marginal prices, particularly taking into account CO2 emission constraint, CO2 emission cost, and unit heat value of fuels. Then, we propose a distributionally robust self-scheduling optimization model under uncertainty in both the distribution form and moments of the locational marginal prices, where the knowledge of the prices is solely derived from historical data. We prove that the proposed robust self-scheduling model can be solved to any precision in polynomial time. These arguments are confirmed in a practical example on the IEEE 30 bus test system.

  18. MULTI-OBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION USING GENETIC ALGORITHMS IN MOTSP (CO2 EMISSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EL HASSANI Hicham

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, consumers and legislation have been pushing companies to optimize their activities in such a way as to reduce negative environmental and social impacts more and more. In the other side, companies must keep their total supply chain costs as low as possible to remain competitive. This work aims to develop a model to traveling salesman problem including environmental impacts and to identify, as far as possible, the contribution of genetic operator’s tuning and setting in the success and efficiency of genetic algorithms for solving this problem with consideration of CO2 emission due to transport. This efficiency is calculated in terms of CPU time consumption and convergence of the solution. The best transportation policy is determined by finding a balance between financial and environmental criteria. Empirically, we have demonstrated that the performance of the genetic algorithm undergo relevant improvements during some combinations of parameters and operators which we present in our results part.

  19. 1:1 scale wellbore experiment and associated modeling for a better understanding of well integrity in the context of CO2 geological storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manceau, J.C.; Trémosa, J.; Audigane, P.; Claret, F.; Wasch, L.J.; Gherardi, F.; Ukelis, O.; Dimier, A.; Nussbaum, C.; Lettry, Y.; Fierz, T.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present a new experiment for following the evolution of the well integrity over time due to different changes in well conditions (pressure, temperature and fluids in contact with the well) in the context of CO2 geological storage. A small section of a wellbore is reproduced in the

  20. Transcriptional and metabolic insights into the differential physiological responses of arabidopsis to optimal and supraoptimal atmospheric CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Kaplan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In tightly closed human habitats such as space stations, locations near volcano vents and closed culture vessels, atmospheric CO(2 concentration may be 10 to 20 times greater than Earth's current ambient levels. It is known that super-elevated (SE CO(2 (>1,200 µmol mol(-1 induces physiological responses different from that of moderately elevated CO(2 (up to 1,200 µmol mol(-1, but little is known about the molecular responses of plants to supra-optimal [CO(2]. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand the underlying molecular causes for differential physiological responses, metabolite and transcript profiles were analyzed in aerial tissue of Arabidopsis plants, which were grown under ambient atmospheric CO(2 (400 µmol mol(-1, elevated CO(2 (1,200 µmol mol(-1 and SE CO(2 (4,000 µmol mol(-1, at two developmental stages early and late vegetative stage. Transcript and metabolite profiling revealed very different responses to elevated versus SE [CO(2]. The transcript profiles of SE CO(2 treated plants were closer to that of the control. Development stage had a clear effect on plant molecular response to elevated and SE [CO(2]. Photosynthetic acclimation in terms of down-regulation of photosynthetic gene expression was observed in response to elevated [CO(2], but not that of SE [CO(2] providing the first molecular evidence that there appears to be a fundamental disparity in the way plants respond to elevated and SE [CO(2]. Although starch accumulation was induced by both elevated and SE [CO(2], the increase was less at the late vegetative stage and accompanied by higher soluble sugar content suggesting an increased starch breakdown to meet sink strength resulting from the rapid growth demand. Furthermore, many of the elevated and SE CO(2-responsive genes found in the present study are also regulated by plant hormone and stress. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides new insights into plant acclimation to elevated and SE [CO

  1. Experimental Studies on the Interaction of scCO2 and scCO2-SO2 With Rock Forming Minerals at Conditions of Geologic Carbon Storages - First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erzinger, J.; Wilke, F.; Wiersberg, T.; Vasquez Parra, M.

    2010-12-01

    Co-injection of SO2 (plus possibly NOx and O2) during CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers may cause stronger brine acidification than CO2 alone. Because of that, we investigate chemical corrosion of rocks and rock-forming minerals with impure supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at possible storage conditions of >73.7 bar and >31°C. Contaminates were chosen with respect to the composition of CO2 captured industrially from coal-fired power plants using the oxyfuel technology. The resulting data should build a base for the long-term prediction of the behavior of CO2 in geologic storage reservoirs. Experiments of up to 1000 hrs duration have been performed with 10 natural mineral concentrates (calcite, dolomite, siderite, anhydrite, hematite, albite, microcline, kaolinite, muscovite, biotite) in 3n NaCl solution and pure scCO2 or scCO2+SO2 (99.5+0.5 vol%). The NaCl reaction fluid resembles the average salinity of deep formation waters of the North German Basin and is not free of oxygen. To increase reaction rates all minerals were ground and the reagents agitated either by stirring or shaking in autoclaves of about one liter in volume. The autoclaves consist of Hastelloy™ or ferromagnetic stainless steel fully coated with PTFE. We used in average 15 g of solids, 700 ml liquid, and the vessels were pressurized up to 100 bars with CO2 or CO2-SO2 mixture. Experiments were run at temperatures up to 90°C. Before, during and after the experiments small amounts fluids were sampled and analyzed for dissolved constituents and pH. Solid phases were characterized by XRF, XRD, and EMPA before and after the experiments. Pure scCO2 corrodes all carbonates, reacts only slightly with anhydrite, albite, and microcline at a minimum pH of 4, and does not recognizably interact with the others. After the experiment, albite has gained in a, not yet fully identified, carbonate phase which might be dawsonite. Reaction fluids of the experiments with scCO2+SO2 have mostly lower pH than using scCO2

  2. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helen Kerr

    2004-04-01

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies

  3. CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

    2005-04-15

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre

  4. CO2 Separation Using Thermally Optimized Membranes: A Comprehensive Project Report (2000 - 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2008-03-04

    This is a complete (Fiscal Years 2000–2006) collection of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) research and development contributions to the project, “CO2 Separation Using Thermally Optimized Membranes.” The INL scientific contribution to the project has varied due to the fluctuations in funding from year to year. The focus of the project was polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes and developing PBI compounds (both substitution and blends) that provide good film formation and gas separation membranes. The underlying problem with PBI is its poor solubility in common solvents. Typically, PBI is dissolved in “aggressive” solvents, like N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) and N methylpyrrolidone (NMP). The INL FY-03 research was directed toward making soluble N-substituted PBI polymers, where INL was very successful. Many different types of modified PBI polymers were synthesized; however, film formation proved to be a big problem with both unsubstituted and N-substituted PBIs. Therefore, INL researchers directed their attention to using plasticizers or additives to make the membranes more stable and workable. During the course of these studies, other high-performance polymers (like polyamides and polyimides) were found to be better materials, which could be used either by themselves or blends with PBI. These alternative high-performance polymers provided the best pathway forward for soluble high-temperature polymers with good stable film formation properties. At present, the VTEC polyimides (product of RBI, Inc.) are the best film formers that exhibit high-temperature resistance. INL’s gas testing results show VTEC polyimides have very good gas selectivities for both H2/CO2 and CO2/CH4. Overall, these high-performance polymers pointed towards new research areas where INL has gained a greater understanding of polymer film formation and gas separation. These studies are making possible a direct approach to stable polymer-based high-temperature gas separation membranes

  5. CO2 Separation Using Thermally Optimized Membranes: A Comprehensive Project Report (2000 - 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.R. Klaehn; C.J. Orme; E.S. Peterson; T.A. Luther; M.G. Jones; A.K. Wertsching

    2008-03-01

    This is a complete (Fiscal Years 2000–2006) collection of the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) research and development contributions to the project, “CO2 Separation Using Thermally Optimized Membranes.” The INL scientific contribution to the project has varied due to the fluctuations in funding from year to year. The focus of the project was polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes and developing PBI compounds (both substitution and blends) that provide good film formation and gas separation membranes. The underlying problem with PBI is its poor solubility in common solvents. Typically, PBI is dissolved in “aggressive” solvents, like N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) and N methylpyrrolidone (NMP). The INL FY-03 research was directed toward making soluble N-substituted PBI polymers, where INL was very successful. Many different types of modified PBI polymers were synthesized; however, film formation proved to be a big problem with both unsubstituted and N-substituted PBIs. Therefore, INL researchers directed their attention to using plasticizers or additives to make the membranes more stable and workable. During the course of these studies, other high-performance polymers (like polyamides and polyimides) were found to be better materials, which could be used either by themselves or blends with PBI. These alternative high-performance polymers provided the best pathway forward for soluble high-temperature polymers with good stable film formation properties. At present, the VTEC polyimides (product of RBI, Inc.) are the best film formers that exhibit high-temperature resistance. INL’s gas testing results show VTEC polyimides have very good gas selectivities for both H2/CO2 and CO2/CH4. Overall, these high-performance polymers pointed towards new research areas where INL has gained a greater understanding of polymer film formation and gas separation. These studies are making possible a direct approach to stable polymer-based high-temperature gas separation membranes

  6. Modeling and optimization of a concentrated solar supercritical CO2 power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Julian D.

    Renewable energy sources are fundamental alternatives to supply the rising energy demand in the world and to reduce or replace fossil fuel technologies. In order to make renewable-based technologies suitable for commercial and industrial applications, two main challenges need to be solved: the design and manufacture of highly efficient devices and reliable systems to operate under intermittent energy supply conditions. In particular, power generation technologies based on solar energy are one of the most promising alternatives to supply the world energy demand and reduce the dependence on fossil fuel technologies. In this dissertation, the dynamic behavior of a Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) supercritical CO2 cycle is studied under different seasonal conditions. The system analyzed is composed of a central receiver, hot and cold thermal energy storage units, a heat exchanger, a recuperator, and multi-stage compression-expansion subsystems with intercoolers and reheaters between compressors and turbines respectively. The effects of operating and design parameters on the system performance are analyzed. Some of these parameters are the mass flow rate, intermediate pressures, number of compression-expansion stages, heat exchangers' effectiveness, multi-tank thermal energy storage, overall heat transfer coefficient between the solar receiver and the environment and the effective area of the recuperator. Energy and exergy models for each component of the system are developed to optimize operating parameters in order to lead to maximum efficiency. From the exergy analysis, the components with high contribution to exergy destruction were identified. These components, which represent an important potential of improvement, are the recuperator, the hot thermal energy storage tank and the solar receiver. Two complementary alternatives to improve the efficiency of concentrated solar thermal systems are proposed in this dissertation: the optimization of the system's operating

  7. Reducing refinery CO2 emissions through amine solvent upgrade and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Thiago V.; Valenzuela, Michelle [The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Regional initiatives are underway to reduce and limit the emissions of greenhouse gases. With CO2 emissions making up over 80% of the greenhouse gases, cap-and-trade programs will focus on those industries that consume the most energy. Refineries are among the top energy consumers and are seeking opportunities to reduce usage. With tightening margins, energy management programs will not only help refineries meet CO{sub 2} emission regulations, but can also provide a competitive advantage. With the trend towards heavier and higher sulfur containing crudes, refineries are increasing processing capabilities, which can include capital-intensive projects and additional energy consumption. Energy conservation plans should include optimization of these processes. One area to consider includes the acid gas removal systems in refineries. Through the selection and use of optimal solvents and implementation of energy efficiency techniques, which require minimal capital investment and expenditures, refineries can reduce energy usage, overall CO{sub 2} emissions, and total cost in acid gas systems. This paper will discuss these approaches and share case studies detailing the implementation and results. (author)

  8. Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-10-01

    One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water

  9. Using a laser-based CO2 carbon isotope analyser to investigate gas transfer in geological media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, S.; Pili, E.; Agrinier, P.

    2012-05-01

    CO2 stable carbon isotopes are very attractive in environmental research to investigate both natural and anthropogenic carbon sources. Laser-based CO2 carbon isotope analysis provides continuous measurement at high temporal resolution and is a promising alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We performed a thorough assessment of a commercially available CO2 Carbon Isotope Analyser (CCIA DLT-100, Los Gatos Research) that allows in situ measurement of δ 13C in CO2. Using a set of reference gases of known CO2 concentration and carbon isotopic composition, we evaluated the precision, long-term stability, temperature sensitivity and concentration dependence of the analyser. Despite good precision calculated from Allan variance (5.0 ppm for CO2 concentration, and 0.05 ‰ for δ 13C at 60 s averaging), real performances are altered by two main sources of error: temperature sensitivity and dependence of δ 13C on CO2 concentration. Data processing is required to correct for these errors. Following application of these corrections, we achieve an accuracy of 8.7 ppm for CO2 concentration and 1.3 ‰ for δ 13C, which is worse compared to mass spectrometry performance, but still allowing field applications. With this portable analyser we measured CO2 flux degassed from rock in an underground tunnel. The obtained carbon isotopic composition agrees with IRMS measurement, and can be used to identify the carbon source.

  10. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P < 0.05) and root respiration (24%, P < 0.05). These data indicate that plant communities adapt to CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  11. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  12. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  13. A Fundamental Study of Convective Mixing Contributing to Dissolution Trapping of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geologic Media using Surrogate Fluids and Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illangasekare, Tissa; Agartan, Eliff; Trevisan, Luca; Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin

    2013-04-01

    Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide is considered as an important strategy to slow down global warming and hence climate change. Dissolution trapping is one of the primary mechanisms contributing to long-term storage of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) in deep saline geologic formations. When liquid scCO2 is injected into the formation, its density is less than density of brine. During the movement of injected scCO2 under the effect of buoyancy forces, it is immobilized due to capillary forces. With the progress of time, entrapped scCO2 dissolves in formation brine, and density-driven convective fingers are expected to be generated due to the higher density of the solute compared to brine. These fingers enhance mixing of dissolved CO2 in brine. The development and role of these convective fingers in mixing in homogeneous formations have been studied in past investigations. The goal of this study is to evaluate the contribution of convective mixing to dissolution trapping of scCO2 in naturally heterogeneous geologic formations via laboratory experiments and numerical analyses. To mimic the dissolution of scCO2 in formation brine under ambient laboratory conditions, a group of surrogate fluids were selected according to their density and viscosity ratios, and tested in different fluid/fluid mixtures and variety of porous media test systems. After selection of the appropriate fluid mixture, a set of experiments in a small test tank packed in homogeneous configurations was performed in order to analyze the fingering behavior. A second set of experiments was conducted for layered systems to study the effects of formation heterogeneity on convective mixing. To capture the dominant processes observed in the experiments, a Finite Volume based numerical code was developed. The model was then used to simulate more complex heterogeneous systems that were not represented in the experiments. Results of these analyses suggest that density-driven convective fingers that contributes

  14. Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) with CO2 as heat transmission fluid--A scheme for combining recovery of renewable energy with geologic storage of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.; Spycher, N.

    2009-05-01

    It has been suggested that enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) may be operated with supercritical CO{sub 2} instead of water as heat transmission fluid (D.W. Brown, 2000). Such a scheme could combine recovery of geothermal energy with simultaneous geologic storage of CO{sub 2}, a greenhouse gas. At geothermal temperature and pressure conditions of interest, the flow and heat transfer behavior of CO{sub 2} would be considerably different from water, and chemical interactions between CO{sub 2} and reservoir rocks would also be quite different from aqueous fluids. This paper summarizes our research to date into fluid flow and heat transfer aspects of operating EGS with CO{sub 2}. (Chemical aspects of EGS with CO{sub 2} are discussed in a companion paper; Xu and Pruess, 2010.) Our modeling studies indicate that CO{sub 2} would achieve heat extraction at larger rates than aqueous fluids. The development of an EGS-CO{sub 2} reservoir would require replacement of the pore water by CO{sub 2} through persistent injection. We find that in a fractured reservoir, CO{sub 2} breakthrough at production wells would occur rapidly, within a few weeks of starting CO{sub 2} injection. Subsequently a two-phase water-CO{sub 2} mixture would be produced for a few years,followed by production of a single phase of supercritical CO{sub 2}. Even after single-phase production conditions are reached,significant dissolved water concentrations will persist in the CO{sub 2} stream for many years. The presence of dissolved water in the production stream has negligible impact on mass flow and heat transfer rates.

  15. Dynamic simulation and optimization of an industrial-scale absorption tower for CO2 capturing from ethane gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Pouladi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article considers a process technology based on absorption for CO2 capturing of ethane gas in phase 9 and 10 of south pars in Iran using diethanolamine (DEA as absorbent solvent. This CO2 capture plant was designed to achieve 85% CO2 recovery and obtain 19 ppm the CO2 concentration in the outlet of absorber. ASPEN–HYSYS software was used for the dynamic simulation of a commercial-scale CO2 capture plant and amine Pkg equation was chosen from the fluid property package for calculating the thermodynamic properties of the process. A static approach for optimization was used to evaluate the optimum conditions. This research revealed that pressure variation does not have any considerable changes in the absorption process, while both amine inlet temperature and volumetric flow rate increment enhance the absorption tower efficiency. The effect of temperature was very significant as shown in the dynamic study plots. The optimum condition for CO2 absorption from a stream of ethane gas with molar flow rate of 2118 kg mol h−1 was obtained 75 m3  h−1 of amine at 53 °C and 24 bar. This optimized condition is acceptable from economical, safe as well as feasible point of view.

  16. Optimization of CO2 laser cutting parameters on Austenitic type Stainless steel sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthiban, A.; Sathish, S.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Ravikumar, R.

    2017-03-01

    Thin AISI 316L stainless steel sheet widely used in sheet metal processing industries for specific applications. CO2 laser cutting is one of the most popular sheet metal cutting processes for cutting of sheets in different profile. In present work various cutting parameters such as laser power (2000 watts-4000 watts), cutting speed (3500mm/min – 5500 mm/min) and assist gas pressure (0.7 Mpa-0.9Mpa) for cutting of AISI 316L 2mm thickness stainless sheet. This experimentation was conducted based on Box-Behenken design. The aim of this work is to develop a mathematical model kerf width for straight and curved profile through response surface methodology. The developed mathematical models for straight and curved profile have been compared. The Quadratic models have the best agreement with experimental data, and also the shape of the profile a substantial role in achieving to minimize the kerf width. Finally the numerical optimization technique has been used to find out best optimum laser cutting parameter for both straight and curved profile cut.

  17. Efficiency enhancement for natural gas liquefaction with CO2 capture and sequestration through cycles innovation and process optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdulkarem, Abdullah

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants are energy intensive. As a result, the power plants operating these LNG plants emit high amounts of CO2 . To mitigate global warming that is caused by the increase in atmospheric CO2, CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) using amine absorption is proposed. However, the major challenge of implementing this CCS system is the associated power requirement, increasing power consumption by about 15--25%. Therefore, the main scope of this work is to tackle this challenge by minimizing CCS power consumption as well as that of the entire LNG plant though system integration and rigorous optimization. The power consumption of the LNG plant was reduced through improving the process of liquefaction itself. In this work, a genetic algorithm (GA) was used to optimize a propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) LNG plant modeled using HYSYS software. An optimization platform coupling Matlab with HYSYS was developed. New refrigerant mixtures were found, with savings in power consumption as high as 13%. LNG plants optimization with variable natural gas feed compositions was addressed and the solution was proposed through applying robust optimization techniques, resulting in a robust refrigerant which can liquefy a range of natural gas feeds. The second approach for reducing the power consumption is through process integration and waste heat utilization in the integrated CCS system. Four waste heat sources and six potential uses were uncovered and evaluated using HYSYS software. The developed models were verified against experimental data from the literature with good agreement. Net available power enhancement in one of the proposed CCS configuration is 16% more than the conventional CCS configuration. To reduce the CO2 pressurization power into a well for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications, five CO2 pressurization methods were explored. New CO2 liquefaction cycles were developed and modeled using HYSYS software. One of the developed

  18. Monitoring of injected CO2 at two commercial geologic storage sites with significant pressure depletion and/or re-pressurization histories: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanand Saini

    2017-03-01

    The monitoring technologies that have been used/deployed/tested at both the normally pressured West Hastings and the subnormally pressured Bell Creek storage sites appear to adequately address any of the potential “out of zone migration” of injected CO2 at these sites. It would be interesting to see if any of the collected monitoring data at the West Hastings and the Bell Creek storage sites could also be used in future to better understand the viability of initially subnormally pressured and subsequently depleted and re-pressurized oil fields as secure geologic CO2 storage sites with relatively large storage CO2 capacities compared to the depleted and re-pressurized oil fields that were initially discovered as normally pressured.

  19. Multivariable Optimization of the Piperazine CO2 Post-Combustion Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; von Solms, Nicolas; Thomsen, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    8 molal piperazine (PZ) is a promising solvent for developing an energy efficient CO2 post-combustion capture process. However, it has a limited operating range due to precipitation. The operating range can be extended by decreasing the piperazine concentration and/or increasing the CO2 loading...... which accounts for precipitation when estimating the heat and mass transfer rates. The results show that the 7 molal piperazine gives the lowest specific reboiler duty at 0.40 CO2 lean loading: 3.32 GJ/t CO2 and 4.05 GJ/t CO2 for the ASC case and NGCC cases. The analysis also reveals that the capture.......2 to 0.6 lean loading, and for two flue gas sources: natural gas combined cycle power plant (NGCC, 3.9 mol% CO2) and a coal based power plant (ASC, 13.25 mol% CO2). Special attention is given to the boundaries where precipitation may occur. The results are created by the hybrid CAPCO2 rate-based model...

  20. Porous materials with optimal adsorption thermodynamics and kinetics for CO2 separation

    KAUST Repository

    Nugent, Patrick S.

    2013-02-27

    The energy costs associated with the separation and purification of industrial commodities, such as gases, fine chemicals and fresh water, currently represent around 15 per cent of global energy production, and the demand for such commodities is projected to triple by 2050 (ref. 1). The challenge of developing effective separation and purification technologies that have much smaller energy footprints is greater for carbon dioxide (CO2) than for other gases; in addition to its involvement in climate change, CO 2 is an impurity in natural gas, biogas (natural gas produced from biomass), syngas (CO/H 2, the main source of hydrogen in refineries) and many other gas streams. In the context of porous crystalline materials that can exploit both equilibrium and kinetic selectivity, size selectivity and targeted molecular recognition are attractive characteristics for CO 2 separation and capture, as exemplified by zeolites 5A and 13X (ref. 2), as well as metal-organic materials (MOMs). Here we report that a crystal engineering or reticular chemistry strategy that controls pore functionality and size in a series of MOMs with coordinately saturated metal centres and periodically arrayed hexafluorosilicate (SiF 6 2-) anions enables a \\'sweet spot\\' of kinetics and thermodynamics that offers high volumetric uptake at low CO2 partial pressure (less than 0.15 bar). Most importantly, such MOMs offer an unprecedented CO 2 sorption selectivity over N2, H 2 and CH 4, even in the presence of moisture. These MOMs are therefore relevant to CO2 separation in the context of post-combustion (flue gas, CO2/N2), pre-combustion (shifted synthesis gas stream, CO 2/H 2) and natural gas upgrading (natural gas clean-up, CO2/CH 4). © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  1. [Optimization for supercritical CO2 extraction with response surface methodology and component analysis of Sapindus mukorossi oil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Xiao, Xin-yu; Ge, Fa-huan

    2012-02-01

    To study the extraction conditions of Sapindus mukorossi oil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction and identify its components. Optimized SFE-CO2 Extraction by response surface methodology and used GC-MS to analysie Sapindus mukorossi oil compounds. Established the model of an equation for the extraction rate of Sapindus mukorossi oil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction, and the optimal parameters for the Supercritical CO2 Extraction determined by the equation were: the extraction pressure was 30 MPa, temperature was 40 degrees C; The separation I pressure was 14 MPa, temperature was 45 degrees C; The separation II pressure was 6 MPa, temperature was 40 degrees C; The extraction time was 60 min and the extraction rate of Sapindus mukorossi oil of 17.58%. 22 main compounds of Sapindus mukorossi oil extracted by supercritical CO2 were identified by GC-MS, unsaturated fatty acids were 86.59%. This process is reliable, safe and with simple operation, and can be used for the extraction of Sapindus mukorossi oil.

  2. Optimization and evaluation of wheat germ oil extracted by supercritical CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu, LiYa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Box-Behnken design combined with response surface methodology (RSM was used to optimize the parameters of supercritical CO2 extraction (SFE of wheat germ oil. The quality of the oil and residual meal obtained by SFE and solvent extraction (SE were evaluated from proximate analysis, fatty acid composition and antioxidant activity. A maximum oil yield of 10.46% was achieved under the optimal conditions of wheat germ particle size 60-80 mesh; water content 4.37%; pressure 30MPa; temperature 40°C extraction time 1.7h. The oil obtained by SFE showed stronger DPPH radical scavenging ability than SE oil at the same concentration. The fatty acid composition of SFE oil was similar to SE oil. Higher contents of protein (34.3% and lysine (2.47g/100g were found in the residual meal obtained by SFE. The results show that oil and defatted meal obtained by SFE can be promising nutritional sources for food.Un diseño Box-Behnken combinado con metodología de superficie de respuesta (RSM fue usado para optimizar los parámetros de extracción con fluido supercrítico (SFE del aceite de germen de trigo. La calidad del aceite y de la harina residual obtenida por SFE y por extracción con solvente (SE fue evaluada mediante su análisis porcentual, composición de ácidos grasos y actividad antioxidante. Un máximo rendimiento de aceite del 10.46% fue obtenido con las condiciones óptimas de 60-80 mesh de tamaño de partícula del germen de trigo; 4.37% contenido de agua; 30MPa de presión; 40°C de temperatura y 1.7 h de tiempo de extracción. El aceite obtenido por SFE mostró una capacidad atrapadora de radicales libres mucho mayor que el aceite obtenido por SE a la misma concentración. La composición de ácidos grasos del aceite SFE fue similar al aceite SE. El mayor contenido de proteínas (34% y de lisina (2.47g/100g fue encontrado en las harinas residuales obtenidas por SFE. Los resultados muestran que el aceite y la harina desengrasada obtenidas por SFE

  3. Genomic insights into growth and survival of supercritical-CO2 tolerant bacterium MIT0214 under conditions associated with geologic carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, K. C.; Freedman, A. J.; Hernandez, H.; Thompson, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) of CO2 has the potential to significantly reduce the emissions of greenhouse gasses associated with fossil fuel combustion. The largest potential for storing captured CO2 in the United Sates is in deep geologic saline formations. Currently, little is known about the effects of CO2 storage on biologically active microbial communities found in the deep earth biosphere. Therefore, to investigate how deep earth microbial communities will be affected by the storage of CO2 we have enriched for a microbial consortium from the saline formation waters of the Frio 2 project site (Texas Gulf Coast) that is capable of growth in nutrient media under a supercritical CO2 headspace (Hernandez, et al). The cultivation of actively growing cells in an environment containing scCO2 is unexpected based on previous experimental evidence of microbial sterilization attributed to the acidic, desiccating, and solvent-like properties of scCO2. We have isolated strain MIT0214 from this supercritical CO2 based enrichment and have sequenced its genome using the Illumina platform followed by de novo assembly of reads and targeted Sanger sequencing to reduce gaps in the draft assembly. The genome of strain MIT0214 is approximately 5,551,062 base pairs with 35% GC-content and is most similar to nonpathogenic Bacillus cereus strain ATCC 14597. Annotation of the draft assembly of the MIT0214 genome by the Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (RAST) server revealed 5538 coding sequences where 4145 of the coding sequences were assigned putative functions. These functions were enriched in cell wall and capsule formation, phage/prophage and plasmids, gene regulation and signaling, and nitrogen and sulfur metabolism relative to the genome of the most closely-related surface-isolated B. cereus reference (ATCC 14597) and in total 773,416 bp of the MIT0214 genome content was distinct from the B. cereus reference. Notably, this set of distinct sequences were most

  4. Optimization of capillary trapping for application in geological carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, E.; Wildenschild, D.; Armstrong, R. T.; Herring, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration, as a method of atmospheric greenhouse gas reduction, is at the technological forefront of the climate change movement. Sequestration is achieved by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) gas effluent from coal fired power plants and injecting it into saline aquifers. In an effort to fully understand and optimize CO2 trapping efficiency, the capillary trapping mechanisms that immobilize subsurface CO2 were analyzed at the pore scale. Pairs of analogous fluids representing the range of in situ supercritical CO2 and brine conditions were used during experimentation. The two fluids (identified as wetting and non wetting) were imbibed and drained from a flow cell apparatus containing a sintered glass bead column. Experimental and fluid parameters, such as interfacial tension, non-wetting fluid viscosity and flow rate, were altered to characterize their impact on capillary trapping. Through the use of computed x-ray microtomography (CMT), we were able to quantify distinct differences between initial (post NW phase imbibition) and residual (post wetting fluid flood) non-wetting phase saturations. Observed trends will be used to identify optimal conditions for trapping CO2 during subsurface sequestration.

  5. TiO(OH)2 - highly effective catalysts for optimizing CO2 desorption kinetics reducing CO2 capture cost: A new pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongbao; Toan, Sam; Huang, Liang; Fan, Maohong; Wang, Yujun; Russell, Armistead G; Luo, Guangsheng; Fei, Weiyang

    2017-06-07

    The objective is to find a new pathway for significant reduction in CO2 capture energy consumption. Specifically, nanoporous TiO(OH)2 was used to realize the objective, which was desired as a catalyst to significantly accelerate the decomposition of aqueous NaHCO3, essentially CO2 desorption - the key step of Na2CO3/NaHCO3 based CO2 capture technologies from overall CO2 energy consumption perspective. Effects of several important factors on TiO(OH)2-catalyzed NaHCO3 decomposition were investigated. The quantity of CO2 generated from 0.238 mol/L NaHCO3 at 65 °C with catalyst is ~800% of that generated without the presence of catalyst. When a 12 W vacuum pump was used for carrying the generated CO2 out of reactor, the total amount of CO2 released was improved by ~2,500% under the given experimental conditions. No significant decrease in the catalytic effect of TiO(OH)2 was observed after five cyclic CO2 activated tests. In addition, characterizations with in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravity analysis and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller of TiO(OH)2 indicate that TiO(OH)2 is quite stable. The discovery in this research could inspire scientists' interests in starting to focus on a new pathway instead of making huge effort or investment in designing high-capacity but expensive CO2 sorbent for developing practical or cost-effective CO2 technologies.

  6. Stress history influence on sedimentary rock porosity estimates: Implications for geological CO2 storage in Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jie Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We established a stress-history-dependent porosity model of potential target rocks for CO2 geosequestration based on rock sample porosity measurements under various effective stresses (5 - 120 MPa. The measured samples were collected from shallow boreholes (< 300 m depth drilled at the frontal fold in northern Taiwan. The lithology, density, and the stress-history-dependent porosity derived from shallow boreholes enabled us to predict the porosity-depth relationship of given rock formations at (burial depths of approximately 3170 - 3470 m potential sites for CO2 geosequestration located near the Taoyuan Tableland coastline. Our results indicate that the porosity of samples derived from laboratory tests under atmospheric pressure is significantly greater than the porosity measured under stress caused by sediment burial. It is therefore strongly recommended that CO2 storage capacity assessment not be estimated from the porosity measured under atmospheric pressure. Neglecting the stress history effect on the porosity of compacted and uplifted rocks may induce a percentage error of 7.7% at a depth of approximately 1000 m, where the thickness of the eroded, formerly overlying formation is 2.5 km in a synthetic case. The CO2 injection pressure effect on the porosity was also evaluated using the stress-history-dependent porosity model. As expected, the pore pressure buildup during CO2 injection will induce an increase in the rock porosity. For example, a large injection pressure of 13 MPa at a depth of approximately 1000 m will increase the rock porosity by a percentage error of 6.7%. Our results have implications for CO2 storage capacity injection pressure estimates.

  7. Separation and capture of CO2 from large stationary sources and sequestration in geological formations--coalbeds and deep saline aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Curt M; Strazisar, Brian R; Granite, Evan J; Hoffman, James S; Pennline, Henry W

    2003-06-01

    The topic of global warming as a result of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration is arguably the most important environmental issue that the world faces today. It is a global problem that will need to be solved on a global level. The link between anthropogenic emissions of CO2 with increased atmospheric CO2 levels and, in turn, with increased global temperatures has been well established and accepted by the world. International organizations such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have been formed to address this issue. Three options are being explored to stabilize atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and global temperatures without severely and negatively impacting standard of living: (1) increasing energy efficiency, (2) switching to less carbon-intensive sources of energy, and (3) carbon sequestration. To be successful, all three options must be used in concert. The third option is the subject of this review. Specifically, this review will cover the capture and geologic sequestration of CO2 generated from large point sources, namely fossil-fuel-fired power gasification plants. Sequestration of CO2 in geological formations is necessary to meet the President's Global Climate Change Initiative target of an 18% reduction in GHG intensity by 2012. Further, the best strategy to stabilize the atmospheric concentration of CO2 results from a multifaceted approach where sequestration of CO2 into geological formations is combined with increased efficiency in electric power generation and utilization, increased conservation, increased use of lower carbon-intensity fuels, and increased use of nuclear energy and renewables. This review covers the separation and capture of CO2 from both flue gas and fuel gas using wet scrubbing technologies, dry regenerable sorbents, membranes, cryogenics, pressure and temperature swing adsorption, and other advanced concepts. Existing

  8. Optimization of Geothermal Well Placement under Geological Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Daniel O.; Arnold, Dan; Demyanov, Vasily; Sass, Ingo; Geiger, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    Well placement optimization is critical to commercial success of geothermal projects. However, uncertainties of geological parameters prohibit optimization based on a single scenario of the subsurface, particularly when few expensive wells are to be drilled. The optimization of borehole locations is usually based on numerical reservoir models to predict reservoir performance and entails the choice of objectives to optimize (total enthalpy, minimum enthalpy rate, production temperature) and the development options to adjust (well location, pump rate, difference in production and injection temperature). Optimization traditionally requires trying different development options on a single geological realization yet there are many possible different interpretations possible. Therefore, we aim to optimize across a range of representative geological models to account for geological uncertainty in geothermal optimization. We present an approach that uses a response surface methodology based on a large number of geological realizations selected by experimental design to optimize the placement of geothermal wells in a realistic field example. A large number of geological scenarios and design options were simulated and the response surfaces were constructed using polynomial proxy models, which consider both geological uncertainties and design parameters. The polynomial proxies were validated against additional simulation runs and shown to provide an adequate representation of the model response for the cases tested. The resulting proxy models allow for the identification of the optimal borehole locations given the mean response of the geological scenarios from the proxy (i.e. maximizing or minimizing the mean response). The approach is demonstrated on the realistic Watt field example by optimizing the borehole locations to maximize the mean heat extraction from the reservoir under geological uncertainty. The training simulations are based on a comprehensive semi

  9. Optimized CO2-flue gas separation model for a coal fired power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udara S. P. R. Arachchige, Muhammad Mohsin, Morten C. Melaaen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The detailed description of the CO2 removal process using mono-ethylamine (MEA as a solvent for coal-fired power plant is present in this paper. The rate based Electrolyte NRTL activity coefficient model was used in the Aspen Plus. The complete removal process with re-circulating solvent back to the absorber was implemented with the sequential modular method in Aspen Plus. The most significant cost related to CO2 capture is the energy requirement for re-generating solvent, i.e. re-boiler duty. Parameters’ effects on re-boiler duty were studied, resulting decreased re-boiler duty with the packing height and absorber packing diameter, absorber pressure, solvent temperature, stripper packing height and diameter. On the other hand, with the flue gas temperature, re-boiler duty is increased. The temperature profiles and CO2 loading profiles were used to check the model behavior.

  10. Optimized CO2-flue gas separation model for a coal fired power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arachchige, Udara S.P.R. [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); Mohsin, Muhammad [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); Melaaen, Morten C. [Telemark University College, Porsgrunn (Norway); Tel-Tek, Porsgrunn (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    The detailed description of the CO2 removal process using mono-ethylamine (MEA) as a solvent for coal-fired power plant is present in this paper. The rate based Electrolyte NRTL activity coefficient model was used in the Aspen Plus. The complete removal process with re-circulating solvent back to the absorber was implemented with the sequential modular method in Aspen Plus. The most significant cost related to CO2 capture is the energy requirement for re-generating solvent, i.e. re-boiler duty. Parameters’ effects on re-boiler duty were studied, resulting decreased re-boiler duty with the packing height and absorber packing diameter, absorber pressure, solvent temperature, stripper packing height and diameter. On the other hand, with the flue gas temperature, re-boiler duty is increased. The temperature profiles and CO2 loading profiles were used to check the model behavior.

  11. Numerical optimization of a transcritical CO2/propylene cascaded refrigeration-heat pump system with economizer in HT cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alok Manas Dubey; Suresh Kumar; Ghanshyam Das Agrawal

    2015-04-01

    Use of organic refrigerants such as Hydrochlorofluorocarbons and Chlorofluorocarbons have been criticized for their adverse impact on the Earth's protective ozone layer and for their significant global warming potential (GWP). CO2 has been receiving great concern as an alternative refrigerant. Cascade refrigeration systems employing CO2 are used for low temperature applications. Being a low critical temperature fluid CO2 transcritical cascade systems offer low COP for a given application. Parallel compression economization is one of the promising cycle modifications to improve the COP of transcritical CO2 cascaded systems. In this paper, transcritical CO2/propylene cascade system with parallel compression economization in the HT cycle has been analysed for cooling/heating applications. An enhancement in COP of 9% has been predicted. Thermodynamic analysis on R744-R1270 cascade refrigeration system has been performed to determine the optimal value of the various design parameters of the system. The design parameters included are: gas cooler outlet temperature and intermediate temperature in the high temperature circuit and evaporator temperature and temperature difference in the cascade condenser in the low temperature circuit.

  12. Steady-state simulation and optimization of an integrated gasification combined cycle power plant with CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are a promising technology option for power generation with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in view of their efficiency and environmental advantages over conventional coal utilization technologies. This paper presents a three-phase, top-down, optimization-based approach for designing an IGCC plant with precombustion CO2 capture in a process simulator environment. In the first design phase, important global design decisions are made on the basis of plant-wide optimization studies with the aim of increasing IGCC thermal efficiency and thereby making better use of coal resources and reducing CO2 emissions. For the design of an IGCC plant with 90% CO2 capture, the optimal combination of the extent of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion in the water-gas shift (WGS) reactors and the extent of CO2 capture in the SELEXOL process, using dimethylether of polyethylene glycol as the solvent, is determined in the first phase. In the second design phase, the impact of local design decisions is explored considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first phase as additional constraints. Two decisions are made focusing on the SELEXOL and Claus unit. In the third design phase, the operating conditions are optimized considering the optimum values of the decision variables from the first and second phases as additional constraints. The operational flexibility of the plant must be taken into account before taking final design decisions. Two studies on the operational flexibility of the WGS reactors and one study focusing on the operational flexibility of the sour water stripper (SWS) are presented. At the end of the first iteration, after executing all the phases once, the net plant efficiency (HHV basis) increases to 34.1% compared to 32.5% in a previously published study (DOE/NETL-2007/1281; National Energy Technology Laboratory, 2007). The study shows that the three-phase, top-down design approach presented is very

  13. Shallow groundwater monitoring at the SACROC oilfield, Scurry County, TX: good news for geologic storage of CO2 despite a complex hydrogeologic and geochemical setting (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, R. C.; Romanak, K.; Yang, C.; Hovorka, S.

    2009-12-01

    The SACROC water study is the first comprehensive research project with application to geologic storage (GS) of CO2 that focuses on collection and interpretation of field measurements of groundwater (water level and water chemistry data). CO2 has been injected for enhanced oil recovery at the SACROC oilfield in Scurry County, TX since 1972. Hence, we have a perfect natural laboratory and an analog for monitoring future commercial CO2 sequestration sites. Kinder Morgan currently operates the SACROC oilfield where over 150 million metric tons (MMT) of CO2 has been injected for EOR at ~2 km depth; over 75 MMT of the CO2 has been produced and re-injected. CO2 is assumed to be trapped in the deep subsurface at SACROC. The goals of monitoring shallow groundwater over CO2 injection sites are to (1) confirm that CO2 has remained in the deep subsurface and (2) assess impacts to water quality if CO2 were to migrate upward along conduit flow paths (e.g. leaking well bores). We collected groundwater and stratigraphic data within an ~3,000 km2 area centered on SACROC to establish regional variability prior to assessing potential impacts to groundwater from CO2 injection. Groundwater data include results from five sampling trips between June 2006 and November 2008, and a compilation of historical data from the Texas Water Development Board database, dating back to 1936. Sources of complexity that contribute to data interpretation challenges include: (1) regional historic oilfield activity, (2) multiple freshwater-bearing strata in the regional Dockum aquifer, (3) sampled wells screened in shallowest (30 m), deepest (150 m), or across both water-bearing zones, (4) variable discharge rate of sampled wells (250 gpm), (5) groundwater flow divide that bisects SACROC, (6) variable aquifer recharge mechanisms, (7) temporal variability in groundwater levels and chemistry, (8) cation exchange, (9) presence of biogenically-produced CO2 in aquifer, and (10) incongruent dissolution of

  14. Calculation of optimal parameters of an NH3-CO2 lidar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasil'ev, BI; Mannoun, OM

    2005-01-01

    The basic parameters (range, signal-to-noise ratio, and sensitivity) of a lidar using NH3 and CO2 lasers are calculated. The principle of lidar operation is based on the differential absorption recording. Absorption spectra of all known Freons are considered in the spectral range 9-13.5 mu m and opt

  15. Calculation of optimal parameters of an NH3-CO2 lidar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasil'ev, BI; Mannoun, OM

    The basic parameters (range, signal-to-noise ratio, and sensitivity) of a lidar using NH3 and CO2 lasers are calculated. The principle of lidar operation is based on the differential absorption recording. Absorption spectra of all known Freons are considered in the spectral range 9-13.5 mu m and

  16. Determination of the optimal pore size for improved CO2 adsorption in activated carbon fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul-Yi; Park, Soo-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Commercially available activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were modified further by a chemical activation method to obtain superior CO(2) adsorption capacity. The relationship between the pore structure of the modified ACF and the CO(2) adsorption behaviors was investigated. Chemical activation (with KOH at a fixed activation temperature of 900°C for 1h and various KOH/ACF weight ratios ranging from 1 to 4) of ACF increased the total pore volume and specific surface area to 1.124 cm(3)g(-1) (KOH/ACF weight ratio of 2) and 2318 m(2)g(-1) (KOH/ACF weight ratio of 4), respectively. Compared to ACF, the total pore volume and specific surface area were improved by factors of 2.5 and 2.3, respectively. Interestingly, the highest CO(2) adsorption capacity of 250 mg g(-1) at 298 K and 1 bar was observed at a KOH/ACF weight ratio of 3. The modified ACF had the narrowest microporosity ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 nm. Therefore, the increase in CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation is closely related to the narrower pore size distribution rather than the total or micropore volume and specific surface area.

  17. Distinctive Reactivities at Biotite Edge and Basal Planes in the Presence of Organic Ligands: Implications for Organic-Rich Geologic CO2 Sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijie; Jun, Young-Shin

    2015-08-18

    To better understand how scCO2-saturated brine-mineral interactions can affect safe and efficient geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS), we studied the effects of organic ligands (acetate and oxalate) on biotite dissolution and surface morphological changes. The experimental conditions were chosen to be relevant to GCS sites (95 °C and 102 atm CO2). Quantitative analyses of dissolution differences between biotite edge and basal planes were made. Acetate slightly inhibited biotite dissolution and promoted secondary precipitation. The effect of acetate was mainly pH-induced aqueous acetate speciation and the subsequent surface adsorption. Under the experimental conditions, most of acetate exists as acetic acid and adsorbs to biotite surface Si and Al sites, thereby reducing their release. However, oxalate strongly enhanced biotite dissolution and induced faster and more significant surface morphology changes by forming bidentate mononuclear surface complexes. For the first time, we show that oxalate selectively attacks edge surface sites and enhances biotite dissolution. Thus, oxalate increases the relative reactivity ratio of biotite edge surfaces to basal surfaces, while acetate does not impact this relative reactivity. This study provides new information on reactivity differences at biotite edge and basal planes in the presence of organic ligands, which has implications for safe CO2 storage in organic-rich sites.

  18. Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2007-10-24

    If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

  19. Optimal Surface Amino-Functionalization Following Thermo-Alkaline Treatment of Nanostructured Silica Adsorbents for Enhanced CO2 Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obdulia Medina-Juárez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Special preparation of Santa Barbara Amorphous (SBA-15, mesoporous silica with highly hexagonal ordered, these materials have been carried out for creating adsorbents exhibiting an enhanced and partially selective adsorption toward CO2. This creation starts from an adequate conditioning of the silica surface, via a thermo-alkaline treatment to increase the population of silanol species on it. CO2 adsorption is only reasonably achieved when the SiO2 surface becomes aminated after put in contact with a solution of an amino alkoxide compound in the right solvent. Unfunctionalized and amine-functionalized substrates were characterized through X-ray diffraction, N2 sorption, Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, 29Si solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, and NH3 thermal programmed desorption. These analyses proved that the thermo-alkaline procedure desilicates the substrate and eliminates the micropores (without affecting the SBA-15 capillaries, present in the original solid. NMR analysis confirms that the hydroxylated solid anchors more amino functionalizing molecules than the unhydroxylated material. The SBA-15 sample subjected to hydroxylation and amino-functionalization displays a high enthalpy of interaction, a reason why this solid is suitable for a strong deposition of CO2 but with the possibility of observing a low-pressure hysteresis phenomenon. Contrastingly, CH4 adsorption on amino-functionalized, hydroxylated SBA-15 substrates becomes almost five times lower than the CO2 one, thus giving proof of their selectivity toward CO2. Although the amount of retained CO2 is not yet similar to or higher than those determined in other investigations, the methodology herein described is still susceptible to optimization.

  20. Optimal Surface Amino-Functionalization Following Thermo-Alkaline Treatment of Nanostructured Silica Adsorbents for Enhanced CO2 Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Juárez, Obdulia; García-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel; Arellano-Sánchez, Ulises; Kornhauser-Straus, Isaac; Rojas-González, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Special preparation of Santa Barbara Amorphous (SBA)-15, mesoporous silica with highly hexagonal ordered, these materials have been carried out for creating adsorbents exhibiting an enhanced and partially selective adsorption toward CO2. This creation starts from an adequate conditioning of the silica surface, via a thermo-alkaline treatment to increase the population of silanol species on it. CO2 adsorption is only reasonably achieved when the SiO2 surface becomes aminated after put in contact with a solution of an amino alkoxide compound in the right solvent. Unfunctionalized and amine-functionalized substrates were characterized through X-ray diffraction, N2 sorption, Raman spectroscopy, electron microscopy, 29Si solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), and NH3 thermal programmed desorption. These analyses proved that the thermo-alkaline procedure desilicates the substrate and eliminates the micropores (without affecting the SBA-15 capillaries), present in the original solid. NMR analysis confirms that the hydroxylated solid anchors more amino functionalizing molecules than the unhydroxylated material. The SBA-15 sample subjected to hydroxylation and amino-functionalization displays a high enthalpy of interaction, a reason why this solid is suitable for a strong deposition of CO2 but with the possibility of observing a low-pressure hysteresis phenomenon. Contrastingly, CH4 adsorption on amino-functionalized, hydroxylated SBA-15 substrates becomes almost five times lower than the CO2 one, thus giving proof of their selectivity toward CO2. Although the amount of retained CO2 is not yet similar to or higher than those determined in other investigations, the methodology herein described is still susceptible to optimization. PMID:28774017

  1. Multi-objective and multi-criteria optimization for power generation expansion planning with CO2 mitigation in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamphol Promjiraprawat

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In power generation expansion planning, electric utilities have encountered the major challenge of environmental awareness whilst being concerned with budgetary burdens. The approach for selecting generating technologies should depend on economic and environmental constraint as well as externalities. Thus, the multi-objective optimization becomes a more attractive approach. This paper presents a hybrid framework of multi-objective optimization and multi-criteria decision making to solve power generation expansion planning problems in Thailand. In this paper, CO2 emissions and external cost are modeled as a multi-objective optimization problem. Then the analytic hierarchy process is utilized to determine thecompromised solution. For carbon capture and storage technology, CO2 emissions can be mitigated by 74.7% from the least cost plan and leads to the reduction of the external cost of around 500 billion US dollars over the planning horizon. Results indicate that the proposed approach provides optimum cost-related CO2 mitigation plan as well as external cost.

  2. Geology and hydrogeochemistry of the Jungapeo CO 2-rich thermal springs, State of Michoacán, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebe, Claus; Goff, Fraser; Armienta, María Aurora; Counce, Dale; Poreda, Robert; Chipera, Steve

    2007-06-01

    We present the first geothermal assessment of the Jungapeo CO 2-rich mineral springs, which are located in the eastern part of Michoacán State (central Mexico) at the southern limit of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. All but one of the > 10 springs occur at the lower contact of the distal olivine-bearing basaltic andesite lavas of the Tuxpan shield, a 0.49- to 0.60-Ma-old cluster of monogenetic scoria cones and lava flows. The Tuxpan shield has a maximum radius of 6 km and was constructed on top of a folded and faulted Cretaceous basement consisting largely of marine limestones, marls, and shales. The mineral waters are characterized by moderate temperatures (28 to 32 °C), mild acidity (pH from 5.5 to 6.5), relatively high discharge rates, effervescence of CO 2 gas, clarity at emergence and abundant subsequent precipitation of hydrous iron, silica oxides, and carbonates around pool margins and issuing streamlets. Chemical and isotopic (deuterium, oxygen, and tritium) analyses of water and gas samples obtained during the period 1991-1997 indicate that the springs are largely composed of meteoric water from a local source with relatively short residence times (water ages of 7 to 25 years). Spring waters are chemically characterized by moderate SiO 2, Ca + Mg nearly equal to Na + K, high HCO 3, moderate to low Cl, low F and SO 4, high B, moderate Li, while Br and As are low. In contrast, Fe + Mn is exceptionally high. Thus, the Jungapeo waters cannot be regarded as high-temperature geothermal fluids. Instead, they resemble soda spring waters similar to other low-to-medium temperature soda waters in the world. Gas samples are extremely rich in CO 2 with no detectable geothermal H 2S or H 2 and very low contents of CH 4 and NH 3, indicating the gases are not derived from a high-temperature resource. Carbon-13 analyses of CO 2 show a narrow range (- 6.7‰ and - 7.2‰) that falls within the range for MORB CO 2. Thus, most CO 2 seems to originate from the mantle but

  3. Risk Assessment-Led Characterisation of the SiteChar UK North Sea Site for the Geological Storage of CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhurst Maxine

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Risk assessment-led characterisation of a site for the geological storage of CO2 in the UK northern North Sea was performed for the EU SiteChar research project as one of a portfolio of sites. Implementation and testing of the SiteChar project site characterisation workflow has produced a ‘dry-run’ storage permit application that is compliant with regulatory requirements. A site suitable for commercial-scale storage was characterised, compatible with current and future industrial carbon dioxide (CO2 sources in the northern UK. Pre-characterisation of the site, based on existing information acquired during hydrocarbon exploration and production, has been achieved from publicly available data. The project concept is to store captured CO2 at a rate of 5 Mt per year for 20 years in the Blake Oil Field and surrounding Captain Sandstone saline aquifer. This commercial-scale storage of 100 Mt CO2 can be achieved through a storage scenario combining injection of CO2 into the oil field and concurrent water production down-dip of the field. There would be no encroachment of supercritical phase CO2 for more than two kilometres beyond the field boundary and no adverse influence on operating hydrocarbon fields provided there is pressure management. Components of a storage permit application for the site are presented, developed as far as possible within a research project. Characterisation and technical investigations were guided by an initial assessment of perceived risks to the prospective site and a need to provide the information required for the storage permit application. The emphasis throughout was to reduce risks and uncertainty on the subsurface containment of stored CO2, particularly with respect to site technical performance, monitoring and regulatory issues, and effects on other resources. The results of selected risk assessment-led site characterisation investigations and the subsequent risk reassessments are described together with their

  4. Microfluidic diffusivity meter: a tool to optimize CO2 driven enhanced oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puneeth, S. B.; Kim, Young Ho; Goel, Sanket

    2017-02-01

    As the energy demands continue to swell with growing population and there persists a lack of unexploited oilfields, the prime focus of any nation would be to maximize the oil recovery factor from existing oil fields. CO2-Enhanced oil recovery is a process to improve the recovery of crude oil from an oil field and works at high pressure and in very deep conditions. CO2 and oil are miscible at high pressure, resulting in low viscosity and oil swells. This swelling can be measured based on mathematical calculations in real time and correlated with the CO2 concentration. This process has myriad advantages over its counterparts which include being able to harness oil trapped in reservoirs besides being cheaper and more efficient. A Diffusivity meter is inevitable in the measurement of the diffusion co-efficient of two samples. Diffusivity meters currently available in the market are weighed down by disadvantages like the requirement of large samples for testing, high cost and complexity. This elicits the need for a Microfluidic based diffusivity meter capable of analyzing Nano-liter sample volumes besides being more precise and affordable. The scope of this work involves the design and development of a Microfluidic robust and inexpensive prototype diffusivity meter using a capillary tube and endorsing its performance by comparison of results with known diffusivity range and supervision of the results with an electronic microscope coupled to PC and Data Acquisition System. The prototype produced at the end of the work is expected to outweigh disadvantages in existing products in terms of sample size, efficiency and time saving.

  5. Optimizing Binding Energies of Key Intermediates for CO2 Hydrogenation to Methanol over Oxide-Supported Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattel, Shyam; Yan, Binhang; Yang, Yixiong; Chen, Jingguang G; Liu, Ping

    2016-09-28

    Rational optimization of catalytic performance has been one of the major challenges in catalysis. Here we report a bottom-up study on the ability of TiO2 and ZrO2 to optimize the CO2 conversion to methanol on Cu, using combined density functional theory (DFT) calculations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) measurements, and steady-state flow reactor tests. The theoretical results from DFT and KMC agree with in situ DRIFTS measurements, showing that both TiO2 and ZrO2 help to promote methanol synthesis on Cu via carboxyl intermediates and the reverse water-gas-shift (RWGS) pathway; the formate intermediates, on the other hand, likely act as a spectator eventually. The origin of the superior promoting effect of ZrO2 is associated with the fine-tuning capability of reduced Zr(3+) at the interface, being able to bind the key reaction intermediates, e.g. *CO2, *CO, *HCO, and *H2CO, moderately to facilitate methanol formation. This study demonstrates the importance of synergy between theory and experiments to elucidate the complex reaction mechanisms of CO2 hydrogenation for the realization of a better catalyst by design.

  6. Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Fotini K.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the potential impacts of unexpected surface releases of CO{sub 2} is an essential part of risk assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have extended a mesoscale atmospheric model to model dense gas dispersion of CO{sub 2} leakage. The hazard from CO{sub 2} leakage is greatest in regions with topographic depressions where the dense gas can pool. Simulation of dispersion in idealized topographies shows that CO{sub 2} can persist even under high winds. Simulation of a variety of topographies, winds, and release conditions allows the generation of a catalog of simulation results that can be queried to estimate potential impacts at actual geologic carbon sequestration sites.

  7. Underground reconnaissance and environmental monitoring related to geologic CO2 sequestration studies at the DUSEL Facility, Homestake Mine, South Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salve, Rohit

    2009-11-20

    Underground field reconnaissance was carried out in the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) to identify potential locations for the planned geologic carbon sequestration experimental facility known as DUSEL CO{sub 2}. In addition, instrumentation for continuous environmental monitoring of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity was installed at various locations within the Homestake mine. The motivation for this work is the need to locate and design the DUSEL CO{sub 2} facility currently being planned to host CO{sub 2} and water flow and reaction experiments in long column pressure vessels over large vertical length scales. Review of existing geologic data and reconnaissance underground revealed numerous potential locations for vertical experimental flow columns, with limitations of existing vertical boreholes arising from limited vertical extent, poor continuity between drifts, and small diameter. Results from environmental monitoring over 46 days reveal spatial and temporal variations related to ventilation, weather, and ongoing dewatering of the mine.

  8. Pore-lining composition and capillary breakthrough pressure of mudstone caprocks : sealing efficiency at geologic CO2 storage sites.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, Jason E.; Nemer, Martin B.; McPherson, Brian J. O. L. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Dewers, Thomas A.; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2010-12-01

    Subsurface containment of CO2 is predicated on effective caprock sealing. Many previous studies have relied on macroscopic measurements of capillary breakthrough pressure and other petrophysical properties without direct examination of solid phases that line pore networks and directly contact fluids. However, pore-lining phases strongly contribute to sealing behavior through interfacial interactions among CO2, brine, and the mineral or non-mineral phases. Our high resolution (i.e., sub-micron) examination of the composition of pore-lining phases of several continental and marine mudstones indicates that sealing efficiency (i.e., breakthrough pressure) is governed by pore shapes and pore-lining phases that are not identifiable except through direct characterization of pores. Bulk X-ray diffraction data does not indicate which phases line the pores and may be especially lacking for mudstones with organic material. Organics can line pores and may represent once-mobile phases that modify the wettability of an originally clay-lined pore network. For shallow formations (i.e., < {approx}800 m depth), interfacial tension and contact angles result in breakthrough pressures that may be as high as those needed to fracture the rock - thus, in the absence of fractures, capillary sealing efficiency is indicated. Deeper seals have poorer capillary sealing if mica-like wetting dominates the wettability. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and the Southeast and Southwest Carbon Sequestration Partnerships for supporting this work.

  9. Zn(II, Mn(II and Sr(II Behavior in a Natural Carbonate Reservoir System. Part II: Impact of Geological CO2 Storage Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auffray B.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Some key points still prevent the full development of geological carbon sequestration in underground formations, especially concerning the assessment of the integrity of such storage. Indeed, the consequences of gas injection on chemistry and petrophysical properties are still much discussed in the scientific community, and are still not well known at either laboratory or field scale. In this article, the results of an experimental study about the mobilization of Trace Elements (TE during CO2 injection in a reservoir are presented. The experimental conditions range from typical storage formation conditions (90 bar, supercritical CO2 to shallower conditions (60 and 30 bar, CO2 as gas phase, and consider the dissolution of the two carbonates, coupled with the sorption of an initial concentration of 10−5 M of Zn(II, and the consequent release in solution of Mn(II and Sr(II. The investigation goes beyond the sole behavior of TE in the storage conditions: it presents the specific behavior of each element with respect to the pressure and the natural carbonate considered, showing that different equilibrium concentrations are to be expected if a fluid with a given concentration of TE leaks to an upper formation. Even though sorption is evidenced, it does not balance the amount of TE released by the dissolution process. The increase in porosity is clearly evidenced as a linear function of the CO2 pressure imposed for the St-Emilion carbonate. For the Lavoux carbonate, this trend is not confirmed by the 90 bar experiment. A preferential dissolution of the bigger family of pores from the preexisting porosity is observed in one of the samples (Lavoux carbonate while the second one (St-Emilion carbonate presents a newly-formed family of pores. Both reacted samples evidence that the pore network evolves toward a tubular network type.

  10. Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-09-30

    Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along

  11. Life Cycle Energy and CO2 Emission Optimization for Biofuel Supply Chain Planning under Uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; An, Da; Liang, Hanwei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for the decision-makers/stakeholders to design biofuel supply chain under uncertainties. Life cycle energy and CO2 emission of biofuel supply chain are employed as the objective functions, multiple feedstocks, multiple transportation modes, multiple...... in this study. A bi-objective interval mix integer programming model has been developed for biofuel supply chain design under uncertainties, and the bio-objective interval programming method has been developed to solve this model. An illustrative case of a multiple-feedstock-bioethanol system has been studied...... sites for building biofuel plants, multiple technologies for biofuel production, and multiple markets for biofuel distribution are considered, and the amount of feedstocks in agricultural system, transportation capacities, yields of crops, and market demands are considered as uncertainty variables...

  12. Application of Cutting-Edge 3D Seismic Attribute Technology to the Assessment of Geological Reservoirs for CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Liner; Jianjun Zeng; Po Geng Heather King Jintan Li; Jennifer Califf; John Seales

    2010-03-31

    The goals of this project were to develop innovative 3D seismic attribute technologies and workflows to assess the structural integrity and heterogeneity of subsurface reservoirs with potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic attributes to aide in quantifying reservoir properies and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. Our study area is the Dickman field in Ness County, Kansas, a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontent to Indiana and beyond. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. Geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We systematically tested over a dozen seismic attributes, finding that curvature, SPICE, and ANT were particularly useful for mapping discontinuities in the data that likely indicated fracture trends. Our simulation results in the deep saline aquifer indicate two effective ways of reducing free CO{sub 2}: (a) injecting CO{sub 2} with brine water, and (b) horizontal well injection. A tuned combination of these methods can reduce the amount of free CO{sub 2} in the aquifer from over 50% to less than 10%.

  13. Automatic Optimization of Focal Point Position in CO2 Laser Welding with Neural Network in A Focus Control System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    acquisition card - DAQCard-700, and a self-learning mechanism - Neural Network. The optimization procedure starts with the welding process being carried out by continuously moving the focal point position from above a welding plate to below the plate, thus the process is ensured to be shifted from initially...... in a computer hard disk for later data processing. Thereafter the optimum focal point position (OFPP) is output by the self-learning mechanism - the neural network. The optimization procedure is completed with the welding process being carried out by adjusting the focus of the laser beam to the OFPP.A self-learning....... The results of the self-learning focus control system show that the neural network is capable of optimizing the focal point position with good accuracy in CW CO2 laser welding....

  14. Biological/biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry targets. 1. optimizing the CO2 reduction step using zinc dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kelly, Peter B; Clifford, Andrew J

    2008-10-15

    Biological and biomedical applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) use isotope ratio mass spectrometry to quantify minute amounts of long-lived radioisotopes such as (14)C. AMS target preparation involves first the oxidation of carbon (in sample of interest) to CO 2 and second the reduction of CO 2 to filamentous, fluffy, fuzzy, or firm graphite-like substances that coat a -400-mesh spherical iron powder (-400MSIP) catalyst. Until now, the quality of AMS targets has been variable; consequently, they often failed to produce robust ion currents that are required for reliable, accurate, precise, and high-throughput AMS for biological/biomedical applications. Therefore, we described our optimized method for reduction of CO 2 to high-quality uniform AMS targets whose morphology we visualized using scanning electron microscope pictures. Key features of our optimized method were to reduce CO 2 (from a sample of interest that provided 1 mg of C) using 100 +/- 1.3 mg of Zn dust, 5 +/- 0.4 mg of -400MSIP, and a reduction temperature of 500 degrees C for 3 h. The thermodynamics of our optimized method were more favorable for production of graphite-coated iron powders (GCIP) than those of previous methods. All AMS targets from our optimized method were of 100% GCIP, the graphitization yield exceeded 90%, and delta (13)C was -17.9 +/- 0.3 per thousand. The GCIP reliably produced strong (12)C (-) currents and accurate and precise F m values. The observed F m value for oxalic acid II NIST SRM deviated from its accepted F m value of 1.3407 by only 0.0003 +/- 0.0027 (mean +/- SE, n = 32), limit of detection of (14)C was 0.04 amol, and limit of quantification was 0.07 amol, and a skilled analyst can prepare as many as 270 AMS targets per day. More information on the physical (hardness/color), morphological (SEMs), and structural (FT-IR, Raman, XRD spectra) characteristics of our AMS targets that determine accurate, precise, and high-hroughput AMS measurement are in the

  15. Evaluation of Optimal Pore Size of (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane Grafted MCM-41 for Improved CO2 Adsorption

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    An array of new MCM-41 with substantially larger average pore diameters was synthesized through adding 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB) as the swelling agent to explore the effect of pore size on final adsorbent properties. The pore expanded MCM-41 was also grafted with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) to determine the optimal pore size for CO2 adsorption. The pore-expanded mesoporous MCM-41s showed relatively less structural regularity but significant increments of pore diameter (4.64 to 7...

  16. Automatic Optimization of Focal Point Position in CO2 Laser Welding with Neural Network in A Focus Control System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Hui; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    CO2 lasers are increasingly being utilized for quality welding in production. Considering the high cost of equipment, the start-up time and the set-up time should be minimized. Ideally the parameters should be set up and optimized more or less automatically. In this paper a control system......-learning mechanism - neural network as the essence of the control system is trained with the photo diode signals extracted from various welding processes with the changes on the laser power, translation speed, material and thickness of the plate, shielding gas type and flow rate, and welding configuration...

  17. Multiple scale physical and numerical modeling for improved understanding of mechanisms of trapping and leakage of CO2 in deep geologic formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illangasekare, T.; Plampin, M.; Trevisan, L.; Agartan, E.; Mori, H.; Sakaki, T.; Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J.; Zhou, Q.; Pawar, R.; Zyvoloski, G.

    2012-04-01

    The fundamental processes associated with trapping and leakage of CO2 in deep geologic formations are complex. Formation heterogeneity manifested at all scales is expected to affect capillary and dissolution trapping and leakage of gaseous CO2 to the shallow subsurface. Research is underway to improve our fundamental understanding of trapping and leakage. This research involves experimentation in multiple scales and modeling focusing on effects of formation heterogeneity. The primary hypothesis that drives this research is that when the effects of heterogeneity on entrapment and leakage are understood, it will be possible to design more effective and safe storage schemes. Even though field investigations have some value in understanding issues related to large scale behavior and performance assessment, a fundamental understanding of how the heterogeneity affects trapping is difficult or impossible to obtain in field settings. Factors that contribute to these difficulties are the inability to fully characterize the formation heterogeneity at all scales of interest and lack of experimental control at very high depths. Intermediate scale physical model testing provides an attractive alternative to investigate these processes in the laboratory. Heterogeneities can be designed using soils with known properties in test tanks and the experiments can be conducted under controlled conditions to obtain accurate data. Conducting laboratory experiments under ambient pressure and temperature conditions to understand the processes that occur in deep formations poses many challenges. This research attempts to address such challenges and demonstrates how this testing approach could be used to generate useful data. The experiments involve the use of test systems of hierarchy of scales from small to intermediate scale tanks (~ 5 m) and long columns (~ 4.5 m). These experiments use surrogate fluids to investigate both capillary and solubility trapping in homogeneous and heterogeneous

  18. Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

    2004-03-29

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration is being considered as a way to offset fossil-fuel-related CO{sub 2} emissions to reduce the rate of increase of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The accumulation of vast quantities of injected carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in geologic sequestration sites may entail health and environmental risks from potential leakage and seepage of CO{sub 2} into the near-surface environment. We are developing and applying a coupled subsurface and atmospheric surface-layer modeling capability built within the framework of the integral finite difference reservoir simulator TOUGH2. The overall purpose of modeling studies is to predict CO{sub 2} concentration distributions under a variety of seepage scenarios and geologic, hydrologic, and atmospheric conditions. These concentration distributions will provide the basis for determining above-ground and near-surface instrumentation needs for carbon sequestration monitoring and verification, as well as for assessing health, safety, and environmental risks. A key feature of CO{sub 2} is its large density ({rho} = 1.8 kg m{sup -3}) relative to air ({rho} = 1.2 kg m{sup -3}), a property that may allow small leaks to cause concentrations in air above the occupational exposure limit of 4 percent in low-lying and enclosed areas such as valleys and basements where dilution rates are low. The approach we take to coupled modeling involves development of T2CA, a TOUGH2 module for modeling the multicomponent transport of water, brine, CO{sub 2}, gas tracer, and air in the subsurface. For the atmospheric surface-layer advection and dispersion, we use a logarithmic vertical velocity profile to specify constant time-averaged ambient winds, and atmospheric dispersion approaches to model mixing due to eddies and turbulence. Initial simulations with the coupled model suggest that atmospheric dispersion quickly dilutes diffuse CO{sub 2} seepage fluxes to negligible concentrations, and that rainfall

  19. Assessment of the optimal operating parameters during extracorporeal CO2 removal with the Abylcap® system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloot, Sunny; Peperstraete, Harlinde; De Somer, Filip; Hoste, Eric

    2017-01-13

    Lung protective ventilation is recommended in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) needing mechanical ventilation. This can however be associated with hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis, such that extracorporeal CO2 removal (ECCO2R) can be applied. The aim of this study was to derive optimal operating parameters for the ECCO2R Abylcap® system (Bellco, Italy). We included 4 ARDS patients with a partial arterial oxygen tension over the fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) lower than 150 mmHg, receiving lung-protective ventilation and treated with the Abylcap® via a double lumen 13.5-Fr dialysis catheter in the femoral vein. Every 24 hours during 5 consecutive days, blood was sampled at the Abylcap® inlet and outlet for different blood flows (QB:200-300-400 mL/min) with 100% O2 gas flow (QG) of 7 L/min, and for different QG (QG: 0.5-1-1.5-3-6-8 L/min) with QB400 mL/min. CO2 and O2 transfer remained constant over 5 days for a fixed QB. We found that, for a fixed QG of 7 L/min, CO2 transfer linearly and significantly increased with QB (i.e. from 58 ± 8 to 98 ± 16 mL/min for QB 200 to 400 mL/min). For a fixed QB of 400 mL/min, CO2 transfer non-linearly increased with QG (i.e. from 39 ± 9 to 98 ± 16 mL/min for QG 0.5 to 8 L/min) reaching a plateau at QG of 6 L/min. Hence, when using the Abylcap® ECCO2R in the treatment of ARDS patients the O2 flow should be at least 6 L/min while QB should be set at its maximum.

  20. Optimal Fixed Bed Reactor Network Configuration for the Efficient Recycling of CO2 into Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Elkamel

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available An optimal design strategy of a network of fixed bed reactors for Methanol Production (MP is proposed in this study. Both methanol production and profit spanning a production period of eight years have been set as objective functions to find the optimal production network. The conservation of mass and energy laws on a heterogeneous model of a single industrial methanol reactor was first developed. The model was solved numerically and was validated with industrial plant data. Different reactor network arrangements were then simulated in order to find an optimal superstructure. It was found that a structure of four reactors (two in series in parallel with another two in series provide maximum production rate. The application of the more realistic objective function of profit showed that a configuration of two parallel reactors is the best configuration. This optimal structure produces 92 tons/day more methanol than a single reactor.

  1. Energy in the Netherlands. Optimized pathways to CO2 reduction in the Dutch context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-09-15

    This document reports the findings of research undertaken by the Energy Forum NL (EFNL) which consists of companies active in different parts of the energy sector. The group strives for a more long-term, stable energy policy and investment climate in the Netherlands, one that will help realize overall climate ambitions. This report is part of the group's contribution to the energy debate in the Netherlands; it lays out a fact-based, objective analysis of the potential energy mix if one assumes a continued focus on carbon abatement. In this report, the Energy Forum NL provides pathways that show how the Netherlands can best contribute to the EU target of 80% CO2e emission reduction by 2050 compared to 1990. They particularly focus on the goal for the next 20 years: reducing CO2e emissions by 40% by 2030 compared to 1990. The Forum selected 40% as a midway target for 80% in 2050; this falls within the EU ambition of 40%-44% in 2030.1 The period beyond 2030, which is much more uncertain, is modeled in less detail. However, the Forum took care to not let the choice of any pathway during 2010-2030 lock a pathway after 2030 in or out. A 'least cost' approach, which works across sectors, is used to reduce emissions. In a 'least cost' approach, all emission reduction measures are ranked on costs and implemented progressively (starting from the cheapest) until the targeted abatement level is reached. In addition, a few developing technologies are implemented even if they are more expensive than alternatives. This choice prevents technology lock-in, ensures a more versatile, resilient energy system and provides a reasonable starting position for the period post-2030. The report assumes a pan-European approach for the power sector, which is the key sector in the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS); in this case, Dutch abatement options 'compete' with those in other EU countries. For the other sectors it uses a national approach. Non-cost factors

  2. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2004-01-01

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in

  3. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong, Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2003-01-01

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants while enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Data from more than 4,000 coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama provide an opportunity to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of coal and to develop a geologic screening model for the application of carbon sequestration technology. This report summarizes stratigraphy and sedimentation, structural geology, geothermics, hydrology, coal quality, gas capacity, and production characteristics of coal in the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway and the implications of geology for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Coal in the Black Warrior basin is distributed among several fluvial-deltaic coal zones in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation. Most coal zones contain one to three coal beds that are significant targets for coalbed methane production and carbon sequestration, and net coal thickness generally increases southeastward. Pottsville strata have effectively no matrix permeability to water, so virtually all flow is through natural fractures. Faults and folds influence the abundance and openness of fractures and, hence, the performance of coalbed methane wells. Water chemistry in the Pottsville Formation ranges from fresh to saline, and zones with TDS content lower than 10,000 mg/L can be classified as USDW. An aquifer exemption facilitating enhanced recovery in USDW can be obtained where TDS content is higher than 3,000 mg/L. Carbon dioxide becomes a supercritical fluid above a temperature of 88 F and a pressure of 1,074 psi. Reservoir temperature exceeds 88 F in much of the study area. Hydrostatic pressure gradients range from normal to extremely underpressured. A large area of underpressure is developed around closely spaced longwall coal mines, and areas of natural underpressure are distributed among the coalbed methane fields. The mobility and

  4. Optimized, Competitive Supercritical-CO2 Cycle GFR for Gen IV Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.J. Driscoll; P. Hejzlar; G. Apostolakis

    2008-09-08

    An overall plant design was developed for a gas-cooled fast reactor employing a direct supercritical Brayton power conversion system. The most important findings were that (1) the concept could be capital-cost competitive, but startup fuel cycle costs are penalized by the low core power density, specified in large part to satisfy the goal of significatn post-accident passive natural convection cooling; (2) active decay heat removal is preferable as the first line of defense, with passive performance in a backup role; (3) an innovative tube-in-duct fuel assembly, vented to the primpary coolant, appears to be practicable; and (4) use of the S-Co2 GFR to support hydrogen production is a synergistic application, since sufficient energy can be recuperated from the product H2 and 02 to allow the electrolysis cell to run 250 C hotter than the reactor coolant, and the water boilers can be used for reactor decay heat removal. Increasing core poer density is identified as the top priority for future work on GFRs of this type.

  5. Recovery Act: Multi-Objective Optimization Approaches for the Design of Carbon Geological Sequestration Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bau, Domenico

    2013-05-31

    The main objective of this project is to provide training opportunities for two graduate students in order to improve the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies. The graduate student effort will be geared towards the formulation and implementation of an integrated simulation-optimization framework to provide a rigorous scientific support to the design CCS systems that, for any given site: (a) maximize the amount of carbon storage; (b) minimize the total cost associated with the CCS project; (c) minimize the risk of CO2 upward leakage from injected formations. The framework will stem from a combination of data obtained from geophysical investigations, a multiphase flow model, and a stochastic multi-objective optimization algorithm. The methodology will rely on a geostatistical approach to generate ensembles of scenarios of the parameters that are expected to have large sensitivities and uncertainties on the model response and thus on the risk assessment, in particular the permeability properties of the injected formation and its cap rock. The safety theme will be addressed quantitatively by including the risk of CO2 upward leakage from the injected formations as one the objectives that should be minimized in the optimization problem. The research performed under this grant is significant to academic researchers and professionals weighing the benefits, costs, and risks of CO2 sequestration. Project managers in initial planning stages of CCS projects will be able to generate optimal tradeoff surfaces and with corresponding injection plans for potential sequestration sites leading to cost efficient preliminary project planning. In addition, uncertainties concerning CCS have been researched. Uncertainty topics included Uncertainty Analysis of Continuity of Geological Confining Units using Categorical Indicator Kriging (CIK) and the Influence of Uncertain Parameters on the Leakage of CO2 to

  6. From Injectivity to Integrity Studies of CO2 Geological Storage Caractérisation de l’injectivité et de l’intégrité d’un stockage géologique de CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bemer E.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The technical and economical success of a CO2 geological storage project requires the preservation of the site injectivity and integrity properties over its lifetime. Unlike conventional hydrocarbon gas injection, CO2 injection implies geochemical reactions between the reactive brine and the in situ formations (reservoir and cap rock leading to modifications of their petrophysical and geomechanical properties. This paper underlines the experimental difficulties raised by the low permeability of samples representative either of the cap rock itself or at least of transition zones between the reservoir and the effective cap rock. Acidification effects induced by CO2 injection have been studied using an experimental procedure of chemical alteration, which ensures a homogeneous dissolution pattern throughout the rock sample and especially avoids any wormholing process that would lead to erroneous measurements at the core scale. Porosity, permeability and geomechanical properties of outcrop and field carbonate samples of various permeability levels have been measured under their native state and different levels of alteration. The present work has been conducted within the framework of ANR GeoCarbone-INJECTIVITY and GeoCarbone-INTEGRITY projects. Each experimental step: chemical alteration, petrophysical measurements and geomechanical testing, is considered from the point of view of injectivity and integrity issues. The obtained experimental data show clear trends of chemically induced mechanical weakening. La réussite technique et économique d’un projet de stockage géologique de CO2 repose sur le maintien des propriétés d’injectivité et d’intégrité du site pendant sa durée de vie. Contrairement à l’injection d’un gaz d’hydrocarbure standard, l’injection de CO2 implique des réactions géochimiques entre la saumure réactive mobile et les roches en place (réservoir et couverture conduisant à des modifications de leurs propri

  7. [Optimization of supercritical CO2 extraction of plantaginis semen oil by response surface methodology and studies on its antioxidant activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Ling, Weijian; Chu, Kedan; Li, Huang; Chen, Lidian; Zhang, Yuqin; Chen, Xianwen

    2011-12-01

    The optimum conditions of SFE-CO2 extraction of Plantaginis Semen oil (SPO), the composition of SPO and its antioxidant activities of SPO were all investigated in this paper. Response surface method (RSM) was used to establish the mathematical model of SFE-CO2 extraction of SPO to obtain the optimum conditions based on Single factor experiments. Fatty acid compositions and contents of SPO were tested by GC-MS, and antioxidant activities of SPO were studied by DPPH and ABTS free radical elimination method. The optimum conditions obtained through RSM analysis were as follows: extraction tempreture 70 degrees C, extraction pressure 30 MPa, extraction time 120 min and flow rate 30 L x h(-1). Under the optimal condition, predicted value was 35.91%, while the experimental value was 35.07%. The experimental values agree with the predicted from the regression model with a relative error less than 5%. The main components of SPO were 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid, 8,11-octadecadienoic acid, octadecanoic acid and hexadecanoic acid. Most of the fatty acids were polyunsaturated fatty ones, whose quantities were obtained more than 88%. The IC50DPPH and IC50ABTS were 1.13, 3.57 g x L(-1) respectively in DPPH and ABTS assay. Optimization of the extraction process by RSM of SPO is convenient and feasible. SPO has good antioxidant activity and is worth to develop for application.

  8. State-of-the-art researches on CO2 geologic storage in deep saline aquifer%深部咸水层CO2地质封存研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘阳; 王媛

    2011-01-01

    从超临界CO2的物理性质出发,总结国内外深部咸水层封存CO2的机理研究、数值模拟、试验研究和工程应用方面所取得的主要成果.指出以往的研究主要集中于单一尺度研究均质地层封存CO2,较少考虑多尺度非均质性对咸水层封存CO2的影响.认为CO2在多尺度非均质深部咸水层中的运移与俘获特征将是碳捕捉封存技术的研究重点.%Based on the physical properties of supercritical CO2, the main achievements in the worldwide researches on CO2trapping in deep saline aquifer were summarized from the aspects of mechanism, numerical modeling, tests and projectapplications. The results show that the majority of the current researches focus on single-scale researches on CO2 trapping inhomogenous formation, and few researches refer to the effects of multi-scale heterogeneity on CO2 trapping. The future researcheson carbon storage technology should highlight the migration and trapping features of CO2 in multi-scale heterogonous deep salineaquifer.

  9. Optimal dissection for transanal total mesorectal excision using modified CO2 insufflation and smoke extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, G; Knol, J; Houben, B; Cunningham, C; Ashraf, S; Hompes, R

    2015-11-01

    The new approach of transanal total mesorectal excision is technically challenging and demands a stable field of dissection with optimal view of anatomical landmarks. We aimed to describe and demonstrate a modification of both the insufflation of carbon dioxide and smoke evacuation, in order to optimize dissection. The comparison of standard insufflation to an AirSeal platform demonstrates a clear difference. This is shown in the accompanying video-recordings. A more stable pneumorectum and better smoke evacuation as well as more convenient and precise dissection were achieved with the AirSeal platform. Using the technique outlined, the operating surgeon is able to perform the surgical dissection in a stable operating environment with increased visibility compared to the standard approach. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. On scale and magnitude of pressure build-up induced by large-scale geologic storage of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2011-05-01

    The scale and magnitude of pressure perturbation and brine migration induced by geologic carbon sequestration is discussed assuming a full-scale deployment scenario in which enough CO{sub 2} is captured and stored to make relevant contributions to global climate change mitigation. In this scenario, the volumetric rates and cumulative volumes of CO{sub 2} injection would be comparable to or higher than those related to existing deep-subsurface injection and extraction activities, such as oil production. Large-scale pressure build-up in response to the injection may limit the dynamic storage capacity of suitable formations, because over-pressurization may fracture the caprock, may drive CO{sub 2}/brine leakage through localized pathways, and may cause induced seismicity. On the other hand, laterally extensive sedimentary basins may be less affected by such limitations because (i) local pressure effects are moderated by pressure propagation and brine displacement into regions far away from the CO{sub 2} storage domain; and (ii) diffuse and/or localized brine migration into overlying and underlying formations allows for pressure bleed-off in the vertical direction. A quick analytical estimate of the extent of pressure build-up induced by industrial-scale CO{sub 2} storage projects is presented. Also discussed are pressure perturbation and attenuation effects simulated for two representative sedimentary basins in the USA: the laterally extensive Illinois Basin and the partially compartmentalized southern San Joaquin Basin in California. These studies show that the limiting effect of pressure build-up on dynamic storage capacity is not as significant as suggested by Ehlig-Economides and Economides, who considered closed systems without any attenuation effects.

  11. Optimization of Supercritical CO2 Extraction Technology of Vanilla Bean%香草兰超临界CO2萃取工艺优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗由萍; 崔胜华; 邓鹏飞; 于长江; 吴秀宁

    2013-01-01

    使用国产超临界CO2萃取中试装置,利用均匀设计法研究了香草兰(Vanilla planifolia Andrews)的超临界萃取工艺.以萃取压力、萃取温度、夹带剂乙醇用量和萃取时间为考察因素,确定最佳萃取工艺条件为萃取压力30.9 MPa、萃取温度53.1℃、夹带剂乙醇用量1.53 mL/g、萃取时间135 min,此条件下香兰素的萃取率为19.56 mg/g.

  12. Can observed ecosystem responses to elevated CO2 and N fertilisation be explained by optimal plant C allocation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Benjamin; Prentice, I. Colin

    2016-04-01

    The degree to which nitrogen availability limits the terrestrial C sink under rising CO2 is a key uncertainty in carbon cycle and climate change projections. Results from ecosystem manipulation studies and meta-analyses suggest that plant C allocation to roots adjusts dynamically under varying degrees of nitrogen availability and other soil fertility parameters. In addition, the ratio of biomass production to GPP appears to decline under nutrient scarcity. This reflects increasing plant C export into the soil and to symbionts (Cex) with decreasing nutrient availability. Cex is consumed by an array of soil organisms and may imply an improvement of nutrient availability to the plant. These concepts are left unaccounted for in Earth system models. We present a model for the coupled cycles of C and N in grassland ecosystems to explore optimal plant C allocation under rising CO2 and its implications for the ecosystem C balance. The model follows a balanced growth approach, accounting for the trade-offs between leaf versus root growth and Cex in balancing C fixation and N uptake. We further model a plant-controlled rate of biological N fixation (BNF) by assuming that Cex is consumed by N2-fixing processes if the ratio of Nup:Cex falls below the inverse of the C cost of N2-fixation. The model is applied at two temperate grassland sites (SwissFACE and BioCON), subjected to factorial treatments of elevated CO2 (FACE) and N fertilization. Preliminary simulation results indicate initially increased N limitation, evident by increased relative allocation to roots and Cex. Depending on the initial state of N availability, this implies a varying degree of aboveground growth enhancement, generally consistent with observed responses. On a longer time scale, ecosystems are progressively released from N limitation due tighter N cycling. Allowing for plant-controlled BNF implies a quicker release from N limitation and an adjustment to more open N cycling. In both cases, optimal plant

  13. Supercritical CO2 extraction of candlenut oil: process optimization using Taguchi orthogonal array and physicochemical properties of the oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subroto, Erna; Widjojokusumo, Edward; Veriansyah, Bambang; Tjandrawinata, Raymond R

    2017-04-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to determine optimum conditions for supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of candlenut oil. A Taguchi experimental design with L9 orthogonal array (four factors in three levels) was employed to evaluate the effects of pressure of 25-35 MPa, temperature of 40-60 °C, CO2 flow rate of 10-20 g/min and particle size of 0.3-0.8 mm on oil solubility. The obtained results showed that increase in particle size, pressure and temperature improved the oil solubility. The supercritical carbon dioxide extraction at optimized parameters resulted in oil yield extraction of 61.4% at solubility of 9.6 g oil/kg CO2. The obtained candlenut oil from supercritical carbon dioxide extraction has better oil quality than oil which was extracted by Soxhlet extraction using n-hexane. The oil contains high unsaturated oil (linoleic acid and linolenic acid), which have many beneficial effects on human health.

  14. Technology Optimization on Extraction of Lycopene by Supercritical CO2%超临界CO2萃取番茄红素工艺优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓岑; 娄岩; 于国萍

    2006-01-01

    本实验以番茄粉为原料,利用超临界CO2流体萃取技术对番茄红素的提取工艺进行了研究.探讨了萃取压力、萃取温度、萃取时间及夹带剂对番茄红素萃取率的影响,应用高效液相色谱仪对萃取物进行分析检测.采用二次回归正交旋转组合设计,通过计算机分析得出最佳工艺参数为:萃取压力38Mpa、萃取温度61℃、夹带剂添加64mL大豆色拉油、萃取时间120min,番茄红素的萃取率为1.18mg/100g.

  15. Technology Optimization on Extraction of Lycopene by Supercritical CO2%超临界CO2萃取番茄红素工艺优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓岑; 于国萍; 娄岩

    2007-01-01

    试验以番茄粉为原料,利用超临界CO2流体萃取技术对番茄红素的提取工艺进行了研究.探讨了萃取压力、萃取温度、萃取时间及夹带剂对番茄红素萃取率的影响,应用高效液相色谱仪对萃取物进行分析检测.采用二次回归正交旋转组合设计,通过计算机分析得出最佳工艺参数为:萃取压力38Mpa、萃取温度61℃、夹带剂添加64mL大豆色拉油、萃取时间120min,番茄红素的萃取率为1.18mg/100g.

  16. Feedforward non-Michaelis-Menten mechanism for CO(2) uptake by Rubisco: contribution of carbonic anhydrases and photorespiration to optimization of photosynthetic carbon assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Roussel, Marc R

    2012-03-01

    Rubisco, the most abundant protein serving as the primary engine generating organic biomass on Earth, is characterized by a low catalytic constant (in higher plants approx. 3s(-1)) and low specificity for CO(2) leading to photorespiration. We analyze here why this enzyme evolved as the main carbon fixation engine. The high concentration of Rubisco exceeding the concentration of its substrate CO(2) by 2-3 orders of magnitude makes application of Michaelis-Menten kinetics invalid and requires alternative kinetic approaches to describe photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation. Efficient operation of Rubisco is supported by a strong flux of CO(2) to the chloroplast stroma provided by fast equilibration of bicarbonate and CO(2) and forwarding the latter to Rubisco reaction centers. The main part of this feedforward mechanism is a thylakoidal carbonic anhydrase associated with photosystem II and pumping CO(2) from the thylakoid lumen in coordination with the rate of electron transport, water splitting and proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. This steady flux of CO(2) limits photosynthesis at saturating CO(2) concentrations. At low ambient CO(2) and correspondingly limited capacity of the bicarbonate pool in the stroma, its depletion at the sites of Rubisco is relieved by utilizing O(2) instead of CO(2), i.e. by photorespiration, a process which supplies CO(2) back to Rubisco and buffers the redox state and energy level in the chloroplast. Thus, the regulation of Rubisco function aims to keep steady non-equilibrium levels of CO(2), NADPH/NADP and ATP/ADP in the chloroplast stroma and to optimize the condition of homeostatic photosynthetic flux of matter and energy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimizing Measure for Inlet Temperature at Fifth Stage of Reciprocating Compressor of CO2%往复式CO2压缩机五段入口温度的优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华

    2012-01-01

    分析了往复式CO2压缩机五段入口温度控制难度较大的原因;采取了定期清洗压缩机酸排、增大脱硫槽容积、调整压缩机四段冷却器用水流程等优化措施。改造效果表明,CO2压缩机五段入口温度的波动范围为±2℃,达到指标要求。%Author has analyzed the cause that controlling the inlet temperature at fifth stage of the reciprocating compressor of CO2 was more difficult; has adopted the optimizing measures of periodically washing the acid discharge of compressor, increasing the volume of de-sulfur tank, adjusting the water usage process for cooler at fourth stage of compressor and so on. Reformation effect indicates that fluctuation scope of inlet temperature at fifth stage of CO2 compressor is ± 2℃, index requirement can be reached.

  18. "Carbon in Underland": A multidisciplinary approach to producing an informative animated video for the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geological CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, S.; Cappuccio, J. A.; Berry, I.; Miller, J.; Bourg, I. C.; Kelly, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the 'Science for Our Nation's Energy Future, Summit and Forum', each of the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) created in 2009 by the US Department of Energy was invited to design a short, engaging film with the central goal to educate, inspire, and entertain an intelligent but not expert audience about the extraordinary science, innovation and people in their center. The Center for Nanoscale Control of Geological CO2 (NCGC) is an EFRC that is building a next generation understanding of molecular-to-pore-scale processes critical to controlling the flow,transport, and ultimate mineralization in porous rock media, in particular as applied to geologic sequestration of CO2. In response to the invitation, the NCGC assembled a team that included several young scientists, the Center project manager, and members from the Public Affairs and Creative Services Office of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with the objective of preparing a submission. A videographer from the Creative Services Office was responsible for overall management including production, art direction, and editing, while scientists from the Center were responsible for scientific content and original storyline concept. The Center project manager facilitated the communication between team members. A group of scientists together with the project manager developed the original idea, which was refined and given shape as a script in dialogue form by a science writer from Public Affairs. The objective was to communicate scientific content in an entertaining manner with a simple storyline. In a second phase, the script was revised further by scientists for content. Clips from experiments and modeling simulations were requested from the Center's scientists to illustrate the scientific content. Video production and animation were done by the videographer and an animator in an iterative process that involve feedback from the Center team. The final cut was edited to meet the maximum length

  19. Optimized recovery through cooperative geology and reservoir engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, F.F. Jr.; Willcox, P.J.; Ballard, J.R.; Nation, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    Reservoir engineers have always used geological descriptions in their performance calculations. At first, the only information that could be utilized consisted of gross factors such as structure, thickness, fault and boundary locations, and the like, and average values for permeability, porosity, and fluid saturations. The advent of easy-to-use, relatively inexpensive mathematical models provided a new and powerful tool to the reservoir engineer for predicting performance. However, this tool required for its optimum use a more detailed reservoir description than geologists were accustomed to providing. Today's reservoir engineer utilizes the most detailed geological information along with a reservoir performance simulator to synthesize a detailed reservoir description capable of matching actual field performance data. Use of such a reservoir description permits the design of operating programs to obtain optimized recovery from hydrocarbon reservoirs. Two examples of the use of this combined geology-reservoir engineering technique are taken from the international arena of operations.

  20. Modeling and Simulated Annealing Optimization of Surface Roughness in CO2 Laser Nitrogen Cutting of Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Madić

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a systematic methodology for empirical modeling and optimization of surface roughness in nitrogen, CO2 laser cutting of stainless steel . The surface roughness prediction model was developed in terms of laser power , cutting speed , assist gas pressure and focus position by using The artificial neural network ( ANN . To cover a wider range of laser cutting parameters and obtain an experimental database for the ANN model development, Taguchi 's L27 orthogonal array was implemented in the experimental plan. The developed ANN model was expressed as an explicit nonlinear function , while the influence of laser cutting parameters and their interactions on surface roughness were analyzed by generating 2D and 3D plots . The final goal of the experimental study Focuses on the determinationof the optimum laser cutting parameters for the minimization of surface roughness . Since the solution space of the developed ANN model is complex, and the possibility of many local solutions is great, simulated annealing (SA was selected as a method for the optimization of surface roughness.

  1. Near Surface Gas Simulator (NSGS): A Visual Basic program to improve the design of near-surface gas geochemistry surveys above CO2 geological storage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaubien, S. E.; Annunziatellis, A.; Ciotoli, G.; Lombardi, S.

    2009-04-01

    If CO2 were to leak from a geological storage site and be released to the atmosphere, where would it occur and how large would the leak be in terms of dimension and flow rate? There are many options available to monitor storage sites, including deep and shallow geophysical or geochemical methods, biological markers, or remote sensing techniques, each with its advantages and disadvantages. However only the direct measurement of CO2 at the earth's surface, that is soil gas or gas flux analyses, can give a definitive answer to these questions. Considering that these methods involve point measurements, the question has be raised regarding the sampling density that would be needed to locate a leak above a storage site, or, conversely, to ensure that a leak does not exist. To address this issue we have written a program in Visual Basic which uses highly-detailed, gridded synthetic data (with user-defined gas leakage areas) to study the link between sampling density and anomaly size and to find a sampling strategy which minimises the number of samples collected while maximizing the probability that an anomaly (i.e. a leak) will be found. At the beginning of a run the user is asked to define the location, size, and intensity of leakage areas; these areas are then superimposed on a grid (1 x 1 m step size) of normally-distributed background CO2 flux values. Then the user is asked to provide a series of sampling densities (for example, x = 10, 50, 100, 500, and 1000 samples km-2) and the number of simulations that must be conducted for each sampling density (e.g. y = 100). The program then uses a nested loop structure whereby the synthetic dataset is randomly subsampled at the sampling density "x" for a total of "y" times - each of these smaller datasets is then analysed statistically and spatially using subroutines from the programs Statistica and Surfer, and the resultant data from each simulation for that "x" sampling density is combined to define its statistical

  2. Cost and CO2 emission optimization of precast prestressed concrete U-beam road bridges by a hybrid glowworm swarm algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Yepes Piqueras, Víctor; Martí Albiñana, José Vicente

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology to optimize cost and CO2 emissions when designing precast-prestressed concrete road bridges with a double U-shape cross-section. To this end, a hybrid glowworm swarm optimization algorithm (SAGSO) is used to combine the synergy effect of the local search with simulated annealing (SA) and the global search with glowworm swarm optimization (GSO). The solution is defined by 40 variables, including the geometry, materials and reinforcement of the beam and the sl...

  3. Determination of extractability of pine bark using supercritical CO(2) extraction and different solvents: optimization and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem; Otto, Frank; Gruener, Sabine; Parlar, Harun

    2009-01-28

    Bark from Pinus brutia was extracted with supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), using CO(2), at various extraction conditions both at laboratory and at pilot scale. Optimized parameters were 200 bar, 60 degrees C, and 3% ethanol at a solvent/feed ratio of 30. Additionally, the pine bark was sonicated (1 h at 50 degrees C) by different solvents (n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and ethanol) to investigate the correlation between the different extraction setups and to obtain information on SFE up-scaling possibilities. Analyzed by HPLC, 7.2% of (-)-catechin was extractable at laboratory scale, and 58.4% (800 bar) and 47.8% (200 bar), both with modifiers, at pilot scale. By sonication with ethanol, 46.8% of (-)-catechin and almost 100% of (-)-epicatechin and (-)-catechin gallate were extracted. Ethyl acetate extract revealed high correlations with the laboratory scale SFE (r = 0.98) and also pilot scale SFE runs at 200 (r = 0.99) and 800 bar (r = 0.98) without modifiers.

  4. Ann modeling of kerf transfer in Co2 laser cutting and optimization of cutting parameters using monte carlo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Madić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an attempt has been made to develop a mathematical model in order to study the relationship between laser cutting parameters such as laser power, cutting speed, assist gas pressure and focus position, and kerf taper angle obtained in CO2 laser cutting of AISI 304 stainless steel. To this aim, a single hidden layer artificial neural network (ANN trained with gradient descent with momentum algorithm was used. To obtain an experimental database for the ANN training, laser cutting experiment was planned as per Taguchi’s L27 orthogonal array with three levels for each of the cutting parameters. Statistically assessed as adequate, ANN model was then used to investigate the effect of the laser cutting parameters on the kerf taper angle by generating 2D and 3D plots. It was observed that the kerf taper angle was highly sensitive to the selected laser cutting parameters, as well as their interactions. In addition to modeling, by applying the Monte Carlo method on the developed kerf taper angle ANN model, the near optimal laser cutting parameter settings, which minimize kerf taper angle, were determined.

  5. Energy Optimization for Transcritical CO2 Heat Pump for Combined Heating and Cooling and Thermal Storage Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do Carmo, Carolina Madeira Ramos; Blarke, Morten; Yazawa, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    A transcritical heat pump (THP) cycle using carbon dioxide (CO2) as the refrigerant is known to feature an excellent coefficient of performance (COP) as a thermodynamic system. Using this feature, we are designing and building a system that combines a water-to-water CO2 heat pump with both hot an...

  6. The trade-off between CO2 emissions and logistics costs based on multi-objective optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, N.S.; Janic, M.; Van Wee, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a decision-support tool for estimating the balanced market shares of given freight transport systems operating in a given network, satisfying both the minimum costs and the Carbon-Dioxide (CO2) emission requirements. Since CO2 constraints in logistics markets need to be realized

  7. Improved cost models for optimizing CO2 pipeline configuration for point-to-point pipelines and simple networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoope, M. M. J.; Guijt, W.; Ramirez, A.; Faaij, A. P. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a new cost model is developed for CO2 pipeline transport, which starts with the physical properties of CO2 transport and includes different kinds of steel grades and up-to-date material and construction costs. This pipeline cost model is used for a new developed tool to determine the

  8. The trade-off between CO2 emissions and logistics costs based on multi-objective optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, N.S.; Janic, M.; Van Wee, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a decision-support tool for estimating the balanced market shares of given freight transport systems operating in a given network, satisfying both the minimum costs and the Carbon-Dioxide (CO2) emission requirements. Since CO2 constraints in logistics markets need to be realized

  9. Using an optimality model to understand medium and long-term responses of vegetation water use to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J.; Roderick, Michael L.; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation has different adjustable properties for adaptation to its environment. Examples include stomatal conductance at short time scale (minutes), leaf area index and fine root distributions at longer time scales (days–months) and species composition and dominant growth forms at very long time scales (years–decades–centuries). As a result, the overall response of evapotranspiration to changes in environmental forcing may also change at different time scales. The vegetation optimality model simulates optimal adaptation to environmental conditions, based on the assumption that different vegetation properties are optimized to maximize the long-term net carbon profit, allowing for separation of different scales of adaptation, without the need for parametrization with observed responses. This paper discusses model simulations of vegetation responses to today's elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) at different temporal scales and puts them in context with experimental evidence from free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments. Without any model tuning or calibration, the model reproduced general trends deduced from FACE experiments, but, contrary to the widespread expectation that eCO2 would generally decrease water use due to its leaf-scale effect on stomatal conductance, our results suggest that eCO2 may lead to unchanged or even increased vegetation water use in water-limited climates, accompanied by an increase in perennial vegetation cover. PMID:26019228

  10. Using an optimality model to understand medium and long-term responses of vegetation water use to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J; Roderick, Michael L; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2015-05-27

    Vegetation has different adjustable properties for adaptation to its environment. Examples include stomatal conductance at short time scale (minutes), leaf area index and fine root distributions at longer time scales (days-months) and species composition and dominant growth forms at very long time scales (years-decades-centuries). As a result, the overall response of evapotranspiration to changes in environmental forcing may also change at different time scales. The vegetation optimality model simulates optimal adaptation to environmental conditions, based on the assumption that different vegetation properties are optimized to maximize the long-term net carbon profit, allowing for separation of different scales of adaptation, without the need for parametrization with observed responses. This paper discusses model simulations of vegetation responses to today's elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) at different temporal scales and puts them in context with experimental evidence from free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments. Without any model tuning or calibration, the model reproduced general trends deduced from FACE experiments, but, contrary to the widespread expectation that eCO2 would generally decrease water use due to its leaf-scale effect on stomatal conductance, our results suggest that eCO2 may lead to unchanged or even increased vegetation water use in water-limited climates, accompanied by an increase in perennial vegetation cover.

  11. Design and Optimization on Simulation System of Mine CO2 Open Loop Cycle Refrigeration%矿用CO2开放式制冷仿真系统设计与优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹利波

    2013-01-01

    According to the importance of the CO2 open loop cycle refrigeration applied to the rescue cabin, the refuge chamber and other limited airtight space, the FLOWMASTER simulation software of the thermal fluid system was applied to design the simulation system of the CO2 open loop cycle refrigeration applied to a limited airtight space. Under the conditions to meet the designed refrigeration value and the pressure drop and temperature drop at the inlet and outlet of the pneumatic blower, the tube length of the evaporator was optimized and the optimum length of the evaporator was obtained. Meanwhile the refrigeration system features and the different refrigeration value under the non designed performances were checked.The test certification was conducted on the refrigeration simulation system.The simulated value and the test value were well fitted and the simulation accuracy and precision of the system were verified.%针对CO2开放式制冷在避难硐室、救生舱等有限密闭空间中应用的重要性,利用FLOWMASTER热流体计算仿真软件,设计了一种用于有限密闭空间的CO2开放式制冷仿真系统,在满足设计制冷量和气动风机进出口压降、温降的条件下,对蒸发器管长进行优化,获得了最佳蒸发器长度,同时对非设计工况下的制冷系统特性及不同制冷量进行校核,并对该制冷仿真系统进行了试验验证,仿真值与试验值吻合良好,验证了系统仿真的准确性和精确性.

  12. Study on Optimization of Process for Extracting Ginger Oil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction Technology%超临界CO2萃取姜油树脂的工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建立; 李公春

    2011-01-01

    [目的]优化采用超临界CO_2萃取取姜油树脂的工艺.[方法]利用超临界CO_2流体作为萃取溶剂从干姜中提取姜油树脂,研究萃取压力、萃取时间和萃取温度对姜油树脂萃取率的影响,通过正交试验确定了姜油树脂萃取工艺的最佳萃取条件.[结果]姜油树脂超临界CO_2萃取的最佳萃取工艺条件为:萃取压力35MPa,萃取时间2.5h,萃取温度40℃,在此条件下,姜油树脂的萃取率为2.86%.[结论]该研究可为调味料科研工作者和生产厂家提供参考.%[ Objective] The research aimed to optimize the process of extracting ginger oil by supercritical CO2 extraction technology. [ Method] The ginger oil was extracted from dry ginger by supercritical CO, fluid, and the effects of extraction pressure, extraction time and extraction temperature on extraction rate of ginger oil were studied. The optimum extraction condition of ginger oil was determined through orthogonal test. [Result] The optimum extraction process of ginger oil was extraction pressure of 35 Mpa, extraction time of 2.5 h, extraction temperature of 40 ℃. Under this condition, the extraction rate of ginger oil was 2.86%. [ Conclusion] The study can provide reference for scientists researching flavoring and manufacturers.

  13. Why capture CO2 from the atmosphere?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith, David W

    2009-01-01

    Air capture is an industrial process for capturing CO2 from ambient air; it is one of an emerging set of technologies for CO2 removal that includes geological storage of biotic carbon and the acceleration of geochemical weathering...

  14. A microporous Cu-MOF with optimized open metal sites and pore spaces for high gas storage and active chemical fixation of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chao-Ying; Tian, Hong-Rui; Ai, Jing; Li, Lei-Jiao; Dang, Song; Lan, Ya-Qian; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2016-09-25

    A microporous Cu-MOF with optimized open metal sites and pore space was constructed based on a designed bent ligand; it exhibits high-capacity multiple gas storage under atmospheric pressure and efficient catalytic activity for chemical fixation of CO2 under mild conditions.

  15. Implications of Sub-Hydrostatic Pressures in the Bravo Dome Natural CO2 Reservoir for the Long-Term Security of Geological Carbon Dioxide Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhbari, D.; Hesse, M. A.; Larson, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Bravo Dome field in northeast New Mexico is one of the largest gas accumulations worldwide and the largest natural CO2 accumulation in North America. The field is only 580-900 m deep and located in the Permian Tubb sandstone that unconformably overlies the granitic basement. Sathaye et al. (2014) estimated that 1.3 Gt of CO2 is stored at the reservoir. A major increase in the pore pressure relative to the hydrostatic pressure is expected due to the large amount of CO2 injected into the reservoir. However, the pre-production gas pressures indicate that most parts of the reservoir are approximately 5 MPa below hydrostatic pressure. Three processes could explain the under pressure in the Bravo Dome reservoir; 1) erosional unloading, 2) CO2 dissolution into the ambient brine, 3) cooling of CO2after injection. Analytical solutions suggest that an erosion rate of 180 m/Ma is required to reduce the pore pressures to the values observed at Bravo Dome. Given that the current erosion rate is only 5 m/Ma (Nereson et al. 2013); the sub-hydrostatic pressures at Bravo Dome are likely due to CO2dissolution and cooling. To investigate the impact of CO2 dissolution on the pore pressure we have developed new analytical solutions and conducted laboratory experiments. We assume that gaseous CO2 was confined to sandstones during emplacement due to the high entry pressure of the siltstones. After emplacement the CO2 dissolves in to the brine contained in the siltstones and the pressure in the sandstones declines. Assuming the sandstone-siltstone system is closed, the pressure decline due to CO2 dissolution is controlled by a single dimensionless number, η = KHRTVw /Vg. Herein, KH is Henry's constant, R is ideal gas constant, T is temperature, Vw is water volume, and Vg is CO2 volume. The pressure drop is controlled by the ratio of water volume to CO2 volume and η varies between 0.1 to 8 at Bravo Dome. This corresponds to pressure drops between 0.8-7.5 MPa and can therefore account

  16. 黑59区块回注气驱 CO2浓度优选%Optimization of the CO2 concentration for gas reinjection flooding in HEI-59 oil-field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓明; 廖新维; 赵晓亮; 崔灿; 叶恒; 王牧

    2015-01-01

    Some of domestic oil fields are in the tertiary EOR phase .Carbon dioxide drive is an environmental friendly ,low carbon emission and high economic efficiency EOR method .The technique of gas reinjection ,as extension of Carbon dioxide drive tech ,the determination of the components is of great significance to the field oil recovery′s improvement .According to Song Liao Basin′s reservoir characteristics ,methods of experimental analysis and theoretical studies were combined .Phase behavior of reinjection gas was studied .Reinjection gas compo‐sition′s impact on the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) was analyzed .Oil displacement efficiency characteristics under different CO2 purity were researched .Technical indicators of gas injection EOR were determined through combination of reservoir engineering and numer‐ical simulation methods .The result shows that when the concentration ratio of CO2 in rein‐jection gas is greater than 93% ,HEI‐59 reaches an optimal displacement characteristics .%国内部分油田进入了三次采油期。采用CO2驱油提高采收率,具有低碳环保、经济高效等优势,已经得到了推广应用。回注气驱油技术作为CO2驱替技术的一个延伸,其组分的确定对矿场提高采收率具有十分重要的意义。本文针对松辽盆地的油藏特征,进行了细管实验分析和数值模拟研究,分析了回注气组成对最小混相压力的影响以及不同CO2纯度下的驱油效率特征。同时,应用油藏工程方法,确定了回注气提高采收率的工程技术指标,为矿场回注气的高效开发提供技术参考。实验分析和数值模拟结果均表明,黑59区块回注气C O 2浓度比例不低于93%时,驱油效果最佳。

  17. CO2 Sequestration short course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Cole, David R [The Ohio State University; Navrotsky, Alexandra [University of California-Davis; Bourg, Ian C [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2014-12-08

    Given the public’s interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

  18. Optimization of Operation Parameters for Helical Flow Cleanout with Supercritical CO2 in Horizontal Wells Using Back-Propagation Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xianzhi; Peng, Chi; Li, Gensheng

    2016-01-01

    Sand production and blockage are common during the drilling and production of horizontal oil and gas wells as a result of formation breakdown. The use of high-pressure rotating jets and annular helical flow is an effective way to enhance horizontal wellbore cleanout. In this paper, we propose the idea of using supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) as washing fluid in water-sensitive formation. SC-CO2 is manifested to be effective in preventing formation damage and enhancing production rate as drilling fluid, which justifies tis potential in wellbore cleanout. In order to investigate the effectiveness of SC-CO2 helical flow cleanout, we perform the numerical study on the annular flow field, which significantly affects sand cleanout efficiency, of SC-CO2 jets in horizontal wellbore. Based on the field data, the geometry model and mathematical models were built. Then a numerical simulation of the annular helical flow field by SC-CO2 jets was accomplished. The influences of several key parameters were investigated, and SC-CO2 jets were compared to conventional water jets. The results show that flow rate, ambient temperature, jet temperature, and nozzle assemblies play the most important roles on wellbore flow field. Once the difference between ambient temperatures and jet temperatures is kept constant, the wellbore velocity distributions will not change. With increasing lateral nozzle size or decreasing rear/forward nozzle size, suspending ability of SC-CO2 flow improves obviously. A back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) was successfully employed to match the operation parameters and SC-CO2 flow velocities. A comprehensive model was achieved to optimize the operation parameters according to two strategies: cost-saving strategy and local optimal strategy. This paper can help to understand the distinct characteristics of SC-CO2 flow. And it is the first time that the BP-ANN is introduced to analyze the flow field during wellbore cleanout in horizontal wells. PMID

  19. Optimization of Operation Parameters for Helical Flow Cleanout with Supercritical CO2 in Horizontal Wells Using Back-Propagation Artificial Neural Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianzhi Song

    Full Text Available Sand production and blockage are common during the drilling and production of horizontal oil and gas wells as a result of formation breakdown. The use of high-pressure rotating jets and annular helical flow is an effective way to enhance horizontal wellbore cleanout. In this paper, we propose the idea of using supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2 as washing fluid in water-sensitive formation. SC-CO2 is manifested to be effective in preventing formation damage and enhancing production rate as drilling fluid, which justifies tis potential in wellbore cleanout. In order to investigate the effectiveness of SC-CO2 helical flow cleanout, we perform the numerical study on the annular flow field, which significantly affects sand cleanout efficiency, of SC-CO2 jets in horizontal wellbore. Based on the field data, the geometry model and mathematical models were built. Then a numerical simulation of the annular helical flow field by SC-CO2 jets was accomplished. The influences of several key parameters were investigated, and SC-CO2 jets were compared to conventional water jets. The results show that flow rate, ambient temperature, jet temperature, and nozzle assemblies play the most important roles on wellbore flow field. Once the difference between ambient temperatures and jet temperatures is kept constant, the wellbore velocity distributions will not change. With increasing lateral nozzle size or decreasing rear/forward nozzle size, suspending ability of SC-CO2 flow improves obviously. A back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN was successfully employed to match the operation parameters and SC-CO2 flow velocities. A comprehensive model was achieved to optimize the operation parameters according to two strategies: cost-saving strategy and local optimal strategy. This paper can help to understand the distinct characteristics of SC-CO2 flow. And it is the first time that the BP-ANN is introduced to analyze the flow field during wellbore cleanout in

  20. Assessing the short-term and long-term integrity of top seals in feasibility studies of geological CO2 storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlic, B.; Heege, J.H. ter; Wassing, B.B.T.

    2011-01-01

    The geomechanical effects of past hydrocarbon production and subsequent CO2 injection in depleted gas reservoirs were evaluated as a part of several recently accomplished feasibility studies of CO2 storage in the Netherlands. The objectives of geomechanical studies were to assess the mechanical

  1. Prospects for optimizing soil microbial functioning to improve plant nutrient uptake and soil carbon sequestration under elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, M.; Pendall, E. G.

    2013-12-01

    Potential to mitigate climate change through increasing plant productivity and its carbon (C) input to soil may be limited by soil nitrogen (N) availability. Using a novel 13C-CO2 and 15N-soil dual labeling method, we investigated whether plant growth-promoting bacteria would interact with atmospheric CO2 concentration to alter plant productivity and soil C storage. We grew Bouteloua gracilis under ambient (380 ppm) or elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in climate-controlled chambers, and plant individuals were grown with or without Pseudomonas fluorescens inoculum, which can produce N catabolic enzymes. We observed that both eCO2 and P. fluorescens increased plant productivity and its C allocation to soil. P. fluorescens relative to eCO2 enhanced plant N uptake from soil organic matter, which highly correlated with soil N enzyme activities and rhizosphere exudate C. More importantly, P. fluorescens increased microbial biomass and deceased specific microbial respiration in comparison with eCO2. These results indicate that application of plant growth-promoting bacteria can increase microbial C utilization efficiency with subsequent N mineralization from soil organic matter, and may improve plant N availability and soil C sequestration. Together, our findings highlight the potential of plant growth-promoting bacteria for global change mitigation by terrestrial ecosystems.

  2. Reactive Transport Modeling of the Enhancement of Density-Driven CO2 Convective Mixing in Carbonate Aquifers and its Potential Implication on Geological Carbon Sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Akand; Sun, Alexander Y; Yang, Changbing

    2016-01-01

    We study the convection and mixing of CO2 in a brine aquifer, where the spread of dissolved CO2 is enhanced because of geochemical reactions with the host formations (calcite and dolomite), in addition to the extensively studied, buoyancy-driven mixing. The nonlinear convection is investigated under the assumptions of instantaneous chemical equilibrium, and that the dissipation of carbonate rocks solely depends on flow and transport and chemical speciation depends only on the equilibrium thermodynamics of the chemical system. The extent of convection is quantified in term of the CO2 saturation volume of the storage formation. Our results suggest that the density increase of resident species causes significant enhancement in CO2 dissolution, although no significant porosity and permeability alterations are observed. Early saturation of the reservoir can have negative impact on CO2 sequestration.

  3. Optimization of Co2+ ions removal from water solutions via polymer enhanced ultrafiltration with application of PVA and sulfonated PVA as complexing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzal, Niğmet; Jaworska, Agnieszka; Miśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Zakrzewska-Trznadel, Grażyna; Cojocaru, Corneliu

    2011-10-15

    The paper presents the results of the studies of UF-complexation process applied for the removal of Co(2+) ions from water solutions. As binding agents for cobalt ions, the PVA polymer (M(w)=10,000) and its sulfonated form, synthesized in the laboratory, have been used. The method of experimental design and response surface methodology have been employed to find out the optimal conditions for the complexation process and to evaluate the interaction between the input variables, i.e., initial cobalt concentration, pH and amount of the polymer used, expressed as a polymer/Co(2+) ratio r. The data collected by the designed experiments showed that sulfonation of polymer has improved significantly the binding ability of PVA. The optimal conditions of cobalt ions complexation established by response surface model for non-sulfonated PVA polymer have been found to be as follows: the initial concentration of Co(2+)=5.70 mg L(-1), the ratio between polymer and metal ions, r=8.58 and pH=5.93. The removal efficiency of Co(2+) in these conditions was 31.81%. For sulfonated PVA polymer, the optimal conditions determined are as follows: initial concentration of [Co(2+)](0)=10 mg L(-1), r=1.2 and pH=6.5. For these conditions, a removal efficiency of 99.98% has been determined. The experiments showed that Co(2+) removal ability of sulfonated PVA was much higher than its non-sulfonated precursor. Although the polymer concentrations used in the tests with sulfonated PVA were approximately ten times lower than the non-sulfonated one, the removal efficiency of cobalt ions was significantly higher.

  4. [Optimize the extraction process with supercritical CO2 fluid from lotus leaves by the uniform design and analysis on the chemical constituents by GC-MS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hui-jing; Qian, Yi-fan; Pu, Cun-hai

    2007-04-01

    To study the optimum parameters of the supercritical CO, fluid extraction of lotus leaves and chemical constituents of extractive matters. Supercritical CO2 fluid extraction condition was selected by uniform design. The extraction pressure, extraction temperature, extraction time were three factors in the experiment. GC-MS was applied for analyzing the extraction. The optimum condition were obtained: the extraction pressure was 26 Mpa, the extraction temperature was 40 degrees C, the extracion time was 90 minutes. The major constituent was 1H-Pyrrole-2-carboxaldehyde, 1-ethyl-in extractive matters. Uniform design can optimize the CO2 Supercritical Fluid Extraction process quickly and accuratly with satisfactory results.

  5. Simple processes for optimized growth and harvest of Ettlia sp. by pH control using CO2 and light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Chan; La, Hyun-Joon; Kim, Sun-Chang; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2015-02-01

    Microalgae cultures show wide range of pH depending on the availability of light and CO2 for their strain specific photosynthesis. Thus, the modulation of light irradiation and CO2 supply can be applied for the pH control of microalgae cultures. The optimal pH of Ettlia sp. YC001, for phototrophic growth and auto-flocculation was investigated by controlling light irradiation and 10% CO2 supply. Ettlia sp. YC001 showed the highest biomass productivity, 96.7 mg L(-1)  d(-1) , at pH 8.5. The flocculating activity of Ettlia sp. YC001 showed a sigmoid pattern with pH increase and was above 70% at pH 10.5. Based on these differentiated optimal pH regimes for the growth and flocculation, an integrated process consisting of cultivation and settling vessels was proposed. The integrated process demonstrated that high flocculation activity of Ettlia sp. YC001 could be achieved in the settling vessel with various hydraulic retention times by only irradiation of light to maintain high pH while maintaining the optimal growth in cultivation vessel with the light irradiation and CO2 supply at pH 8.5. Thus, the proposed strategy for pH control would provide a simple, cost-effective, and flexible design and operation for microalgae cultivation-harvest systems. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahdat, Nader

    2013-09-30

    The project provided hands-on training and networking opportunities to undergraduate students in the area of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and transport, through fundamental research study focused on advanced separation methods that can be applied to the capture of CO2 resulting from the combustion of fossil-fuels for power generation . The project team’s approach to achieve its objectives was to leverage existing Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) course materials and teaching methods to create and implement an annual CCS short course for the Tuskegee University community; conduct a survey of CO2 separation and capture methods; utilize data to verify and develop computer models for CO2 capture and build CCS networks and hands-on training experiences. The objectives accomplished as a result of this project were: (1) A comprehensive survey of CO2 capture methods was conducted and mathematical models were developed to compare the potential economics of the different methods based on the total cost per year per unit of CO2 avoidance; and (2) Training was provided to introduce the latest CO2 capture technologies and deployment issues to the university community.

  7. The hybrid MPC-MINLP algorithm for optimal operation of coal-fired power plants with solvent based post-combustion CO2 capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhuda Abdul Manaf

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an algorithm that combines model predictive control (MPC with MINLP optimization and demonstrates its application for coal-fired power plants retrofitted with solvent based post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC plant. The objective function of the optimization algorithm works at a primary level to maximize plant economic revenue while considering an optimal carbon capture profile. At a secondary level, the MPC algorithm is used to control the performance of the PCC plant. Two techno-economic scenarios based on fixed (capture rate is constant and flexible (capture rate is variable operation modes are developed using actual electricity prices (2011 with fixed carbon prices ($AUD 5, 25, 50/tonne-CO2 for 24 h periods. Results show that fixed operation mode can bring about a ratio of net operating revenue deficit at an average of 6% against the superior flexible operation mode.

  8. Process optimization of total flavonoids from chuan bergamot by supercritical CO2 extraction%川佛手中总黄酮的超临界CO2萃取工艺优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓祥; 黄小梅; 吴狄

    2014-01-01

    采用超临界CO2萃取技术提取川佛手中的总黄酮,通过单因素分析和正交试验,确定了川佛手中总黄酮的最佳提取工艺参数,即萃取压力为30 MPa,萃取温度为50℃,料液比为100:120 g/mL和萃取时间为2.0 h,在此条件下总黄酮的萃取率达到3.79%.%The total flavonoids was extracted from Chuan Bergamot by supercritical CO2 extraction. The optimal parameters were determined as follows:extraction pressure was 30 MPa;extraction temperature was 50 ℃;solid-liquid ratio was 100:120( g/mL)and extraction time was 2. 0 h by single factor tests and orthogonal experiments. Under these conditions,the extraction yield of total flavonoids is 3. 79%.

  9. Optimization of a Frequency-Stabilized Laser Reference at 1.57μM for AN Active Laser Remote Sensing of CO2 from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.; Petway, L. B.; Lee, H. R.; Harrison, F. W.; Browell, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    Several airborne flight campaigns have shown that active remote sensing of carbon dioxide mixing ratio (XCO2) in the atmosphere using either an Intensity Modulated-Continuous Wave (IM-CW) Laser Absorption Spectrometer (LAS) at 1.57 μm or a pulsed laser CO2 sounder at 1.57 μm is a promising technique for an accurate space measurement approach for the Active Sensing of CO2 over Nights, Days, and Seasons mission [1, 2]. In order to achieve a measurement accuracy of one part per million (ppmv) for CO2 column density and associated mixing ratio by volume, the frequency stability (frequency or wavelength variance) of the lasers at 1.57 μm for a space-borne active remote sensing system should be greater than 1.5e-9 (less than 300 kHz or less than 2.5e-3 pm) is required for most moderate-size instruments [3]. In this paper, we report a design and optimization of a frequency-locking laser reference with an integration of Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD) and Proportional Integration Derivation (PID) feed-back control techniques to stabilize laser frequency associated to one of CO or CO2 absorption lines at 1.57 μm. The optimized sensitivity based on PSD signals in terms of the modulation frequency, the length of the gas cell, and the pressure of the gas will be provided. The design and optimization has been demonstrated at a 2-μm CO2 absorption line and is applicable to the active remote sensing systems at 1.57 μm. [1] E. V. Browell, J. Dobler, F. W. Harrison, and B. Moore III, "Development and Validation of CO2 and O2 Laser Measurements for Future Active XCO2 Space Mission", Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 13, EGU2011-12598, 2011 [2] J. B. Abshire, H. Riris, G. R. Allen, C. J. Weaver, J. Mao, X. Sun, W. E. Hasselbrack, S. R. Kawa, S. Biraud, "Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 column Absorption", Tellus (2010), 62B, 770-783 [3] E. Ehret, C. Kiemle, M. Wirth, A. Amediek, A. Fix, and S. Houweling, 2008: Space

  10. Energy Optimization for Transcritical CO2 Heat Pump for Combined Heating and Cooling and Thermal Storage Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do Carmo, Carolina Madeira Ramos; Blarke, Morten; Yazawa, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    A transcritical heat pump (THP) cycle using carbon dioxide (CO2) as the refrigerant is known to feature an excellent coefficient of performance (COP) as a thermodynamic system. Using this feature, we are designing and building a system that combines a water-to-water CO2 heat pump with both hot...... and cold thermal storages know as Thermal Battery (TB) (Blarke, 2012). Smart and effective use of intermittent renewable energy resources (for example solar and wind power) is obtained supplying water heating (>70 oC) and cooling services (

  11. Response surface methodology as an approach to optimization of ethereal Oil from cassia by supercritical CO2 extraction%CO2超临界萃取桂皮精油工艺条件的优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成国; 王冬冬; 陈瑶; 罗扬

    2011-01-01

    Cassia was used as raw material to extract ethereal oil using supercritical CO2 extraction.Scavenging effect of DPPH · (2,2-Diphenyl-l-Picryhydrazyl)was used as antioxidant activity index, based on single factor experiments, the optimal extraction process was determined using central composite design combined with response surface methodology.Optimal conditions of supereritical CO2 extraction of ethereal oil from cassia can be concluded as follows: Extraction pressure 33.5 MPa, extraction time 1.7 h, extraction temperature 60.5 ℃.On these conditions, the observed and predicted values of the scavenging effect of DPPH · were 84.98% and 85.17%.%以桂皮为原料,利用CO超临界萃取法提取桂皮精油.在单因素试验的基础上,以二苯代苦味酰基自由基清除率(2,2-Diphenyl-1-Picryhydrazyl,DPPH·)为抗氧化性指标,利用Box-Benhnken中心组合试验和响应面分析法,确定提取桂皮精油的最适工艺条件:萃取压力33.5 MPa,萃取时间1.7 h,萃取温度60.5℃.该条件下测得桂皮精油的DPPH·清除率为84.98%,预测值为85.17%.

  12. 超临界 CO2提取桑叶中总黄酮的工艺研究%Study on the optimal supercritical CO2 extraction of total flavonoids from mulberry leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林英男; 时伟

    2014-01-01

    本文以总黄酮得率为指标,依次用单因素试验和正交试验考察了萃取压力、温度、时间以及夹带剂用量对超临界萃取的综合影响,优选出桑叶黄酮类化合物的超临界CO2最佳萃取工艺。最佳萃取条件是:萃取压力30 MPa,萃取温度40℃,萃取时间3.0 h,夹带剂无水乙醇用量4.0 mL/g,总黄酮得率是3.2%。研究表明超临界萃取的效率远优于传统提取方法,适用于桑叶黄酮类化合物的大规模提取。%Single factor and orthogonal experimental tests were used to determine the comprehensive effects on extraction ratio of total flavonoids by extraction,temperature,time,amount of alcohol solvent by using the extraction ratio of flavonoids as the index to study the optimal supercrnical CO2 extraction conditions of navonoids from mulberry leaves.The optimal conditions of the extraction could be mentioned as the extraction pressure was 30MPa,the extraction temperature was 40 ℃,the extraction time was 3.0 h,the amount of alcohol solvent was 4.0 mL/g,the extraction ratio of total flavonoids was 3.2%. The research showed that the extraction ratio of supercritical extraction was much higher than that of supersonic extraction,and the former was fit to extract total flavonoids in large-scale.

  13. Optimization of the operational parameters in a fast axial flow CW CO 2 laser using artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adineh, V. R.; Aghanajafi, C.; Dehghan, G. H.; Jelvani, S.

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents an artificial intelligence approach for optimization of the operational parameters such as gas pressure ratio and discharge current in a fast-axial-flow CW CO 2 laser by coupling artificial neural networks and genetic algorithm. First, a series of experiments were used as the learning data for artificial neural networks. The best-trained network was connected to genetic algorithm as a fitness function to find the optimum parameters. After the optimization, the calculated laser power increases by 33% and the measured value increases by 21% in an experiment as compared to a non-optimized case.

  14. Optimalization of the preparation of Na +- and CO 2-3 -containing hydroxyapatite by the hydrolysis of monetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maeyer, Erna A. P.; Verbeeck, Ronald M. H.; Naessens, Didier E.

    1994-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the preparation of Na +- and CO 2-3 containing apatites by the hydrolysis of monetite (CaHPO 4) at 95°C in solutions with Na 2CO 3 concentrations ranging from 0.001M to 0.250M. When the pH of the solution is relatively low (monetite to apatite. Moreover, low Na 2CO 3 concentrations (<0.005M) favour, even at high pH (˜ 10), the incorporation of HPO 2-4 in the apatite lattice and suppress the CO 2-3 incorporation corroborating the competition between CO 2-3 and HPO 2-4 for an incorporation in the lattice. It was also found that a coprecipitation of CaCO3 (calcite) occurs after short reaction times. However, after hydrolysis for at least 5 h, no calcite could be detected in the precipitates. It is concluded that uncontaminated, well crystalline and single phase apatites with varying Na- and CO 3 content can be obtained in a highly reproducible way by the hydrolysis of CaHPO 4 for at least 5 h in Na 2CO 3 solutions with a concentration between 0.010M and 0.250M. A suitable choice of the solid/solution ratio permits to restrict the changes of CO 2-3 and Na + concentration in the solution to acceptable values.

  15. Microbes under pressure: A comparison of CO2 stress responses on three model organisms and their implications for geologic carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, E. U.; Franks, M. A.; Omelon, C. R.; Bennett, P.

    2011-12-01

    When carbon dioxide is captured and stored in deep saline aquifers, many biogeochemical changes will occur in these reservoirs. High concentrations of aqueous CO2 itself can be toxic to microorganisms as the gas easily enters cell membranes and alters intracellular cell functions. Because of this, we expect CO2 to be a perturbation that will alter microbial community composition. Microbes that are capable of withstanding CO2 stress will be selected for and their subsequent growth and metabolism will further affect brine chemistry. For this study, we examined three organisms representing metabolic functions and cellular structures potentially found in deep saline aquifers: the Gram-negative dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, the aerobic Gram-positive hydrocarbon degrading Geobacillus stearothermophilus, and the methanogenic archaeon Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus. Organisms were grown in batch cultures and subsequently exposed to high PCO2 ranging from 25 atm to 60 atm for 2 to 24 hours. Cultures were then plated for viability or tested for metabolic activity such as methane production. Following CO2 stress, organisms were also examined for membrane changes through phospholipid fatty acid analysis and for morphological changes by transmission electron microscopy. After only 2 hours of incubation in 30 atm of CO2, no viable cells were found in planktonic cultures of Shewanella. In contrast, cultures of Geobacillus remained viable (less than a log 2 reduction from initial counts) even after exposure to double the CO2 pressure and for 17 hours. However, when grown in the presence of quartz sandstone, biofilm formation on the rock surface occurred in Shewanella cultures, resulting in survival times greater than 8 hours. Our results suggest that biofilm formation and cell wall thickness may be two very important factors in resisting CO2 toxicity as they create a reactive barrier that slows the diffusion of CO2 into

  16. [Optimization of SFE-CO2 Extraction for Ursolic Acid from Punica granatum Peel by Plackett-Burman and Central Composite Design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhan-yi; Jin, Mei-hua; Wang, Yu-hai; Zhang, Li-hua; Bi, Hai-dan; Li, Zhuo-wa

    2015-03-01

    The optimum extraction of ursolic acid from Punica granatum peel by SFE-CO2 was investigated. Based on the design of Plackett-Burman(PB), significant factors influencing the yield of ursolic acid in the operation process were filtered, with the extraction rate of ursolic acid as the index. The results obtained by steepest ascent method approximated the maximum area of ursolic acid yield. Then the Central Composite Design(CCD) design was used to carry on the response surface optimization of significant factors, getting a two order mathematical model affecting the ursolic acid yield, as well as the optimum process conditions. The best technological conditions of the extraction of ursolic acid from Punica granatum peel by SFE-CO2 were that the extraction temperature was 46. 29 °C, extraction time was 91. 6 min and the extraction pressure was 34. 49 MPa. Under the optimal conditions, verification test of ursolic acid yield was 12. 508 mg/g, approximating to the predicted value of 12. 645 mg/g. The PB test and CCD test design are combined to optimize the extraction process of ursolic acid from Punica granatum peel by SFE-CO2. The screening results are statistically significant and the process operation is feasible.

  17. Synthesis, Characterization, and Optimization of Co2SnO4 Nanoparticles via Co-precipitation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamirian, Armen; Edrisi, Mohammad; Naderi, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Nano-structured pure Co2SnO4 powders have been synthesized using the co-precipitation method in the presence of oleic acid (OA) as a capping agent. The Taguchi L4 statistical design was used to investigate the effect of the main parameters (i.e., OA concentration, calcination time, and calcination temperature) on Co2SnO4 formation, crystallite size, and morphology. Co2SnO4 particles were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform of infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements. The formation of small and well-crystalline particles, on the order of 41.12-90.60 nm in crystal size, has been determined from XRD patterns and confirmed by SEM and DLS. The specific surface area was measured by a BET method to be 25.43 m2/g. The particle size of the product was observed by DLS to be in the range of 40-105 nm. The results indicated that calcination temperature has the most significant effect on the produced cobalt stannate crystal size.

  18. Photosynthetic pigments and gas exchange in castor bean under conditions of above the optimal temperature and high CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola França Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The castor bean plant, a Euphorbiaceae oil seed C3-metabolism rustic and drought-resistant plant, is cultivated in a wide range of environments due to its good adaptive capacity. However, given the current environmental changes, many biochemical and physiological impacts may affect the productivity of important crops, such as castor bean. This work aimed to evaluate the impacts of the castor bean gas exchange in response to high temperature and increased CO2concentration.Our experiment was conducted in a phytotron located at Embrapa Algodão in 2010. We adopted a completely randomized design, with four treatments in a factorial combination of two temperatures (30/20 and 37/30°C and two CO2 levels (400 and 800 mmol L-1; four replications were performed, obtained in five surveys over the growth cycle, for a total of 80 sample units. An infrared gas analyzer (IRGA - Infra Red Gas Analyzer was used for the quantification of the photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration. An increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature negatively affected the physiology of the castor bean plants, decreasing the net rate of photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance.

  19. Optimization of Electricity Generation Schemes in the Java-Bali Grid System with Co2 Reduction Consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farizal Farizal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research considers the problem of reducing CO2 emissions from the Java-Bali power grid system that consists of a variety of power-generating plants: coal-fired, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy (PV, geothermal, hydroelectric, wind, and landfill gas. The problem is formulated as linear programming and solved using LINGO 10. The model was developed for a nation to meet a specified CO2 emission target. Two carbon dioxide mitigation options are considered in this study, i.e. fuel balancing and fuel switching. In order to reduce the CO2 emissions by 26% in 2021, State Electric Supply Company (PLN has to generate up to 30% of electricity from renewable energy (RE, and the cost of electricity (COE is expected to increase to 617.77 IDR per kWh for a fuel balancing option, while for fuel switching option, PLN has to generate 29% of electricity from RE, and the COE is expected to increase to 535.85 IDR per kWh.

  20. Numerical Simulation and Optimization of Enhanced Oil Recovery by the In Situ Generated CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process with Compound Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the numerical investigation and optimization of the operating parameters of the in situ generated CO2 Huff-n-Puff method with compound surfactant on the performance of enhanced oil recovery. First, we conducted experiments of in situ generated CO2 and surfactant flooding. Next, we constructed a single-well radial 3D numerical model using a thermal recovery chemical flooding simulator to simulate the process of CO2 Huff-n-Puff. The activation energy and reaction enthalpy were calculated based on the reaction kinetics and thermodynamic models. The interpolation parameters were determined through history matching a series of surfactant core flooding results with the simulation model. The effect of compound surfactant on the Huff-n-Puff CO2 process was demonstrated via a series of sensitivity studies to quantify the effects of a number of operation parameters including the injection volume and mole concentration of the reagent, the injection rate, the well shut-in time, and the oil withdrawal rate. Based on the daily production rate during the period of Huff-n-Puff, a desirable agreement was shown between the field applications and simulated results.

  1. Considering economic and geological uncertainty in the simulation of realistic investment decisions for CO2-EOR projects in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welkenhuysen, Kris; Rupert, Jort; Compernolle, Tine; Ramirez, Andrea|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/284852414; Swennen, Rudy; Piessens, Kris

    2017-01-01

    The use of anthropogenic CO2 for enhancing oil recovery from mature oil fields in the North Sea has several potential benefits, and a number of assessments have been conducted. It remains, however, difficult to realistically simulate the economic circumstances and decisions, while including the

  2. Multi-Objective Optimization of Building Energy Design to Reconcile Collective and Private Perspectives: CO2-eq vs. Discounted Payback Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hamdy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Building energy design is a multi-objective optimization problem where collective and private perspectives conflict each other. For instance, whereas the collectivity pursues the minimization of environmental impact, the private pursues the maximization of financial viability. Solving such trade-off design problems usually involves a big computational cost for exploring a huge solution domain including a large number of design options. To reduce that computational cost, a bi-objective simulation-based optimization algorithm, developed in a previous study, is applied in the present investigation. The algorithm is implemented for minimizing the CO2-eq emissions and the discounted payback time (DPB of a single-family house in cold climate, where 13,456 design solutions including building envelope and heating system options are explored and compared to a predefined reference case. The whole building life is considered by assuming a calculation period of 30 years. The results show that the type of heating system significantly affects energy performance; notably, the ground source heat pump leads to the highest reduction in CO2-eq emissions, around 1300 kgCO2-eq/m2, with 17 year DPB; the oil fire boiler can provide the lowest DPB, equal to 8.5 years, with 850 kgCO2-eq/m2 reduction. In addition, it is shown that using too high levels of thermal insulation is not an effective solution as it causes unacceptable levels of summertime overheating. Finally a multi-objective decision making approach is proposed in order to enable the stakeholders to choice among the optimal solutions according to the weight given to each objective, and thus to each perspective.

  3. 超临界CO2法制备褪黑素脂质体的工艺优化%Technology optimization of melatonin liposome using supercritical CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵少杰; 叶盛英; 欧春凤; 郑森鸿

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an indole hormone produced by the pineal gland of mammals and humans. It can improve sleep, immune regulation, anti-oxidant and free radical scavenging, anti-tumor, lower blood pressure, regulate heart rate, protection of cardiovascular cells, kidneys, liver and other effects. Melatonin nutrient application in the food industry is greatly limited due to low solubility in water. When melatonin is made into liposomes, it’s solubility in polar solvent is increased. However, the current preparing methods of melatonin liposomes are complicated, result in the low entrapment rate, high cost, and use too much organic solvent. From 1970s, supercritical fluids technology has been used in liposomal preparation because of its friendliness, nontoxicity to the environment and its solvent-free liposomes and industrial-scale of liposome production. Phospholipid, cholesterol and melatonin can be solvated by supercritical carbon dioxide concurrently with a certain proportion of ethanol under higher pressure. The liposomes can be obtained when the pressure is reduced to release CO2. The homogeneous super-critical solution is expanded and simultaneously mixed with the aqueous phase to yield liposomes encapsulating the lipid soluble drugs under the lower pressure. The experiment was conducted to enhance the bioavailability of melatonin by improving entrapment rate in this study. The response surface methodology was used to optimize the technical conditions of supercritical carbon dioxide method for the preparation of melatonin liposome. The entrapment rate of melatonin liposome as a major index was optimized based on the ethanol concentration, supercritical temperature and time by response surface methodology using single factor experiments. The applicability of the quadratic-multinomial-mathematical model developed based on the response surface methodology was verified. The results indicated that the highest entrapment rate of melatonin liposome was reached to 83

  4. Intermediate-Scale Investigation of Capillary and Dissolution Trapping during CO2 Injection and Post-Injection in Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihan, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Rodriguez, D.

    2010-12-01

    The capillary and dissolution trapping processes are believed to be major trapping mechanisms during CO2 injection and post-injection in heterogeneous subsurface environments. These processes are important at relatively shorter time periods compared to mineralization and have a strong impact on storage capacity and leakage risks, and they are suitable to investigate at reasonable times in the laboratory. The objectives of the research presented is to investigate the effect of the texture transitions and variability in heterogeneous field formations on the effective capillary and dissolution trapping at the field scale through multistage analysis comprising of experimental and modeling studies. A series of controlled experiments in intermediate-scale test tanks are proposed to investigate the key processes involving (1) viscous fingering of free-phase CO2 along high-permeability (or high-K) fast flow pathways, (2) dynamic intrusion of CO2 from high-K zones into low-K zones by capillarity (as well as buoyancy), (3) diffusive transport of dissolved CO2 into low-K zones across large interface areas, and (4) density-driven convective mass transfer into CO2-free regions. The test tanks contain liquid sampling ports to measure spatial and temporal changes in concentration of dissolved fluid as the injected fluid migrates. In addition to visualization and capturing images through digital photography, X-ray and gamma attenuation methods are used to measure phase saturations. Heterogeneous packing configurations are created with tightly packed sands ranging from very fine to medium fine to mimic sedimentary rocks at potential storage formations. Effect of formation type, injection pressure and injection rate on trapped fluid fraction are quantified. Macroscopic variables such as saturation, pressure and concentration that are measured will be used for testing the existing macroscopic models. The applicability of multiphase flow theories will be evaluated by comparing with

  5. Optimization of a gas sampling system for measuring eddy-covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, S.; Burba, G.; Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P. D.; Li, J.; Luo, H.; Zulueta, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) will provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across eco-climatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analysers are widely employed for eddy-covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation varies with site properties, and requires correction. Here, we show that the gas sampling system substantially contributes to high-frequency attenuation, which can be minimized by careful design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5-16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4-14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3-21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4-19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyser cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor-capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was developed on this basis. The design consists of the stainless steel intake tube, a pleated mesh

  6. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Stefan; Burba, George; Burns, Sean P.; Blanken, Peter D.; Li, Jiahong; Luo, Hongyan; Zulueta, Rommel C.

    2016-03-01

    Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS) are set to provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across ecoclimatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analyzers are widely employed for eddy covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation varies with site properties and gas sampling systems, and requires correction. Here, we show that components of the gas sampling system can substantially contribute to such high-frequency attenuation, but their effects can be significantly reduced by careful system design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5-16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4-14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3-21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4-19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 %) by 50 % in the infrared gas analyzer cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor-capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was developed on this

  7. Parameters optimization of supercritical fluid-CO2 extracts of frankincense using response surface methodology and its pharmacodynamics effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Ma, Xing-miao; Qiu, Bi-Han; Chen, Jun-xia; Bian, Lin; Pan, Lin-mei

    2013-01-01

    The volatile oil parts of frankincense (Boswellia carterii Birdw.) were extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide under constant pressure (15, 20, or 25 MPa) and fixed temperature (40, 50, or 60°C), given time (60, 90, or 120 min) aiming at the acquisition of enriched fractions containing octyl acetate, compounds of pharmaceutical interest. A mathematical model was created by Box-Behnken design, a popular template for response surface methodology, for the extraction process. The response value was characterized by synthetical score, which comprised yields accounting for 20% and content of octyl acetate for 80%. The content of octyl acetate was determined by GC. The supercritical fluid extraction showed higher selectivity than conventional steam distillation. Supercritical fluid-CO(2) for extracting frankincense under optimum condition was of great validity, which was also successfully verified by the pharmacological experiments.

  8. Forecasting global atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Agustí-Panareda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 real-time forecast is now available as part of the pre-operational Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate – Interim Implementation (MACC-II service using the infrastructure of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS. One of the strengths of the CO2 forecasting system is that the land surface, including vegetation CO2 fluxes, is modelled online within the IFS. Other CO2 fluxes are prescribed from inventories and from off-line statistical and physical models. The CO2 forecast also benefits from the transport modelling from a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP system initialized daily with a wealth of meteorological observations. This paper describes the capability of the forecast in modelling the variability of CO2 on different temporal and spatial scales compared to observations. The modulation of the amplitude of the CO2 diurnal cycle by near-surface winds and boundary layer height is generally well represented in the forecast. The CO2 forecast also has high skill in simulating day-to-day synoptic variability. In the atmospheric boundary layer, this skill is significantly enhanced by modelling the day-to-day variability of the CO2 fluxes from vegetation compared to using equivalent monthly mean fluxes with a diurnal cycle. However, biases in the modelled CO2 fluxes also lead to accumulating errors in the CO2 forecast. These biases vary with season with an underestimation of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle both for the CO2 fluxes compared to total optimized fluxes and the atmospheric CO2 compared to observations. The largest biases in the atmospheric CO2 forecast are found in spring, corresponding to the onset of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. In the future, the forecast will be re-initialized regularly with atmospheric CO2 analyses based on the assimilation of CO2 satellite retrievals, as they

  9. [Technical condition of semi-bionic extraction in optimizing formula of Rhizoma Cyperi that had been extracted by SFE-CO2 through homogeneous design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiumei; Shi, Haiyan; Zhang, Zhaowang; Wang, Yingzi

    2009-11-01

    To optimize the extraction condtions in the modification of Rhizoma Cyperi, which had been extracted by the technique of supercritical CO2 extraction. The semi-bionic extraction (SBE) conditions were optimized through homogeneous design while the extracts (extracts were adopted as markers. The optimized SBE extraction conditions are the following: pH in first extraction was adjusted to 2.005 3. And then pH in second and third extraction adjusted to 6.508 2 and 8.945 6, time of the whole extracted process was 3.912 7 h. Combine the faction of production,we make sure the conclusion is pH in first extraction was 2.00, pH in second and third extraction adjusted to 6.50 and 9.00, duration of run was 2.0 h, 1.0 h and 1.0 h, respectively.

  10. Error Analysis and Selection of Optimal Excitation Parameters for the Sensing of CO2 and O2 from Space for ASCENDS Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-01-01

    Simulation studies to optimize sensing of CO2 and O2 from space are described. Uncertainties in line-by-line calculations unaccounted for in previous studies identified. Multivariate methods are employed for measurement wavelengths selection. The Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) recommended by NRC Decadal Survey has a stringent accuracy requirements of 0.5% or better in XCO2 retrievals. NASA LaRC and its partners are investigating the use of the 1.57 m band of CO2 and the 1.26-1.27 m band of oxygen for XCO2 measurements. As part of these efforts, we are carrying out simulation studies using a lidar modeling framework being developed at NASA LaRC to predict the performance of our proposed ASCENDS mission implementation [1]. Our study is aimed at predicting the sources and magnitudes of errors anticipated in XCO2 retrievals for further error minimization through the selection of optimum excitation parameters and development of better retrieval methods.

  11. Surface Condensation of CO2 onto Kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaef, Herbert T.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Owen, Antionette T.; Ramprasad, Sudhir; Martin, Paul F.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2014-02-11

    The fundamental adsorption behavior of gaseous and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) onto poorly crystalline kaolinite (KGa-2) at conditions relevant to geologic sequestration has been investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and density functional theory (DFT) methods. The QCM data indicated linear adsorption of CO2 (0-0.3 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) onto the kaolinite surface up through the gaseous state (0.186 g/cm3). However in the supercritical region, CO2 adsorption increases dramatically, reaching a peak (0.9-1.0 mmol CO2/g KGa-2) near 0.43 g/cm3, before declining rapidly to surface adsorption values equivalent or below gaseous CO2. This adsorption profile was not observed with He or N2. Comparative density functional studies of CO2 interactions with kaolinite surface models rule out CO2 intercalation and confirm that surface adsorption is favored up to approximately 0.35 g/cm3 of CO2, showing distorted T-shaped CO2-CO2 clustering, typical of supercritical CO2 aggregation over the surface as the density increases. Beyond this point, the adsorption energy gain for any additional CO2 becomes less than the CO2 interaction energy (~0.2 eV) in the supercritical medium resulting in overall desorption of CO2 from the kaolinite surface.

  12. Modern Global Warming and Its Uncertainties Based on the Relationship between CO_2 Concentration and Temperature from Geological Records%从地质时期大气CO_2浓度与温度的对应关系分析现代气候变暖不确定性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马明明; 刘秀铭; 吕镔; 郭晖; 雷培文; 赵国永; 刘植; 李平原

    2012-01-01

    气候变化问题是近年来国际社会所关注的热点,对于近代全球是否在变暖?以及驱动变暖的因素到底是什么?是自然过程还是人为作用?科学家们一直对此有着不同的见解.政府间气候变化专门委员会(IPCC)认为现在全球变暖是因为人类活动排放了大量CO2,其浓度增加而导致增温,但是很多科学家并不赞同.为了理清这一问题,本研究整合了近年来有关地质时期及现代大气CO2浓度与温度的关系数据,对其进行了梳理分析,结果显示不论是从地质年代的长尺度上来看,还是从近代的短尺度上来看,CO2浓度变化与全球气温变化之间都不存在一个足以令人信服的关系,因此,以此证明现在温度的增加是由于CO2浓度增加所引起的是不科学的.关于温度变化的驱动因子还存在很大的不确定性,也就不能明确地判断大气温度增加的主导因素是自然过程还是人为作用.%Global warming has become a great focus for international community in recent years.However,did it really happen? What factors have driven and are still driving it? How to identify the roles of natural and man-made process? Scientists have different opinions on these questions.IPCC asserted that modern global warming was caused by the increase of CO2 concentration mainly due to human activities.However,many scientists did not agree with this statement.In order to sort out this problem,we investigated the published data concerning the relations of atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature during various geological periods.The results show,both from the geological time scale and from the modern short time scale,no convincing relationship between CO2 concentration and temperature can prove that the increasing temperature nowadays is caused by the increasing CO2 concentration.This indicates the great uncertainty about driving factors on temperature increasing,nor can we determine the main reason of

  13. Optimization of a gas sampling system for measuring eddy-covariance fluxes of H2O and CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Metzger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Several initiatives are currently emerging to observe the exchange of energy and matter between the earth's surface and atmosphere standardized over larger space and time domains. For example, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON and the Integrated Carbon Observing System (ICOS will provide the ability of unbiased ecological inference across eco-climatic zones and decades by deploying highly scalable and robust instruments and data processing. In the construction of these observatories, enclosed infrared gas analysers are widely employed for eddy-covariance applications. While these sensors represent a substantial improvement compared to their open- and closed-path predecessors, remaining high-frequency attenuation varies with site properties, and requires correction. Here, we show that the gas sampling system substantially contributes to high-frequency attenuation, which can be minimized by careful design. From laboratory tests we determine the frequency at which signal attenuation reaches 50 % for individual parts of the gas sampling system. For different models of rain caps and particulate filters, this frequency falls into ranges of 2.5–16.5 Hz for CO2, 2.4–14.3 Hz for H2O, and 8.3–21.8 Hz for CO2, 1.4–19.9 Hz for H2O, respectively. A short and thin stainless steel intake tube was found to not limit frequency response, with 50 % attenuation occurring at frequencies well above 10 Hz for both H2O and CO2. From field tests we found that heating the intake tube and particulate filter continuously with 4 W was effective, and reduced the occurrence of problematic relative humidity levels (RH > 60 % by 50 % in the infrared gas analyser cell. No further improvement of H2O frequency response was found for heating in excess of 4 W. These laboratory and field tests were reconciled using resistor-capacitor theory, and NEON's final gas sampling system was developed on this basis. The design consists of the stainless steel intake tube

  14. Strategic use of the underground for an energy mix plan, synergies among CO2 and CH4 Geological Storage and Geothermal Energy: Italian Energy review and Latium case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procesi, M.; Cantucci, B.; Buttinelli, M.; Armezzani, G.; Quattrocchi, F.

    2012-04-01

    Since the world-wide energy demand has been growing so much in the last years, it is necessary to develop a strategic mix-energy plan to supply low GHG (GreenHouseGas) emissions energy and solve the problem of CO2 emission increasing. A recent study published by European Commission shows that, if existing trends continue, by 2050 CO2 emissions will be unsustainably high: 900-1000 parts per million by volume. The European Commission in 2007 underline the necessity to elaborate, at European level, a Strategic Energy Technology Plan focused on non-carbon or reduced-carbon sources of energy, as renewable energies, CO2 capture and storage technologies, smart energy networks and energy efficiency and savings. Future scenarios for 2030 elaborated by the International Energy Agency (IEA) shows as a mix energy plan could reduce the global CO2 emissions from 27Gt to 23 Gt (about 15%). A strategic use of the underground in terms of: - development of CCS (Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage) associated to fossil fuel combustion; - increase of CH4 geological storage sites; - use of renewable energies as geothermic for power generation; could open a new energy scenario, according to the climate models published by IPCC. Nowadays CCS market is mainly developed in USA and Canada, but still not much accounted in Europe. In Italy there aren't active CCS projects, even if potential areas have been already identified. Many CH4 storage sites are located in Northern America, while other are present in Europe and Italy, but the number of sites is limited despite the huge underground potentiality. In Italy the power generation from geothermal energy comes exclusively from Tuscany (Larderello-Travale and Mt. Amiata geothermal fields) despite the huge potentiality of other regions as Latium, Campania and Sicily (Central and South Italy). The energy deficit and the relevant CO2 emissions represent a common status for many Italian regions, especially for the Latium Region. This suggests that a

  15. Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations: Linking the Chemical and Physical Effects to Elastic and Transport Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavko, G.; Vanorio, T.; Vialle, S.; Saxena, N.

    2014-03-31

    Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities were measured over a range of confining pressures while injecting CO2 and brine into the samples. Pore fluid pressure was also varied and monitored together with porosity during injection. Effective medium models were developed to understand the mechanisms and impact of observed changes and to provide the means for implementation of the interpretation methodologies in the field. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in carbonate rocks show as much as 20-50% decrease after injection of the reactive CO2-brine mixture; the changes were caused by permanent changes to the rock elastic frame associated with dissolution of mineral. Velocity decreases were observed under both dry and fluid-saturated conditions, and the amount of change was correlated with the initial pore fabrics. Scanning Electron Microscope images of carbonate rock microstructures were taken before and after injection of CO2-rich water. The images reveal enlargement of the pores, dissolution of micrite (micron-scale calcite crystals), and pitting of grain surfaces caused by the fluid- solid chemical reactivity. The magnitude of the changes correlates with the rock microtexture – tight, high surface area samples showed the largest changes in permeability and smallest changes in porosity and elastic stiffness compared to those in rocks with looser texture and larger intergranular pore space. Changes to the pore space also occurred from flow of fine particles with the injected fluid. Carbonates with grain-coating materials, such as residual oil, experienced very little permanent change during injection. In the tight micrite/spar cement component, dissolution is controlled by diffusion: the mass transfer of products and reactants is thus slow and the fluid is expected to be close to thermodynamical equilibrium with the calcite, leading to very little dissolution, or even precipitation. In the microporous rounded micrite and macropores, dissolution is controlled by

  16. Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is

  17. A DEPTH OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR GEOLOGIC ISOLATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thadani, M.

    1980-02-01

    Current Federal plans for the isolation of high-level radioactive wastes and spent fuel include the possible placement of these wastes in deep geologic repositories. It is generally assumed that increasing the emplacement depth increases safety because the wastes are farther removed from the phenomena that might compromise the integrity of their isolation. Also, the path length for the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere increases with depth, thus delaying their arrival. However, increasing the depth of emplacement adds cost and operatiunal penalties. Therefore, a trade-off between the safety and the cost of waste isolation exists. A simple algorithm has been developed to relate the repository construction and operation costs, the costs associated with construction and operational hazards, and the costs resulting from radiological exposures to future generations to the depth of emplacement: The application of the algorithm is illustrated by SdDlP 1 e ca leul at ions u t il i zing se 1 ec ted parameters. The cost-optimum emplacement depths are estimated by summing the cost elements and determining the depth at which the sum would be the least. The relationship between the repository construction costs and the depth of the depository was derived from simplified rock mechanics and stability considerations applied to repository design concepts selected from the current literature and the available data base on mining and excavation costs. In developing the relationship between the repository costs and the depth of the depository, a worldwide cost information data base was used. The relationships developed are suitable for application to bedded sa1t, shale, and basalt geologies. The incremental impacts of hazards as a function of repository depth resulting from drilling, construction of repositories and hoisting systems, and operation of repositories were developed from the reported data on accidents involving shafts and mine construction activities and shaft

  18. CO2 capture and sequestration source-sink match optimization in Jing-Jin-Ji region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong ZHENG; Dan GAO; Linwei MA; Zheng LI; Weidou NI

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration (CCS) is considered to be an important option for climate change mitigation. A key problem for the implementation of CCS technology is the source-sink match design and optimization when considering both economic and envir-onmental requirement. This paper presents a generic-optimization-based model for the strategic planning and design of future CCS source-sink matching. The features and capabilities of the model are illustrated through a detailed case study for the Jing-Jin-Ji (Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei Province) region in China. It shows how the model helps make a compromise in arriving at a strategic decision for CCS source-sink matching by providing the tradeoff frontiers between economic and environmental perfor-mance, and the features of match solutions with the best economic performance or with the best environmental performance.

  19. 以粉煤灰为原料制备低温CO2吸附剂的工艺参数优化%Parameter optimization of solid amine sorbents from fly ash for CO2 capture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张中华; 肖永丰; 孙永伟; 杨霞; 赵兴雷; 孙琦; 王宝冬

    2016-01-01

    利用高铝粉煤灰预脱硅液作为载体原料,通过使用胺基化合物对载体改性制备低温CO2吸附剂.应用6 sigma中的工具,对制备工艺进行优化,得到理想的吸附剂,并对吸附剂样品进行表征.结果表明制备的CO2吸附剂表现出良好的CO2吸附性能.此类CO2吸附剂具有吸附容量高(160 mg·g-1)、吸附速率快、对设备腐蚀低、成本低廉等特点,是一种极具工业应用潜力的CO2吸附剂.

  20. Optimization and selection of extraction conditions of essential oil from Mentha haplocalyx by supercritical CO2 extraction method%薄荷油超临界CO2萃取条件的优化和筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁呈元; 李维林; 夏冰; 房海灵; 王小敏

    2006-01-01

    以样品中的薄荷脑含量为指标,通过单因素和正交实验对影响薄荷(Mentha haplocalyx Briq.)油超临界CO2萃取的因素进行研究,筛选出薄荷油超临界CO2萃取的最佳条件.研究结果表明,影响样品中薄荷脑萃取率的因素从大到小依次为萃取压力、萃取温度、萃取时间、CO2流量.样品中薄荷脑含量最高的超临界CO2萃取条件为萃取压力10 MPa、萃取温度50℃、CO2流量30 L·h-1且萃取时间1.5 h.

  1. Modeling and optimization of proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cell: Conversion of CO2 into value-added products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namwong, Lawit; Authayanun, Suthida; Saebea, Dang; Patcharavorachot, Yaneeporn; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2016-11-01

    Proton-conducting solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC-H+) are a promising technology that can utilize carbon dioxide to produce syngas. In this work, a detailed electrochemical model was developed to predict the behavior of SOEC-H+ and to prove the assumption that the syngas is produced through a reversible water gas-shift (RWGS) reaction. The simulation results obtained from the model, which took into account all of the cell voltage losses (i.e., ohmic, activation, and concentration losses), were validated using experimental data to evaluate the unknown parameters. The developed model was employed to examine the structural and operational parameters. It is found that the cathode-supported SOEC-H+ is the best configuration because it requires the lowest cell potential. SOEC-H+ operated favorably at high temperatures and low pressures. Furthermore, the simulation results revealed that the optimal S/C molar ratio for syngas production, which can be used for methanol synthesis, is approximately 3.9 (at a constant temperature and pressure). The SOEC-H+ was optimized using a response surface methodology, which was used to determine the optimal operating conditions to minimize the cell potential and maximize the carbon dioxide flow rate.

  2. Time-explicit methods for joint economical and geological risk mitigation in production optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Lasse Hjuler; Capolei, Andrea; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2016-01-01

    Real-life applications of production optimization face challenges of risks related to unpredictable fluctuations in oil prices and sparse geological data. Consequently, operating companies are reluctant to adopt model-based production optimization into their operations. Conventional production...... optimization methods focus on mitigation of geological risks related to the long-term net present value (NPV). A major drawback of such methods is that the time-dependent and exceedingly growing uncertainty of oil prices implies that long-term predictions become highly unreliable. Conventional methods...... of mitigating economical and geological risks. As opposed to conventional strategies that focus on a single long-term objective, TE methods seek to reduce risks and promote returns over the entire reservoir life by optimization of a given ensemble-based geological risk measure over time. By explicit involvement...

  3. Intensification of marrubiin concentration by optimization of microwave-assisted (low CO2 yielding) extraction process for Marrubium vulgare using central composite design and antioxidant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Vineet; Nanda, Arun

    2017-12-01

    Marrubium vulgare Linn (Lamiaceae) was generally extracted by conventional methods with low yield of marrubiin; these processes were not considered environment friendly. This study extracts the whole plant of M. vulgare by microwave assisted extraction (MAE) and optimizes the effect of various extraction parameters on the marrubiin yield by using Central Composite Design (CCD). The selected medicinal plant was extracted using ethanol: water (1:1) as solvent by MAE. The plant material was also extracted using a Soxhlet and the various extracts were analyzed by HPTLC to quantify the marrubiin concentration. The optimized conditions for the microwave-assisted extraction of selected medicinal plant was microwave power of 539 W, irradiation time of 373 s and solvent to drug ratio, 32 mL per g of the drug. The marrubiin concentration in MAE almost doubled relative to the traditional method (0.69 ± 0.08 to 1.35 ± 0.04%). The IC50 for DPPH was reduced to 66.28 ± 0.6 μg/mL as compared to conventional extract (84.14 ± 0.7 μg/mL). The scanning electron micrographs of the treated and untreated drug samples further support the results. The CCD can be successfully applied to optimize the extraction parameters (MAE) for M. vulgare. Moreover, in terms of environmental impact, the MAE technique could be assumed as a 'Green approach' because the MAE approach for extraction of plant released only 92.3 g of CO2 as compared to 3207.6 g CO2 using the Soxhlet method of extraction.

  4. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  5. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  6. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  7. Joint Optimization of Distribution Network Design and Two-Echelon Inventory Control with Stochastic Demand and CO2 Emission Tax Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangyan; Li, Xialian; Zhang, Dezhi; Zhou, Lingyun

    2017-01-01

    This study develops an optimization model to integrate facility location and inventory control for a three-level distribution network consisting of a supplier, multiple distribution centers (DCs), and multiple retailers. The integrated model addressed in this study simultaneously determines three types of decisions: (1) facility location (optimal number, location, and size of DCs); (2) allocation (assignment of suppliers to located DCs and retailers to located DCs, and corresponding optimal transport mode choices); and (3) inventory control decisions on order quantities, reorder points, and amount of safety stock at each retailer and opened DC. A mixed-integer programming model is presented, which considers the carbon emission taxes, multiple transport modes, stochastic demand, and replenishment lead time. The goal is to minimize the total cost, which covers the fixed costs of logistics facilities, inventory, transportation, and CO2 emission tax charges. The aforementioned optimal model was solved using commercial software LINGO 11. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the applications of the proposed model. The findings show that carbon emission taxes can significantly affect the supply chain structure, inventory level, and carbon emission reduction levels. The delay rate directly affects the replenishment decision of a retailer. PMID:28103246

  8. Joint Optimization of Distribution Network Design and Two-Echelon Inventory Control with Stochastic Demand and CO2 Emission Tax Charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangyan; Li, Xialian; Zhang, Dezhi; Zhou, Lingyun

    2017-01-01

    This study develops an optimization model to integrate facility location and inventory control for a three-level distribution network consisting of a supplier, multiple distribution centers (DCs), and multiple retailers. The integrated model addressed in this study simultaneously determines three types of decisions: (1) facility location (optimal number, location, and size of DCs); (2) allocation (assignment of suppliers to located DCs and retailers to located DCs, and corresponding optimal transport mode choices); and (3) inventory control decisions on order quantities, reorder points, and amount of safety stock at each retailer and opened DC. A mixed-integer programming model is presented, which considers the carbon emission taxes, multiple transport modes, stochastic demand, and replenishment lead time. The goal is to minimize the total cost, which covers the fixed costs of logistics facilities, inventory, transportation, and CO2 emission tax charges. The aforementioned optimal model was solved using commercial software LINGO 11. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the applications of the proposed model. The findings show that carbon emission taxes can significantly affect the supply chain structure, inventory level, and carbon emission reduction levels. The delay rate directly affects the replenishment decision of a retailer.

  9. Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

    2006-06-30

    Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings

  10. Hybridization of Response Surface Methodology and Genetic Algorithm optimization for CO2 laser cutting parameter on AA6061 material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Parthiban

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of laser cutting parameters on aluminium alloy (AA6061 is important due to its high reflectivity and thermal conductivity. Generally Aluminium alloy is a widely used material in aeronautical and automation industries for its inherent properties. Although the main problem during laser cutting is occurrence of recasting layer and laser beam incidence that affecting the cutting quality is known as kerf dimensions. In a sense the relationship between the laser cutting parameters such as laser power, cutting speed, gas pressure and focal position with kerf dimensions are having important role in laser cutting operation. So this work considers the response surface methodology (RSM, for making empirical relationship between dependent and independent variables. Simultaneously, this work reveals that laser power, cutting speed, gas pressure and focal position have significant effects on kerf dimension. Thus the development of empirical model and the selection of best parameters are important for manufacturing industries. Hence this work develops the statistical model with RSM and optimizes the cutting parameters with genetic algorithm (GA.

  11. A DEPTH OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR GEOLOGIC ISOLATION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thadani, M.

    1980-02-01

    Current Federal plans for the isolation of high-level radioactive wastes and spent fuel include the possible placement of these wastes in deep geologic repositories. It is generally assumed that increasing the emplacement depth increases safety because the wastes are farther removed from the phenomena that might compromise the integrity of their isolation. Also, the path length for the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere increases with depth, thus delaying their arrival. However, increasing the depth of emplacement adds cost and operatiunal penalties. Therefore, a trade-off between the safety and the cost of waste isolation exists. A simple algorithm has been developed to relate the repository construction and operation costs, the costs associated with construction and operational hazards, and the costs resulting from radiological exposures to future generations to the depth of emplacement: The application of the algorithm is illustrated by SdDlP 1 e ca leul at ions u t il i zing se 1 ec ted parameters. The cost-optimum emplacement depths are estimated by summing the cost elements and determining the depth at which the sum would be the least. The relationship between the repository construction costs and the depth of the depository was derived from simplified rock mechanics and stability considerations applied to repository design concepts selected from the current literature and the available data base on mining and excavation costs. In developing the relationship between the repository costs and the depth of the depository, a worldwide cost information data base was used. The relationships developed are suitable for application to bedded sa1t, shale, and basalt geologies. The incremental impacts of hazards as a function of repository depth resulting from drilling, construction of repositories and hoisting systems, and operation of repositories were developed from the reported data on accidents involving shafts and mine construction activities and shaft

  12. CO2 Injectivity in Geological Storages: an Overview of Program and Results of the GeoCarbone-Injectivity Project Injectivité du CO2 dans les stockages géologiques : programme et principaux résultats du projet ANR GéoCarbone-Injectivité

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lombard J.M.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the GeoCarbone-Injectivity project was to develop a methodology to study the complex phenomena involved in the near wellbore region during CO2 injection. This paper presents an overview of the program and results of the project, and some further necessary developments. The proposed methodology is based on experiments and simulations at the core scale, in order to understand (physical modelling and definition of constitutive laws and quantify (calibration of simulation tools the mechanisms involved in injectivity variations: fluid/rock interactions, transport mechanisms, geomechanical effects. These mechanisms and the associated parameters have then to be integrated in the models at the wellbore scale. The methodology has been applied for the study of a potential injection of CO2 in the Dogger geological formation of the Paris Basin, in collaboration with the other ANR GeoCarbone projects. L’objectif du projet GéoCarbone-Injectivité était de définir une méthodologie pour étudier les phénomènes complexes intervenant aux abords des puits lors de l’injection de CO2. La méthodologie proposée s’appuie sur des expérimentations interprétées numériquement à l’échelle de la carotte afin de comprendre (modélisation physique et lois de comportement et de quantifier (paramétrisation des outils de simulation les différents mécanismes susceptibles de modifier l’injectivité : les interactions roche/fluide, les mécanismes de transport aux abords du puits d’injection et les effets géomécaniques. Ces mécanismes et les paramètres associés devront ensuite être intégrés dans une modélisation à l’échelle métrique à décamétrique des abords du puits d’injection. Cette approche a été appliquée pour l’étude d’une injection potentielle de CO2 dans la formation géologique du Dogger du Bassin Parisien, en relation avec les projets ANR GéoCarbone.

  13. Geology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This database is an Arc/Info implementation of the 1:500,000 scale Geology Map of Kansas, M­23, 1991. This work wasperformed by the Automated Cartography section of...

  14. 利用侧光光纤优化生物反应器固定CO2的研究%RESEARCH ON FIXING CO2 BY USING SIDE LIGHT OPTICAL FIBER TO OPTIMIZE THE PHOTOBIOREACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈忱; 孙硕; 周集体; 金若菲

    2013-01-01

    为了研究Chlorella sp.固定CO2的效果,降低能耗,采用自制生物光照反应器并选用侧光光纤作为光源.实验结果表明,在适宜条件下,通入浓度为10% CO2后,Chlorella sp.的生长明显加快.当选择红光和蓝光作为侧光光纤的光源交替运行,2mm与3 mm光纤各28根耦合于16 W的光源发生器,较120 W LED外置光源而言,每瓦可提升6倍的生长速率.

  15. Optimization for supercritical CO2 extraction of tilapia fish head oil by response surface method%响应面优化超临界CO2萃取罗非鱼头油的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春华; 包斌; 陈山乔; 沈晶晶; 潘镜; 陶宁萍; 吴文惠

    2015-01-01

    为优化罗非鱼头油的提取工艺,通过单因素试验选择超临界CO2萃取罗非鱼头油的单因素水平,采用响应面法优化超临界CO2萃取罗非鱼头油的工艺条件,分析了罗非鱼头油的品质及脂肪酸组成.结果表明:超临界CO2技术萃取罗非鱼头油的最优工艺条件是压力36 MPa、温度41℃和时间3.1h,超临界CO2流体技术优于蒸煮法、碱水解法和酶解法;罗非鱼头油的最大提取率是79.5%,其碘值、过氧化值和酸值分别是(5.36-0.15) mg/kg、(4.27±0.33) mmol/kg、(139.0±8.9)g/l00g;罗非鱼头油的饱和脂肪酸(saturated fatty acid,SFA)、单不饱和脂肪酸(monounsaturated fatty acid,MUFA)和多不饱和脂肪酸(polyunsaturated fatty acid,PUFA)的含量分别是27.85%,41.74%和30.41%,罗非鱼头油丰富的脂肪酸构成暗示着其优良的营养价值和功能性.

  16. 超临界CO2萃取芦柑籽油的工艺优化%Techniques optimization for the extraction of oil from mandarin orange seed by supercritical CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢三都; 张惠婷; 江佳佳; 许沂杰; 应陈寿

    2013-01-01

    研究了超临界CO2流体技术萃取芦柑籽油的工艺条件.结果表明,超临界CO2萃取芦柑籽油最优工艺条件:萃取压力25 MPa、CO2流量25L.h-1、萃取温度40℃、萃取时间150 min,所得芦柑籽油萃取率为42.65%.气相色谱—质谱联用(GC-MS)分析表明,芦柑籽油含10,13-十八碳二烯酸(36.37%)、(Z)-9-油酸(29.42%)、棕榈酸(27.95%)、硬脂酸(3.54%)、亚麻酸(2.71%),不饱和脂肪酸含量高达68.10%.

  17. Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Toelle

    2008-11-30

    This project, 'Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations', investigated the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This primarily involved the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) in an attempt to observe and map the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through a carbonate reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, were used for this purpose. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, such as Weyborne. This study was conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in the northern Michigan Basin, which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that completed its primary production in 1997 and was scheduled for enhanced oil recovery using injected CO{sub 2}. Prior to injection an initial 'Base' 3D survey was obtained over the field and was then processed and interpreted. CO{sub 2} injection within the main portion of the reef was conducted intermittently during 13 months starting in August 2005. During this time, 29,000 tons of CO{sub 2} was injected into the Guelph formation, historically known as the Niagaran Brown formation. By September 2006, the reservoir pressure within the reef had risen to approximately 2000 lbs and oil and water production from the one producing well within the field had increased significantly. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution, a critical aspect of reservoir characterization and simulation, proved to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple 3D seismic surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model was developed based on seismic attributes obtained from the base 3D seismic survey and available well data. This

  18. Selection and Characterization of Geological Sites able to Host a Pilot-Scale CO2 Storage in the Paris Basin (GéoCarbone-PICOREF Choix et caractérisation de sites géologiques propices à l’installation d’un pilote pour le stockage de CO2 dans le bassin de Paris (GéoCarbone-PICOREF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brosse É.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the GéoCarbone-PICOREF project was to select and characterize geological sites where CO2 storage in permeable reservoir could be tested at the pilot scale. Both options of storage in deep saline aquifer and in depleted hydrocarbon field were considered. The typical size envisioned for the pilot was 100 kt CO2 per year. GéoCarbone-PICOREF initially focused on a “Regional Domain”, ca. 200 × 150 km, in the Paris Basin. It was attractive for the following reasons: detailed geological data is available, due to 50 years of petroleum exploration; basin-scale deep saline aquifers are present, with a preliminary estimate of storage capacity which is at the Gt CO2 level, namely the carbonate Oolithe Blanche Formation, of Middle Jurassic age, generally located between 1500 and 1800 m depths in the studied area, and several sandstone formations of Triassic age, located between 2000 and 3000 m; several depleted oil fields exist: although offering storage capacities at a much lower level, they do represent very well constrained geological environments, with proven sealing properties; several sources of pure CO2 were identified in the area, at a flow rate compatible with the pilot size, that would avoid capture costs. 750 km of seismic lines were reprocessed and organized in six sections fitted on well logs. This first dataset provided improved representations of: the gross features of the considered aquifers in the Regional Domain; the structural scheme; lateral continuity of the sealing cap rocks. An inventory of the environmental characteristics was also made, including human occupancy, protected areas, water resource, natural hazards, potential conflicts of use with other resources of the subsurface, etc. From all these criteria, a more restricted geographical domain named the “Sector”, ca. 70 × 70 km, was chosen, the most appropriate for further selection of storage site(s. The geological characterization of the Sector has

  19. Reagent optimization for on-line simultaneous polarographic determination of trace amounts of Cu2+, Cd2+ and Co2+ in the presence of anextremely large excess of Zn2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国伟; 阳春华; 朱红求; 李勇刚; 桂卫华

    2016-01-01

    Reagents are optimized for the simultaneous determination of trace amounts of Cu2+, Cd2+ and Co2+ in zinc sulfate solution, which contains an extremely large excess of Zn2+. First, the reagents and their doses for the experiment are selected according to the characteristics of the zinc sulfate solution. Then, the reagent doses are optimized by analyzing the influence of reagent dose on the polarographic parameters (i.e. half-wave potentialE1/2 and limiting diffusion current Ip). Finally, the optimization results are verified by simultaneously determining trace amounts of Cu2+, Cd2+ and Co2+ in the presence of an extremely large excess of Zn2+. The determination results indicate that the optimized reagents exhibit wide linearity, low detection limits, high accuracy and good precision for the simultaneous determination of trace amounts of Cu2+, Cd2+ and Co2+ in the presence of an extremely large excess of Zn2+.

  20. CO2 -Responsive polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shaojian; Theato, Patrick

    2013-07-25

    This Review focuses on the recent progress in the area of CO2 -responsive polymers and provides detailed descriptions of these existing examples. CO2 -responsive polymers can be categorized into three types based on their CO2 -responsive groups: amidine, amine, and carboxyl groups. Compared with traditional temperature, pH, or light stimuli-responsive polymers, CO2 -responsive polymers provide the advantage to use CO2 as a "green" trigger as well as to capture CO2 directly from air. In addition, the current challenges of CO2 -responsive polymers are discussed and the different solution methods are compared. Noteworthy, CO2 -responsive polymers are considered to have a prosperous future in various scientific areas.

  1. CO2 laser modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  2. Modeling and optimization of a modified claus process as part of an integrted gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2011-01-01

    devised so as to determine which set of linearly independent reactions would best describe the product distributions from available plant data. Various approaches are taken to derive the kinetic rate expressions which are either missing in the open literature or found to be inconsistent. A set of plant data is used for optimal estimation of the kinetic parameters. The final model agrees well with the published plant data. Using the developed kinetics models of the Claus reaction furnace, WHB, and catalytic stages, two optimization studies are carried out. The first study shows that there exists an optimal steam pressure generated in the WHB that balances hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In the second study, it is shown that an optimal H2S/SO2 ratio exists that balances single-pass conversion, hydrogen yield, oxygen demand, and power generation. In addition, an operability study has been carried out to examine the operating envelope in which both H2S/SO2 ratio and adiabatic flame temperature can be controlled in the face of disturbances typical for the operation of an IGCC power plant with CO2 capture. Impact of CO2 capture on the Claus process has also been discussed.

  3. Development of Methods for Gaseous Phase Geochemical Monitoring on the Surface and in the Intermediate Overburden Strata of Geological CO2 Storage Sites Développement de méthodes de suivi géochimique en phase gazeuse à la surface et dans la couverture intermédiaire des sites de stockage géologique du CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokryszka Z.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The developments and results presented in this paper are taken from the work carried out as part of the GeoCarbon-Monitoring project, which was partly funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR. An important part of this project covers methods for gas monitoring on the surface as well as within the cap rock of geological CO2 storage sites. The work undertaken by INERIS was targeted at two specific approaches which are often recommended as essential for the monitoring of future storage sites: early detection (pre-alert, based on the sampling and analysis of gas at the bottom of the dedicated boreholes which are drilled from the surface into the intermediate cap rock strata; the detection and quantification of the gaseous flux of CO2 released from the ground into the atmosphere. These two approaches were developed in the laboratory successively and then applied and tested in-situ, under conditions that are as close as possible to those of the future storage sites. They offer the advantage of ensuring a direct measurement as well as providing real-time information on the presence or, on the contrary, the absence of CO2 leaks. The tests undertaken on a 200 meter deep borehole have shown that the detection of CO2 leaks passing through the intermediate overburden strata was possible thanks to the continuous sampling and analysis of the composition of the gas which accumulated at the bottom of the borehole. In particular, the detection of small releases of gas emanating from the surrounding rock gave rise to a number of good results. These releases may be a precursor to a larger leak. Likewise, it has been possible to take a sample and ensure the transit of gas over long distances, up to 1000 meters from the sampling point. This was done without causing any significant deformation or dilution of the initial gaseous signal, even for low amplitude leaks. These results allow us to envisage the implementation of a relatively simple system for

  4. Optimal sampling schemes for vegetation and geological field visits

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The presentation made to Wits Statistics Department was on common classification methods used in the field of remote sensing, and the use of remote sensing to design optimal sampling schemes for field visits with applications in vegetation...

  5. Optimized recovery through cooperative geology and reservoir engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, F.F. Jr.; Willcox, P.J.; Ballard, J.R.; Nation, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    Two examples of the use of this combined geology-reservoir engineering technique are taken from the international arena of operations. The first involves a gas reservoir in the U.K.-North Sea waters and the second an oil reservoir in the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. The improved reservoir description obtained for each of these reservoirs is permitting a better assessment of future performance as influenced by various operating alternatives. Waterflooding is relatively tolerant of reservoir nonuniformities. However, the need for additional reserves leads to increased utilization of improved recovery techniques, beyond waterflooding, for secondary as well as tertiary application. The development of better reservoir descriptions will provide guidance on the need for special sweep improvement techniques and ultimately lead to both maximum oil production and reduced risk in application of improved recovery processes.

  6. JOINT ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL OPTIMIZATION OF HYBRID POWER SUPPLY FOR LARGE SCALE RO-DESALINATION PLANT: WITH AND WITHOUT CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMAN A. TORA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a multi- objective optimization approach is introduced to define a hybrid power supply system for a large scale RO- desalination plant. The target is to integrate a number of locally available energy resources to generate the electricity demand of the RO- desalination plant with minimizing both the electricity generation cost and the greenhouse gas emissions whereby carbon dioxide sequestration may be an option. The considered energy resources and technologies are wind turbines, solar PV, combined cycles with natural gas turbines, combined cycles with coal gasification, pulverized coal with flue gas desulfurization, and biomass combined heat and power CHP. These variable energy resources are investigated under different constraints on the renewable energy contribution. Likewise, the effect of carbon dioxide sequestration is included. Accordingly, five scenarios have been analyzed. Trade- offs between the minimum electricity generation cost and the minimum greenhouse gas emissions have been determined and represented in Pareto curves using the constraint method (. The results highlight that among the studied fossil fuel technologies, the integrated combined cycle natural gas turbines can provide considerable fraction of the needed power supply. Likewise, wind turbines are the most effective technology among renewable energy options. When CO2 sequestration applied, the costs increase and significant changes in the optimum combination of renewable energy resources have been monitored. In that case, solar PV starts to appreciably compete. The optimum mix of energy resources extends to include biomass CHP as well.

  7. Effects of process parameters on supercritical CO2 extraction of total phenols from strawberry (Arbutus unedo L.) fruits: An optimization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Seref; Alpak, Ilknur; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize total phenolic yield of Arbutus unedo fruits using supercritical fluid extraction. A Box-Behnken statistical design was used to evaluate the effect of various values of pressure (50-300 bar), temperature (30-80°C) and concentration of ethanol as co-solvent (0-20%) by CO2 flow rate of 15 g/min for 60 min. The most effective variable was co-solvent ratio (pextraction conditions were elicited as 60 bar, 48°C and 19.7% yielding 25.72 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE) total phenols/g extract and 99.9% radical scavenging capacity, which were higher than the values obtained by conventional water (24.89 mg/g; 83.8%) and ethanol (15.12 mg/g; 95.8%) extractions demonstrating challenges as a green separation process with improved product properties for industrial applications. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Optimization of process parameters of extraction of amentoflavone, quercetin and ginkgetin from Taxus chinensis using supercritical CO2 plus co-solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiao; Yan, Liu-Ye; Li, Xian-Xian; Liu, Ben; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Qiang

    2014-10-31

    The effects of extraction time, temperature, pressure and different concentration of ethanol and their interactions on the yields of amentoflavone, quercetin and ginkgetin extracted from Taxus chinensis by supercritical CO2 were investigated by using a central composite design (CCD). An CCD experimental design with four factors and five levels was used to optimize the extraction parameters. Ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) was used to analyze the content of the tree components in the extracts. Experimental results show that the main effects of factors and their interactions are significant on the yields (p extraction conditions were established for the three compounds: yield of 4.47 mg/g for amentoflavone at 48 °C, 25 MPa, 2.02 h and 78.5% ethanol, 3.73 mg/g for quercetin at 46 °C, 24 MPa, 2.3 h, 82% ethanol and 3.47 mg/g for ginkgetin at 48 °C, 20 MPa, 2.38 h, 82% ethanol, respectively.

  9. CO2NNIE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Andersen, Ove; Lewis-Kelham, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a system for calculating the personalized annual fuel consumption and CO2 emissions from transportation. The system, named CO2NNIE, estimates the fuel consumption on the fastest route between the frequent destinations of the user. The travel time and fuel consumption estimated are based......% of the actual fuel consumption (4.6% deviation on average). We conclude, that the system provides new detailed information on CO2 emissions and fuel consumption for any make and model....

  10. Wearable CO2 sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Radu, Tanja; Fay, Cormac; Lau, King-Tong; Waite, Rhys; Diamond, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    High concentrations of CO2 may develop particularly in the closed spaces during fires and can endanger the health of emergency personnel by causing serious physiological effects. The proposed prototype provides real-time continuous monitoring of CO2 in a wearable configuration sensing platform. A commercially available electrochemical CO2 sensor was selected due to its selectivity, sensitivity and low power demand. This was integrated onto an electronics platform that performed signal capture...

  11. A mean–variance objective for robust production optimization in uncertain geological scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capolei, Andrea; Suwartadi, Eka; Foss, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    directly. In the mean–variance bi-criterion objective function risk appears directly, it also considers an ensemble of reservoir models, and has robust optimization as a special extreme case. The mean–variance objective is common for portfolio optimization problems in finance. The Markowitz portfolio......In this paper, we introduce a mean–variance criterion for production optimization of oil reservoirs and suggest the Sharpe ratio as a systematic procedure to optimally trade-off risk and return. We demonstrate by open-loop simulations of a two-phase synthetic oil field that the mean......–variance criterion is able to mitigate the significant inherent geological uncertainties better than the alternative certainty equivalence and robust optimization strategies that have been suggested for production optimization. In production optimization, the optimal water injection profiles and the production...

  12. Impacts: economic trade-offs for CO2 impurity specification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eickhoff, C.; Neele, F.P.; Hammer, M.; DiBiagio, M.; Hofstee, C.; Koenen, M.; Fischer, S.; Isaenko, A.; Brown, A.; Kovacs, T.

    2014-01-01

    The IMPACTS project has a stated broad objective to develop the knowledge base of CO2 quality required for establishing norms and regulations to ensure safe and reliable design, construction and operation of CO2 pipelines and injection equipment, and safe long-term geological storage of CO2. More sp

  13. Rising CO2 from historical concentrations enhances the physiological performance of Brassica napus seedlings under optimal water supply but not under reduced water availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faralli, Michele; Grove, Ivan G; Hare, Martin C; Kettlewell, Peter S; Fiorani, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    The productivity of many important crops is significantly threatened by water shortage, and the elevated atmospheric CO2 can significantly interact with physiological processes and crop responses to drought. We examined the effects of three different CO2 concentrations (historical ~300 ppm, ambient ~400 ppm and elevated ~700 ppm) on physiological traits of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) seedlings subjected to well-watered and reduced water availability. Our data show (1) that, as expected, increasing CO2 level positively modulates leaf photosynthetic traits, leaf water-use efficiency and growth under non-stressed conditions, although a pronounced acclimation of photosynthesis to elevated CO2 occurred; (2) that the predicted elevated CO2 concentration does not reduce total evapotranspiration under drought when compared with present (400 ppm) and historical (300 ppm) concentrations because of a larger leaf area that does not buffer transpiration; and (3) that accordingly, the physiological traits analysed decreased similarly under stress for all CO2 concentrations. Our data support the hypothesis that increasing CO2 concentrations may not significantly counteract the negative effect of increasing drought intensity on Brassica napus performance.

  14. Natural analogue study of CO2 storage monitoring using probability statistics of CO2-rich groundwater chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. K.; Hamm, S. Y.; Kim, S. O.; Yun, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    For confronting global climate change, carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of several very useful strategies as using capture of greenhouse gases like CO2 spewed from stacks and then isolation of the gases in underground geologic storage. CO2-rich groundwater could be produced by CO2 dissolution into fresh groundwater around a CO2 storage site. As consequence, natural analogue studies related to geologic storage provide insights into future geologic CO2 storage sites as well as can provide crucial information on the safety and security of geologic sequestration, the long-term impact of CO2 storage on the environment, and field operation and monitoring that could be implemented for geologic sequestration. In this study, we developed CO2 leakage monitoring method using probability density function (PDF) by characterizing naturally occurring CO2-rich groundwater. For the study, we used existing data of CO2-rich groundwaters in different geological regions (Gangwondo, Gyeongsangdo, and Choongchungdo provinces) in South Korea. Using PDF method and QI (quantitative index), we executed qualitative and quantitative comparisons among local areas and chemical constituents. Geochemical properties of groundwater with/without CO2 as the PDF forms proved that pH, EC, TDS, HCO3-, Ca2+, Mg2+, and SiO2 were effective monitoring parameters for carbonated groundwater in the case of CO2leakage from an underground storage site. KEY WORDS: CO2-rich groundwater, CO2 storage site, monitoring parameter, natural analogue, probability density function (PDF), QI_quantitative index Acknowledgement This study was supported by the "Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF), which is funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2013R1A1A2058186)" and the "R&D Project on Environmental Management of Geologic CO2 Storage" from KEITI (Project number: 2014001810003).

  15. CO2 blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  16. CO2 laser resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, R E

    2001-07-01

    The CO2 Laser offers a variety of unique features in resurfacing facial photodamage and acne scarring. These include hemostasis, efficient removal of the epidermis in a single pass, thermally induced tissue tightening, and safe, predictable tissue interaction. Knowledge of these mechanisms will result in the capability of using the CO2 laser effectively and safely whether the goal is superficial or deep treatment.

  17. Geophysical monitoring technology for CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-Feng; Li, Lin; Wang, Hao-Fan; Tan, Ming-You; Cui, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Yun-Yin; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Jia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical techniques play key roles in the measuring, monitoring, and verifying the safety of CO2 sequestration and in identifying the efficiency of CO2-enhanced oil recovery. Although geophysical monitoring techniques for CO2 sequestration have grown out of conventional oil and gas geophysical exploration techniques, it takes a long time to conduct geophysical monitoring, and there are many barriers and challenges. In this paper, with the initial objective of performing CO2 sequestration, we studied the geophysical tasks associated with evaluating geological storage sites and monitoring CO2 sequestration. Based on our review of the scope of geophysical monitoring techniques and our experience in domestic and international carbon capture and sequestration projects, we analyzed the inherent difficulties and our experiences in geophysical monitoring techniques, especially, with respect to 4D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation.

  18. Evolution of the Petrophysical and Mineralogical Properties of Two Reservoir Rocks Under Thermodynamic Conditions Relevant for CO2 Geological Storage at 3 km Depth Évolution des propriétés physiques et minéralogiques de deux roches réservoirs dans des conditions thermodynamiques correspondant à un stockage géologique de CO2 à 3 km de profondeur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimmelé G.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2 underground, for long-term geological storage purposes, is considered as an economically viable option to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere. The chemical interactions between supercritical CO2 and the potential reservoir rock need to be thoroughly investigated under thermodynamic conditions relevant for geological storage. In the present study, 40 samples of Lavoux limestone and Adamswiller sandstone, both collected from reservoir rocks in the Paris basin, were experimentally exposed to CO2 in laboratory autoclaves specially built to simulate CO2-storage-reservoir conditions. The two types of rock were exposed to wet supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated water for one month, at 28 MPa and 90°C, corresponding to conditions for a burial depth approximating 3 km. The changes in mineralogy and microtexture of the samples were measured using X-ray diffraction analyses, Raman spectroscopy, scanning-electron microscopy, and energy-dispersionspectroscopy microanalysis. The petrophysical properties were monitored by measuring the weight, density, mechanical properties, permeability, global porosity, and local porosity gradients through the samples. Both rocks maintained their mechanical and mineralogical properties after CO2 exposure despite an increase of porosity and permeability. Microscopic zones of calcite dissolution observed in the limestone are more likely to be responsible for such increase. In the sandstone, an alteration of the petrofabric is assumed to have occurred due to clay minerals reacting with CO2. All samples of Lavoux limestone and Adamswiller sandstone showed a measurable alteration when immersed either in wet supercritical CO2 or in CO2-saturated water. These batch experiments were performed using distilled water and thus simulate more severe conditions than using formation water (brine. L’injection de dioxyde de carbone (CO2 en sous-sol pour un stockage géologique à long terme

  19. Optimization of Extraction Process of Papaya Seed Oil by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Based on Neural Network%神经网络优化番木瓜籽油的超临界CO2萃取工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓楚津; 董强; 张常松; 张良; 刘书成

    2012-01-01

    Papaya seed oil was extracted by supercritical CO2. A neural network model of supercritical CO2 extracting papaya seed oil was established to optimize extracting process parameters in JMP 7. 0 software. The parameters were that grinded papaya seeds were screened through a 20 - inch boult,flow of CO2 was 25 L/h,extraction pressure was 27 Mpa,extraction temperature was 54 ℃ ,and extraction time was 3 h. Under these conditions,the extraction rate was above 30%. Papaya seed oil extracted by supercritical CO2 can meet the standard of edible oils and fats.%采用超临界CO2萃取法萃取番木瓜籽油,利用JMP 7.0软件中的神经网络平台,建立超临界CO2萃取番木瓜籽油的神经网络模型,并优化了萃取过程的工艺参数.结果表明:番木瓜籽破碎后过20目筛,CO2流量为25 L/h,萃取压力27 MPa,萃取温度54℃,萃取时间3h,油脂得率达30%以上;超临界CO2萃取的番木瓜籽油的理化性质达到了食用油脂的标准.

  20. Optimization for Supercritical CO2 Extraction with Response Surface Methodology and Component Analysis of Sapindus mukorossi Oil%响应曲面法优化无患子油超临界CO2萃取工艺研究及其成分分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴燕; 肖新玉; 葛发欢

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究无患子油超临界CO2萃取工艺及其成分分析.方法:以无患子为材料,采用响应曲面法优化无患子油超临界CO2萃取工艺,并采用GC-MS对无患子油成分进行分析.结果:建立了一个能较好预测萃取结果的数学模型,并根据该方程对无患子油的超临界萃取工艺参数进行了优选.确定了无患子油超临界CO2萃取最佳工艺为:萃取压力30 MPa,萃取温度40℃,分离I压力14 MPa、温度45℃,分离Ⅱ压力6MPa、温度40℃,萃取时间60 min,得率为17.58%;并对无患子油进行了GC-MS分析,鉴定了22种成分,其中不饱和脂肪酸含量为86.59%.结论:优化后的工艺合理可行,操作简单,可用于无患子油的提取.%Objective:To study the extraction conditions of Sapindus mukorossi oil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction and identify its components. Methods: Optimized SFE-CO, Extraction by Response Surface Methodology and used GC-MS to analysis Sapindus mukorossi oil compounds. Results: Established the model of an equation for the extraction rate of Sapindus mukorossi oil by Supercritical CO2 Extraction, and the optimal parameters for the Supercritical CO2 Extraction determined by the equation were:the extraction pressure was 30 MPa, temperature was 40 ℃; The separation I pressure was 14 MPa. temperature was 45℃ ; The separation Ⅱ pressure was 6 MPa, temperature was 40℃ ; The extraction time was 60 min and the extraction rate of Sapindus mukorossi oil of 17.58%. 22 main compounds of Sapindus mukorossi oil extracted by supercritical CO2 were identified by GC-MS, unsaturated fatty acids were 86. 59%. Conclusion·This process is reliable, safe and with simple operation, and can be used for the extraction of Sapindus mukorossi oil.

  1. Outsourcing CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. J.; Caldeira, K. G.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are the primary cause of global warming. Much attention has been focused on the CO2 directly emitted by each country, but relatively little attention has been paid to the amount of emissions associated with consumption of goods and services in each country. This consumption-based emissions inventory differs from the production-based inventory because of imports and exports of goods and services that, either directly or indirectly, involved CO2 emissions. Using the latest available data and reasonable assumptions regarding trans-shipment of embodied carbon through third-party countries, we developed a global consumption-based CO2 emissions inventory and have calculated associated consumption-based energy and carbon intensities. We find that, in 2004, 24% of CO2 emissions are effectively outsourced to other countries, with much of the developed world outsourcing CO2 emissions to emerging markets, principally China. Some wealthy countries, including Switzerland and Sweden, outsource over half of their consumption-based emissions, with many northern Europeans outsourcing more than three tons of emissions per person per year. The United States is both a big importer and exporter of emissions embodied in trade, outsourcing >2.6 tons of CO2 per person and at the same time as >2.0 tons of CO2 per person are outsourced to the United States. These large flows indicate that CO2 emissions embodied in trade must be taken into consideration when considering responsibility for increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

  2. Simulation of CO2-Distribution in Fractured Oil Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Furuvik, Nora; Halvorsen, Britt

    2015-01-01

    Deep geologic injections and storage of Carbon dioxide (CO2) for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) are an upcoming combination due to the potential for increased oil production from depleted oilfields at the same time reducing the carbon footprint from industrial sources. CO2-EOR refers to a technique for injection of supercritical-dense CO2 into an oil reservoir. Remaining oil, not producible by primary and secondary techniques, has been successfully produced using EOR with CO2 since early 1970??....

  3. 响应面法优化超临界CO2萃取丁香酚的工艺研究%Optimization of supercritical CO2 extraction of eugenol from clove (Eugenia caryophyllata Thunb) bud by response surface methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢莹莹; 王志祥; 史益强; 丁朝中

    2013-01-01

    Objective To optimize the supercritical CO2 extraction process of cugcnol from colve(Eugenia caryophyllata Thunb). Method On the basis of single factors, using extraction rate as reference, extraction conditions of cugcnol from clove (Eugenia car yo phyllala Thunb) bud with supercritical CO2 extraction was optimized with response surface analysis. Results The optimum extraction conditions were as follows: power 25 Mpa, temperature 55 ℃ , time 1 h, volume fraction of alcohol 90%, and flow of modifier 0.04 mL · min-1 ,particle size 100 mesh. Under these conditions cugenol extraction rate could reach to 17. 41 %. Conclusion The optimized process conditions arc stable and practicable in manufacture.%目的 优选丁香中丁香酚的超临界CO2萃取工艺.方法 以丁香酚得率为考察指标,在单因素实验的基础上,采用响应面法对超临界CO2萃取丁香酚的工艺条件进行优化.结果 得到优选萃取条件为:萃取压力25 MPa,萃取温度55 ℃,萃取时间1 h,夹带剂体积分数90%乙醇,夹带剂流量0.04 mL·min-1,原料粒径100目,在此条件下丁香酚得率可达到17.41%.结论 优选的萃取工艺稳定、可行.

  4. Improved Criteria for Increasing CO2 Storage Potential with CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, J.; Pawar, R.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been found that deployment of CO2 capture and storage technology at large scales will be difficult without significant incentives. One of the technologies that has been a focus in recent years is CO2 enhanced oil/gas recovery, where additional hydrocarbon recovery provides an economic incentive for deployment. The way CO2 EOR is currently deployed, maximization of additional oil production does not necessarily lead to maximization of stored CO2, though significant amounts of CO2 are stored regardless of the objective. To determine the potential of large-scale CO2 storage through CO2 EOR, it is necessary to determine the feasibility of deploying this technology over a wide range of oil/gas field characteristics. In addition it is also necessary to accurately estimate the ultimate CO2 storage potential and develop approaches that optimize oil recovery along with long-term CO2 storage. This study uses compositional reservoir simulations to further develop technical screening criteria that not only improve oil recovery, but maximize CO2 storage during enhanced oil recovery operations. Minimum miscibility pressure, maximum oil/ CO2 contact without the need of significant waterflooding, and CO2 breakthrough prevention are a few key parameters specific to the technical aspects of CO2 enhanced oil recovery that maximize CO2 storage. We have developed reduced order models based on simulation results to determine the ultimate oil recovery and CO2 storage potential in these formations. Our goal is to develop and demonstrate a methodology that can be used to determine feasibility and long-term CO2 storage potential of CO2 EOR technology.

  5. 超临界CO2流体萃取-精馏联用技术提取脱酸月见草油的工艺优选%Optimization of Supercritical CO2 Fluid Extraction-Fractionation Technology for One Step Deacidification of Evening Primrose Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷满仓; 钱亚芳

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To optimize extraction technology conditions of deacidification evening primrose oil by supercritical CO2 fluid extraction-fractionation technology (SCFEF).Method:With yield of oil and the content of γ-linolenic acid as indexes,single factor tests were adopted to investigate effect of extraction pressure,extraction temperature,separation pressure and separation temperature on extraction technology of evening primrose oil.And quality differences of evening primrose oil was compared,which were extracted by SCFEF and supercritical CO2 fluid extraction (SCFE).Result:Optimal extraction parameters were as follows:extraction pressure 22 MPa,extraction temperature 36 ℃,separation pressure 10-12 MPa,separation temperature 48 ℃,dosage of CO2 45 kg,oil yield 16.7%-18.1%,the acid values of 0.85-1.21 mg KOH · g-1,each physical and chemical indicators of evening primrose oil from SCFEF were better than that from SCFE.Conclusion:SCFEF successfully prepared deacidified evening primrose oil by integration of extraction,separation and purification processions into one step.%目的:优选超临界CO2流体萃取-精馏联用技术(SCFEF)提取脱酸月见草油的工艺条件.方法:以得油率和γ-亚麻酸含量为指标,采用单因素试验考察萃取压力、萃取温度、分离压力和分离温度对月见草油提取工艺的影响.比较SCFEF与超临界CO2流体萃取技术(SCFE)提取的月见草油质量差异.结果:优选的脱酸月见草油提取工艺参数为萃取压力22 MPa,萃取温度308 K,分离压力10~12 MPa,分离温度321 K,CO2用量45 kg,脱酸月见草油得率16.7%~18.1%,酸值0.85~1.21 mg KOH·g-1,所得脱酸月见草油各项理化指标均优于SCFE所得月见草油.结论:SCFEF通过将萃取、分离与纯化工序耦合,可做到一步提取脱酸月见草油.

  6. Comparison of Dry Gas Seasonal Storage with CO2 Storage and Re-Use Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Killerud, Marie

    2013-01-01

    To make large-scale CO2 storage economic, many groups have proposed using CO2in EOR projects to create value for CO2 storage. However, CO2 EOR projectsgenerally require a large and variable supply of CO2 and consequently may requiretemporary storage of CO2 in geological formations. In order to store CO2 atoffshore sites as a source for CO2 EOR projects, the CO2 needs to be extractedfrom a storage site to a certain extent. Alternatively, CO2 EOR projects maybe developed alongside saline aquife...

  7. Comparison of Dry Gas Seasonal Storage with CO2 Storage and Re-Use Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Killerud, Marie

    2013-01-01

    To make large-scale CO2 storage economic, many groups have proposed using CO2in EOR projects to create value for CO2 storage. However, CO2 EOR projectsgenerally require a large and variable supply of CO2 and consequently may requiretemporary storage of CO2 in geological formations. In order to store CO2 atoffshore sites as a source for CO2 EOR projects, the CO2 needs to be extractedfrom a storage site to a certain extent. Alternatively, CO2 EOR projects maybe developed alongside saline aquife...

  8. CO2-strategier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2008-01-01

    I 2007 henvendte Lyngby-Taarbæk kommunens Agenda 21 koordinator sig til Videnskabsbutikken og spurgte om der var interesse for at samarbejde om CO2-strategier. Da Videnskabsbutikken DTU er en åben dør til DTU for borgerne og deres organisationer, foreslog Videnskabsbutikken DTU at Danmarks...... Naturfredningsforening’s lokalkomité for Lyngby blev en del af samarbejdet for at få borgerne i kommunen involveret i arbejdet med at udvikle strategier for reduktion af CO2. Siden sommeren 2007 har Videnskabsbutikken DTU, Lyngby-Taarbæk kommune og Danmarks Naturfredningsforening i Lyngby-Taarbæk samarbejdet om analyse...... og innovation i forhold til CO2-strategier....

  9. Optimal Bidding and Operation of a Power Plant with Solvent-Based Carbon Capture under a CO2 Allowance Market: A Solution with a Reinforcement Learning-Based Sarsa Temporal-Difference Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziang Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a reinforcement learning (RL-based Sarsa temporal-difference (TD algorithm is applied to search for a unified bidding and operation strategy for a coal-fired power plant with monoethanolamine (MEA-based post-combustion carbon capture under different carbon dioxide (CO2 allowance market conditions. The objective of the decision maker for the power plant is to maximize the discounted cumulative profit during the power plant lifetime. Two constraints are considered for the objective formulation. Firstly, the tradeoff between the energy-intensive carbon capture and the electricity generation should be made under presumed fixed fuel consumption. Secondly, the CO2 allowances purchased from the CO2 allowance market should be approximately equal to the quantity of CO2 emission from power generation. Three case studies are demonstrated thereafter. In the first case, we show the convergence of the Sarsa TD algorithm and find a deterministic optimal bidding and operation strategy. In the second case, compared with the independently designed operation and bidding strategies discussed in most of the relevant literature, the Sarsa TD-based unified bidding and operation strategy with time-varying flexible market-oriented CO2 capture levels is demonstrated to help the power plant decision maker gain a higher discounted cumulative profit. In the third case, a competitor operating another power plant identical to the preceding plant is considered under the same CO2 allowance market. The competitor also has carbon capture facilities but applies a different strategy to earn profits. The discounted cumulative profits of the two power plants are then compared, thus exhibiting the competitiveness of the power plant that is using the unified bidding and operation strategy explored by the Sarsa TD algorithm.

  10. Study on Optimization of Extraction Conditions of Catechin from Roasted Green Tea by Supercritical-CO2 Fluid Extraction%炒青绿茶儿茶素超临界CO2萃取工艺优化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛世红; 邱涛涛

    2014-01-01

    The extraction conditions of catechin from roasted green tea by supercritical-CO 2 fluid extraction (SFE-CO2)were studied. Influences of extraction temperature, extraction pressure, materiel-liquid ratio, and extraction time on the content of catechin were investigated, and the effect of extraction conditions on the extraction rate of catechin from extracts was evaluated by single factor and orthogonal tests.Experimental results showed that the successive order of diferent effect factors on yield of catechin was extraction pressure>materiel-liquid ratio>extraction time>materiel granularity. The optimal extraction conditions of catechin from roasted green tea as follows:extraction temperature 50℃, extraction time 120 min, extraction pressure 25 MPa, 1∶2.5 of solid to liquid ratio was used as a modifier, and 0.65 mm of particle size. The maximum SFE-CO2 extracting rate of catechin 6.053 6%.%采用单因素试验和正交试验对炒青绿茶儿茶素超临界CO2萃取工艺进行探讨,确定萃取效果影响的程度从高到低依次为:萃取压力>夹带剂乙醇用量>萃取时间>萃取粒度,最佳萃取工艺为:底物与夹带剂(乙醇)之比为100 g/250 mL,萃取压力25 MPa,萃取温度50℃,粒度为60目,萃取120 min。按照该工艺茶叶中儿茶素粗提物的得率为6.0536%。

  11. Multi-objective optimization of using NSGA-II in CO2 capture system for coal-fired power plant%燃煤电厂脱碳系统的模拟与多目标优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马欢欢; 鄢烈祥; 李国建; 史彬

    2013-01-01

    In order to reduce the heat waste and increase heat efficiency, a method is proposed to improve the traditional CO2 capture system for coal-fired power plant by adding a multistage heat exchanger. Based on the 85%of CO2 capture rate, the utility consumption is depressed to the original 51.61%. Multi-objective optimization of heat consumption and carbon dioxide capture rate is proposed instead of single object optimization. At first, the modified carbon dioxide removal system for coal-fired power plant is modeled using Aspen Plus. Multi-objective optimization using Non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm with elitist strategy (NSGA-II) was performed based on the Aspen Plus simulation and MATLAB. At last, the Pareto-optimal set for the two optimization objective of carbon dioxide capture rate and reboiler heat duty is obtained and the best compromise solution is achieved using a fuzzy decision-making process. Carbon dioxide capture rate reaches 95.92%, reboiler heat duty reaches 775.39 MW, which provide a theoretical basis for process optimization.%针对燃煤电厂脱碳系统余热浪费问题,提出了增加多级换热器MHeatX模块的改进设计以提高热量利用率。在保证CO2捕获率为85%的前提下,可降低系统总公用工程消耗量48.39%。在此基础上,再应用带精英策略的非支配排序遗传算法(NSGA-II)对脱碳系统的热能消耗和CO2捕获率2个目标进行了同步优化,得到了碳捕获率和再沸器热负荷的最优Pareto解集。为了将优化结果应用于实际,本文采用模糊集方法求得最优妥协解,可使CO2捕获率达到95.92%,再沸器负荷降至775.39 MW,为该工艺的优化操作提供了理论依据。

  12. 低渗油藏水驱后 CO2潜力评价及注采方式优选%CO2 flooding potential evaluation and its injection-production method optimization after water flooding in low permeability reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨红; 吴志伟; 余华贵; 江绍静; 朱庆祝; 奥洋洋

    2015-01-01

    针对延长油田乔家洼区块由于基质致密和非均质性严重造成注水开发效果差的问题,通过开展CO2室内驱油实验,在水驱基础上分别对连续气驱和气水交替驱驱油潜力进行评价,并对气水交替驱流体注入速度、段塞尺寸及气水比等注入参数进行优化。同时,对区块采用水驱、优化井网后水驱、利用优化的CO2驱注入参数开展气驱和注气5年后转气水交替驱4种开发方案,进行数值模拟产量预测。实验结果表明,CO2驱在目标区块高含水后有着较大驱油潜力,连续气驱和气水交替驱分别在水驱基础上可提高采收率8.43%和20.95%;气水交替注入方式下采收率随各注入参数的增大均呈先增加后降低的趋势,最佳注入速度、最佳注入段塞尺寸和最佳气水比分别为0.73 mL/min、0.1 PV和1∶1。数值模拟结果表明:优化井网后水驱、连续气驱和注气5年后转气水交替驱3种方案在开发15年后,分别可以在原水驱方案基础上提高采收率0.77%、13.81%和12.98%,建议采用注气5年后转气水交替驱方案进行生产。%Due to dense matrix and serious heterogeneity ,the water flooding development effect is poor in Qiaojiaowa block ,Yanchang Oilfield .Therefore ,CO2 indoor flooding experiment is carried out to potentially evaluate CO2 flooding and water alternating gas (WAG) on the basis of water flood‐ing ,and optimize the injection parameters such as injecting velocity ,slug size and the ratio of gas and water .Besides ,yield predictions of water flooding ,water flooding based on well optimized ,CO2 flooding and WAG after injection CO 2 for 5 years are conducted using numerical simulation .Experi‐mental results show that it is a large potential in target block for CO 2 flooding after water flooding . The enhanced oil recovery (EOR) improvement of CO2 flooding and WAG are 8 .43% and 20 .95% re‐spectively compared

  13. CO2-neutral fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  14. CO2-neutral fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goede A. P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for storage of renewable energy (RE generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel

  15. CO2 mineralization-bridge between storage and utilization of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerlings, Hans; Zevenhoven, Ron

    2013-01-01

    CO2 mineralization comprises a chemical reaction between suitable minerals and the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. The CO2 is effectively sequestered as a carbonate, which is stable on geological timescales. In addition, the variety of materials that can be produced through mineralization could find applications in the marketplace, which makes implementation of the technology more attractive. In this article, we review recent developments and assess the current status of the CO2 mineralization field. In an outlook, we briefly describe a few mineralization routes, which upon further development have the potential to be implemented on a large scale.

  16. Regional-scale brine migration along vertical pathways due to CO2 injection - Part 1: The participatory modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Dirk; Konrad, Wilfried; Class, Holger; Kissinger, Alexander; Knopf, Stefan; Noack, Vera

    2017-06-01

    Saltwater intrusion into potential drinking water aquifers due to the injection of CO2 into deep saline aquifers is one of the potential hazards associated with the geological storage of CO2. Thus, in a site selection process, models for predicting the fate of the displaced brine are required, for example, for a risk assessment or the optimization of pressure management concepts. From the very beginning, this research on brine migration aimed at involving expert and stakeholder knowledge and assessment in simulating the impacts of injecting CO2 into deep saline aquifers by means of a participatory modeling process. The involvement exercise made use of two approaches. First, guideline-based interviews were carried out, aiming at eliciting expert and stakeholder knowledge and assessments of geological structures and mechanisms affecting CO2-induced brine migration. Second, a stakeholder workshop including the World Café format yielded evaluations and judgments of the numerical modeling approach, scenario selection, and preliminary simulation results. The participatory modeling approach gained several results covering brine migration in general, the geological model sketch, scenario development, and the review of the preliminary simulation results. These results were included in revised versions of both the geological model and the numerical model, helping to improve the analysis of regional-scale brine migration along vertical pathways due to CO2 injection.

  17. 响应面设计优化超临界CO2法制备盐酸小檗碱脂质体的处方工艺%Response surface methodology optimization of formulation using supercritical CO2 to prepare berberine liposome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志丽; 张少华; 张志云; 郭永学; 周丽莉

    2012-01-01

    目的 采用中心复合设计实验优化超临界CO2法制备盐酸小檗碱脂质体的处方工艺.方法 考察药脂质量比和磷脂质量浓度对盐酸小檗碱脂质体包封率的影响,采用中心复合设计实验对超临界制备盐酸小檗碱处方工艺进行优化,并利用响应曲面法进行优化分析.结果 最优的工艺条件为:药脂质量比为13.2∶60,磷脂质量浓度为30 g·L-1,理论包封率为73.30%,载药量为15.98%.在此条件下的实际包封率为(72.15±1.9)%,载药量为15.74%,接近理论预测值.结论 作者研究的超临界CO2法制备盐酸小檗碱脂质体,实现了包封率与载药量的最佳组合,且工艺简单,适合工业生产.%Objective To develop a procedure to prepare and characterize berberine liposome using supercritical CO2. Methods The investigation of drug to phospholipid ratio(m- m) and the concentration of soya phos-phatidyl choline(SPC)on berberine hydrochloride liposome entrapment efficiency influence were studied to get the range of critical factors and then optimized by central composite design experiment using response surface methodology (RSM) to get the maximum entrapment efficiency and drug loading. Results The optimal formulation was as follow;the ratio of the amount of drug to phospholipid was 13. 25:60,and the concentration of soya phosphatidyl choline ( SPC) was 30 g·L-1,15. 74% berberine was loaded on liposomes and the entrapment efficiency reached 72. 15%. Conclusions The preparation of berberine hydrochloride liposome by using supercritical CO2 technology is proved to be the optimal combination both for entrapment efficiency and drug loading. The procedure is simple and suitable for the industrial production.

  18. CO2 sequestration in basalts: laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otheim, L. T.; Adam, L.; van Wijk, K.; McLing, T. L.; Podgorney, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is proposed as the only promising large-scale method to help reduce CO2 gas emission by its capture at large point sources and subsequent long-term storage in deep geologic formations. Reliable and cost-effective monitoring will be important aspect of ensuring geological sequestration is a safe, effective, and acceptable method for CO2 emissions mitigation. Once CO2 injection starts, seismic methods can be used to monitor the migration of the carbon dioxide plume. To calibrate changes in rock properties from field observations, we propose to first analyze changes in elastic properties on basalt cores. Carbon dioxide sequestration in basalt rocks results in fluid substitution and mixing of CO2 with water and rock mineralizations. Carbon dioxide sequestration in mafic rocks creates reactions such as Mg2SiO 4 + CaMgSi2O 6 + 4CO2 = Mg 3Ca(CO 3) 4 + 3SiO2 whereby primary silicate minerals within the basalt react with carbonic acid laden water to creating secondary carbonate minerals and silicates. Using time-lapse laboratory scale experiments, such as laser generated ultrasonic wave propagation; it is possible to observe small changes in the physical properties of a rock. We will show velocity and modulus measurements on three basalt core samples for different saturation. The ultimate goal of the project is to track seismic changes due to fluid substitution and mineralization. The porosity of our basalts ranges from 8% to 12%, and the P-wave velocity increases by 20% to 40% from dry to water saturated conditions. Petrographic analysis (CT-scans, thin sections, XRF, XRf) will aid in the characterization of the mineral structure in these basalts and its correlation to seismic properties changes resulting from fluid substitution and mineralization.

  19. CO2-Water-Rock Wettability: Variability, Influencing Factors, and Implications for CO2 Geostorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglauer, Stefan

    2017-05-16

    Carbon geosequestration (CGS) has been identified as a key technology to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and thus significantly mitigate climate change. In CGS, CO2 is captured from large point-source emitters (e.g., coal fired power stations), purified, and injected deep underground into geological formations for disposal. However, the CO2 has a lower density than the resident formation brine and thus migrates upward due to buoyancy forces. To prevent the CO2 from leaking back to the surface, four trapping mechanisms are used: (1) structural trapping (where a tight caprock acts as a seal barrier through which the CO2 cannot percolate), (2) residual trapping (where the CO2 plume is split into many micrometer-sized bubbles, which are immobilized by capillary forces in the pore network of the rock), (3) dissolution trapping (where CO2 dissolves in the formation brine and sinks deep into the reservoir due to a slight increase in brine density), and (4) mineral trapping (where the CO2 introduced into the subsurface chemically reacts with the formation brine or reservoir rock or both to form solid precipitates). The efficiency of these trapping mechanisms and the movement of CO2 through the rock are strongly influenced by the CO2-brine-rock wettability (mainly due to the small capillary-like pores in the rock which form a complex network), and it is thus of key importance to rigorously understand CO2-wettability. In this context, a substantial number of experiments have been conducted from which several conclusions can be drawn: of prime importance is the rock surface chemistry, and hydrophilic surfaces are water-wet while hydrophobic surfaces are CO2-wet. Note that CO2-wet surfaces dramatically reduce CO2 storage capacities. Furthermore, increasing pressure, salinity, or dissolved ion valency increases CO2-wettability, while the effect of temperature is not well understood. Indeed theoretical understanding of CO2-wettability and the ability to

  20. 西藏拉萨地体冈底斯岩基紫苏花岗岩中的高密度CO2包裹体成因及其地质意义%Origin and geological significance of high-density CO2 fluid inclusions in Charnockites from the Gangdese batholith, Lhasa terrane, southern Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈昆; 张泽明; Santosh M; 董昕

    2012-01-01

    Charnockits, occurring as intrusive rocks in the Gangdese batholith in the southeastern Lhasa terrane, are characterized by the presence of dry mineral assemblage. The anhydrous conditions required for the formation of charnockites are thought to be controlled by the lowering of water activity through the influx of CO2 -- bearing fluids. Through petrographic, microthermometric studies and Raman analysis of CO2- rich fluid inclusions in the eharnockite samples from the Gangdese batholith, we have characterized the composition and density of the fluids during the crystallization of the charnockites. Our results indicate that the carbonic fluid inclusions were trapped during the crystallization of the charnockites and its isochores pass through the P T conditions around 850 ℃ -950 ℃ and 0.75- 1.0 GPa as estimated by mineral thermobarometry data. High-density carbonic fluid inclusions (up to 1.14 g/cm^3 ) in quartz provide potential evidence for the involvement of CO2 -- rich fluid during granulite facies metamorphism in the Lhasa terrane. Occurrence of CO2 --rich inclusions and elevated P--T conditions open up the possibility favoring the mechanism of vapour-deficient dehydration melting accompanied by CO2 infiltration to account for charnockite formation in the ocean ridge subduction process.%产于西藏拉萨地体东南部冈底斯岩基中的紫苏花岗岩侵入体具有低水活度的矿物组合,富含CO2流体包裹体.形成紫苏花岗岩所需要的低水活度条件主要是受到含CO2流体带入的控制.通过对产于冈底斯岩基紫苏花岗岩中CO2流体包裹体的岩相学观察、显微测温和激光拉曼光谱分析,确定了其组成和密度.结果表明碳质(CO2)流体包裹体是在紫苏花岗岩结晶过程中捕获的,其等容线通过了由矿物温压计估算的P-T条件(850℃~950℃,0.75~1.0GPa),随后经历了短期近等压降温作用和地体快速隆起的影响.石英中的高密度碳质流体

  1. Density of aqueous solutions of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Julio E.

    2001-10-10

    In this report, we present a numerical representation for the partial molar volume of CO2 in water and the calculation of the corresponding aqueous solution density. The motivation behind this work is related to the importance of having accurate representations for aqueous phase properties in the numerical simulation of carbon dioxide disposal into aquifers as well as in geothermal applications. According to reported experimental data the density of aqueous solutions of CO2 can be as much as 2-3% higher than pure water density. This density variation might produce an influence on the groundwater flow regime. For instance, in geologic sequestration of CO2, convective transport mixing might occur when, several years after injection of carbon dioxide has stopped, the CO2-rich gas phase is concentrated at the top of the formation, just below an overlaying caprock. In this particular case the heavier CO2 saturated water will flow downward and will be replaced by water with a lesser CO2 content.

  2. A hypothesis linking sub-optimal seawater pCO2 conditions for cnidarian-Symbiodinium symbioses with the exceedence of the interglacial threshold (> 260 ppmv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Wooldridge

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Most scleractinian corals and many other cnidarians host intracellular photosynthetic dinoflagellate symbionts ("zooxanthellae". The zooxanthellae contribute to host metabolism and skeletogenesis to such an extent that this symbiosis is well recognised for its contribution in creating the coral reef ecosystem. The stable functioning of cnidarian symbioses is however dependent upon the host's ability to maintain demographic control of its algal partner. In this review, I explain how the modern envelope of seawater conditions found within many coral reef ecosystems (characterised by elevated temperatures, rising pCO2, and enriched nutrient levels are antagonistic toward the dominant host processes that restrict excessive symbiont proliferation. Moreover, I outline a new hypothesis and initial evidence base, which support the suggestion that the additional "excess" zooxanthellae fraction permitted by seawater pCO2 levels beyond 260 ppmv significantly increases the propensity for symbiosis breakdown ("bleaching" in response to temperature and irradiance extremes. The relevance of this biological threshold is discussed in terms of historical reef extinction events, glacial-interglacial climate cycles and the modern decline of coral reef ecosystems.

  3. A hypothesis linking sub-optimal seawater pCO2 conditions for cnidarian-Symbiodinium symbioses with the exceedence of the interglacial threshold (>260 ppmv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Wooldridge

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Most scleractinian corals and many other cnidarians host intracellular photosynthetic dinoflagellate symbionts ("zooxanthellae". The zooxanthellae contribute to host metabolism and skeletogenesis to such an extent that this symbiosis is well recognised for its contribution in creating the coral reef ecosystem. The stable functioning of cnidarian symbioses is however dependent upon the host's ability to maintain demographic control of its algal partner. In this review, I explain how the modern envelope of seawater conditions found within many coral reef ecosystems (characterised by elevated temperatures, rising pCO2, and enriched nutrient levels are antagonistic toward the dominant host processes that restrict excessive symbiont proliferation. Moreover, I outline a new hypothesis and initial evidence base, which support the suggestion that the additional "excess" zooxanthellae fraction permitted by seawater pCO2 levels beyond 260 ppmv significantly increases the propensity for symbiosis breakdown ("bleaching" in response to temperature and irradiance extremes. The relevance of this biological threshold is discussed in terms of historical reef extinction events, glacial-interglacial climate cycles and the modern decline of coral reef ecosystems.

  4. The Search for Biosignatures on Mars: Using Predictive Geology to Optimize Exploration Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Allen, Carlton C.

    2011-01-01

    Predicting geologic context from satellite data is a method used on Earth for exploration in areas with limited ground truth. The method can be used to predict facies likely to contain organic-rich shales. Such shales concentrate and preserve organics and are major repositories of organic biosignatures on Earth [1]. Since current surface conditions on Mars are unfavorable for development of abundant life or for preservation of organic remains of past life, the chances are low of encountering organics in surface samples. Thus, focusing martian exploration on sites predicted to contain organic-rich shales would optimize the chances of discovering evidence of life, if it ever existed on that planet.

  5. CO2 storage capacity calculations for the Dutch subsurface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, L.G.H. van der; Yavuz, F.

    2009-01-01

    Estimating the capacity of a geological formation to store CO2 is not a straightforward or simple process. Bradshaw [1] has recently listed various estimations for both regional and global CO2 storage capacity. The estimations were quoted as "very large" with ranges for the estimates in the order of

  6. Geothermal energy combined with CO2 sequestration: An additional benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, H.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.; Bruining, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this transition period from a fossil-fuel based society to a sustainable-energy society, it is expected that CO2 capture and subsequent sequestration in geological formations plays a major role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. An alternative for CO2 emission reduction is to partially replace

  7. CO2 dissolution and its impact on reservoir pressure behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, E.; Egberts, P.J.P.; Loeve, D.; Hofstee, C.

    2015-01-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in large, saline aquifers needs to be monitored for safety purposes. In particular the observation of the pressure behavior of a storage site is relevant for the indication of CO2 leakage. However, interpretation of observed pressure is not straightforward in these systems,

  8. CO2 dissolution and its impact on reservoir pressure behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, E.; Egberts, P.J.P.; Loeve, D.; Hofstee, C.

    2015-01-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in large, saline aquifers needs to be monitored for safety purposes. In particular the observation of the pressure behavior of a storage site is relevant for the indication of CO2 leakage. However, interpretation of observed pressure is not straightforward in these systems,

  9. Geothermal energy combined with CO2 sequestration: An additional benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salimi, H.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.; Bruining, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this transition period from a fossil-fuel based society to a sustainable-energy society, it is expected that CO2 capture and subsequent sequestration in geological formations plays a major role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. An alternative for CO2 emission reduction is to partially replace

  10. Isotopic fractionation during carbon acquisition in dinoflagellates : a new proxy for pCO2?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoins, M.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations (pCO2) have markedly changed over geological timescales, thereby considerably influencing Earth’s climate and ecosystems. Reconstructing pCO2 is therefore one of the major challenges for the scientific community today. This thesis aims at investigating if past pCO2 can

  11. CO2 storage capacity estimation: Methodology and gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachu, S.; Bonijoly, D.; Bradshaw, J.; Burruss, R.; Holloway, S.; Christensen, N.P.; Mathiassen, O.M.

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of CO2 capture and geological storage (CCGS) technology at the scale needed to achieve a significant and meaningful reduction in CO2 emissions requires knowledge of the available CO2 storage capacity. CO2 storage capacity assessments may be conducted at various scales-in decreasing order of size and increasing order of resolution: country, basin, regional, local and site-specific. Estimation of the CO2 storage capacity in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is straightforward and is based on recoverable reserves, reservoir properties and in situ CO2 characteristics. In the case of CO2-EOR, the CO2 storage capacity can be roughly evaluated on the basis of worldwide field experience or more accurately through numerical simulations. Determination of the theoretical CO2 storage capacity in coal beds is based on coal thickness and CO2 adsorption isotherms, and recovery and completion factors. Evaluation of the CO2 storage capacity in deep saline aquifers is very complex because four trapping mechanisms that act at different rates are involved and, at times, all mechanisms may be operating simultaneously. The level of detail and resolution required in the data make reliable and accurate estimation of CO2 storage capacity in deep saline aquifers practical only at the local and site-specific scales. This paper follows a previous one on issues and development of standards for CO2 storage capacity estimation, and provides a clear set of definitions and methodologies for the assessment of CO2 storage capacity in geological media. Notwithstanding the defined methodologies suggested for estimating CO2 storage capacity, major challenges lie ahead because of lack of data, particularly for coal beds and deep saline aquifers, lack of knowledge about the coefficients that reduce storage capacity from theoretical to effective and to practical, and lack of knowledge about the interplay between various trapping mechanisms at work in deep saline aquifers. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd

  12. The optimization of essential oils supercritical CO2 extraction from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic steps procedure and semi-continuous technique using response surface method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Hossein; Aminimoghadamfarouj, Noushin; Golmakani, Ebrahim; Nematollahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and evaluate crucial variables in essential oils extraction process from Lavandula hybrida through static-dynamic and semi-continuous techniques using response surface method. Essential oil components were extracted from Lavandula hybrida (Lavandin) flowers using supercritical carbon dioxide via static-dynamic steps (SDS) procedure, and semi-continuous (SC) technique. Using response surface method the optimum extraction yield (4.768%) was obtained via SDS at 108.7 bar, 48.5°C, 120 min (static: 8×15), 24 min (dynamic: 8×3 min) in contrast to the 4.620% extraction yield for the SC at 111.6 bar, 49.2°C, 14 min (static), 121.1 min (dynamic). The results indicated that a substantial reduction (81.56%) solvent usage (kg CO2/g oil) is observed in the SDS method versus the conventional SC method.

  13. Optimization of Geological Environments for Carbon Dioxide Disposan in Saline Aquifers in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovorka, Susan

    1999-02-01

    Recent research and applications have demonstrated technologically feasible methods, defined costs, and modeled processes needed to sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline-water-bearing formations (aquifers). One of the simplifying assumptions used in previous modeling efforts is the effect of real stratigraphic complexity on transport and trapping in saline aquifers. In this study we have developed and applied criteria for characterizing saline aquifers for very long-term sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate a methodology for optimizing matches between CO{sub 2} sources and nearby saline formations that can be used for sequestration. This project identified 14 geologic properties used to prospect for optimal locations for CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline-water-bearing formations. For this demonstration, we digitized maps showing properties of saline formations and used analytical tools in a geographic information system (GIS) to extract areas that meet variably specified prototype criteria for CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Through geologic models, realistic aquifer properties such as discontinuous sand-body geometry are determined and can be used to add realistic hydrologic properties to future simulations. This approach facilitates refining the search for a best-fit saline host formation as our understanding of the most effective ways to implement sequestration proceeds. Formations where there has been significant drilling for oil and gas resources as well as extensive characterization of formations for deep-well injection and waste disposal sites can be described in detail. Information to describe formation properties can be inferred from poorly known saline formations using geologic models in a play approach. Resulting data sets are less detailed than in well-described examples but serve as an effective screening tool to identify prospects for more detailed work.

  14. 超临界CO2萃取冷破碎苹果皮蜡质工艺优化及其成分分析%Optimization of extracting process of waxes from cold-break apple peel by supercritical CO2 and analysis of the composition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李卓; 郭玉蓉; 闫玉培

    2012-01-01

    The extraction condition of waxes from cold-break apple peel by supercritical CO_2 extraction technology was studied and the composition of apple waxes was analyzed by GC-MS.The optimum condition of supercritical CO_2 were as follows:extraction pressure 35MPa,extraction temperature 50℃,raw material particle size100 mesh,extraction time 1.5h.Under optimal conditions,the yield of apple waxes was 2.081%.36 compounds of apple waxes were detected.Main ingredients were hydrocarbons and esters which account for 41.44% and 37.41% respectively of all the detected compounds.Alcohols,fatty acids,ketones,β-sitosterol and friedelin were also detected.%以冷破碎苹果皮渣为原料,研究超临界CO2萃取苹果皮蜡质的工艺条件,并用气相色谱-质谱联用技术(GC-MS)分析苹果皮蜡质的化学组成。结果表明:超临界CO2萃取苹果皮蜡质的最佳工艺条件为:萃取压力35MPa,萃取温度50℃,萃取时间1.5h,原料粒度〉100目,该条件下萃取率为2.081%;用GC-MS检测到萃取物中36种化合物,其中主要成分是饱和烷烃和酯类,这两类物质的相对含量分别为41.44%和37.41%;其次,苹果皮蜡质还含有醇类、脂肪酸、酮类、β-谷甾醇、木栓酮等成分。

  15. CO2 laser preionisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    The final report for work done during the reporting period of January 25, 1990 to January 24, 1991 is presented. A literature survey was conducted to identify the required parameters for effective preionization in TEA CO2 lasers and the methods and techniques for characterizing preionizers are reviewed. A numerical model of the LP-140 cavity was used to determine the cause of the transverse mode stability improvement obtained when the cavity was lengthened. The measurement of the voltage and current discharge pulses on the LP-140 were obtained and their subsequent analysis resulted in an explanation for the low efficiency of the laser. An assortment of items relating to the development of high-voltage power supplies is also provided. A program for analyzing the frequency chirp data files obtained with the HP time and frequency analyzer is included. A program to calculate the theoretical LIMP chirp is also included and a comparison between experiment and theory is made. A program for calculating the CO2 linewidth and its dependence on gas composition and pressure is presented. The program also calculates the number of axial modes under the FWHM of the line for a given resonator length. A graphical plot of the results is plotted.

  16. Enhanced CO2 Dissolution in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, K.; Neufeld, J. A.; Bickle, M. J.; Hallworth, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term and secure geological storage of CO2 through technologies such as Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) within reservoirs is seen as a technological means to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The long-term viability of this technology is reliant on the structural and secondary trapping of supercritical CO2 within heterogeneous reservoirs. Secondary trapping, primarily through the dissolution of CO2 into ambient reservoir brine to produce a denser fluid, is capable of retaining CO2 in the subsurface and thus reducing the risks of storage. To model secondary trapping we need to understand how the flow of CO2 through heterogeneous reservoir rocks enhances dissolution of supercritical CO2 in reservoir brines. Here we experimentally investigate the dissolution of CO2 in reservoir brines in layered, heterogeneous geological formations. Using analogue experiments, designed to approximate an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) setting, the processes of mixing, dispersion and dissolution are examined. These are compared against test results from non-layered, homogeneous porous media experiments. We find that heterogeneities significantly enhance mixing, particularly between adjacent porous layers. During fluid propagation, pore-scale viscous fingers grow and retreat, thereby providing an increased surface area between the flow and the ambient reservoir fluid. This enhanced mixing is predicted to substantially increase the dissolution of CO2 in reservoir brines. Both permeability and viscosity differences are found to have a significant effect on the interface between the two fluids, and therefore the likely amount of dissolution of CO2.

  17. Measurements of capillary pressure and electric permittivity of gas-water systems in porous media at elevated pressures: application to geological storage of CO2 in aquifers and wetting behavior in coal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plug, W.-J.

    2007-01-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in aquifers and coal layers is a promising technique to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Considering the reservoir properties, e.g. wettability, heterogeneity and the caprocks sealing capacity, the capillary pressure is an important measure to evaluate the efficiency, the

  18. Long-term elevated air [CO2 ] strengthens photosynthetic functioning and mitigates the impact of supra-optimal temperatures in tropical Coffea arabica and C. canephora species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Weverton P; Martins, Madlles Q; Fortunato, Ana S; Rodrigues, Ana P; Semedo, José N; Simões-Costa, Maria C; Pais, Isabel P; Leitão, António E; Colwell, Filipe; Goulao, Luis; Máguas, Cristina; Maia, Rodrigo; Partelli, Fábio L; Campostrini, Eliemar; Scotti-Campos, Paula; Ribeiro-Barros, Ana I; Lidon, Fernando C; DaMatta, Fábio M; Ramalho, José C

    2016-01-01

    The tropical coffee crop has been predicted to be threatened by future climate changes and global warming. However, the real biological effects of such changes remain unknown. Therefore, this work aims to link the physiological and biochemical responses of photosynthesis to elevated air [CO2 ] and temperature in cultivated genotypes of Coffea arabica L. (cv. Icatu and IPR108) and Coffea canephora cv. Conilon CL153. Plants were grown for ca. 10 months at 25/20°C (day/night) and 380 or 700 μl CO2 l(-1) and then subjected to temperature increase (0.5°C day(-1) ) to 42/34°C. Leaf impacts related to stomatal traits, gas exchanges, C isotope composition, fluorescence parameters, thylakoid electron transport and enzyme activities were assessed at 25/20, 31/25, 37/30 and 42/34°C. The results showed that (1) both species were remarkably heat tolerant up to 37/30°C, but at 42/34°C a threshold for irreversible nonstomatal deleterious effects was reached. Impairments were greater in C. arabica (especially in Icatu) and under normal [CO2 ]. Photosystems and thylakoid electron transport were shown to be quite heat tolerant, contrasting to the enzymes related to energy metabolism, including RuBisCO, which were the most sensitive components. (2) Significant stomatal trait modifications were promoted almost exclusively by temperature and were species dependent. Elevated [CO2 ], (3) strongly mitigated the impact of temperature on both species, particularly at 42/34°C, modifying the response to supra-optimal temperatures, (4) promoted higher water-use efficiency under moderately higher temperature (31/25°C) and (5) did not provoke photosynthetic downregulation. Instead, enhancements in [CO2 ] strengthened photosynthetic photochemical efficiency, energy use and biochemical functioning at all temperatures. Our novel findings demonstrate a relevant heat resilience of coffee species and that elevated [CO2 ] remarkably mitigated the impact of heat on coffee physiology, therefore

  19. Oxidative degradation of dyes in water using Co2+/H2O2 and Co2+/peroxymonosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Sie King; Wang, Shaobin; Peng, Yuelian

    2010-06-15

    Dye degradation using advanced oxidation processes with Co(2+)/H(2)O(2) and Co(2+)/peroxymonosulfate (PMS) systems has been investigated. Two types of dyes, basic blue 9 and acid red 183, were employed. Several parameters affecting dye degradation such as Co(2+), PMS, H(2)O(2), and dye concentrations were investigated. The optimal ratio of oxidant (PMS, H(2)O(2))/Co(2+) for the degradation of two dyes was determined. It is found that dye decomposition is much faster in Co(2+)/PMS system than in Co(2+)/H(2)O(2). For Co(2+)/H(2)O(2), an optimal ratio of H(2)O(2) to Co(2+) at 6 is required for the maximum decomposition of the dyes. For Co(2+)/PMS, higher concentrations of Co(2+) and PMS will increase dye degradation rate with an optimal ratio of 3, achieving 95% decolourisation. For basic blue 9, a complete decolourisation can be achieved in 5 min at 0.13 mM Co(2+), 0.40 mM PMS and 7 mg/l basic blue 9 while the complete degradation of acid red 183 will be achieved at 30 min at 0.13 mM Co(2+), 0.40 mM PMS and 160 mg/l of acid red 183. The degradation of acid red 183 follows the second-order kinetics. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. CO2 adsorption isotherm on clay minerals and the CO2 accessibility into the clay interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Bertier, Pieter; Busch, Andreas; Rother, Gernot; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale CO2 storage in porous rock formations at 1-3 km depth is seen as a global warming mitigation strategy. In this process, CO2 is separated from the flue gas of coal or gas power plants, compressed, and pumped into porous subsurface reservoirs with overlying caprocks (seals). Good seals are mechanically and chemically stable caprocks with low porosity and permeability. They prevent leakage of buoyant CO2 from the reservoir. Caprocks are generally comprised of thick layers of shale, and thus mainly consist of clay minerals. These clays can be affected by CO2-induced processes, such as swelling or dissolution. The interactions of CO2 with clay minerals in shales are at present poorly understood. Sorption measurements in combination scattering techniques could provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms governing CO2-clay interaction. Volumetric sorption techniques have assessed the sorption of supercritical CO2 onto coal (Gensterblum et al., 2010; Gensterblum et al., 2009), porous silica (Rother et al., 2012a) and clays as a means of exploring the potential of large-scale storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geological reservoirs (Busch et al., 2008). On different clay minerals and shales, positive values of excess sorption were measured at gas pressures up to 6 MPa, where the interfacial fluid is assumed to be denser than the bulk fluid. However, zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, which suggests the adsorbed fluid becomes equal to and eventually less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid, or that the clay minerals expand on CO2 charging. Using a combination of neutron diffraction and excess sorption measurements, we recently deduced the interlayer density of scCO2 in Na-montmorillonite clay in its single-layer hydration state (Rother et al., 2012b), and confirmed its low density, as well as the expansion of the basal spacings. We performed neutron diffraction experiments at the FRMII diffractometer on smectite, kaolinite and illite