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Sample records for optimized imaging protocol

  1. Developing optimized CT scan protocols: Phantom measurements of image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarb, Francis; Rainford, Louise; McEntee, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The increasing frequency of computerized tomography (CT) examinations is well documented, leading to concern about potential radiation risks for patients. However, the consequences of not performing the CT examination and missing injuries and disease are potentially serious, impacting upon correct patient management. The ALARA principle of dose optimization must be employed for all justified CT examinations. Dose indicators displayed on the CT console as either CT dose index (CTDI) and/or dose length product (DLP), are used to indicate dose and can quantify improvements achieved through optimization. Key scan parameters contributing to dose have been identified in previous literature and in previous work by our group. The aim of this study was to optimize the scan parameters of mA; kV and pitch, whilst maintaining image quality and reducing dose. This research was conducted using psychophysical image quality measurements on a CT quality assurance (QA) phantom establishing the impact of dose optimization on image quality parameters. Method: Current CT scan parameters for head (posterior fossa and cerebrum), abdomen and chest examinations were collected from 57% of CT suites available nationally in Malta (n = 4). Current scan protocols were used to image a Catphan 600 CT QA phantom whereby image quality was assessed. Each scan parameter: mA; kV and pitch were systematically reduced until the contrast resolution (CR), spatial resolution (SR) and noise were significantly lowered. The Catphan 600 images, produced by the range of protocols, were evaluated by 2 expert observers assessing CR, SR and noise. The protocol considered as the optimization threshold was just above the setting that resulted in a significant reduction in CR and noise but not affecting SR at the 95% confidence interval. Results: The limit of optimization threshold was determined for each CT suite. Employing optimized parameters, CTDI and DLP were both significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.001) by

  2. Optimized protocols for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with thoracic metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Laura J; Cross, Russell R; O'Brien, Kendall E; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Hansen, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a valuable tool in congenital heart disease; however patients frequently have metal devices in the chest from the treatment of their disease that complicate imaging. Methods are needed to improve imaging around metal implants near the heart. Basic sequence parameter manipulations have the potential to minimize artifact while limiting effects on image resolution and quality. Our objective was to design cine and static cardiac imaging sequences to minimize metal artifact while maintaining image quality. Using systematic variation of standard imaging parameters on a fluid-filled phantom containing commonly used metal cardiac devices, we developed optimized sequences for steady-state free precession (SSFP), gradient recalled echo (GRE) cine imaging, and turbo spin-echo (TSE) black-blood imaging. We imaged 17 consecutive patients undergoing routine cardiac MR with 25 metal implants of various origins using both standard and optimized imaging protocols for a given slice position. We rated images for quality and metal artifact size by measuring metal artifact in two orthogonal planes within the image. All metal artifacts were reduced with optimized imaging. The average metal artifact reduction for the optimized SSFP cine was 1.5+/-1.8 mm, and for the optimized GRE cine the reduction was 4.6+/-4.5 mm (P metal artifact reduction for the optimized TSE images was 1.6+/-1.7 mm (P metal artifact are easily created by modifying basic sequence parameters, and images are superior to standard imaging sequences in both quality and artifact size. Specifically, for optimized cine imaging a GRE sequence should be used with settings that favor short echo time, i.e. flow compensation off, weak asymmetrical echo and a relatively high receiver bandwidth. For static black-blood imaging, a TSE sequence should be used with fat saturation turned off and high receiver bandwidth.

  3. Optimized protocols for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with thoracic metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cross, Russell R.; O' Brien, Kendall E. [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Hansen, Michael S. [National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a valuable tool in congenital heart disease; however patients frequently have metal devices in the chest from the treatment of their disease that complicate imaging. Methods are needed to improve imaging around metal implants near the heart. Basic sequence parameter manipulations have the potential to minimize artifact while limiting effects on image resolution and quality. Our objective was to design cine and static cardiac imaging sequences to minimize metal artifact while maintaining image quality. Using systematic variation of standard imaging parameters on a fluid-filled phantom containing commonly used metal cardiac devices, we developed optimized sequences for steady-state free precession (SSFP), gradient recalled echo (GRE) cine imaging, and turbo spin-echo (TSE) black-blood imaging. We imaged 17 consecutive patients undergoing routine cardiac MR with 25 metal implants of various origins using both standard and optimized imaging protocols for a given slice position. We rated images for quality and metal artifact size by measuring metal artifact in two orthogonal planes within the image. All metal artifacts were reduced with optimized imaging. The average metal artifact reduction for the optimized SSFP cine was 1.5+/-1.8 mm, and for the optimized GRE cine the reduction was 4.6+/-4.5 mm (P < 0.05). Quality ratings favored the optimized GRE cine. Similarly, the average metal artifact reduction for the optimized TSE images was 1.6+/-1.7 mm (P < 0.05), and quality ratings favored the optimized TSE imaging. Imaging sequences tailored to minimize metal artifact are easily created by modifying basic sequence parameters, and images are superior to standard imaging sequences in both quality and artifact size. Specifically, for optimized cine imaging a GRE sequence should be used with settings that favor short echo time, i.e. flow compensation off, weak asymmetrical echo and a relatively high receiver bandwidth. For static

  4. Optimized workflow and imaging protocols for whole-body oncologic PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Shirou; Hara, Takamitsu; Nanbu, Takeyuki; Suenaga, Hiroki; Sugawara, Shigeyasu; Kuroiwa, Daichi; Sekino, Hirofumi; Miyajima, Masayuki; Kubo, Hitoshi; Oriuchi, Noboru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Although PET/MRI has the advantages of a simultaneous acquisition of PET and MRI, high soft-tissue contrast of the MRI images, and reduction of radiation exposure, its low profitability and long acquisition time are significant problems in clinical settings. Thus, MRI protocols that meet oncological purposes need to be used in order to reduce examination time while securing detectability. Currently, half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo and 3D-T1 volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination may be the most commonly used sequences for whole-body imaging due to their shorter acquisition time and higher diagnostic accuracy. Although there have been several reports that adding diffusion weighted image (DWI) to PET/MRI protocol has had no effect on tumor detection to date, in cases of liver, kidney, bladder, and prostate cancer, the use of DWI may be beneficial in detecting lesions. Another possible option is to scan each region with different MRI sequences instead of scanning the whole body using one sequence continuously. We herein report a workflow and imaging protocols for whole-body oncologic PET/MRI using an integrated system in the clinical routine, designed for the detection, for example by cancer screening, of metastatic lesions, in order to help future users optimize their workflow and imaging protocols.

  5. Dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole body PET acquisition protocol of ~45min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6-min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (6 passes x 7 bed positions, each scanned for 45sec). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares (OLS) Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of 10 different clinically

  6. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ~45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  7. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ∼15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ∼45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate K i and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different

  8. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ˜15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ˜45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  9. Optimization on the dose versus noise in the image on protocols for computed tomography of pediatric head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saint'Yves, Thalis L.A.; Travassos, Paulo Cesar B.; Goncalves, Elicardo A.S.; Mecca A, Fernando; Silveira, Thiago B.

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to establish protocols optimized for computed tomography of pediatric skull, to the Picker Q2000 tomography of the Instituto Nacional de Cancer, through the analysis of dose x noise on the image with the variation of values of mAs and kVp. We used a water phantom to measure the noise, a pencil type ionization chamber to measure the dose in the air and the Alderson Randon phantom for check the quality of the image. We found values of mAs and kVp that reduce the skin dose of the original protocol used in 35.9%, maintaining the same image quality at a safe diagnosis. (author)

  10. Improved identification of cranial nerves using paired-agent imaging: topical staining protocol optimization through experimentation and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Veronica C.; Wilson, Todd; Staneviciute, Austeja; Byrne, Richard W.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2018-03-01

    Skull base tumors are particularly difficult to visualize and access for surgeons because of the crowded environment and close proximity of vital structures, such as cranial nerves. As a result, accidental nerve damage is a significant concern and the likelihood of tumor recurrence is increased because of more conservative resections that attempt to avoid injuring these structures. In this study, a paired-agent imaging method with direct administration of fluorophores is applied to enhance cranial nerve identification. Here, a control imaging agent (ICG) accounts for non-specific uptake of the nerve-targeting agent (Oxazine 4), and ratiometric data analysis is employed to approximate binding potential (BP, a surrogate of targeted biomolecule concentration). For clinical relevance, animal experiments and simulations were conducted to identify parameters for an optimized stain and rinse protocol using the developed paired-agent method. Numerical methods were used to model the diffusive and kinetic behavior of the imaging agents in tissue, and simulation results revealed that there are various combinations of stain time and rinse number that provide improved contrast of cranial nerves, as suggested by optimal measures of BP and contrast-to-noise ratio.

  11. Optimization of whole-body PET imaging protocol for the detection of 18F-FDG overlappings in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartizien, C.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear imaging modality that allows studying in vivo cellular metabolic and biochemical processes. During the 90's, there has been a growing interest in the applications of PET in oncology related to the use of a glucose analog (FDG) labeled with the positron emitter 18 F. This tracer of the glucose metabolism is trapped in the cancer cells characterized by a deregulated glycolytic activity. This allows detecting tumors and metastases. The interest of PET in oncology has lead to develop imaging systems and protocols to perform whole-body acquisitions of the patient. Whole-body PET imaging has been limited in practice by the high level of statistical noise that affects the detection of small lesions due to limited radioactive dose injected to the patient and short acquisition time. In this context, our work focused on the optimization of detection performances in whole-body 18 F-FDG PET images. We have first developed an original method to evaluate detectability based on the psychophysical approach of the ROC methodology and adapted to the specificity of whole-body PET images. This method was used to evaluate detection performances of different reconstruction algorithms used for whole-body imaging. We have also studied the influence of the acquisition mode, namely the 2D and the 3D modes. To that purpose, we have used the NEC index to select relevant statistical acquisition conditions in both acquisition modes as a function of the injected dose to the patient. Then, we have compared the detection performances of these different acquisition conditions based on our psychophysical evaluation technique. (author) [fr

  12. A simple protocol for attenuating the auto-fluorescence of cyanobacteria for optimized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Perrine; Ploux, Olivier; Méjean, Annick

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria contain pigments, which generate auto-fluorescence that interferes with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging of cyanobacteria. We describe simple chemical treatments using CuSO4 or H2O2 that significantly reduce the auto-fluorescence of Microcystis strains. These protocols were successfully applied in FISH experiments using 16S rRNA specific probes and filamentous cyanobacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. MR imaging of the ankle at 3 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla: protocol optimization and application to cartilage, ligament and tendon pathology in cadaver specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, Cameron; Malfair, David; Henning, Tobias D.; Steinbach, Lynne; Link, Thomas M.; Bauer, Jan S.; Ma, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize ankle joint MR imaging in volunteers at 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0 T, and to compare these optimized sequences concerning image quality and performance in assessing cartilage, ligament and tendon pathology in fresh human cadaver specimens. Initially our clinical ankle protocol consisting of T1-weighted (-w), fat-saturated (fs) T2-w, and short τ inversion-recovery fast spinecho (FSE) sequences was optimized at 1.5 T and 3.0 T by two radiologists. For dedicated cartilage imaging, fs-intermediate (IM)-w FSE, fs spoiled gradient echo, and balanced free-precession steady-state sequences were optimized. Using the optimized sequences, thirteen cadaver ankle joints were imaged. Four radiologists independently assessed these images concerning image quality and pathology. All radiologists consistently rated image quality higher at 3.0 T (all sequences p<0.05). For detecting cartilage pathology, diagnostic performance was significantly higher at 3.0 T (ROC-values up to 0.93 vs. 0.77; p<0.05); the fs-IM FSE sequence showed highest values among the different sequences. Average sensitivity for detecting tendon pathology was 63% at 3.0 T vs. 41% at 1.5 T and was significantly higher at 3.0 T for 2 out of 4 radiologists (p<0.05). Compared to 1.5 T, imaging of the ankle joint at 3.0 T significantly improved image quality and diagnostic performance in assessing cartilage pathology. (orig.)

  14. SU-F-I-46: Optimizing Dose Reduction in Adult Head CT Protocols While Maintaining Image Quality in Postmortem Head Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Quails, N; Correa, N; Rajderkar, D; Bennett, J; Rill, L; Arreola, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize adult head CT protocol by reducing dose to an appropriate level while providing CT images of diagnostic quality. Methods: Five cadavers were scanned from the skull base to the vertex using a routine adult head CT protocol (120 kVp, 270 mA, 0.75 s rotation, 0.5 mm × 32 detectors, 70.8 mGy CTDIvol) followed by seven reduced-dose protocols with varying combinations of reduced tube current, reduced rotation time, and increased detectors with CTDIvol ranging from 38.2 to 65.6 mGy. Organ doses were directly measured with 21 OSL dosimeters placed on the surface and implanted in the head by a neurosurgeon. Two neuroradiologists assessed grey-white matter differentiation, fluid space, ventricular size, midline shift, brain mass, edema, ischemia, and skull fractures on a three point scale: (1) Unacceptable, (2) Borderline Acceptable, and (3) Acceptable. Results: For the standard scan, doses to the skin, lens of the eye, salivary glands, thyroid, and brain were 37.55 mGy, 49.65 mGy, 40.67 mGy, 4.63 mGy, and 27.33 mGy, respectively. Two cadavers had cerebral edema due to changing dynamics of postmortem effects, causing the grey-white matter differentiation to appear less distinct. Two cadavers with preserved grey-white matter received acceptable scores for all image quality features for the protocol with a CTDIvol of 57.3 mGy, allowing organ dose savings ranging from 34% to 45%. One cadaver allowed for greater dose reduction for the protocol with a CTDIvol of 42 mGy. Conclusion: Efforts to optimize scan protocol should consider both dose and clinical image quality. This is made possible with postmortem subjects, whose brains are similar to patients, allowing for an investigation of ideal scan parameters. Radiologists at our institution accepted scan protocols acquired with lower scan parameters, with CTDIvol values closer to the American College of Radiology’s (ACR) Achievable Dose level of 57 mGy.

  15. SU-F-I-46: Optimizing Dose Reduction in Adult Head CT Protocols While Maintaining Image Quality in Postmortem Head Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Quails, N; Correa, N; Rajderkar, D; Bennett, J; Rill, L; Arreola, M [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize adult head CT protocol by reducing dose to an appropriate level while providing CT images of diagnostic quality. Methods: Five cadavers were scanned from the skull base to the vertex using a routine adult head CT protocol (120 kVp, 270 mA, 0.75 s rotation, 0.5 mm × 32 detectors, 70.8 mGy CTDIvol) followed by seven reduced-dose protocols with varying combinations of reduced tube current, reduced rotation time, and increased detectors with CTDIvol ranging from 38.2 to 65.6 mGy. Organ doses were directly measured with 21 OSL dosimeters placed on the surface and implanted in the head by a neurosurgeon. Two neuroradiologists assessed grey-white matter differentiation, fluid space, ventricular size, midline shift, brain mass, edema, ischemia, and skull fractures on a three point scale: (1) Unacceptable, (2) Borderline Acceptable, and (3) Acceptable. Results: For the standard scan, doses to the skin, lens of the eye, salivary glands, thyroid, and brain were 37.55 mGy, 49.65 mGy, 40.67 mGy, 4.63 mGy, and 27.33 mGy, respectively. Two cadavers had cerebral edema due to changing dynamics of postmortem effects, causing the grey-white matter differentiation to appear less distinct. Two cadavers with preserved grey-white matter received acceptable scores for all image quality features for the protocol with a CTDIvol of 57.3 mGy, allowing organ dose savings ranging from 34% to 45%. One cadaver allowed for greater dose reduction for the protocol with a CTDIvol of 42 mGy. Conclusion: Efforts to optimize scan protocol should consider both dose and clinical image quality. This is made possible with postmortem subjects, whose brains are similar to patients, allowing for an investigation of ideal scan parameters. Radiologists at our institution accepted scan protocols acquired with lower scan parameters, with CTDIvol values closer to the American College of Radiology’s (ACR) Achievable Dose level of 57 mGy.

  16. Optimization of the dose versus noise in the image on protocols for computed tomography of pediatric head;Otimizacao da relacao dose versus ruido na imagem em protocolos de tomografia computadorizada de cranio pediatrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint' Yves, T.L.A.; Travassos, P.C.; Goncalves, E.A.S.; Mecca, F.A.; Silveira, T.B. [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This article aims to establish protocols optimized for computed tomography of pediatric skull, to the Picker Q 2000 tomography of the Instituto Nacional de Cancer, through the analysis of dose x noise on the image with the variation of values of m As and k Vp. We used a water phantom to measure the noise, a pencil type ionization chamber to measure the dose in the air and the Alderson Randon phantom for check the quality of the image. We found values of m As and k Vp that reduce the skin dose of the original protocol used in 35.9%, maintaining the same image quality at a safe diagnosis. (author)

  17. Satellite image collection optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William

    2002-09-01

    Imaging satellite systems represent a high capital cost. Optimizing the collection of images is critical for both satisfying customer orders and building a sustainable satellite operations business. We describe the functions of an operational, multivariable, time dynamic optimization system that maximizes the daily collection of satellite images. A graphical user interface allows the operator to quickly see the results of what if adjustments to an image collection plan. Used for both long range planning and daily collection scheduling of Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite, the satellite control and tasking (SCT) software allows collection commands to be altered up to 10 min before upload to the satellite.

  18. Nucleic acid protocols: Extraction and optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed El-Ashram

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Yield and quality are fundamental features for any researchers during nucleic acid extraction. Here, we describe a simplified, semi-unified, effective, and toxic material free protocol for extracting DNA and RNA from different prokaryotic and eukaryotic sources exploiting the physical and chemical properties of nucleic acids. Furthermore, this protocol showed that DNA and RNA are under triple protection (i.e. EDTA, SDS and NaCl during lysis step, and this environment is improper for RNase to have DNA liberated of RNA and even for DNase to degrade the DNA. Therefore, the complete removal of RNA under RNase influence is achieved when RNase is added after DNA extraction, which gives optimal quality with any protocols. Similarly, DNA contamination in an isolated RNA is degraded by DNase to obtain high-quality RNA. Our protocol is the protocol of choice in terms of simplicity, recovery time, environmental safety, amount, purity, PCR and RT-PCR applicability.

  19. Quantitative and qualitative comparison of MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint at 1.5 and 3.0 T using an optimized high-resolution protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Georg; Wyss, Michael; Erni, Stefan; Ettlin, Dominik A; Nanz, Daniel; Ulbrich, Erika J; Gallo, Luigi M; Andreisek, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To quantitatively and qualitatively compare MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using an optimized high-resolution protocol at 3.0 T and a clinical standard protocol at 1.5 T. Methods: A phantom and 12 asymptomatic volunteers were MR imaged using a 2-channel surface coil (standard TMJ coil) at 1.5 and 3.0 T (Philips Achieva and Philips Ingenia, respectively; Philips Healthcare, Best, Netherlands). Imaging protocol consisted of coronal and oblique sagittal proton density-weighted turbo spin echo sequences. For quantitative evaluation, a spherical phantom was imaged. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) maps were calculated on a voxelwise basis. For qualitative evaluation, all volunteers underwent MRI of the TMJ with the jaw in closed position. Two readers independently assessed visibility and delineation of anatomical structures of the TMJ and overall image quality on a 5-point Likert scale. Quantitative and qualitative measurements were compared between field strengths. Results: The quantitative analysis showed similar SNR for the high-resolution protocol at 3.0 T compared with the clinical protocol at 1.5 T. The qualitative analysis showed significantly better visibility and delineation of clinically relevant anatomical structures of the TMJ, including the TMJ disc and pterygoid muscle as well as better overall image quality at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T. Conclusions: The presented results indicate that expected gains in SNR at 3.0 T can be used to increase the spatial resolution when imaging the TMJ, which translates into increased visibility and delineation of anatomical structures of the TMJ. Therefore, imaging at 3.0 T should be preferred over 1.5 T for imaging the TMJ. PMID:26371077

  20. Quantitative and qualitative comparison of MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint at 1.5 and 3.0 T using an optimized high-resolution protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoliu, Andrei; Spinner, Georg; Wyss, Michael; Erni, Stefan; Ettlin, Dominik A; Nanz, Daniel; Ulbrich, Erika J; Gallo, Luigi M; Andreisek, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    To quantitatively and qualitatively compare MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using an optimized high-resolution protocol at 3.0 T and a clinical standard protocol at 1.5 T. A phantom and 12 asymptomatic volunteers were MR imaged using a 2-channel surface coil (standard TMJ coil) at 1.5 and 3.0 T (Philips Achieva and Philips Ingenia, respectively; Philips Healthcare, Best, Netherlands). Imaging protocol consisted of coronal and oblique sagittal proton density-weighted turbo spin echo sequences. For quantitative evaluation, a spherical phantom was imaged. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) maps were calculated on a voxelwise basis. For qualitative evaluation, all volunteers underwent MRI of the TMJ with the jaw in closed position. Two readers independently assessed visibility and delineation of anatomical structures of the TMJ and overall image quality on a 5-point Likert scale. Quantitative and qualitative measurements were compared between field strengths. The quantitative analysis showed similar SNR for the high-resolution protocol at 3.0 T compared with the clinical protocol at 1.5 T. The qualitative analysis showed significantly better visibility and delineation of clinically relevant anatomical structures of the TMJ, including the TMJ disc and pterygoid muscle as well as better overall image quality at 3.0 T than at 1.5 T. The presented results indicate that expected gains in SNR at 3.0 T can be used to increase the spatial resolution when imaging the TMJ, which translates into increased visibility and delineation of anatomical structures of the TMJ. Therefore, imaging at 3.0 T should be preferred over 1.5 T for imaging the TMJ.

  1. Optimization on the dose versus noise in the image on protocols for computed tomography of pediatric head; Otimizacao da relacao dose versus ruido na imagem em protocolos de tomografia computadorizada de cranio pediatrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint' Yves, Thalis L.A.; Travassos, Paulo Cesar B.; Goncalves, Elicardo A.S.; Mecca A, Fernando; Silveira, Thiago B. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: fmecca@inca.gov.br, e-mail: thalis09@yahoo.com.br

    2010-03-15

    This article aims to establish protocols optimized for computed tomography of pediatric skull, to the Picker Q2000 tomography of the Instituto Nacional de Cancer, through the analysis of dose x noise on the image with the variation of values of mAs and kVp. We used a water phantom to measure the noise, a pencil type ionization chamber to measure the dose in the air and the Alderson Randon phantom for check the quality of the image. We found values of mAs and kVp that reduce the skin dose of the original protocol used in 35.9%, maintaining the same image quality at a safe diagnosis. (author)

  2. Dose optimization for multislice computed tomography protocols of the midface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzen, M.; Wedegaertner, U.; Weber, C.; Adam, G.; Lorenzen, J.; Lockemann, U.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to optimize multislice computed tomography (MSCT) protocols of the midface for dose reduction and adequate image quality. Materials and methods: MSCT (somatom volume zoom, siemens) of the midface was performed on 3 cadavers within 24 hours of death with successive reduction of the tube current, applying 150, 100, 70 and 30 mAs at 120 kV as well as 40 and 21 mAs at 80 kV. At 120 kV, a pitch of 0.875 and collimation of 4 x 1 mm were used, and at 80 kV, a pitch of 0.7 and collimation of 2 x 0.5 mm. Images were reconstructed in transverse and coronal orientation. Qualitative image analysis was separately performed by two radiologists using a five-point scale (1 = excellent; 5 = poor) applying the following parameters: image quality, demarcation and sharpness of lamellar bone, overall image quality, and image noise (1 = minor; 5 = strong). The effective body dose [mSv] and organ dose [mSv] of the ocular lens (using the dosimetry system ''WINdose'') were calculated, and the interobserver agreement (kappa coefficient) was determined. Results: for the evaluation of the lamellar bone, adequate sharpness, demarcation and image quality was demonstrated at 120 kV/30 mAs, and for the overall image quality and noise, 120 kV/40 mAs was acceptable. With regard to image quality, the effective body dose could be reduced from 1.89 mSv to 0.34 mSv and the organ dose of the ocular lens from 27.2 mSv to 4.8 mSv. Interobserver agreement was moderate (kappa = 0.39). Conclusion: adequate image quality was achieved for MSCT protocols of the midface with 30 mAs at 120 kV, resulting in a dose reduction of 70% in comparison to standard protocols. (orig.)

  3. Protocol optimization of sacroiliac joint MR Imaging at 3 Tesla: Impact of coil design and motion resistant sequences on image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim Teixeira, P A; Bravetti, M; Hossu, G; Lecocq, S; Petit, D; Loeuille, D; Blum, A

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of coil design and motion-resistant sequences on the quality of sacroiliac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination in patients with spondyloarthropathy. One hundred and twenty-one patients with suspected sacroiliitis and referred for MRI of the sacroiliac joints were retrospectively evaluated with MRI at 3-Tesla. There were 78 women and 43 men with a mean age of 36.7±11.5 (SD) years (range: 15.8-78.4 years). Conventional and motion-resistant fat-saturated fast-spin echo T2-weighted sequences were performed with two different coils. Image quality was subjectively evaluated by two independent readers (R1 and R2) using a four-point scale. Confidence in the identification of bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) was also evaluated subjectively using a three-point scale. Phased array body coil yielded improved image quality compared to surface coil (14.1 to 30.4% for R1 and 14.6 to 25.7% for R2; Pcoil with motion-resistant T2-weighted sequence (kappa 0.990). The smallest number of indeterminate BMEP zones was seen on MRI set acquired with the phased-array body coil and motion-resistant T2-weighted sequence. Phased array body coil and motion-resistant T2-weighted sequences perform better than surface coil and conventional T2-weighted sequences for the evaluation of sacroiliac joints, increasing confidence in the identification of BMEP. Copyright © 2017 Editions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols for paediatric neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, Dawn E.; Thompson, Clare; Gunny, Roxanne; Jones, Rod; Cox, Tim; Chong, Wui Khean

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, radiologists are encouraged to have protocols for all imaging studies and to include imaging guidelines in care pathways set up by the referring clinicians. This is particularly advantageous in MRI where magnet time is limited and a radiologist's review of each patient's images often results in additional sequences and longer scanning times without the advantage of improvement in diagnostic ability. The difficulties of imaging small children and the challenges presented to the radiologist as the brain develops are discussed. We present our protocols for imaging the brain and spine of children based on 20 years experience of paediatric neurological MRI. The protocols are adapted to suit children under the age of 2 years, small body parts and paediatric clinical scenarios. (orig.)

  5. The development of optimization protocol in SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S. J.; Suh, T. S.; Lee, H. K.; Choe, B. Y.

    2002-01-01

    In an operation of stereotactic radiosurgery(SRS), a high dose must be delivered to a target region while a normal tissue region must be spared. Using dose distribution which fits in a target region satisfies this purpose. This is solved by using data bases through the simple patient model simulating the brain model and the tumor region. The objective of this research is to develop brain model with tumor based on pseudo coordinate and systematic optimization protocol and to construct data base(DB) about beam parameters such as position and number of isocenter and collimator size. The normal tissue region of patient can be spared by DB in a operation of SRS

  6. The development of optimization protocol in SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, S. J.; Suh, T. S.; Lee, H. K.; Choe, B. Y. [The Catholic Univ., of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    In an operation of stereotactic radiosurgery(SRS), a high dose must be delivered to a target region while a normal tissue region must be spared. Using dose distribution which fits in a target region satisfies this purpose. This is solved by using data bases through the simple patient model simulating the brain model and the tumor region. The objective of this research is to develop brain model with tumor based on pseudo coordinate and systematic optimization protocol and to construct data base(DB) about beam parameters such as position and number of isocenter and collimator size. The normal tissue region of patient can be spared by DB in a operation of SRS.

  7. Detection and characteristics of microvascular obstruction in reperfused acute myocardial infarction using an optimized protocol for contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkers, Sebastiaan C.A.M.; Gorgels, Anton P.M.; Passos, Valeria Lima; Waltenberger, Johannes; Crijns, Harry J.G.M.; Schalla, Simon [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, P. Debyelaan 25, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Backes, Walter H.; Snoep, Gabriel [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kim, Raymond J. [Duke University Medical Center, Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, PO Box 3934, Durham, NC (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Several cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) techniques are used to detect microvascular obstruction (MVO) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To determine the prevalence of MVO and gain more insight into the dynamic changes in appearance of MVO, we studied 84 consecutive patients with a reperfused AMI on average 5 and 104 days after admission, using an optimised single breath-hold 3D inversion recovery gradient echo pulse sequence (IR-GRE) protocol. Early MVO (2 min post-contrast) was detected in 53 patients (63%) and late MVO (10 min post-contrast) in 45 patients (54%; p = 0.008). The extent of MVO decreased from early to late imaging (4.3 {+-} 3.2% vs. 1.8 {+-} 1.8%, p < 0.001) and showed a heterogeneous pattern. At baseline, patients without MVO (early and late) had a higher left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) than patients with persistent late MVO (56 {+-} 7% vs. 48 {+-} 7%, p < 0.001) and LVEF was intermediate in patients with early MVO but late MVO disappearance (54 {+-} 6%). During follow-up, LVEF improved in all three subgroups but remained intermediate in patients with late MVO disappearance. This optimised single breath-hold 3D IR-GRE technique for imaging MVO early and late after contrast administration is fast, accurate and allows detection of patients with intermediate remodelling at follow-up. (orig.)

  8. Optimization of Protocol CT, PET-CT, whole body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Fredys Santos; Namias, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the acquisition protocols and processing existing of the CT PET/CT scanner for clinical use of Nuclear Diagnostic Center Foundation, a way to minimize the radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality properly. Dosimetric data of PET / CT service were surveyed and obtained the baseline against which we compare and define strategies and modifications to develop online. We selected transaxial up to the pulmonary hilum and liver slices as the anatomical regions of interest that led to the standardization of the study

  9. Optimal and secure measurement protocols for quantum sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Zachary; Foss-Feig, Michael; Gross, Jonathan A.; Rolston, S. L.; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2018-04-01

    Studies of quantum metrology have shown that the use of many-body entangled states can lead to an enhancement in sensitivity when compared with unentangled states. In this paper, we quantify the metrological advantage of entanglement in a setting where the measured quantity is a linear function of parameters individually coupled to each qubit. We first generalize the Heisenberg limit to the measurement of nonlocal observables in a quantum network, deriving a bound based on the multiparameter quantum Fisher information. We then propose measurement protocols that can make use of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states or spin-squeezed states and show that in the case of GHZ states the protocol is optimal, i.e., it saturates our bound. We also identify nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging as a promising setting for this technology.

  10. Protocol optimization in chest CT scans of child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrao L, L. T.; Amaral de O, F.; Prata M, A. [Biomedical Engineering Center, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, 30421-169, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Bustos F, M., E-mail: luanaabrao@gmail.com [Universidad Federal de Minas Gerais, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Av. Pres. Antonio Carlos 6627, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    The dissemination of Computed Tomography (CT), a radiodiagnostic technique, has significant increase in the patient dose. In the last years, this technique has shown a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, neoplasm and pediatric traumas. Dose measurement is important to correlate with the deleterious effects of radiation on the organism and radiation future effects is related with stochastic risks due to tissue radiosensitivity, allied to the life expectancy of the child. In this work, a cylindrical phantom, representing an adult chest made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), was used and a new born chest phantom with a shape oblong was developed based on the dimensions of a typical newborn. In a Ge CT scanner, Discovery model, with 64 channels, the central slice of the phantoms were irradiated successively in order to obtain dose measurements using an ionizing pencil camera. Based in the measurements, dose index was calculated (CTDI{sub vol}). The radiological service chest protocol using a voltage of 120 kV was used for scanning 10 cm of the central area of the adult and newborn phantom, in helical mode. An acquisition of images was performed using this radiological service chest protocol to compare with the protocol optimized. In the newborn phantom was also used protocols optimized using a voltage of 120 and 80 kV. The voltage of 80 kV has the lowest dose index for the pediatric object phantom. This work allowed the comparison between absorbed dose variations by the pediatric phantom changing the X-ray tube supply voltage. This dose variation has shown how important is specific protocols for children. (Author)

  11. Protocol optimization in chest CT scans of child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrao L, L. T.; Amaral de O, F.; Prata M, A.; Bustos F, M.

    2017-10-01

    The dissemination of Computed Tomography (CT), a radiodiagnostic technique, has significant increase in the patient dose. In the last years, this technique has shown a high growth due to clinical cases of medical emergencies, neoplasm and pediatric traumas. Dose measurement is important to correlate with the deleterious effects of radiation on the organism and radiation future effects is related with stochastic risks due to tissue radiosensitivity, allied to the life expectancy of the child. In this work, a cylindrical phantom, representing an adult chest made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), was used and a new born chest phantom with a shape oblong was developed based on the dimensions of a typical newborn. In a Ge CT scanner, Discovery model, with 64 channels, the central slice of the phantoms were irradiated successively in order to obtain dose measurements using an ionizing pencil camera. Based in the measurements, dose index was calculated (CTDI vol ). The radiological service chest protocol using a voltage of 120 kV was used for scanning 10 cm of the central area of the adult and newborn phantom, in helical mode. An acquisition of images was performed using this radiological service chest protocol to compare with the protocol optimized. In the newborn phantom was also used protocols optimized using a voltage of 120 and 80 kV. The voltage of 80 kV has the lowest dose index for the pediatric object phantom. This work allowed the comparison between absorbed dose variations by the pediatric phantom changing the X-ray tube supply voltage. This dose variation has shown how important is specific protocols for children. (Author)

  12. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, Catherine [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Hustinx, Roland [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Domaine Universitaire du Sart Tilman, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et Imagerie Oncologique, CHU de Liege, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  13. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckers, Catherine; Hustinx, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  14. An optimized DNA extraction protocol for benthic Didymosphenia geminata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyua, Noelia Mariel; Manrique, Julieta Marina; Jones, Leandro Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Didymosphenia geminata mats display few cells in relation to extracellular material and contain polysaccharides and heavy metals that interfere with molecular studies. We describe an optimized DNA extraction protocol that help to overcome these difficulties. Our protocol outperformed five previously described DNA extraction techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  16. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging protocol for endoscopic cranial base image-guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindle, Christopher R; Curry, Joseph M; Kang, Melissa D; Evans, James J; Rosen, Marc R

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increasing utilization of image-guided surgery, no radiology protocols for obtaining magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of adequate quality are available in the current literature. At our institution, more than 300 endonasal cranial base procedures including pituitary, extended pituitary, and other anterior skullbase procedures have been performed in the past 3 years. To facilitate and optimize preoperative evaluation and assessment, there was a need to develop a magnetic resonance protocol. Retrospective Technical Assessment was performed. Through a collaborative effort between the otolaryngology, neurosurgery, and neuroradiology departments at our institution, a skull base MR image-guided (IGS) protocol was developed with several ends in mind. First, it was necessary to generate diagnostic images useful for the more frequently seen pathologies to improve work flow and limit the expense and inefficiency of case specific MR studies. Second, it was necessary to generate sequences useful for IGS, preferably using sequences that best highlight that lesion. Currently, at our institution, all MR images used for IGS are obtained using this protocol as part of preoperative planning. The protocol that has been developed allows for thin cut precontrast and postcontrast axial cuts that can be used to plan intraoperative image guidance. It also obtains a thin cut T2 axial series that can be compiled separately for intraoperative imaging, or may be fused with computed tomographic images for combined modality. The outlined protocol obtains image sequences effective for diagnostic and operative purposes for image-guided surgery using both T1 and T2 sequences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of image quality and dose in renal colic: comparison of different spiral-CT protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimondini, A.; Mucelli, R.P.; Dalla Palma, L.; De Denaro, M.; Bregant, P.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test different technical spiral-CT parameters to obtain optimal image quality with reduced X-ray dose. Images were acquired with a spiral-CT system Philips Tomoscan AVE1, using 250 mA, 120 kV, and 1-s rotational time. Three protocols were tested: protocol A with 5-mm thickness, pitch 1.6, slice reconstruction every 2.5 mm; protocol B with 3-mm thickness, pitch 1.6, slice reconstruction every 1.5 mm; and protocol C with 3-mm thickness, pitch 2, slice reconstruction every 1.5 mm. Two phantoms were employed to evaluate the image quality. Axial images were acquired, then sagittal and coronal images were reconstructed. Finally, the absorbed X-ray dose for each protocol was measured. Regarding image quality, 5-mm-thick images (protocol A) showed greater spatial resolution and lower noise compared with 3-mm-thick images (protocols B and C) on the axial plane; 3-mm reconstructed sagittal and coronal images (protocols B and C) showed an improved image quality compared with 5-mm reformatted images (protocol A). Concerning X-ray dose, the mean dose was: protocol A 19.6±0.8 mGy; protocol B 14.4±0.6 mGy; protocol C 12.5±1.0 mGy. Our study supports the use of thin slices (3 mm) combined with pitch of 1.6 or 2 in renal colic for X-ray dose reduction to the patient and good image quality. (orig.)

  18. [Imaging center - optimization of the imaging process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, H-P

    2013-04-01

    Hospitals around the world are under increasing pressure to optimize the economic efficiency of treatment processes. Imaging is responsible for a great part of the success but also of the costs of treatment. In routine work an excessive supply of imaging methods leads to an "as well as" strategy up to the limit of the capacity without critical reflection. Exams that have no predictable influence on the clinical outcome are an unjustified burden for the patient. They are useless and threaten the financial situation and existence of the hospital. In recent years the focus of process optimization was exclusively on the quality and efficiency of performed single examinations. In the future critical discussion of the effectiveness of single exams in relation to the clinical outcome will be more important. Unnecessary exams can be avoided, only if in addition to the optimization of single exams (efficiency) there is an optimization strategy for the total imaging process (efficiency and effectiveness). This requires a new definition of processes (Imaging Pathway), new structures for organization (Imaging Center) and a new kind of thinking on the part of the medical staff. Motivation has to be changed from gratification of performed exams to gratification of process quality (medical quality, service quality, economics), including the avoidance of additional (unnecessary) exams. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Reduction of cancer risk by optimization of Computed Tomography head protocols: far eastern Cuban experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller Clemente, R.; Adame Brooks, D.; Lores Guevara, M.; Perez Diaz, M.; Arias Garlobo, M. L.; Ortega Rodriguez, O.; Nepite Haber, R.; Grinnan Hernandez, O.; Guillama Llosas, A.

    2015-01-01

    The cancer risk estimation constitutes one way for the evaluation of the public health, regarding computed tomography (CT) exposures. Starting from the hypothesis that the optimization of CT protocols would reduce significantly the added cancer risk, the purpose of this research was the application of optimization strategies regarding head CT protocols, in order to reduce the factors affecting the risk of induced cancer. The applied systemic approach included technological and human components, represented by quantitative physical factors. the volumetric kerma indexes, compared with respect to standard, optimized and reference values, were evaluated with multiple means comparison method. The added cancer risk resulted from the application of the methodology for biological effects evaluation, at low doses with low Linear Energy Transfer. Human observers in all scenarios evaluated the image quality. the reduced dose was significantly lower than for standard head protocols and reference levels, where: (1) for pediatric patients, by using an Automatic Exposure Control system, a reduction of 31% compared with standard protocol and ages range of 10-14, and (2) adults, using a Bilateral Filter for images obtained at low doses of 62% from those of standard head protocol. The risk reduction was higher than 25%. The systemic approach used allows the effective identification of factors involved on cancer risk related with exposures to CT. The combination of dose modulation and image restoration with Bilateral Filter, provide a significantly reduction of cancer risk, with acceptable diagnostic image quality. (Author)

  20. Image quality comparison between single energy and dual energy CT protocols for hepatic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Yuan; Pelc, Norbert J.; Ng, Joshua M.; Megibow, Alec J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) enables volumetric scans in a single breath hold and is clinically useful for hepatic imaging. For simple tasks, conventional single energy (SE) computed tomography (CT) images acquired at the optimal tube potential are known to have better quality than dual energy (DE) blended images. However, liver imaging is complex and often requires imaging of both structures containing iodinated contrast media, where atomic number differences are the primary contrast mechanism, and other structures, where density differences are the primary contrast mechanism. Hence it is conceivable that the broad spectrum used in a dual energy acquisition may be an advantage. In this work we are interested in comparing these two imaging strategies at equal-dose and more complex settings. Methods: We developed numerical anthropomorphic phantoms to mimic realistic clinical CT scans for medium size and large size patients. MDCT images based on the defined phantoms were simulated using various SE and DE protocols at pre- and post-contrast stages. For SE CT, images from 60 kVp through 140 with 10 kVp steps were considered; for DE CT, both 80/140 and 100/140 kVp scans were simulated and linearly blended at the optimal weights. To make a fair comparison, the mAs of each scan was adjusted to match the reference radiation dose (120 kVp, 200 mAs for medium size patients and 140 kVp, 400 mAs for large size patients). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of liver against other soft tissues was used to evaluate and compare the SE and DE protocols, and multiple pre- and post-contrasted liver-tissue pairs were used to define a composite CNR. To help validate the simulation results, we conducted a small clinical study. Eighty-five 120 kVp images and 81 blended 80/140 kVp images were collected and compared through both quantitative image quality analysis and an observer study. Results: In the simulation study, we found that the CNR of pre-contrast SE image mostly

  1. Clinical dosimetry in molecular radiotherapy: protocol optimization and clinical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Ludovic

    2011-01-01

    Molecular radiotherapy (mrt) consists in destructing tumour targets by radiolabelled vectors. This nuclear medicine specialty is being considered with increasing interest for example via the success achieved in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas by radioimmunotherapy. One of the keys of mrt optimization relies on the personalising of absorbed doses delivered to the patient: This is required to ascertain that irradiation is focused on tumour cells while keeping surrounding healthy tissue irradiation at an acceptable - non-toxic - level. Radiation dose evaluation in mrt requires in one hand, the spatial and temporal localization of injected radioactive sources by scintigraphic imaging, and on a second hand, the knowledge of the emitted radiation propagating media, given by CT imaging. Global accuracy relies on the accuracy of each of the steps that contribute to clinical dosimetry. There is no reference, standardized dosimetric protocol to date. Due to heterogeneous implementations, evaluation of the accuracy of the absorbed dose is a difficult task. In this thesis, we developed and evaluated different dosimetric approaches that allow us to find a relationship between the absorbed dose to the bone marrow and haematological toxicity. Besides, we built a scientific project, called DosiTest, which aims at evaluating the impact of the various step that contribute to the realization of a dosimetric study, by means of a virtual multicentric comparison based on Monte-Carlo modelling. (author) [fr

  2. Relationship among RR interval, optimal reconstruction phase, temporal resolution, and image quality of end-systolic reconstruction of coronary CT angiography in patients with high heart rates. In search of the optimal acquisition protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tomonari; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Kondo, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Sekine, Takako; Arai, Takehiro; Morita, Hitomi; Takase, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the relationship among RR interval (RR), the optimal reconstruction phase, and adequate temporal resolution (TR) to obtain coronary CT angiography images of acceptable quality using 64-multi detector-row CT (MDCT) (Aquilion 64) of end-systolic reconstruction in 407 patients with high heart rates. Image quality was classified into 3 groups [rank A (excellent): 161, rank B (acceptable): 207, and rank C (unacceptable): 39 patients]. The optimal absolute phase (OAP) significantly correlated with RR [OAP (ms)=119-0.286 RR (ms), r=0.832, p<0.0001], and the optimal relative phase (ORP) also significantly correlated with RR [ORP (%)=62-0.023 RR (ms), r=0.656, p<0.0001], and the correlation coefficient of OAP was significantly (p<0.0001) higher than that of ORP. The OAP range (±2 standard deviation (SD)) in which it is highly possible to get a static image was from [119-0.286 RR (ms)-46] to [119-0.286 RR (ms)+46]. The TR was significantly different among ranks A (97±22 ms), B (111±31 ms) and C (135±34 ms). The TR significantly correlated with RR in ranks A (TR=-16+0.149 RR, r=0.767, p<0.0001), B (TR=-15+0.166 RR, r=0.646, p<0.0001), and C (TR=52+0.117 RR, r=0.425, p=0.0069). Rank C was distinguished from ranks A or B by linear discriminate analysis (TR=-46+0.21 RR), and the discriminate rate was 82.6%. In conclusion, both the OAP and adequate TR depend on RR, and the OAP range (±2 SD) can be calculated using the formula [119-0.286 RR (ms)-46] to [119-0.286 RR (ms) +46], and an adequate TR value would be less than (-46+0.21 RR). (author)

  3. Cloud Optimized Image Format and Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P.; Plesea, L.; Maurer, T.

    2015-04-01

    Cloud based image storage and processing requires revaluation of formats and processing methods. For the true value of the massive volumes of earth observation data to be realized, the image data needs to be accessible from the cloud. Traditional file formats such as TIF and NITF were developed in the hay day of the desktop and assumed fast low latency file access. Other formats such as JPEG2000 provide for streaming protocols for pixel data, but still require a server to have file access. These concepts no longer truly hold in cloud based elastic storage and computation environments. This paper will provide details of a newly evolving image storage format (MRF) and compression that is optimized for cloud environments. Although the cost of storage continues to fall for large data volumes, there is still significant value in compression. For imagery data to be used in analysis and exploit the extended dynamic range of the new sensors, lossless or controlled lossy compression is of high value. Compression decreases the data volumes stored and reduces the data transferred, but the reduced data size must be balanced with the CPU required to decompress. The paper also outlines a new compression algorithm (LERC) for imagery and elevation data that optimizes this balance. Advantages of the compression include its simple to implement algorithm that enables it to be efficiently accessed using JavaScript. Combing this new cloud based image storage format and compression will help resolve some of the challenges of big image data on the internet.

  4. Optimal protocols and optimal transport in stochastic thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurell, Erik; Mejía-Monasterio, Carlos; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo

    2011-06-24

    Thermodynamics of small systems has become an important field of statistical physics. Such systems are driven out of equilibrium by a control, and the question is naturally posed how such a control can be optimized. We show that optimization problems in small system thermodynamics are solved by (deterministic) optimal transport, for which very efficient numerical methods have been developed, and of which there are applications in cosmology, fluid mechanics, logistics, and many other fields. We show, in particular, that minimizing expected heat released or work done during a nonequilibrium transition in finite time is solved by the Burgers equation and mass transport by the Burgers velocity field. Our contribution hence considerably extends the range of solvable optimization problems in small system thermodynamics.

  5. Optimizing imaging in suspected appendicitis (OPTIMAP-study: A multicenter diagnostic accuracy study of MRI in patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossuyt Patrick MM

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with clinically suspected appendicitis, imaging is needed to substantiate the clinical diagnosis. Imaging accuracy of ultrasonography (US is suboptimal, while the most accurate technique (CT is associated with cancer related deaths through exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI is a potential replacement, without associated ionizing radiation and no need for contrast medium administration. If MRI is proven to be sufficiently accurate, it could be introduced in the diagnostic pathway of patients with suspected appendicitis, increasing diagnostic accuracy and improving clinical outcomes, without the risk of radiation induced cancer or iodinated contrast medium-related drawbacks. The multicenter OPTIMAP study was designed to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in patients with suspected acute appendicitis in the general population. Methods/Design Eligible for this study are consecutive patients presenting with clinically suspected appendicitis at the emergency department in six centers. All patients will undergo imaging according to the Dutch guideline for acute appendicitis: initial ultrasonography in all and subsequent CT whenever US does not confirm acute appendicitis. Then MRI is performed in all patients, but the results are not used for patient management. A final diagnosis assigned by an expert panel, based on all available information including 3-months follow-up, except MRI findings, is used as the reference standard in estimating accuracy. We will calculate the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and inter-observer agreement of MRI, and aim to include 230 patients. Patient acceptance and total imaging costs will also be evaluated. Discussion If MRI is found to be sufficiently accurate, it could replace CT in some or all patients. This will limit or obviate the ionizing radiation exposure associated risk of cancer induction and contrast medium induced nephropathy with CT, preventing the burden and

  6. Transfer learning improves supervised image segmentation across imaging protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Ikram, M Arfan; Vernooij, Meike W; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2015-05-01

    The variation between images obtained with different scanners or different imaging protocols presents a major challenge in automatic segmentation of biomedical images. This variation especially hampers the application of otherwise successful supervised-learning techniques which, in order to perform well, often require a large amount of labeled training data that is exactly representative of the target data. We therefore propose to use transfer learning for image segmentation. Transfer-learning techniques can cope with differences in distributions between training and target data, and therefore may improve performance over supervised learning for segmentation across scanners and scan protocols. We present four transfer classifiers that can train a classification scheme with only a small amount of representative training data, in addition to a larger amount of other training data with slightly different characteristics. The performance of the four transfer classifiers was compared to that of standard supervised classification on two magnetic resonance imaging brain-segmentation tasks with multi-site data: white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid segmentation; and white-matter-/MS-lesion segmentation. The experiments showed that when there is only a small amount of representative training data available, transfer learning can greatly outperform common supervised-learning approaches, minimizing classification errors by up to 60%.

  7. Transfer learning improves supervised image segmentation across imaging protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Ikram, M. Arfan; Vernooij, Meike W.

    2015-01-01

    with slightly different characteristics. The performance of the four transfer classifiers was compared to that of standard supervised classification on two MRI brain-segmentation tasks with multi-site data: white matter, gray matter, and CSF segmentation; and white-matter- /MS-lesion segmentation......The variation between images obtained with different scanners or different imaging protocols presents a major challenge in automatic segmentation of biomedical images. This variation especially hampers the application of otherwise successful supervised-learning techniques which, in order to perform...... well, often require a large amount of labeled training data that is exactly representative of the target data. We therefore propose to use transfer learning for image segmentation. Transfer-learning techniques can cope with differences in distributions between training and target data, and therefore...

  8. Protocol optimization for in vitro mass propagation of two sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-19

    Mar 19, 2014 ... The present study was initiated to optimize in vitro protocol for mass propagation of two commercial sugarcane clones (Co 449 and Co .... mass propagation of sugarcane genotypes grown in. Ethiopia, and due to this the .... transferred cultures showed multiple shooting with an average of 9.10 ± 0.10 shoots ...

  9. Protocol optimization for in vitro shoot multiplication of Jackfruit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jemal

    2017-01-11

    Jan 11, 2017 ... Protocol optimization for in vitro shoot multiplication of ... shoot length and leaf number, whereby 2 mg/L BAP alone was found to be the best with a mean shoot .... Analysis of variance showed that the interaction between.

  10. Hepatobiliary transit times of gadoxetate disodium (Primovist) for protocol optimization of comprehensive MR imaging of the biliary system-What is normal?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringe, Kristina I., E-mail: ringe.kristina@mh-hannover.de [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiology, Carl-Neuberg Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Husarik, Daniela B., E-mail: danielahusarik@yahoo.com [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Gupta, Rajan T., E-mail: rajan.gupta@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Boll, Daniel T., E-mail: daniel.boll@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Merkle, Elmar M., E-mail: elmar.merkle@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Box 3808, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine transit times for excretion of Gd-EOB-DTPA into different segments of the hepatobiliary system in patients with normal liver function. Methods: This retrospective study was IRB approved with a waiver of consent granted. 61 patients (39 female, 22 male, mean age 52.5 years) with normal liver and renal function who underwent contrast enhanced hepatic MRI after injection of 10 mLGd-EOB-DTPA at 1.5 T and 3 T were included. Two readers evaluated all delayed images (3-20 min post contrast) for the presence of contrast agent in the intrahepatic bile ducts (IBD), the common bile duct (CBD), the gallbladder and the duodenum. A two-tailed, unpaired Student's t-test with p < 0.05 deemed significant was used to determine whether transit times were affected by patient gender, age or body mass index. Results: 20 min after contrast initiation, Gd-EOB-DTPA could be detected in the IBD and the CBD in all patients (100%); gallbladder reflux was visible in 53 (86.9%), duodenal excretion in 40 patients (65.5%), respectively. Mean transit times for contrast appearance in the various segments were as follows: IBD 12 min 13 s; CBD 12 min 27 s; gallbladder 13 min 32 s. Transit times were not significantly affected by patient gender, age or BMI. Conclusion: Within 20 min post contrast initiation, Gd-EOB-DTPA can be expected in the IBD and the CBD in patients with normal liver function. However, functional information about the sphincter Oddi complex can be ascertained only in about two thirds of these patients within this timeframe.

  11. Optimal protocols for Hamiltonian and Schrödinger dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmiedl, Tim; Dieterich, Eckhard; Dieterich, Peter-Simon; Seifert, Udo

    2009-01-01

    For systems in an externally controllable time dependent potential, the optimal protocol minimizes the mean work spent in a finite time transition between given initial and final values of a control parameter. For an initially thermalized ensemble, we consider both Hamiltonian evolution for classical systems and Schrödinger evolution for quantum systems. In both cases, we show that for harmonic potentials, the optimal work is given by the adiabatic work even in the limit of short transition times. This result is counter-intuitive because the adiabatic work is substantially smaller than the work for an instantaneous jump. We also perform numerical calculations for the optimal protocol for Hamiltonian dynamics in an anharmonic quartic potential. For a two-level spin system, we give examples where the adiabatic work can be reached in either a finite or an arbitrarily short transition time depending on the allowed parameter space

  12. Optimizing the high-resolution manometry (HRM) study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A; Ding, A; Mirza, F; Gyawali, C P

    2015-02-01

    Intolerance of the esophageal manometry catheter may prolong high-resolution manometry (HRM) studies and increase patient distress. We assessed the impact of obtaining the landmark phase at the end of the study when the patient has acclimatized to the HRM catheter. 366 patients (mean age 55.4 ± 0.8 years, 62.0% female) undergoing esophageal HRM over a 1-year period were studied. The standard protocol consisted of the landmark phase, 10 5 mL water swallows 20-30 s apart, and multiple rapid swallows where 4-6 2 mL swallows were administered in rapid succession. The modified protocol consisted of the landmark phase at the end of the study after test swallows. Study duration, technical characteristics, indications, and motor findings were compared between standard and modified protocols. Of the 366 patients, 89.6% underwent the standard protocol (study duration 12.9 ± 0.3 min). In 10.4% with poor catheter tolerance undergoing the modified protocol, study duration was significantly longer (15.6 ± 1.0 min, p = 0.004) despite similar duration of study maneuvers. Only elevated upper esophageal sphincter basal pressures at the beginning of the study segregated modified protocol patients. The 95th percentile time to landmark phase in the standard protocol patients was 6.1 min; as many as 31.4% of modified protocol patients could not obtain their first study maneuver within this period (p = 0.0003). Interpretation was not impacted by shifting the landmark phase to the end of the study. Modification of the HRM study protocol with the landmark phase obtained at the end of the study optimizes study duration without compromising quality. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. MR imaging diagnostic protocol for unilocular lesions of the jaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironobu Konouchi

    2012-08-01

    Using our MR imaging diagnostic protocol to diagnose 31 cases, we obtained a positivity rate of 71.0%. The use of our MR imaging diagnostic protocol for unilocular lesions, which are especially difficult to differentiate by radiography, would improve the morphological and qualitative diagnosis of soft tissue lesions.

  14. RFID protocol design, optimization, and security for the Internet of Things

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Alex X; Liu, Xiulong; Li, Keqiu

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the topic of RFID protocol design and optimization and the authors aim to demystify complicated RFID protocols and explain in depth the principles, techniques, and practices in designing and optimizing them.

  15. Image registration via optimization over disjoint image regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Todd; Hathaway, Simon; Karelitz, David B.; Sandusky, John; Laine, Mark Richard

    2018-02-06

    Technologies pertaining to registering a target image with a base image are described. In a general embodiment, the base image is selected from a set of images, and the target image is an image in the set of images that is to be registered to the base image. A set of disjoint regions of the target image is selected, and a transform to be applied to the target image is computed based on the optimization of a metric over the selected set of disjoint regions. The transform is applied to the target image so as to register the target image with the base image.

  16. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80 each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. • Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection provides appropriate scan protocols. • Abdominal CT is feasible using spectral imaging and 300 mgI/kg contrast agent. • 50-keV monochromatic images with 50 % ASIR provide optimal image quality.

  17. Quality and dose optimized CT trauma protocol. Recommendation from a university level-I trauma center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Johannes; Boening, Georg; Rotzinger, Roman; Freyhardt, Patrick; Streitparth, Florian [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kaul, David [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schwabe, Philipp [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Trauma Surgery; Maurer, Martin H. [Inselspital Bern (Switzerland). Dept. of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology; Renz, Diane Miriam [Univ. Hospital Jena (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-09-15

    As a supra-regional level-I trauma center, we evaluated computed tomography (CT) acquisitions of polytraumatized patients for quality and dose optimization purposes. Adapted statistical iterative reconstruction [(AS)IR] levels, tube voltage reduction as well as a split-bolus contrast agent (CA) protocol were applied. Materials and Methods 61 patients were split into 3 different groups that differed with respect to tube voltage (120 - 140 kVp) and level of applied ASIR reconstruction (ASIR 20 - 50%). The CT protocol included a native acquisition of the head followed by a single contrast-enhanced acquisition of the whole body (64-MSCT). CA (350 mg/ml iodine) was administered as a split bolus injection of 100 ml (2 ml/s), 20 ml NaCl (1 ml/s), 60 ml (4 ml/s), 40 ml NaCl (4 ml/s) with a scan delay of 85s to detect injuries of both the arterial system and parenchymal organs in a single acquisition. Both the quantitative (SNR/CNR) and qualitative (5-point Likert scale) image quality was evaluated in parenchymal organs that are often injured in trauma patients. Radiation exposure was assessed. The use of IR combined with a reduction of tube voltage resulted in good qualitative and quantitative image quality and a significant reduction in radiation exposure of more than 40% (DLP 1087 vs. 647 mGy x cm). Image quality could be improved due to a dedicated protocol that included different levels of IR adapted to different slice thicknesses, kernels and the examined area for the evaluation of head, lung, body and bone injury patterns. In synopsis of our results, we recommend the implementation of a polytrauma protocol with a tube voltage of 120 kVp and the following IR levels: cCT 5mm: ASIR 20; cCT 0.625 mm: ASIR 40; lung 2.5 mm: ASIR 30, body 5 mm: ASIR 40; body 1.25 mm: ASIR 50; body 0.625 mm: ASIR 0. A dedicated adaptation of the CT trauma protocol (level of reduction of tube voltage and of IR) according to the examined body region (head, lung, body, bone) combined with a

  18. Quality and dose optimized CT trauma protocol. Recommendation from a university level-I trauma center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, Johannes; Boening, Georg; Rotzinger, Roman; Freyhardt, Patrick; Streitparth, Florian; Kaul, David; Schwabe, Philipp; Maurer, Martin H.; Renz, Diane Miriam

    2017-01-01

    As a supra-regional level-I trauma center, we evaluated computed tomography (CT) acquisitions of polytraumatized patients for quality and dose optimization purposes. Adapted statistical iterative reconstruction [(AS)IR] levels, tube voltage reduction as well as a split-bolus contrast agent (CA) protocol were applied. Materials and Methods 61 patients were split into 3 different groups that differed with respect to tube voltage (120 - 140 kVp) and level of applied ASIR reconstruction (ASIR 20 - 50%). The CT protocol included a native acquisition of the head followed by a single contrast-enhanced acquisition of the whole body (64-MSCT). CA (350 mg/ml iodine) was administered as a split bolus injection of 100 ml (2 ml/s), 20 ml NaCl (1 ml/s), 60 ml (4 ml/s), 40 ml NaCl (4 ml/s) with a scan delay of 85s to detect injuries of both the arterial system and parenchymal organs in a single acquisition. Both the quantitative (SNR/CNR) and qualitative (5-point Likert scale) image quality was evaluated in parenchymal organs that are often injured in trauma patients. Radiation exposure was assessed. The use of IR combined with a reduction of tube voltage resulted in good qualitative and quantitative image quality and a significant reduction in radiation exposure of more than 40% (DLP 1087 vs. 647 mGy x cm). Image quality could be improved due to a dedicated protocol that included different levels of IR adapted to different slice thicknesses, kernels and the examined area for the evaluation of head, lung, body and bone injury patterns. In synopsis of our results, we recommend the implementation of a polytrauma protocol with a tube voltage of 120 kVp and the following IR levels: cCT 5mm: ASIR 20; cCT 0.625 mm: ASIR 40; lung 2.5 mm: ASIR 30, body 5 mm: ASIR 40; body 1.25 mm: ASIR 50; body 0.625 mm: ASIR 0. A dedicated adaptation of the CT trauma protocol (level of reduction of tube voltage and of IR) according to the examined body region (head, lung, body, bone) combined with a

  19. Optimal protocol for teleconsultation with a cellular phone for dentoalveolar trauma: an in-vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won Se; Lee, Hae Na; Jeong, Jin Sun; Kwon, Jung Hoon; Lee, Grace H; Kim, Kee Dong

    2012-01-01

    Dental trauma is frequently unpredictable. The initial assessment and urgent treatment are essential for dentists to save the patient's teeth. Mobile-phone-assisted teleconsultation and telediagnosis for dental trauma could be an aid when a dentist is not available. In the present in-vitro study, we evaluated the success rate and time to transfer images under various conditions. We analyzed the image quality of cameras built into mobile phones based on their resolution, autofocus, white-balance, and anti-movement functions. The image quality of most built-in cameras was acceptable to perform the initial assessment, with the autofocus function being essential to obtain high-quality images. The transmission failure rate increased markedly when the image size exceeded 500 kB and the additional text messaging did not improve the success rate or the transmission time. Our optimal protocol could be useful for emergency programs running on the mobile phones.

  20. Optimal protocol for teleconsultation with a cellular phone for dentoalveolar trauma: an in-vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Se; Lee, Hae Na; Jeong, Jin Sun; Kwon, Jung Hoon; Lee, Grace H; Kim, Kee Dong [College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Dental trauma is frequently unpredictable. The initial assessment and urgent treatment are essential for dentists to save the patient's teeth. Mobile-phone-assisted teleconsultation and telediagnosis for dental trauma could be an aid when a dentist is not available. In the present in-vitro study, we evaluated the success rate and time to transfer images under various conditions. We analyzed the image quality of cameras built into mobile phones based on their resolution, autofocus, white-balance, and anti-movement functions. The image quality of most built-in cameras was acceptable to perform the initial assessment, with the autofocus function being essential to obtain high-quality images. The transmission failure rate increased markedly when the image size exceeded 500 kB and the additional text messaging did not improve the success rate or the transmission time. Our optimal protocol could be useful for emergency programs running on the mobile phones.

  1. Optimal linear detectors for nonorthogonal amplify-and-forward protocol

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Qasim Zeeshan; Park, Kihong; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Aissa, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose optimal linear detectors for non-orthogonal amplify-and-forward cooperative protocol when considering a single-relay scenario. Two types of detectors are proposed based on the principles of minimum mean square error (MMSE) and minimum bit error rate (MBER). The MMSE detector minimizes the mean square error, while the MBER minimizes the system bit error rate (BER). Both detectors exhibit excellent BER performance with relatively low complexity as compared to the maximal likelihood (ML) detector. The BER performance of both detectors is superior to the channel inversion, the maximal ratio combining, and the biased ML detectors. © 2013 IEEE.

  2. Optimal linear detectors for nonorthogonal amplify-and-forward protocol

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Qasim Zeeshan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose optimal linear detectors for non-orthogonal amplify-and-forward cooperative protocol when considering a single-relay scenario. Two types of detectors are proposed based on the principles of minimum mean square error (MMSE) and minimum bit error rate (MBER). The MMSE detector minimizes the mean square error, while the MBER minimizes the system bit error rate (BER). Both detectors exhibit excellent BER performance with relatively low complexity as compared to the maximal likelihood (ML) detector. The BER performance of both detectors is superior to the channel inversion, the maximal ratio combining, and the biased ML detectors. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols for examination of the neurocranium at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, W; Kugel, H; Bachmann, R; Kloska, S; Allkemper, T; Maintz, D; Pfleiderer, B; Tombach, B; Heindel, W

    2003-09-01

    The increasing availability of high-field (3 T) MR scanners requires adapting and optimizing clinical imaging protocols to exploit the theoretically higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the higher field strength. Our aim was to establish reliable and stable protocols meeting the clinical demands for imaging the neurocranium at 3 T. Two hundred patients with a broad range of indications received an examination of the neurocranium with an appropriate assortment of imaging techniques at 3 T. Several imaging parameters were optimized. Keeping scan times comparable to those at 1.5 T we increased spatial resolution. Contrast-enhanced and non-enhanced T1-weighted imaging was best applying gradient-echo and inversion recovery (rather than spin-echo) techniques, respectively. For fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging a TE of 120 ms yielded optimum contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). High-resolution isotropic 3D data sets were acquired within reasonable scan times. Some artifacts were pronounced, but generally imaging profited from the higher SNR. We present a set of optimized examination protocols for neuroimaging at 3 T, which proved to be reliable in a clinical routine setting.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols for examination of the neurocranium at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwindt, W.; Kugel, H.; Bachmann, R.; Kloska, S.; Allkemper, T.; Maintz, D.; Pfleiderer, B.; Tombach, B.; Heindel, W. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Muenster, Albert-Schweitzer-Strasse 33, 48129, Muenster (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    The increasing availability of high-field (3 T) MR scanners requires adapting and optimizing clinical imaging protocols to exploit the theoretically higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the higher field strength. Our aim was to establish reliable and stable protocols meeting the clinical demands for imaging the neurocranium at 3 T. Two hundred patients with a broad range of indications received an examination of the neurocranium with an appropriate assortment of imaging techniques at 3 T. Several imaging parameters were optimized. Keeping scan times comparable to those at 1.5 T we increased spatial resolution. Contrast-enhanced and non-enhanced T1-weighted imaging was best applying gradient-echo and inversion recovery (rather than spin-echo) techniques, respectively. For fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging a TE of 120 ms yielded optimum contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). High-resolution isotropic 3D data sets were acquired within reasonable scan times. Some artifacts were pronounced, but generally imaging profited from the higher SNR. We present a set of optimized examination protocols for neuroimaging at 3 T, which proved to be reliable in a clinical routine setting. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols for examination of the neurocranium at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwindt, W.; Kugel, H.; Bachmann, R.; Kloska, S.; Allkemper, T.; Maintz, D.; Pfleiderer, B.; Tombach, B.; Heindel, W.

    2003-01-01

    The increasing availability of high-field (3 T) MR scanners requires adapting and optimizing clinical imaging protocols to exploit the theoretically higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the higher field strength. Our aim was to establish reliable and stable protocols meeting the clinical demands for imaging the neurocranium at 3 T. Two hundred patients with a broad range of indications received an examination of the neurocranium with an appropriate assortment of imaging techniques at 3 T. Several imaging parameters were optimized. Keeping scan times comparable to those at 1.5 T we increased spatial resolution. Contrast-enhanced and non-enhanced T1-weighted imaging was best applying gradient-echo and inversion recovery (rather than spin-echo) techniques, respectively. For fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging a TE of 120 ms yielded optimum contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). High-resolution isotropic 3D data sets were acquired within reasonable scan times. Some artifacts were pronounced, but generally imaging profited from the higher SNR. We present a set of optimized examination protocols for neuroimaging at 3 T, which proved to be reliable in a clinical routine setting. (orig.)

  6. Optimal Scanning Protocols for Dual-Energy CT Angiography in Peripheral Arterial Stents: An in Vitro Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Almutairi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the optimal dual-energy computed tomography (DECT scanning protocol for peripheral arterial stents while achieving a low radiation dose, while still maintaining diagnostic image quality, as determined by an in vitro phantom study. Methods: Dual-energy scans in monochromatic spectral imaging mode were performed on a peripheral arterial phantom with use of three gemstone spectral imaging (GSI protocols, three pitch values, and four kiloelectron volts (keV ranges. A total of 15 stents of different sizes, materials, and designs were deployed in the phantom. Image noise, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, different levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR, and the four levels of monochromatic energy for DECT imaging of peripheral arterial stents were measured and compared to determine the optimal protocols. Results: A total of 36 scans with 180 datasets were reconstructed from a combination of different protocols. There was a significant reduction of image noise with a higher SNR from monochromatic energy images between 65 and 70 keV in all investigated preset GSI protocols (p < 0.05. In addition, significant effects were found from the main effect analysis for these factors: GSI, pitch, and keV (p = 0.001. In contrast, there was significant interaction on the unstented area between GSI and ASIR (p = 0.015 and a very high significant difference between keV and ASIR (p < 0.001. A radiation dose reduction of 50% was achieved. Conclusions: The optimal scanning protocol and energy level in the phantom study were GSI-48, pitch value 0.984, and 65 keV, which resulted in lower image noise and a lower radiation dose, but with acceptable diagnostic images.

  7. Investigation of optimal scanning protocol for X-ray computed tomography polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellakumar, P. [Bangalore Institute of Oncology, 44-45/2, II Cross, RRMR Extension, Bangalore 560 027 (India)], E-mail: psellakumar@rediffmail.com; James Jebaseelan Samuel, E. [School of Science and Humanities, VIT University, Vellore 632 014 (India); Supe, Sanjay S. [Department of Radiation Physics, Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, Hosur Road, Bangalore 560 027 (India)

    2007-11-15

    X-ray computed tomography is one of the potential tool used to evaluate the polymer gel dosimeters in three dimensions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors which affect the image noise for X-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry. A cylindrical water filled phantom was imaged with single slice Siemens Somatom Emotion CT scanner. The imaging parameters like tube voltage, tube current, slice scan time, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm were varied independently to study the dependence of noise on each other. Reductions of noise with number of images to be averaged and spatial uniformity of the image were also investigated. Normoxic polymer gel PAGAT was manufactured and irradiated using Siemens Primus linear accelerator. The radiation induced change in CT number was evaluated using X-ray CT scanner. From this study it is clear that image noise is reduced with increase in tube voltage, tube current, slice scan time, slice thickness and also reduced with increasing the number of images averaged. However to reduce the tube load and total scan time, it was concluded that tube voltage of 130 kV, tube current of 200 mA, scan time of 1.5 s, slice thickness of 3 mm for high dose gradient and 5 mm for low dose gradient were optimal scanning protocols for this scanner. Optimum number of images to be averaged was concluded to be 25 for X-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry. Choice of reconstruction algorithm was also critical. From the study it is also clear that CT number increase with imaging tube voltage and shows the energy dependency of polymer gel dosimeter. Hence for evaluation of polymer gel dosimeters with X-ray CT scanner needs the optimization of scanning protocols to reduce the image noise.

  8. Optimization of MR imaging for extracranial head and neck lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalley, R.W.; Maravilla, K.R.; Cohen, W.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have used a 1.5T MR imager to study 28 pathologically proven extracranial head and neck lesions. Multiple pulse sequences were performed pre-and/or post-gadolinium, including T1-weighted, short TI inversion-recovery (STIR), spin-density, and T2-weighted sequences. T1-weighted images provided excellent anatomic detail but relatively poor muscle/lesion contrast. Gadolinium often improved lesion visibility; however, discrimination from surrounding fat was impaired. Postcontrast T2-weighted images seemed to provide better lesion conspicuity than did pre-gadolinium images. STIR imaging provided the highest lesion conspicuity in fatty areas. No single sequence was optimal for all head and neck imaging. The authors analyze the advantages and limitations of each sequence and formulate rational imaging protocols based on the primary region of interest

  9. CT radiation dose and image quality optimization using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarb, Francis; McEntee, Mark F; Rainford, Louise

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate potential radiation dose savings and resultant image quality effects with regard to optimization of commonly performed computed tomography (CT) studies derived from imaging a porcine (pig) model. Imaging protocols for 4 clinical CT suites were developed based on the lowest milliamperage and kilovoltage, the highest pitch that could be set from current imaging protocol parameters, or both. This occurred before significant changes in noise, contrast, and spatial resolution were measured objectively on images produced from a quality assurance CT phantom. The current and derived phantom protocols were then applied to scan a porcine model for head, abdomen, and chest CT studies. Further optimized protocols were developed based on the same methodology as in the phantom study. The optimization achieved with respect to radiation dose and image quality was evaluated following data collection of radiation dose recordings and image quality review. Relative visual grading analysis of image quality criteria adapted from the European guidelines on radiology quality criteria for CT were used for studies completed with both the phantom-based or porcine-derived imaging protocols. In 5 out of 16 experimental combinations, the current clinical protocol was maintained. In 2 instances, the phantom protocol reduced radiation dose by 19% to 38%. In the remaining 9 instances, the optimization based on the porcine model further reduced radiation dose by 17% to 38%. The porcine model closely reflects anatomical structures in humans, allowing the grading of anatomical criteria as part of image quality review without radiation risks to human subjects. This study demonstrates that using a porcine model to evaluate CT optimization resulted in more radiation dose reduction than when imaging protocols were tested solely on quality assurance phantoms.

  10. Optimizing color reproduction of natural images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yendrikhovskij, S.N.; Blommaert, F.J.J.; Ridder, de H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper elaborates on understanding, measuring and optimizing perceived color quality of natural images. We introduce a model for optimal color reproduction of natural scenes which is based on the assumption that color quality of natural images is constrained by perceived naturalness and

  11. Optimization of a protocol for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy by using an anthropomorphic phantom*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Susie Medeiros Oliveira; Glavam, Adriana Pereira; Kubo, Tadeu Takao Almodovar; de Sá, Lidia Vasconcellos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a study aiming at optimizing myocardial perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods Imaging of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a GE SPECT Ventri gamma camera, with varied activities and acquisition times, in order to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the quality of the reconstructed medical images. The 99mTc-sestamibi radiotracer was utilized, and then the images were clinically evaluated on the basis of data such as summed stress score, and on the technical image quality and perfusion. The software ImageJ was utilized in the data quantification. Results The results demonstrated that for the standard acquisition time utilized in the procedure (15 seconds per angle), the injected activity could be reduced by 33.34%. Additionally, even if the standard scan time is reduced by 53.34% (7 seconds per angle), the standard injected activity could still be reduced by 16.67%, without impairing the image quality and the diagnostic reliability. Conclusion The described method and respective results provide a basis for the development of a clinical trial of patients in an optimized protocol. PMID:25741088

  12. Optimization of a protocol for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy by using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Susie Medeiros Oliveira; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de, E-mail: susie@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Glavam, Adriana Pereira; Kubo, Tadeu Takao Almodovar [Clinica de Diagnostico Por Imagem (CDPI/DASA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: to develop a study aiming at optimizing myocardial perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods: imaging of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a GE SPECT Ventri gamma camera, with varied activities and acquisition times, in order to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the quality of the reconstructed medical images. The {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi radiotracer was utilized, and then the images were clinically evaluated on the basis of data such as summed stress score, and on the technical image quality and perfusion. The software ImageJ was utilized in the data quantification. Results: the results demonstrated that for the standard acquisition time utilized in the procedure (15 seconds per angle), the injected activity could be reduced by 33.34%. Additionally, even if the standard scan time is reduced by 53.34% (7 seconds per angle), the standard injected activity could still be reduced by 16.67%, without impairing the image quality and the diagnostic reliability. Conclusion: the described method and respective results provide a basis for the development of a clinical trial of patients in an optimized protocol. (author)

  13. Analytical approach to cross-layer protocol optimization in wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortos, William S.

    2008-04-01

    In the distributed operations of route discovery and maintenance, strong interaction occurs across mobile ad hoc network (MANET) protocol layers. Quality of service (QoS) requirements of multimedia service classes must be satisfied by the cross-layer protocol, along with minimization of the distributed power consumption at nodes and along routes to battery-limited energy constraints. In previous work by the author, cross-layer interactions in the MANET protocol are modeled in terms of a set of concatenated design parameters and associated resource levels by multivariate point processes (MVPPs). Determination of the "best" cross-layer design is carried out using the optimal control of martingale representations of the MVPPs. In contrast to the competitive interaction among nodes in a MANET for multimedia services using limited resources, the interaction among the nodes of a wireless sensor network (WSN) is distributed and collaborative, based on the processing of data from a variety of sensors at nodes to satisfy common mission objectives. Sensor data originates at the nodes at the periphery of the WSN, is successively transported to other nodes for aggregation based on information-theoretic measures of correlation and ultimately sent as information to one or more destination (decision) nodes. The "multimedia services" in the MANET model are replaced by multiple types of sensors, e.g., audio, seismic, imaging, thermal, etc., at the nodes; the QoS metrics associated with MANETs become those associated with the quality of fused information flow, i.e., throughput, delay, packet error rate, data correlation, etc. Significantly, the essential analytical approach to MANET cross-layer optimization, now based on the MVPPs for discrete random events occurring in the WSN, can be applied to develop the stochastic characteristics and optimality conditions for cross-layer designs of sensor network protocols. Functional dependencies of WSN performance metrics are described in

  14. Optimization of Synthetic Aperture Image Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture (SA) imaging produces high-quality images and velocity estimates of both slow and fast flow at high frame rates. However, grating lobe artifacts can appear both in transmission and reception. These affect the image quality and the frame rate. Therefore optimization of parameter...

  15. iTOUGH2 Universal Optimization Using the PEST Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finsterle, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    , the PEST protocol [Doherty, 2007] has been implemented into iTOUGH2. This protocol enables communication between the application (which can be a single 'black-box' executable or a script or batch file that calls multiple codes) and iTOUGH2. The concept requires that for the application model: (1) Input is provided on one or more ASCII text input files; (2) Output is returned to one or more ASCII text output files; (3) The model is run using a system command (executable or script/batch file); and (4) The model runs to completion without any user intervention. For each forward run invoked by iTOUGH2, select parameters cited within the application model input files are then overwritten with values provided by iTOUGH2, and select variables cited within the output files are extracted and returned to iTOUGH2. It should be noted that the core of iTOUGH2, i.e., its optimization routines and related analysis tools, remains unchanged; it is only the communication format between input parameters, the application model, and output variables that are borrowed from PEST. The interface routines have been provided by Doherty [2007]. The iTOUGH2-PEST architecture is shown in Figure 1. This manual contains installation instructions for the iTOUGH2-PEST module, and describes the PEST protocol as well as the input formats needed in iTOUGH2. Examples are provided that demonstrate the use of model-independent optimization and analysis using iTOUGH2.

  16. Quality and Dose Optimized CT Trauma Protocol - Recommendation from a University Level-I Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Johannes; Kaul, David; Böning, Georg; Rotzinger, Roman; Freyhardt, Patrick; Schwabe, Philipp; Maurer, Martin H; Renz, Diane Miriam; Streitparth, Florian

    2017-09-01

    Purpose  As a supra-regional level-I trauma center, we evaluated computed tomography (CT) acquisitions of polytraumatized patients for quality and dose optimization purposes. Adapted statistical iterative reconstruction [(AS)IR] levels, tube voltage reduction as well as a split-bolus contrast agent (CA) protocol were applied. Materials and Methods  61 patients were split into 3 different groups that differed with respect to tube voltage (120 - 140 kVp) and level of applied ASIR reconstruction (ASIR 20 - 50 %). The CT protocol included a native acquisition of the head followed by a single contrast-enhanced acquisition of the whole body (64-MSCT). CA (350 mg/ml iodine) was administered as a split bolus injection of 100 ml (2 ml/s), 20 ml NaCl (1 ml/s), 60 ml (4 ml/s), 40 ml NaCl (4 ml/s) with a scan delay of 85 s to detect injuries of both the arterial system and parenchymal organs in a single acquisition. Both the quantitative (SNR/CNR) and qualitative (5-point Likert scale) image quality was evaluated in parenchymal organs that are often injured in trauma patients. Radiation exposure was assessed. Results  The use of IR combined with a reduction of tube voltage resulted in good qualitative and quantitative image quality and a significant reduction in radiation exposure of more than 40 % (DLP 1087 vs. 647 mGyxcm). Image quality could be improved due to a dedicated protocol that included different levels of IR adapted to different slice thicknesses, kernels and the examined area for the evaluation of head, lung, body and bone injury patterns. In synopsis of our results, we recommend the implementation of a polytrauma protocol with a tube voltage of 120 kVp and the following IR levels: cCT 5mm: ASIR 20; cCT 0.625 mm: ASIR 40; lung 2.5 mm: ASIR 30, body 5 mm: ASIR 40; body 1.25 mm: ASIR 50; body 0.625 mm: ASIR 0. Conclusion  A dedicated adaptation of the CT trauma protocol (level of reduction of tube voltage and of IR

  17. Dispersion of Nanomaterials in Aqueous Media: Towards Protocol Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Inder; Ellis, Laura-Jayne; Romer, Isabella; Tantra, Ratna; Carriere, Marie; Allard, Soline; Mayne-L'Hermite, Martine; Minelli, Caterina; Unger, Wolfgang; Potthoff, Annegret; Rades, Steffi; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2017-12-25

    The sonication process is commonly used for de-agglomerating and dispersing nanomaterials in aqueous based media, necessary to improve homogeneity and stability of the suspension. In this study, a systematic step-wise approach is carried out to identify optimal sonication conditions in order to achieve a stable dispersion. This approach has been adopted and shown to be suitable for several nanomaterials (cerium oxide, zinc oxide, and carbon nanotubes) dispersed in deionized (DI) water. However, with any change in either the nanomaterial type or dispersing medium, there needs to be optimization of the basic protocol by adjusting various factors such as sonication time, power, and sonicator type as well as temperature rise during the process. The approach records the dispersion process in detail. This is necessary to identify the time points as well as other above-mentioned conditions during the sonication process in which there may be undesirable changes, such as damage to the particle surface thus affecting surface properties. Our goal is to offer a harmonized approach that can control the quality of the final, produced dispersion. Such a guideline is instrumental in ensuring dispersion quality repeatability in the nanoscience community, particularly in the field of nanotoxicology.

  18. Evaluation of a new system for chest tomosynthesis: aspects of image quality of different protocols determined using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, A; Aspelin, P; Båth, M; Nyrén, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the image quality obtained with the different protocols in a new chest digital tomosynthesis (DTS) system. Methods: A chest phantom was imaged with chest X-ray equipment with DTS. 10 protocols were used, and for each protocol, nine acquisitions were performed. Four observers visually rated the quality of the reconstructed section images according to pre-defined quality criteria in four different classes. The data were analysed with visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis, using the vendor-recommended protocol [12-s acquisition time, source-to-image distance (SID) 180 cm] as reference, and the area under the VGC curve (AUCVGC) was determined for each protocol and class of criteria. Results: Protocols with a smaller swing angle resulted in a lower image quality for the classes of criteria “disturbance” and “homogeneity in nodule” but a higher image quality for the class “structure”. The class “demarcation” showed little dependency on the swing angle. All protocols but one (6.3 s, SID 130 cm) obtained an AUCVGC significantly <0.5 (indicating lower quality than reference) for at least one class of criteria. Conclusion: The study indicates that the DTS protocol with 6.3 s yields image quality similar to that obtained with the vendor-recommended protocol (12 s) but with the clinically important advantage for patients with respiratory impairment of a shorter acquisition time. Advances in knowledge: The study demonstrates that the image quality may be strongly affected by the choice of protocol and that the vendor-recommended protocol may not be optimal. PMID:26118300

  19. Optimized UAV Communication Protocol Based on Prior Locations

    OpenAIRE

    Sboui, Lokman; Rabah, Abdullatif

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we adopt a new communication protocol between the UAV and fixed on-ground nodes. This protocol tends to reduce communication power consumption by stopping communication if the channel is not good to communicate (i.e. far nodes, obstacles, etc.) The communication is performed using the XBee 868M standard and Libelium wapsmotes. Our designed protocol is based on a new communication model that we propose in this paper. The protocole decides wether to communicate or not after compu...

  20. An Optimal Non-Interactive Message Authentication Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Pasini, Sylvain; Vaudenay, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Vaudenay recently proposed a message authentication protocol which is interactive and based on short authenticated strings (SAS). We study here SAS-based non-interactive message authentication protocols (NIMAP). We start by the analysis of two popular non-interactive message authentication protocols. The first one is based on a collision-resistant hash function and was presented by Balfanz et al. The second protocol is based on a universal hash function family and was proposed by Gehrmann, Mi...

  1. Imaging techniques and investigation protocols in pediatric emergency imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharitzer, M.; Hoermann, M.; Puig, S.; Prokop, M.

    2002-01-01

    Paediatric emergencies demand a quick and efficient radiological investigation with special attention to specific adjustments related to patient age and radiation protection. Imaging modalities are improving rapidly and enable to diagnose childhood diseases and injuries more quickly, accurately and safely. This article provides an overview of imaging techniques adjusted to the age of the child and an overview of imaging strategies of common paediatric emergencies. Optimising the imaging parameters (digital radiography, different screen-film systems, exposure specifications) allows for substantial reduction of radiation dose. Spiral- and multislice-CT reduce scan time and enable a considerable reduction of radiation exposure if scanning parameters (pitch setting, tube current) are properly adjusted. MRI is still mainly used for neurological or spinal emergencies despite the advent of fast imaging sequences. The radiologist's task is to select an appropriate imaging strategy according to expected differential diagnosis and to adjust the imaging techniques to the individual patient. (orig.) [de

  2. Use of a channelized Hotelling observer to assess CT image quality and optimize dose reduction for iteratively reconstructed images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher P; Ferrero, Andrea; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McMillan, Kyle L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2017-07-01

    The use of iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms in CT generally decreases image noise and enables dose reduction. However, the amount of dose reduction possible using IR without sacrificing diagnostic performance is difficult to assess with conventional image quality metrics. Through this investigation, achievable dose reduction using a commercially available IR algorithm without loss of low contrast spatial resolution was determined with a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) model and used to optimize a clinical abdomen/pelvis exam protocol. A phantom containing 21 low contrast disks-three different contrast levels and seven different diameters-was imaged at different dose levels. Images were created with filtered backprojection (FBP) and IR. The CHO was tasked with detecting the low contrast disks. CHO performance indicated dose could be reduced by 22% to 25% without compromising low contrast detectability (as compared to full-dose FBP images) whereas 50% or more dose reduction significantly reduced detection performance. Importantly, default settings for the scanner and protocol investigated reduced dose by upward of 75%. Subsequently, CHO-based protocol changes to the default protocol yielded images of higher quality and doses more consistent with values from a larger, dose-optimized scanner fleet. CHO assessment provided objective data to successfully optimize a clinical CT acquisition protocol.

  3. TH-E-209-02: Dose Monitoring and Protocol Optimization: The Pediatric Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDougall, R.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation dose monitoring solutions have opened up new opportunities for medical physicists to be more involved in modern clinical radiology practices. In particular, with the help of comprehensive radiation dose data, data-driven protocol management and informed case follow up are now feasible. Significant challenges remain however and the problems faced by medical physicists are highly heterogeneous. Imaging systems from multiple vendors and a wide range of vintages co-exist in the same department and employ data communication protocols that are not fully standardized or implemented making harmonization complex. Many different solutions for radiation dose monitoring have been implemented by imaging facilities over the past few years. Such systems are based on commercial software, home-grown IT solutions, manual PACS data dumping, etc., and diverse pathways can be used to bring the data to impact clinical practice. The speakers will share their experiences with creating or tailoring radiation dose monitoring/management systems and procedures over the past few years, which vary significantly in design and scope. Topics to cover: (1) fluoroscopic dose monitoring and high radiation event handling from a large academic hospital; (2) dose monitoring and protocol optimization in pediatric radiology; and (3) development of a home-grown IT solution and dose data analysis framework. Learning Objectives: Describe the scope and range of radiation dose monitoring and protocol management in a modern radiology practice Review examples of data available from a variety of systems and how it managed and conveyed. Reflect on the role of the physicist in radiation dose awareness.

  4. TH-E-209-02: Dose Monitoring and Protocol Optimization: The Pediatric Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDougall, R. [Boston Children’s Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Radiation dose monitoring solutions have opened up new opportunities for medical physicists to be more involved in modern clinical radiology practices. In particular, with the help of comprehensive radiation dose data, data-driven protocol management and informed case follow up are now feasible. Significant challenges remain however and the problems faced by medical physicists are highly heterogeneous. Imaging systems from multiple vendors and a wide range of vintages co-exist in the same department and employ data communication protocols that are not fully standardized or implemented making harmonization complex. Many different solutions for radiation dose monitoring have been implemented by imaging facilities over the past few years. Such systems are based on commercial software, home-grown IT solutions, manual PACS data dumping, etc., and diverse pathways can be used to bring the data to impact clinical practice. The speakers will share their experiences with creating or tailoring radiation dose monitoring/management systems and procedures over the past few years, which vary significantly in design and scope. Topics to cover: (1) fluoroscopic dose monitoring and high radiation event handling from a large academic hospital; (2) dose monitoring and protocol optimization in pediatric radiology; and (3) development of a home-grown IT solution and dose data analysis framework. Learning Objectives: Describe the scope and range of radiation dose monitoring and protocol management in a modern radiology practice Review examples of data available from a variety of systems and how it managed and conveyed. Reflect on the role of the physicist in radiation dose awareness.

  5. Practical considerations for optimizing cardiac computed tomography protocols for comprehensive acquisition prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalique, Omar K; Pulerwitz, Todd C; Halliburton, Sandra S; Kodali, Susheel K; Hahn, Rebecca T; Nazif, Tamim M; Vahl, Torsten P; George, Isaac; Leon, Martin B; D'Souza, Belinda; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is performed frequently in patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who are at high risk or inoperable for open surgical aortic valve replacement. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) has become the gold standard imaging modality for pre-TAVR cardiac anatomic and vascular access assessment. Traditionally, cardiac CTA has been most frequently used for assessment of coronary artery stenosis, and scanning protocols have generally been tailored for this purpose. Pre-TAVR CTA has different goals than coronary CTA and the high prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the TAVR patient population creates a particular need to optimize protocols for a reduction in iodinated contrast volume. This document reviews details which allow the physician to tailor CTA examinations to maximize image quality and minimize harm, while factoring in multiple patient and scanner variables which must be considered in customizing a pre-TAVR protocol. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimizing Urine Processing Protocols for Protein and Metabolite Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Nazema Y; DuBois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Will, Thompson J; Grenier, Carole; Burke, Emily; Fraser, Matthew O; Amundsen, Cindy L; Murphy, Susan K

    In urine, factors such as timing of voids, and duration at room temperature (RT) may affect the quality of recovered protein and metabolite data. Additives may aid with detection, but can add more complexity in sample collection or analysis. We aimed to identify the optimal urine processing protocol for clinically-obtained urine samples that allows for the highest protein and metabolite yields with minimal degradation. Healthy women provided multiple urine samples during the same day. Women collected their first morning (1 st AM) void and another "random void". Random voids were aliquotted with: 1) no additive; 2) boric acid (BA); 3) protease inhibitor (PI); or 4) both BA + PI. Of these aliquots, some were immediately stored at 4°C, and some were left at RT for 4 hours. Proteins and individual metabolites were quantified, normalized to creatinine concentrations, and compared across processing conditions. Sample pools corresponding to each processing condition were analyzed using mass spectrometry to assess protein degradation. Ten Caucasian women between 35-65 years of age provided paired 1 st morning and random voided urine samples. Normalized protein concentrations were slightly higher in 1 st AM compared to random "spot" voids. The addition of BA did not significantly change proteins, while PI significantly improved normalized protein concentrations, regardless of whether samples were immediately cooled or left at RT for 4 hours. In pooled samples, there were minimal differences in protein degradation under the various conditions we tested. In metabolite analyses, there were significant differences in individual amino acids based on the timing of the void. For comparative translational research using urine, information about void timing should be collected and standardized. For urine samples processed in the same day, BA does not appear to be necessary while the addition of PI enhances protein yields, regardless of 4°C or RT storage temperature.

  7. Polymerase chain reaction: basic protocol plus troubleshooting and optimization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Todd C

    2012-05-22

    In the biological sciences there have been technological advances that catapult the discipline into golden ages of discovery. For example, the field of microbiology was transformed with the advent of Anton van Leeuwenhoek's microscope, which allowed scientists to visualize prokaryotes for the first time. The development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of those innovations that changed the course of molecular science with its impact spanning countless subdisciplines in biology. The theoretical process was outlined by Keppe and coworkers in 1971; however, it was another 14 years until the complete PCR procedure was described and experimentally applied by Kary Mullis while at Cetus Corporation in 1985. Automation and refinement of this technique progressed with the introduction of a thermal stable DNA polymerase from the bacterium Thermus aquaticus, consequently the name Taq DNA polymerase. PCR is a powerful amplification technique that can generate an ample supply of a specific segment of DNA (i.e., an amplicon) from only a small amount of starting material (i.e., DNA template or target sequence). While straightforward and generally trouble-free, there are pitfalls that complicate the reaction producing spurious results. When PCR fails it can lead to many non-specific DNA products of varying sizes that appear as a ladder or smear of bands on agarose gels. Sometimes no products form at all. Another potential problem occurs when mutations are unintentionally introduced in the amplicons, resulting in a heterogeneous population of PCR products. PCR failures can become frustrating unless patience and careful troubleshooting are employed to sort out and solve the problem(s). This protocol outlines the basic principles of PCR, provides a methodology that will result in amplification of most target sequences, and presents strategies for optimizing a reaction. By following this PCR guide, students should be able to: • Set up reactions and thermal cycling

  8. Cost-optimization of the IPv4 zeroconf protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohnenkamp, H.C.; van der Stok, Peter; Hermanns, H.; Vaandrager, Frits

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the tradeoff between reliability and effectiveness for the IPv4 Zeroconf protocol, proposed by Cheshire/Adoba/Guttman in 2002, dedicated to the selfconfiguration of IP network interfaces. We develop a simple stochastic cost model of the protocol, where reliability is measured

  9. Optimization of Rb-82 PET acquisition and reconstruction protocols for myocardial perfusion defect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Rahmim, Arman; Lautamäki, Riikka; Lodge, Martin A.; Bengel, Frank M.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to optimize the dynamic Rb-82 cardiac PET acquisition and reconstruction protocols for maximum myocardial perfusion defect detection using realistic simulation data and task-based evaluation. Time activity curves (TACs) of different organs under both rest and stress conditions were extracted from dynamic Rb-82 PET images of five normal patients. Combined SimSET-GATE Monte Carlo simulation was used to generate nearly noise-free cardiac PET data from a time series of 3D NCAT phantoms with organ activities modeling different pre-scan delay times (PDTs) and total acquisition times (TATs). Poisson noise was added to the nearly noise-free projections and the OS-EM algorithm was applied to generate noisy reconstructed images. The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with 32× 32 spatial templates corresponding to four octave-wide frequency channels was used to evaluate the images. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated from the CHO rating data as an index for image quality in terms of myocardial perfusion defect detection. The 0.5 cycle cm-1 Butterworth post-filtering on OS-EM (with 21 subsets) reconstructed images generates the highest AUC values while those from iteration numbers 1 to 4 do not show different AUC values. The optimized PDTs for both rest and stress conditions are found to be close to the cross points of the left ventricular chamber and myocardium TACs, which may promote an individualized PDT for patient data processing and image reconstruction. Shortening the TATs for <~3 min from the clinically employed acquisition time does not affect the myocardial perfusion defect detection significantly for both rest and stress studies.

  10. Standardized food images : A photographing protocol and image database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charbonnier, Lisette; van Meer, Floor; van der Laan, Laura N.; Viergever, Max A.; Smeets, Paul A M

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of food intake has gained much research interest because of the current obesity epidemic. For research purposes, food images are a good and convenient alternative for real food because many dietary decisions are made based on the sight of foods. Food pictures are assumed to elicit

  11. Standardized food images: A photographing protocol and image database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charbonnier, L.; Meer, van der F.; Laan, van der L.N.; Viergever, M.A.; Smeets, P.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of food intake has gained much research interest because of the current obesity epidemic. For research purposes, food images are a good and convenient alternative for real food because many dietary decisions are made based on the sight of foods. Food pictures are assumed to elicit

  12. Acoustic-noise-optimized diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Martin; Blaimer, Martin; Grodzki, David M; Breuer, Felix A; Roesch, Julie; Dörfler, Arnd; Heismann, Björn; Jakob, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    This work was aimed at reducing acoustic noise in diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) that might reach acoustic noise levels of over 100 dB(A) in clinical practice. A diffusion-weighted readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence was optimized for acoustic noise by utilizing small readout segment widths to obtain low gradient slew rates and amplitudes instead of faster k-space coverage. In addition, all other gradients were optimized for low slew rates. Volunteer and patient imaging experiments were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Acoustic noise measurements were performed and analyzed for four different DWI measurement protocols at 1.5T and 3T. An acoustic noise reduction of up to 20 dB(A) was achieved, which corresponds to a fourfold reduction in acoustic perception. The image quality was preserved at the level of a standard single-shot (ss)-EPI sequence, with a 27-54% increase in scan time. The diffusion-weighted imaging technique proposed in this study allowed a substantial reduction in the level of acoustic noise compared to standard single-shot diffusion-weighted EPI. This is expected to afford considerably more patient comfort, but a larger study would be necessary to fully characterize the subjective changes in patient experience.

  13. Heuristic optimization in penumbral image for high resolution reconstructed image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, R.; Nozaki, S.; Fujioka, S.; Chen, Y. W.; Namihira, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Penumbral imaging is a technique which uses the fact that spatial information can be recovered from the shadow or penumbra that an unknown source casts through a simple large circular aperture. The size of the penumbral image on the detector can be mathematically determined as its aperture size, object size, and magnification. Conventional reconstruction methods are very sensitive to noise. On the other hand, the heuristic reconstruction method is very tolerant of noise. However, the aperture size influences the accuracy and resolution of the reconstructed image. In this article, we propose the optimization of the aperture size for the neutron penumbral imaging.

  14. Circular SAR Optimization Imaging Method of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jian-feng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Circular Synthetic Aperture Radar (CSAR can obtain the entire scattering properties of targets because of its great ability of 360° observation. In this study, an optimal orientation of the CSAR imaging algorithm of buildings is proposed by applying a combination of coherent and incoherent processing techniques. FEKO software is used to construct the electromagnetic scattering modes and simulate the radar echo. The FEKO imaging results are compared with the isotropic scattering results. On comparison, the optimal azimuth coherent accumulation angle of CSAR imaging of buildings is obtained. Practically, the scattering directions of buildings are unknown; therefore, we divide the 360° echo of CSAR into many overlapped and few angle echoes corresponding to the sub-aperture and then perform an imaging procedure on each sub-aperture. Sub-aperture imaging results are applied to obtain the all-around image using incoherent fusion techniques. The polarimetry decomposition method is used to decompose the all-around image and further retrieve the edge information of buildings successfully. The proposed method is validated with P-band airborne CSAR data from Sichuan, China.

  15. Optimized nonorthogonal transforms for image compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleryuz, O G; Orchard, M T

    1997-01-01

    The transform coding of images is analyzed from a common standpoint in order to generate a framework for the design of optimal transforms. It is argued that all transform coders are alike in the way they manipulate the data structure formed by transform coefficients. A general energy compaction measure is proposed to generate optimized transforms with desirable characteristics particularly suited to the simple transform coding operation of scalar quantization and entropy coding. It is shown that the optimal linear decoder (inverse transform) must be an optimal linear estimator, independent of the structure of the transform generating the coefficients. A formulation that sequentially optimizes the transforms is presented, and design equations and algorithms for its computation provided. The properties of the resulting transform systems are investigated. In particular, it is shown that the resulting basis are nonorthogonal and complete, producing energy compaction optimized, decorrelated transform coefficients. Quantization issues related to nonorthogonal expansion coefficients are addressed with a simple, efficient algorithm. Two implementations are discussed, and image coding examples are given. It is shown that the proposed design framework results in systems with superior energy compaction properties and excellent coding results.

  16. Image-Optimized Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shaela I.; Uritsky, Vadim; Davila, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    We have reported previously on a new method we are developing for using image-based information to improve global coronal magnetic field models. In that work we presented early tests of the method which proved its capability to improve global models based on flawed synoptic magnetograms, given excellent constraints on the field in the model volume. In this follow-up paper we present the results of similar tests given field constraints of a nature that could realistically be obtained from quality white-light coronagraph images of the lower corona. We pay particular attention to difficulties associated with the line-of-sight projection of features outside of the assumed coronagraph image plane, and the effect on the outcome of the optimization of errors in localization of constraints. We find that substantial improvement in the model field can be achieved with this type of constraints, even when magnetic features in the images are located outside of the image plane.

  17. Image-optimized Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Shaela I.; Uritsky, Vadim; Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: shaela.i.jones-mecholsky@nasa.gov, E-mail: shaela.i.jonesmecholsky@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 670, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    We have reported previously on a new method we are developing for using image-based information to improve global coronal magnetic field models. In that work, we presented early tests of the method, which proved its capability to improve global models based on flawed synoptic magnetograms, given excellent constraints on the field in the model volume. In this follow-up paper, we present the results of similar tests given field constraints of a nature that could realistically be obtained from quality white-light coronagraph images of the lower corona. We pay particular attention to difficulties associated with the line-of-sight projection of features outside of the assumed coronagraph image plane and the effect on the outcome of the optimization of errors in the localization of constraints. We find that substantial improvement in the model field can be achieved with these types of constraints, even when magnetic features in the images are located outside of the image plane.

  18. Guided color consistency optimization for image mosaicking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Renping; Xia, Menghan; Yao, Jian; Li, Li

    2018-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of color consistency correction for sequential images with diverse color characteristics. Existing algorithms try to adjust all images to minimize color differences among images under a unified energy framework, however, the results are prone to presenting a consistent but unnatural appearance when the color difference between images is large and diverse. In our approach, this problem is addressed effectively by providing a guided initial solution for the global consistency optimization, which avoids converging to a meaningless integrated solution. First of all, to obtain the reliable intensity correspondences in overlapping regions between image pairs, we creatively propose the histogram extreme point matching algorithm which is robust to image geometrical misalignment to some extents. In the absence of the extra reference information, the guided initial solution is learned from the major tone of the original images by searching some image subset as the reference, whose color characteristics will be transferred to the others via the paths of graph analysis. Thus, the final results via global adjustment will take on a consistent color similar to the appearance of the reference image subset. Several groups of convincing experiments on both the synthetic dataset and the challenging real ones sufficiently demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve as good or even better results compared with the state-of-the-art approaches.

  19. A time-efficient acquisition protocol for multipurpose diffusion-weighted microstructural imaging at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrband, Farshid; O'Brien, Kieran; Barth, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Several diffusion-weighted MRI techniques have been developed and validated during the past 2 decades. While offering various neuroanatomical inferences, these techniques differ in their proposed optimal acquisition design, preventing clinicians and researchers benefiting from all potential inference methods, particularly when limited time is available. This study reports an optimal design that enables for a time-efficient diffusion-weighted MRI acquisition scheme at 7 Tesla. The primary audience of this article is the typical end user, interested in diffusion-weighted microstructural imaging at 7 Tesla. We tested b-values in the range of 700 to 3000 s/mm 2 with different number of angular diffusion-encoding samples, against a data-driven "gold standard." The suggested design is a protocol with b-values of 1000 and 2500 s/mm 2 , with 25 and 50 samples, uniformly distributed over two shells. We also report a range of protocols in which the results of fitting microstructural models to the diffusion-weighted data had high correlation with the gold standard. We estimated minimum acquisition requirements that enable diffusion tensor imaging, higher angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging, neurite orientation dispersion, and density imaging and white matter tract integrity across whole brain with isotropic resolution of 1.8 mm in less than 11 min. Magn Reson Med 78:2170-2184, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Power Saving MAC Protocols for WSNs and Optimization of S-MAC Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simarpreet Kaur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Low power MAC protocols have received a lot of consideration in the last few years because of their influence on the lifetime of wireless sensor networks. Since, sensors typically operate on batteries, replacement of which is often difficult. A lot of work has been done to minimize the energy expenditure and prolong the sensor lifetime through energy efficient designs, across layers. Meanwhile, the sensor network should be able to maintain a certain throughput in order to fulfill the QoS requirements of the end user, and to ensure the constancy of the network. This paper introduces different types of MAC protocols used for WSNs and proposes S‐MAC, a Medium‐Access Control protocol designed for Wireless Sensor Networks. S‐MAC uses a few innovative techniques to reduce energy consumption and support selfconfiguration. A new protocol is suggested to improve the energy efficiency, latency and throughput of existing MAC protocol for WSNs. A modification of the protocol is then proposed to eliminate the need for some nodes to stay awake longer than the other nodes which improves the energy efficiency, latency and throughput and hence increases the life span of a wireless sensor network.

  1. Security Protocol Verification and Optimization by Epistemic Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    Three cryptographers are sitting down to dinner at their favourite restau- rant. Their waiter informs them that arrangements have been made with the...Unfortunately, the protocol cannot be expected to satisfy this: suppose that all agents manage to broadcast their mes- sage and all messages have the

  2. Hardware Abstraction and Protocol Optimization for Coded Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nistor, Maricica; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Barros, João

    2015-01-01

    The design of the communication protocols in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) often neglects several key characteristics of the sensor's hardware, while assuming that the number of transmitted bits is the dominating factor behind the system's energy consumption. A closer look at the hardware speci...

  3. Blocking Optimality in Distributed Real-Time Locking Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Bernhard Brandenburg

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lower and upper bounds on the maximum priority inversion blocking (pi-blocking that is generally unavoidable in distributed multiprocessor real-time locking protocols (where resources may be accessed only from specific synchronization processors are established. Prior work on suspension-based shared-memory multiprocessor locking protocols (which require resources to be accessible from all processors has established asymptotically tight bounds of Ω(m and Ω(n maximum pi-blocking under suspension-oblivious and suspension-aware analysis, respectively, where m denotes the total number of processors and n denotes the number of tasks. In this paper, it is shown that, in the case of distributed semaphore protocols, there exist two different task allocation scenarios that give rise to distinct lower bounds. In the case of co-hosted task allocation, where application tasks may also be assigned to synchronization processors (i.e., processors hosting critical sections, Ω(Φ · n maximum pi-blocking is unavoidable for some tasks under any locking protocol under both suspension-aware and suspension-oblivious schedulability analysis, where Φ denotes the ratio of the maximum response time to the shortest period. In contrast, in the case of disjoint task allocation (i.e., if application tasks may not be assigned to synchronization processors, only Ω(m and Ω(n maximum pi-blocking is fundamentally unavoidable under suspension-oblivious and suspension-aware analysis, respectively, as in the shared-memory case. These bounds are shown to be asymptotically tight with the construction of two new distributed real-time locking protocols that ensure O(m and O(n maximum pi-blocking under suspension-oblivious and suspension-aware analysis, respectively.

  4. Optimization of a sample processing protocol for recovery of Bacillus anthracis spores from soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Erin E.; Feldhake, David; Griffin, Dale; Lisle, John T.; Nichols, Tonya L.; Shah, Sanjiv; Pemberton, A; Schaefer III, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    Following a release of Bacillus anthracis spores into the environment, there is a potential for lasting environmental contamination in soils. There is a need for detection protocols for B. anthracis in environmental matrices. However, identification of B. anthracis within a soil is a difficult task. Processing soil samples helps to remove debris, chemical components, and biological impurities that can interfere with microbiological detection. This study aimed to optimize a previously used indirect processing protocol, which included a series of washing and centrifugation steps. Optimization of the protocol included: identifying an ideal extraction diluent, variation in the number of wash steps, variation in the initial centrifugation speed, sonication and shaking mechanisms. The optimized protocol was demonstrated at two laboratories in order to evaluate the recovery of spores from loamy and sandy soils. The new protocol demonstrated an improved limit of detection for loamy and sandy soils over the non-optimized protocol with an approximate matrix limit of detection at 14 spores/g of soil. There were no significant differences overall between the two laboratories for either soil type, suggesting that the processing protocol will be robust enough to use at multiple laboratories while achieving comparable recoveries.

  5. Optimized Quasi-Interpolators for Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacht, Leonardo; Nehab, Diego

    2015-12-01

    We propose new quasi-interpolators for the continuous reconstruction of sampled images, combining a narrowly supported piecewise-polynomial kernel and an efficient digital filter. In other words, our quasi-interpolators fit within the generalized sampling framework and are straightforward to use. We go against standard practice and optimize for approximation quality over the entire Nyquist range, rather than focusing exclusively on the asymptotic behavior as the sample spacing goes to zero. In contrast to previous work, we jointly optimize with respect to all degrees of freedom available in both the kernel and the digital filter. We consider linear, quadratic, and cubic schemes, offering different tradeoffs between quality and computational cost. Experiments with compounded rotations and translations over a range of input images confirm that, due to the additional degrees of freedom and the more realistic objective function, our new quasi-interpolators perform better than the state of the art, at a similar computational cost.

  6. Comparison of dose and image quality in protocols abdominal CT using high an low KVP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas Munoz, I.; Alejo Luque, L.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Sanchez Munoz, F. J.; Serrada Hierro, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares quantitatively low kV Protocol with the conventional Protocol of abdomen, analysing the image quality with objective physical parameters and calculating the corresponding dummy dose reduction. (Author)

  7. Optimized contrast volume for dynamic CT angiography in renal transplant patients using a multiphase CT protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helck, A.; Bamberg, F.; Sommer, W.H.; Wessely, M.; Becker, C.; Clevert, D.A.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Reiser, M.; Nikolaou, K.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To study the feasibility of an optimized multiphase renal-CT-angiography (MP-CTA) protocol in patients with history of renal transplantation compared with Doppler-ultrasound (DUS). Methods: 36 Patients underwent both DUS and time-resolved, MP-CTA (12 phases), with a mean contrast-volume of 34.4 ± 5.1 ml. Quality of MP-CTA was assessed quantitatively (vascular attenuation) and qualitatively (grades 1–4, 1 = best). For the assessment of clinical value of MP-CTA, cases were grouped into normal, macrovascular (arterial/venous) and microvascular complications (parenchymal perfusion defect). DUS served as the standard of reference. Results: Using the best of 12 phases in each patient, optimal attenuation was 353 ± 111 HU, 337 ± 98 HU and 164 ± 51 HU in the iliac arteries, renal arteries, and renal veins, respectively. Mean image quality was 1.1 ± 0.3 (n = 36) and 2.1 ± 0.6 (n = 30) for the transplant renal arteries and veins, respectively. Six renal veins were non-diagnostic in MP-CTA. In 36 patients, MP-CTA showed 13 vascular complications and 10 parenchymal perfusion defects. DUS was not assessable in eight patients. Overall, MP-CTA showed 15 cases with pathology (42%) not identifiable with DUS. The mean effective radiation dose of the MP-CTA protocol was 13.5 ± 5.2 mSv. Conclusion: MP-CTA can be sufficiently performed with reduced contrast volume at reasonable radiation dose in renal transplant patients, providing substantially higher diagnostic yield than DUS.

  8. Color standardization and optimization in Whole Slide Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagi Yukako

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Standardization and validation of the color displayed by digital slides is an important aspect of digital pathology implementation. While the most common reason for color variation is the variance in the protocols and practices in the histology lab, the color displayed can also be affected by variation in capture parameters (for example, illumination and filters, image processing and display factors in the digital systems themselves. Method We have been developing techniques for color validation and optimization along two paths. The first was based on two standard slides that are scanned and displayed by the imaging system in question. In this approach, one slide is embedded with nine filters with colors selected especially for H&E stained slides (looking like tiny Macbeth color chart; the specific color of the nine filters were determined in our previous study and modified for whole slide imaging (WSI. The other slide is an H&E stained mouse embryo. Both of these slides were scanned and the displayed images were compared to a standard. The second approach was based on our previous multispectral imaging research. Discussion As a first step, the two slide method (above was used to identify inaccurate display of color and its cause, and to understand the importance of accurate color in digital pathology. We have also improved the multispectral-based algorithm for more consistent results in stain standardization. In near future, the results of the two slide and multispectral techniques can be combined and will be widely available. We have been conducting a series of researches and developing projects to improve image quality to establish Image Quality Standardization. This paper discusses one of most important aspects of image quality – color.

  9. Two-Layer Hierarchy Optimization Model for Communication Protocol in Railway Wireless Monitoring Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Ma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The wireless monitoring system is always destroyed by the insufficient energy of the sensors in railway. Hence, how to optimize the communication protocol and extend the system lifetime is crucial to ensure the stability of system. However, the existing studies focused primarily on cluster-based or multihop protocols individually, which are ineffective in coping with the complex communication scenarios in the railway wireless monitoring system (RWMS. This study proposes a hybrid protocol which combines the cluster-based and multihop protocols (CMCP to minimize and balance the energy consumption in different sections of the RWMS. In the first hierarchy, the total energy consumption is minimized by optimizing the cluster quantities in the cluster-based protocol and the number of hops and the corresponding hop distances in the multihop protocol. In the second hierarchy, the energy consumption is balanced through rotating the cluster head (CH in the subnetworks and further optimizing the hops and the corresponding hop distances in the backbone network. On this basis, the system lifetime is maximized with the minimum and balance energy consumption among the sensors. Furthermore, the hybrid particle swarm optimization and genetic algorithm (PSO-GA are adopted to optimize the energy consumption from the two-layer hierarchy. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed CMCP is verified in the simulation. The performances of the proposed CMCP in system lifetime, residual energy, and the corresponding variance are all superior to the LEACH protocol widely applied in the previous research. The effective protocol proposed in this study can facilitate the application of the wireless monitoring network in the railway system and enhance safety operation of the railway.

  10. Thick tissue diffusion model with binding to optimize topical staining in fluorescence breast cancer margin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Kang, Soyoung; Navarro-Comes, Eric; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2018-03-01

    Intraoperative tumor/surgical margin assessment is required to achieve higher tumor resection rate in breast-conserving surgery. Though current histology provides incomparable accuracy in margin assessment, thin tissue sectioning and the limited field of view of microscopy makes histology too time-consuming for intraoperative applications. If thick tissue, wide-field imaging can provide an acceptable assessment of tumor cells at the surface of resected tissues, an intraoperative protocol can be developed to guide the surgery and provide immediate feedback for surgeons. Topical staining of margins with cancer-targeted molecular imaging agents has the potential to provide the sensitivity needed to see microscopic cancer on a wide-field image; however, diffusion and nonspecific retention of imaging agents in thick tissue can significantly diminish tumor contrast with conventional methods. Here, we present a mathematical model to accurately simulate nonspecific retention, binding, and diffusion of imaging agents in thick tissue topical staining to guide and optimize future thick tissue staining and imaging protocol. In order to verify the accuracy and applicability of the model, diffusion profiles of cancer targeted and untargeted (control) nanoparticles at different staining times in A431 tumor xenografts were acquired for model comparison and tuning. The initial findings suggest the existence of nonspecific retention in the tissue, especially at the tissue surface. The simulator can be used to compare the effect of nonspecific retention, receptor binding and diffusion under various conditions (tissue type, imaging agent) and provides optimal staining and imaging protocols for targeted and control imaging agent.

  11. SU-F-207-16: CT Protocols Optimization Using Model Observer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, H; Fan, J; Kupinski, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the performance of different CT protocols using task-based measures of image quality. This work studies the task of size and the contrast estimation of different iodine concentration rods inserted in head- and body-sized phantoms using different imaging protocols. These protocols are designed to have the same dose level (CTDIvol) but using different X-ray tube voltage settings (kVp). Methods: Different concentrations of iodine objects inserted in a head size phantom and a body size phantom are imaged on a 64-slice commercial CT scanner. Scanning protocols with various tube voltages (80, 100, and 120 kVp) and current settings are selected, which output the same absorbed dose level (CTDIvol). Because the phantom design (size of the iodine objects, the air gap between the inserted objects and the phantom) is not ideal for a model observer study, the acquired CT images are used to generate simulation images with four different sizes and five different contracts iodine objects. For each type of the objects, 500 images (100 x 100 pixels) are generated for the observer study. The observer selected in this study is the channelized scanning linear observer which could be applied to estimate the size and the contrast. The figure of merit used is the correct estimation ratio. The mean and the variance are estimated by the shuffle method. Results: The results indicate that the protocols with 100 kVp tube voltage setting provides the best performance for iodine insert size and contrast estimation for both head and body phantom cases. Conclusion: This work presents a practical and robust quantitative approach using channelized scanning linear observer to study contrast and size estimation performance from different CT protocols. Different protocols at same CTDIvol setting could Result in different image quality performance. The relationship between the absorbed dose and the diagnostic image quality is not linear

  12. SU-F-207-16: CT Protocols Optimization Using Model Observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, H [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Fan, J [CT Systems Engineering, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin (United States); Kupinski, M [Univ Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the performance of different CT protocols using task-based measures of image quality. This work studies the task of size and the contrast estimation of different iodine concentration rods inserted in head- and body-sized phantoms using different imaging protocols. These protocols are designed to have the same dose level (CTDIvol) but using different X-ray tube voltage settings (kVp). Methods: Different concentrations of iodine objects inserted in a head size phantom and a body size phantom are imaged on a 64-slice commercial CT scanner. Scanning protocols with various tube voltages (80, 100, and 120 kVp) and current settings are selected, which output the same absorbed dose level (CTDIvol). Because the phantom design (size of the iodine objects, the air gap between the inserted objects and the phantom) is not ideal for a model observer study, the acquired CT images are used to generate simulation images with four different sizes and five different contracts iodine objects. For each type of the objects, 500 images (100 x 100 pixels) are generated for the observer study. The observer selected in this study is the channelized scanning linear observer which could be applied to estimate the size and the contrast. The figure of merit used is the correct estimation ratio. The mean and the variance are estimated by the shuffle method. Results: The results indicate that the protocols with 100 kVp tube voltage setting provides the best performance for iodine insert size and contrast estimation for both head and body phantom cases. Conclusion: This work presents a practical and robust quantitative approach using channelized scanning linear observer to study contrast and size estimation performance from different CT protocols. Different protocols at same CTDIvol setting could Result in different image quality performance. The relationship between the absorbed dose and the diagnostic image quality is not linear.

  13. Optimal wave focusing for seismic source imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Farhad

    In both global and exploration seismology, studying seismic sources provides geophysicists with invaluable insight into the physics of earthquakes and faulting processes. One way to characterize the seismic source is to directly image it. Time-reversal (TR) focusing provides a simple and robust solution to the source imaging problem. However, for recovering a well- resolved image, TR requires a full-aperture receiver array that surrounds the source and adequately samples the wavefield. This requirement often cannot be realized in practice. In most source imaging experiments, the receiver geometry, due to the limited aperture and sparsity of the stations, does not allow adequate sampling of the source wavefield. Incomplete acquisition and imbalanced illumination of the imaging target limit the resolving power of the TR process. The main focus of this thesis is to offer an alternative approach to source imaging with the goal of mitigating the adverse effects of incomplete acquisition on the TR modeling. To this end, I propose a new method, named Backus-Gilbert (BG) source imaging, to optimally focus the wavefield onto the source position using a given receiver geometry. I first introduce BG as a method for focusing waves in acoustic media at a desired location and time. Then, by exploiting the source-receiver reciprocity of the Green function and the linearity of the problem, I show that BG focusing can be adapted and used as a source-imaging tool. Following this, I generalize the BG theory for elastic waves. Applying BG formalism for source imaging requires a model for the wave propagation properties of the earth and an estimate of the source location. Using numerical tests, I next examine the robustness and sensitivity of the proposed method with respect to errors in the earth model, uncertainty in the source location, and noise in data. The BG method can image extended sources as well as point sources. It can also retrieve the source mechanism. These features of

  14. Seismic image watermarking using optimized wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mufti, M.

    2010-01-01

    Geotechnical processes and technologies are becoming more and more sophisticated by the use of computer and information technology. This has made the availability, authenticity and security of geo technical data even more important. One of the most common methods of storing and sharing seismic data images is through standardized SEG- Y file format.. Geo technical industry is now primarily data centric. The analytic and detection capability of seismic processing tool is heavily dependent on the correctness of the contents of the SEG-Y data file. This paper describes a method through an optimized wavelet transform technique which prevents unauthorized alteration and/or use of seismic data. (author)

  15. Adapting protocols of CT imaging in a pediatric emergency department. Evaluation of image quality and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista Arce, A.; Gonzalez Lopez, S.; Catalan Acosta, A.; Casares Magaz, O.; Hernandez Armas, O.; Hernandez Armas, J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess qualitatively the picture quality in relation to the radiation dose delivered in CT studies of computer tomograph Pediatric Emergency Department of Hospital Universitario de Canarias (HUC) in order to optimize the technical parameters used these radiological examinations so as to obtain optimal image quality at the lowest possible dose.

  16. Protocol optimization for enhanced production of pigments in Spirulina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Devendra; Kumar, Neeraj; Pabbi, Sunil; Walia, Suresh; Dhar, Dolly Wattal

    2013-01-01

    Spirulina has attracted special attention due to its importance as human foodstuff and natural colours with specific functional properties. These functional properties have been attributed to phycobilins, carotenoids, phenolics and unsaturated fatty acids. Present study was conducted under controlled phytotron conditions to identify the efficient strains of Spirulina in terms of pigment synthesis and to optimize their enhanced production. Methodology for enhanced production was standardized by varying specific environmental parameters (light intensity, temperature, carbon dioxide concentration, pH and NaCl level). Different strains of Spirulina depicted variability and environmental parameters showed distinct influence on pigments. Growth and pigment production was recorded to be most efficient under optimized conditions of light intensity (70 μmol m -2  s -1 ), temperature (30 °C), CO 2 concentration (550 ppm and 750 ppm), pH (10.5) and NaCl level (2 g L -1 ).

  17. Optimization of Protocol CT, PET-CT, whole body; Optimizacion de protocolo CT, en PET-CT, de cuerpo entero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Fredys Santos, E-mail: fsantos@ccss.sa.cr [Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social (ACCPR/CCSS), San Jose (Costa Rica). Area Control de Calidade Y Proteccion Radiologica; Namias, Mauro, E-mail: mnamias@gmail.com [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (FCDN/CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Fundacion Centro Diagnostico Nuclear

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the acquisition protocols and processing existing of the CT PET/CT scanner for clinical use of Nuclear Diagnostic Center Foundation, a way to minimize the radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality properly. Dosimetric data of PET / CT service were surveyed and obtained the baseline against which we compare and define strategies and modifications to develop online. We selected transaxial up to the pulmonary hilum and liver slices as the anatomical regions of interest that led to the standardization of the study.

  18. Optimization of oligonucleotide arrays and RNA amplification protocols for analysis of transcript structure and alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, John; Garrett-Engele, Phil; Armour, Christopher D; Duenwald, Sven J; Loerch, Patrick M; Meyer, Michael R; Schadt, Eric E; Stoughton, Roland; Parrish, Mark L; Shoemaker, Daniel D; Johnson, Jason M

    2003-01-01

    Microarrays offer a high-resolution means for monitoring pre-mRNA splicing on a genomic scale. We have developed a novel, unbiased amplification protocol that permits labeling of entire transcripts. Also, hybridization conditions, probe characteristics, and analysis algorithms were optimized for detection of exons, exon-intron edges, and exon junctions. These optimized protocols can be used to detect small variations and isoform mixtures, map the tissue specificity of known human alternative isoforms, and provide a robust, scalable platform for high-throughput discovery of alternative splicing.

  19. Comparison of two imaging protocols for acute stroke: unenhanced cranial CT versus a multimodality cranial CT protocol with perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, R. D.; Gorkom, K. Neidl van.; Kaabi, Ho Al.; Torab, F.; Czechowski, J.; Nagi, M.; Ashish, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The aim of the study was to validate a multimodality cranial computed tomography (CCT) protocol for patients with acute stroke in the United Arab Emirates as a basic imaging procedure for a stroke unit. Therefore, a comparative study was conducted between two groups: retrospective, historical group 1 with early unenhanced CCT and prospective group 2 undergoing a multimodality CCT protocol. Follow-up unenhanced CCT >48 h served as gold standard in both groups. Group 1: Early unenhanced CCT of 50 patients were evaluated retrospectively, using Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score, and compared with the definite infarction on follow-up CCT. Group 2: 50 patients underwent multimodality CCT (unenhanced CCT, perfusion studies: cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, mean transit time and CT angiography) <8 h after clinical onset and follow-up studies. Modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale was used clinically in both groups. Group 1 showed 38 men, 12 women, clinical onset 2-8 h before CCT and modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale 0-28. Group 2 included 38 men, 12 women, onset 3-8 h before CCT, modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale 0-28. Sensitivity was 58.3% in group 1 and 84.2% in group 2. Computed tomography angiography detected nine intracranial occlusions/stenoses. The higher sensitivity of the multimodality CCT protocol justifies its use as a basic diagnostic tool for the set-up of a first-stroke unit in the United Arab Emirates

  20. A Power-Optimized Cooperative MAC Protocol for Lifetime Extension in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Wu, Shan; Huang, Bo; Liu, Feng; Xu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    In wireless sensor networks, in order to satisfy the requirement of long working time of energy-limited nodes, we need to design an energy-efficient and lifetime-extended medium access control (MAC) protocol. In this paper, a node cooperation mechanism that one or multiple nodes with higher channel gain and sufficient residual energy help a sender relay its data packets to its recipient is employed to achieve this objective. We first propose a transmission power optimization algorithm to prolong network lifetime by optimizing the transmission powers of the sender and its cooperative nodes to maximize their minimum residual energy after their data packet transmissions. Based on it, we propose a corresponding power-optimized cooperative MAC protocol. A cooperative node contention mechanism is designed to ensure that the sender can effectively select a group of cooperative nodes with the lowest energy consumption and the best channel quality for cooperative transmissions, thus further improving the energy efficiency. Simulation results show that compared to typical MAC protocol with direct transmissions and energy-efficient cooperative MAC protocol, the proposed cooperative MAC protocol can efficiently improve the energy efficiency and extend the network lifetime.

  1. Optimizing CT radiation dose based on patient size and image quality: the size-specific dose estimate method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David B. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The principle of ALARA (dose as low as reasonably achievable) calls for dose optimization rather than dose reduction, per se. Optimization of CT radiation dose is accomplished by producing images of acceptable diagnostic image quality using the lowest dose method available. Because it is image quality that constrains the dose, CT dose optimization is primarily a problem of image quality rather than radiation dose. Therefore, the primary focus in CT radiation dose optimization should be on image quality. However, no reliable direct measure of image quality has been developed for routine clinical practice. Until such measures become available, size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) can be used as a reasonable image-quality estimate. The SSDE method of radiation dose optimization for CT abdomen and pelvis consists of plotting SSDE for a sample of examinations as a function of patient size, establishing an SSDE threshold curve based on radiologists' assessment of image quality, and modifying protocols to consistently produce doses that are slightly above the threshold SSDE curve. Challenges in operationalizing CT radiation dose optimization include data gathering and monitoring, managing the complexities of the numerous protocols, scanners and operators, and understanding the relationship of the automated tube current modulation (ATCM) parameters to image quality. Because CT manufacturers currently maintain their ATCM algorithms as secret for proprietary reasons, prospective modeling of SSDE for patient populations is not possible without reverse engineering the ATCM algorithm and, hence, optimization by this method requires a trial-and-error approach. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of a dedicated MDCT protocol using iterative image reconstruction after cervical spine trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, L L; Körner, M; Hempel, R; Deak, Z; Mueck, F G; Linsenmaier, U; Reiser, M F; Wirth, S

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate radiation exposure for 64-row computed tomography (CT) of the cervical spine comparing two optimized protocols using filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), respectively. Sixty-seven studies using FBP (scanner 1) were retrospectively compared with 80 studies using ASIR (scanner 2). The key scanning parameters were identical (120 kV dose modulation, 64 × 0.625 mm collimation, pitch 0.531:1). In protocol 2, the noise index (NI) was increased from 5 to 25, and ASIR and the high-definition (HD) mode were used. The scan length, CT dose index (CTDI), and dose-length product (DLP) were recorded. The image quality was analysed subjectively by using a three-point scale (0; 1; 2), and objectively by using a region of interest (ROI) analysis. Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon's test were used. In the FBP group, the mean CTDI was 21.43 mGy, mean scan length 186.3 mm, and mean DLP 441.15 mGy cm. In the ASIR group, the mean CTDI was 9.57 mGy, mean scan length 195.21 mm, and mean DLP 204.23 mGy cm. The differences were significant for CTDI and DLP (p 0.05). The estimated mean effective dose decreased from 2.38 mSv (FBP) to 1.10 mSv (ASIR). The radiation dose of 64-row MDCT can be reduced to a level comparable to plain radiography without loss of subjective image quality by implementation of ASIR in a dedicated cervical spine trauma protocol. These results might contribute to an improved relative risk-to-benefit ratio and support the justification of CT as a first-line imaging tool to evaluate cervical spine trauma. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of a dedicated MDCT protocol using iterative image reconstruction after cervical spine trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, L.L.; Körner, M.; Hempel, R.; Deak, Z.; Mueck, F.G.; Linsenmaier, U.; Reiser, M.F.; Wirth, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate radiation exposure for 64-row computed tomography (CT) of the cervical spine comparing two optimized protocols using filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), respectively. Materials and methods: Sixty-seven studies using FBP (scanner 1) were retrospectively compared with 80 studies using ASIR (scanner 2). The key scanning parameters were identical (120 kV dose modulation, 64 × 0.625 mm collimation, pitch 0.531:1). In protocol 2, the noise index (NI) was increased from 5 to 25, and ASIR and the high-definition (HD) mode were used. The scan length, CT dose index (CTDI), and dose–length product (DLP) were recorded. The image quality was analysed subjectively by using a three-point scale (0; 1; 2), and objectively by using a region of interest (ROI) analysis. Mann–Whitney U and Wilcoxon's test were used. Results: In the FBP group, the mean CTDI was 21.43 mGy, mean scan length 186.3 mm, and mean DLP 441.15 mGy cm. In the ASIR group, the mean CTDI was 9.57 mGy, mean scan length 195.21 mm, and mean DLP 204.23 mGy cm. The differences were significant for CTDI and DLP (p 0.05). The estimated mean effective dose decreased from 2.38 mSv (FBP) to 1.10 mSv (ASIR). Conclusion: The radiation dose of 64-row MDCT can be reduced to a level comparable to plain radiography without loss of subjective image quality by implementation of ASIR in a dedicated cervical spine trauma protocol. These results might contribute to an improved relative risk-to-benefit ratio and support the justification of CT as a first-line imaging tool to evaluate cervical spine trauma

  4. Experimental protocols for behavioral imaging: seeing animal models of drug abuse in a new light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Alexandra R; Talan, Amanda; Schiffer, Wynne K

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral neuroimaging is a rapidly evolving discipline that represents a marriage between the fields of behavioral neuroscience and preclinical molecular imaging. This union highlights the changing role of imaging in translational research. Techniques developed for humans are now widely applied in the study of animal models of brain disorders such as drug addiction. Small animal or preclinical imaging allows us to interrogate core features of addiction from both behavioral and biological endpoints. Snapshots of brain activity allow us to better understand changes in brain function and behavior associated with initial drug exposure, the emergence of drug escalation, and repeated bouts of drug withdrawal and relapse. Here we review the development and validation of new behavioral imaging paradigms and several clinically relevant radiotracers used to capture dynamic molecular events in behaving animals. We will discuss ways in which behavioral imaging protocols can be optimized to increase throughput and quantitative methods. Finally, we discuss our experience with the practical aspects of behavioral neuroimaging, so investigators can utilize effective animal models to better understand the addicted brain and behavior.

  5. Optimal Image Data Compression For Whole Slide Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Isola

    2016-06-01

    Differences in WSI file sizes of scanned images deemed “visually lossless” were significant. If we set Hamamatsu Nanozoomer .NDPI file size (using its default “jpeg80 quality” as 100%, the size of a “visually lossless” JPEG2000 file was only 15-20% of that. Comparisons to Aperio and 3D-Histech files (.svs and .mrxs at their default settings yielded similar results. A further optimization of JPEG2000 was done by treating empty slide area as uniform white-grey surface, which could be maximally compressed. Using this algorithm, JPEG2000 file sizes were only half, or even smaller, of original JPEG2000. Variation was due to the proportion of empty slide area on the scan. We anticipate that wavelet-based image compression methods, such as JPEG2000, have a significant advantage in saving storage costs of scanned whole slide image. In routine pathology laboratories applying WSI technology widely to their histology material, absolute cost savings can be substantial.  

  6. Evaluation of imaging protocol for ECT based on CS image reconstruction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaolin; Yun Mingkai; Cao Xuexiang; Liu Shuangquan; Wang Lu; Huang Xianchao; Wei Long

    2014-01-01

    Single-photon emission computerized tomography and positron emission tomography are essential medical imaging tools, for which the sampling angle number and scan time should be carefully chosen to give a good compromise between image quality and radiopharmaceutical dose. In this study, the image quality of different acquisition protocols was evaluated via varied angle number and count number per angle with Monte Carlo simulation data. It was shown that, when similar imaging counts were used, the factor of acquisition counts was more important than that of the sampling number in emission computerized tomography. To further reduce the activity requirement and the scan duration, an iterative image reconstruction algorithm for limited-view and low-dose tomography based on compressed sensing theory has been developed. The total variation regulation was added to the reconstruction process to improve the signal to noise Ratio and reduce artifacts caused by the limited angle sampling. Maximization of the maximum likelihood of the estimated image and the measured data and minimization of the total variation of the image are alternatively implemented. By using this advanced algorithm, the reconstruction process is able to achieve image quality matching or exceed that of normal scans with only half of the injection radiopharmaceutical dose. (authors)

  7. Introduction of a standardized multimodality image protocol for navigation-guided surgery of suspected low-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Aygül; Kiesel, Barbara; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Martínez-Moreno, Mauricio; Minchev, Georgi; Furtner, Julia; Knosp, Engelbert; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Widhalm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT Surgery of suspected low-grade gliomas (LGGs) poses a special challenge for neurosurgeons due to their diffusely infiltrative growth and histopathological heterogeneity. Consequently, neuronavigation with multimodality imaging data, such as structural and metabolic data, fiber tracking, and 3D brain visualization, has been proposed to optimize surgery. However, currently no standardized protocol has been established for multimodality imaging data in modern glioma surgery. The aim of this study was therefore to define a specific protocol for multimodality imaging and navigation for suspected LGG. METHODS Fifty-one patients who underwent surgery for a diffusely infiltrating glioma with nonsignificant contrast enhancement on MRI and available multimodality imaging data were included. In the first 40 patients with glioma, the authors retrospectively reviewed the imaging data, including structural MRI (contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and FLAIR sequences), metabolic images derived from PET, or MR spectroscopy chemical shift imaging, fiber tracking, and 3D brain surface/vessel visualization, to define standardized image settings and specific indications for each imaging modality. The feasibility and surgical relevance of this new protocol was subsequently prospectively investigated during surgery with the assistance of an advanced electromagnetic navigation system in the remaining 11 patients. Furthermore, specific surgical outcome parameters, including the extent of resection, histological analysis of the metabolic hotspot, presence of a new postoperative neurological deficit, and intraoperative accuracy of 3D brain visualization models, were assessed in each of these patients. RESULTS After reviewing these first 40 cases of glioma, the authors defined a specific protocol with standardized image settings and specific indications that allows for optimal and simultaneous visualization of structural and metabolic data, fiber tracking, and 3D brain

  8. Research of protocols for optimization of exposure dose in abdominopelic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    This study measured the exposure dose during abdominal-pelvic CT exam which occupies 70% of CT exam and tried to propose a protocol for optimized exposure dose in abdomen and pelvis without affecting the imagery interpretation. The study scanned abdomen-pelvis using the current clinical scan method, the 120 kVp, auto exposure control(AEC), as 1 phase. As for the newly proposed 2 phase scan method, the study divided into 1 phase abdomen exam and 2 phase pelvis exam and each conducted tube voltage 120 kVp, AEC for abdomen exam, and fixed tube current method in 120 kVp, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400 mA for pelvis exam. The exposure dose value was compared using CTDIVOL, DLP value measured during scan, and average value of CT attenuation coefficient, noise, SNR from each scan image were obtained to evaluate the image. As for the result, scanning of 2 phase showed significant difference compared to 1 phase. In CTDIVOL value, the 2 phase showed 26% decrease in abdomen, 1.8∼59.5% decrease in pelvis for 100∼250 mA, 12.7%∼30% increase in pelvis for 300∼400 mA. Also, DLP value showed 53% decrease in abdomen and 41∼81% decrease in pelvis when scanned by 2 phase compared to 1 phase, but it was not statistically significant. As for the SNR, when scanning 2 phase close to heart, scanning 1 phase close to pelvis, scanning and scanning 1 phase at upper and lower abdomen, it was higher when scanning 2 phase for 200∼ 250 mA. Also, the CT number and noise was overall similar, but the noise was high close to pelvis. However, when scanning 2 phase for 250 mA close to pelvis, the noise value came out similar to 1 phase, and did not show statistically significant difference. It seems when separating pelvis to scan in 250 mA rather than 400 mA in 1 phase as before, it is expected to have reduced effect of exposure dose without difference in the quality of image. Thus, for patients who often get abdominal-pelvic CT exam, fertile women or children, this study proposes 2

  9. Triple rule-out CT in the emergency department: protocols and spectrum of imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frauenfelder, Thomas; Appenzeller, Philippe; Karlo, Christoph; Scheffel, Hans; Desbiolles, Lotus; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem; Schertler, Thomas [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-04-15

    Triage decisions in patients suffering from acute chest pain remain a challenge. The patient's history, initial cardiac enzyme levels, or initial electrocardiograms (ECG) often do not allow selecting the patients in whom further tests are needed. Numerous vascular and non-vascular chest problems, such as pulmonary embolism (PE), aortic dissection, or acute coronary syndrome, as well as pulmonary, pleural, or osseous lesions, must be taken into account. Nowadays, contrast-enhanced multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) has replaced previous invasive diagnostic procedures and currently represents the imaging modality of choice when the clinical suspicion of PE or acute aortic syndrome is raised. At the same time, CT is capable of detecting a multitude of non-vascular causes of acute chest pain, such as pneumonia, pericarditis, or fractures. Recent technical advances in CT technology have also shown great advantages for non-invasive imaging of the coronary arteries. In patients with acute chest pain, the optimization of triage decisions and cost-effectiveness using cardiac CT in the emergency department have been repetitively demonstrated. Triple rule-out CT denominates an ECG-gated protocol that allows for the depiction of the pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta, and coronary arteries within a single examination. This can be accomplished through the use of a dedicated contrast media administration regimen resulting in a simultaneous attenuation of the three vessel territories. This review is intended to demonstrate CT parameters and contrast media administration protocols for performing a triple rule-out CT and discusses radiation dose issues pertinent to the protocol. Typical life-threatening and non-life-threatening diseases causing acute chest pain are illustrated. (orig.)

  10. SU-F-207-02: Use of Postmortem Subjects for Subjective Image Quality Assessment in Abdominal CT Protocols with Iterative Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mench, A; Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Lamoureux, R; Smajdor, L; Cormack, B; Mohammed, T; Rill, L; Arreola, M; Sinclair, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: New radiation dose reduction technologies are emerging constantly in the medical imaging field. The latest of these technologies, iterative reconstruction (IR) in CT, presents the ability to reduce dose significantly and hence provides great opportunity for CT protocol optimization. However, without effective analysis of image quality, the reduction in radiation exposure becomes irrelevant. This work explores the use of postmortem subjects as an image quality assessment medium for protocol optimizations in abdominal CT. Methods: Three female postmortem subjects were scanned using the Abdomen-Pelvis (AP) protocol at reduced minimum tube current and target noise index (SD) settings of 12.5, 17.5, 20.0, and 25.0. Images were reconstructed using two strengths of iterative reconstruction. Radiologists and radiology residents from several subspecialties were asked to evaluate 8 AP image sets including the current facility default scan protocol and 7 scans with the parameters varied as listed above. Images were viewed in the soft tissue window and scored on a 3-point scale as acceptable, borderline acceptable, and unacceptable for diagnosis. The facility default AP scan was identified to the reviewer while the 7 remaining AP scans were randomized and de-identified of acquisition and reconstruction details. The observers were also asked to comment on the subjective image quality criteria they used for scoring images. This included visibility of specific anatomical structures and tissue textures. Results: Radiologists scored images as acceptable or borderline acceptable for target noise index settings of up to 20. Due to the postmortem subjects’ close representation of living human anatomy, readers were able to evaluate images as they would those of actual patients. Conclusion: Postmortem subjects have already been proven useful for direct CT organ dose measurements. This work illustrates the validity of their use for the crucial evaluation of image quality

  11. SU-F-207-02: Use of Postmortem Subjects for Subjective Image Quality Assessment in Abdominal CT Protocols with Iterative Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mench, A [Salem Hospital, Salem, OR (United States); Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Lamoureux, R; Smajdor, L; Cormack, B; Mohammed, T; Rill, L; Arreola, M [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sinclair, L [Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: New radiation dose reduction technologies are emerging constantly in the medical imaging field. The latest of these technologies, iterative reconstruction (IR) in CT, presents the ability to reduce dose significantly and hence provides great opportunity for CT protocol optimization. However, without effective analysis of image quality, the reduction in radiation exposure becomes irrelevant. This work explores the use of postmortem subjects as an image quality assessment medium for protocol optimizations in abdominal CT. Methods: Three female postmortem subjects were scanned using the Abdomen-Pelvis (AP) protocol at reduced minimum tube current and target noise index (SD) settings of 12.5, 17.5, 20.0, and 25.0. Images were reconstructed using two strengths of iterative reconstruction. Radiologists and radiology residents from several subspecialties were asked to evaluate 8 AP image sets including the current facility default scan protocol and 7 scans with the parameters varied as listed above. Images were viewed in the soft tissue window and scored on a 3-point scale as acceptable, borderline acceptable, and unacceptable for diagnosis. The facility default AP scan was identified to the reviewer while the 7 remaining AP scans were randomized and de-identified of acquisition and reconstruction details. The observers were also asked to comment on the subjective image quality criteria they used for scoring images. This included visibility of specific anatomical structures and tissue textures. Results: Radiologists scored images as acceptable or borderline acceptable for target noise index settings of up to 20. Due to the postmortem subjects’ close representation of living human anatomy, readers were able to evaluate images as they would those of actual patients. Conclusion: Postmortem subjects have already been proven useful for direct CT organ dose measurements. This work illustrates the validity of their use for the crucial evaluation of image quality

  12. [Multidisciplinary protocol for computed tomography imaging and angiographic embolization of splenic injury due to trauma: assessment of pre-protocol and post-protocol outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, M; Sabaté, A; Magalló, P; García, M A; Domínguez, J; de Lama, M E; López, S

    2011-11-01

    To assess conservative treatment of splenic injury due to trauma, following a protocol for computed tomography (CT) and angiographic embolization. To quantify the predictive value of CT for detecting bleeding and need for embolization. The care protocol developed by the multidisciplinary team consisted of angiography with embolization of lesions revealed by contrast extravasation under CT as well as embolization of grade III-V injuries observed, or grade I-II injuries causing hemodynamic instability and/or need for blood transfusion. We collected data on demographic variables, injury severity score (ISS), angiographic findings, and injuries revealed by CT. Pre-protocol and post-protocol outcomes were compared. The sensitivity and specificity of CT findings were calculated for all patients who required angiographic embolization. Forty-four and 30 angiographies were performed in the pre- and post-protocol periods, respectively. The mean (SD) ISSs in the two periods were 25 (11) and 26 (12), respectively. A total of 24 (54%) embolizations were performed in the pre-protocol period and 28 (98%) after implementation of the protocol. Two and 7 embolizations involved the spleen in the 2 periods, respectively; abdominal laparotomies numbered 32 and 25, respectively, and 10 (31%) vs 4 (16%) splenectomies were performed. The specificity and sensitivity values for contrast extravasation found on CT and followed by embolization were 77.7% and 79.5%. The implementation of this multidisciplinary protocol using CT imaging and angiographic embolization led to a decrease in the number of splenectomies. The protocol allows us to take a more conservative treatment approach.

  13. Active SAmpling Protocol (ASAP) to Optimize Individual Neurocognitive Hypothesis Testing: A BCI-Inspired Dynamic Experimental Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Gaëtan; Lecaignard, Françoise; Otman, Anatole; Maby, Emmanuel; Mattout, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    The relatively young field of Brain-Computer Interfaces has promoted the use of electrophysiology and neuroimaging in real-time. In the meantime, cognitive neuroscience studies, which make extensive use of functional exploration techniques, have evolved toward model-based experiments and fine hypothesis testing protocols. Although these two developments are mostly unrelated, we argue that, brought together, they may trigger an important shift in the way experimental paradigms are being designed, which should prove fruitful to both endeavors. This change simply consists in using real-time neuroimaging in order to optimize advanced neurocognitive hypothesis testing. We refer to this new approach as the instantiation of an Active SAmpling Protocol (ASAP). As opposed to classical (static) experimental protocols, ASAP implements online model comparison, enabling the optimization of design parameters (e.g., stimuli) during the course of data acquisition. This follows the well-known principle of sequential hypothesis testing. What is radically new, however, is our ability to perform online processing of the huge amount of complex data that brain imaging techniques provide. This is all the more relevant at a time when physiological and psychological processes are beginning to be approached using more realistic, generative models which may be difficult to tease apart empirically. Based upon Bayesian inference, ASAP proposes a generic and principled way to optimize experimental design adaptively. In this perspective paper, we summarize the main steps in ASAP. Using synthetic data we illustrate its superiority in selecting the right perceptual model compared to a classical design. Finally, we briefly discuss its future potential for basic and clinical neuroscience as well as some remaining challenges.

  14. Optimal Scale Edge Detection Utilizing Noise within Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Khashman

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Edge detection techniques have common problems that include poor edge detection in low contrast images, speed of recognition and high computational cost. An efficient solution to the edge detection of objects in low to high contrast images is scale space analysis. However, this approach is time consuming and computationally expensive. These expenses can be marginally reduced if an optimal scale is found in scale space edge detection. This paper presents a new approach to detecting objects within images using noise within the images. The novel idea is based on selecting one optimal scale for the entire image at which scale space edge detection can be applied. The selection of an ideal scale is based on the hypothesis that "the optimal edge detection scale (ideal scale depends on the noise within an image". This paper aims at providing the experimental evidence on the relationship between the optimal scale and the noise within images.

  15. Optimization of Nonambulant Mass Casualty Decontamination Protocols as Part of an Initial or Specialist Operational Response to Chemical Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcott, Robert P; Mitchell, Hannah; Matar, Hazem

    2018-05-30

    The UK's Initial Operational Response (IOR) is a new process for improving the survival of multiple casualties following a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear incident. Whilst the introduction of IOR represents a patient-focused response for ambulant casualties, there is currently no provision for disrobe and dry decontamination of nonambulant casualties. Moreover, the current specialist operational response (SOR) protocol for nonambulant casualty decontamination (also referred to as "clinical decontamination") has not been subject to rigorous evaluation or development. Therefore, the aim of this study was to confirm the effectiveness of putatively optimized dry (IOR) and wet (SOR) protocols for nonambulant decontamination in human volunteers. Dry and wet decontamination protocols were objectively evaluated using human volunteers. Decontamination effectiveness was quantified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the recovery of a chemical warfare agent simulant (methylsalicylate) from skin and hair of volunteers, with whole-body fluorescence imaging to quantify the skin distribution of residual simulant. Both the dry and wet decontamination processes were rapid (3 and 4 min, respectively) and were effective in removing simulant from the hair and skin of volunteers, with no observable adverse effects related to skin surface spreading of contaminant. Further studies are required to assess the combined effectiveness of dry and wet decontamination under more realistic conditions and to develop appropriate operational procedures that ensure the safety of first responders.

  16. A new optimal seam method for seamless image stitching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jiale; Chen, Shengyong; Cheng, Xu; Han, Ying; Zhao, Meng

    2017-07-01

    A novel optimal seam method which aims to stitch those images with overlapping area more seamlessly has been propos ed. Considering the traditional gradient domain optimal seam method and fusion algorithm result in bad color difference measurement and taking a long time respectively, the input images would be converted to HSV space and a new energy function is designed to seek optimal stitching path. To smooth the optimal stitching path, a simplified pixel correction and weighted average method are utilized individually. The proposed methods exhibit performance in eliminating the stitching seam compared with the traditional gradient optimal seam and high efficiency with multi-band blending algorithm.

  17. Image Mosaic Techniques OptimizationUsing Wavelet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUAn-qi; CUILi

    2014-01-01

    This essay concentrates on two key procedures of image mosaic——image registration and imagefusion.Becauseof the character of geometric transformation invariance of edge points, wecalculate the angle difference of the direction vector ofedge points in different images anddraw an angle difference histogramto adjust the rotationproblem. Through this way, algorithm based on gray information is expandedandcan be used in images withdisplacementand rotation. Inthe term of image fusion, wavelet multi-scale analysis is used to fuse spliced images. In order to choose the best method of imagefusion,weevaluate the results of different methods of image fusion by cross entropy.

  18. Optimization of Segmentation Quality of Integrated Circuit Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintautas Mušketas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigation into the application of genetic algorithms for the segmentation of the active regions of integrated circuit images. This article is dedicated to a theoretical examination of the applied methods (morphological dilation, erosion, hit-and-miss, threshold and describes genetic algorithms, image segmentation as optimization problem. The genetic optimization of the predefined filter sequence parameters is carried out. Improvement to segmentation accuracy using a non optimized filter sequence makes 6%.Artcile in Lithuanian

  19. Is gait variability reliable in older adults and Parkinson's disease? Towards an optimal testing protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galna, Brook; Lord, Sue; Rochester, Lynn

    2013-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of gait variability in research and clinical studies, testing protocols designed to optimise its reliability have not been established. This study evaluates the impact of testing protocol and pathology on the reliability of gait variability. To (i) estimate the reliability of gait variability during continuous and intermittent walking protocols in older adults and people with Parkinson's disease (PD), (ii) determine optimal number of steps for acceptable levels of reliability of gait variability and (iii) provide sample size estimates for use in clinical trials. Gait variability was measured twice, one week apart, in 27 older adults and 25 PD participants. Participants walked at their preferred pace during: (i) a continuous 2 min walk and (ii) 3 intermittent walks over a 12 m walkway. Gait variability was calculated as the within-person standard deviation for step velocity, length and width, and step, stance and swing duration. Reliability of gait variability ranged from poor to excellent (intra class correlations .041-.860; relative limits of agreement 34-89%). Gait variability was more reliable during continuous walks. Control and PD participants demonstrated similar reliability. Increasing the number of steps improved reliability, with most improvement seen across the first 30 steps. In this study, we identified testing protocols that improve the reliability of measuring gait variability. We recommend using a continuous walking protocol and to collect no fewer than 30 steps. Early PD does not appear to impact negatively on the reliability of gait variability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Design and Analysis of Optimization Algorithms to Minimize Cryptographic Processing in BGP Security Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Vinay K; Montgomery, Doug

    2017-07-01

    The Internet is subject to attacks due to vulnerabilities in its routing protocols. One proposed approach to attain greater security is to cryptographically protect network reachability announcements exchanged between Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routers. This study proposes and evaluates the performance and efficiency of various optimization algorithms for validation of digitally signed BGP updates. In particular, this investigation focuses on the BGPSEC (BGP with SECurity extensions) protocol, currently under consideration for standardization in the Internet Engineering Task Force. We analyze three basic BGPSEC update processing algorithms: Unoptimized, Cache Common Segments (CCS) optimization, and Best Path Only (BPO) optimization. We further propose and study cache management schemes to be used in conjunction with the CCS and BPO algorithms. The performance metrics used in the analyses are: (1) routing table convergence time after BGPSEC peering reset or router reboot events and (2) peak-second signature verification workload. Both analytical modeling and detailed trace-driven simulation were performed. Results show that the BPO algorithm is 330% to 628% faster than the unoptimized algorithm for routing table convergence in a typical Internet core-facing provider edge router.

  1. Single-cell qPCR on dispersed primary pituitary cells -an optimized protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haug Trude M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of false positives is a potential problem in single-cell PCR experiments. This paper describes an optimized protocol for single-cell qPCR measurements in primary pituitary cell cultures following patch-clamp recordings. Two different cell harvesting methods were assessed using both the GH4 prolactin producing cell line from rat, and primary cell culture from fish pituitaries. Results Harvesting whole cells followed by cell lysis and qPCR performed satisfactory on the GH4 cell line. However, harvesting of whole cells from primary pituitary cultures regularly produced false positives, probably due to RNA leakage from cells ruptured during the dispersion of the pituitary cells. To reduce RNA contamination affecting the results, we optimized the conditions by harvesting only the cytosol through a patch pipette, subsequent to electrophysiological experiments. Two important factors proved crucial for reliable harvesting. First, silanizing the patch pipette glass prevented foreign extracellular RNA from attaching to charged residues on the glass surface. Second, substituting the commonly used perforating antibiotic amphotericin B with β-escin allowed efficient cytosol harvest without loosing the giga seal. Importantly, the two harvesting protocols revealed no difference in RNA isolation efficiency. Conclusion Depending on the cell type and preparation, validation of the harvesting technique is extremely important as contaminations may give false positives. Here we present an optimized protocol allowing secure harvesting of RNA from single cells in primary pituitary cell culture following perforated whole cell patch clamp experiments.

  2. A review of imaging protocols for suspected skeletal dysplasia and a proposal for standardisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Sarah G.; Calder, Alistair D.; Offiah, Amaka C.; Negus, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Expert radiology opinions are often requested to aid diagnosis of skeletal dysplasias or dysostoses, but due to variability in the imaging protocols used at different centres the views presented may be considered inadequate or incomplete resulting in diagnostic delays and increased patient and family anxiety. We propose the introduction of a standardised protocol that may be adapted in certain specific situations. (orig.)

  3. A review of imaging protocols for suspected skeletal dysplasia and a proposal for standardisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Sarah G. [Royal Surrey County Hospital, Department of Radiology, Surrey (United Kingdom); Calder, Alistair D. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Offiah, Amaka C. [Sheffield Children' s NHS Foundation Trust, The University of Sheffield Academic Unit of Child Health, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Negus, Samantha [St George' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    Expert radiology opinions are often requested to aid diagnosis of skeletal dysplasias or dysostoses, but due to variability in the imaging protocols used at different centres the views presented may be considered inadequate or incomplete resulting in diagnostic delays and increased patient and family anxiety. We propose the introduction of a standardised protocol that may be adapted in certain specific situations. (orig.)

  4. The preparation of Drosophila embryos for live-imaging using the hanging drop protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bruce H; McMillan, Stephanie C; Chaudhary, Roopali

    2009-03-13

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based timelapse live-imaging is a powerful technique for studying the genetic regulation of dynamic processes such as tissue morphogenesis, cell-cell adhesion, or cell death. Drosophila embryos expressing GFP are readily imaged using either stereoscopic or confocal microscopy. A goal of any live-imaging protocol is to minimize detrimental effects such as dehydration and hypoxia. Previous protocols for preparing Drosophila embryos for live-imaging analysis have involved placing dechorionated embryos in halocarbon oil and sandwiching them between a halocarbon gas-permeable membrane and a coverslip. The introduction of compression through mounting embryos in this manner represents an undesirable complication for any biomechanical-based analysis of morphogenesis. Our method, which we call the hanging drop protocol, results in excellent viability of embryos during live imaging and does not require that embryos be compressed. Briefly, the hanging drop protocol involves the placement of embryos in a drop of halocarbon oil that is suspended from a coverslip, which is, in turn, fixed in position over a humid chamber. In addition to providing gas exchange and preventing dehydration, this arrangement takes advantage of the buoyancy of embryos in halocarbon oil to prevent them from drifting out of position during timelapse acquisition. This video describes in detail how to collect and prepare Drosophila embryos for live imaging using the hanging drop protocol. This protocol is suitable for imaging dechorionated embryos using stereomicroscopy or any upright compound fluorescence microscope.

  5. Investigation of Optimal Integrated Circuit Raster Image Vectorization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonas Jasevičius

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Visual analysis of integrated circuit layer requires raster image vectorization stage to extract layer topology data to CAD tools. In this paper vectorization problems of raster IC layer images are presented. Various line extraction from raster images algorithms and their properties are discussed. Optimal raster image vectorization method was developed which allows utilization of common vectorization algorithms to achieve the best possible extracted vector data match with perfect manual vectorization results. To develop the optimal method, vectorized data quality dependence on initial raster image skeleton filter selection was assessed.Article in Lithuanian

  6. Development of an optimized random amplified polymorphic DNA protocol for fingerprinting of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashayeri-Panah, M; Eftekhar, F; Feizabadi, M M

    2012-04-01

    To develop an optimized random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) protocol for fingerprinting clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Employing factorial design of experiments, repeatable amplification patterns were obtained for 54 nosocomial isolates using 1 μmol 1(-1) primer, 4 mmol 1(-1) MgCl(2), 0·4 mmol 1(-1) dNTPs, 2·5 U Taq DNA polymerase and 90 ng DNA template in a total volume of 25 μl. The optimum thermocycling program was: initial denaturation at 94°C for 4 min followed by 50 cycles of 1 min at 94°C, 2 min at 34°C, 2 min at 72°C and a final extension at 72°C for 10 min. The optimized RAPD protocol was highly discriminatory (Simpson's diversity index, 0·982), and all isolates were typable with repeatable patterns (Pearson's similarity coefficient ≈ 100%). Seven main clusters were obtained on a similarity level of 70% and 32 distinct clusters on a similarity level of 85%, reflecting the heterogeneity of the isolates. Systematic optimization of RAPD generated reliable DNA fingerprints for nosocomial isolates of K. pneumoniae. This is the first report on RAPD optimization based on factorial design of experiments for discrimination of K. pneumoniae. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. TH-B-207B-00: Pediatric Image Quality Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children

  8. TH-B-207B-00: Pediatric Image Quality Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children.

  9. SU-E-J-113: The Influence of Optimizing Pediatric CT Simulator Protocols On the Treatment Dose Calculation in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Hu, Q; Tie, J; Wu, H [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiotherapy, Peking University Cancer Hospital ' Institute, Beijing (China); Deng, J [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of applying optimized scanning protocols for pediatric CT simulation by quantifying the dosimetric inaccuracy introduced by using a fixed HU to density conversion. Methods: The images of a CIRS electron density reference phantom (Model 062) were acquired by a Siemens CT simulator (Sensation Open) using the following settings of tube voltage and beam current: 120 kV/190mA (the reference protocol used to calibrate CT for our treatment planning system (TPS)); Fixed 190mA combined with all available kV: 80, 100, and 140; fixed 120 kV and various current from 37 to 444 mA (scanner extremes) with interval of 30 mA. To avoid the HU uncertainty of point sampling in the various inserts of known electron densities, the mean CT numbers of the central cylindrical volume were calculated using DICOMan software. The doses per 100 MU to the reference point (SAD=100cm, Depth=10cm, Field=10X10cm, 6MV photon beam) in a virtual cubic phantom (30X30X30cm) were calculated using Eclipse TPS (calculation model: AcurosXB-11031) by assigning the CT numbers to HU of typical materials acquired by various protocols. Results: For the inserts of densities less than muscle, CT number fluctuations of all protocols were within the tolerance of 10 HU as accepted by AAPM-TG66. For more condensed materials, fixed kV yielded stable HU with any mA combination where largest disparities were found in 1750mg/cc insert: HU{sub reference}=1801(106.6cGy), HU{sub minimum}=1799 (106.6cGy, error{sub dose}=0.00%), HU{sub maximum}=1815 (106.8cGy, error{sub dose}=0.19%). Yet greater disagreements were observed with increasing density when kV was modified: HU{sub minimum}=1646 (104.5cGy, error{sub dose}=- 1.97%), HU{sub maximum}=2487 (116.4cGy, error{sub dose}=9.19%) in 1750mg/cc insert. Conclusion: Without affecting treatment dose calculation, personalized mA optimization of CT simulator can be conducted by fixing kV for a better cost-effectiveness of imaging dose and quality

  10. SU-E-I-68: Practical Considerations On Implementation of the Image Gently Pediatric CT Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Adams, C; Lumby, C; Dillon, J; Woods, E; Richer, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: One limitation associated with the Image Gently pediatric CT protocols is practical implementation of the recommended manual techniques. Inconsistency as a result of different practice is a possibility among technologist. An additional concern is the added risk of data error that would result in over or underexposure. The Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) features automatically reduce radiation for children. However, they do not work efficiently for the patients of very small size and relative large size. This study aims to implement the Image Gently pediatric CT protocols in the practical setting while maintaining the use of AEC features for pediatric patients of varying size. Methods: Anthropomorphological abdomen phantoms were scanned in a CT scanner using the Image Gently pediatric protocols, the AEC technique with a fixed adult baseline, and automatic protocols with various baselines. The baselines were adjusted corresponding to patient age, weight and posterioranterior thickness to match the Image Gently pediatric CT manual techniques. CTDIvol was recorded for each examination. Image noise was measured and recorded for image quality comparison. Clinical images were evaluated by pediatric radiologists. Results: By adjusting vendor default baselines used in the automatic techniques, radiation dose and image quality can match those of the Image Gently manual techniques. In practice, this can be achieved by dividing pediatric patients into three major groups for technologist reference: infant, small child, and large child. Further division can be done but will increase the number of CT protocols. For each group, AEC can efficiently adjust acquisition techniques for children. This implementation significantly overcomes the limitation of the Image Gently manual techniques. Conclusion: Considering the effectiveness in clinical practice, Image Gently Pediatric CT protocols can be implemented in accordance with AEC techniques, with adjusted baselines, to

  11. Optimization of an Efficient and Sustainable Sonogashira Cross-Coupling Protocol

    KAUST Repository

    Walter, Philipp E.

    2012-12-01

    Cross coupling reactions are a well-established tool in modern organic synthesis and play a crucial role in the synthesis of a high number of organic compounds. Their importance is highlighted by the Nobel Prize in chemistry to Suzuki, Heck and Negishi in 2010. The increasing importance of sustainability requirements in chemical production has furthermore promoted the development of cross-coupling protocols that comply with the principles of “Green Chemistry”1. The Sonogashira reaction is today the most versatile and powerful way to generate aryl alkynes, a moiety recurring in many pharmaceutical and natural products. Despite many improvements to the original reaction, reports on generally applicable protocols that work under sustainable conditions are scarce. Our group recently reported an efficient protocol for a copperfree Sonogashira cross-coupling at low temperature, in aqueous medium and with no addition of organic solvents or additives2. The goal of this work was to further investigate the effects of different reaction parameters on the catalytic activity in order to optimize the protocol. Limitations of the protocol were tested in respect to reaction temperature, heating method, atmosphere, base type and amount, catalyst loading, reaction time and work up procedure. The reaction worked successfully under air and results were not affected by the presence of oxygen in the water phase. Among a variety of bases tested, triethylamine was confirmed to give the best results and its required excess could be reduced from nine to four equivalents. Catalyst loading could also be reduced by up to 90%: Good to near quantitative yields for a broad range of substrates were achieved using a catalyst concentration of 0.25mol% and 5 eq of Et3N at 50°C while more reactive substrates could be coupled with a catalyst concentration as low as 0.025mol%. Filtration experiments showed the possibility of a simplified work up procedure and a protocol completely free of organic

  12. Penicillin allergy: optimizing diagnostic protocols, public health implications, and future research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Unverified penicillin allergy is being increasingly recognized as a public health concern. The ideal protocol for verifying true clinically significant IgE-mediated penicillin allergy needs to use only commercially available materials, be well tolerated and easy to perform in both the inpatient and outpatient settings, and minimize false-positive determinations. This review concentrates on articles published in 2013 and 2014 that present new data relating to the diagnosis and management of penicillin allergy. Penicillin allergy can be safely evaluated at this time, in patients with an appropriate clinical history of penicillin allergy, using only penicilloyl-poly-lysine and native penicillin G as skin test reagents, if an oral challenge with amoxicillin 250 mg, followed by 1 h of observation, is given to all skin test negative individuals. Millions of individuals falsely labeled with penicillin allergy need to be evaluated to safely allow them to use penicillin-class antibiotics and avoid morbidity associated with penicillin avoidance. Further research is needed to determine optimal protocol(s). There will still be a 1-2% rate of adverse reactions reported with all future therapeutic penicillin-class antibiotic use, even with optimal methods used to determine acute penicillin tolerance. Only a small minority of these new reactions will be IgE-mediated.

  13. Advanced CUBIC protocols for whole-brain and whole-body clearing and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susaki, Etsuo A; Tainaka, Kazuki; Perrin, Dimitri; Yukinaga, Hiroko; Kuno, Akihiro; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a protocol for advanced CUBIC (Clear, Unobstructed Brain/Body Imaging Cocktails and Computational analysis). The CUBIC protocol enables simple and efficient organ clearing, rapid imaging by light-sheet microscopy and quantitative imaging analysis of multiple samples. The organ or body is cleared by immersion for 1-14 d, with the exact time required dependent on the sample type and the experimental purposes. A single imaging set can be completed in 30-60 min. Image processing and analysis can take whole-brain neural activities at single-cell resolution using Arc-dVenus transgenic (Tg) mice. CUBIC informatics calculated the Venus signal subtraction, comparing different brains at a whole-organ scale. These protocols provide a platform for organism-level systems biology by comprehensively detecting cells in a whole organ or body.

  14. Random mask optimization for fast neutron coded aperture imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Marleau, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Brubaker, Erik [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    In coded aperture imaging, one of the most important factors determining the quality of reconstructed images is the choice of mask/aperture pattern. In many applications, uniformly redundant arrays (URAs) are widely accepted as the optimal mask pattern. Under ideal conditions, thin and highly opaque masks, URA patterns are mathematically constructed to provide artifact-free reconstruction however, the number of URAs for a chosen number of mask elements is limited and when highly penetrating particles such as fast neutrons and high-energy gamma-rays are being imaged, the optimum is seldom achieved. In this case more robust mask patterns that provide better reconstructed image quality may exist. Through the use of heuristic optimization methods and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction, we show that for both point and extended neutron sources a random mask pattern can be optimized to provide better image quality than that of a URA.

  15. Optimized energy-delay sub-network routing protocol development and implementation for wireless sensor networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, James W; Zawodniok, Maciej; Jagannathan, S; Watkins, Steve E

    2008-01-01

    The development and the implementation issues of a reactive optimized energy-delay sub-network routing (OEDSR) protocol for wireless sensor networks (WSN) are introduced and its performance is contrasted with the popular ad hoc on-demand distance vector (AODV) routing protocol. Analytical results illustrate the performance of the proposed OEDSR protocol, while experimental results utilizing a hardware testbed under various scenarios demonstrate improvements in energy efficiency of the OEDSR protocol. A hardware platform constructed at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR), now the Missouri University of Science and Technology (MST), based on the Generation 4 Smart Sensor Node (G4-SSN) prototyping platform is also described. Performance improvements are shown in terms of end-to-end (E2E) delay, throughput, route-set-up time and drop rates and energy usage is given for three topologies, including a mobile topology. Additionally, results from the hardware testbed provide valuable lessons for network deployments. Under testing OEDSR provides a factor of ten improvement in the energy used in the routing session and extends network lifetime compared to AODV. Depletion experiments show that the time until the first node failure is extended by a factor of three with the network depleting and network lifetime is extended by 6.7%

  16. Image Edge Tracking via Ant Colony Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruowei; Wu, Hongkun; Liu, Shilong; Rahman, M. A.; Liu, Sanchi; Kwok, Ngai Ming

    2018-04-01

    A good edge plot should use continuous thin lines to describe the complete contour of the captured object. However, the detection of weak edges is a challenging task because of the associated low pixel intensities. Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) has been employed by many researchers to address this problem. The algorithm is a meta-heuristic method developed by mimicking the natural behaviour of ants. It uses iterative searches to find the optimal solution that cannot be found via traditional optimization approaches. In this work, ACO is employed to track and repair broken edges obtained via conventional Sobel edge detector to produced a result with more connected edges.

  17. An Image Morphing Technique Based on Optimal Mass Preserving Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L2 mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods. PMID:17547128

  18. Optimal protocol for maximum work extraction in a feedback process with a time-varying potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chulan

    2017-12-01

    The nonequilibrium nature of information thermodynamics is characterized by the inequality or non-negativity of the total entropy change of the system, memory, and reservoir. Mutual information change plays a crucial role in the inequality, in particular if work is extracted and the paradox of Maxwell's demon is raised. We consider the Brownian information engine where the protocol set of the harmonic potential is initially chosen by the measurement and varies in time. We confirm the inequality of the total entropy change by calculating, in detail, the entropic terms including the mutual information change. We rigorously find the optimal values of the time-dependent protocol for maximum extraction of work both for the finite-time and the quasi-static process.

  19. Diagnosis of scaphoid fracture: optimal imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geijer M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mats Geijer Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skåne University Hospital and Lund University, Lund, Sweden Abstract: This review aims to provide an overview of modern imaging techniques for evaluation of scaphoid fracture, with emphasis on occult fractures and an outlook on the possible evolution of imaging; it also gives an overview of the pathologic and anatomic basis for selection of techniques. Displaced scaphoid fractures detected by wrist radiography, with or without special scaphoid views, pose no diagnostic problems. After wrist trauma with clinically suspected scaphoid fracture and normal scaphoid radiography, most patients will have no clinically important fracture. Between 5% and 19% of patients (on average 16% in meta-analyses will, however, have an occult scaphoid fracture which, untreated, may lead to later, potentially devastating, complications. Follow-up imaging may be done with repeat radiography, tomosynthesis, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, or bone scintigraphy. However, no method is perfect, and choice of imaging may be based on availability, cost, perceived accuracy, or personal preference. Generally, MRI and bone scintigraphy are regarded as the most sensitive modalities, but both are flawed by false positive results at various rates. Keywords: occult fracture, wrist, radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide imaging

  20. An optimized protocol for isolating primary epithelial cell chromatin for ChIP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Browne

    Full Text Available A critical part of generating robust chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP data is the optimization of chromatin purification and size selection. This is particularly important when ChIP is combined with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq to identify targets of DNA-binding proteins, genome-wide. Current protocols refined by the ENCODE consortium generally use a two-step cell lysis procedure that is applicable to a wide variety of cell types. However, the isolation and size selection of chromatin from primary human epithelial cells may often be particularly challenging. These cells tend to form sheets of formaldehyde cross-linked material in which cells are resistant to membrane lysis, nuclei are not released and subsequent sonication produces extensive high molecular weight contamination. Here we describe an optimized protocol to prepare high quality ChIP-grade chromatin from primary human bronchial epithelial cells. The ENCODE protocol was used as a starting point to which we added the following key steps to separate the sheets of formaldehyde-fixed cells prior to lysis. (1 Incubation of the formaldehyde-fixed adherent cells in Trypsin-EDTA (0.25% room temperature for no longer than 5 min. (2 Equilibration of the fixed cells in detergent-free lysis buffers prior to each lysis step. (3 The addition of 0.5% Triton X-100 to the complete cell membrane lysis buffer. (4 Passing the cell suspension (in complete cell membrane lysis buffer through a 25-gauge needle followed by continuous agitation on ice for 35 min. Each step of the modified protocol was documented by light microscopy using the Methyl Green-Pyronin dual dye, which stains cytoplasm red (Pyronin and the nuclei grey-blue (Methyl green. This modified method is reproducibly effective at producing high quality sheared chromatin for ChIP and is equally applicable to other epithelial cell types.

  1. ProxImaL: efficient image optimization using proximal algorithms

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Diamond, Steven; Nieß ner, Matthias; Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan; Heidrich, Wolfgang; Wetzstein, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    domain-specific language and compiler for image optimization problems that makes it easy to experiment with different problem formulations and algorithm choices. The language uses proximal operators as the fundamental building blocks of a variety

  2. An objective method to optimize the MR sequence set for plaque classification in carotid vessel wall images using automated image segmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald van 't Klooster

    Full Text Available A typical MR imaging protocol to study the status of atherosclerosis in the carotid artery consists of the application of multiple MR sequences. Since scanner time is limited, a balance has to be reached between the duration of the applied MR protocol and the quantity and quality of the resulting images which are needed to assess the disease. In this study an objective method to optimize the MR sequence set for classification of soft plaque in vessel wall images of the carotid artery using automated image segmentation was developed. The automated method employs statistical pattern recognition techniques and was developed based on an extensive set of MR contrast weightings and corresponding manual segmentations of the vessel wall and soft plaque components, which were validated by histological sections. Evaluation of the results from nine contrast weightings showed the tradeoff between scan duration and automated image segmentation performance. For our dataset the best segmentation performance was achieved by selecting five contrast weightings. Similar performance was achieved with a set of three contrast weightings, which resulted in a reduction of scan time by more than 60%. The presented approach can help others to optimize MR imaging protocols by investigating the tradeoff between scan duration and automated image segmentation performance possibly leading to shorter scanning times and better image interpretation. This approach can potentially also be applied to other research fields focusing on different diseases and anatomical regions.

  3. Solving iTOUGH2 simulation and optimization problems using the PEST protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finsterle, S.A.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-02-01

    The PEST protocol has been implemented into the iTOUGH2 code, allowing the user to link any simulation program (with ASCII-based inputs and outputs) to iTOUGH2's sensitivity analysis, inverse modeling, and uncertainty quantification capabilities. These application models can be pre- or post-processors of the TOUGH2 non-isothermal multiphase flow and transport simulator, or programs that are unrelated to the TOUGH suite of codes. PEST-style template and instruction files are used, respectively, to pass input parameters updated by the iTOUGH2 optimization routines to the model, and to retrieve the model-calculated values that correspond to observable variables. We summarize the iTOUGH2 capabilities and demonstrate the flexibility added by the PEST protocol for the solution of a variety of simulation-optimization problems. In particular, the combination of loosely coupled and tightly integrated simulation and optimization routines provides both the flexibility and control needed to solve challenging inversion problems for the analysis of multiphase subsurface flow and transport systems.

  4. Outcomes of Optimized over Standard Protocol of Rabbit Antithymocyte Globulin for Severe Aplastic Anemia: A Single-Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Meili; Shao, Yingqi; Huang, Jinbo; Huang, Zhendong; Zhang, Jing; Nie, Neng; Zheng, Yizhou

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous reports showed that outcome of rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) was not satisfactory as the first-line therapy for severe aplastic anemia (SAA). We explored a modifying schedule of administration of rATG. Design and Methods Outcomes of a cohort of 175 SAA patients, including 51 patients administered with standard protocol (3.55 mg/kg/d for 5 days) and 124 cases with optimized protocol (1.97 mg/kg/d for 9 days) of rATG plus cyclosporine (CSA), were analyzed retrospectively. Results Of all 175 patients, response rates at 3 and 6 months were 36.6% and 56.0%, respectively. 51 cases received standard protocol had poor responses at 3 (25.5%) and 6 months (41.2%). However, 124 patients received optimized protocol had better responses at 3 (41.1%, P = 0.14) and 6 (62.1%, P = 0.01). Higher incidences of infection (57.1% versus 37.9%, P = 0.02) and early mortality (17.9% versus 0.8%, P<0.001) occurred in patients received standard protocol compared with optimized protocol. The 5-year overall survival in favor of the optimized over standard rATG protocol (76.0% versus. 50.3%, P<0.001) was observed. By multivariate analysis, optimized protocol (RR = 2.21, P = 0.04), response at 3 months (RR = 10.31, P = 0.03) and shorter interval (<23 days) between diagnosis and initial dose of rATG (RR = 5.35, P = 0.002) were independent favorable predictors of overall survival. Conclusions Optimized instead of standard rATG protocol in combination with CSA remained efficacious as a first-line immunosuppressive regimen for SAA. PMID:23554855

  5. Optimization of contrast of MR images in imaging of knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szyblinski, K.; Bacic, G.

    1994-01-01

    The work describes the method of contrast optimization in magnetic resonance imaging. Computer program presented in the report allows analysis of contrast in selected tissues as a function of experiment parameters. Application to imaging of knee joint is presented

  6. Recurrence of Ewing sarcoma: Is detection by imaging follow-up protocol associated with survival advantage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Melina; Ranft, Andreas; Langer, Thorsten; Jürgens, Herbert; Kreyer, Justus; Vieth, Volker; Schäfers, Michael; Weckesser, Matthias; Simon, Thorsten; Hassenpflug, Wolf; Corbacioglu, Selim; Bielack, Stefan; Mayer-Steinacker, Regina; Kühne, Thomas; van den Berg, Henk; Gelderblom, Hans; Bauer, Sebastian; Stegger, Lars; Dirksen, Uta

    2018-01-01

    The Cooperative Ewing Sarcoma Study and the Late Effects Surveillance System of the Society for Paediatric Oncology and Haematology recommend a structured follow-up imaging protocol (FUIP) for patients with Ewing sarcoma (EwS) with decreasing frequency of imaging over the first 5 years. The present

  7. Optimization of Butterworth filter for brain SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Maruno, Hirotaka; Yui, Nobuharu

    1993-01-01

    A method has been described to optimize the cutoff frequency of the Butterworth filter for brain SPECT imaging. Since a computer simulation study has demonstrated that separation between an object signal and the random noise in projection images in a spatial-frequency domain is influenced by the total number of counts, the cutoff frequency of the Butterworth filter should be optimized for individual subjects according to total counts in a study. To reveal the relationship between the optimal cutoff frequencies and total counts in brain SPECT study, we used a normal volunteer and 99m Tc hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) to obtain projection sets with different total counts. High quality images were created from a projection set with an acquisition time of 300-seconds per projection. The filter was optimized by calculating mean square errors from high quality images visually inspecting filtered reconstructed images. Dependence between total counts and optimal cutoff frequencies was clearly demonstrated in a nomogram. Using this nomogram, the optimal cutoff frequency for each study can be estimated from total counts, maximizing visual image quality. The results suggest that the cutoff frequency of Butterworth filter should be determined by referring to total counts in each study. (author)

  8. Cochlear implant tailored imaging protocol: What clinicians need to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tougan Taha

    2015-03-01

    Clinical relevance/application: SNHL is a malfunction of the inner ear, vestibulocochlear nerve or central auditory pathway. Imaging helps to establish treatment regimens that improve auditory function.

  9. Optimization of shearography image quality analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafhayudi Jamro

    2005-01-01

    Shearography is an optical technique based on speckle pattern to measure the deformation of the object surface in which the fringe pattern is obtained through the correlation analysis from the speckle pattern. Analysis of fringe pattern for engineering application is limited for qualitative measurement. Therefore, for further analysis that lead to qualitative data, series of image processing mechanism are involved. In this paper, the fringe pattern for qualitative analysis is discussed. In principal field of applications is qualitative non-destructive testing such as detecting discontinuity, defect in the material structure, locating fatigue zones and etc and all these required image processing application. In order to performed image optimisation successfully, the noise in the fringe pattern must be minimised and the fringe pattern itself must be maximise. This can be achieved by applying a filtering method with a kernel size ranging from 2 X 2 to 7 X 7 pixels size and also applying equalizer in the image processing. (Author)

  10. Discrete Particle Swarm Optimization Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks with Multiple Mobile Sinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Liu, Fagui; Cao, Jianneng; Wang, Liangming

    2016-07-14

    Mobile sinks can achieve load-balancing and energy-consumption balancing across the wireless sensor networks (WSNs). However, the frequent change of the paths between source nodes and the sinks caused by sink mobility introduces significant overhead in terms of energy and packet delays. To enhance network performance of WSNs with mobile sinks (MWSNs), we present an efficient routing strategy, which is formulated as an optimization problem and employs the particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO) to build the optimal routing paths. However, the conventional PSO is insufficient to solve discrete routing optimization problems. Therefore, a novel greedy discrete particle swarm optimization with memory (GMDPSO) is put forward to address this problem. In the GMDPSO, particle's position and velocity of traditional PSO are redefined under discrete MWSNs scenario. Particle updating rule is also reconsidered based on the subnetwork topology of MWSNs. Besides, by improving the greedy forwarding routing, a greedy search strategy is designed to drive particles to find a better position quickly. Furthermore, searching history is memorized to accelerate convergence. Simulation results demonstrate that our new protocol significantly improves the robustness and adapts to rapid topological changes with multiple mobile sinks, while efficiently reducing the communication overhead and the energy consumption.

  11. ProxImaL: efficient image optimization using proximal algorithms

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2016-07-11

    Computational photography systems are becoming increasingly diverse, while computational resources-for example on mobile platforms-are rapidly increasing. As diverse as these camera systems may be, slightly different variants of the underlying image processing tasks, such as demosaicking, deconvolution, denoising, inpainting, image fusion, and alignment, are shared between all of these systems. Formal optimization methods have recently been demonstrated to achieve state-of-the-art quality for many of these applications. Unfortunately, different combinations of natural image priors and optimization algorithms may be optimal for different problems, and implementing and testing each combination is currently a time-consuming and error-prone process. ProxImaL is a domain-specific language and compiler for image optimization problems that makes it easy to experiment with different problem formulations and algorithm choices. The language uses proximal operators as the fundamental building blocks of a variety of linear and nonlinear image formation models and cost functions, advanced image priors, and noise models. The compiler intelligently chooses the best way to translate a problem formulation and choice of optimization algorithm into an efficient solver implementation. In applications to the image processing pipeline, deconvolution in the presence of Poisson-distributed shot noise, and burst denoising, we show that a few lines of ProxImaL code can generate highly efficient solvers that achieve state-of-the-art results. We also show applications to the nonlinear and nonconvex problem of phase retrieval.

  12. Evaluation of image-guidance protocols in the treatment of head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeidan, Omar A.; Langen, Katja M.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Manon, Rafael R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Jenkins, D. Wayne; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the residual setup error of different image-guidance (IG) protocols in the alignment of patients with head and neck cancer. The protocols differ in the percentage of treatment fractions that are associated with image guidance. Using data from patients who were treated with daily IG, the residual setup errors for several different protocols are retrospectively calculated. Methods and Materials: Alignment data from 24 patients (802 fractions) treated with daily IG on a helical tomotherapy unit were analyzed. The difference between the daily setup correction and the setup correction that would have been made according to a specific protocol was used to calculate the residual setup errors for each protocol. Results: The different protocols are generally effective in reducing systematic setup errors. Random setup errors are generally not reduced for fractions that are not image guided. As a consequence, if every other treatment is image guided, still about 11% of all treatments (IG and not IG) are subject to three-dimensional setup errors of at least 5 mm. This frequency increases to about 29% if setup errors >3 mm are scored. For various protocols that require 15% to 31% of the treatments to be image guided, from 50% to 60% and from 26% to 31% of all fractions are subject to setup errors >3 mm and >5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Residual setup errors reduce with increasing frequency of IG during the course of external-beam radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer patients. The inability to reduce random setup errors for fractions that are not image guided results in notable residual setup errors

  13. Muon tomography imaging improvement using optimized limited angle data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chuanyong; Simon, Sean; Kindem, Joel; Luo, Weidong; Sossong, Michael J.; Steiger, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Image resolution of muon tomography is limited by the range of zenith angles of cosmic ray muons and the flux rate at sea level. Low flux rate limits the use of advanced data rebinning and processing techniques to improve image quality. By optimizing the limited angle data, however, image resolution can be improved. To demonstrate the idea, physical data of tungsten blocks were acquired on a muon tomography system. The angular distribution and energy spectrum of muons measured on the system was also used to generate simulation data of tungsten blocks of different arrangement (geometry). The data were grouped into subsets using the zenith angle and volume images were reconstructed from the data subsets using two algorithms. One was a distributed PoCA (point of closest approach) algorithm and the other was an accelerated iterative maximal likelihood/expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm. Image resolution was compared for different subsets. Results showed that image resolution was better in the vertical direction for subsets with greater zenith angles and better in the horizontal plane for subsets with smaller zenith angles. The overall image resolution appeared to be the compromise of that of different subsets. This work suggests that the acquired data can be grouped into different limited angle data subsets for optimized image resolution in desired directions. Use of multiple images with resolution optimized in different directions can improve overall imaging fidelity and the intended applications.

  14. Edge detection in digital images using Ant Colony Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Kuchaki Rafsanjani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ant Colony Optimization (ACO is an optimization algorithm inspired by the behavior of real ant colonies to approximate the solutions of difficult optimization problems. In this paper, ACO is introduced to tackle the image edge detection problem. The proposed approach is based on the distribution of ants on an image; ants try to find possible edges by using a state transition function. Experimental results show that the proposed method compared to standard edge detectors is less sensitive to Gaussian noise and gives finer details and thinner edges when compared to earlier ant-based approaches.

  15. Soft chelating irrigation protocol optimizes bonding quality of Resilon/Epiphany root fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Deus, Gustavo; Namen, Fátima; Galan, João; Zehnder, Matthias

    2008-06-01

    This study was designed to test the impact of either a strong (MTAD) or a soft (1-hydroxyethylidene-1, 1-bisphosphonate [HEPB]) chelating solution on the bond strength of Resilon/Epiphany root fillings. Both 17% EDTA and the omission of a chelator in the irrigation protocol were used as reference treatments. Forty extracted human upper lateral incisors were prepared using different irrigation protocols (n = 10): G1: NaOCl, G2: NaOCl + 17% EDTA, G3: NaOCl + BioPure MTAD (Dentsply/Tulsa, Tulsa, OK), and G4: NaOCl + 18% HEPB. The teeth were obturated and then prepared for micropush-out assessment using root slices of 1 mm thickness. Loading was performed on a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons were used to compare the results among the experimental groups. EDTA- and MTAD-treated samples revealed intermediate bond strength (0.3-3.6 MPa). The lowest bond strengths were achieved in NaOCl-treated samples (0.3-1.2 MPa, p < 0.05). The highest bond strength was reached in the HEBP-treated samples (3.1-6.1 MPa, p < 0.05). Under the present in vitro conditions, the soft chelating irrigation protocol (18% HEBP) optimized the bonding quality of Resilon/Epiphany (Resilon Research LLC, Madison, CT) root fillings.

  16. Modified Discrete Grey Wolf Optimizer Algorithm for Multilevel Image Thresholding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linguo Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The computation of image segmentation has become more complicated with the increasing number of thresholds, and the option and application of the thresholds in image thresholding fields have become an NP problem at the same time. The paper puts forward the modified discrete grey wolf optimizer algorithm (MDGWO, which improves on the optimal solution updating mechanism of the search agent by the weights. Taking Kapur’s entropy as the optimized function and based on the discreteness of threshold in image segmentation, the paper firstly discretizes the grey wolf optimizer (GWO and then proposes a new attack strategy by using the weight coefficient to replace the search formula for optimal solution used in the original algorithm. The experimental results show that MDGWO can search out the optimal thresholds efficiently and precisely, which are very close to the result examined by exhaustive searches. In comparison with the electromagnetism optimization (EMO, the differential evolution (DE, the Artifical Bee Colony (ABC, and the classical GWO, it is concluded that MDGWO has advantages over the latter four in terms of image segmentation quality and objective function values and their stability.

  17. Optimization of Saanen sperm genes amplification: evaluation of standardized protocols in genetically uncharacterized rural goats reared under a subtropical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Elie K; Saade, Maya F; Sleiman, Fawwak T; Hamadeh, Shady K; Mouneimne, Youssef; Kassaifi, Zeina; Kayali, Ghazi; Harakeh, Steve; Jaber, Lina S; Shaib, Houssam A

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to optimize quantitatively the amplification of specific sperm genes in reference genomically characterized Saanen goat and to evaluate the standardized protocols applicability on sperms of uncharacterized genome of rural goats reared under subtropical environment for inclusion in future selection programs. The optimization of the protocols in Saanen sperms included three production genes (growth hormone (GH) exons 2, 3, and 4, αS1-casein (CSN1S1), and α-lactalbumin) and two health genes (MHC class II DRB and prion (PrP)). The optimization was based on varying the primers concentrations and the inclusion of a PCR cosolvent (Triton X). The impact of the studied variables on statistically significant increase in the yield of amplicons was noticed in four out of five (80%) optimized protocols, namely in those related to GH, CSN1S1, α-lactalbumin, and PrP genes (P 0.05). The applicability of the optimized protocols of Saanen sperm genes on amplification of uncharacterized rural goat sperms revealed a 100% success in tested individuals for amplification of GH, CSN1S1, α-lactalbumin, and MHC class II DRB genes and a 75% success for the PrP gene. The significant success in applicability of the Saanen quantitatively optimized protocols to other uncharacterized genome of rural goats allows for their inclusion in future selection, targeting the sustainability of this farming system in a subtropical environment and the improvement of the farmers livelihood.

  18. Multihopping Multilevel Clustering Heterogeneity-Sensitive Optimized Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aslam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective utilization of energy resources in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs has become challenging under uncertain distributed cluster-formation and single-hop intercluster communication capabilities. So, sensor nodes are forced to operate at expensive full rate transmission power level continuously during whole network operation. These challenging network environments experience unwanted phenomena of drastic energy consumption and packet drop. In this paper, we propose an adaptive immune Multihopping Multilevel Clustering (MHMLC protocol that executes a Hybrid Clustering Algorithm (HCA to perform optimal centralized selection of Cluster-Heads (CHs within radius of centrally located Base Station (BS and distributed CHs selection in the rest of network area. HCA of MHMLC also produces optimal intermediate CHs for intercluster multihop communications that develop heterogeneity-aware economical links. This hybrid cluster-formation facilitates the sensors to function at short range transmission power level that enhances link quality and avoids packet drop. The simulation environments produce fair comparison among proposed MHMLC and existing state-of-the-art routing protocols. Experimental results give significant evidence of better performance of the proposed model in terms of network lifetime, stability period, and data delivery ratio.

  19. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology, Zhengzhou, Henan Province (China)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80) each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. (orig.)

  20. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80) each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. (orig.)

  1. Optimized imaging using non-rigid registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Binev, Peter; Blom, Douglas A.; Dahmen, Wolfgang; Sharpley, Robert C.; Vogt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The extraordinary improvements of modern imaging devices offer access to data with unprecedented information content. However, widely used image processing methodologies fall far short of exploiting the full breadth of information offered by numerous types of scanning probe, optical, and electron microscopies. In many applications, it is necessary to keep measurement intensities below a desired threshold. We propose a methodology for extracting an increased level of information by processing a series of data sets suffering, in particular, from high degree of spatial uncertainty caused by complex multiscale motion during the acquisition process. An important role is played by a non-rigid pixel-wise registration method that can cope with low signal-to-noise ratios. This is accompanied by formulating objective quality measures which replace human intervention and visual inspection in the processing chain. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of siliceous zeolite material exhibits the above-mentioned obstructions and therefore serves as orientation and a test of our procedures. - Highlights: • Developed a new process for extracting more information from a series of STEM images. • An objective non-rigid registration process copes with distortions. • Images of zeolite Y show retrieval of all information available from the data set. • Quantitative measures of registration quality were implemented. • Applicable to any serially acquired data, e.g. STM, AFM, STXM, etc

  2. Optimization of microsatellite DNA Gelred fluorescence imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    2012-10-11

    Oct 11, 2012 ... In order to explore the best microsatellite DNA Gelred imaging technology, this ... analysis and character identification breeding practice, because it is ... detection methods are agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) with ethidium ... method (PG). Gelred 10000X stock reagent was diluted in the 1.5% agarose gel.

  3. Whatever works: a systematic user-centered training protocol to optimize brain-computer interfacing individually.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth V C Friedrich

    Full Text Available This study implemented a systematic user-centered training protocol for a 4-class brain-computer interface (BCI. The goal was to optimize the BCI individually in order to achieve high performance within few sessions for all users. Eight able-bodied volunteers, who were initially naïve to the use of a BCI, participated in 10 sessions over a period of about 5 weeks. In an initial screening session, users were asked to perform the following seven mental tasks while multi-channel EEG was recorded: mental rotation, word association, auditory imagery, mental subtraction, spatial navigation, motor imagery of the left hand and motor imagery of both feet. Out of these seven mental tasks, the best 4-class combination as well as most reactive frequency band (between 8-30 Hz was selected individually for online control. Classification was based on common spatial patterns and Fisher's linear discriminant analysis. The number and time of classifier updates varied individually. Selection speed was increased by reducing trial length. To minimize differences in brain activity between sessions with and without feedback, sham feedback was provided in the screening and calibration runs in which usually no real-time feedback is shown. Selected task combinations and frequency ranges differed between users. The tasks that were included in the 4-class combination most often were (1 motor imagery of the left hand (2, one brain-teaser task (word association or mental subtraction (3, mental rotation task and (4 one more dynamic imagery task (auditory imagery, spatial navigation, imagery of the feet. Participants achieved mean performances over sessions of 44-84% and peak performances in single-sessions of 58-93% in this user-centered 4-class BCI protocol. This protocol is highly adjustable to individual users and thus could increase the percentage of users who can gain and maintain BCI control. A high priority for future work is to examine this protocol with severely

  4. Development of a calibration protocol for quantitative imaging for molecular radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wevrett, J.; Fenwick, A.; Scuffham, J.; Nisbet, A.

    2017-01-01

    Within the field of molecular radiotherapy, there is a significant need for standardisation in dosimetry, in both quantitative imaging and dosimetry calculations. Currently, there are a wide range of techniques used by different clinical centres and as a result there is no means to compare patient doses between centres. To help address this need, a 3 year project was funded by the European Metrology Research Programme, and a number of clinical centres were involved in the project. One of the required outcomes of the project was to develop a calibration protocol for three dimensional quantitative imaging of volumes of interest. Two radionuclides were selected as being of particular interest: iodine-131 ( 131 I, used to treat thyroid disorders) and lutetium-177 ( 177 Lu, used to treat neuroendocrine tumours). A small volume of activity within a scatter medium (water), representing a lesion within a patient body, was chosen as the calibration method. To ensure ease of use in clinical centres, an “off-the-shelf” solution was proposed – to avoid the need for in-house manufacturing. The BIODEX elliptical Jaszczak phantom and 16 ml fillable sphere were selected. The protocol was developed for use on SPECT/CT gamma cameras only, where the CT dataset would be used to correct the imaging data for attenuation of the emitted photons within the phantom. The protocol corrects for scatter of emitted photons using the triple energy window correction technique utilised by most clinical systems. A number of clinical systems were tested in the development of this protocol, covering the major manufacturers of gamma camera generally used in Europe. Initial imaging was performed with 131 I and 177 Lu at a number of clinical centres, but due to time constraints in the project, some acquisitions were performed with 177 Lu only. The protocol is relatively simplistic, and does not account for the effects of dead-time in high activity patients, the presence of background activity

  5. Development of a quality assurance protocol for peripheral subtraction imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, C.; Murphy, D.; O'Hare, N.

    2002-01-01

    Peripheral subtraction scanning is used to trace the blood vessels of upper and lower extremities. In some modern C-arm fluoroscopy systems this function is performed automatically. In this mode the system is programmed to advance and stop in a series of steps taking a mask image at each point. The system then repeats each step after the contrast agent has been injected, and produces a DSA image at each point. Current radiographic quality assurance protocols do not address this feature. This note reviews methods of measuring system vibration while images are being acquired in automated peripheral stepping. The effect on image quality pre- and post-image processing is assessed. Results show that peripheral stepping DSA does not provide the same degree of image quality as static DSA. In examining static test objects, the major cause of the reduction in image quality is misregistration due to vibration of the image intensifier during imaging. (author)

  6. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S Grosser

    Full Text Available Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT or positron emission tomography (PET with computed tomography (CT. Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR on the image quality of the low-dose CT images.Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88 and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04. In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001.In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality.

  7. Image processing to optimize wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kyle Marc-Anthony

    The world is turning to renewable energies as a means of ensuring the planet's future and well-being. There have been a few attempts in the past to utilize wave power as a means of generating electricity through the use of Wave Energy Converters (WEC), but only recently are they becoming a focal point in the renewable energy field. Over the past few years there has been a global drive to advance the efficiency of WEC. Placing a mechanical device either onshore or offshore that captures the energy within ocean surface waves to drive a mechanical device is how wave power is produced. This paper seeks to provide a novel and innovative way to estimate ocean wave frequency through the use of image processing. This will be achieved by applying a complex modulated lapped orthogonal transform filter bank to satellite images of ocean waves. The complex modulated lapped orthogonal transform filterbank provides an equal subband decomposition of the Nyquist bounded discrete time Fourier Transform spectrum. The maximum energy of the 2D complex modulated lapped transform subband is used to determine the horizontal and vertical frequency, which subsequently can be used to determine the wave frequency in the direction of the WEC by a simple trigonometric scaling. The robustness of the proposed method is provided by the applications to simulated and real satellite images where the frequency is known.

  8. Preliminary pilot fMRI study of neuropostural optimization with a noninvasive asymmetric radioelectric brain stimulation protocol in functional dysmetria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mura M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Marco Mura1, Alessandro Castagna2, Vania Fontani2, Salvatore Rinaldi21Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari, 2Rinaldi Fontani Institute – Department of Neuro Psycho Physical Optimization, Florence, ItalyPurpose: This study assessed changes in functional dysmetria (FD and in brain activation observable by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during a leg flexion-extension motor task following brain stimulation with a single radioelectric asymmetric conveyer (REAC pulse, according to the precisely defined neuropostural optimization (NPO protocol.Population and methods: Ten healthy volunteers were assessed using fMRI conducted during a simple motor task before and immediately after delivery of a single REAC-NPO pulse. The motor task consisted of a flexion-extension movement of the legs with the knees bent. FD signs and brain activation patterns were compared before and after REAC-NPO.Results: A single 250-millisecond REAC-NPO treatment alleviated FD, as evidenced by patellar asymmetry during a sit-up motion, and modulated activity patterns in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum, during the performance of the motor task.Conclusion: Activity in brain areas involved in motor control and coordination, including the cerebellum, is altered by administration of a REAC-NPO treatment and this effect is accompanied by an alleviation of FD.Keywords: motor behavior, motor control, cerebellum, dysmetria, functional dysmetria, fluctuating asymmetry

  9. System for verifiable CT radiation dose optimization based on image quality. part II. process control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David B; Malarik, Remo J; Hall, Seth M; Podberesky, Daniel J

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of an automated computed tomography (CT) radiation dose optimization and process control system on the consistency of estimated image noise and size-specific dose estimates (SSDEs) of radiation in CT examinations of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. This quality improvement project was determined not to constitute human subject research. An automated system was developed to analyze each examination immediately after completion, and to report individual axial-image-level and study-level summary data for patient size, image noise, and SSDE. The system acquired data for 4 months beginning October 1, 2011. Protocol changes were made by using parameters recommended by the prediction application, and 3 months of additional data were acquired. Preimplementation and postimplementation mean image noise and SSDE were compared by using unpaired t tests and F tests. Common-cause variation was differentiated from special-cause variation by using a statistical process control individual chart. A total of 817 CT examinations, 490 acquired before and 327 acquired after the initial protocol changes, were included in the study. Mean patient age and water-equivalent diameter were 12.0 years and 23.0 cm, respectively. The difference between actual and target noise increased from -1.4 to 0.3 HU (P process control chart identified several special causes of variation. Implementation of an automated CT radiation dose optimization system led to verifiable simultaneous decrease in image noise variation and SSDE. The automated nature of the system provides the opportunity for consistent CT radiation dose optimization on a broad scale. © RSNA, 2013.

  10. Compositional breast imaging using a dual-energy mammography protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laidevant, Aurelie D.; Malkov, Serghei; Flowers, Chris I.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Shepherd, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Mammography has a low sensitivity in dense breasts due to low contrast between malignant and normal tissue confounded by the predominant water density of the breast. Water is found in both adipose and fibroglandular tissue and constitutes most of the mass of a breast. However, significant protein mass is mainly found in the fibroglandular tissue where most cancers originate. If the protein compartment in a mammogram could be imaged without the influence of water, the sensitivity and specificity of the mammogram may be improved. This article describes a novel approach to dual-energy mammography, full-field digital compositional mammography (FFDCM), which can independently image the three compositional components of breast tissue: water, lipid, and protein. Methods: Dual-energy attenuation and breast shape measures are used together to solve for the three compositional thicknesses. Dual-energy measurements were performed on breast-mimicking phantoms using a full-field digital mammography unit. The phantoms were made of materials shown to have similar x-ray attenuation properties of the compositional compartments. They were made of two main stacks of thicknesses around 2 and 4 cm. Twenty-six thickness and composition combinations were used to derive the compositional calibration using a least-squares fitting approach. Results: Very high accuracy was achieved with a simple cubic fitting function with root mean square errors of 0.023, 0.011, and 0.012 cm for the water, lipid, and protein thicknesses, respectively. The repeatability (percent coefficient of variation) of these measures was tested using sequential images and was found to be 0.5%, 0.5%, and 3.3% for water, lipid, and protein, respectively. However, swapping the location of the two stacks of the phantom on the imaging plate introduced further errors showing the need for more complete system uniformity corrections. Finally, a preliminary breast image is presented of each of the compositional

  11. Bound Alternative Direction Optimization for Image Deblurring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangrong Zeng

    2014-01-01

    the ℓp regularizer by a novel majorizer and then, based on a variable splitting, to reformulate the bound unconstrained problem into a constrained one, which is then addressed via an augmented Lagrangian method. The proposed algorithm actually combines the reweighted ℓ1 minimization method and the alternating direction method of multiples (ADMM such that it succeeds in extending the application of ADMM to ℓp minimization problems. The conducted experimental studies demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithm for the synthesis ℓp minimization over the state-of-the-art algorithms for the synthesis ℓ1 minimization on image deblurring.

  12. Optimization of T2-weighted imaging for shoulder magnetic resonance arthrography by synthetic magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young Han; Hahn, Seok; Yang, Jaemoon; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-01-01

    Background Synthetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows reformatting of various synthetic images by adjustment of scanning parameters such as repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE). Optimized MR images can be reformatted from T1, T2, and proton density (PD) values to achieve maximum tissue contrast between joint fluid and adjacent soft tissue. Purpose To demonstrate the method for optimization of TR and TE by synthetic MRI and to validate the optimized images by comparison with conventional shoulder MR arthrography (MRA) images. Material and Methods Thirty-seven shoulder MRA images acquired by synthetic MRI were retrospectively evaluated for PD, T1, and T2 values at the joint fluid and glenoid labrum. Differences in signal intensity between the fluid and labrum were observed between TR of 500-6000 ms and TE of 80-300 ms in T2-weighted (T2W) images. Conventional T2W and synthetic images were analyzed for diagnostic agreement of supraspinatus tendon abnormalities (kappa statistics) and image quality scores (one-way analysis of variance with post-hoc analysis). Results Optimized mean values of TR and TE were 2724.7 ± 1634.7 and 80.1 ± 0.4, respectively. Diagnostic agreement for supraspinatus tendon abnormalities between conventional and synthetic MR images was excellent (κ = 0.882). The mean image quality score of the joint space in optimized synthetic images was significantly higher compared with those in conventional and synthetic images (2.861 ± 0.351 vs. 2.556 ± 0.607 vs. 2.750 ± 0.439; P optimized TR and TE for shoulder MRA enables optimization of soft-tissue contrast.

  13. Normalization of cortical thickness measurements across different T1 magnetic resonance imaging protocols by novel W-Score standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinyong; Yoo, Kwangsun; Lee, Peter; Kim, Chan Mi; Roh, Jee Hoon; Park, Ji Eun; Kim, Sang Joon; Seo, Sang Won; Shin, Jeong-Hyeon; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Jeong, Yong

    2017-10-01

    The use of different 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance (T1 MR) imaging protocols induces image incompatibility across multicenter studies, negating the many advantages of multicenter studies. A few methods have been developed to address this problem, but significant image incompatibility still remains. Thus, we developed a novel and convenient method to improve image compatibility. W-score standardization creates quality reference values by using a healthy group to obtain normalized disease values. We developed a protocol-specific w-score standardization to control the protocol effect, which is applied to each protocol separately. We used three data sets. In dataset 1, brain T1 MR images of normal controls (NC) and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from two centers, acquired with different T1 MR protocols, were used (Protocol 1 and 2, n = 45/group). In dataset 2, data from six subjects, who underwent MRI with two different protocols (Protocol 1 and 2), were used with different repetition times, echo times, and slice thicknesses. In dataset 3, T1 MR images from a large number of healthy normal controls (Protocol 1: n = 148, Protocol 2: n = 343) were collected for w-score standardization. The protocol effect and disease effect on subjects' cortical thickness were analyzed before and after the application of protocol-specific w-score standardization. As expected, different protocols resulted in differing cortical thickness measurements in both NC and AD subjects. Different measurements were obtained for the same subject when imaged with different protocols. Multivariate pattern difference between measurements was observed between the protocols. Classification accuracy between two protocols was nearly 90%. After applying protocol-specific w-score standardization, the differences between the protocols substantially decreased. Most importantly, protocol-specific w-score standardization reduced both univariate and multivariate differences in the images while

  14. Optimizing a Treadmill Ramp Protocol to Evaluate Aerobic Capacity of Hemiparetic Poststroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes, Wendell L; Montenegro, Rafael A; Monteiro, Walace D; de Almeida Freire, Raul; Massaferri, Renato; Farinatti, Paulo

    2018-03-01

    Bernardes, WL, Montenegro, RA, Monteiro, WD, de Almeida Freire, R, Massaferri, R, and Farinatti, P. Optimizing a treadmill ramp protocol to evaluate aerobic capacity of hemiparetic poststroke patients. J Strength Cond Res 32(3): 876-884, 2018-A correct assessment of cardiopulmonary capacity is important for aerobic training within motor rehabilitation of poststroke hemiparetic patients (PSHPs). However, specific cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) for these patients are scarce. We proposed adaptations in a protocol originally developed for PSHPs by Ovando et al. (CPET1). We hypothesized that our adapted protocol (CPET2) would improve the original test, by preventing early fatigue and increasing patients' peak performance. Eleven PSHPs (52 ± 14 years, 10 men) performed both protocols. CPET2 integrated changes in final speed (100-120% vs. 140% maximal speed in 10-m walking test), treadmill inclination (final inclination of 5 vs. 10%), and estimated test duration (10 vs. 8 minutes) to smooth the rate of workload increment of CPET1. Peak oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak) (20.3 ± 6.1 vs. 18.6 ± 5.0 ml·kg·min; p = 0.04), V[Combining Dot Above]O2 at gas exchange transition (V[Combining Dot Above]O2-GET) (11.5 ± 2.9 vs. 9.8 ± 2.0 ml·kg·min; p = 0.04), and time to exhaustion (10 ± 3 vs. 6 ± 2 minutes; p higher in CPET2 than in CPET1. Slopes and intercepts of regressions describing relationships between V[Combining Dot Above]O2 vs. workload, heart rate vs. workload, and V[Combining Dot Above]O2 vs. heart rate were similar between CPETs. However, standard errors of estimates obtained for regressions between heart rate vs. workload (3.0 ± 1.3 vs. 3.8 ± 1.0 b·min; p = 0.004) and V[Combining Dot Above]O2 vs. heart rate (6.0 ± 2.1 vs. 4.8 ± 2.4 ml·kg·min; p = 0.05) were lower in CPET2 than in CPET1. In conclusion, the present adaptations in Ovando's CPET protocol increased exercise tolerance of PSHPs, eliciting higher V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak

  15. Detection and optimization of image quality and dose in digital mammography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semturs, F.

    2015-01-01

    the measured entry dose, the average glandular dose (AGD) is calculated. Both values - image quality and dose - are related to each other and also compared with corresponding limiting values in the EUREF protocol. Results: CR needle crystal detectors achieve at 60 mm breast thickness (50 mm PMMA) the same image quality as with traditional CR plates with half of the dose. Further on, it is possible to reach with needle crystal detectors even the better EUREF-achievable limiting values without exceeding the EUREF dose limiting values, specified in EUREF. If instead of Mo/Rh exposure parameters W/Rh are used, the dose can be further reduced by about 20% without compromising image quality. Discussion: Mammography systems with CR needle crystal detectors support with at least comparable image quality an AGD reduction of about 50% compared to powder-based CR. This new FFDM-CR technology is offered from several FFDM-CR-manufacturers (Agfa, Carestream and Konica), while Fuji focussed with its research directly on FFDM-DR as replacement for its FFDM-CR offering. This allowed for at least equal image quality a further reduction of dose. Conclusions: Also powder based FFDM-CR Systems can be optimized with some effort, to support image quality and dose within the limiting values, specified in the EUREF protocol. The FFDM-CR needle crystal technology allows further dose reduction without compromising image quality. (author) [de

  16. Optimization of dose radiation and image quality on computed tomography of thorax in adult women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, G. R.; Casian C, G. [Hospital Juarez de Mexico, Av. IPN No. 5160, 07760 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gaona, E.; Franco E, J. G.; Molina F, N., E-mail: gaen1310@correo.xoc.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Xochimilco, Calz. del Hueso 1100, 04960 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The objective of the study is the optimization of the dose (Dlp) and image quality in the exploration of adult women in studies of thorax with computed tomography (CT). The CT is a technique of exploration with high radiation doses to patients with an increase of the risk factors of developing cancer in the future, but X-rays are a very important medical diagnostic tool. We performed a retrospective survey of 50 female patients who had thorax tomography using the automatic protocol established by the manufacturer, a database of dose (Dlp), measures of patient A P and radiological parameters such as kV and m A was obtained. Subsequently, we carry out the prospective study with 30 patients with prescription of thorax tomography, scans were conducted with CT with reduced doses using manual techniques protocol of exploration while maintaining diagnostic image quality. The results show that the prospective study patients received doses lower than 30% on average. In general the dose patients were within the confidence interval of 95% of the levels of diagnostic reference (DRL) adopted by the European Community for CT and the most common value is 400 Dlp for thorax. Comparative image quality study was conducted using the protocol of the manufacturer and the manual protocol and image quality was diagnostic after dose reduction up to 30%. The reduction of radiation dose in female patients in studies of thorax CT helps to reduce risk factors of developing cancer later in life. A thorax tomography study includes the fibro-glandular tissue of the breast which is very sensitive to stochastic effects of radiation. (Author)

  17. Optimization of dose radiation and image quality on computed tomography of thorax in adult women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Z, G. R.; Casian C, G.; Gaona, E.; Franco E, J. G.; Molina F, N.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: The objective of the study is the optimization of the dose (Dlp) and image quality in the exploration of adult women in studies of thorax with computed tomography (CT). The CT is a technique of exploration with high radiation doses to patients with an increase of the risk factors of developing cancer in the future, but X-rays are a very important medical diagnostic tool. We performed a retrospective survey of 50 female patients who had thorax tomography using the automatic protocol established by the manufacturer, a database of dose (Dlp), measures of patient A P and radiological parameters such as kV and m A was obtained. Subsequently, we carry out the prospective study with 30 patients with prescription of thorax tomography, scans were conducted with CT with reduced doses using manual techniques protocol of exploration while maintaining diagnostic image quality. The results show that the prospective study patients received doses lower than 30% on average. In general the dose patients were within the confidence interval of 95% of the levels of diagnostic reference (DRL) adopted by the European Community for CT and the most common value is 400 Dlp for thorax. Comparative image quality study was conducted using the protocol of the manufacturer and the manual protocol and image quality was diagnostic after dose reduction up to 30%. The reduction of radiation dose in female patients in studies of thorax CT helps to reduce risk factors of developing cancer later in life. A thorax tomography study includes the fibro-glandular tissue of the breast which is very sensitive to stochastic effects of radiation. (Author)

  18. Optimization of wavelet decomposition for image compression and feature preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shih-Chung B; Li, Huai; Freedman, Matthew T

    2003-09-01

    A neural-network-based framework has been developed to search for an optimal wavelet kernel that can be used for a specific image processing task. In this paper, a linear convolution neural network was employed to seek a wavelet that minimizes errors and maximizes compression efficiency for an image or a defined image pattern such as microcalcifications in mammograms and bone in computed tomography (CT) head images. We have used this method to evaluate the performance of tap-4 wavelets on mammograms, CTs, magnetic resonance images, and Lena images. We found that the Daubechies wavelet or those wavelets with similar filtering characteristics can produce the highest compression efficiency with the smallest mean-square-error for many image patterns including general image textures as well as microcalcifications in digital mammograms. However, the Haar wavelet produces the best results on sharp edges and low-noise smooth areas. We also found that a special wavelet whose low-pass filter coefficients are 0.32252136, 0.85258927, 1.38458542, and -0.14548269) produces the best preservation outcomes in all tested microcalcification features including the peak signal-to-noise ratio, the contrast and the figure of merit in the wavelet lossy compression scheme. Having analyzed the spectrum of the wavelet filters, we can find the compression outcomes and feature preservation characteristics as a function of wavelets. This newly developed optimization approach can be generalized to other image analysis applications where a wavelet decomposition is employed.

  19. OPTIMIZATION OF DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING IN BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Velichko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of breast imaging for 47200 women. Breast cancer was detected in 862 (1.9% patients, fibroadenoma in 1267 (2.7% patients and isolated breast cysts in 1162 (2.4% patients. Different types of fibrocystic breast disease (adenosis, diffuse fibrocystic changes, local fibrosis and others were observed in 60.1% of women. Problems of breast cancer visualization during mammography, characterized by the appearance of fibrocystic mastopathy (sclerosing adenosis, fibrous bands along the ducts have been analyzed. Data on the development of diagnostic algorithms including the modern techniques for ultrasound and interventional radiology aimed at detecting early breast cancer have been presented.  

  20. The influence of referral protocols on the utilization of magnetic resonance imaging: evidence from Manitoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustard, C.A.; McClarty, B.M.; MacEwan, D.W. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    1994-04-01

    The influence of referral protocols on the utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) services was studied. Three neuroradiologists and one radiologist reviewed the indications for MRI for 198 referrals to a facility in Winnipeg, selected at random from patients seen in 1991 for suspected disorders of the brain or the spine. Out-of-province referrals had not been subject to referral protocols, whereas those from within Manitoba had been subject to such protocols. At least three of the four radiologists agreed on whether an examination was appropriate in 88.4 % of the cases. Out-of-province referrals were significantly more likely to be considered inappropriate for MRI (24 %) than referrals from within Manitoba (10 %). It was estimated that the combined effect of instituting protocols and reviewing each referral before the examination could result in a 16 % to 31 % reduction in the demand for MRI services without compromising diagnostic information. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Dental-CT: image quality and absorbed radiation dose of different scan protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorn, C.; Alamo, L.; Funke, M.; Grabbe, E.; Visser, H.; Hermann, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a scan protocol for dental-CT which guarantees good image quality at the lowest possible radiation dose. Methods: In an experimental investigation Dental-CT (HSA, GE, Milwaukee, USA) of the mandible of two human skeletons positioned in a water tank were performed in order to define the most advantageous scan protocol. Tube currents ranged from 40 to 200 mA and the scan technique was modified (axial mode or helical mode with pitches of 1 to 3 and corresponding increments of 0.4 to 1.0 mm). 39 patients underwent a dental-CT with decreased current (80 mA) in the helical scan mode (pitch 2, slice thickness 1 mm). Dose measurements were performed for two different scan protocols (A: axial, 130 mAs, B: helical, 80 mA, pitch 2). Results: The preliminary investigations of image quality showed only a minor effect of the applied current. For the helical scan mode, pitches of more than 2 impaired image quality. A low increment had no advantages. There were no disadvantages in clinical practice using protocol B with decreased tube current. Absorbed radiation dose of dental CT performed with protocol B was decreased to one third in comparison to protocol A. Conclusions: A scan protocol with a low tube current (e.g., 80 mA, for a rotation time of 1 s) and a helical scan mode (e.g., for a slice thickness of 1 mm with a pitch of 2 and an increment of 1 mm) is recommended for performing dental-CT. (orig.) [de

  2. Optimizing the multimodal approach to pancreatic cyst fluid diagnosis: developing a volume-based triage protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Siaw Ming; Herba, Karl; Kumarasinghe, M Priyanthi; de Boer, W Bastiaan; Amanuel, Benhur; Grieu-Iacopetta, Fabienne; Lim, Ee Mun; Segarajasingam, Dev; Yusoff, Ian; Choo, Chris; Frost, Felicity

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a triage algorithm to optimize diagnostic yield from cytology, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) testing on different components of a single pancreatic cyst fluid specimen. The authors also sought to determine whether cell block supernatant was suitable for CEA and KRAS testing. Fifty-four pancreatic cysts were triaged according to a volume-dependent protocol to generate fluid (neat and supernatant) and cell block specimens for cytology, comparative CEA, and KRAS testing. Follow-up histology, diagnostic cytology, or a combined clinicopathologic interpretation was recorded as the final diagnosis. There were 26 mucinous cystic lesions and 28 nonmucinous cystic lesions with volumes ranging from 0.3 mL to 55 mL. Testing different components of the specimens (cell block, neat, and/or supernatant) enabled all laboratory investigations to be performed on 50 of 54 cyst fluids (92.6%). Interpretive concordance was observed in 17 of 17 cases (100%) and in 35 of 40 cases (87.5%) that had multiple components tested for CEA and KRAS mutations, respectively. An elevated CEA level (>192 ng/mL) was the most sensitive test for the detection of a mucinous cystic lesion (62.5%) versus KRAS mutation (56%) and "positive" cytology (61.5%). KRAS mutations were identified in 2 of 25 mucinous cystic lesions (8%) in which cytology and CEA levels were not contributory. A volume-based protocol using different components of the specimen was able to optimize diagnostic yield in pancreatic cyst fluids. KRAS mutation testing increased diagnostic yield when combined with cytology and CEA analysis. The current results demonstrated that supernatant is comparable to neat fluid and cell block material for CEA and KRAS testing. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  3. Optimization of a protocol for cryopreservation of mouse spermatozoa using cryotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Ayumi; Yonezawa, Kazuya; Ohta, Akihiko; Mochida, Keiji; Ogura, Atsuo

    2012-01-01

    The rapid increase in the number of genetically modified mouse strains has produced a high demand for their frozen spermatozoa from laboratories and mouse banking facilities. Historically, plastic straws have been used preferentially as containers for frozen mammalian spermatozoa because spermatozoa frozen in plastic straws have a high survival rate after thawing. However, plastic straws are more fragile and are used less often than the cryotubes used for conventional cell freezing. In this study, we sought to develop a new protocol for sperm freezing using cryotubes as the container to increase the accessibility of mouse sperm cryopreservation. Epididymal spermatozoa were collected from mature ICR or C57BL/6J (B6) males and were suspended in 18% raffinose and 3% skim milk solution. We then optimized the following conditions using the sperm survival rate as an index: 1) distance of cryotubes from the surface of the liquid nitrogen at freezing, 2) volume of the sperm suspension in the cryotube and 3) temperature of warming sperm during thawing. The best result was obtained when cryotubes containing 10 µl of sperm suspension were immersed 1 cm below the surface of the liquid nitrogen and then thawed at 50 C. The fertilization rates using spermatozoa frozen and thawed using this method were 63.1% in ICR mice and 28.2% in B6 mice. The latter rate was increased to 62.3% by adding reduced glutathione to the fertilization medium. After embryo transfer, 68% and 62% of the fertilized oocytes developed into normal offspring in the ICR and B6 strains, respectively. These results show that cryotubes can be used for cryopreservation of mouse spermatozoa under optimized conditions. This protocol is easy and reproducible, and it may be used in laboratories that do not specialize in sperm cryopreservation.

  4. Optimization of a Biometric System Based on Acoustic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Izquierdo Fuente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of an acoustic biometric system that captures 16 acoustic images of a person for 4 frequencies and 4 positions, a study was carried out to improve the performance of the system. On a first stage, an analysis to determine which images provide more information to the system was carried out showing that a set of 12 images allows the system to obtain results that are equivalent to using all of the 16 images. Finally, optimization techniques were used to obtain the set of weights associated with each acoustic image that maximizes the performance of the biometric system. These results improve significantly the performance of the preliminary system, while reducing the time of acquisition and computational burden, since the number of acoustic images was reduced.

  5. Improved MR breast images by contrast optimization using artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konig, H.; Gohagan, J.; Laub, G.; Bachus, R.; Heywang, S.; Reinhardt, E.R.

    1986-01-01

    The clinical relevance of MR imaging of the breast is mainly related to the modelity's ability to differentiate among normal, benign, and malignant tissue and to yield prognostic information. In addition to the MR imaging parameters, morphologic features of these images are calculated. Based on statistical information of a comprehensive, labeled image and knowledge of a data base system, a numerical classifier is deduced. The application of this classifier to all cases leads to estimations of specific tissue types for each pixel. The method is sufficiently sensitive for grading a recognized tissue class. In this manner images with optimal contrast appropriate to particular diagnostic requirements are generated. The discriminant power of each MR imaging parameter as well as of a combination of parameters can be determined objectively with respect to tissue discrimination

  6. Optimization of a Biometric System Based on Acoustic Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo Fuente, Alberto; Del Val Puente, Lara; Villacorta Calvo, Juan J.; Raboso Mateos, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of an acoustic biometric system that captures 16 acoustic images of a person for 4 frequencies and 4 positions, a study was carried out to improve the performance of the system. On a first stage, an analysis to determine which images provide more information to the system was carried out showing that a set of 12 images allows the system to obtain results that are equivalent to using all of the 16 images. Finally, optimization techniques were used to obtain the set of weights associated with each acoustic image that maximizes the performance of the biometric system. These results improve significantly the performance of the preliminary system, while reducing the time of acquisition and computational burden, since the number of acoustic images was reduced. PMID:24616643

  7. The PWR loading pattern optimization in X-IMAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.G.; Smith, K.S.; Rempe, K.R.; Downar, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    The design of reactor core loading patterns is difficult due to the staggering number of patterns. The integer nature and nonlinear neutronic response of core design preclude simple prescriptions for generation of the feasible patterns, much less optimization among feasible candidates. Fortunately, recent developments in optimization, graphical user interfaces (GUIs), and the speed and low cost of engineering workstations combine to make loading pattern automation possible. The optimization module SIMAN has been added to X-IMAGE to automatically generate high-quality core loadings

  8. Imaging algorithms and CT protocols in trauma patients: survey of Swiss emergency centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinzpeter, R.; Alkadhi, Hatem; Boehm, T.; Boll, D.; Constantin, C.; Del Grande, F.; Fretz, V.; Leschka, S.; Ohletz, T.; Broennimann, M.; Schmidt, S.; Treumann, T.; Poletti, P.A.

    2017-01-01

    To identify imaging algorithms and indications, CT protocols, and radiation doses in polytrauma patients in Swiss trauma centres. An online survey with multiple choice questions and free-text responses was sent to authorized level-I trauma centres in Switzerland. All centres responded and indicated that they have internal standardized imaging algorithms for polytrauma patients. Nine of 12 centres (75 %) perform whole-body CT (WBCT) after focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and conventional radiography; 3/12 (25 %) use WBCT for initial imaging. Indications for WBCT were similar across centres being based on trauma mechanisms, vital signs, and presence of multiple injuries. Seven of 12 centres (58 %) perform an arterial and venous phase of the abdomen in split-bolus technique. Six of 12 centres (50 %) use multiphase protocols of the head (n = 3) and abdomen (n = 4), whereas 6/12 (50 %) use single-phase protocols for WBCT. Arm position was on the patient's body during scanning (3/12, 25 %), alongside the body (2/12, 17 %), above the head (2/12, 17 %), or was changed during scanning (5/12, 42 %). Radiation doses showed large variations across centres ranging from 1268-3988 mGy*cm (DLP) per WBCT. Imaging algorithms in polytrauma patients are standardized within, but vary across Swiss trauma centres, similar to the individual WBCT protocols, resulting in large variations in associated radiation doses. (orig.)

  9. Imaging algorithms and CT protocols in trauma patients: survey of Swiss emergency centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinzpeter, R.; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Boehm, T. [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Department of Radiology, Chur (Switzerland); Boll, D. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Constantin, C. [Spital Wallis, Department of Radiology, Visp (Switzerland); Del Grande, F. [Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Department of Radiology, Lugano (Switzerland); Fretz, V. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Winterthur (Switzerland); Leschka, S. [Kantonsspital St Gallen, Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Gallen (Switzerland); Ohletz, T. [Kantonsspital Aarau, Department of Radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); Broennimann, M. [University Hospital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Schmidt, S. [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Treumann, T. [Luzerner Kantonsspital, Institute of Radiology, Luzern 16 (Switzerland); Poletti, P.A. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Geneve (Switzerland)

    2017-05-15

    To identify imaging algorithms and indications, CT protocols, and radiation doses in polytrauma patients in Swiss trauma centres. An online survey with multiple choice questions and free-text responses was sent to authorized level-I trauma centres in Switzerland. All centres responded and indicated that they have internal standardized imaging algorithms for polytrauma patients. Nine of 12 centres (75 %) perform whole-body CT (WBCT) after focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and conventional radiography; 3/12 (25 %) use WBCT for initial imaging. Indications for WBCT were similar across centres being based on trauma mechanisms, vital signs, and presence of multiple injuries. Seven of 12 centres (58 %) perform an arterial and venous phase of the abdomen in split-bolus technique. Six of 12 centres (50 %) use multiphase protocols of the head (n = 3) and abdomen (n = 4), whereas 6/12 (50 %) use single-phase protocols for WBCT. Arm position was on the patient's body during scanning (3/12, 25 %), alongside the body (2/12, 17 %), above the head (2/12, 17 %), or was changed during scanning (5/12, 42 %). Radiation doses showed large variations across centres ranging from 1268-3988 mGy*cm (DLP) per WBCT. Imaging algorithms in polytrauma patients are standardized within, but vary across Swiss trauma centres, similar to the individual WBCT protocols, resulting in large variations in associated radiation doses. (orig.)

  10. Effects of optimization and image processing in digital chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheddache, S.; Maansson, L.G.; Angelhed, J.E.; Denbratt, L.; Gottfridsson, B.; Schlossman, D.

    1991-01-01

    A digital system for chest radiography based on a large image intensifier was compared to a conventional film-screen system. The digital system was optimized with regard to spatial and contrast resolution and dose. The images were digitally processed for contrast and edge enhancement. A simulated pneumothorax and two and two simulated nodules were positioned over the lungs and the mediastinum of an anthro-pomorphic phantom. Observer performance was evaluated with Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Five observers assessed the processed digital images and the conventional full-size radiographs. The time spent viewing the full-size radiographs and the digital images was recorded. For the simulated pneumothorax, the results showed perfect performance for the full-size radiographs and detectability was high also for the processed digital images. No significant differences in the detectability of the simulated nodules was seen between the two imaging systems. The results for the digital images showed a significantly improved detectability for the nodules in the mediastinum as compared to a previous ROC study where no optimization and image processing was available. No significant difference in detectability was seen between the former and the present ROC study for small nodules in the lung. No difference was seen in the time spent assessing the conventional full-size radiographs and the digital images. The study indicates that processed digital images produced by a large image intensifier are equal in image quality to conventional full-size radiographs for low-contrast objects such as nodules. (author). 38 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Toward optimal color image quality of television display

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Lindsay W.; Endrikhovski, Sergej N.; Bech, Soren; Jensen, Kaj

    1999-12-01

    A general framework and first experimental results are presented for the `OPTimal IMage Appearance' (OPTIMA) project, which aims to develop a computational model for achieving optimal color appearance of natural images on adaptive CRT television displays. To achieve this goal we considered the perceptual constraints determining quality of displayed images and how they could be quantified. The practical value of the notion of optimal image appearance was translated from the high level of the perceptual constraints into a method for setting the display's parameters at the physical level. In general, the whole framework of quality determination includes: (1) evaluation of perceived quality; (2) evaluation of the individual perceptual attributes; and (3) correlation between the physical measurements, psychometric parameters and the subjective responses. We performed a series of psychophysical experiments, with observers viewing a series of color images on a high-end consumer television display, to investigate the relationships between Overall Image Quality and four quality-related attributes: Brightness Rendering, Chromatic Rendering, Visibility of Details and Overall Naturalness. The results of the experiments presented in this paper suggest that these attributes are highly inter-correlated.

  12. Establishment and optimization of NMR-based cell metabonomics study protocols for neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Sun, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Gao, Rong; Liu, Qiao; Dong, Fangting; Fang, Haiqin; Peng, Shuangqing; Li, Famei; Yan, Xianzhong

    2017-01-15

    A quenching, harvesting, and extraction protocol was optimized for cardiomyocytes NMR metabonomics analysis in this study. Trypsin treatment and direct scraping cells in acetonitrile were compared for sample harvesting. The results showed trypsin treatment cause normalized concentration increasing of phosphocholine and metabolites leakage, since the trypsin-induced membrane broken and long term harvesting procedures. Then the intracellular metabolite extraction efficiency of methanol and acetonitrile were compared. As a result, washing twice with phosphate buffer, direct scraping cells and extracting with acetonitrile were chosen to prepare cardiomyocytes extracts samples for metabonomics studies. This optimized protocol is rapid, effective, and exhibits greater metabolite retention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimization of brain PET imaging for a multicentre trial: the French CATI experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habert, Marie-Odile; Marie, Sullivan; Bertin, Hugo; Reynal, Moana; Martini, Jean-Baptiste; Diallo, Mamadou; Kas, Aurélie; Trébossen, Régine

    2016-12-01

    CATI is a French initiative launched in 2010 to handle the neuroimaging of a large cohort of subjects recruited for an Alzheimer's research program called MEMENTO. This paper presents our test protocol and results obtained for the 22 PET centres (overall 13 different scanners) involved in the MEMENTO cohort. We determined acquisition parameters using phantom experiments prior to patient studies, with the aim of optimizing PET quantitative values to the highest possible per site, while reducing, if possible, variability across centres. Jaszczak's and 3D-Hoffman's phantom measurements were used to assess image spatial resolution (ISR), recovery coefficients (RC) in hot and cold spheres, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). For each centre, the optimal reconstruction parameters were chosen as those maximizing ISR and RC without a noticeable decrease in SNR. Point-spread-function (PSF) modelling reconstructions were discarded. The three figures of merit extracted from the images reconstructed with optimized parameters and routine schemes were compared, as were volumes of interest ratios extracted from Hoffman acquisitions. The net effect of the 3D-OSEM reconstruction parameter optimization was investigated on a subset of 18 scanners without PSF modelling reconstruction. Compared to the routine parameters of the 22 PET centres, average RC in the two smallest hot and cold spheres and average ISR remained stable or were improved with the optimized reconstruction, at the expense of slight SNR degradation, while the dispersion of values was reduced. For the subset of scanners without PSF modelling, the mean RC of the smallest hot sphere obtained with the optimized reconstruction was significantly higher than with routine reconstruction. The putamen and caudate-to-white matter ratios measured on 3D-Hoffman acquisitions of all centres were also significantly improved by the optimization, while the variance was reduced. This study provides guidelines for optimizing quantitative

  14. In vivo cellular imaging using fluorescent proteins - Methods and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Monti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and genetic engineering of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cell biology. What was previously invisible to the cell often can be made visible with the use of fluorescent proteins. With this words, Robert M. Hoffman introduces In vivo Cellular Imaging Using Fluorescent proteins, the eighteen chapters book dedicated to the description of how fluorescence proteins have changed the way to analyze cellular processes in vivo. Modern researches aim to study new and less invasive methods able to follow the behavior of different cell types in different biological contexts: for example, how cancer cells migrate or how they respond to different therapies. Also, in vivo systems can help researchers to better understand animal embryonic development so as how fluorescence proteins may be used to monitor different processes in living organisms at the molecular and cellular level.

  15. Optimized T1- and T2-weighted volumetric brain imaging as a diagnostic tool in very preterm neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nossin-Manor, Revital; Chung, Andrew D.; Morris, Drew; Thomas, Bejoy; Shroff, Manohar M.; Soares-Fernandes, Joao P.; Cheng, Hai-Ling M.; Whyte, Hilary E.A.; Taylor, Margot J.; Sled, John G.

    2011-01-01

    T1- and T2-W MR sequences used for obtaining diagnostic information and morphometric measurements in the neonatal brain are frequently acquired using different imaging protocols. Optimizing one protocol for obtaining both kinds of information is valuable. To determine whether high-resolution T1- and T2-W volumetric sequences optimized for preterm brain imaging could provide both diagnostic and morphometric value. Thirty preterm neonates born between 24 and 32 weeks' gestational age were scanned during the first 2 weeks after birth. T1- and T2-W high-resolution sequences were optimized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and scan time and compared to conventional spin-echo-based sequences. No differences were found between conventional and high-resolution T1-W sequences for diagnostic confidence, image quality and motion artifacts. A preference for conventional over high-resolution T2-W sequences for image quality was observed. High-resolution T1 images provided better delineation of thalamic myelination and the superior temporal sulcus. No differences were found for detection of myelination and sulcation using conventional and high-resolution T2-W images. High-resolution T1- and T2-W volumetric sequences can be used in clinical MRI in the very preterm brain to provide both diagnostic and morphometric information. (orig.)

  16. A standardised protocol for texture feature analysis of endoscopic images in gynaecological cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattichis Marios S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the development of tissue classification methods, classifiers rely on significant differences between texture features extracted from normal and abnormal regions. Yet, significant differences can arise due to variations in the image acquisition method. For endoscopic imaging of the endometrium, we propose a standardized image acquisition protocol to eliminate significant statistical differences due to variations in: (i the distance from the tissue (panoramic vs close up, (ii difference in viewing angles and (iii color correction. Methods We investigate texture feature variability for a variety of targets encountered in clinical endoscopy. All images were captured at clinically optimum illumination and focus using 720 × 576 pixels and 24 bits color for: (i a variety of testing targets from a color palette with a known color distribution, (ii different viewing angles, (iv two different distances from a calf endometrial and from a chicken cavity. Also, human images from the endometrium were captured and analysed. For texture feature analysis, three different sets were considered: (i Statistical Features (SF, (ii Spatial Gray Level Dependence Matrices (SGLDM, and (iii Gray Level Difference Statistics (GLDS. All images were gamma corrected and the extracted texture feature values were compared against the texture feature values extracted from the uncorrected images. Statistical tests were applied to compare images from different viewing conditions so as to determine any significant differences. Results For the proposed acquisition procedure, results indicate that there is no significant difference in texture features between the panoramic and close up views and between angles. For a calibrated target image, gamma correction provided an acquired image that was a significantly better approximation to the original target image. In turn, this implies that the texture features extracted from the corrected images provided for better

  17. Effective Clipart Image Vectorization through Direct Optimization of Bezigons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Chao, Hongyang; Zhang, Chi; Guo, Jun; Yuan, Lu; Sun, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Bezigons, i.e., closed paths composed of Bézier curves, have been widely employed to describe shapes in image vectorization results. However, most existing vectorization techniques infer the bezigons by simply approximating an intermediate vector representation (such as polygons). Consequently, the resultant bezigons are sometimes imperfect due to accumulated errors, fitting ambiguities, and a lack of curve priors, especially for low-resolution images. In this paper, we describe a novel method for vectorizing clipart images. In contrast to previous methods, we directly optimize the bezigons rather than using other intermediate representations; therefore, the resultant bezigons are not only of higher fidelity compared with the original raster image but also more reasonable because they were traced by a proficient expert. To enable such optimization, we have overcome several challenges and have devised a differentiable data energy as well as several curve-based prior terms. To improve the efficiency of the optimization, we also take advantage of the local control property of bezigons and adopt an overlapped piecewise optimization strategy. The experimental results show that our method outperforms both the current state-of-the-art method and commonly used commercial software in terms of bezigon quality.

  18. A Degree Distribution Optimization Algorithm for Image Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Yang, Junjie

    2016-09-01

    Luby Transform (LT) code is the first practical implementation of digital fountain code. The coding behavior of LT code is mainly decided by the degree distribution which determines the relationship between source data and codewords. Two degree distributions are suggested by Luby. They work well in typical situations but not optimally in case of finite encoding symbols. In this work, the degree distribution optimization algorithm is proposed to explore the potential of LT code. Firstly selection scheme of sparse degrees for LT codes is introduced. Then probability distribution is optimized according to the selected degrees. In image transmission, bit stream is sensitive to the channel noise and even a single bit error may cause the loss of synchronization between the encoder and the decoder. Therefore the proposed algorithm is designed for image transmission situation. Moreover, optimal class partition is studied for image transmission with unequal error protection. The experimental results are quite promising. Compared with LT code with robust soliton distribution, the proposed algorithm improves the final quality of recovered images obviously with the same overhead.

  19. An improved technique for the prediction of optimal image resolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-10-04

    Oct 4, 2010 ... Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJEST ... robust technique for predicting optimal image resolution for the mapping of savannah ecosystems was developed. .... whether to purchase multi-spectral imagery acquired by GeoEye-2 ..... Analysis of the spectral behaviour of the pasture class in.

  20. An improved technique for the prediction of optimal image resolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Past studies to predict optimal image resolution required for generating spatial information for savannah ecosystems have yielded different outcomes, hence providing a knowledge gap that was investigated in the present study. The postulation, for the present study, was that by graphically solving two simultaneous ...

  1. Optimizing the Information Presentation on Mining Potential by using Web Services Technology with Restful Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdillah, T.; Dai, R.; Setiawan, E.

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to develop the application of Web Services technology with RestFul Protocol to optimize the information presentation on mining potential. This study used User Interface Design approach for the information accuracy and relevance as well as the Web Service for the reliability in presenting the information. The results show that: the information accuracy and relevance regarding mining potential can be seen from the achievement of User Interface implementation in the application that is based on the following rules: The consideration of the appropriate colours and objects, the easiness of using the navigation, and users’ interaction with the applications that employs symbols and languages understood by the users; the information accuracy and relevance related to mining potential can be observed by the information presented by using charts and Tool Tip Text to help the users understand the provided chart/figure; the reliability of the information presentation is evident by the results of Web Services testing in Figure 4.5.6. This study finds out that User Interface Design and Web Services approaches (for the access of different Platform apps) are able to optimize the presentation. The results of this study can be used as a reference for software developers and Provincial Government of Gorontalo.

  2. Optimization of intra-voxel incoherent motion imaging at 3.0 Tesla for fast liver examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leporq, Benjamin; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Rabrait, Cecile; Pilleul, Frank; Guillaud, Olivier; Dumortier, Jérôme; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Beuf, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    Optimization of multi b-values MR protocol for fast intra-voxel incoherent motion imaging of the liver at 3.0 Tesla. A comparison of four different acquisition protocols were carried out based on estimated IVIM (DSlow , DFast , and f) and ADC-parameters in 25 healthy volunteers. The effects of respiratory gating compared with free breathing acquisition then diffusion gradient scheme (simultaneous or sequential) and finally use of weighted averaging for different b-values were assessed. An optimization study based on Cramer-Rao lower bound theory was then performed to minimize the number of b-values required for a suitable quantification. The duration-optimized protocol was evaluated on 12 patients with chronic liver diseases No significant differences of IVIM parameters were observed between the assessed protocols. Only four b-values (0, 12, 82, and 1310 s.mm(-2) ) were found mandatory to perform a suitable quantification of IVIM parameters. DSlow and DFast significantly decreased between nonadvanced and advanced fibrosis (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01) whereas perfusion fraction and ADC variations were not found to be significant. Results showed that IVIM could be performed in free breathing, with a weighted-averaging procedure, a simultaneous diffusion gradient scheme and only four optimized b-values (0, 10, 80, and 800) reducing scan duration by a factor of nine compared with a nonoptimized protocol. Preliminary results have shown that parameters such as DSlow and DFast based on optimized IVIM protocol can be relevant biomarkers to distinguish between nonadvanced and advanced fibrosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. MO-A-218-01: CT Protocol Review - Practical Tips for Imaging Physicists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzutiello, R

    2012-06-01

    In the 1980's and 90's, when every mammography department had a wet film processor and a sundial to keep the schedule, medical physicists performing mammography surveys were primarily focused on measuring machine performance and image quality. As our professional experience matured, medical physicists began to learn that they were uniquely qualified to help to recommend technique factors that would balance dose and image quality. Technique charts using different kVp, target-filter combinations and AEC modes gradually became common and patients benefitted from our input. With the revolutionary change in CT Scanner technology and utilization, medical physicists have begun to contribute their expertise to developing and improving CT protocols. This presentation will present practical challenges and offer some directions for the practicing medical physicist who desires to participate in this critical and emerging aspect of imaging physics practice: CT Protocol Review. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. PET image reconstruction: mean, variance, and optimal minimax criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Huafeng; Guo, Min; Gao, Fei; Shi, Pengcheng; Xue, Liying; Nie, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Given the noise nature of positron emission tomography (PET) measurements, it is critical to know the image quality and reliability as well as expected radioactivity map (mean image) for both qualitative interpretation and quantitative analysis. While existing efforts have often been devoted to providing only the reconstructed mean image, we present a unified framework for joint estimation of the mean and corresponding variance of the radioactivity map based on an efficient optimal min–max criterion. The proposed framework formulates the PET image reconstruction problem to be a transformation from system uncertainties to estimation errors, where the minimax criterion is adopted to minimize the estimation errors with possibly maximized system uncertainties. The estimation errors, in the form of a covariance matrix, express the measurement uncertainties in a complete way. The framework is then optimized by ∞-norm optimization and solved with the corresponding H ∞ filter. Unlike conventional statistical reconstruction algorithms, that rely on the statistical modeling methods of the measurement data or noise, the proposed joint estimation stands from the point of view of signal energies and can handle from imperfect statistical assumptions to even no a priori statistical assumptions. The performance and accuracy of reconstructed mean and variance images are validated using Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments on phantom scans with a small animal PET scanner and real patient scans are also conducted for assessment of clinical potential. (paper)

  5. Initial experience on protocol optimization for integrated PET/MR%PET/MR一体机操作优化的初步经验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘家金; 陈英茂; 张雄伟; 富丽萍; 田嘉禾; 尹大一; 徐白萱

    2014-01-01

    目的 通过比较PET/CT和PET/MR,初步探索PET/MR一体机的操作流程和成像优化方案.方法 228例患者同日内接受PET/CT和PET/MR检查,通过6种不同MR序列与PET采集组合方案,比较图像质量的优劣,以在保证诊断信息基础上缩短患者扫描时间的原则分析判断,并初步确定最优PET/MR一体机采集方案.结果 PET/MR结果与PET/CT相近,但其操作流程和注意事项有独特之处;在6种方案中,以躯干和头部各有独立序列组合、兼顾各向同性结构显示与突出病灶特点的方案6效果最优;PET/MR比PET/CT更易产生伪影.结论 在优化方案基础上,PET/MR可获得与PET/CT一致的诊断级图像,但PET/MR采集时间长、伪影多,有待进一步完善.%Objective To investigate the optimal workflow and protocol for integrated PET/MR by comparison with PET/CT.Methods A total of 228 patients were enrolled in this study for PET/CT and PET/MR evaluation on the same day.Six PET/MR protocols with different MR sequences but the same PET acquisition protocol were investigated and the optimal protocol was identified based on image quality,acquisition time and diagnostic performance.Results PET/MR workflow was similar to PET/CT,however,some special issues needed to be considered for PET/MR.Among the 6 protocols,protocol No.6 outperformed others for body and head regions.Types of artifacts were found more often in PET/MR than in PET/CT.Conclusions By optimizing the protocol,PET/MR could achieve almost the same diagnostic performance as PET/CT.However,the issues of long acquisition time and artifacts on PET/MR need to be further improved.

  6. Optimized multiple linear mappings for single image super-resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaibing; Li, Jie; Xiong, Zenggang; Liu, Xiuping; Gao, Xinbo

    2017-12-01

    Learning piecewise linear regression has been recognized as an effective way for example learning-based single image super-resolution (SR) in literature. In this paper, we employ an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to further improve the SR performance of our previous multiple linear mappings (MLM) based SR method. In the training stage, the proposed method starts with a set of linear regressors obtained by the MLM-based method, and then jointly optimizes the clustering results and the low- and high-resolution subdictionary pairs for regression functions by using the metric of the reconstruction errors. In the test stage, we select the optimal regressor for SR reconstruction by accumulating the reconstruction errors of m-nearest neighbors in the training set. Thorough experimental results carried on six publicly available datasets demonstrate that the proposed SR method can yield high-quality images with finer details and sharper edges in terms of both quantitative and perceptual image quality assessments.

  7. Rationale for and approach to preoperative opioid weaning: a preoperative optimization protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath McAnally

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The practice of chronic opioid prescription for chronic non-cancer pain has come under considerable scrutiny within the past several years as mounting evidence reveals a generally unfavorable risk to benefit ratio and the nation reels from the grim mortality statistics associated with the opioid epidemic. Patients struggling with chronic pain tend to use opioids and also seek out operative intervention for their complaints, which combination may be leading to increased postoperative “acute-on-chronic” pain and fueling worsened chronic pain and opioid dependence. Besides worsened postoperative pain, a growing body of literature, reviewed herein, indicates that preoperative opioid use is associated with significantly worsened surgical outcomes, and severely increased financial drain on an already severely overburdened healthcare budget. Conversely, there is evidence that preoperative opioid reduction may result in substantial improvements in outcome. In the era of accountable care, efforts such as the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS protocol have been introduced in an attempt to standardize and facilitate evidence-based perioperative interventions to optimize surgical outcomes. We propose that addressing preoperative opioid reduction as part of a targeted optimization approach for chronic pain patients seeking surgery is not only logical but mandatory given the stakes involved. Simple opioid reduction/abstinence however is not likely to occur in the absence of provision of viable and palatable alternatives to managing pain, which will require a strong focus upon reducing pain catastrophization and bolstering self-efficacy and resilience. In response to a call from our surgical community toward that end, we have developed a simple and easy-to-implement outpatient preoperative optimization program focusing on gentle opioid weaning/elimination as well as a few other high-yield areas of intervention, requiring a minimum of resources.

  8. Morphology and structure of lipoproteins revealed by an optimized negative-staining protocol of electron microscopy[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Song, James; Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Ishida, Brian Y.; Zhang, Shengli; Kane, John P.; Weisgraber, Karl H.; Oda, Michael N.; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Pownall, Henry J.; Ren, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Plasma lipoprotein levels are predictors of risk for coronary artery disease. Lipoprotein structure-function relationships provide important clues that help identify the role of lipoproteins in cardiovascular disease. The compositional and conformational heterogeneity of lipoproteins are major barriers to the identification of their structures, as discovered using traditional approaches. Although electron microscopy (EM) is an alternative approach, conventional negative staining (NS) produces rouleau artifacts. In a previous study of apolipoprotein (apo)E4-containing reconstituted HDL (rHDL) particles, we optimized the NS method in a way that eliminated rouleaux. Here we report that phosphotungstic acid at high buffer salt concentrations plays a key role in rouleau formation. We also validate our protocol for analyzing the major plasma lipoprotein classes HDL, LDL, IDL, and VLDL, as well as homogeneously prepared apoA-I-containing rHDL. High-contrast EM images revealed morphology and detailed structures of lipoproteins, especially apoA-I-containing rHDL, that are amenable to three-dimensional reconstruction by single-particle analysis and electron tomography. PMID:20978167

  9. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

  10. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    improvement of the NCC value by 100% and of the RMSD value by 81%. The corresponding maximum improvements for the registration-based approach were 20% and 40%. In phases with very rapid motion the registration-based algorithm obtained better image quality, while the image quality of the MAM algorithm was superior in phases with less motion. The image quality improvement of the MAM optimization was visually confirmed for the different clinical cases. Conclusions: The proposed method allows a software-based best-phase image quality improvement in coronary CT angiography. A short scan data interval at the target heart phase is sufficient, no additional scan data in other cardiac phases are required. The algorithm is therefore directly applicable to any standard cardiac CT acquisition protocol.

  11. Technical requirements, biophysical considerations and protocol optimization with magnetic resonance angiography using blood-pool agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrer, M.; Geerts-Ossevoort, L.; Laub, G.

    2007-01-01

    In order to maximize the potential benefits of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, careful attention must be paid to the choice of hardware, data acquisition and processing, and to the choice of contrast agent. Typically, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography uses parallel-imaging techniques, which shorten the acquisition time, enhance spatial resolution and reduce artefacts. The timing of data acquisition is crucial for maximal enhancement of the arteries: for optimal arterial depiction, the centre of k-space should be acquired at the time of peak concentration of contrast agent in the arterial bed being investigated, and a number of k-space acquisition techniques are available to achieve this. SENSE or GRAPPA techniques can be used to facilitate parallel-imaging reconstruction of either the image data or k-space data, respectively. Gadolinium contrast agents shorten the proton relaxation times (most importantly T1) of blood, thereby increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and enhancing differentiation between blood vessels and other tissues. The blood-pool (intravascular) contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is reversibly protein-bound in human plasma. This results in a marked increase in relaxivity, and hence a strong T1 shortening effect compared with other gadolinium-based contrast agents. Furthermore, the blood retention time of gadofosveset trisodium is substantially prolonged compared with conventional contrast agents. As a result, gadofosveset trisodium permits both first-pass and steady-state imaging. (orig.)

  12. Reducing sedation for pediatric body MRI using accelerated and abbreviated imaging protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Hu, Houchun Harry; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established diagnostic imaging tool for investigating pediatric disease. MRI allows assessment of structure, function, and morphology in cardiovascular imaging, as well as tissue characterization in body imaging, without the use of ionizing radiation. For MRI in children, sedation and general anesthesia (GA) are often utilized to suppress patient motion, which can otherwise compromise image quality and diagnostic efficacy. However, evidence is emerging that use of sedation and GA in children might have long-term neurocognitive side effects, in addition to the short-term procedure-related risks. These concerns make risk-benefit assessment of sedation and GA more challenging. Therefore, reducing or eliminating the need for sedation and GA is an important goal of imaging innovation and research in pediatric MRI. In this review, the authors focus on technical and clinical approaches to reducing and eliminating the use of sedation in the pediatric population based on image acquisition acceleration and imaging protocols abbreviation. This paper covers important physiological and technical considerations for pediatric body MR imaging and discusses MRI techniques that offer the potential of recovering diagnostic-quality images from accelerated scans. In this review, the authors also introduce the concept of reporting elements for important indications for pediatric body MRI and use this as a basis for abbreviating the MR protocols. By employing appropriate accelerated and abbreviated approaches based on an understanding of the imaging needs and reporting elements for a given clinical indication, it is possible to reduce sedation and GA for pediatric chest, cardiovascular and abdominal MRI. (orig.)

  13. Reducing sedation for pediatric body MRI using accelerated and abbreviated imaging protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Rizwan [The Ohio State University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbus, OH (United States); Hu, Houchun Harry; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established diagnostic imaging tool for investigating pediatric disease. MRI allows assessment of structure, function, and morphology in cardiovascular imaging, as well as tissue characterization in body imaging, without the use of ionizing radiation. For MRI in children, sedation and general anesthesia (GA) are often utilized to suppress patient motion, which can otherwise compromise image quality and diagnostic efficacy. However, evidence is emerging that use of sedation and GA in children might have long-term neurocognitive side effects, in addition to the short-term procedure-related risks. These concerns make risk-benefit assessment of sedation and GA more challenging. Therefore, reducing or eliminating the need for sedation and GA is an important goal of imaging innovation and research in pediatric MRI. In this review, the authors focus on technical and clinical approaches to reducing and eliminating the use of sedation in the pediatric population based on image acquisition acceleration and imaging protocols abbreviation. This paper covers important physiological and technical considerations for pediatric body MR imaging and discusses MRI techniques that offer the potential of recovering diagnostic-quality images from accelerated scans. In this review, the authors also introduce the concept of reporting elements for important indications for pediatric body MRI and use this as a basis for abbreviating the MR protocols. By employing appropriate accelerated and abbreviated approaches based on an understanding of the imaging needs and reporting elements for a given clinical indication, it is possible to reduce sedation and GA for pediatric chest, cardiovascular and abdominal MRI. (orig.)

  14. Optimization for PET imaging based on phantom study and NECdensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Shimada, Naoki; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    In consideration of the requirement for global standardization and quality control of PET imaging, the present studies gave an outline of phantom study to decide both scan and reconstruction parameters based on FDG-PET/CT procedure guideline in Japan, and optimization of scan duration based on NEC density was performed continuously. In the phantom study, scan and reconstruction parameters were decided by visual assessment and physical indexes (N 10mm , NEC phantom , Q H,10mm /N 10mm ) to visualize hot spot of 10 mm diameter with standardized uptake value (SUV)=4 explicitly. Simultaneously, Recovery Coefficient (RC) was evaluated to recognize that PET images had enough quantifiably. Scan durations were optimized by Body Mass Index (BMI) based on retrospective analysis of NEC density . Correlation between visual score in clinical FDG-PET images and NEC density fell after the optimization of scan duration. Both Inter-institution and inter-patient variability were decreased by performing the phantom study based on the procedure guideline and the optimization of scan duration based on NEC density which seem finally useful to practice highly precise examination and promote high-quality controlled study. (author)

  15. Evaluation of adult outpatient magnetic resonance imaging sedation practices: are patients being sedated optimally?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middelkamp, J.E.; Forster, B.B; Keogh, C.; Lennox, P.; Mayson, K.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the use of anxiolytics in adult outpatient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) centres and to determine whether utilisation is optimal based on the pharmacology of the drugs used, who prescribes these drugs, and how patients are managed after administration. Identical paper and Web-based surveys were used to anonymously collect data about radiologists' use of anxiolytic agents for adult outpatient MRI examinations. The survey questions were about the type of facility, percentage of studies that require sedation, the drug used and route of administration, who orders the drug, timing of administration, patient monitoring during and observation after the study, use of a dedicated nurse for monitoring, and use of standard sedation and discharge protocols. The χ2 analysis for statistical association among variables was used. Eighty-five of 263 surveys were returned (32% response rate). The radiologist ordered the medication (53%) in slightly more facilities than the referring physician (44%) or the nurse. Forty percent of patients received medication 15-30 minutes before MRI, which is too early for peak effect of oral or sublingual drugs. Lorazepam was most commonly used (64% first choice). Facilities with standard sedation protocols (56%) were more likely to use midazolam than those without standard sedation protocols (17% vs 10%), to have a nurse for monitoring (P = .032), to have standard discharge criteria (P = .001), and to provide written information regarding adverse effects (P = .002). Many outpatients in MRI centres may be scanned before the peak effect of anxiolytics prescribed. A standard sedation protocol in such centres is associated with a more appropriate drug choice, as well as optimized monitoring and postprocedure care. (author)

  16. GPU based Monte Carlo for PET image reconstruction: parameter optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cserkaszky, Á; Légrády, D.; Wirth, A.; Bükki, T.; Patay, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the optimization of a fully Monte Carlo (MC) based iterative image reconstruction of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) measurements. With our MC re- construction method all the physical effects in a PET system are taken into account thus superior image quality is achieved in exchange for increased computational effort. The method is feasible because we utilize the enormous processing power of Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) to solve the inherently parallel problem of photon transport. The MC approach regards the simulated positron decays as samples in mathematical sums required in the iterative reconstruction algorithm, so to complement the fast architecture, our work of optimization focuses on the number of simulated positron decays required to obtain sufficient image quality. We have achieved significant results in determining the optimal number of samples for arbitrary measurement data, this allows to achieve the best image quality with the least possible computational effort. Based on this research recommendations can be given for effective partitioning of computational effort into the iterations in limited time reconstructions. (author)

  17. Ab initio thermochemistry using optimal-balance models with isodesmic corrections: The ATOMIC protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakowies, Dirk

    2009-04-01

    A theoretical composite approach, termed ATOMIC for Ab initio Thermochemistry using Optimal-balance Models with Isodesmic Corrections, is introduced for the calculation of molecular atomization energies and enthalpies of formation. Care is taken to achieve optimal balance in accuracy and cost between the various components contributing to high-level estimates of the fully correlated energy at the infinite-basis-set limit. To this end, the energy at the coupled-cluster level of theory including single, double, and quasiperturbational triple excitations is decomposed into Hartree-Fock, low-order correlation (MP2, CCSD), and connected-triples contributions and into valence-shell and core contributions. Statistical analyses for 73 representative neutral closed-shell molecules containing hydrogen and at least three first-row atoms (CNOF) are used to devise basis-set and extrapolation requirements for each of the eight components to maintain a given level of accuracy. Pople's concept of bond-separation reactions is implemented in an ab initio framework, providing for a complete set of high-level precomputed isodesmic corrections which can be used for any molecule for which a valence structure can be drawn. Use of these corrections is shown to lower basis-set requirements dramatically for each of the eight components of the composite model. A hierarchy of three levels is suggested for isodesmically corrected composite models which reproduce atomization energies at the reference level of theory to within 0.1 kcal/mol (A), 0.3 kcal/mol (B), and 1 kcal/mol (C). Large-scale statistical analysis shows that corrections beyond the CCSD(T) reference level of theory, including coupled-cluster theory with fully relaxed connected triple and quadruple excitations, first-order relativistic and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections can normally be dealt with using a greatly simplified model that assumes thermoneutral bond-separation reactions and that reduces the estimate of these

  18. A service protocol for post-processing of medical images on the mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Longjun; Ming, Xing; Xu, Lang; Liu, Qian

    2014-03-01

    With computing capability and display size growing, the mobile device has been used as a tool to help clinicians view patient information and medical images anywhere and anytime. It is uneasy and time-consuming for transferring medical images with large data size from picture archiving and communication system to mobile client, since the wireless network is unstable and limited by bandwidth. Besides, limited by computing capability, memory and power endurance, it is hard to provide a satisfactory quality of experience for radiologists to handle some complex post-processing of medical images on the mobile device, such as real-time direct interactive three-dimensional visualization. In this work, remote rendering technology is employed to implement the post-processing of medical images instead of local rendering, and a service protocol is developed to standardize the communication between the render server and mobile client. In order to make mobile devices with different platforms be able to access post-processing of medical images, the Extensible Markup Language is taken to describe this protocol, which contains four main parts: user authentication, medical image query/ retrieval, 2D post-processing (e.g. window leveling, pixel values obtained) and 3D post-processing (e.g. maximum intensity projection, multi-planar reconstruction, curved planar reformation and direct volume rendering). And then an instance is implemented to verify the protocol. This instance can support the mobile device access post-processing of medical image services on the render server via a client application or on the web page.

  19. Optimization of an Image-Based Talking Head System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Liu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an image-based talking head system, which includes two parts: analysis and synthesis. The audiovisual analysis part creates a face model of a recorded human subject, which is composed of a personalized 3D mask as well as a large database of mouth images and their related information. The synthesis part generates natural looking facial animations from phonetic transcripts of text. A critical issue of the synthesis is the unit selection which selects and concatenates these appropriate mouth images from the database such that they match the spoken words of the talking head. Selection is based on lip synchronization and the similarity of consecutive images. The unit selection is refined in this paper, and Pareto optimization is used to train the unit selection. Experimental results of subjective tests show that most people cannot distinguish our facial animations from real videos.

  20. Optimization of the alpha image reconstruction. An iterative CT-image reconstruction with well-defined image quality metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, Sergej; Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelriess, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Optimization of the AIR-algorithm for improved convergence and performance. TThe AIR method is an iterative algorithm for CT image reconstruction. As a result of its linearity with respect to the basis images, the AIR algorithm possesses well defined, regular image quality metrics, e.g. point spread function (PSF) or modulation transfer function (MTF), unlike other iterative reconstruction algorithms. The AIR algorithm computes weighting images α to blend between a set of basis images that preferably have mutually exclusive properties, e.g. high spatial resolution or low noise. The optimized algorithm uses an approach that alternates between the optimization of rawdata fidelity using an OSSART like update and regularization using gradient descent, as opposed to the initially proposed AIR using a straightforward gradient descent implementation. A regularization strength for a given task is chosen by formulating a requirement for the noise reduction and checking whether it is fulfilled for different regularization strengths, while monitoring the spatial resolution using the voxel-wise defined modulation transfer function for the AIR image. The optimized algorithm computes similar images in a shorter time compared to the initial gradient descent implementation of AIR. The result can be influenced by multiple parameters that can be narrowed down to a relatively simple framework to compute high quality images. The AIR images, for instance, can have at least a 50% lower noise level compared to the sharpest basis image, while the spatial resolution is mostly maintained. The optimization improves performance by a factor of 6, while maintaining image quality. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the spatial resolution for AIR can be determined using regular image quality metrics, given smooth weighting images. This is not possible for other iterative reconstructions as a result of their non linearity. A simple set of parameters for the algorithm is discussed that provides

  1. Optimization of the alpha image reconstruction. An iterative CT-image reconstruction with well-defined image quality metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Sergej; Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelriess, Marc [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany).

    2017-10-01

    Optimization of the AIR-algorithm for improved convergence and performance. TThe AIR method is an iterative algorithm for CT image reconstruction. As a result of its linearity with respect to the basis images, the AIR algorithm possesses well defined, regular image quality metrics, e.g. point spread function (PSF) or modulation transfer function (MTF), unlike other iterative reconstruction algorithms. The AIR algorithm computes weighting images α to blend between a set of basis images that preferably have mutually exclusive properties, e.g. high spatial resolution or low noise. The optimized algorithm uses an approach that alternates between the optimization of rawdata fidelity using an OSSART like update and regularization using gradient descent, as opposed to the initially proposed AIR using a straightforward gradient descent implementation. A regularization strength for a given task is chosen by formulating a requirement for the noise reduction and checking whether it is fulfilled for different regularization strengths, while monitoring the spatial resolution using the voxel-wise defined modulation transfer function for the AIR image. The optimized algorithm computes similar images in a shorter time compared to the initial gradient descent implementation of AIR. The result can be influenced by multiple parameters that can be narrowed down to a relatively simple framework to compute high quality images. The AIR images, for instance, can have at least a 50% lower noise level compared to the sharpest basis image, while the spatial resolution is mostly maintained. The optimization improves performance by a factor of 6, while maintaining image quality. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the spatial resolution for AIR can be determined using regular image quality metrics, given smooth weighting images. This is not possible for other iterative reconstructions as a result of their non linearity. A simple set of parameters for the algorithm is discussed that provides

  2. An optimal big data workflow for biomedical image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelle Tchagna Kouanou

    Full Text Available Background and objective: In the medical field, data volume is increasingly growing, and traditional methods cannot manage it efficiently. In biomedical computation, the continuous challenges are: management, analysis, and storage of the biomedical data. Nowadays, big data technology plays a significant role in the management, organization, and analysis of data, using machine learning and artificial intelligence techniques. It also allows a quick access to data using the NoSQL database. Thus, big data technologies include new frameworks to process medical data in a manner similar to biomedical images. It becomes very important to develop methods and/or architectures based on big data technologies, for a complete processing of biomedical image data. Method: This paper describes big data analytics for biomedical images, shows examples reported in the literature, briefly discusses new methods used in processing, and offers conclusions. We argue for adapting and extending related work methods in the field of big data software, using Hadoop and Spark frameworks. These provide an optimal and efficient architecture for biomedical image analysis. This paper thus gives a broad overview of big data analytics to automate biomedical image diagnosis. A workflow with optimal methods and algorithm for each step is proposed. Results: Two architectures for image classification are suggested. We use the Hadoop framework to design the first, and the Spark framework for the second. The proposed Spark architecture allows us to develop appropriate and efficient methods to leverage a large number of images for classification, which can be customized with respect to each other. Conclusions: The proposed architectures are more complete, easier, and are adaptable in all of the steps from conception. The obtained Spark architecture is the most complete, because it facilitates the implementation of algorithms with its embedded libraries. Keywords: Biomedical images, Big

  3. Spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy detection in retinal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartczak, Piotr; Fält, Pauli; Penttinen, Niko; Ylitepsa, Pasi; Laaksonen, Lauri; Lensu, Lasse; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Uusitalo, Hannu

    2017-04-01

    Retinal photography is a standard method for recording retinal diseases for subsequent analysis and diagnosis. However, the currently used white light or red-free retinal imaging does not necessarily provide the best possible visibility of different types of retinal lesions, important when developing diagnostic tools for handheld devices, such as smartphones. Using specifically designed illumination, the visibility and contrast of retinal lesions could be improved. In this study, spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy lesion visualization are implemented using a spectrally tunable light source based on digital micromirror device. The applicability of this method was tested in vivo by taking retinal monochrome images from the eyes of five diabetic volunteers and two non-diabetic control subjects. For comparison to existing methods, we evaluated the contrast of retinal images taken with our method and red-free illumination. The preliminary results show that the use of optimal illuminations improved the contrast of diabetic lesions in retinal images by 30-70%, compared to the traditional red-free illumination imaging.

  4. Software optimization for electrical conductivity imaging in polycrystalline diamond cutters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanov, G.; Ludwig, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Rd, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States); Wiggins, J.; Bertagnolli, K. [US Synthetic, 1260 South 1600 West, Orem, UT 84058 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    We previously reported on an electrical conductivity imaging instrument developed for measurements on polycrystalline diamond cutters. These cylindrical cutters for oil and gas drilling feature a thick polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide substrate. The instrument uses electrical impedance tomography to profile the conductivity in the diamond table. Conductivity images must be acquired quickly, on the order of 5 sec per cutter, to be useful in the manufacturing process. This paper reports on successful efforts to optimize the conductivity reconstruction routine, porting major portions of it to NVIDIA GPUs, including a custom CUDA kernel for Jacobian computation.

  5. Towards optimized naphthalocyanines as sonochromes for photoacoustic imaging in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell J. Duffy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we establish a methodology to predict photoacoustic imaging capabilities from the structure of absorber molecules (sonochromes. The comparative in vitro and in vivo screening of naphthalocyanines and cyanine dyes has shown a substitution pattern dependent shift in photoacoustic excitation wavelength, with distal substitution producing the preferred maximum around 800 nm. Central ion change showed variable production of photoacoustic signals, as well as singlet oxygen photoproduction and fluorescence with the optimum for photoacoustic imaging being nickel(II. Our approach paves the way for the design, evaluation and realization of optimized sonochromes as photoacoustic contrast agents. Keywords: Naphthalocyanines, Spectroscopy

  6. ADAPTIVE CLUSTER BASED ROUTING PROTOCOL WITH ANT COLONY OPTIMIZATION FOR MOBILE AD-HOC NETWORK IN DISASTER AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Budianto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In post-disaster rehabilitation efforts, the availability of telecommunication facilities takes important role. However, the process to improve telecommunication facilities in disaster area is risky if it is done by humans. Therefore, a network method that can work efficiently, effectively, and capable to reach the widest possible area is needed. This research introduces a cluster-based routing protocol named Adaptive Cluster Based Routing Protocol (ACBRP equipped by Ant Colony Optimization method, and its implementation in a simulator developed by author. After data analysis and statistical tests, it can be concluded that routing protocol ACBRP performs better than AODV and DSR routing protocol. Pada upaya rehabilitasi pascabencana, ketersediaan fasilitas telekomunikasi memiliki peranan yang sangat penting. Namun, proses untuk memperbaiki fasilitas telekomunikasi di daerah bencana memiliki resiko jika dilakukan oleh manusia. Oleh karena itu, metode jaringan yang dapat bekerja secara efisien, efektif, dan mampu mencapai area seluas mungkin diperlukan. Penelitian ini memperkenalkan sebuah protokol routing berbasis klaster bernama Adaptive Cluster Based Routing Protocol (ACBRP, yang dilengkapi dengan metode Ant Colony Optimization, dan diimplementasikan pada simulator yang dikembangkan penulis. Setelah data dianalisis dan dilakukan uji statistik, disimpulkan bahwa protokol routing ACBRP beroperasi lebih baik daripada protokol routing AODV maupun DSR.

  7. A Multipath Routing Protocol Based on Clustering and Ant Colony Optimization for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available For monitoring burst events in a kind of reactive wireless sensor networks (WSNs, a multipath routing protocol (MRP based on dynamic clustering and ant colony optimization (ACO is proposed.. Such an approach can maximize the network lifetime and reduce the energy consumption. An important attribute of WSNs is their limited power supply, and therefore some metrics (such as energy consumption of communication among nodes, residual energy, path length were considered as very important criteria while designing routing in the MRP. Firstly, a cluster head (CH is selected among nodes located in the event area according to some parameters, such as residual energy. Secondly, an improved ACO algorithm is applied in the search for multiple paths between the CH and sink node. Finally, the CH dynamically chooses a route to transmit data with a probability that depends on many path metrics, such as energy consumption. The simulation results show that MRP can prolong the network lifetime, as well as balance of energy consumption among nodes and reduce the average energy consumption effectively.

  8. Promoting teamwork and surgical optimization: combining TeamSTEPPS with a specialty team protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbs, Sheila Marie; Moss, Jacqueline

    2014-11-01

    This quality improvement project was a 300-day descriptive preintervention and postintervention comparison consisting of a convenience sample of 18 gynecology surgical team members. We administered the Team Strategies & Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS®) Teamwork Perception Questionnaire to measure the perception of teamwork. In addition, we collected data regarding rates of compliance (ie, huddle, time out) and measurable surgical procedure times. Results showed a statistically significant increase in the number of team members present for each procedure, 2.34 μ before compared with 2.61 μ after (P = .038), and in the final time-out (FTO) compliance as a result of a clarification of the definition of FTO, 1.05 μ before compared with 1.18 μ after (P = .004). Additionally, there was improvement in staff members' perception of teamwork. The implementation of team training, protocols, and algorithms can enhance surgical optimization, communication, and work relationships. Copyright © 2014 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Standardization and Optimization of Computed Tomography Protocols to Achieve Low-Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Cynthia; Cody, Dianna D.; Gupta, Rajiv; Hess, Christopher P.; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Kofler, James M.; Krishnam, Mayil S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The increase in radiation exposure due to CT scans has been of growing concern in recent years. CT scanners differ in their capabilities and various indications require unique protocols, but there remains room for standardization and optimization. In this paper we summarize approaches to reduce dose, as discussed in lectures comprising the first session of the 2013 UCSF Virtual Symposium on Radiation Safety in Computed Tomography. The experience of scanning at low dose in different body regions, for both diagnostic and interventional CT procedures, is addressed. An essential primary step is justifying the medical need for each scan. General guiding principles for reducing dose include tailoring a scan to a patient, minimizing scan length, use of tube current modulation and minimizing tube current, minimizing-tube potential, iterative reconstruction, and periodic review of CT studies. Organized efforts for standardization have been spearheaded by professional societies such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. Finally, all team members should demonstrate an awareness of the importance of minimizing dose. PMID:24589403

  10. Blood cell mRNAs and microRNAs: optimized protocols for extraction and preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikmans, Michael; Rekers, Niels V; Anholts, Jacqueline D H; Heidt, Sebastiaan; Claas, Frans H J

    2013-03-14

    Assessing messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA levels in peripheral blood cells may complement conventional parameters in clinical practice. Working with small, precious samples requires optimal RNA yields and minimal RNA degradation. Several procedures for RNA extraction and complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis were compared for their efficiency. The effect on RNA quality of freeze-thawing peripheral blood cells and storage in preserving reagents was investigated. In terms of RNA yield and convenience, quality quantitative polymerase chain reaction signals per nanogram of total RNA and using NucleoSpin and mirVana columns is preferable. The SuperScript III protocol results in the highest cDNA yields. During conventional procedures of storing peripheral blood cells at -180°C and thawing them thereafter, RNA integrity is maintained. TRIzol preserves RNA in cells stored at -20°C. Detection of mRNA levels significantly decreases in degraded RNA samples, whereas microRNA molecules remain relatively stable. When standardized to reference targets, mRNA transcripts and microRNAs can be reliably quantified in moderately degraded (quality index 4-7) and severely degraded (quality index <4) RNA samples, respectively. We describe a strategy for obtaining high-quality and quantity RNA from fresh and stored cells from blood. The results serve as a guideline for sensitive mRNA and microRNA expression assessment in clinical material.

  11. Optimization of Protocols for In Vitro Regeneration of Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakra Jamil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane contributes 60–70% of annual sugar production in the world. Somaclonal variation has potential to enhance genetic variation present within a species. Present study was done to optimize an in vitro propagation protocol for sugarcane. The experiments included four varieties, 9 callus induction media, 27 regeneration media, and 9 root induction media under two-factor factorial CRD. Data were recorded on callus induction, embryogenic callus formation, shoot elongation (cm, root induction, and plant regeneration. Statistically significant differences existed between genotypes and treatments for callus induction (%, embryogenic callus formation (%, shoot elongation (cm, root induction, and plant regeneration (%. All parameters showed dependency on genotypes, culture media, and their interaction. Highest callus induction (95% embryogenic callus formation (95% was observed in callus induction media 5. Highest plantlet regeneration (98.9% capacity was observed in regeneration media 11 whereas maximum shoot elongation (12.13 cm and root induction (8.32 were observed in rooting media 4. G1 showed best response for all traits and vice versa for G4. Hence it was concluded that G1, callus induction media 5, regeneration media 11, and rooting media 4 are the best conditions for in vitro propagation of sugarcane.

  12. Determination of an optimal priming duration and concentration protocol for pepper seeds (Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen ALOUI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Seed priming is a simple pre-germination method to improve seed performance and to attenuate the effects of stress exposure. The objective of this study was to determinate an optimal priming protocol for three pepper cultivars (Capsicum annuum L.: ‘Beldi’, ‘Baklouti’ and ‘Anaheim Chili’. Seeds were primed with three solutions of NaCl, KCl and CaCl2 (0, 10, 20 and 50 mM for three different durations (12, 24 and 36h. Control seeds were soaked in distilled water for the same durations. After that, all seeds were kept to germinate in laboratory under normal light and controlled temperature. Results indicated that priming depends on concentration, duration and cultivar. The best combinations that we obtained were: KCl priming (10 mM, 36h for ‘Beldi’ cultivar, CaCl2 priming (10 mM, 36h for ‘Baklouti’ cultivar and finally NaCl priming (50 mM, 24h for ‘Anaheim Chili’ cultivar. Generally, priming had an effect on total germination percentage, mean germination time, germination index and the coefficient of velocity compared to control seeds. The beneficial effect of seed priming could be used for improving salt tolerance on germination and early seedling growth for pepper cultivar.

  13. Otsu Based Optimal Multilevel Image Thresholding Using Firefly Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sri Madhava Raja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histogram based multilevel thresholding approach is proposed using Brownian distribution (BD guided firefly algorithm (FA. A bounded search technique is also presented to improve the optimization accuracy with lesser search iterations. Otsu’s between-class variance function is maximized to obtain optimal threshold level for gray scale images. The performances of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated by considering twelve benchmark images and are compared with the existing FA algorithms such as Lévy flight (LF guided FA and random operator guided FA. The performance assessment comparison between the proposed and existing firefly algorithms is carried using prevailing parameters such as objective function, standard deviation, peak-to-signal ratio (PSNR, structural similarity (SSIM index, and search time of CPU. The results show that BD guided FA provides better objective function, PSNR, and SSIM, whereas LF based FA provides faster convergence with relatively lower CPU time.

  14. SU-E-I-23: A General KV Constrained Optimization of CNR for CT Abdominal Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: While Tube current modulation has been well accepted for CT dose reduction, kV adjusting in clinical settings is still at its early stage. This is mainly due to the limited kV options of most current CT scanners. kV adjusting can potentially reduce radiation dose and optimize image quality. This study is to optimize CT abdomen imaging acquisition based on the assumption of a continuous kV, with the goal to provide the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: For a given dose (CTDIvol) level, the CNRs at different kV and pitches were measured with an ACR GAMMEX phantom. The phantom was scanned in a Siemens Sensation 64 scanner and a GE VCT 64 scanner. A constrained mathematical optimization was used to find the kV which led to the highest CNR for the anatomy and pitch setting. Parametric equations were obtained from polynomial fitting of plots of kVs vs CNRs. A suitable constraint region for optimization was chosen. Subsequent optimization yielded a peak CNR at a particular kV for different collimations and pitch setting. Results: The constrained mathematical optimization approach yields kV of 114.83 and 113.46, with CNRs of 1.27 and 1.11 at the pitch of 1.2 and 1.4, respectively, for the Siemens Sensation 64 scanner with the collimation of 32 x 0.625mm. An optimized kV of 134.25 and 1.51 CNR is obtained for a GE VCT 64 slice scanner with a collimation of 32 x 0.625mm and a pitch of 0.969. At 0.516 pitch and 32 x 0.625 mm an optimized kV of 133.75 and a CNR of 1.14 was found for the GE VCT 64 slice scanner. Conclusion: CNR in CT image acquisition can be further optimized with a continuous kV option instead of current discrete or fixed kV settings. A continuous kV option is a key for individualized CT protocols

  15. SU-E-I-23: A General KV Constrained Optimization of CNR for CT Abdominal Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While Tube current modulation has been well accepted for CT dose reduction, kV adjusting in clinical settings is still at its early stage. This is mainly due to the limited kV options of most current CT scanners. kV adjusting can potentially reduce radiation dose and optimize image quality. This study is to optimize CT abdomen imaging acquisition based on the assumption of a continuous kV, with the goal to provide the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: For a given dose (CTDIvol) level, the CNRs at different kV and pitches were measured with an ACR GAMMEX phantom. The phantom was scanned in a Siemens Sensation 64 scanner and a GE VCT 64 scanner. A constrained mathematical optimization was used to find the kV which led to the highest CNR for the anatomy and pitch setting. Parametric equations were obtained from polynomial fitting of plots of kVs vs CNRs. A suitable constraint region for optimization was chosen. Subsequent optimization yielded a peak CNR at a particular kV for different collimations and pitch setting. Results: The constrained mathematical optimization approach yields kV of 114.83 and 113.46, with CNRs of 1.27 and 1.11 at the pitch of 1.2 and 1.4, respectively, for the Siemens Sensation 64 scanner with the collimation of 32 x 0.625mm. An optimized kV of 134.25 and 1.51 CNR is obtained for a GE VCT 64 slice scanner with a collimation of 32 x 0.625mm and a pitch of 0.969. At 0.516 pitch and 32 x 0.625 mm an optimized kV of 133.75 and a CNR of 1.14 was found for the GE VCT 64 slice scanner. Conclusion: CNR in CT image acquisition can be further optimized with a continuous kV option instead of current discrete or fixed kV settings. A continuous kV option is a key for individualized CT protocols.

  16. Selecting optimal monochromatic level with spectral CT imaging for improving imaging quality in hepatic venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jun; Luo Xianfu; Wang Shou'an; Wang Jun; Sun Jiquan; Wang Zhijun; Wu Jingtao

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of spectral CT monochromatic images for improving imaging quality in hepatic venography. Methods: Thirty patients underwent spectral CT examination on a GE Discovery CT 750 HD scanner. During portal phase, 1.25 mm slice thickness polychromatic images and optimal monochromatic images were obtained, and volume rendering and maximum intensity projection were created to show the hepatic veins respectively. The overall imaging quality was evaluated on a five-point scale by two radiologists. Inter-observer agreement in subjective image quality grading was assessed by Kappa statistics. Paired-sample t test were used to compare hepatic vein attenuation, hepatic parenchyma attenuation, CT value difference between the hepatic vein and the liver parenchyma, image noise, vein-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the image quality score of hepatic venography between the two image data sets. Results: The monochromatic images at 50 keV were found to demonstrate the best CNR for hepatic vein.The hepatic vein attenuation [(329 ± 47) HU], hepatic parenchyma attenuation [(178 ± 33) HU], CT value difference between the hepatic vein and the liver parenchyma [(151 ± 33) HU], image noise (17.33 ± 4.18), CNR (9.13 ± 2.65), the image quality score (4.2 ± 0.6) of optimal monochromatic images were significantly higher than those of polychromatic images [(149 ± 18) HU], [(107 ± 14) HU], [(43 ±11) HU], 12.55 ± 3.02, 3.53 ± 1.03, 3.1 ± 0.8 (t values were 24.79, 13.95, 18.85, 9.07, 13.25 and 12.04, respectively, P < 0.01). In the comparison of image quality, Kappa value was 0.81 with optimal monochromatic images and 0.69 with polychromatic images. Conclusion: Monochromatic images of spectral CT could improve CNR for displaying hepatic vein and improve the image quality compared to the conventional polychromatic images. (authors)

  17. Three-pass protocol scheme for bitmap image security by using vernam cipher algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmawati, D.; Budiman, M. A.; Aulya, L.

    2018-02-01

    Confidentiality, integrity, and efficiency are the crucial aspects of data security. Among the other digital data, image data is too prone to abuse of operation like duplication, modification, etc. There are some data security techniques, one of them is cryptography. The security of Vernam Cipher cryptography algorithm is very dependent on the key exchange process. If the key is leaked, security of this algorithm will collapse. Therefore, a method that minimizes key leakage during the exchange of messages is required. The method which is used, is known as Three-Pass Protocol. This protocol enables message delivery process without the key exchange. Therefore, the sending messages process can reach the receiver safely without fear of key leakage. The system is built by using Java programming language. The materials which are used for system testing are image in size 200×200 pixel, 300×300 pixel, 500×500 pixel, 800×800 pixel and 1000×1000 pixel. The result of experiments showed that Vernam Cipher algorithm in Three-Pass Protocol scheme could restore the original image.

  18. Implementing Protocols to Improve Patient Safety in the Medical Imaging Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizales, Gwen; Clark, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a focal point in healthcare because of recent changes issued by CMS. Hospital reimbursement rates have fallen, and these reimbursement rates are governed by CMS mandates regarding patient safety procedures. Reimbursement changes are reflected in the National Patient Safety Goals (NPSGs) administered annually by The Joint Commission. Medical imaging departments have multiple areas of patient safety concerns including effective handoff communication, proper patient identification, and safe medication/contrast administration. This literature review examines those areas of patient safety within the medical imaging department and reveals the need for continued protocol and policy changes to keep patients safe.

  19. Optimal context quantization in lossless compression of image data sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Wu, X.; Andersen, Jakob Dahl

    2004-01-01

    In image compression context-based entropy coding is commonly used. A critical issue to the performance of context-based image coding is how to resolve the conflict of a desire for large templates to model high-order statistic dependency of the pixels and the problem of context dilution due...... to insufficient sample statistics of a given input image. We consider the problem of finding the optimal quantizer Q that quantizes the K-dimensional causal context C/sub t/=(X/sub t-t1/,X/sub t-t2/,...,X/sub t-tK/) of a source symbol X/sub t/ into one of a set of conditioning states. The optimality of context...... quantization is defined to be the minimum static or minimum adaptive code length of given a data set. For a binary source alphabet an optimal context quantizer can be computed exactly by a fast dynamic programming algorithm. Faster approximation solutions are also proposed. In case of m-ary source alphabet...

  20. 3-D brain image registration using optimal morphological processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loncaric, S.; Dhawan, A.P.

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) registration of Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Positron Emission Tomographic (PET) images of the brain is important for analysis of the human brain and its diseases. A procedure for optimization of (3-D) morphological structuring elements, based on a genetic algorithm, is presented in the paper. The registration of the MR and PET images is done by means of a registration procedure in two major phases. In the first phase, the Iterative Principal Axis Transform (IPAR) is used for initial registration. In the second phase, the optimal shape description method based on the Morphological Signature Transform (MST) is used for final registration. The morphological processing is used to improve the accuracy of the basic IPAR method. The brain ventricle is used as a landmark for MST registration. A near-optimal structuring element obtained by means of a genetic algorithm is used in MST to describe the shape of the ventricle. The method has been tested on the set of brain images demonstrating the feasibility of approach. (author). 11 refs., 3 figs

  1. Evaluating the optimal timing of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujagic, Edin; Zwimpfer, Tibor; Marti, Walter R; Zwahlen, Marcel; Hoffmann, Henry; Kindler, Christoph; Fux, Christoph; Misteli, Heidi; Iselin, Lukas; Lugli, Andrea Kopp; Nebiker, Christian A; von Holzen, Urs; Vinzens, Fabrizio; von Strauss, Marco; Reck, Stefan; Kraljević, Marko; Widmer, Andreas F; Oertli, Daniel; Rosenthal, Rachel; Weber, Walter P

    2014-05-24

    Surgical site infections are the most common hospital-acquired infections among surgical patients. The administration of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis reduces the risk of surgical site infections . The optimal timing of this procedure is still a matter of debate. While most studies suggest that it should be given as close to the incision time as possible, others conclude that this may be too late for optimal prevention of surgical site infections. A large observational study suggests that surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis should be administered 74 to 30 minutes before surgery. The aim of this article is to report the design and protocol of a randomized controlled trial investigating the optimal timing of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis. In this bi-center randomized controlled trial conducted at two tertiary referral centers in Switzerland, we plan to include 5,000 patients undergoing general, oncologic, vascular and orthopedic trauma procedures. Patients are randomized in a 1:1 ratio into two groups: one receiving surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the anesthesia room (75 to 30 minutes before incision) and the other receiving surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the operating room (less than 30 minutes before incision). We expect a significantly lower rate of surgical site infections with surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis administered more than 30 minutes before the scheduled incision. The primary outcome is the occurrence of surgical site infections during a 30-day follow-up period (one year with an implant in place). When assuming a 5% surgical site infection risk with administration of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the operating room, the planned sample size has an 80% power to detect a relative risk reduction for surgical site infections of 33% when administering surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis in the anesthesia room (with a two-sided type I error of 5%). We expect the study to be completed within three years. The results of this

  2. An Adaptive Cultural Algorithm with Improved Quantum-behaved Particle Swarm Optimization for Sonar Image Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingmei; Hao, Wenqian; Li, Qiming

    2017-12-18

    This paper proposes an adaptive cultural algorithm with improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (ACA-IQPSO) to detect the underwater sonar image. In the population space, to improve searching ability of particles, iterative times and the fitness value of particles are regarded as factors to adaptively adjust the contraction-expansion coefficient of the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm (QPSO). The improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm (IQPSO) can make particles adjust their behaviours according to their quality. In the belief space, a new update strategy is adopted to update cultural individuals according to the idea of the update strategy in shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA). Moreover, to enhance the utilization of information in the population space and belief space, accept function and influence function are redesigned in the new communication protocol. The experimental results show that ACA-IQPSO can obtain good clustering centres according to the grey distribution information of underwater sonar images, and accurately complete underwater objects detection. Compared with other algorithms, the proposed ACA-IQPSO has good effectiveness, excellent adaptability, a powerful searching ability and high convergence efficiency. Meanwhile, the experimental results of the benchmark functions can further demonstrate that the proposed ACA-IQPSO has better searching ability, convergence efficiency and stability.

  3. Optimization of image quality and patient dose in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafqat Faaruq; Jaferi, R.A.; Nafeesa Nazlee

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Optimization of patient dose and image quality can be defined as to get the best image quality with minimum possible radiation dose to the patient by setting various parameters and modes of operation available in mammography machines. The optimization procedures were performed on two mammography units from M/S GE and Metaltronica, available at NORI, using standard mammographic accreditation phantom (Model: BR-156) and acrylic sheets of variable thicknesses. Quality assurance and quality control (QC) tests being the essential part of optimization. The QC tests as recommended by American College of Radiology, were first performed on both machines as well as X-ray film processor. In the second step, different affecting the image quality and radiation dose to patient, like film screen combination (FSC), phantom optical density (PD), kVp, mAs etc, were adjusted for various phantom thicknesses ranging from 3 cm to 6.5 cm in various modes of operation in the machines (semi-auto- and manual in GE, Auto-, semi-auto- and manual mode in Metaltronica). The image quality was studied for these optimized parameters on the basis of the number of test objects of the phantom visible in these images. Finally the linear relationship between mAs and skin entrance dose (mGy) was verified using ionization chamber with the phantom and the actual patients. Despite some practical limitations, the results of the quality assurance tests were within acceptable limits defined by ACR. The dose factor for GE was 68.0 y/mAs, while 76.0 mGy/mAs for Metaltronica at 25 kVp. Before the start of this study the only one mammography unit GE, was routinely used at NORI and normal mode of operation of this unit was semi-auto mode with fixed kVp independent of compressed breast thickness, but in this study it was concluded that selecting kVp according to beast thickness result in an appreciable dose reduction (4-5 times less) without any compromise in image quality. The

  4. Optimal image resolution for digital storage of radiotherapy-planning images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Yuji; Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Murakami, Ryuji; Baba, Takashi; Yokoyama, Toshimi; Nishimura, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the quality of digitized radiation-planning images at different resolution and to determine the optimal resolution for digital storage. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five planning films were scanned and digitized using a film scanner at a resolution of 72 dots per inch (dpi) with 8-bit depth. The resolution of scanned images was reduced to 48, 36, 24, and 18 dpi using computer software. Image qualities of these five images (72, 48, 36, 24, and 18 dpi) were evaluated and given scores (4 = excellent; 3 = good; 2 = fair; and 1 = poor) by three radiation oncologists. An image data compression algorithm by the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) (not reversible and some information will be lost) was also evaluated. Results: The scores of digitized images with 72, 48, 36, 24, and 17 dpi resolution were 3.8 ± 0.3, 3.5 ± 0.3, 3.3 ± 0.5, 2.7 ± 0.5, and 1.6 ± 0.3, respectively. The quality of 36-dpi images were definitely worse compared to 72-dpi images, but were good enough as planning films. Digitized planning images with 72- and 36-dpi resolution requires about 800 and 200 KBytes, respectively. The JPEG compression algorithm produces little degradation in 36-dpi images at compression ratios of 5:1. Conclusion: The quality of digitized images with 36-dpi resolution was good enough as radiation-planning images and required 200 KBytes/image

  5. 3D T2-weighted imaging to shorten multiparametric prostate MRI protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanec, Stephan H; Lazar, Mathias; Wengert, Georg J; Bickel, Hubert; Spick, Claudio; Susani, Martin; Shariat, Shahrokh; Clauser, Paola; Baltzer, Pascal A T

    2018-04-01

    To determine whether 3D acquisitions provide equivalent image quality, lesion delineation quality and PI-RADS v2 performance compared to 2D acquisitions in T2-weighted imaging of the prostate at 3 T. This IRB-approved, prospective study included 150 consecutive patients (mean age 63.7 years, 35-84 years; mean PSA 7.2 ng/ml, 0.4-31.1 ng/ml). Two uroradiologists (R1, R2) independently rated image quality and lesion delineation quality using a five-point ordinal scale and assigned a PI-RADS score for 2D and 3D T2-weighted image data sets. Data were compared using visual grading characteristics (VGC) and receiver operating characteristics (ROC)/area under the curve (AUC) analysis. Image quality was similarly good to excellent for 2D T2w (mean score R1, 4.3 ± 0.81; R2, 4.7 ± 0.83) and 3D T2w (mean score R1, 4.3 ± 0.82; R2, 4.7 ± 0.69), p = 0.269. Lesion delineation was rated good to excellent for 2D (mean score R1, 4.16 ± 0.81; R2, 4.19 ± 0.92) and 3D T2w (R1, 4.19 ± 0.94; R2, 4.27 ± 0.94) without significant differences (p = 0.785). ROC analysis showed an equivalent performance for 2D (AUC 0.580-0.623) and 3D (AUC 0.576-0.629) T2w (p > 0.05, respectively). Three-dimensional acquisitions demonstrated equivalent image and lesion delineation quality, and PI-RADS v2 performance, compared to 2D in T2-weighted imaging of the prostate. Three-dimensional T2-weighted imaging could be used to considerably shorten prostate MRI protocols in clinical practice. • 3D shows equivalent image quality and lesion delineation compared to 2D T2w. • 3D T2w and 2D T2w image acquisition demonstrated comparable diagnostic performance. • Using a single 3D T2w acquisition may shorten the protocol by 40%. • Combined with short DCE, multiparametric protocols of 10 min are feasible.

  6. Information theoretic methods for image processing algorithm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokushkin, Sergey F.; Galil, Erez

    2015-01-01

    Modern image processing pipelines (e.g., those used in digital cameras) are full of advanced, highly adaptive filters that often have a large number of tunable parameters (sometimes > 100). This makes the calibration procedure for these filters very complex, and the optimal results barely achievable in the manual calibration; thus an automated approach is a must. We will discuss an information theory based metric for evaluation of algorithm adaptive characteristics ("adaptivity criterion") using noise reduction algorithms as an example. The method allows finding an "orthogonal decomposition" of the filter parameter space into the "filter adaptivity" and "filter strength" directions. This metric can be used as a cost function in automatic filter optimization. Since it is a measure of a physical "information restoration" rather than perceived image quality, it helps to reduce the set of the filter parameters to a smaller subset that is easier for a human operator to tune and achieve a better subjective image quality. With appropriate adjustments, the criterion can be used for assessment of the whole imaging system (sensor plus post-processing).

  7. Optimization of Iron Oxide Tracer Synthesis for Magnetic Particle Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Ziemian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of iron oxide nanoparticles as tracers for magnetic particle imaging (MPI alongside the development of data acquisition equipment and image reconstruction techniques is crucial for the required improvements in image resolution and sensitivity of MPI scanners. We present a large-scale water-based synthesis of multicore superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dextran (MC-SPIONs. We also demonstrate the preparation of single core superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in organic media, subsequently coated with a poly(ethylene glycol gallic acid polymer and phase transferred to water (SC-SPIONs. Our aim was to obtain long-term stable particles in aqueous media with high MPI performance. We found that the amplitude of the third harmonic measured by magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS at 10 mT is 2.3- and 5.8-fold higher than Resovist for the MC-SPIONs and SC-SPIONs, respectively, revealing excellent MPI potential as compared to other reported MPI tracer particle preparations. We show that the reconstructed MPI images of phantoms using optimized multicore and specifically single-core particles are superior to that of commercially available Resovist, which we utilize as a reference standard, as predicted by MPS.

  8. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemkens, Bjorn, E-mail: b.stemkens@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Tijssen, Rob H.N. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Senneville, Baudouin D. de [Imaging Division, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); L' Institut de Mathématiques de Bordeaux, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5251, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Heerkens, Hanne D.; Vulpen, Marco van; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.; Berg, Cornelis A.T. van den [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients.

  9. Optimization-Based Image Segmentation by Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberger C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many works in the literature focus on the definition of evaluation metrics and criteria that enable to quantify the performance of an image processing algorithm. These evaluation criteria can be used to define new image processing algorithms by optimizing them. In this paper, we propose a general scheme to segment images by a genetic algorithm. The developed method uses an evaluation criterion which quantifies the quality of an image segmentation result. The proposed segmentation method can integrate a local ground truth when it is available in order to set the desired level of precision of the final result. A genetic algorithm is then used in order to determine the best combination of information extracted by the selected criterion. Then, we show that this approach can either be applied for gray-levels or multicomponents images in a supervised context or in an unsupervised one. Last, we show the efficiency of the proposed method through some experimental results on several gray-levels and multicomponents images.

  10. Optimization-Based Image Segmentation by Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laurent

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Many works in the literature focus on the definition of evaluation metrics and criteria that enable to quantify the performance of an image processing algorithm. These evaluation criteria can be used to define new image processing algorithms by optimizing them. In this paper, we propose a general scheme to segment images by a genetic algorithm. The developed method uses an evaluation criterion which quantifies the quality of an image segmentation result. The proposed segmentation method can integrate a local ground truth when it is available in order to set the desired level of precision of the final result. A genetic algorithm is then used in order to determine the best combination of information extracted by the selected criterion. Then, we show that this approach can either be applied for gray-levels or multicomponents images in a supervised context or in an unsupervised one. Last, we show the efficiency of the proposed method through some experimental results on several gray-levels and multicomponents images.

  11. The optimal algorithm for Multi-source RS image fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei; Huang, Shui-Guang; Li, Zeng-Shun; Shen, Hao; Li, Jun-Shuai; Wang, Peng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In order to solve the issue which the fusion rules cannot be self-adaptively adjusted by using available fusion methods according to the subsequent processing requirements of Remote Sensing (RS) image, this paper puts forward GSDA (genetic-iterative self-organizing data analysis algorithm) by integrating the merit of genetic arithmetic together with the advantage of iterative self-organizing data analysis algorithm for multi-source RS image fusion. The proposed algorithm considers the wavelet transform of the translation invariance as the model operator, also regards the contrast pyramid conversion as the observed operator. The algorithm then designs the objective function by taking use of the weighted sum of evaluation indices, and optimizes the objective function by employing GSDA so as to get a higher resolution of RS image. As discussed above, the bullet points of the text are summarized as follows.•The contribution proposes the iterative self-organizing data analysis algorithm for multi-source RS image fusion.•This article presents GSDA algorithm for the self-adaptively adjustment of the fusion rules.•This text comes up with the model operator and the observed operator as the fusion scheme of RS image based on GSDA. The proposed algorithm opens up a novel algorithmic pathway for multi-source RS image fusion by means of GSDA.

  12. Modeling digital breast tomosynthesis imaging systems for optimization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Beverly Amy

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a new imaging modality for breast imaging. In tomosynthesis, multiple images of the compressed breast are acquired at different angles, and the projection view images are reconstructed to yield images of slices through the breast. One of the main problems to be addressed in the development of DBT is the optimal parameter settings to obtain images ideal for detection of cancer. Since it would be unethical to irradiate women multiple times to explore potentially optimum geometries for tomosynthesis, it is ideal to use a computer simulation to generate projection images. Existing tomosynthesis models have modeled scatter and detector without accounting for oblique angles of incidence that tomosynthesis introduces. Moreover, these models frequently use geometry-specific physical factors measured from real systems, which severely limits the robustness of their algorithms for optimization. The goal of this dissertation was to design the framework for a computer simulation of tomosynthesis that would produce images that are sensitive to changes in acquisition parameters, so an optimization study would be feasible. A computer physics simulation of the tomosynthesis system was developed. The x-ray source was modeled as a polychromatic spectrum based on published spectral data, and inverse-square law was applied. Scatter was applied using a convolution method with angle-dependent scatter point spread functions (sPSFs), followed by scaling using an angle-dependent scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR). Monte Carlo simulations were used to generate sPSFs for a 5-cm breast with a 1-cm air gap. Detector effects were included through geometric propagation of the image onto layers of the detector, which were blurred using depth-dependent detector point-spread functions (PRFs). Depth-dependent PRFs were calculated every 5-microns through a 200-micron thick CsI detector using Monte Carlo simulations. Electronic noise was added as Gaussian noise as a

  13. An optimized framework for quantitative magnetization transfer imaging of the cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Marco; Grussu, Francesco; Ianus, Andrada; Schneider, Torben; Prados, Ferran; Fairney, James; Ourselin, Sebastien; Alexander, Daniel C; Cercignani, Mara; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Samson, Rebecca S

    2018-05-01

    To develop a framework to fully characterize quantitative magnetization transfer indices in the human cervical cord in vivo within a clinically feasible time. A dedicated spinal cord imaging protocol for quantitative magnetization transfer was developed using a reduced field-of-view approach with echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. Sequence parameters were optimized based in the Cramer-Rao-lower bound. Quantitative model parameters (i.e., bound pool fraction, free and bound pool transverse relaxation times [ T2F, T2B], and forward exchange rate [k FB ]) were estimated implementing a numerical model capable of dealing with the novelties of the sequence adopted. The framework was tested on five healthy subjects. Cramer-Rao-lower bound minimization produces optimal sampling schemes without requiring the establishment of a steady-state MT effect. The proposed framework allows quantitative voxel-wise estimation of model parameters at the resolution typically used for spinal cord imaging (i.e. 0.75 × 0.75 × 5 mm 3 ), with a protocol duration of ∼35 min. Quantitative magnetization transfer parametric maps agree with literature values. Whole-cord mean values are: bound pool fraction = 0.11(±0.01), T2F = 46.5(±1.6) ms, T2B = 11.0(±0.2) µs, and k FB  = 1.95(±0.06) Hz. Protocol optimization has a beneficial effect on reproducibility, especially for T2B and k FB . The framework developed enables robust characterization of spinal cord microstructure in vivo using qMT. Magn Reson Med 79:2576-2588, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  14. Image Registration for PET/CT and CT Images with Particle Swarm Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hak Jae; Kim, Yong Kwon; Lee, Ki Sung; Choi, Jong Hak; Kim, Chang Kyun; Moon, Guk Hyun; Joo, Sung Kwan; Kim, Kyeong Min; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2009-01-01

    Image registration is a fundamental task in image processing used to match two or more images. It gives new information to the radiologists by matching images from different modalities. The objective of this study is to develop 2D image registration algorithm for PET/CT and CT images acquired by different systems at different times. We matched two CT images first (one from standalone CT and the other from PET/CT) that contain affluent anatomical information. Then, we geometrically transformed PET image according to the results of transformation parameters calculated by the previous step. We have used Affine transform to match the target and reference images. For the similarity measure, mutual information was explored. Use of particle swarm algorithm optimized the performance by finding the best matched parameter set within a reasonable amount of time. The results show good agreements of the images between PET/CT and CT. We expect the proposed algorithm can be used not only for PET/CT and CT image registration but also for different multi-modality imaging systems such as SPECT/CT, MRI/PET and so on.

  15. Optimized Protocol for Protein Extraction from the Breast Tissue that is Compatible with Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Zakharchenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics is a highly informative approach to analyze cancer-associated transformation in tissues. The main challenge to use a tissue for proteomics studies is the small sample size and difficulties to extract and preserve proteins. The choice of a buffer compatible with proteomics applications is also a challenge. Here we describe a protocol optimized for the most efficient extraction of proteins from the human breast tissue in a buffer compatible with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE. This protocol is based on mechanically assisted disintegration of tissues directly in the 2D-GE buffer. Our method is simple, robust and easy to apply in clinical practice. We demonstrate high quality of separation of proteins prepared according to the reported here protocol.

  16. Parameter Optimization of Multi-Element Synthetic Aperture Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Behar

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In conventional ultrasound imaging systems with phased arrays, the further improvement of lateral resolution requires enlarging of the number of array elements that in turn increases both, the complexity and the cost, of imaging systems. Multi-element synthetic aperture focusing (MSAF systems are a very good alternative to conventional systems with phased arrays. The benefit of the synthetic aperture is in reduction of the system complexity, cost and acquisition time. In a MSAF system considered in the paper, a group of elements transmit and receive signals simultaneously, and the transmit beam is defocused to emulate a single element response. The echo received at each element of a receive sub-aperture is recorded in the computer memory. The process of transmission/reception is repeated for all positions of a transmit sub-aperture. All the data recordings associated with each corresponding pair "transmit-receive sub-aperture" are then focused synthetically producing a low-resolution image. The final high-resolution image is formed by summing of the all low-resolution images associated with transmit/receive sub-apertures. A problem of parameter optimization of a MSAF system is considered in this paper. The quality of imaging (lateral resolution and contrast is expressed in terms of the beam characteristics - beam width and side lobe level. The comparison between the MSAF system described in the paper and an equivalent conventional phased array system shows that the MSAF system acquires images of equivalent quality much faster using only a small part of the power per image.

  17. An optimized protocol for generation and analysis of Ion Proton sequencing reads for RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yongxian; Xu, Huaiqian; Leung, Ross Ka-Kit

    2016-05-26

    Previous studies compared running cost, time and other performance measures of popular sequencing platforms. However, comprehensive assessment of library construction and analysis protocols for Proton sequencing platform remains unexplored. Unlike Illumina sequencing platforms, Proton reads are heterogeneous in length and quality. When sequencing data from different platforms are combined, this can result in reads with various read length. Whether the performance of the commonly used software for handling such kind of data is satisfactory is unknown. By using universal human reference RNA as the initial material, RNaseIII and chemical fragmentation methods in library construction showed similar result in gene and junction discovery number and expression level estimated accuracy. In contrast, sequencing quality, read length and the choice of software affected mapping rate to a much larger extent. Unspliced aligner TMAP attained the highest mapping rate (97.27 % to genome, 86.46 % to transcriptome), though 47.83 % of mapped reads were clipped. Long reads could paradoxically reduce mapping in junctions. With reference annotation guide, the mapping rate of TopHat2 significantly increased from 75.79 to 92.09 %, especially for long (>150 bp) reads. Sailfish, a k-mer based gene expression quantifier attained highly consistent results with that of TaqMan array and highest sensitivity. We provided for the first time, the reference statistics of library preparation methods, gene detection and quantification and junction discovery for RNA-Seq by the Ion Proton platform. Chemical fragmentation performed equally well with the enzyme-based one. The optimal Ion Proton sequencing options and analysis software have been evaluated.

  18. Optimization of Fluosol-DA administration during a fractionated radiation protocol in the Lewis lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teicher, B.A.; McIntosh, N.L.

    1987-01-01

    The perfluorchemical emulsion, Fluosol-DA, in combination with breathing a 100% or 95% oxygen atmosphere, has been shown to enhance the response of several solid rodent tumors to single dose and fractionated radiation treatment. As an approach to determining the optimal dose schedule for Fluosol-DA during a course of fractionated radiation therapy, a total dose of 16 ml/kg of Fluosol-DA was administered either as two doses of 8 ml/kg on days 1 and 3 or as four doses of 4 ml/kg on days 1,2,3 and 4 of a four day protocol using the Lewis lung tumor model system. The Lewis lung tumor was grown s.c. in the flanks of C57BL/6J mice. Treatment was initiated when the tumors were 50-100 mm/sup 3/. Radiation was delivered as 4 daily fractions of 2.5, 4.0 or 5.0 Gray. Fluosol-DA was adminstered i.v. prior to irradiation. Each day carbogen breathing was maintained for 1 hr prior to and during each x-ray treatment. When Fluosol-DA was administered as two doses of 8 ml/kg, the dose modifying factor (DMF) observed was 1.7 +- 0.3. When Fluosol-DA was given as four doses of 4 ml/kg, the DMF was 1.5+-0.3 compared to x-ray treatment with carbogen breathing. It appears, therefore, administering Fluosol-DA at a therapeutic dose less frequently with carbogen breathing with every fraction may produce a better treatment outcome than giving more frequent lower doses

  19. Optimization of super-resolution processing using incomplete image sets in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Guoping; Pan, Tinsu; Clark, John W; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2008-12-01

    Super-resolution (SR) techniques are used in PET imaging to generate a high-resolution image by combining multiple low-resolution images that have been acquired from different points of view (POVs). The number of low-resolution images used defines the processing time and memory storage necessary to generate the SR image. In this paper, the authors propose two optimized SR implementations (ISR-1 and ISR-2) that require only a subset of the low-resolution images (two sides and diagonal of the image matrix, respectively), thereby reducing the overall processing time and memory storage. In an N x N matrix of low-resolution images, ISR-1 would be generated using images from the two sides of the N x N matrix, while ISR-2 would be generated from images across the diagonal of the image matrix. The objective of this paper is to investigate whether the two proposed SR methods can achieve similar performance in contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as the SR image generated from a complete set of low-resolution images (CSR) using simulation and experimental studies. A simulation, a point source, and a NEMA/IEC phantom study were conducted for this investigation. In each study, 4 (2 x 2) or 16 (4 x 4) low-resolution images were reconstructed from the same acquired data set while shifting the reconstruction grid to generate images from different POVs. SR processing was then applied in each study to combine all as well as two different subsets of the low-resolution images to generate the CSR, ISR-1, and ISR-2 images, respectively. For reference purpose, a native reconstruction (NR) image using the same matrix size as the three SR images was also generated. The resultant images (CSR, ISR-1, ISR-2, and NR) were then analyzed using visual inspection, line profiles, SNR plots, and background noise spectra. The simulation study showed that the contrast and the SNR difference between the two ISR images and the CSR image were on average 0.4% and 0.3%, respectively. Line profiles of

  20. Effectiveness of a Rapid Lumbar Spine MRI Protocol Using 3D T2-Weighted SPACE Imaging Versus a Standard Protocol for Evaluation of Degenerative Changes of the Lumbar Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayah, Anousheh; Jay, Ann K; Toaff, Jacob S; Makariou, Erini V; Berkowitz, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Reducing lumbar spine MRI scanning time while retaining diagnostic accuracy can benefit patients and reduce health care costs. This study compares the effectiveness of a rapid lumbar MRI protocol using 3D T2-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrast with different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) sequences with a standard MRI protocol for evaluation of lumbar spondylosis. Two hundred fifty consecutive unenhanced lumbar MRI examinations performed at 1.5 T were retrospectively reviewed. Full, rapid, and complete versions of each examination were interpreted for spondylotic changes at each lumbar level, including herniations and neural compromise. The full examination consisted of sagittal T1-weighted, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE), and STIR sequences; and axial T1- and T2-weighted TSE sequences (time, 18 minutes 40 seconds). The rapid examination consisted of sagittal T1- and T2-weighted SPACE sequences, with axial SPACE reformations (time, 8 minutes 46 seconds). The complete examination consisted of the full examination plus the T2-weighted SPACE sequence. Sensitivities and specificities of the full and rapid examinations were calculated using the complete study as the reference standard. The rapid and full studies had sensitivities of 76.0% and 69.3%, with specificities of 97.2% and 97.9%, respectively, for all degenerative processes. Rapid and full sensitivities were 68.7% and 66.3% for disk herniation, 85.2% and 81.5% for canal compromise, 82.9% and 69.1% for lateral recess compromise, and 76.9% and 69.7% for foraminal compromise, respectively. Isotropic SPACE T2-weighted imaging provides high-quality imaging of lumbar spondylosis, with multiplanar reformatting capability. Our SPACE-based rapid protocol had sensitivities and specificities for herniations and neural compromise comparable to those of the protocol without SPACE. This protocol fits within a 15-minute slot, potentially reducing costs and discomfort for a large subgroup of

  1. Systematic radiation dose optimization of abdominal dual-energy CT on a second-generation dual-source CT scanner: assessment of the accuracy of iodine uptake measurement and image quality in an in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindera, Sebastian T; Zaehringer, Caroline; D'Errico, Luigia; Schwartz, Fides; Kekelidze, Maka; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Benz, Matthias R

    2017-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of iodine quantification in a phantom study at different radiation dose levels with dual-energy dual-source CT and to evaluate image quality and radiation doses in patients undergoing a single-energy and two dual-energy abdominal CT protocols. In a phantom study, the accuracy of iodine quantification (4.5-23.5 mgI/mL) was evaluated using the manufacturer-recommended and three dose-optimized dual-energy protocols. In a patient study, 75 abdomino-pelvic CT examinations were acquired as follows: 25 CT scans with the manufacturer-recommended dual-energy protocol (protocol A); 25 CT scans with a dose-optimized dual-energy protocol (protocol B); and 25 CT scans with a single-energy CT protocol (protocol C). CTDI vol and objective noise were measured. Five readers scored each scan according to six subjective image quality parameters (noise, contrast, artifacts, visibility of small structures, sharpness, overall diagnostic confidence). In the phantom study, differences between the real and measured iodine concentrations ranged from -8.8% to 17.0% for the manufacturer-recommended protocol and from -1.6% to 20.5% for three dose-optimized protocols. In the patient study, the CTDI vol of protocol A, B, and C were 12.5 ± 1.9, 7.5 ± 1.2, and 6.5 ± 1.7 mGycm, respectively (p dual-energy and the single-energy protocol. A dose reduction of 41% is feasible for the manufacturer-recommended, abdominal dual-energy CT protocol, as it maintained the accuracy of iodine measurements and subjective image quality compared to a single-energy protocol.

  2. An Optimized Method for Terrain Reconstruction Based on Descent Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Xinchao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An optimization method is proposed to perform high-accuracy terrain reconstruction of the landing area of Chang’e III. First, feature matching is conducted using geometric model constraints. Then, the initial terrain is obtained and the initial normal vector of each point is solved on the basis of the initial terrain. By changing the vector around the initial normal vector in small steps a set of new vectors is obtained. By combining these vectors with the direction of light and camera, the functions are set up on the basis of a surface reflection model. Then, a series of gray values is derived by solving the equations. The new optimized vector is recorded when the obtained gray value is closest to the corresponding pixel. Finally, the optimized terrain is obtained after iteration of the vector field. Experiments were conducted using the laboratory images and descent images of Chang’e III. The results showed that the performance of the proposed method was better than that of the classical feature matching method. It can provide a reference for terrain reconstruction of the landing area in subsequent moon exploration missions.

  3. Computed tomography-based lung nodule volumetry - do optimized reconstructions of routine protocols achieve similar accuracy, reproducibility and interobserver variability to that of special volumetry protocols?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolte, H.; Riedel, C.; Knoess, N.; Hoffmann, B.; Heller, M.; Biederer, J.; Freitag, S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this in vitro and ex vivo CT study was to investigate whether the use of a routine thorax protocol (RTP) with optimized reconstruction parameters can provide comparable accuracy, reproducibility and interobserver variability of volumetric analyses to that of a special volumetry protocol (SVP). Materials and Methods: To assess accuracy, 3 polyurethane (PU) spheres (35 HU; diameters: 4, 6 and 10 mm) were examined with a recommended SVP using a multislice CT (collimation 16 x 0.75 mm, pitch 1.25, 20 mAs, slice thickness 1 mm, increment 0.7 mm, medium kernel) and an optimized RTP (collimation 16 x 1.5 mm, pitch 1.25, 100 mAs, reconstructed slice thickness 2 mm, increment 0.4 mm, sharp kernel). For the assessment of intrascan and interscan reproducibility and interobserver variability, 20 artificial small pulmonary nodules were placed in a dedicated ex vivo chest phantom and examined with identical scan protocols. The artificial lesions consisted of a fat-wax-Lipiodol registered mixture. Phantoms and ex vivo lesions were examined afterwards using commercial volumetry software. To describe accuracy the relative deviations from the true volumes of the PU phantoms were calculated. For intrascan and interscan reproducibility and interobserver variability, the 95 % normal range (95 % NR) of relative deviations between two measurements was calculated. Results: For the SVP the achieved relative deviations for the 4, 6 and 10 mm PU phantoms were - 14.3 %, - 12.7 % and - 6.8 % and were 4.5 %, - 0.6 % and - 2.6 %, respectively, for the optimized RTP. SVP showed a 95 % NR of 0 - 1.5 % for intrascan and a 95 % NR of - 10.8 - 2.9 % for interscan reproducibility. The 95 % NR for interobserver variability was - 4.3 - 3.3 %. The optimized RTP achieved a 95 % NR of - 3.1 - 4.3 % for intrascan reproducibility and a 95 % NR of - 7.0 - 3.5 % for interscan reproducibility. The 95 % NR for interobserver variability was - 0.4 - 6.8 %. (orig.)

  4. Task-based optimization of image reconstruction in breast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a task-based assessment of image quality in dedicated breast CT in order to optimize the number of projection views acquired. The methodology we employ is based on the Hotelling Observer (HO) and its associated metrics. We consider two tasks: the Rayleigh task of discerning between two resolvable objects and a single larger object, and the signal detection task of classifying an image as belonging to either a signalpresent or signal-absent hypothesis. HO SNR values are computed for 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 projection view images, with the total imaging radiation dose held constant. We use the conventional fan-beam FBP algorithm and investigate the effect of varying the width of a Hanning window used in the reconstruction, since this affects both the noise properties of the image and the under-sampling artifacts which can arise in the case of sparse-view acquisitions. Our results demonstrate that fewer projection views should be used in order to increase HO performance, which in this case constitutes an upper-bound on human observer performance. However, the impact on HO SNR of using fewer projection views, each with a higher dose, is not as significant as the impact of employing regularization in the FBP reconstruction through a Hanning filter.

  5. Endoscopic hyperspectral imaging: light guide optimization for spectral light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Craig M.; Mayes, Samuel; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a technology used in remote sensing, food processing and documentation recovery. Recently, this approach has been applied in the medical field to spectrally interrogate regions of interest within respective substrates. In spectral imaging, a two (spatial) dimensional image is collected, at many different (spectral) wavelengths, to sample spectral signatures from different regions and/or components within a sample. Here, we report on the use of hyperspectral imaging for endoscopic applications. Colorectal cancer is the 3rd leading cancer for incidences and deaths in the US. One factor of severity is the miss rate of precancerous/flat lesions ( 65% accuracy). Integrating HSI into colonoscopy procedures could minimize misdiagnosis and unnecessary resections. We have previously reported a working prototype light source with 16 high-powered light emitting diodes (LEDs) capable of high speed cycling and imaging. In recent testing, we have found our current prototype is limited by transmission loss ( 99%) through the multi-furcated solid light guide (lightpipe) and the desired framerate (20-30 fps) could not be achieved. Here, we report on a series of experimental and modeling studies to better optimize the lightpipe and the spectral endoscopy system as a whole. The lightpipe was experimentally evaluated using an integrating sphere and spectrometer (Ocean Optics). Modeling the lightpipe was performed using Monte Carlo optical ray tracing in TracePro (Lambda Research Corp.). Results of these optimization studies will aid in manufacturing a revised prototype with the newly designed light guide and increased sensitivity. Once the desired optical output (5-10 mW) is achieved then the HIS endoscope system will be able to be implemented without adding onto the procedure time.

  6. Optimization and Verification of the TR-MAC Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morshed, S.; Heijenk, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Energy-efficiency is an important requirement in the design of communication protocols for wireless sensor networks (WSN). TR-MAC is an energy-efficient medium access control (MAC) layer protocol for low power WSN that exploits transmitted-reference (TR) modulation in the physical layer. The

  7. Using Green Star Metrics to Optimize the Greenness of Literature Protocols for Syntheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rita C. C.; Ribeiro, M. Gabriela T. C.; Machado, Adélio A. S. C.

    2015-01-01

    A procedure to improve the greenness of a synthesis, without performing laboratory work, using alternative protocols available in the literature is presented. The greenness evaluation involves the separate assessment of the different steps described in the available protocols--reaction, isolation, and purification--as well as the global process,…

  8. An Optimized Protocol to Increase Virus-Induced Gene Silencing Efficiency and Minimize Viral Symptoms in Petunia

    OpenAIRE

    Broderick, Shaun R.; Jones, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is used to down-regulate endogenous plant genes. VIGS efficiency depends on viral proliferation and systemic movement throughout the plant. Although tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based VIGS has been successfully used in petunia (Petunia × hybrida), the protocol has not been thoroughly optimized for efficient and uniform gene down-regulation in this species. Therefore, we evaluated six parameters that improved VIGS in petunia. Inoculation of mechanically wounde...

  9. Cross-layer Energy Optimization Under Image Quality Constraints for Wireless Image Transmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Na; Demirkol, Ilker; Heinzelman, Wendi

    2012-01-01

    Wireless image transmission is critical in many applications, such as surveillance and environment monitoring. In order to make the best use of the limited energy of the battery-operated cameras, while satisfying the application-level image quality constraints, cross-layer design is critical. In this paper, we develop an image transmission model that allows the application layer (e.g., the user) to specify an image quality constraint, and optimizes the lower layer parameters of transmit power and packet length, to minimize the energy dissipation in image transmission over a given distance. The effectiveness of this approach is evaluated by applying the proposed energy optimization to a reference ZigBee system and a WiFi system, and also by comparing to an energy optimization study that does not consider any image quality constraint. Evaluations show that our scheme outperforms the default settings of the investigated commercial devices and saves a significant amount of energy at middle-to-large transmission distances.

  10. MRI of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Imaging features and recommended MRI protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collie, D.A.; Sellar, R.J.; Zeidler, M.; Colchester, A.C.F.; Knight, R.; Will, R.G

    2001-09-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a rare, progressive and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by specific histopathological features. Of the four subtypes of CJD described, the commonest is sporadic CJD (sCJD). More recently, a new clinically distinct form of the disease affecting younger patients, known as variant CJD (vCJD), has been identified, and this has been causally linked to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent in cattle. Characteristic appearances on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been identified in several forms of CJD; sCJD may be associated with high signal changes in the putamen and caudate head and vCJD is usually associated with hyperintensity of the pulvinar (posterior nuclei) of the thalamus. These appearances and other imaging features are described in this article. Using appropriate clinical and radiological criteria and tailored imaging protocols, MRI plays an important part in the in vivodiagnosis of this disease. Collie, D.A. et al. (2001)

  11. MRI of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Imaging features and recommended MRI protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collie, D.A.; Sellar, R.J.; Zeidler, M.; Colchester, A.C.F.; Knight, R.; Will, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a rare, progressive and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by specific histopathological features. Of the four subtypes of CJD described, the commonest is sporadic CJD (sCJD). More recently, a new clinically distinct form of the disease affecting younger patients, known as variant CJD (vCJD), has been identified, and this has been causally linked to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent in cattle. Characteristic appearances on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been identified in several forms of CJD; sCJD may be associated with high signal changes in the putamen and caudate head and vCJD is usually associated with hyperintensity of the pulvinar (posterior nuclei) of the thalamus. These appearances and other imaging features are described in this article. Using appropriate clinical and radiological criteria and tailored imaging protocols, MRI plays an important part in the in vivodiagnosis of this disease. Collie, D.A. et al. (2001)

  12. Physical performance and image optimization of megavoltage cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Aubin, Michele; Chen, Josephine; Descovich, Martina; Hashemi, Ali-Bani; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Siemens Oncology Care Systems, Concord, California 94520 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    . These variations did not cause noticeable reduction in the image quality. The results on uniformity suggest that the cupping artifact occurring with MVCBCT is mostly due to off-axis response of the detector and not scattered radiation. Simple uniformity correction methods were developed to nearly eliminate this cupping artifact. The spatial resolution of the baseline MVCBCT reconstruction protocol was approximately 2 mm. An optimized reconstruction protocol was developed and showed an improvement of 75% in CNR with a penalty of only 8% in spatial resolution. Using this new reconstruction protocol, large adipose and muscular structures were differentiated at an exposure of 9 MU. A reduction of 36% in CNR was observed on a larger (pelvic-sized) phantom. This study demonstrates that soft-tissue visualization with MVCBCT can be substantially improved with proper system settings. Further improvement is expected from the next generation MVCBCT system with an optimized megavoltage imaging beamline.

  13. Protocol for the quality control systems of electronic portal imaging used in verification of radiotherapy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre, Ileana; Alfonso, Rodolfo; Garcia, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Following the approach of quality control of radiotherapy equipment, conceived in the IAEA TECDOC-1151, we analyzed the different tests must be to an EPID to guarantee levels of accuracy required in the administration of radiation treatments, including the study of the impact of different parameters, geometric and dosimetric imaging, involved in the process. Established the types and frequency of checks, as well as procedures for their implementation, the allowable tolerances set of values records and forms for recording . Was carried out assessment protocol in various services based on amorphous silicon EPID for its applicability and scope. Was designed and validated in clinical practice protocol for EPID quality control, demonstrating its applicability with a minimum of material and human resources. It We concluded that with proper and systematic quality control program, tests including dosimetry, the EPID can provide valuable information about physico-beam dosimetry, and ensure adequate accuracy geometric in the patient's location. (author)

  14. Optimal scanning and image processing with the STEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewe, A.V.; Ohtsuki, M.

    1981-01-01

    We have recently published a theory of an optimal scanning system which is particularly suited for the STEM. One concludes from the theory that the diffraction limit of the electron probe should be a fixed fraction of the full-scale deflection in order to avoid scanning artifacts. More recently, we have confirmed the value of this technique by direct experiments. Our program now is to combine the use of optimal scanning with the use of a programmable digital refresh memory for image analysis. Limited experience to date indicates that false color conversion is probably more useful than histogram equalization in black and white and that this system is particularly valuable for rotational averaging and selected area Fourier transforms. (orig.)

  15. Optimization of individualized abdominal scan protocol with 64-slice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Minxia; Zhao Xinming; Song Junfeng; Zhou Chunwu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore an individualized abdominal scan protocol with a 64-slice CT scanner. Methods: From Sep. 2010 to Nov. 2010, one hundred consecutive patients, who underwent twice non-contrast-enhanced abdominal CT scans within 3 months, were enrolled in this study. For each patient, the tube current of 274 eff. mAs and 207 eff. mAs were applied respectively in the first and second abdominal scan. The imaging qualities of the two scans were evaluated retrospectively by 3 reviewers. All the individual variants,including height, weight, body mass index (BMI), the maximum transverse diameter, the anteroposterior diameter and the average maximum diameter of abdomen were recorded. A five-point scale was used for grading the image noise of eight organs, including abdominal aorta, portal vein, liver, spleen, gallbladder, pancreas, renal cortex and renal medulla. Diagnostic acceptability of CT images at three anatomic levels,including porta hepatis, pancreas and the upper pole of renal, was also evaluated by using a five-point scale. The noise value of abdominal aorta was defined as the standard deviation (SD) of CT values of aorta at the level of porta hepatis. Scatter diagram and Pearson correlation analysis were used for evaluating the linear relationship between the individual variants and the noise value of abdominal aorta, and multivariate linear regression analysis was used for evaluating the relevance between the individual variants and the noise value of aorta. Results: In this patients group, the average height was (164.6 ± 7.5) cm,the average weight was (64.3 ± 11.0) kg, the BMI was (23.7 ±3.3) kg/m 2 , the maximum transverse diameter of abdomen was (29.8 ± 2.3) cm, the anteroposterior diameter of abdomen was (23.1 ± 2.9) cm, and the average maximum diameter of abdomen was (26.5 ± 2.5) cm. Pearson correlation analysis showed significant positive linear correlation between the noise value of abdominal aorta (1 1.7 ± 3.0) and patients' weight (r=0

  16. Optimizing Nanoscale Quantitative Optical Imaging of Subfield Scattering Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Mark-Alexander; Barnes, Bryan M.; Zhou, Hui; Sohn, Martin; Silver, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    The full 3-D scattered field above finite sets of features has been shown to contain a continuum of spatial frequency information, and with novel optical microscopy techniques and electromagnetic modeling, deep-subwavelength geometrical parameters can be determined. Similarly, by using simulations, scattering geometries and experimental conditions can be established to tailor scattered fields that yield lower parametric uncertainties while decreasing the number of measurements and the area of such finite sets of features. Such optimized conditions are reported through quantitative optical imaging in 193 nm scatterfield microscopy using feature sets up to four times smaller in area than state-of-the-art critical dimension targets. PMID:27805660

  17. Accuracy optimization with wavelength tunability in overlay imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Honggoo; Kang, Yoonshik; Han, Sangjoon; Shim, Kyuchan; Hong, Minhyung; Kim, Seungyoung; Lee, Jieun; Lee, Dongyoung; Oh, Eungryong; Choi, Ahlin; Kim, Youngsik; Marciano, Tal; Klein, Dana; Hajaj, Eitan M.; Aharon, Sharon; Ben-Dov, Guy; Lilach, Saltoun; Serero, Dan; Golotsvan, Anna

    2018-03-01

    As semiconductor manufacturing technology progresses and the dimensions of integrated circuit elements shrink, overlay budget is accordingly being reduced. Overlay budget closely approaches the scale of measurement inaccuracies due to both optical imperfections of the measurement system and the interaction of light with geometrical asymmetries of the measured targets. Measurement inaccuracies can no longer be ignored due to their significant effect on the resulting device yield. In this paper we investigate a new approach for imaging based overlay (IBO) measurements by optimizing accuracy rather than contrast precision, including its effect over the total target performance, using wavelength tunable overlay imaging metrology. We present new accuracy metrics based on theoretical development and present their quality in identifying the measurement accuracy when compared to CD-SEM overlay measurements. The paper presents the theoretical considerations and simulation work, as well as measurement data, for which tunability combined with the new accuracy metrics is shown to improve accuracy performance.

  18. Optimized optical clearing method for imaging central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tingting; Qi, Yisong; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan

    2015-03-01

    The development of various optical clearing methods provides a great potential for imaging entire central nervous system by combining with multiple-labelling and microscopic imaging techniques. These methods had made certain clearing contributions with respective weaknesses, including tissue deformation, fluorescence quenching, execution complexity and antibody penetration limitation that makes immunostaining of tissue blocks difficult. The passive clarity technique (PACT) bypasses those problems and clears the samples with simple implementation, excellent transparency with fine fluorescence retention, but the passive tissue clearing method needs too long time. In this study, we not only accelerate the clearing speed of brain blocks but also preserve GFP fluorescence well by screening an optimal clearing temperature. The selection of proper temperature will make PACT more applicable, which evidently broaden the application range of this method.

  19. A novel strategy to access high resolution DICOM medical images based on JPEG2000 interactive protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuan; Cai, Weihua; Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2008-03-01

    The demand for sharing medical information has kept rising. However, the transmission and displaying of high resolution medical images are limited if the network has a low transmission speed or the terminal devices have limited resources. In this paper, we present an approach based on JPEG2000 Interactive Protocol (JPIP) to browse high resolution medical images in an efficient way. We designed and implemented an interactive image communication system with client/server architecture and integrated it with Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS). In our interactive image communication system, the JPIP server works as the middleware between clients and PACS servers. Both desktop clients and wireless mobile clients can browse high resolution images stored in PACS servers via accessing the JPIP server. The client can only make simple requests which identify the resolution, quality and region of interest and download selected portions of the JPEG2000 code-stream instead of downloading and decoding the entire code-stream. After receiving a request from a client, the JPIP server downloads the requested image from the PACS server and then responds the client by sending the appropriate code-stream. We also tested the performance of the JPIP server. The JPIP server runs stably and reliably under heavy load.

  20. Improved sliced velocity map imaging apparatus optimized for H photofragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazanov, Mikhail; Reisler, Hanna

    2013-04-14

    Time-sliced velocity map imaging (SVMI), a high-resolution method for measuring kinetic energy distributions of products in scattering and photodissociation reactions, is challenging to implement for atomic hydrogen products. We describe an ion optics design aimed at achieving SVMI of H fragments in a broad range of kinetic energies (KE), from a fraction of an electronvolt to a few electronvolts. In order to enable consistently thin slicing for any imaged KE range, an additional electrostatic lens is introduced in the drift region for radial magnification control without affecting temporal stretching of the ion cloud. Time slices of ∼5 ns out of a cloud stretched to ⩾50 ns are used. An accelerator region with variable dimensions (using multiple electrodes) is employed for better optimization of radial and temporal space focusing characteristics at each magnification level. The implemented system was successfully tested by recording images of H fragments from the photodissociation of HBr, H2S, and the CH2OH radical, with kinetic energies ranging from 3 eV. It demonstrated KE resolution ≲1%-2%, similar to that obtained in traditional velocity map imaging followed by reconstruction, and to KE resolution achieved previously in SVMI of heavier products. We expect it to perform just as well up to at least 6 eV of kinetic energy. The tests showed that numerical simulations of the electric fields and ion trajectories in the system, used for optimization of the design and operating parameters, provide an accurate and reliable description of all aspects of system performance. This offers the advantage of selecting the best operating conditions in each measurement without the need for additional calibration experiments.

  1. Optimization of image processing algorithms on mobile platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Pramod; Shirvaikar, Mukul

    2011-03-01

    This work presents a technique to optimize popular image processing algorithms on mobile platforms such as cell phones, net-books and personal digital assistants (PDAs). The increasing demand for video applications like context-aware computing on mobile embedded systems requires the use of computationally intensive image processing algorithms. The system engineer has a mandate to optimize them so as to meet real-time deadlines. A methodology to take advantage of the asymmetric dual-core processor, which includes an ARM and a DSP core supported by shared memory, is presented with implementation details. The target platform chosen is the popular OMAP 3530 processor for embedded media systems. It has an asymmetric dual-core architecture with an ARM Cortex-A8 and a TMS320C64x Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The development platform was the BeagleBoard with 256 MB of NAND RAM and 256 MB SDRAM memory. The basic image correlation algorithm is chosen for benchmarking as it finds widespread application for various template matching tasks such as face-recognition. The basic algorithm prototypes conform to OpenCV, a popular computer vision library. OpenCV algorithms can be easily ported to the ARM core which runs a popular operating system such as Linux or Windows CE. However, the DSP is architecturally more efficient at handling DFT algorithms. The algorithms are tested on a variety of images and performance results are presented measuring the speedup obtained due to dual-core implementation. A major advantage of this approach is that it allows the ARM processor to perform important real-time tasks, while the DSP addresses performance-hungry algorithms.

  2. Tool development for organ dose optimization taking into account the image quality in Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrien-Decoene, Camille

    2015-01-01

    Due to the significant rise of computed tomography (CT) exams in the past few years and the increase of the collective dose due to medical exams, dose estimation in CT imaging has become a major public health issue. However dose optimization cannot be considered without taking into account the image quality which has to be good enough for radiologists. In clinical practice, optimization is obtained through empirical index and image quality using measurements performed on specific phantoms like the CATPHAN. Based on this kind of information, it is thus difficult to correctly optimize protocols regarding organ doses and radiologist criteria. Therefore our goal is to develop a tool allowing the optimization of the patient dose while preserving the image quality needed for diagnosis. The work is divided into two main parts: (i) the development of a Monte Carlo dose simulator based on the PENELOPE code, and (ii) the assessment of an objective image quality criterion. For that purpose, the GE Lightspeed VCT 64 CT tube was modelled with information provided by the manufacturer technical note and by adapting the method proposed by Turner et al (Med. Phys. 36: 2154-2164). The axial and helical movements of the X-ray tube were then implemented into the MC tool. To improve the efficiency of the simulation, two variance reduction techniques were used: a circular and a translational splitting. The splitting algorithms allow a uniform particle distribution along the gantry path to simulate the continuous gantry motion in a discrete way. Validations were performed in homogeneous conditions using a home-made phantom and the well-known CTDI phantoms. Then, dose values were measured in CIRS ATOM anthropomorphic phantom using both optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters for point doses and XR-QA Gafchromic films for relative dose maps. Comparisons between measured and simulated values enabled us to validate the MC tool used for dosimetric purposes. Finally, organ doses for

  3. Cherenkov imaging method for rapid optimization of clinical treatment geometry in total skin electron beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M., E-mail: Jacqueline.M.Andreozzi.th@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Lesley.A.Jarvis@hitchcock.org; Glaser, Adam K. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Zhang, Rongxiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Gladstone, David J.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Jarvis, Lesley A., E-mail: Jacqueline.M.Andreozzi.th@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Lesley.A.Jarvis@hitchcock.org [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States); Pogue, Brian W. [Thayer School of Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    angles, to only 9.8% with the angles optimized. A linear relationship between angle spread and SSD was observed, ranging from 35° at 441 cm, to 39° at 300 cm, with no significant variation in percent-depth dose at midline (R{sup 2} = 0.998). For patient studies, factors influencing in vivo correlation between Cherenkov intensity and measured surface dose are still being investigated. Conclusions: Cherenkov intensity correlates to relative dose measured at depth of maximum dose in a uniform, flat phantom. Imaging of phantoms can thus be used to analyze and optimize TSET treatment geometry more extensively and rapidly than thermoluminescent dosimeters or ionization chambers. This work suggests that there could be an expanded role for Cherenkov imaging as a tool to efficiently improve treatment protocols and as a potential verification tool for routine monitoring of unique patient treatments.

  4. Clinical grade purification and expansion of NK cell products for an optimized manufacturing protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eKoehl

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic Natural Killer (NK cells are used for adoptive immunotherapy after stem cell transplantation. In order to overcome technical limitations in NK cell purification and activation, the following study investigates the impact of different variables on NK cell recovery, cytotoxicity and T cell depletion during GMP-grade NK cell selection. 40 NK cell products were derived from 54 unstimulated donor leukaphereses using immunomagnetic CD3 T-cell depletion, followed by a CD56 cell enrichment step. For T cell depletion, either the depletion 2.1 program in single or double procedure (D2.1 1depl, n=18; D2.1 2depl, n=13 or the faster depletion 3.1 (D3.1, n=9 was used on the CliniMACS instrument. 17 purified NK cell products were activated in vitro by IL-2 for 12 days. The whole process resulted in a median number of 7.59x10e8 CD56+CD3- cells with both purity and viability of 94%, respectively. The T-cell depletion was significantly better using D2.1 1depl/2depl compared to D3.1 (log 4.6/log 4.9 vs. log 3.7; p<0.01 and double procedure in two stages led always to residual T cells below 0.1%. In contrast D3.1 was superior to D2.1 1depl/2depl with regard to recovery of CD56+CD3- NK cells (68% vs 41%/38%. Concomitant monocytes and especially IL-2 activation led to increased NK cell activity against malignant target cells compared to unstimulated NK cells, which correlated with both up-regulation of natural cytotoxicity receptors and intracellular signaling. Overall, wide variations in the NK cell expansion rate and the distribution of NK cell subpopulations were found. In conclusion, our results indicate that GMP-grade purification of NK cells might be improved by a sequential processing of T cell depletion program D2.1 and D3.1. In addition NK cell expansion protocols need to be further optimized.

  5. Imaging techniques and investigation protocols in pediatric emergency imaging; Aufnahmetechnik und Untersuchungsprotokolle beim paediatrischen Notfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharitzer, M.; Hoermann, M.; Puig, S.; Prokop, M. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2002-03-01

    Paediatric emergencies demand a quick and efficient radiological investigation with special attention to specific adjustments related to patient age and radiation protection. Imaging modalities are improving rapidly and enable to diagnose childhood diseases and injuries more quickly, accurately and safely. This article provides an overview of imaging techniques adjusted to the age of the child and an overview of imaging strategies of common paediatric emergencies. Optimising the imaging parameters (digital radiography, different screen-film systems, exposure specifications) allows for substantial reduction of radiation dose. Spiral- and multislice-CT reduce scan time and enable a considerable reduction of radiation exposure if scanning parameters (pitch setting, tube current) are properly adjusted. MRI is still mainly used for neurological or spinal emergencies despite the advent of fast imaging sequences. The radiologist's task is to select an appropriate imaging strategy according to expected differential diagnosis and to adjust the imaging techniques to the individual patient. (orig.) [German] Das akut erkrankte Kind erfordert eine rasche radiologische Abklaerung mit besonderer Beruecksichtung der geaenderten Untersuchungsparameter bei gleichzeitig hohem Anspruch an den Strahlenschutz. Hochaufloesende Schallkoepfe, Multislice-CT und schnelle MR-Sequenzen erlauben eine bessere Anpassung der Untersuchungsmethoden an die Beduerfnisse in der Kinderradiologie. Ziel dieses Artikels ist eine Uebersicht ueber die verschiedenen radiologischen Untersuchungstechniken sowie deren Anpassung an kindliche Anforderungen und die Angabe von Untersuchungsalgorithmen der haeufigsten paediatrischen Notfaelle. In der Projektionsradiographie erlaubt die Optimierung der Aufnahmetechnik (digitale Radiographie, unterschiedliche Klassen von Film-Folien-Systemen, Belichtungsparameter) eine deutliche Reduktion der Strahlendosis bei diagnostisch ausreichender Qualitaet. Spiral- oder

  6. Optimization of oncological {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging based on a multiparameter analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Vinicius O., E-mail: vinicius@radtec.com.br [Nuclear Medicine Department, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41720-375, Brazil and Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco/Ebserh, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil); Machado, Marcos A. D. [Nuclear Medicine Department, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41720-375, Brazil and Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Bahia/Ebserh, Salvador 40110-060 (Brazil); Queiroz, Cleiton C. [Nuclear Medicine Department, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41720-375, Brazil and Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital Universitário Professor Alberto Antunes/Ebserh, Maceió 57072-900 (Brazil); Souza, Susana O. [Department of Physics, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão 49100-000 (Brazil); D’Errico, Francesco [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 and School of Engineering, University of Pisa, Pisa 56126 (Italy); Namías, Mauro [Fundación Centro Diagnóstico Nuclear, Buenos Aires C1417CVE (Argentina); Larocca, Ticiana F. [Centro de Biotecnologia e Terapia Celular, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41253-190 (Brazil); Soares, Milena B. P. [Centro de Biotecnologia e Terapia Celular, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41253-190, Brazil and Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesq. Gonçalo Moniz, Salvador 40296-710 (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: This paper describes a method to achieve consistent clinical image quality in {sup 18}F-FDG scans accounting for patient habitus, dose regimen, image acquisition, and processing techniques. Methods: Oncological PET/CT scan data for 58 subjects were evaluated retrospectively to derive analytical curves that predict image quality. Patient noise equivalent count rate and coefficient of variation (CV) were used as metrics in their analysis. Optimized acquisition protocols were identified and prospectively applied to 179 subjects. Results: The adoption of different schemes for three body mass ranges (<60 kg, 60–90 kg, >90 kg) allows improved image quality with both point spread function and ordered-subsets expectation maximization-3D reconstruction methods. The application of this methodology showed that CV improved significantly (p < 0.0001) in clinical practice. Conclusions: Consistent oncological PET/CT image quality on a high-performance scanner was achieved from an analysis of the relations existing between dose regimen, patient habitus, acquisition, and processing techniques. The proposed methodology may be used by PET/CT centers to develop protocols to standardize PET/CT imaging procedures and achieve better patient management and cost-effective operations.

  7. Aircraft path planning for optimal imaging using dynamic cost functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Gordon; Chaudhry, Haseeb; Kochersberger, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Unmanned aircraft development has accelerated with recent technological improvements in sensing and communications, which has resulted in an "applications lag" for how these aircraft can best be utilized. The aircraft are becoming smaller, more maneuverable and have longer endurance to perform sensing and sampling missions, but operating them aggressively to exploit these capabilities has not been a primary focus in unmanned systems development. This paper addresses a means of aerial vehicle path planning to provide a realistic optimal path in acquiring imagery for structure from motion (SfM) reconstructions and performing radiation surveys. This method will allow SfM reconstructions to occur accurately and with minimal flight time so that the reconstructions can be executed efficiently. An assumption is made that we have 3D point cloud data available prior to the flight. A discrete set of scan lines are proposed for the given area that are scored based on visibility of the scene. Our approach finds a time-efficient path and calculates trajectories between scan lines and over obstacles encountered along those scan lines. Aircraft dynamics are incorporated into the path planning algorithm as dynamic cost functions to create optimal imaging paths in minimum time. Simulations of the path planning algorithm are shown for an urban environment. We also present our approach for image-based terrain mapping, which is able to efficiently perform a 3D reconstruction of a large area without the use of GPS data.

  8. Optimization of a shorter variable-acquisition time for legs to achieve true whole-body PET/CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Takuro; Miwa, Kenta; Murata, Taisuke; Miyaji, Noriaki; Wagatsuma, Kei; Motegi, Kazuki; Terauchi, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuru

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate PET images as a function of acquisition time for various leg sizes, and to optimize a shorter variable-acquisition time protocol for legs to achieve better qualitative and quantitative accuracy of true whole-body PET/CT images. The diameters of legs to be modeled as phantoms were defined based on data derived from 53 patients. This study analyzed PET images of a NEMA phantom and three plastic bottle phantoms (diameter, 5.68, 8.54 and 10.7 cm) that simulated the human body and legs, respectively. The phantoms comprised two spheres (diameters, 10 and 17 mm) containing fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose solution with sphere-to-background ratios of 4 at a background radioactivity level of 2.65 kBq/mL. All PET data were reconstructed with acquisition times ranging from 10 to 180, and 1200 s. We visually evaluated image quality and determined the coefficient of variance (CV) of the background, contrast and the quantitative %error of the hot spheres, and then determined two shorter variable-acquisition protocols for legs. Lesion detectability and quantitative accuracy determined based on maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) in PET images of a patient using the proposed protocols were also evaluated. A larger phantom and a shorter acquisition time resulted in increased background noise on images and decreased the contrast in hot spheres. A visual score of ≥ 1.5 was obtained when the acquisition time was ≥ 30 s for three leg phantoms, and ≥ 120 s for the NEMA phantom. The quantitative %errors of the 10- and 17-mm spheres in the leg phantoms were ± 15 and ± 10%, respectively, in PET images with a high CV (scan mean SUV max of three lesions using the current fixed-acquisition and two proposed variable-acquisition time protocols in the clinical study were 3.1, 3.1 and 3.2, respectively, which did not significantly differ. Leg acquisition time per bed position of even 30-90

  9. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography--imaging protocols, artifacts, and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Antoch, Gerald; Freudenberg, Lutz S; Kühl, Hilmar; Debatin, Jörg F; Müller, Stefan P

    2004-01-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in fused images of anatomical information, such as that provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, with biological information obtainable by positron emission tomography (PET). The near-simultaneous data acquisition in a fixed combination of a PET and a CT scanner in a combined PET/CT imaging system minimizes spatial and temporal mismatches between the modalities by eliminating the need to move the patient in between exams. In addition, using the fast CT scan for PET attenuation correction, the duration of the examination is significantly reduced compared to standalone PET imaging with standard rod-transmission sources. The main source of artifacts arises from the use of the CT-data for scatter and attenuation correction of the PET images. Today, CT reconstruction algorithms cannot account for the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings or prostheses, properly, thus resulting in streak artifacts, which are propagated into the PET image by the attenuation correction. The transformation of attenuation coefficients at X-ray energies to those at 511 keV works well for soft tissues, bone, and air, but again is insufficient for dense CT contrast agents, such as iodine or barium. Finally, mismatches, for example, due to uncoordinated respiration result in incorrect attenuation-corrected PET images. These artifacts, however, can be minimized or avoided prospectively by careful acquisition protocol considerations. In doubt, the uncorrected images almost always allow discrimination between true and artificial finding. PET/CT has to be integrated into the diagnostic workflow for harvesting the full potential of the new modality. In particular, the diagnostic power of both, the CT and the PET within the combination must not be underestimated. By combining multiple diagnostic studies within a single examination, significant logistic advantages can be expected if the combined PET

  10. Cross-layer protocol design for QoS optimization in real-time wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortos, William S.

    2010-04-01

    The metrics of quality of service (QoS) for each sensor type in a wireless sensor network can be associated with metrics for multimedia that describe the quality of fused information, e.g., throughput, delay, jitter, packet error rate, information correlation, etc. These QoS metrics are typically set at the highest, or application, layer of the protocol stack to ensure that performance requirements for each type of sensor data are satisfied. Application-layer metrics, in turn, depend on the support of the lower protocol layers: session, transport, network, data link (MAC), and physical. The dependencies of the QoS metrics on the performance of the higher layers of the Open System Interconnection (OSI) reference model of the WSN protocol, together with that of the lower three layers, are the basis for a comprehensive approach to QoS optimization for multiple sensor types in a general WSN model. The cross-layer design accounts for the distributed power consumption along energy-constrained routes and their constituent nodes. Following the author's previous work, the cross-layer interactions in the WSN protocol are represented by a set of concatenated protocol parameters and enabling resource levels. The "best" cross-layer designs to achieve optimal QoS are established by applying the general theory of martingale representations to the parameterized multivariate point processes (MVPPs) for discrete random events occurring in the WSN. Adaptive control of network behavior through the cross-layer design is realized through the parametric factorization of the stochastic conditional rates of the MVPPs. The cross-layer protocol parameters for optimal QoS are determined in terms of solutions to stochastic dynamic programming conditions derived from models of transient flows for heterogeneous sensor data and aggregate information over a finite time horizon. Markov state processes, embedded within the complex combinatorial history of WSN events, are more computationally

  11. Optimization of image quality in diagnostic radiology associated with exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulea, C.; Ramboiu, S.

    1996-01-01

    Optimal parameters for a high quality image and minimal radiation risk for the patients were established. The characteristics that affect image quality speed, contrast factor, latitude, base density, fog density, reciprocity law failure and latent image fading were analyzed. Base density on the radiographic image was measured for Azoix film and it is 0.1 log units. Fog density is a function of development time and it will increase with 20% through the increase with 2 minutes of development time. The curve Hurter-Driffield was used to characterize photographic emulsion for Azoix film. The value of latitude of 0.7 log units is in the normally useful range of densities found in radiographs. The speed of Azoix film, as a function of the time interval between exposure and development, increase with 10% for the first 24 hours. The reduction in the patient exposure that could be effected by delaying the development of Azoix is so small, that it is far outweighed by the possible disadvantage of a delay in the acquisition of diagnostic information. Therefore, latent image fading is not very important from the point of view of patient exposure. The speeds evaluated for exposure times 0.08s, 0.16s, 0.64s were unmodified, that is reciprocity law failure was unimportant for Azoix film Perlux screen. The romania films Azoix used with Perlux screen and processed with original solutions are determined an optical density of 1.0 (average density of medical radiograph) with a minimum radiation exposure for the patient (59·10 -7 C/kg). (author)

  12. Optimizing ultrasound molecular imaging of secreted frizzled related protein 2 expression in angiosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K Tsuruta

    Full Text Available Secreted frizzled related protein 2 (SFRP2 is a tumor endothelial marker expressed in angiosarcoma. Previously, we showed ultrasound molecular imaging with SFRP2-targeted contrast increased average video pixel intensity (VI of angiosarcoma vessels by 2.2 ± 0.6 VI versus streptavidin contrast. We hypothesized that redesigning our contrast agents would increase imaging performance. Improved molecular imaging reagents were created by combining NeutrAvidin™-functionalized microbubbles with biotinylated SFRP2 or IgY control antibodies. When angiosarcoma tumors in nude mice reached 8 mm, time-intensity, antibody loading, and microbubble dose experiments optimized molecular imaging. 10 minutes after injection, the control-subtracted time-intensity curve (TIC for SFRP2-targeted contrast reached a maximum, after subtracting the contribution of free-flowing contrast. SFRP2 antibody-targeted VI was greater when contrast was formulated with 10-fold molar excess of maleimide-activated NeutrAvidin™ versus 3-fold (4.5 ± 0.18 vs. 0.32 ± 0.15, VI ± SEM, 5 x 106 dose, p < 0.001. Tumor vasculature returned greater average video pixel intensity using 5 x 107 versus 5 x 106 microbubbles (21.2 ± 2.5 vs. 4.5 ± 0.18, p = 0.0011. Specificity for tumor vasculature was confirmed by low VI for SFRP2-targeted, and control contrast in peri-tumoral vasculature (3.2 ± 0.52 vs. 1.6 ± 0.71, p = 0.92. After optimization, average video pixel intensity of tumor vasculature was 14.2 ± 3.0 VI units higher with SFRP2-targeted contrast versus IgY-targeted control (22.1 ± 2.5 vs. 7.9 ± 1.6, p < 0.001. After log decompression, 14.2 ΔVI was equal to ~70% higher signal, in arbitray acoustic units (AU, for SFRP2 versus IgY. This provided ~18- fold higher acoustic signal enhancement than provided previously by 2.2 ΔVI. Basing our targeted contrast on NeutrAvidin™-functionalized microbubbles, using IgY antibodies for our control contrast, and optimizing our imaging protocol

  13. Near-optimality of special periodic protocols for fluid models of single server switched networks with switchover times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, A. S.; Ishchenko, R.

    2017-11-01

    We consider a generic deterministic time-invariant fluid model of a single server switched network, which consists of finitely many infinite size buffers (queues) and receives constant rate inflows of jobs from the outside. Any flow undergoes a multi-phase service, entering a specific buffer after every phase, and ultimately leaves the network; the route of the flow over the buffers is pre-specified, and flows may merge inside the network. They share a common source of service, which can serve at most one buffer at a time and has to switch among buffers from time to time; any switch consumes a nonzero switchover period. With respect to the long-run maximal scaled wip (work in progress) performance metric, near-optimality of periodic scheduling and service protocols is established: the deepest optimum (that is over all feasible processes in the network, irrespective of the initial state) is furnished by such a protocol up to as small error as desired. Moreover, this can be achieved with a special periodic protocol introduced in the paper. It is also shown that the exhaustive policy is optimal for any buffer whose service at the maximal rate does not cause growth of the scaled wip.

  14. Improved image quality and radiation dose reduction in liver dynamic CT scan with the protocol change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yu Jin; Cho, Pyong Kon [Radiological Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The purpose is reducing radiation dose while maintaining of image quality in liver dynamic CT(LDCT) scan, by protocols generally used and the tube voltage set at a low level protocol compared to the radiation dose and image quality. The target is body mass index, 18.5-24 patients out of 40 patients who underwent the ACT(abdominal CT). Group A(tube voltage : 120 kVp, SAFIRE strength 1) of 20 people among 40 people, to apply the general abdominal CT scan protocol, group B(tube voltage : 100 kVp, apply SAFIRE strength 0-5) was 20 people, set a lower tube voltage. Image quality evaluation was setting a region of interest(ROI) in the liver parenchyma, aorta, superior mesenteric artery (SMA), celiac trunk, visceral fat of arterial phase. In the ROI were compared by measuring the noise, signal to noise ratio(SNR), contrast to noise ratio(CNR), CT number. In addition, qualitative assessments to evaluate two people in the rich professional experience in Radiology by 0-3 points. We compared the total radiation dose, dose length product(DLP) and effective dose, volume computed tomography dose index(CTDIvol). The higher SAFIRE in the tube voltage 100 kVp, noise is reduced, CT number was increased. Thus, SNR and CNR was increased higher the SAFIRE step. Compared with the tube voltage 120 kVp, noise, SNR, CNR was most similar in SAFIRE strength 2 and 3. Qualitative assessment SAFIRE strength 2 is the most common SAFIRE strength 2 the most common qualitative assessment, if the tube voltage of 100 kVp when the quality of the images better evaluated was SAFIRE strength 1. Dose was reduced from 21.69%, in 100 kVp than 120 kVp. In the case of a relatively high BMI is not LDCT scan, When it is shipped from the factory tube voltage is set higher, unnecessary radiation exposure when considering the reality that is concerned, when according to the results of this study, set a lower tube voltage and adjust the SAFIRE strength to 1 or 2, the radiation without compromising image quality

  15. A standardized imaging protocol for the endoscopic prediction of dysplasia within sessile serrated polyps (with video).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, David J; Jayanna, Mahesh; Awadie, Halim; Desomer, Lobke; Lee, Ralph; Heitman, Steven J; Sidhu, Mayenaaz; Goodrick, Kathleen; Burgess, Nicholas G; Mahajan, Hema; McLeod, Duncan; Bourke, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Dysplasia within sessile serrated polyps (SSPs) is difficult to detect and may be mistaken for an adenoma, risking incomplete resection of the background serrated tissue, and is strongly implicated in interval cancer after colonoscopy. The use of endoscopic imaging to detect dysplasia within SSPs has not been systematically studied. Consecutively detected SSPs ≥8 mm in size were evaluated by using a standardized imaging protocol at a tertiary-care endoscopy center over 3 years. Lesions suspected as SSPs were analyzed with high-definition white light then narrow-band imaging. A demarcated area with a neoplastic pit pattern (Kudo type III/IV, NICE type II) was sought among the serrated tissue. If this was detected, the lesion was labeled dysplastic (sessile serrated polyp with dysplasia); if not, it was labeled non-dysplastic (sessile serrated polyp without dysplasia). Histopathology was reviewed by 2 blinded specialist GI pathologists. A total of 141 SSPs were assessed in 83 patients. Median lesion size was 15.0 mm (interquartile range 10-20), and 54.6% were in the right side of the colon. Endoscopic evidence of dysplasia was detected in 36 of 141 (25.5%) SSPs; of these, 5 of 36 (13.9%) lacked dysplasia at histopathology. Two of 105 (1.9%) endoscopically designated non-dysplastic SSPs had dysplasia at histopathology. Endoscopic imaging, therefore, had an accuracy of 95.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.1%-97.6%) and a negative predictive value of 98.1% (95% CI, 92.6%-99.7%) for detection of dysplasia within SSPs. Dysplasia within SSPs can be detected accurately by using a simple, broadly applicable endoscopic imaging protocol that allows complete resection. Independent validation of this protocol and its dissemination to the wider endoscopic community may have a significant impact on rates of interval cancer. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT03100552.). Copyright © 2018 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  16. An Experimental Protocol for Assessing the Performance of New Ultrasound Probes Based on CMUT Technology in Application to Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrone, Giulia; Ramalli, Alessandro; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart; Quaglia, Fabio; Castellazzi, Gloria; Morbini, Patrizia; Piastra, Marco

    2017-09-24

    The possibility to perform an early and repeatable assessment of imaging performance is fundamental in the design and development process of new ultrasound (US) probes. Particularly, a more realistic analysis with application-specific imaging targets can be extremely valuable to assess the expected performance of US probes in their potential clinical field of application. The experimental protocol presented in this work was purposely designed to provide an application-specific assessment procedure for newly-developed US probe prototypes based on Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer (CMUT) technology in relation to brain imaging. The protocol combines the use of a bovine brain fixed in formalin as the imaging target, which ensures both realism and repeatability of the described procedures, and of neuronavigation techniques borrowed from neurosurgery. The US probe is in fact connected to a motion tracking system which acquires position data and enables the superposition of US images to reference Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the brain. This provides a means for human experts to perform a visual qualitative assessment of the US probe imaging performance and to compare acquisitions made with different probes. Moreover, the protocol relies on the use of a complete and open research and development system for US image acquisition, i.e. the Ultrasound Advanced Open Platform (ULA-OP) scanner. The manuscript describes in detail the instruments and procedures involved in the protocol, in particular for the calibration, image acquisition and registration of US and MR images. The obtained results prove the effectiveness of the overall protocol presented, which is entirely open (within the limits of the instrumentation involved), repeatable, and covers the entire set of acquisition and processing activities for US images.

  17. GUI implementation of image encryption and decryption using Open CV-Python script on secured TFTP protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K. Rasool; Rao, Ch. Madhava

    2018-04-01

    Currently safety is one of the primary concerns in the transmission of images due to increasing the use of images within the industrial applications. So it's necessary to secure the image facts from unauthorized individuals. There are various strategies are investigated to secure the facts. In that encryption is certainly one of maximum distinguished method. This paper gives a sophisticated Rijndael (AES) algorithm to shield the facts from unauthorized humans. Here Exponential Key Change (EKE) concept is also introduced to exchange the key between client and server. The things are exchange in a network among client and server through a simple protocol is known as Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP). This protocol is used mainly in embedded servers to transfer the data and also provide protection to the data if protection capabilities are integrated. In this paper, implementing a GUI environment for image encryption and decryption. All these experiments carried out on Linux environment the usage of Open CV-Python script.

  18. 101 labeled brain images and a consistent human cortical labeling protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno eKlein

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the Mindboggle-101 dataset, the largest and most complete set of free, publicly accessible, manually labeled human brain images. To manually label the macroscopic anatomy in magnetic resonance images of 101 healthy participants, we created a new cortical labeling protocol that relies on robust anatomical landmarks and minimal manual edits after initialization with automated labels. The Desikan-Killiany-Tourville (DKT protocol is intended to improve the ease, consistency, and accuracy of labeling human cortical areas. Given how difficult it is to label brains, the Mindboggle-101 dataset is intended to serve as brain atlases for use in labeling other brains, as a normative dataset to establish morphometric variation in a healthy population for comparison against clinical populations, and contribute to the development, training, testing, and evaluation of automated registration and labeling algorithms. To this end, we also introduce benchmarks for the evaluation of such algorithms by comparing our manual labels with labels automatically generated by probabilistic and multi-atlas registration-based approaches. All data and related software and updated information are available on the http://www.mindboggle.info/data/ website.

  19. 101 Labeled Brain Images and a Consistent Human Cortical Labeling Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Arno; Tourville, Jason

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the Mindboggle-101 dataset, the largest and most complete set of free, publicly accessible, manually labeled human brain images. To manually label the macroscopic anatomy in magnetic resonance images of 101 healthy participants, we created a new cortical labeling protocol that relies on robust anatomical landmarks and minimal manual edits after initialization with automated labels. The “Desikan–Killiany–Tourville” (DKT) protocol is intended to improve the ease, consistency, and accuracy of labeling human cortical areas. Given how difficult it is to label brains, the Mindboggle-101 dataset is intended to serve as brain atlases for use in labeling other brains, as a normative dataset to establish morphometric variation in a healthy population for comparison against clinical populations, and contribute to the development, training, testing, and evaluation of automated registration and labeling algorithms. To this end, we also introduce benchmarks for the evaluation of such algorithms by comparing our manual labels with labels automatically generated by probabilistic and multi-atlas registration-based approaches. All data and related software and updated information are available on the http://mindboggle.info/data website. PMID:23227001

  20. Performance evaluation of secured DICOM image communication with next generation internet protocol IPv6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fenghai; Zhang, Jianguo; Chen, Xiaomeng; Huang, H. K.

    2005-04-01

    Next Generation Internet (NGI) technology with new communication protocol IPv6 emerges as a potential solution for low-cost and high-speed networks for image data transmission. IPv6 is designed to solve many of the problems of the current version of IP (known as IPv4) with regard to address depletion, security, autoconfiguration, extensibility, and more. We choose CTN (Central Test Node) DICOM software developed by The Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology to implement IPv6/IPv4 enabled DICOM communication software on different operating systems (Windows/Linux), and used this DICOM software to evaluate the performance of the IPv6/IPv4 enabled DICOM image communication with different security setting and environments. We compared the security communications of IPsec with SSL/TLS on different TCP/IP protocols (IPv6/IPv4), and find that there are some trade-offs to choose security solution between IPsec and SSL/TLS in the security implementation of IPv6/IPv4 communication networks.

  1. Safety of adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging by a one-route infusion protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Yuko; Kishino, Koh

    2006-01-01

    When adenosine stress testing is performed, a vein is generally accessed in each arm. To determine whether the one-route infusion protocol, that is, infusion via one upper arm vein, is safe, myocardial perfusion imaging was performed during adenosine stress testing in patients with angina pectoris. Sixty-six consecutive patients (43 men, 68±11 years of age) with suspected coronary artery disease were enrolled in this study. For the stress test, adenosine was injected at 120 μg/kg/min for 6 minutes. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate did not show any significant changes after injection of the adenosine and radioisotope (RI) tracer. Adverse events during infusion of the adenosine were seen in 42 (64%) patients and included chest discomfort/oppression in 17 (26%) and dyspnea/throat discomfort in 15 (23%). On the other hand, adverse events just after infusion of the RI tracer occurred in 5 (8%) patients and included chest oppression in 2 (3%) and dyspnea in 1 (2%). Almost all adverse events disappeared quickly without treatment. Therefore, we concluded that adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging using a one-route infusion protocol is safe and useful to do for patients unable to secure veins in both arms. (author)

  2. DICOM image secure communications with Internet protocols IPv6 and IPv4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Yu, Fenghai; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chenwen

    2007-01-01

    Image-data transmission from one site to another through public network is usually characterized in term of privacy, authenticity, and integrity. In this paper, we first describe a general scenario about how image is delivered from one site to another through a wide-area network (WAN) with security features of data privacy, integrity, and authenticity. Second, we give the common implementation method of the digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) image communication software library with IPv6/IPv4 for high-speed broadband Internet by using open-source software. Third, we discuss two major security-transmission methods, the IP security (IPSec) and the secure-socket layer (SSL) or transport-layer security (TLS), being used currently in medical-image-data communication with privacy support. Fourth, we describe a test schema of multiple-modality DICOM-image communications through TCP/IPv4 and TCP/IPv6 with different security methods, different security algorithms, and operating systems, and evaluate the test results. We found that there are tradeoff factors between choosing the IPsec and the SSL/TLS-based security implementation of IPv6/IPv4 protocols. If the WAN networks only use IPv6 such as in high-speed broadband Internet, the choice is IPsec-based security. If the networks are IPv4 or the combination of IPv6 and IPv4, it is better to use SSL/TLS security. The Linux platform has more security algorithms implemented than the Windows (XP) platform, and can achieve better performance in most experiments of IPv6 and IPv4-based DICOM-image communications. In teleradiology or enterprise-PACS applications, the Linux operating system may be the better choice as peer security gateways for both the IPsec and the SSL/TLS-based secure DICOM communications cross public networks.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of third molars: developing a protocol suitable for forensic age estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tobel, Jannick; Hillewig, Elke; Bogaert, Stephanie; Deblaere, Karel; Verstraete, Koenraad

    2017-03-01

    Established dental age estimation methods in sub-adults study the development of third molar root apices on radiographs. In living individuals, however, avoiding ionising radiation is expedient. Studying dental development with magnetic resonance imaging complies with this requirement, adding the advantage of imaging in three dimensions. To elaborate the development of an MRI protocol to visualise all third molars for forensic age estimation, with particular attention to the development of the root apex. Ex vivo scans of porcine jaws and in vivo scans of 10 volunteers aged 17-25 years were performed to select adequate sequences. Studied parameters were T1 vs T2 weighting, ultrashort echo time (UTE), fat suppression, in plane resolution, slice thickness, 3D imaging, signal-to-noise ratio, and acquisition time. A bilateral four-channel flexible surface coil was used. Two observers evaluated the suitability of the images. T2-weighted images were preferred to T1-weighted images. To clearly distinguish root apices in (almost) fully developed third molars an in plane resolution of 0.33 × 0.33 mm 2 was deemed necessary. Taking acquisition time limits into account, only a T2 FSE sequence with slice thickness of 2 mm generated images with sufficient resolution and contrast. UTE, thinner slice T2 FSE and T2 3D FSE sequences could not generate the desired resolution within 6.5 minutes. Three Tesla MRI of the third molars is a feasible technique for forensic age estimation, in which a T2 FSE sequence can provide the desired in plane resolution within a clinically acceptable acquisition time.

  4. Accumulative difference image protocol for particle tracking in fluorescence microscopy tested in mouse lymphonodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Carlo E; Caccia, Michele; Sironi, Laura; D'Alfonso, Laura; Collini, Maddalena; Rivolta, Ilaria; Miserocchi, Giuseppe; Gorletta, Tatiana; Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2010-08-17

    The basic research in cell biology and in medical sciences makes large use of imaging tools mainly based on confocal fluorescence and, more recently, on non-linear excitation microscopy. Substantially the aim is the recognition of selected targets in the image and their tracking in time. We have developed a particle tracking algorithm optimized for low signal/noise images with a minimum set of requirements on the target size and with no a priori knowledge of the type of motion. The image segmentation, based on a combination of size sensitive filters, does not rely on edge detection and is tailored for targets acquired at low resolution as in most of the in-vivo studies. The particle tracking is performed by building, from a stack of Accumulative Difference Images, a single 2D image in which the motion of the whole set of the particles is coded in time by a color level. This algorithm, tested here on solid-lipid nanoparticles diffusing within cells and on lymphocytes diffusing in lymphonodes, appears to be particularly useful for the cellular and the in-vivo microscopy image processing in which few a priori assumption on the type, the extent and the variability of particle motions, can be done.

  5. Accumulative difference image protocol for particle tracking in fluorescence microscopy tested in mouse lymphonodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo E Villa

    Full Text Available The basic research in cell biology and in medical sciences makes large use of imaging tools mainly based on confocal fluorescence and, more recently, on non-linear excitation microscopy. Substantially the aim is the recognition of selected targets in the image and their tracking in time. We have developed a particle tracking algorithm optimized for low signal/noise images with a minimum set of requirements on the target size and with no a priori knowledge of the type of motion. The image segmentation, based on a combination of size sensitive filters, does not rely on edge detection and is tailored for targets acquired at low resolution as in most of the in-vivo studies. The particle tracking is performed by building, from a stack of Accumulative Difference Images, a single 2D image in which the motion of the whole set of the particles is coded in time by a color level. This algorithm, tested here on solid-lipid nanoparticles diffusing within cells and on lymphocytes diffusing in lymphonodes, appears to be particularly useful for the cellular and the in-vivo microscopy image processing in which few a priori assumption on the type, the extent and the variability of particle motions, can be done.

  6. Economic comparison of common treatment protocols and J5 vaccination for clinical mastitis in dairy herds using optimized culling decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, J A; Cha, E; Johnson, S K; Welcome, F L; Kristensen, A R; Gröhn, Y T

    2016-05-01

    This study used an existing dynamic optimization model to compare costs of common treatment protocols and J5 vaccination for clinical mastitis in US dairy herds. Clinical mastitis is an infection of the mammary gland causing major economic losses in dairy herds due to reduced milk production, reduced conception, and increased risk of mortality and culling for infected cows. Treatment protocols were developed to reflect common practices in dairy herds. These included targeted therapy following pathogen identification, and therapy without pathogen identification using a broad-spectrum antimicrobial or treating with the cheapest treatment option. The cost-benefit of J5 vaccination was also estimated. Effects of treatment were accounted for as changes in treatment costs, milk loss due to mastitis, milk discarded due to treatment, and mortality. Following ineffective treatments, secondary decisions included extending the current treatment, alternative treatment, discontinuing treatment, and pathogen identification followed by recommended treatment. Average net returns for treatment protocols and vaccination were generated using an existing dynamic programming model. This model incorporates cow and pathogen characteristics to optimize management decisions to treat, inseminate, or cull cows. Of the treatment protocols where 100% of cows received recommended treatment, pathogen-specific identification followed by recommended therapy yielded the highest average net returns per cow per year. Out of all treatment scenarios, the highest net returns were achieved with selecting the cheapest treatment option and discontinuing treatment, or alternate treatment with a similar spectrum therapy; however, this may not account for the full consequences of giving nonrecommended therapies to cows with clinical mastitis. Vaccination increased average net returns in all scenarios. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Constructing Benchmark Databases and Protocols for Medical Image Analysis: Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Kauppi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the performance evaluation practices for developing medical image analysis methods, in particular, how to establish and share databases of medical images with verified ground truth and solid evaluation protocols. Such databases support the development of better algorithms, execution of profound method comparisons, and, consequently, technology transfer from research laboratories to clinical practice. For this purpose, we propose a framework consisting of reusable methods and tools for the laborious task of constructing a benchmark database. We provide a software tool for medical image annotation helping to collect class label, spatial span, and expert's confidence on lesions and a method to appropriately combine the manual segmentations from multiple experts. The tool and all necessary functionality for method evaluation are provided as public software packages. As a case study, we utilized the framework and tools to establish the DiaRetDB1 V2.1 database for benchmarking diabetic retinopathy detection algorithms. The database contains a set of retinal images, ground truth based on information from multiple experts, and a baseline algorithm for the detection of retinopathy lesions.

  8. Specimen preparation, imaging, and analysis protocols for knife-edge scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Yoonsuck; Mayerich, David; Kwon, Jaerock; Miller, Daniel E; Sung, Chul; Chung, Ji Ryang; Huffman, Todd; Keyser, John; Abbott, Louise C

    2011-12-09

    Major advances in high-throughput, high-resolution, 3D microscopy techniques have enabled the acquisition of large volumes of neuroanatomical data at submicrometer resolution. One of the first such instruments producing whole-brain-scale data is the Knife-Edge Scanning Microscope (KESM), developed and hosted in the authors' lab. KESM has been used to section and image whole mouse brains at submicrometer resolution, revealing the intricate details of the neuronal networks (Golgi), vascular networks (India ink), and cell body distribution (Nissl). The use of KESM is not restricted to the mouse nor the brain. We have successfully imaged the octopus brain, mouse lung, and rat brain. We are currently working on whole zebra fish embryos. Data like these can greatly contribute to connectomics research; to microcirculation and hemodynamic research; and to stereology research by providing an exact ground-truth. In this article, we will describe the pipeline, including specimen preparation (fixing, staining, and embedding), KESM configuration and setup, sectioning and imaging with the KESM, image processing, data preparation, and data visualization and analysis. The emphasis will be on specimen preparation and visualization/analysis of obtained KESM data. We expect the detailed protocol presented in this article to help broaden the access to KESM and increase its utilization.

  9. Acquisition and Processing Protocols for Uav Images: 3d Modeling of Historical Buildings Using Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtiyoso, A.; Koehl, M.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Freville, T.

    2017-08-01

    Photogrammetry has seen an increase in the use of UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) for both large and smaller scale cartography. The use of UAVs is also advantageous because it may be used for tasks requiring quick response, including in the case of the inspection and monitoring of buildings. The objective of the project is to study the acquisition and processing protocols which exist in the literature and to adapt them for UAV projects. This implies a study on the calibration of the sensors, flight planning, comparison of software solutions, data management, and analysis on the different products of a UAV project. Two historical buildings of the city of Strasbourg were used as case studies: a part of the Rohan Palace façade and the St-Pierre-le-Jeune Catholic church. In addition, a preliminary test was performed on the Josephine Pavilion. Two UAVs were used in this research; namely the Sensefly Albris and the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. The experiments have shown that the calibration parameters tend to be unstable for small sensors. Furthermore, the dense matching of images remains a particular problem to address in a close range photogrammetry project, more so in the presence of noise on the images. Data management in cases where the number of images is high is also very important. The UAV is nevertheless a suitable solution for the surveying and recording of historical buildings because it is able to take images from points of view which are normally inaccessible to classical terrestrial techniques.

  10. Acute beneficial hemodynamic effects of a novel 3D-echocardiographic optimization protocol in cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Sonne

    , individualized echocardiographic optimization with the integration of 3-dimensional indices into the optimization protocol acutely improved LV systolic function and decreased ESV and can be used to select the optimal AV delay and VV interval in CRT.

  11. Generalized PSF modeling for optimized quantitation in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafinia, Saeed; Mohy-Ud-Din, Hassan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Jha, Abhinav K; Casey, Michael E; Kadrmas, Dan J; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-21

    Point-spread function (PSF) modeling offers the ability to account for resolution degrading phenomena within the PET image generation framework. PSF modeling improves resolution and enhances contrast, but at the same time significantly alters image noise properties and induces edge overshoot effect. Thus, studying the effect of PSF modeling on quantitation task performance can be very important. Frameworks explored in the past involved a dichotomy of PSF versus no-PSF modeling. By contrast, the present work focuses on quantitative performance evaluation of standard uptake value (SUV) PET images, while incorporating a wide spectrum of PSF models, including those that under- and over-estimate the true PSF, for the potential of enhanced quantitation of SUVs. The developed framework first analytically models the true PSF, considering a range of resolution degradation phenomena (including photon non-collinearity, inter-crystal penetration and scattering) as present in data acquisitions with modern commercial PET systems. In the context of oncologic liver FDG PET imaging, we generated 200 noisy datasets per image-set (with clinically realistic noise levels) using an XCAT anthropomorphic phantom with liver tumours of varying sizes. These were subsequently reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with varying PSF modelled kernels. We focused on quantitation of both SUV mean and SUV max , including assessment of contrast recovery coefficients, as well as noise-bias characteristics (including both image roughness and coefficient of-variability), for different tumours/iterations/PSF kernels. It was observed that overestimated PSF yielded more accurate contrast recovery for a range of tumours, and typically improved quantitative performance. For a clinically reasonable number of iterations, edge enhancement due to PSF modeling (especially due to over-estimated PSF) was in fact seen to lower SUV mean bias in small tumours. Overall, the results indicate that exactly matched PSF

  12. Combined echo offset (Dixon) and line volume chemical shift imaging as a clinical imaging protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Listerud, J.; Chan, T.; Lenkinski, R.E.; Kressel, H.Y.; Chao, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have studied the sensitivity and specificity of the line-volume chemical-shift imaging (CSI) method as compared with the Dixon method they have recently implemented on a Signa, which supports a variety of options. Potential sources or error for the Dixon method include line broadening due to susceptibility, field inhomogeneity, and errors form olefinic resonances associated with fat, which behave like water in the Dixon regime. The authors investigate whether a combined Dixon/line-volume CSI method could be used to improve the placement of the line volume and to provide higher sensitivity and specificity than does the Dixon method alone

  13. Optimized protocol of chicken antibody (IgY) purification providing electrophoretically homogenous preparations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hodek, P.; Trefil, P.; Šimůnek, Jiří; Hudeček, J.; Stiborová, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2013), 113-124 ISSN 1452-3981 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/G163 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : yolk immunoglobulin * purification protocol * bio-compatible chemicals Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.956, year: 2013

  14. Optimized protocols for Mycobacterium leprae strain management: frozen stock preservation and maintenance in athymic nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombone, Ana Paula Fávaro; Pedrini, Sílvia Cristina Barbosa; Diório, Suzana Madeira; Belone, Andréa de Faria Fernandes; Fachin, Luciana Raquel Vicenzi; do Nascimento, Dejair Caitano; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco

    2014-03-23

    Leprosy, caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is an important infectious disease that is still endemic in many countries around the world, including Brazil. There are currently no known methods for growing M. leprae in vitro, presenting a major obstacle in the study of this pathogen in the laboratory. Therefore, the maintenance and growth of M. leprae strains are preferably performed in athymic nude mice (NU-Foxn1(nu)). The laboratory conditions for using mice are readily available, easy to perform, and allow standardization and development of protocols for achieving reproducible results. In the present report, we describe a simple protocol for purification of bacilli from nude mouse footpads using trypsin, which yields a suspension with minimum cell debris and with high bacterial viability index, as determined by fluorescent microscopy. A modification to the standard method for bacillary counting by Ziehl-Neelsen staining and light microscopy is also demonstrated. Additionally, we describe a protocol for freezing and thawing bacillary stocks as an alternative protocol for maintenance and storage of M. leprae strains.

  15. An algorithm for optimal fusion of atlases with different labeling protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugenio Iglesias, Juan; Sabuncu, Mert Rory; Aganj, Iman

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel label fusion algorithm suited for scenarios in which different manual delineation protocols with potentially disparate structures have been used to annotate the training scans (hereafter referred to as "atlases"). Such scenarios arise when atlases have missing str...

  16. Optimizing the MAC Protocol in Localization Systems Based on IEEE 802.15.4 Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Pérez-Solano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency signals are commonly used in the development of indoor localization systems. The infrastructure of these systems includes some beacons placed at known positions that exchange radio packets with users to be located. When the system is implemented using wireless sensor networks, the wireless transceivers integrated in the network motes are usually based on the IEEE 802.15.4 standard. But, the CSMA-CA, which is the basis for the medium access protocols in this category of communication systems, is not suitable when several users want to exchange bursts of radio packets with the same beacon to acquire the radio signal strength indicator (RSSI values needed in the location process. Therefore, new protocols are necessary to avoid the packet collisions that appear when multiple users try to communicate with the same beacons. On the other hand, the RSSI sampling process should be carried out very quickly because some systems cannot tolerate a large delay in the location process. This is even more important when the RSSI sampling process includes measures with different signal power levels or frequency channels. The principal objective of this work is to speed up the RSSI sampling process in indoor localization systems. To achieve this objective, the main contribution is the proposal of a new MAC protocol that eliminates the medium access contention periods and decreases the number of packet collisions to accelerate the RSSI collection process. Moreover, the protocol increases the overall network throughput taking advantage of the frequency channel diversity. The presented results show the suitability of this protocol for reducing the RSSI gathering delay and increasing the network throughput in simulated and real environments.

  17. Optimizing the MAC Protocol in Localization Systems Based on IEEE 802.15.4 Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Solano, Juan J; Claver, Jose M; Ezpeleta, Santiago

    2017-07-06

    Radio frequency signals are commonly used in the development of indoor localization systems. The infrastructure of these systems includes some beacons placed at known positions that exchange radio packets with users to be located. When the system is implemented using wireless sensor networks, the wireless transceivers integrated in the network motes are usually based on the IEEE 802.15.4 standard. But, the CSMA-CA, which is the basis for the medium access protocols in this category of communication systems, is not suitable when several users want to exchange bursts of radio packets with the same beacon to acquire the radio signal strength indicator (RSSI) values needed in the location process. Therefore, new protocols are necessary to avoid the packet collisions that appear when multiple users try to communicate with the same beacons. On the other hand, the RSSI sampling process should be carried out very quickly because some systems cannot tolerate a large delay in the location process. This is even more important when the RSSI sampling process includes measures with different signal power levels or frequency channels. The principal objective of this work is to speed up the RSSI sampling process in indoor localization systems. To achieve this objective, the main contribution is the proposal of a new MAC protocol that eliminates the medium access contention periods and decreases the number of packet collisions to accelerate the RSSI collection process. Moreover, the protocol increases the overall network throughput taking advantage of the frequency channel diversity. The presented results show the suitability of this protocol for reducing the RSSI gathering delay and increasing the network throughput in simulated and real environments.

  18. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography protocol considerations for head and neck cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escott, Edward J

    2008-08-01

    Positron emission tomographic-computed tomographic (PET-CT) imaging of patients with primary head and neck cancers has become an established approach for staging and restaging, as well as radiation therapy planning. The inherent co-registration of PET and CT images made possible by the integrated PET-CT scanner is particularly valuable in head and neck cancer imaging due to the complex and closely situated anatomy in this part of the body, the varied sources of physiologic and benign 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) tracer uptake that occurs in the neck, and the varied and complex posttreatment appearance of the neck. Careful optimization of both the CT and the PET portion of the examination is essential to insure the most accurate and clinically valuable interpretation of these examinations.

  19. Optimization of coronary optical coherence tomography imaging using the attenuation-compensated technique: a validation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teo, Jing Chun; Foin, Nicolas; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Fam, Jiang Ming; Wong, Philip; Low, Fatt Hoe; Leo, Hwa Liang; Mari, Jean-Martial; Joner, Michael; Girard, Michael J A; Virmani, Renu; Bezerra, HG.; Costa, MA.; Guagliumi, G.; Rollins, AM.; Simon, D.; Gutiérrez-Chico, JL.; Alegría-Barrero, E.; Teijeiro-Mestre, R.; Chan, PH.; Tsujioka, H.; de Silva, R.; Otsuka, F.; Joner, M.; Prati, F.; Virmani, R.; Narula, J.; Members, WC.; Levine, GN.; Bates, ER.; Blankenship, JC.; Bailey, SR.; Bittl, JA.; Prati, F.; Guagliumi, G.; Mintz, G.S.; Costa, Marco; Regar, E.; Akasaka, T.; Roleder, T.; Jąkała, J.; Kałuża, GL.; Partyka, Ł.; Proniewska, K.; Pociask, E.; Girard, MJA.; Strouthidis, NG.; Ethier, CR.; Mari, JM.; Mari, JM.; Strouthidis, NG.; Park, SC.; Girard, MJA.; van der Lee, R.; Foin, N.; Otsuka, F.; Wong, P.K.; Mari, J-M.; Joner, M.; Nakano, M.; Vorpahl, M.; Otsuka, F.; Taniwaki, M.; Yazdani, SK.; Finn, AV.; Nakano, M.; Yahagi, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Taniwaki, M.; Otsuka, F.; Ladich, ER.; Girard, MJ.; Ang, M.; Chung, CW.; Farook, M.; Strouthidis, N.; Mehta, JS.; Foin, N.; Mari, JM.; Nijjer, S.; Sen, S.; Petraco, R.; Ghione, M.; Liu, X.; Kang, JU.; Virmani, R.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Burke, AP.; Farb, A.; Schwartz, S.M.; Yahagi, K.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Otsuka, F.; Finn, AV.; Davis, HR.; Joner, M.; Kume, T.; Akasaka, T.; Kawamoto, T.; Watanabe, N.; Toyota, E.; Neishi, Y.; Rieber, J.; Meissner, O.; Babaryka, G.; Reim, S.; Oswald, M.E.; Koenig, A.S.; Tearney, G. J.; Regar, E.; Akasaka, T.; Adriaenssens, T.; Barlis, P.; Bezerra, HG.; Yabushita, H.; Bouma, BE.; Houser, S. L.; Aretz, HT.; Jang, I-K.; Schlendorf, KH.; Guo, J.; Sun, L.; Chen, Y.D.; Tian, F.; Liu, HB.; Chen, L.; Kawasaki, M.; Bouma, BE.; Bressner, J. E.; Houser, S. L.; Nadkarni, S. K.; MacNeill, BD.; Jansen, CHP.; Onthank, DC.; Cuello, F.; Botnar, RM.; Wiethoff, AJ.; Warley, A.; von Birgelen, C.; Hartmann, A. M.; Kubo, T.; Akasaka, T.; Shite, J.; Suzuki, T.; Uemura, S.; Yu, B.; Habara, M.; Nasu, K.; Terashima, M.; Kaneda, H.; Yokota, D.; Ko, E.; Virmani, R.; Burke, AP.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Farb, A.; Takarada, S.; Imanishi, T.; Kubo, T.; Tanimoto, T.; Kitabata, H.; Nakamura, N.; Hattori, K.; Ozaki, Y.; Ismail, TF.; Okumura, M.; Naruse, H.; Kan, S.; Nishio, R.; Shinke, T.; Otake, H.; Nakagawa, M.; Nagoshi, R.; Inoue, T.; Sinclair, H.D.; Bourantas, C.; Bagnall, A.; Mintz, G.S.; Kunadian, V.; Tearney, G. J.; Yabushita, H.; Houser, S. L.; Aretz, HT.; Jang, I-K.; Schlendorf, KH.; van Soest, G.; Goderie, T.; Regar, E.; Koljenović, S.; Leenders, GL. van; Gonzalo, N.; Xu, C.; Schmitt, JM.; Carlier, SG.; Virmani, R.; van der Meer, FJ; Faber, D.J.; Sassoon, DMB.; Aalders, M.C.; Pasterkamp, G.; Leeuwen, TG. van; Schmitt, JM.; Knuttel, A.; Yadlowsky, M.; Eckhaus, MA.; Karamata, B.; Laubscher, M.; Leutenegger, M.; Bourquin, S.; Lasser, T.; Lambelet, P.; Vermeer, K.A.; Mo, J.; Weda, J.J.A.; Lemij, H.G.; Boer, JF. de

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To optimize conventional coronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) images using the attenuation-compensated technique to improve identification of plaques and the external elastic lamina (EEL) contour. METHOD The attenuation-compensated technique was optimized via manipulating contrast

  20. Simultaneous topography and recognition imaging: physical aspects and optimal imaging conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preiner, Johannes; Ebner, Andreas; Zhu Rong; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Chtcheglova, Lilia

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) allows for the investigation of receptor distributions on natural biological surfaces under physiological conditions. Based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) in combination with a cantilever tip carrying a ligand molecule, it enables us to sense topography and recognition of receptor molecules simultaneously with nanometre accuracy. In this study we introduce optimized handling conditions and investigate the physical properties of the cantilever-tip-sample ensemble, which is essential for the interpretation of the experimental data gained from this technique. In contrast to conventional AFM methods, TREC is based on a more sophisticated feedback loop, which enables us to discriminate topographical contributions from recognition events in the AFM cantilever motion. The features of this feedback loop were investigated through a detailed analysis of the topography and recognition data obtained on a model protein system. Single avidin molecules immobilized on a mica substrate were imaged with an AFM tip functionalized with a biotinylated IgG. A simple procedure for adjusting the optimal amplitude for TREC imaging is described by exploiting the sharp localization of the TREC signal within a small range of oscillation amplitudes. This procedure can also be used for proving the specificity of the detected receptor-ligand interactions. For understanding and eliminating topographical crosstalk in the recognition images we developed a simple theoretical model, which nicely explains its origin and its dependence on the excitation frequency.

  1. Optimization of SPECT calibration for quantification of images applied to dosimetry with iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Samira Marques de

    2018-01-01

    SPECT systems calibration plays an essential role in the accuracy of the quantification of images. In this work, in its first stage, an optimized SPECT calibration method was proposed for 131 I studies, considering the partial volume effect (PVE) and the position of the calibration source. In the second stage, the study aimed to investigate the impact of count density and reconstruction parameters on the determination of the calibration factor and the quantification of the image in dosimetry studies, considering the reality of clinical practice in Brazil. In the final step, the study aimed evaluating the influence of several factors in the calibration for absorbed dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulations (MC) GATE code. Calibration was performed by determining a calibration curve (sensitivity versus volume) obtained by applying different thresholds. Then, the calibration factors were determined with an exponential function adjustment. Images were performed with high and low counts densities for several source positions within the simulator. To validate the calibration method, the calibration factors were used for absolute quantification of the total reference activities. The images were reconstructed adopting two approaches of different parameters, usually used in patient images. The methodology developed for the calibration of the tomographic system was easier and faster to implement than other procedures suggested to improve the accuracy of the results. The study also revealed the influence of the location of the calibration source, demonstrating better precision in the absolute quantification considering the location of the target region during the calibration of the system. The study applied in the Brazilian thyroid protocol suggests the revision of the calibration of the SPECT system, including different positions for the reference source, besides acquisitions considering the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the images. Finally, the doses obtained with the

  2. MO-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Imaging: CT Dose Optimization Technologies I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denison, K; Smith, S

    2014-01-01

    DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Report (RDSR) generates a dose report at the conclusion of every examination. Dose Check preemptively notifies CT operators when scan parameters exceed user-defined dose thresholds. DoseWatch is an information technology application providing vendor-agnostic dose tracking and analysis for CT (and all other diagnostic x-ray modalities) SnapShot Pulse improves coronary CTA dose management. VolumeShuttle uses two acquisitions to increase coverage, decrease dose, and conserve on contrast administration. Color-Coding for Kids applies the Broselow-Luten Pediatric System to facilitate pediatric emergency care and reduce medical errors. FeatherLight achieves dose optimization through pediatric procedure-based protocols. Adventure Series scanners provide a child-friendly imaging environment promoting patient cooperation with resultant reduction in retakes and patient motion. Philips CT Dose Optimization Tools and Advanced Reconstruction Presentation Time: 11:45 ‘ 12:15 PM The first part of the talk will cover “Dose Reduction and Dose Optimization Technologies” present in Philips CT Scanners. The main Technologies to be presented include: DoseRight and tube current modulation (DoseRight, Z-DOM, 3D-DOM, DoseRight Cardiac) Special acquisition modes Beam filtration and beam shapers Eclipse collimator and ClearRay collimator NanoPanel detector DoseRight will cover automatic tube current selection that automatically adjusts the dose for the individual patient. The presentation will explore the modulation techniques currently employed in Philips CT scanners and will include the algorithmic concepts as well as illustrative examples. Modulation and current selection technologies to be covered include the Automatic Current Selection component of DoseRight, ZDOM longitudinal dose modulation, 3D-DOM (combination of longitudinal and rotational dose modulation), Cardiac Dose right (an ECG based dose modulation scheme), and the DoseRight Index (DRI) IQ

  3. MO-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Imaging: CT Dose Optimization Technologies I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denison, K; Smith, S [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Report (RDSR) generates a dose report at the conclusion of every examination. Dose Check preemptively notifies CT operators when scan parameters exceed user-defined dose thresholds. DoseWatch is an information technology application providing vendor-agnostic dose tracking and analysis for CT (and all other diagnostic x-ray modalities) SnapShot Pulse improves coronary CTA dose management. VolumeShuttle uses two acquisitions to increase coverage, decrease dose, and conserve on contrast administration. Color-Coding for Kids applies the Broselow-Luten Pediatric System to facilitate pediatric emergency care and reduce medical errors. FeatherLight achieves dose optimization through pediatric procedure-based protocols. Adventure Series scanners provide a child-friendly imaging environment promoting patient cooperation with resultant reduction in retakes and patient motion. Philips CT Dose Optimization Tools and Advanced Reconstruction Presentation Time: 11:45 ‘ 12:15 PM The first part of the talk will cover “Dose Reduction and Dose Optimization Technologies” present in Philips CT Scanners. The main Technologies to be presented include: DoseRight and tube current modulation (DoseRight, Z-DOM, 3D-DOM, DoseRight Cardiac) Special acquisition modes Beam filtration and beam shapers Eclipse collimator and ClearRay collimator NanoPanel detector DoseRight will cover automatic tube current selection that automatically adjusts the dose for the individual patient. The presentation will explore the modulation techniques currently employed in Philips CT scanners and will include the algorithmic concepts as well as illustrative examples. Modulation and current selection technologies to be covered include the Automatic Current Selection component of DoseRight, ZDOM longitudinal dose modulation, 3D-DOM (combination of longitudinal and rotational dose modulation), Cardiac Dose right (an ECG based dose modulation scheme), and the DoseRight Index (DRI) IQ

  4. Determining the Optimal Protocol for Measuring an Albuminuria Class Transition in Clinical Trials in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kröpelin, Tobias F; de Zeeuw, Dick; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Albuminuria class transition (normo- to micro- to macroalbuminuria) is used as an intermediate end point to assess renoprotective drug efficacy. However, definitions of such class transition vary between trials. To determine the most optimal protocol, we evaluated the approaches used in four...... effect increased (decreased precision) with stricter end point definitions, resulting in a loss of statistical significance. In conclusion, the optimal albuminuria transition end point for use in drug intervention trials can be determined with a single urine collection for albuminuria assessment per...... clinical trials testing the effect of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system intervention on albuminuria class transition in patients with diabetes: the BENEDICT, the DIRECT, the ALTITUDE, and the IRMA-2 Trial. The definition of albuminuria class transition used in each trial differed from the definitions...

  5. Optimization and validation of the protocol used to analyze the taste of traditional Chinese medicines using an electronic tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelin; Gao, Xiaojie; Liu, Ruixin; Wang, Junming; Wu, Zidan; Zhang, Lu; Li, Huiling; Gui, Xinjing; Kang, Bingya; Shi, Junhan

    2016-11-01

    Tools to define the active ingredients and flavors of Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) are limited by long analysis times, complex sample preparation and a lack of multiplexed analysis. The aim of the present study was to optimize and validate an electronic tongue (E-tongue) methodology to analyze the bitterness of TCMs. To test the protocol, 35 different TCM concoctions were measured using an E-tongue, and seven replicate measurements of each sample were taken to evaluate reproducibility and precision. E-tongue sensor information was identified and classified using analysis approaches including least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM), support vector machine (SVM), discriminant analysis (DA) and partial least squares (PLS). A benefit of this analytical protocol was that the analysis of a single sample took <15 min for all seven sensors. The results identified that the LS-SVM approach provided the best bitterness classification accuracy (binary classification accuracy, 100%; ternary classification accuracy, 89.66%). The E-tongue protocol developed showed good reproducibility and high precision within a 6 h measurement cycle. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of an E-tongue being applied to assay the bitterness of TCMs. This approach could be applied in the classification of the taste of TCMs, and serve important roles in other fields, including foods and beverages.

  6. Optimizing Libraries’ Content Findability Using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) With Multi-Tier Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahinta, A.; Haris, I.; Abdillah, T.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a developed application of Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) as a model for improving libraries’ digital content findability on the library web. The study applies XML text-based protocol tools in the collection of data about libraries’ visibility performance in the search results of the book. Model from the integrated Web Service Document Language (WSDL) and Universal Description, Discovery and Integration (UDDI) are applied to analyse SOAP as element within the system. The results showed that the developed application of SOAP with multi-tier architecture can help people simply access the website in the library server Gorontalo Province and support access to digital collections, subscription databases, and library catalogs in each library in Regency or City in Gorontalo Province.

  7. Introduction of an individually optimized protocol for the injection of contrast medium for coronary CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifarth, Harald; Puesken, Michael; Wienbeck, Susanne; Wessling, Johannes; Maintz, David; Heindel, Walter; Juergens, Kai-Uwe; Kalafut, John F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether individually tailored protocols for the injection of contrast medium (CM) result in higher and more homogeneous vascular attenuation throughout the coronary arteries at coronary CT angiography compared with conventional injection protocols using fixed injection parameters. Of 120 patients included in the study, 80 patients were randomized into two groups. Group 1 received 80 mL of CM at 6 mL/s. For group 2 injection parameters were individually adjusted to patient weight, the duration of CT data acquisition, and attenuation parameters following a test bolus. In the control group (group 3) the volume of CM was adjusted to the duration of CT data acquisition and injected at 5 mL/s. Attenuation was measured in the proximal, middle, and distal right coronary artery (RCA), in the proximal and middle left anterior descending artery (LAD), and in cranial and caudal sections of both ventricles. Patient parameters, scan delay, and scan duration did not differ significantly between the groups. Mean CM volume was 82.5 mL (flow rate 5.1 mL/s) in group 2 and 73.5 mL in group 3. Attenuation in both RCA and LAD was significantly higher for group 2 vs. group 3 (RCA: 414.9(±49.9)-396.1(±52.1) HU vs. 366.0(±64.3)-341.6(±72.5) HU; LAD: 398.9(±48.6)-364.6(±44.6) HU vs. 356.3(±69.5)-323.0(±67.2) HU). For group 1 vs. group 2 only attenuation in the distal RCA differed significantly: 396.1(±52.1) vs. 370.7(±70.5) HU. Individually tailored CM injection protocols yield higher attenuation, especially in the distal segments of the coronary vessels, compared with injection protocols using fixed injection parameters. (orig.)

  8. An optimized protocol for handling and processing fragile acini cultured with the hanging drop technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Celia; Elliott, Edith

    2011-12-15

    The hanging drop three-dimensional culture technique allows cultivation of functional three-dimensional mammary constructs without exogenous extracellular matrix. The fragile acini are, however, difficult to preserve during processing steps for advanced microscopic investigation. We describe adaptations to the protocol for handling of hanging drop cultures to include investigation using confocal, scanning, and electron microscopy, with minimal loss of cell culture components. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimized exosome isolation protocol for cell culture supernatant and human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Lobb

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles represent a rich source of novel biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of disease. However, there is currently limited information elucidating the most efficient methods for obtaining high yields of pure exosomes, a subset of extracellular vesicles, from cell culture supernatant and complex biological fluids such as plasma. To this end, we comprehensively characterize a variety of exosome isolation protocols for their efficiency, yield and purity of isolated exosomes. Repeated ultracentrifugation steps can reduce the quality of exosome preparations leading to lower exosome yield. We show that concentration of cell culture conditioned media using ultrafiltration devices results in increased vesicle isolation when compared to traditional ultracentrifugation protocols. However, our data on using conditioned media isolated from the Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC SK-MES-1 cell line demonstrates that the choice of concentrating device can greatly impact the yield of isolated exosomes. We find that centrifuge-based concentrating methods are more appropriate than pressure-driven concentrating devices and allow the rapid isolation of exosomes from both NSCLC cell culture conditioned media and complex biological fluids. In fact to date, no protocol detailing exosome isolation utilizing current commercial methods from both cells and patient samples has been described. Utilizing tunable resistive pulse sensing and protein analysis, we provide a comparative analysis of 4 exosome isolation techniques, indicating their efficacy and preparation purity. Our results demonstrate that current precipitation protocols for the isolation of exosomes from cell culture conditioned media and plasma provide the least pure preparations of exosomes, whereas size exclusion isolation is comparable to density gradient purification of exosomes. We have identified current shortcomings in common extracellular vesicle isolation methods and provide a

  10. Short dynamic FDG-PET imaging protocol for patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torizuka, Tatsuo; Nobezawa, Shuji; Kanno, Toshihiko; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Momiki, Shigeru; Kasamatsu, Norio; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Futatsubashi, Masami; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2000-01-01

    This positron emission tomography (PET) study was designed to compare 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) kinetic parameters of tumours derived from imaging frames of 0-60 min post FDG injection with those derived from shorter imaging frames of 0-30 min. Dynamic FDG-PET scans were performed on 20 patients with primary lung cancers for 1 h after intravenous injection of FDG. Images were reconstructed with attenuation correction using transmission images obtained with a germanium-68 ring source immediately before FDG injection. A region of interest (ROI) was placed on the plane of the maximal tumour FDG uptake. Arterial input function was estimated from an ROI defined in the left atrium. Based on the standard three-compartment metabolic model, we calculated the rate constants (K 1 -k 3 ) and influx constant K i = K 1 k 3 /(k 2 +k 3 ) using the imaging frames for 60 min and 30 min post FDG injection. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of tumour was measured using the imaging frame of 50-60 min post injection. High correlations were observed between kinetic parameters (K 1 , k 2 , k 3 and K i ) derived from imaging frames of 0-60 min and 0-30 min [0.231±0.114 vs 0.260±0.174 (r=0.958), 1.149±1.038 vs 1.565±2.027 (r=0.968), 0.259±0.154 vs 0.311±0.194 (r=0.886) and 0.044±0.022 vs 0.048±0.023 (r=0.961), respectively, P i showed an excellent agreement between the two methods (y=-0.0041+0.09831x). Mean SUV of the lung cancers was 6.58±2.85. It is concluded that the briefer 30-min acquisition may yield essentially the same results as the standard 60-min imaging protocol, thus offering a time saving in dynamic PET studies in which the model parameters are desired. (orig.)

  11. Behavioral effects of acclimatization to restraint protocol used for awake animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Michael D; Pira, Ashley S; Febo, Marcelo

    2013-07-15

    Functional MRI in awake rats involves acclimatization to restraint to minimize motion. We designed a study to examine the effects of an acclimatization protocol (5 days of restraint, 60 min per day) on the emission of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations and performance in a forced swim test (FST). Our results showed that USV calls are reduced significantly by days 3, 4 and 5 of acclimatization. Although the rats showed less climbing activity (and more immobility) in FST on day 5 compared to the 1st day of restraint acclimatization, the difference was not detected once the animals were given a 2-week hiatus. Overall, we showed that animals adapt to the restraint over a five-day period; however, restraint may introduce confounding behavioral outcomes that may hinder the interpretation of results derived from awake rat imaging. The present data warrants further testing of the effects of MRI restraint on behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimizing the use of X and VNC protocols for support of remote observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibrick, Robert I.; Allen, Steven L.; Conrad, Al; Stickel, Terry; Wirth, Gregory D.

    2004-09-01

    Remote observing is the dominant mode of operation for both Keck Telescopes and their associated instruments. Over 90% of all Keck observations are carried out remotely from the Keck Headquarters in Waimea, Hawaii (located 40 kilometers from the telescopes on the summit of Mauna Kea). In addition, an increasing number of observations are now conducted by geographically-dispersed observing teams, with some team members working from Waimea while others collaborate from Keck remote observing facilities located in California. Such facilities are now operational on the Santa Cruz and San Diego campuses of the University of California, and at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. This report describes our use of the X and VNC protocols for providing remote and shared graphical displays to distributed teams of observers and observing assistants located at multiple sites. We describe the results of tests involving both protocols, and explore the limitations and performance of each under different regimes of network bandwidth and latency. We also examine other constraints imposed by differences in the processing performance and bit depth of the various frame buffers used to generate these graphical displays. Other topics covered include the use of ssh tunnels for securely encapsulating both X and VNC protocol streams and the results of tests of ssh compression to improve performance under conditions of limited network bandwidth. We also examine trade-offs between different topologies for locating VNC servers and clients when sharing displays between multiple sites.

  13. Optimization of an Image-Guided Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization Model in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gong

    Full Text Available The mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV has been used in studies of the exudative form of age-related macular degeneration using both the conventional slit lamp and a new image-guided laser system. A standardized protocol is needed for consistent results using this model, which has been lacking. We optimized details of laser-induced CNV using the image-guided laser photocoagulation system. Four lesions with similar size were consistently applied per eye at approximately double the disc diameter away from the optic nerve, using different laser power levels, and mice of various ages and genders. After 7 days, the mice were sacrificed and retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera was flat-mounted, stained with Isolectin B4, and imaged. Quantification of the area of the laser-induced lesions was performed using an established and constant threshold. Exclusion criteria are described that were necessary for reliable data analysis of the laser-induced CNV lesions. The CNV lesion area was proportional to the laser power levels. Mice at 12-16 weeks of age developed more severe CNV than those at 6-8 weeks of age, and the gender difference was only significant in mice at 12-16 weeks of age, but not in those at 6-8 weeks of age. Dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid reduced laser-induced CNV in mice. Taken together, laser-induced CNV lesions can be easily and consistently applied using the image-guided laser platform. Mice at 6-8 weeks of age are ideal for the laser-induced CNV model.

  14. Physics-based optimization of image quality in 3D X-ray flat-panel cone-beam imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeren, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the techniques for modeling and control of 3D X-ray cardiovascular systems in terms of Image Quality and patient dose, aiming at optimizing the diagnostic quality. When aiming at maximum Image Quality (IQ), a cascaded system constituted from inter-dependent imaging components,

  15. Optimization of PET image quality by means of 3D data acquisition and iterative image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, J.; Zaers, J.; Trojan, H.; Bellemann, M.E.; Adam, L.E.; Haberkorn, U.; Brix, G.

    1998-01-01

    The experiments were performed at the latest-generation whole-body PET system ECAT EXACT HR + . For 2D data acquisition, a collimator of thin tungsten septa was positioned in the field-of-view. Prior to image reconstruction, the measured 3D data were sorted into 2D sinograms by using the Fourier rebinning (FORE) algorithm developed by M. Defrise. The standard filtered backprojection (FBP) method and an optimized ML/EM algorithm with overrelaxation for accelerated convergence were employed for image reconstruction. The spatial resolution of both methods as well as the convergence and noise properties of the ML/EM algorithm were studied in phantom measurements. Furthermore, patient data were acquired in the 2D mode as well as in the 3D mode and reconstructed with both techniques. At the same spatial resolution, the ML/EM-reconstructed images showed fewer and less prominent artefacts than the FBP-reconstructed images. The resulting improved detail conspicuously was achieved for the data acquired in the 2D mode as well as in the 3D mode. The best image quality was obtained by iterative 2D reconstruction of 3D data sets which were previously rebinned into 2D sinograms with help of the FORE algorithm. The phantom measurements revealed that 50 iteration steps with the otpimized ML/EM algorithm were sufficient to keep the relative quantitation error below 5%. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Optimization in the relation between image quality and patient dose in head CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Diaz, M.; Paz-Viera, J.E.; Carvalho Filho, A.E.; Andrade, M.E.A.; Khoury, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-two head CT scans were acquired employing an anthropomorphic phantom containing lesions in the posterior fossa, using 2 scanners: Siemens Sensation with 64 slices and Philips Brilliance with 6 slices. Parameters as tube current (mA), slice thickness (mm), collimation (mm), tube potential (kVp) and dynamic range were changed during studies, looking for the optimal acquisition/processing conditions which permit both good lesion detectability and the lowest dose. The CT air kerma index (mGy) was measured with a pencil ionization chamber. Image quality was analyzed by 5 radiologists using a 5 points-scale criteria (1=poor, 2=fair, 3=good, 4=very good, 5=excellent) and also using 5 figure of merit in the spatial and frequency domains: Contrast (C [%]), Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR), Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), Normalized Mean Square Error (NMSE) and Spectral Distance (SD). Objective and subjective results were correlated. We observed that doses could be reduced by up to 25% respect to the usual practice with both scanners, mainly reducing the mAs, without affecting lesion detection. As a result, we propose an optimized protocol for each scanner as follow: 250 mAs, 120 kVp and the collimation of 6 slices x 1.50 mm per rotation the same reconstructed slice thickness to detect the lesions in the posterior fossa with good image quality for the Philips Brilliance 6, while 150 mAs, 100 kVp, collimation of 30 x 1.2 mm and reconstructed slice thickness of 3.0 mm were needed with the Siemens Sensation 64. (author)

  17. Secured Communication for Business Process Outsourcing Using Optimized Arithmetic Cryptography Protocol Based on Virtual Parties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rohit; Joshi, Satyadhar

    Within a span of over a decade, India has become one of the most favored destinations across the world for Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) operations. India has rapidly achieved the status of being the most preferred destination for BPO for companies located in the US and Europe. Security and privacy are the two major issues needed to be addressed by the Indian software industry to have an increased and long-term outsourcing contract from the US. Another important issue is about sharing employee’s information to ensure that data and vital information of an outsourcing company is secured and protected. To ensure that the confidentiality of a client’s information is maintained, BPOs need to implement some data security measures. In this paper, we propose a new protocol for specifically for BPO Secure Multi-Party Computation (SMC). As there are many computations and surveys which involve confidential data from many parties or organizations and the concerned data is property of the organization, preservation and security of this data is of prime importance for such type of computations. Although the computation requires data from all the parties, but none of the associated parties would want to reveal their data to the other parties. We have proposed a new efficient and scalable protocol to perform computation on encrypted information. The information is encrypted in a manner that it does not affect the result of the computation. It uses modifier tokens which are distributed among virtual parties, and finally used in the computation. The computation function uses the acquired data and modifier tokens to compute right result from the encrypted data. Thus without revealing the data, right result can be computed and privacy of the parties is maintained. We have given a probabilistic security analysis of hacking the protocol and shown how zero hacking security can be achieved. Also we have analyzed the specific case of Indian BPO.

  18. Dual-source CT coronary imaging in heart transplant recipients: image quality and optimal reconstruction interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastarrika, Gorka; Arraiza, Maria; Pueyo, Jesus C.; Cecco, Carlo N. de; Ubilla, Matias; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Rabago, Gregorio

    2008-01-01

    The image quality and optimal reconstruction interval for coronary arteries in heart transplant recipients undergoing non-invasive dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) coronary angiography was evaluated. Twenty consecutive heart transplant recipients who underwent DSCT coronary angiography were included (19 male, one female; mean age 63.1±10.7 years). Data sets were reconstructed in 5% steps from 30% to 80% of the R-R interval. Two blinded independent observers assessed the image quality of each coronary segments using a five-point scale (from 0 = not evaluative to 4=excellent quality). A total of 289 coronary segments in 20 heart transplant recipients were evaluated. Mean heart rate during the scan was 89.1±10.4 bpm. At the best reconstruction interval, diagnostic image quality (score ≥2) was obtained in 93.4% of the coronary segments (270/289) with a mean image quality score of 3.04± 0.63. Systolic reconstruction intervals provided better image quality scores than diastolic reconstruction intervals (overall mean quality scores obtained with the systolic and diastolic reconstructions 3.03±1.06 and 2.73±1.11, respectively; P<0.001). Different systolic reconstruction intervals (35%, 40%, 45% of RR interval) did not yield to significant differences in image quality scores for the coronary segments (P=0.74). Reconstructions obtained at the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle allowed excellent diagnostic image quality coronary angiograms in heart transplant recipients undergoing DSCT coronary angiography. (orig.)

  19. Optimization of hybrid iterative reconstruction level and evaluation of image quality and radiation dose for pediatric cardiac computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lin; Liang, Changhong; Zhuang, Jian; Huang, Meiping; Liu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid iterative reconstruction can reduce image noise and produce better image quality compared with filtered back-projection (FBP), but few reports describe optimization of the iteration level. We optimized the iteration level of iDose"4 and evaluated image quality for pediatric cardiac CT angiography. Children (n = 160) with congenital heart disease were enrolled and divided into full-dose (n = 84) and half-dose (n = 76) groups. Four series were reconstructed using FBP, and iDose"4 levels 2, 4 and 6; we evaluated subjective quality of the series using a 5-grade scale and compared the series using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. For FBP and iDose"4-optimal images, we compared contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) using a Student's t-test. We also compared diagnostic-accuracy of each group using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. Mean scores for iDose"4 level 4 were the best in both dose groups (all P < 0.05). CNR was improved in both groups with iDose"4 level 4 as compared with FBP. Mean decrease in SSDE was 53% in the half-dose group. Diagnostic accuracy for the four datasets were in the range 92.6-96.2% (no statistical difference). iDose"4 level 4 was optimal for both the full- and half-dose groups. Protocols with iDose"4 level 4 allowed 53% reduction in SSDE without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  20. Optimization of hybrid iterative reconstruction level and evaluation of image quality and radiation dose for pediatric cardiac computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lin; Liang, Changhong [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Zhuang, Jian [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Guangdong Cardiovascular Inst., Guangdong Provincial Key Lab. of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Huang, Meiping [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Catheterization Lab, Guangdong Cardiovascular Inst., Guangdong Provincial Key Lab. of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Hui [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-01-15

    Hybrid iterative reconstruction can reduce image noise and produce better image quality compared with filtered back-projection (FBP), but few reports describe optimization of the iteration level. We optimized the iteration level of iDose{sup 4} and evaluated image quality for pediatric cardiac CT angiography. Children (n = 160) with congenital heart disease were enrolled and divided into full-dose (n = 84) and half-dose (n = 76) groups. Four series were reconstructed using FBP, and iDose{sup 4} levels 2, 4 and 6; we evaluated subjective quality of the series using a 5-grade scale and compared the series using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. For FBP and iDose{sup 4}-optimal images, we compared contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) using a Student's t-test. We also compared diagnostic-accuracy of each group using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. Mean scores for iDose{sup 4} level 4 were the best in both dose groups (all P < 0.05). CNR was improved in both groups with iDose{sup 4} level 4 as compared with FBP. Mean decrease in SSDE was 53% in the half-dose group. Diagnostic accuracy for the four datasets were in the range 92.6-96.2% (no statistical difference). iDose{sup 4} level 4 was optimal for both the full- and half-dose groups. Protocols with iDose{sup 4} level 4 allowed 53% reduction in SSDE without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  1. Optimization of the Treatment Protocol in Children with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.O. Kriuchko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the substantiation and assessment of the effectiveness of the inclusion of ursodeoxycholic acid preparation Ukrliv suspension in the treatment protocol of children with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Taking into account the results of the studies, the use of ursodeoxycholic acid drug can be recommended as a pathogenetic therapy in the combination treatment of children with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The findings suggest both the efficiency and the high level of safety and tolerability of ursodeoxycholic acid, in particular Ukrliv suspension, during long-term use to prevent recurrences.

  2. Using the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST to optimize an HIV care continuum intervention for vulnerable populations: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marya Viorst Gwadz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than half of persons living with HIV (PLWH in the United States are insufficiently engaged in HIV primary care and not taking antiretroviral therapy (ART, mainly African Americans/Blacks and Hispanics. In the proposed project, a potent and innovative research methodology, the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST, will be employed to develop a highly efficacious, efficient, scalable, and cost-effective intervention to increase engagement along the HIV care continuum. Whereas randomized controlled trials are valuable for evaluating the efficacy of multi-component interventions as a package, they are not designed to evaluate which specific components contribute to efficacy. MOST, a pioneering, engineering-inspired framework, addresses this problem through highly efficient randomized experimentation to assess the performance of individual intervention components and their interactions. We propose to use MOST to engineer an intervention to increase engagement along the HIV care continuum for African American/Black and Hispanic PLWH not well engaged in care and not taking ART. Further, the intervention will be optimized for cost-effectiveness. A similar set of multi-level factors impede both HIV care and ART initiation for African American/Black and Hispanic PLWH, primary among them individual- (e.g., substance use, distrust, fear, social- (e.g., stigma, and structural-level barriers (e.g., difficulties accessing ancillary services. Guided by a multi-level social cognitive theory, and using the motivational interviewing approach, the study will evaluate five distinct culturally based intervention components (i.e., counseling sessions, pre-adherence preparation, support groups, peer mentorship, and patient navigation, each designed to address a specific barrier to HIV care and ART initiation. These components are well-grounded in the empirical literature and were found acceptable, feasible, and promising with respect to

  3. Comparison and systematic optimization of synthetic protocols for DOTA-hydrazide generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuge, F.; Weiler, M.; Gaetjens, J.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2013-01-01

    DOTA-based organometallic complexes are extensively used in functional and molecular imaging studies, as well as in radioimmunotherapy. DOTA forms thermodynamically stable and kinetically inert complexes with various different diagnostic and therapeutic metals, such as gadolinium, gallium, yttrium

  4. SU-F-R-06: Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury Imaging, Developing a Coherent Clinical Protocol From Literature Review Through Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, D; France, E; Lambert, J; Hinkle, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Medical Physics teams can now play a critical role to help plan and provide studied approaches for traumatic brachial plexus MR imaging (tbpMRI). This is especially important for coordination with uncommon applications, since it is challenging to select the right modality, parameters, and train technologists on the essential components. For this work, we started with a review of the medical literature, performed crossover/volunteer studies to bring tbpMRI to practice with greater image QC and protocol management. Methods: To the best of our knowledge, we reviewed the known searchable domain for tbpMRI. We found 69 total articles since 2000. Articles were evaluated with our published protocol for literature management (LIMES3). Two physicists and two radiologists condensed the information from all articles into a knowledgebase. Results: The initial literature demonstrated great heterogeneity, which was a sign that this area needed greater consistency. Despite inconsistency and imprecision, we extracted the most relevant targets using our long-term experience with protocol development in MSK. We ran volunteers on six different magnets of various field strengths with multiple receiver coils, and rebuilt a coherent protocol for tbpMRI. Our radiologists rated LIMES3 work as superior. We have received referrals from the ER and have conducted four patient evaluations. Conclusion: Traumatic brachial plexus MRI has great possible benefits for patients. This work supports the complexity of tbpMRI scanning. As this is rarely performed, it requires a more diligent protocol workflow, coordination of caregivers, and education within multiple clinical departments. Choosing the correct imaging exam can be critical, as patients can have significant neuropathy and/or paralysis. The LIMES3 protocol is well liked at our institution, and forms the cornerstone of understanding for our work. Our literature management led to a better clinical protocol creation despite the diffuse

  5. SU-F-R-06: Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury Imaging, Developing a Coherent Clinical Protocol From Literature Review Through Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, D; France, E; Lambert, J; Hinkle, J [The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Medical Physics teams can now play a critical role to help plan and provide studied approaches for traumatic brachial plexus MR imaging (tbpMRI). This is especially important for coordination with uncommon applications, since it is challenging to select the right modality, parameters, and train technologists on the essential components. For this work, we started with a review of the medical literature, performed crossover/volunteer studies to bring tbpMRI to practice with greater image QC and protocol management. Methods: To the best of our knowledge, we reviewed the known searchable domain for tbpMRI. We found 69 total articles since 2000. Articles were evaluated with our published protocol for literature management (LIMES3). Two physicists and two radiologists condensed the information from all articles into a knowledgebase. Results: The initial literature demonstrated great heterogeneity, which was a sign that this area needed greater consistency. Despite inconsistency and imprecision, we extracted the most relevant targets using our long-term experience with protocol development in MSK. We ran volunteers on six different magnets of various field strengths with multiple receiver coils, and rebuilt a coherent protocol for tbpMRI. Our radiologists rated LIMES3 work as superior. We have received referrals from the ER and have conducted four patient evaluations. Conclusion: Traumatic brachial plexus MRI has great possible benefits for patients. This work supports the complexity of tbpMRI scanning. As this is rarely performed, it requires a more diligent protocol workflow, coordination of caregivers, and education within multiple clinical departments. Choosing the correct imaging exam can be critical, as patients can have significant neuropathy and/or paralysis. The LIMES3 protocol is well liked at our institution, and forms the cornerstone of understanding for our work. Our literature management led to a better clinical protocol creation despite the diffuse

  6. Protocol images for staging of gastric cancer in radiology Hospital San Vicente de Paul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarquin Salvatierra, Estibaliz

    2010-01-01

    The realization of a protocol for the evaluation of imaging in the radiology service of Hospital San Vicente de Paul in the province of Heredia is considered a useful tool that allows a clear and simple communication with the rest of the interdisciplinary team that serves patients with gastric cancer. The adequate management of this disease is important for an assessment and standardized reporting of images to facilitate preoperative planning; because the number of diagnostic studies that should be performed for the detection once obtained the histological diagnosis to establish the staging. Prior knowledge of stage according to TNM (Tumor/Nodes/Metastasis) classification is essential. The initial assessment for radiological detection of gastric cancer was performed with gastroduodenal series with double contrast medium and fluoroscopic control. The establishment of a study effects required for routine is important and avoid underdiagnosis.The new Hospital San Vicente de Paul will have the tomographic assessment and trans abdominal ultrasound (USTA) essential to assess the presence of metastasis to peritoneum and solid organs, in addition to the adenomegaly suggesting neoplastic infiltration. (author) [es

  7. Optimizing the ASC WAN: evaluating network performance tools for comparing transport protocols.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydick, Christopher L.

    2007-07-01

    The Advanced Simulation & Computing Wide Area Network (ASC WAN), which is a high delay-bandwidth network connection between US Department of Energy National Laboratories, is constantly being examined and evaluated for efficiency. One of the current transport-layer protocols which is used, TCP, was developed for traffic demands which are different from that on the ASC WAN. The Stream Control Transport Protocol (SCTP), on the other hand, has shown characteristics which make it more appealing to networks such as these. Most important, before considering a replacement for TCP on any network, a testing tool that performs well against certain criteria needs to be found. In order to try to find such a tool, two popular networking tools (Netperf v.2.4.3 & v.2.4.6 (OpenSS7 STREAMS), and Iperf v.2.0.6) were tested. These tools implement both TCP and SCTP and were evaluated using four metrics: (1) How effectively can the tool reach a throughput near the bandwidth? (2) How much of the CPU does the tool utilize during operation? (3) Is the tool freely and widely available? And, (4) Is the tool actively developed? Following the analysis of those tools, this paper goes further into explaining some recommendations and ideas for future work.

  8. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of endometrial cancer. Optimizing the imaging delay for tumour-myometrium contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Bin; Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu; Oh, Sohee; Lee, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the optimal imaging delay time of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in women with endometrial cancer. This prospective single-institution study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from the participants. Thirty-five women (mean age, 54 years; age range, 29-66 years) underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging with a temporal resolution of 25-40 seconds. The signal intensity difference ratios between the myometrium and endometrial cancer were analyzed to investigate the optimal imaging delay time using single change-point analysis. The optimal imaging delay time for appropriate tumour-myometrium contrast ranged from 31.7 to 268.1 seconds. The median optimal imaging delay time was 91.3 seconds, with an interquartile range of 46.2 to 119.5 seconds. The median signal intensity difference ratios between the myometrium and endometrial cancer were 0.03, with an interquartile range of -0.01 to 0.06, on the pre-contrast MR imaging and 0.20, with an interquartile range of 0.15 to 0.25, on the post-contrast MR imaging. An imaging delay of approximately 90 seconds after initiating contrast material injection may be optimal for obtaining appropriate tumour-myometrium contrast in women with endometrial cancer. (orig.)

  9. Optimization of hybrid imaging systems based on maximization of kurtosis of the restored point spread function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demenikov, Mads

    2011-01-01

    to optimization results based on full-reference image measures of restored images. In comparison with full-reference measures, the kurtosis measure is fast to compute and requires no images, noise distributions, or alignment of restored images, but only the signal-to-noise-ratio. © 2011 Optical Society of America.......I propose a novel, but yet simple, no-reference, objective image quality measure based on the kurtosis of the restored point spread function. Using this measure, I optimize several phase masks for extended-depth-of-field in hybrid imaging systems and obtain results that are identical...

  10. Time Reversal Reconstruction Algorithm Based on PSO Optimized SVM Interpolation for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjian Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging is an innovative imaging technique to image biomedical tissues. The time reversal reconstruction algorithm in which a numerical model of the acoustic forward problem is run backwards in time is widely used. In the paper, a time reversal reconstruction algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO optimized support vector machine (SVM interpolation method is proposed for photoacoustics imaging. Numerical results show that the reconstructed images of the proposed algorithm are more accurate than those of the nearest neighbor interpolation, linear interpolation, and cubic convolution interpolation based time reversal algorithm, which can provide higher imaging quality by using significantly fewer measurement positions or scanning times.

  11. Whole-body computed tomography in trauma patients: optimization of the patient scanning position significantly shortens examination time while maintaining diagnostic image quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickethier T

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tilman Hickethier,1,* Kamal Mammadov,1,* Bettina Baeßler,1 Thorsten Lichtenstein,1 Jochen Hinkelbein,2 Lucy Smith,3 Patrick Sven Plum,4 Seung-Hun Chon,4 David Maintz,1 De-Hua Chang1 1Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Canada; 4Department of General, Visceral and Cancer Surgery, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The study was conducted to compare examination time and artifact vulnerability of whole-body computed tomographies (wbCTs for trauma patients using conventional or optimized patient positioning. Patients and methods: Examination time was measured in 100 patients scanned with conventional protocol (Group A: arms positioned alongside the body for head and neck imaging and over the head for trunk imaging and 100 patients scanned with optimized protocol (Group B: arms flexed on a chest pillow without repositioning. Additionally, influence of two different scanning protocols on image quality in the most relevant body regions was assessed by two blinded readers. Results: Total wbCT duration was about 35% or 3:46 min shorter in B than in A. Artifacts in aorta (27 vs 6%, liver (40 vs 8% and spleen (27 vs 5% occurred significantly more often in B than in A. No incident of non-diagnostic image quality was reported, and no significant differences for lungs and spine were found. Conclusion: An optimized wbCT positioning protocol for trauma patients allows a significant reduction of examination time while still maintaining diagnostic image quality. Keywords: CT scan, polytrauma, acute care, time requirement, positioning

  12. Head CT: Image quality improvement with ASIR-V using a reduced radiation dose protocol for children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Gi [Ajou University School of Medicine, Ajou University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho-Joon; Lee, Seung-Koo; Kim, Myung-Joon [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Ji [Ajou University School of Medicine, Office of Biostatistics, Department of Humanities and Social Medicine, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To investigate the quality of images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction V (ASIR-V), using pediatric head CT protocols. A phantom was scanned at decreasing 20% mA intervals using our standard pediatric head CT protocols. Each study was then reconstructed at 10% ASIR-V intervals. After the phantom study, we reduced mA by 10% in the protocol for <3-year-old patients and applied 30% ASIR-V and by 30% in the protocol for 3- to 15-year-old patients and applied 40% ASIR-V. Increasing the percentage of ASIR-V resulted in lower noise and higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and preserved spatial resolution in the phantom study. Compared to a conventional-protocol, reduced-dose protocol with ASIR-V achieved 12.8% to 34.0% of dose reduction and showed images of lower noise (9.22 vs. 10.73, P = 0.043) and higher CNR in different levels (centrum semiovale, 2.14 vs. 1.52, P = 0.003; basal ganglia, 1.46 vs. 1.07, P = 0.001; and cerebellum, 2.18 vs. 1.33, P < 0.001). Qualitative analysis showed higher gray-white matter differentiation and sharpness and preserved overall diagnostic quality in the images with ASIR-V. Use of ASIR-V allowed a 12.8% to 34.0% dose reduction in each age group with potential to improve image quality. (orig.)

  13. Head CT: Image quality improvement with ASIR-V using a reduced radiation dose protocol for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Ho-Joon; Lee, Seung-Koo; Kim, Hyun Ji; Kim, Myung-Joon

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the quality of images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction V (ASIR-V), using pediatric head CT protocols. A phantom was scanned at decreasing 20% mA intervals using our standard pediatric head CT protocols. Each study was then reconstructed at 10% ASIR-V intervals. After the phantom study, we reduced mA by 10% in the protocol for ASIR-V and by 30% in the protocol for 3- to 15-year-old patients and applied 40% ASIR-V. Increasing the percentage of ASIR-V resulted in lower noise and higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and preserved spatial resolution in the phantom study. Compared to a conventional-protocol, reduced-dose protocol with ASIR-V achieved 12.8% to 34.0% of dose reduction and showed images of lower noise (9.22 vs. 10.73, P = 0.043) and higher CNR in different levels (centrum semiovale, 2.14 vs. 1.52, P = 0.003; basal ganglia, 1.46 vs. 1.07, P = 0.001; and cerebellum, 2.18 vs. 1.33, P ASIR-V. Use of ASIR-V allowed a 12.8% to 34.0% dose reduction in each age group with potential to improve image quality. • It is possible to reduce radiation dose and improve image quality with ASIR-V. • We improved noise and CNR and decreased radiation dose. • Sharpness improved with ASIR-V. • Total radiation dose was decreased by 12.8% to 34.0%.

  14. Head CT: Image quality improvement with ASIR-V using a reduced radiation dose protocol for children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Ho-Joon; Lee, Seung-Koo; Kim, Myung-Joon; Kim, Hyun Ji

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the quality of images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction V (ASIR-V), using pediatric head CT protocols. A phantom was scanned at decreasing 20% mA intervals using our standard pediatric head CT protocols. Each study was then reconstructed at 10% ASIR-V intervals. After the phantom study, we reduced mA by 10% in the protocol for <3-year-old patients and applied 30% ASIR-V and by 30% in the protocol for 3- to 15-year-old patients and applied 40% ASIR-V. Increasing the percentage of ASIR-V resulted in lower noise and higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and preserved spatial resolution in the phantom study. Compared to a conventional-protocol, reduced-dose protocol with ASIR-V achieved 12.8% to 34.0% of dose reduction and showed images of lower noise (9.22 vs. 10.73, P = 0.043) and higher CNR in different levels (centrum semiovale, 2.14 vs. 1.52, P = 0.003; basal ganglia, 1.46 vs. 1.07, P = 0.001; and cerebellum, 2.18 vs. 1.33, P < 0.001). Qualitative analysis showed higher gray-white matter differentiation and sharpness and preserved overall diagnostic quality in the images with ASIR-V. Use of ASIR-V allowed a 12.8% to 34.0% dose reduction in each age group with potential to improve image quality. (orig.)

  15. Interoperative fundus image and report sharing in compliance with integrating the healthcare enterprise conformance and web access todigital imaging and communication in medicinepersistent object protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Qun Wu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To address issues in interoperability between different fundus image systems, we proposed a web eye-picture archiving and communication system (PACS framework in conformance with digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM and health level 7 (HL7 protocol to realize fundus images and reports sharing and communication through internet.METHODS: Firstly, a telemedicine-based eye care work flow was established based on integrating the healthcare enterprise (IHE Eye Care technical framework. Then, a browser/server architecture eye-PACS system was established in conformance with the web access to DICOM persistent object (WADO protocol, which contains three tiers.RESULTS:In any client system installed with web browser, clinicians could log in the eye-PACS to observe fundus images and reports. Multipurpose internet mail extensions (MIME type of a structured report is saved as pdf/html with reference link to relevant fundus image using the WADO syntax could provide enough information for clinicians. Some functions provided by open-source Oviyam could be used to query, zoom, move, measure, view DICOM fundus images.CONCLUSION:Such web eye-PACS in compliance to WADO protocol could be used to store and communicate fundus images and reports, therefore is of great significance for teleophthalmology.

  16. Interoperative fundus image and report sharing in compliance with integrating the healthcare enterprise conformance and web access to digital imaging and communication in medicine persistent object protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Qun; Lv, Zheng-Min; Geng, Xing-Yun; Jiang, Kui; Tang, Le-Min; Zhou, Guo-Min; Dong, Jian-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    To address issues in interoperability between different fundus image systems, we proposed a web eye-picture archiving and communication system (PACS) framework in conformance with digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) and health level 7 (HL7) protocol to realize fundus images and reports sharing and communication through internet. Firstly, a telemedicine-based eye care work flow was established based on integrating the healthcare enterprise (IHE) Eye Care technical framework. Then, a browser/server architecture eye-PACS system was established in conformance with the web access to DICOM persistent object (WADO) protocol, which contains three tiers. In any client system installed with web browser, clinicians could log in the eye-PACS to observe fundus images and reports. Multipurpose internet mail extensions (MIME) type of a structured report is saved as pdf/html with reference link to relevant fundus image using the WADO syntax could provide enough information for clinicians. Some functions provided by open-source Oviyam could be used to query, zoom, move, measure, view DICOM fundus images. Such web eye-PACS in compliance to WADO protocol could be used to store and communicate fundus images and reports, therefore is of great significance for teleophthalmology.

  17. Biplane interventional pediatric system with cone‐beam CT: dose and image quality characterization for the default protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vañó, Eliseo; Alejo, Luis; Ubeda, Carlos; Gutiérrez‐Larraya, Federico; Garayoa, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess image quality and radiation dose of a biplane angiographic system with cone‐beam CT (CBCT) capability tuned for pediatric cardiac procedures. The results of this study can be used to explore dose reduction techniques. For pulsed fluoroscopy and cine modes, polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of various thicknesses and a Leeds TOR 18‐FG test object were employed. Various fields of view (FOV) were selected. For CBCT, the study employed head and body dose phantoms, Catphan 504, and an anthropomorphic cardiology phantom. The study also compared two 3D rotational angiography protocols. The entrance surface air kerma per frame increases by a factor of 3–12 when comparing cine and fluoroscopy frames. The biggest difference in the signal‐to‐noise ratio between fluoroscopy and cine modes occurs at FOV 32 cm because fluoroscopy is acquired at a 1440×1440 pixel matrix size and in unbinned mode, whereas cine is acquired at 720×720 pixels and in binned mode. The high‐contrast spatial resolution of cine is better than that of fluoroscopy, except for FOV 32 cm, because fluoroscopy mode with 32 cm FOV is unbinned. Acquiring CBCT series with a 16 cm head phantom using the standard dose protocol results in a threefold dose increase compared with the low‐dose protocol. Although the amount of noise present in the images acquired with the low‐dose protocol is much higher than that obtained with the standard mode, the images present better spatial resolution. A 1 mm diameter rod with 250 Hounsfield units can be distinguished in reconstructed images with an 8 mm slice width. Pediatric‐specific protocols provide lower doses while maintaining sufficient image quality. The system offers a novel 3D imaging mode. The acquisition of CBCT images results in increased doses administered to the patients, but also provides further diagnostic information contained in the volumetric images. The assessed CBCT protocols provide images that are noisy

  18. Biplane interventional pediatric system with cone-beam CT: dose and image quality characterization for the default protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredoira, Eva; Vañó, Eliseo; Alejo, Luis; Ubeda, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Larraya, Federico; Garayoa, Julia

    2016-07-08

    The aim of this study was to assess image quality and radiation dose of a biplane angiographic system with cone-beam CT (CBCT) capability tuned for pediatric cardiac procedures. The results of this study can be used to explore dose reduction techniques. For pulsed fluoroscopy and cine modes, polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of various thicknesses and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were employed. Various fields of view (FOV) were selected. For CBCT, the study employed head and body dose phantoms, Catphan 504, and an anthropomorphic cardiology phantom. The study also compared two 3D rotational angiography protocols. The entrance surface air kerma per frame increases by a factor of 3-12 when comparing cine and fluoroscopy frames. The biggest difference in the signal-to- noise ratio between fluoroscopy and cine modes occurs at FOV 32 cm because fluoroscopy is acquired at a 1440 × 1440 pixel matrix size and in unbinned mode, whereas cine is acquired at 720 × 720 pixels and in binned mode. The high-contrast spatial resolution of cine is better than that of fluoroscopy, except for FOV 32 cm, because fluoroscopy mode with 32 cm FOV is unbinned. Acquiring CBCT series with a 16 cm head phantom using the standard dose protocol results in a threefold dose increase compared with the low-dose protocol. Although the amount of noise present in the images acquired with the low-dose protocol is much higher than that obtained with the standard mode, the images present better spatial resolution. A 1 mm diameter rod with 250 Hounsfield units can be distinguished in reconstructed images with an 8 mm slice width. Pediatric-specific protocols provide lower doses while maintaining sufficient image quality. The system offers a novel 3D imaging mode. The acquisition of CBCT images results in increased doses administered to the patients, but also provides further diagnostic information contained in the volumetric images. The assessed CBCT protocols provide images that are noisy, but with

  19. Statistically optimized biotransformation protocol for continuous production of L-DOPA using Mucuna monosperma callus culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamdar, Shrirang Appasaheb; Surwase, Shripad Nagnath; Jadhav, Shekhar Bhagwan; Bapat, Vishwas Anant; Jadhav, Jyoti Prafull

    2013-01-01

    L-DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine), a modified amino acid, is an expansively used drug for the Parkinson's disease treatment. In the present study, optimization of nutritional parameters influencing L-DOPA production was attempted using the response surface methodology (RSM) from Mucuna monosperma callus. Optimization of the four factors was carried out using the Box-Behnken design. The optimized levels of factors predicted by the model include tyrosine 0.894 g l(-1), pH 4.99, ascorbic acid 31.62 mg l(-1)and copper sulphate 23.92 mg l(-1), which resulted in highest L-DOPA yield of 0.309 g l(-1). The optimization of medium using RSM resulted in a 3.45-fold increase in the yield of L-DOPA. The ANOVA analysis showed a significant R (2) value (0.9912), model F-value (112.465) and probability (0.0001), with insignificant lack of fit. Optimized medium was used in the laboratory scale column reactor for continuous production of L-DOPA. Uninterrupted flow column exhibited maximum L-DOPA production rate of 200 mg L(-1) h(-1) which is one of the highest values ever reported using plant as a biotransformation source. L-DOPA production was confirmed by HPTLC and HPLC analysis. This study demonstrates the synthesis of L- DOPA using Mucuna monosperma callus using a laboratory scale column reactor.

  20. Convex optimization problem prototyping for image reconstruction in computed tomography with the Chambolle–Pock algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2012-01-01

    The primal–dual optimization algorithm developed in Chambolle and Pock (CP) (2011 J. Math. Imag. Vis. 40 1–26) is applied to various convex optimization problems of interest in computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction. This algorithm allows for rapid prototyping of optimization problems...... for the purpose of designing iterative image reconstruction algorithms for CT. The primal–dual algorithm is briefly summarized in this paper, and its potential for prototyping is demonstrated by explicitly deriving CP algorithm instances for many optimization problems relevant to CT. An example application...

  1. The development of a population of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segars, W. P., E-mail: paul.segars@duke.edu; Norris, Hannah; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Samei, E. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Minhas, Anum; Frush, D. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I. [Center for Imaging Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: We previously developed a set of highly detailed 4D reference pediatric extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 yr with organ and tissue masses matched to ICRP Publication 89 values. In this work, we extended this reference set to a series of 64 pediatric phantoms of varying age and height and body mass percentiles representative of the public at large. The models will provide a library of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric imaging protocols. Methods: High resolution positron emission tomography-computed tomography data obtained from the Duke University database were reviewed by a practicing experienced radiologist for anatomic regularity. The CT portion of the data was then segmented with manual and semiautomatic methods to form a target model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was used to calculate the transform from the best age matching pediatric XCAT reference phantom to the patient target. The transform was used to complete the target, filling in the nonsegmented structures and defining models for the cardiac and respiratory motions. The complete phantoms, consisting of thousands of structures, were then manually inspected for anatomical accuracy. The mass for each major tissue was calculated and compared to linearly interpolated ICRP values for different ages. Results: Sixty four new pediatric phantoms were created in this manner. Each model contains the same level of detail as the original XCAT reference phantoms and also includes parameterized models for the cardiac and respiratory motions. For the phantoms that were 10 yr old and younger, we included both sets of reproductive organs. This gave them the capability to simulate both male and female anatomy. With this, the population can be expanded to 92. Wide anatomical variation was clearly seen amongst the phantom models, both in organ shape and size, even for

  2. Natural Image Enhancement Using a Biogeography Based Optimization Enhanced with Blended Migration Operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a novel and efficient algorithm for solving optimization problem in image processing applications. Image enhancement (IE is one of the complex optimization problems in image processing. The main goal of this paper is to enhance color images such that the eminence of the image is more suitable than the original image from the perceptual viewpoint of human. Traditional methods require prior knowledge of the image to be enhanced, whereas the aim of the proposed biogeography based optimization (BBO enhanced with blended migration operator (BMO algorithm is to maximize the objective function in order to enhance the image contrast by maximizing the parameters like edge intensity, edge information, and entropy. Experimental results are compared with the current state-of-the-art approaches and indicate the superiority of the proposed technique in terms of subjective and objective evaluation.

  3. Quantitative assessment of in-solution digestion efficiency identifies optimal protocols for unbiased protein analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leon, Ileana R; Schwämmle, Veit; Jensen, Ole N

    2013-01-01

    a combination of qualitative and quantitative LC-MS/MS methods and statistical data analysis. In contrast to previous studies we employed both standard qualitative as well as data-independent quantitative workflows to systematically assess trypsin digestion efficiency and bias using mitochondrial protein...... conditions (buffer, RapiGest, deoxycholate, urea), and two methods for removal of detergents prior to analysis of peptides (acid precipitation or phase separation with ethyl acetate). Our data-independent quantitative LC-MS/MS workflow quantified over 3700 distinct peptides with 96% completeness between all...... protocols and replicates, with an average 40% protein sequence coverage and an average of 11 peptides identified per protein. Systematic quantitative and statistical analysis of physicochemical parameters demonstrated that deoxycholate-assisted in-solution digestion combined with phase transfer allows...

  4. Optimized protocol for the radioiodination of hydrazone-type polymer drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedláček, Ondřej; Kučka, Jan; Hrubý, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrazone conjugates of polymers with doxorubicin represent a very promising tool for cancer chemotherapy. However, these conjugates are very difficult to radiolabel with iodine radionuclides, which possess otherwise very advantageous nuclear properties to, e.g., follow biodistribution. In this study, we developed a robust protocol for the high-yield radioiodination of hydrazone-type drug delivery systems with doxorubicin. In particular, it is crucial that the polymer radioiodination step be performed before the deprotection of the hydrazide and doxorubicin binding. - Highlights: • Hydrazone-type drug delivery systems with doxorubicin were radioiodinated. • Radioiodination was performed via polymer-bound phenolic moiety. • Radioiodination step must be performed before deprotection and drug binding

  5. Diffusion-weighted imaging as part of hybrid PET/MRI protocols for whole-body cancer staging: Does it benefit lesion detection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchbender, Christian, E-mail: christian.buchbender@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Hartung-Knemeyer, Verena, E-mail: verena.hartung@uk-essen.de [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Beiderwellen, Karsten, E-mail: karsten.beiderwellen@uk-essen.de [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.heusch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Kühl, Hilmar, E-mail: hilmar.kuehl@uni-due.de [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Lauenstein, Thomas C., E-mail: thomas.lauenstein@uk-essen.de [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Forsting, Michael, E-mail: michael.forsting@uk-essen.de [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Antoch, Gerald, E-mail: antoch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Heusner, Till A., E-mail: heusner@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) requires efficient scan protocols for whole-body cancer staging. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the application of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) results in a diagnostic benefit for lesion detection in oncologic patients if added to a whole-body [18F]-fluorodesoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG) PET/MRI protocol. Methods: 25 consecutive oncologic patients (16 men, 9 women; age 57 ± 12 years) prospectively underwent whole-body [18F]-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner. A team of two readers assessed [18F]-FDG PET/MRI without DWI for primary tumors and metastases. In a second session, now considering DWI, readers reassessed [18F]-FDG PET/MRI accordingly. Additionally, the lesion-to-background contrast on [18F]-FDG PET and DWI was rated qualitatively (0, invisible; 1, low; 2, intermediate; 3, high). Wilcoxon's signed-rank test was performed to test for differences in the lesion-to-background contrast. Results: 49 lesions were detected in 16 patients (5 primaries, 44 metastases). All 49 lesions were concordantly detected by [18F]-FDG PET/MRI alone and [18F]-FDG PET/MRI with DWI. The lesion-to-background contrast on DWI compared to [18F]-FDG PET was rated lower in 22 (44.9%) of 49 detected lesions resulting in a significantly higher lesion-to-background contrast on [18F]-FDG PET compared to DWI (P = 0.001). Conclusions: DWI as part of whole-body [18F]-FDG PET/MRI does not benefit lesion detection. Given the necessity to optimize imaging protocols with regard to patient comfort and efficacy, DWI has to be questioned as a standard tool for whole-body staging in oncologic PET/MRI.

  6. Q-ball imaging models: comparison between high and low angular resolution diffusion-weighted MRI protocols for investigation of brain white matter integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caiazzo, Giuseppina; Trojsi, Francesca; Cirillo, Mario; Tedeschi, Gioacchino [MRI Research Center SUN-FISM-Neurological Institute for Diagnosis and Care ' ' Hermitage Capodimonte' ' , Naples (Italy); Second University of Naples, Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Aging Sciences, Naples (Italy); Esposito, Fabrizio [University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Baronissi (Salerno) (Italy); Maastricht University, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is one of the typical data models for quantifying white matter (WM) anisotropy in diffusion-weighted MRI (DwMRI) studies. Brain and spinal investigation by high angular resolution DwMRI (high angular resolution imaging (HARDI)) protocols exhibits higher angular resolution in diffusion imaging compared to low angular resolution models, although with longer acquisition times. We aimed to assess the difference between QBI-derived anisotropy values from high and low angular resolution DwMRI protocols and their potential advantages or shortcomings in neuroradiology. Brain DwMRI data sets were acquired in seven healthy volunteers using both HARDI (b = 3000 s/mm{sup 2}, 54 gradient directions) and low angular resolution (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}, 32 gradient directions) acquisition schemes. For both sequences, tract of interest tractography and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA) measures were extracted by using QBI model and were compared between the two data sets. QBI tractography and voxel-wise analyses showed that some WM tracts, such as corpus callosum, inferior longitudinal, and uncinate fasciculi, were reconstructed as one-dominant-direction fiber bundles with both acquisition schemes. In these WM tracts, mean percent different difference in GFA between the two data sets was less than 5 %. Contrariwise, multidirectional fiber bundles, such as corticospinal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculus, were more accurately depicted by HARDI acquisition scheme. Our results suggest that the design of optimal DwMRI acquisition protocols for clinical investigation of WM anisotropy by QBI models should consider the specific brain target regions to be explored, inducing researchers to a trade-off choice between angular resolution and acquisition time. (orig.)

  7. Optimizing diffusion of an online computer tailored lifestyle program: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Daniela N

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the Internet is a promising medium to offer lifestyle interventions to large amounts of people at relatively low costs and effort, actual exposure rates of these interventions fail to meet the high expectations. Since public health impact of interventions is determined by intervention efficacy and level of exposure to the intervention, it is imperative to put effort in optimal dissemination. The present project attempts to optimize the dissemination process of a new online computer tailored generic lifestyle program by carefully studying the adoption process and developing a strategy to achieve sustained use of the program. Methods/Design A prospective study will be conducted to yield relevant information concerning the adoption process by studying the level of adoption of the program, determinants involved in adoption and characteristics of adopters and non-adopters as well as satisfied and unsatisfied users. Furthermore, a randomized control trial will be conducted to the test the effectiveness of a proactive strategy using periodic e-mail prompts in optimizing sustained use of the new program. Discussion Closely mapping the adoption process will gain insight in characteristics of adopters and non-adopters and satisfied and unsatisfied users. This insight can be used to further optimize the program by making it more suitable for a wider range of users, or to develop adjusted interventions to attract subgroups of users that are not reached or satisfied with the initial intervention. Furthermore, by studying the effect of a proactive strategy using period prompts compared to a reactive strategy to stimulate sustained use of the intervention and, possibly, behaviour change, specific recommendations on the use and the application of prompts in online lifestyle interventions can be developed. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR1786 and Medical Ethics Committee of Maastricht University and the University Hospital

  8. Protocol and quality assurance for carotid imaging in 100,000 participants of UK Biobank: development and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Sean; Lewandowski, Adam J; Garratt, Steve; Meijer, Rudy; Lynum, Steven; Bedi, Ram; Paterson, James; Yaqub, Mohammad; Noble, J Alison; Neubauer, Stefan; Petersen, Steffen E; Allen, Naomi; Sudlow, Cathie; Collins, Rory; Matthews, Paul M; Leeson, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Background Ultrasound imaging is able to quantify carotid arterial wall structure for the assessment of cerebral and cardiovascular disease risks. We describe a protocol and quality assurance process to enable carotid imaging at large scale that has been developed for the UK Biobank Imaging Enhancement Study of 100,000 individuals. Design An imaging protocol was developed to allow measurement of carotid intima-media thickness from the far wall of both common carotid arteries. Six quality assurance criteria were defined and a web-based interface (Intelligent Ultrasound) was developed to facilitate rapid assessment of images against each criterion. Results and conclusions Excellent inter and intra-observer agreements were obtained for image quality evaluations on a test dataset from 100 individuals. The image quality criteria then were applied in the UK Biobank Imaging Enhancement Study. Data from 2560 participants were evaluated. Feedback of results to the imaging team led to improvement in quality assurance, with quality assurance failures falling from 16.2% in the first two-month period examined to 6.4% in the last. Eighty per cent had all carotid intima-media thickness images graded as of acceptable quality, with at least one image acceptable for 98% of participants. Carotid intima-media thickness measures showed expected associations with increasing age and gender. Carotid imaging can be performed consistently, with semi-automated quality assurance of all scans, in a limited timeframe within a large scale multimodality imaging assessment. Routine feedback of quality control metrics to operators can improve the quality of the data collection.

  9. Latency-Optimized and Energy-Efficient MAC Protocol for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: A Cross-Layer Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xiuzhen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the energy constraint for fixed sensor nodes and the unacceptable long propagation delay, especially for latency sensitive applications of underwater acoustic sensor networks, we propose a MAC protocol that is latency-optimized and energy-efficient scheme and combines the physical layer and the MAC layer to shorten transmission delay. On physical layer, we apply convolution coding and interleaver for transmitted information. Moreover, dynamic code rate is exploited at the receiver side to accelerate data reception rate. On MAC layer, unfixed frame length scheme is applied to reduce transmission delay, and to ensure the data successful transmission rate at the same time. Furthermore, we propose a network topology: an underwater acoustic sensor network with mobile agent. Through fully utilizing the supper capabilities on computation and mobility of autonomous underwater vehicles, the energy consumption for fixed sensor nodes can be extremely reduced, so that the lifetime of networks is extended.

  10. Optimization of a protocol for direct organogenesis of red clover (Trifolium pratense L. meristems for breeding purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN C CARRILLO

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of experiments were carried out in order to optimize a protocol for the direct organogenesis of Chilean red clover germplasm. A range of cultivars were used to analyze the effect of explant source (crown or stem meristems of vegetative plants, culture media and plant growth regulators. Our findings showed that stem meristems were easier to obtain, presented lower levels of contamination and a better development than crown meristems. The L2 medium showed better results than B5 and MS media for the cultivars and experimental lines studied. L2 medium supplemented with 0.003 mg/l of 4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropicolinic acid and 1.0 mg/l of 6-benzylaminopurine gave consistently better results and will be applied in our breeding program to propagate, maintain and eliminate viruses from elite red clover clones.

  11. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virador, Patrick R.G.

    2000-01-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  12. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virador, Patrick R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  13. Stochastic Optimized Relevance Feedback Particle Swarm Optimization for Content Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges for the CBIR is to bridge the gap between low level features and high level semantics according to the need of the user. To overcome this gap, relevance feedback (RF coupled with support vector machine (SVM has been applied successfully. However, when the feedback sample is small, the performance of the SVM based RF is often poor. To improve the performance of RF, this paper has proposed a new technique, namely, PSO-SVM-RF, which combines SVM based RF with particle swarm optimization (PSO. The aims of this proposed technique are to enhance the performance of SVM based RF and also to minimize the user interaction with the system by minimizing the RF number. The PSO-SVM-RF was tested on the coral photo gallery containing 10908 images. The results obtained from the experiments showed that the proposed PSO-SVM-RF achieved 100% accuracy in 8 feedback iterations for top 10 retrievals and 80% accuracy in 6 iterations for 100 top retrievals. This implies that with PSO-SVM-RF technique high accuracy rate is achieved at a small number of iterations.

  14. Standardized cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR protocols, society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance: board of trustees task force on standardized protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Raymond J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Index 1. General techniques 1.1. Stress and safety equipment 1.2. Left ventricular (LV structure and function module 1.3. Right ventricular (RV structure and function module 1.4. Gadolinium dosing module. 1.5. First pass perfusion 1.6. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE 2. Disease specific protocols 2.1. Ischemic heart disease 2.1.1. Acute myocardial infarction (MI 2.1.2. Chronic ischemic heart disease and viability 2.1.3. Dobutamine stress 2.1.4. Adenosine stress perfusion 2.2. Angiography: 2.2.1. Peripheral magnetic resonance angiography (MRA 2.2.2. Thoracic MRA 2.2.3. Anomalous coronary arteries 2.2.4. Pulmonary vein evaluation 2.3. Other 2.3.1. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathy 2.3.2. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC 2.3.3. Congenital heart disease 2.3.4. Valvular heart disease 2.3.5. Pericardial disease 2.3.6. Masses

  15. Patient dosimetry workshop - Scanner in clinical practice: how to optimize one's protocols (acquisition, interpretation, dosimetry)? - Radiation protection in medical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valero, M.; Pilleul, F.; Favre, F.; Tack, D.; Etard, C.; Aubert, B.; Roch, P.; Sinno-Tellier, S.; Gevenois, P.A.; Marelle, P.; Noel, A.; Coquel, P.; Museux, E.; Lair, F.; Francois, A.; Lemaire, P.; Delgoffe, C.; Puech, J.L.; Haller Montejo, M.; Rousselle, I.; Noel, A.; Pierrat, N.; Lasalle, S.; Brisse, H.; Guerson, T.; Mertz, L.; Mertz, M.; Wasylczenko, T.; Bietry, J.; Notter, S.; Jahnen, A.; Back, C.; Kohler, S.; Harpes, N.

    2010-01-01

    A selection of eleven brief communications given at the 2010 French days of radiology are compiled here and deal with: 1 - patient's dosimetry in classical radiology (Valero, M.); 2 - Oncology: how to optimize monitoring (dosimetry, new response criteria)? (Pilleul, F.; Favre, F.); 3 - Thorax: how to optimize lecture (MPR - Multi-Planar Reformat, MIP - Maximum Intensity Projection, MinIP - minimum intensity projection) and dosimetry? (Braine-L'Alleud); 4 - Medical exposure of the French population to diagnostic techniques in 2007 (Etard, C.; Aubert, B.; Sinno-Tellier, S.); 5 - Doses delivered to patients in radio-diagnostics: status of a national inquiry in the public sector (Etard, C.; Sinno-Tellier, S.; Aubert, B.); 6 - External help for the dose per section optimization in tomodensitometry (Tack, D.; Jahnen, A.; Back, C.; Kohler, S.; Harpes, N.; Gevenois, P.A.); 7 - Diagnostic reference levels (DRL) in radiology and scanography: status and evolution (Roch, P.; Aubert, B.); 8 - What conclusions can be drawn from the analysis of the DRLs in conventional radiology addressed to the CEPPIM (College for the evaluation of professional practices in medical imaging) (Marelle, P.; Coquel, P.; Museux, E.; Lair, F.; Francois, A.; Lemaire, P.; Delgoffe, C.; Puech, J.L.; Haller Montejo, M.); 9 - DRL analysis in scanography, an optimization tool? (Rousselle, I.; Noel, A.); 10 - Iterative reconstruction in scanography: potential dosimetric benefit and impact on image quality (Pierrat, N.; Lasalle, S.; Guerson, T.; Brisse, H.); 11 - Development of a patient's dose optimisation aided system in medical imaging (Mertz, L.; Mertz, M.; Wasylczenko, T.; Bietry, J.; Notter, S.)

  16. Relationships of clinical protocols and reconstruction kernels with image quality and radiation dose in a 128-slice CT scanner: Study with an anthropomorphic and water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Krauss, B.; Banckwitz, R.; Maentele, W.; Bauer, R.W.; Vogl, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Research highlights: ► Clinical protocol, reconstruction kernel, reconstructed slice thickness, phantom diameter or the density of material it contains directly affects the image quality of DSCT. ► Dual energy protocol shows the lowest DLP compared to all other protocols examined. ► Dual-energy fused images show excellent image quality and the noise is same as that of single- or high-pitch mode protocol images. ► Advanced CT technology improves image quality and considerably reduce radiation dose. ► An important finding is the comparatively higher DLP of the dual-source high-pitch protocol compared to other single- or dual-energy protocols. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of scanning parameters (clinical protocols), reconstruction kernels and slice thickness with image quality and radiation dose in a DSCT. Materials and methods: The chest of an anthropomorphic phantom was scanned on a DSCT scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition flash) using different clinical protocols, including single- and dual-energy modes. Four scan protocols were investigated: 1) single-source 120 kV, 110 mA s, 2) single-source 100 kV, 180 mA s, 3) high-pitch 120 kV, 130 mA s and 4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140 kV, eff.mA s 89, 76. The automatic exposure control was switched off for all the scans and the CTDIvol selected was in between 7.12 and 7.37 mGy. The raw data were reconstructed using the reconstruction kernels B31f, B80f and B70f, and slice thicknesses were 1.0 mm and 5.0 mm. Finally, the same parameters and procedures were used for the scanning of water phantom. Friedman test and Wilcoxon-Matched-Pair test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The DLP based on the given CTDIvol values showed significantly lower exposure for protocol 4, when compared to protocol 1 (percent difference 5.18%), protocol 2 (percent diff. 4.51%), and protocol 3 (percent diff. 8.81%). The highest change in Hounsfield Units was observed with dual

  17. Making MR Imaging Child's Play - Pediatric Neuroimaging Protocol, Guidelines and Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschle, Nora M.; Lee, Michelle; Buechler, Roman; Christodoulou, Joanna A.; Chang, Maria; Vakil, Monica; Stering, Patrice L.; Gaab, Nadine

    2009-01-01

    's compliance during MR imaging sessions 19,20. In the current video report, we present a pediatric neuroimaging protocol with guidelines and procedures that have proven to be successful to date in young children. PMID:19684560

  18. Optimization of the scan protocol in the measurements of coronary artery calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, L.C.G.; Lopes, R.T. [Coordenacao do Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia (LIN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Gottlieb, I.; Carvalho, F.M. de [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Kodlulovich, S., E-mail: simone@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mecca, F.A. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the tube current applied for studies of calcium score. The research was carried out in a private clinic of Rio de Janeiro, using a 64-slice MDCT scanner and an anthropomorphic cardiac CT phantom. In all images, the Agatston score, the volume and mass of the calcifications, and the noise for each current tube was determined. The average CT attenuation number obtained for all tube currents was 261.6 {+-} 3.2 HU for the CaHA density insert and -0.2 HU {+-} 2.0 for the water insert. The images obtained at lower tube currents were noisier and grainier than those obtained at higher tube currents. However no significant differences were found in the calcium measurements, which suggest a high potential of patient dose reduction, around 50%, without compromising diagnostic information. (author)

  19. An Image Filter Based on Shearlet Transformation and Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital image is always polluted by noise and made data postprocessing difficult. To remove noise and preserve detail of image as much as possible, this paper proposed image filter algorithm which combined the merits of Shearlet transformation and particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. Firstly, we use classical Shearlet transform to decompose noised image into many subwavelets under multiscale and multiorientation. Secondly, we gave weighted factor to those subwavelets obtained. Then, using classical Shearlet inverse transform, we obtained a composite image which is composed of those weighted subwavelets. After that, we designed fast and rough evaluation method to evaluate noise level of the new image; by using this method as fitness, we adopted PSO to find the optimal weighted factor we added; after lots of iterations, by the optimal factors and Shearlet inverse transform, we got the best denoised image. Experimental results have shown that proposed algorithm eliminates noise effectively and yields good peak signal noise ratio (PSNR.

  20. Comparative assessment of various lipid extraction protocols and optimization of transesterification process for microalgal biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Shovon; Patnaik, Reeza; Singh, Amit Kumar; Mallick, Nirupama

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel, using microalgae as feedstocks, is being explored as the most potent form of alternative diesel fuel for sustainable economic development. A comparative assessment of various protocols for microalgal lipid extraction was carried out using five green algae, six blue-green algae and two diatom species treated with different single and binary solvents both at room temperature and using a soxhlet. Lipid recovery was maximum with chloroform-methanol in the soxhlet extractor. Pretreatments ofbiomass, such as sonication, homogenization, bead-beating, lyophilization, autoclaving, microwave treatment and osmotic shock did not register any significant rise in lipid recovery. As lipid recovery using chloroform-methanol at room temperature demonstrated a marginally lower value than that obtained under the soxhlet extractor, on economical point of view, the former is recommended for microalgal total lipid extraction. Transesterification process enhances the quality of biodiesel. Experiments were designed to determine the effects of catalyst type and quantity, methanol to oil ratio, reaction temperature and time on the transesterification process using response surface methodology. Fatty acid methyl ester yield reached up to 91% with methanol:HCl:oil molar ratio of 82:4:1 at 65 degrees C for 6.4h reaction time. The biodiesel yield relative to the weight of the oil was found to be 69%.

  1. Optimized IMAC-IMAC protocol for phosphopeptide recovery from complex biological samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Xumin; Young, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    using Fe(III)-NTA IMAC resin and it proved to be highly selective in the phosphopeptide enrichment of a highly diluted standard sample (1:1000) prior to MALDI MS analysis. We also observed that a higher iron purity led to an increased IMAC enrichment efficiency. The optimized method was then adapted...... to phosphoproteome analyses of cell lysates of high protein complexity. From either 20 microg of mouse sample or 50 microg of Drosophila melanogaster sample, more than 1000 phosphorylation sites were identified in each study using IMAC-IMAC and LC-MS/MS. We demonstrate efficient separation of multiply phosphorylated...... characterization of phosphoproteins in functional phosphoproteomics research projects....

  2. Optimized fabrication protocols of microfluidic devices for X-ray analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Catalano, Rossella

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidics combined with X-ray scattering techniques allows probing conformational changes or assembly processes of biological materials. Our aim was to develop a highly X-ray transparent microfluidic cell for detecting small variations of X-ray scattering involved in such processes. We describe the fabrication of a polyimide microfluidic device based on a simple, reliable and inexpensive lamination process. The implemented microstructured features result in windows with optimized X-ray transmission. The microfluidic device was characterized by X-ray microbeam scattering at the ID13 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of an optimization protocol for radiographic techniques in computerized radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrantes, Marcos Eugenio Silva

    2015-01-01

    This work is designed to produce information for the improvement of image quality to deployment in a radiology department based on previous reviews of the images by questionnaires of acceptance and quality e recognition of the parameters used in chest radiographic techniques. The data collected were divided by male, female, PA and LAT thickness, body mass index, biotypes, anthropomorphic parameters and body evaluation associated with constant voltage and the additional filtration. The results show the predominance of 35 and 40 constants with additional filtration from 0.5 to 1.5 mmAl, voltage in male: (PA and LAT) 86-92 kV and 96-112 kV, female: 85-98 kV and 96-112 kV. The charge applied to the tube for males: (PA and LAT) 5-10 mA.s and 5-16 mA.s, female: (PA and LAT) 6.3-8 mA.s and 9-14 mA.s. Absorbed doses for males: (PA and PF) 0.04-0.17 mGy and 0.03-0.19 mGy and from female (PA and PF) from 0.03-0.22 mGy and 0, 04-0.17 mGy. This procedure can be used in radiology department to implement and acceptance in the quality of images. (author)

  4. Applying GA for Optimizing the User Query in Image and Video Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    In an information retrieval system, the query can be made by user sketch. The new method presented here, optimizes the user sketch and applies the optimized query to retrieval the information. This optimization may be used in Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) and Content-Based Video Retrieval (CBVR) which is based on trajectory extraction. To optimize the retrieval process, one stage of retrieval is performed by the user sketch. The retrieval criterion is based on the proposed distance met...

  5. Digital radiography: optimization of image quality and dose using multi-frequency software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precht, H; Gerke, O; Rosendahl, K; Tingberg, A; Waaler, D

    2012-09-01

    New developments in processing of digital radiographs (DR), including multi-frequency processing (MFP), allow optimization of image quality and radiation dose. This is particularly promising in children as they are believed to be more sensitive to ionizing radiation than adults. To examine whether the use of MFP software reduces the radiation dose without compromising quality at DR of the femur in 5-year-old-equivalent anthropomorphic and technical phantoms. A total of 110 images of an anthropomorphic phantom were imaged on a DR system (Canon DR with CXDI-50 C detector and MLT[S] software) and analyzed by three pediatric radiologists using Visual Grading Analysis. In addition, 3,500 images taken of a technical contrast-detail phantom (CDRAD 2.0) provide an objective image-quality assessment. Optimal image-quality was maintained at a dose reduction of 61% with MLT(S) optimized images. Even for images of diagnostic quality, MLT(S) provided a dose reduction of 88% as compared to the reference image. Software impact on image quality was found significant for dose (mAs), dynamic range dark region and frequency band. By optimizing image processing parameters, a significant dose reduction is possible without significant loss of image quality.

  6. Operational Analysis of Time-Optimal Maneuvering for Imaging Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Figure 1.  In-Track Stereo Satellite Image Collection. From [7] ............................ 3  Figure 2.  NASA MODIS Terra Satellite Image of Oil...satellites for remote sensing ranges from military applications to tracking global weather patterns, tectonic activity, surface vegetation , ocean...imagery [22]. Figure 2 shows an example of a satellite image captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra

  7. Practical protocols for fast histopathology by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Frances N.; Reddy, Rohith K.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2008-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging technique that combines the molecular selectivity of spectroscopy with the spatial specificity of optical microscopy. We demonstrate a new concept in obtaining high fidelity data using commercial array detectors coupled to a microscope and Michelson interferometer. Next, we apply the developed technique to rapidly provide automated histopathologic information for breast cancer. Traditionally, disease diagnoses are based on optical examinations of stained tissue and involve a skilled recognition of morphological patterns of specific cell types (histopathology). Consequently, histopathologic determinations are a time consuming, subjective process with innate intra- and inter-operator variability. Utilizing endogenous molecular contrast inherent in vibrational spectra, specially designed tissue microarrays and pattern recognition of specific biochemical features, we report an integrated algorithm for automated classifications. The developed protocol is objective, statistically significant and, being compatible with current tissue processing procedures, holds potential for routine clinical diagnoses. We first demonstrate that the classification of tissue type (histology) can be accomplished in a manner that is robust and rigorous. Since data quality and classifier performance are linked, we quantify the relationship through our analysis model. Last, we demonstrate the application of the minimum noise fraction (MNF) transform to improve tissue segmentation.

  8. Medially Directed TRUS Biopsy of the Prostate: Clinical Utility and Optimal Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether medially directed transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy is necessary for detection of prostate cancer and for establishment of an optimal biopsy regimen that is equivalent to a systematic 12 core biopsy. A total of 302 patients underwent a TRUS-guided systematic 12 core biopsy consisting of both medial sextant biopsy obtained between the parasagittal line and midline and lateral sextant biopsy obtained between the parasagittal line and lateral border. We obtained cancer detection rates of various biopsy regimens that were produced from a systematic 12 core biopsy. Using a systematic 12 core biopsy, cancer was detected in 116 (38.4%) of 302 patients. No significant difference was observed between cancer detection rates of medial sextant biopsy and lateral sextant biopsy (33.8% versus 31.5%, p >.05). Biopsy regimens that were equivalent to the systematic 12 core regarding cancer detection rate included medially directed cores that were obtained from both medial portions of the apex. Both medially directed biopsy and laterally directed biopsy are necessary for detection of prostate cancer and for establishment of an optimal biopsy regimen.

  9. Feasibility of ASL spinal bone marrow perfusion imaging with optimized inversion time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Dong; Zha, Yunfei; Yan, Liyong; Wang, Kejun; Gong, Wei; Lin, Hui

    2015-11-01

    To assess the correlation between flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in the measurement of spinal bone marrow (SBM) perfusion; in addition, to assess for an optimized inversion time (TI) as well as the reproducibility of SBM FAIR perfusion. The optimized TI of a FAIR SBM perfusion experiment was carried out on 14 volunteers; two adjacent vertebral bodies were selected from each volunteer to measure the change of signal intensity (ΔM) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of FAIR perfusion MRI with five different TIs. Then, reproducibility of FAIR data from 10 volunteers was assessed by the reposition SBM FAIR experiments. Finally, FAIR and DCE-MRI were performed on 27 subjects. The correlation between the blood flow on FAIR (BFASL ) and perfusion-related parameters on DCE-MRI was evaluated. The maximum value of ΔM and SNR were 36.39 ± 12.53 and 2.38 ± 0.97, respectively; both were obtained when TI was near 1200 msec. There were no significant difference between the two successive measurements of SBM BFASL perfusion (P = 0.879), and the within-subject coefficients of variation (wCV) of the measurements was 3.28%. The BFASL showed a close correlation with K(trans) (P FAIR perfusion scan protocol has good reproducibility, and as blood flow measurement on FAIR is reliable and closely related with the parameters on DCE-MRI, FAIR is feasible for measuring SBM blood flow. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Optimal energy window setting depending on the energy resolution for radionuclides used in gamma camera imaging. Planar imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Akihiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Arao, Yuichi; Kawasaki, Masaaki; Takaki, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether the optimal energy window (EW) setting depending on an energy resolution of a gamma camera, which we previously proposed, is valid on planar scintigraphic imaging using Tl-201, Ga-67, Tc-99m, and I-123. Image acquisitions for line sources and paper sheet phantoms containing each radionuclide were performed in air and with scattering materials. For the six photopeaks excluding the Hg-201 characteristic x-rays' one, the conventional 20%-width energy window (EW20%) setting and the optimal energy window (optimal EW) setting (15%-width below 100 keV and 13%-width above 100 keV) were compared. For the Hg-201 characteristic x-rays' photopeak, the conventional on-peak EW20% setting was compared with the off-peak EW setting (73 keV-25%) and the wider off-peak EW setting (77 keV-29%). Image-count ratio (defined as the ratio of the image counts obtained with an EW and the total image counts obtained with the EW covered the whole photopeak for a line source in air), image quality, spatial resolutions (full width half maximum (FWHM) and full width tenth maximum (FWTM) values), count-profile curves, and defect-contrast values were compared between the conventional EW setting and the optimal EW setting. Except for the Hg-201 characteristic x-rays, the image-count ratios were 94-99% for the EW20% setting, but 78-89% for the optimal EW setting. However, the optimal EW setting reduced scatter fraction (defined as the scattered-to-primary counts ratio) effectively, as compared with the EW20% setting. Consequently, all the images with the optimal EW setting gave better image quality than ones with the EW20% setting. For the Hg-201 characteristic x-rays, the off-peak EW setting showed great improvement in image quality in comparison with the EW20% setting and the wider off-peak EW setting gave the best results. In conclusion, from our planar imaging study it was shown that although the optimal EW setting proposed by us gives less image-count ratio by

  11. A PET/MRI study towards finding the optimal ["1"8F]Fluciclovine PET protocol for detection and characterisation of primary prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elschot, Mattijs; Sandsmark, Elise; Tessem, May-Britt; Selnaes, Kirsten M.; Bathen, Tone F.; Krueger-Stokke, Brage; Stoerkersen, Oeystein; Moestue, Siver A.; Bertilsson, Helena

    2017-01-01

    ["1"8F]Fluciclovine PET imaging shows promise for the assessment of prostate cancer. The purpose of this PET/MRI study is to optimise the PET imaging protocol for detection and characterisation of primary prostate cancer, by quantitative evaluation of the dynamic uptake of ["1"8F]Fluciclovine in cancerous and benign tissue. Patients diagnosed with high-risk primary prostate cancer underwent an integrated ["1"8F]Fluciclovine PET/MRI exam before robot-assisted radical prostatectomy with extended pelvic lymph node dissection. Volumes-of-interest (VOIs) of selected organs (prostate, bladder, blood pool) and sub-glandular prostate structures (tumour, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), inflammation, healthy tissue) were delineated on T2-weighted MR images, using whole-mount histology samples as a reference. Three candidate windows for optimal PET imaging were identified based on the dynamic curves of the mean and maximum standardised uptake value (SUV_m_e_a_n and SUV_m_a_x, respectively). The statistical significance of differences in SUV between VOIs were analysed using Wilcoxon rank sum tests (p<0.05, adjusted for multiple testing). Twenty-eight (28) patients [median (range) age: 66 (55-72) years] were included. An early (W1: 5-10 minutes post-injection) and two late candidate windows (W2: 18-23; W3: 33-38 minutes post-injection) were selected. Late compared with early imaging was better able to distinguish between malignant and benign tissue [W3, SUV_m_e_a_n: tumour vs. BPH 2.5 vs. 2.0 (p<0.001), tumour vs. inflammation 2.5 vs. 1.7 (p<0.001), tumour vs. healthy tissue 2.5 vs. 2.0 (p<0.001); W1, SUV_m_e_a_n: tumour vs. BPH 3.1 vs. 3.1 (p=0.771), tumour vs inflammation 3.1 vs. 2.2 (p=0.021), tumour vs. healthy tissue 3.1 vs. 2.5 (p<0.001)] as well as between high-grade and low/intermediate-grade tumours (W3, SUV_m_e_a_n: 2.6 vs. 2.1 (p=0.040); W1, SUV_m_e_a_n: 3.1 vs. 2.8 (p=0.173)). These differences were relevant to the peripheral zone, but not the central gland

  12. A PET/MRI study towards finding the optimal [{sup 18}F]Fluciclovine PET protocol for detection and characterisation of primary prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elschot, Mattijs; Sandsmark, Elise; Tessem, May-Britt [NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Deparment of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Selnaes, Kirsten M.; Bathen, Tone F. [NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Deparment of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Trondheim University Hospital, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Krueger-Stokke, Brage [NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Deparment of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Trondheim University Hospital, Department of Radiology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Stoerkersen, Oeystein [Trondheim University Hospital, Department of Pathology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Moestue, Siver A. [NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Deparment of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children' s and Women' s Health, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Bertilsson, Helena [Trondheim University Hospital, Department of Urology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim (Norway)

    2017-04-15

    [{sup 18}F]Fluciclovine PET imaging shows promise for the assessment of prostate cancer. The purpose of this PET/MRI study is to optimise the PET imaging protocol for detection and characterisation of primary prostate cancer, by quantitative evaluation of the dynamic uptake of [{sup 18}F]Fluciclovine in cancerous and benign tissue. Patients diagnosed with high-risk primary prostate cancer underwent an integrated [{sup 18}F]Fluciclovine PET/MRI exam before robot-assisted radical prostatectomy with extended pelvic lymph node dissection. Volumes-of-interest (VOIs) of selected organs (prostate, bladder, blood pool) and sub-glandular prostate structures (tumour, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), inflammation, healthy tissue) were delineated on T2-weighted MR images, using whole-mount histology samples as a reference. Three candidate windows for optimal PET imaging were identified based on the dynamic curves of the mean and maximum standardised uptake value (SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max}, respectively). The statistical significance of differences in SUV between VOIs were analysed using Wilcoxon rank sum tests (p<0.05, adjusted for multiple testing). Twenty-eight (28) patients [median (range) age: 66 (55-72) years] were included. An early (W1: 5-10 minutes post-injection) and two late candidate windows (W2: 18-23; W3: 33-38 minutes post-injection) were selected. Late compared with early imaging was better able to distinguish between malignant and benign tissue [W3, SUV{sub mean}: tumour vs. BPH 2.5 vs. 2.0 (p<0.001), tumour vs. inflammation 2.5 vs. 1.7 (p<0.001), tumour vs. healthy tissue 2.5 vs. 2.0 (p<0.001); W1, SUV{sub mean}: tumour vs. BPH 3.1 vs. 3.1 (p=0.771), tumour vs inflammation 3.1 vs. 2.2 (p=0.021), tumour vs. healthy tissue 3.1 vs. 2.5 (p<0.001)] as well as between high-grade and low/intermediate-grade tumours (W3, SUV{sub mean}: 2.6 vs. 2.1 (p=0.040); W1, SUV{sub mean}: 3.1 vs. 2.8 (p=0.173)). These differences were relevant to the peripheral zone, but

  13. Centrifugation protocols: tests to determine optimal lithium heparin and citrate plasma sample quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeski, Goce; Solano, Connie; Petroff, Mark K; Hynd, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    Currently, no clear guidelines exist for the most appropriate tests to determine sample quality from centrifugation protocols for plasma sample types with both lithium heparin in gel barrier tubes for biochemistry testing and citrate tubes for coagulation testing. Blood was collected from 14 participants in four lithium heparin and one serum tube with gel barrier. The plasma tubes were centrifuged at four different centrifuge settings and analysed for potassium (K(+)), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), glucose and phosphorus (Pi) at zero time, poststorage at six hours at 21 °C and six days at 2-8°C. At the same time, three citrate tubes were collected and centrifuged at three different centrifuge settings and analysed immediately for prothrombin time/international normalized ratio, activated partial thromboplastin time, derived fibrinogen and surface-activated clotting time (SACT). The biochemistry analytes indicate plasma is less stable than serum. Plasma sample quality is higher with longer centrifugation time, and much higher g force. Blood cells present in the plasma lyse with time or are damaged when transferred in the reaction vessels, causing an increase in the K(+), LD and Pi above outlined limits. The cells remain active and consume glucose even in cold storage. The SACT is the only coagulation parameter that was affected by platelets >10 × 10(9)/L in the citrate plasma. In addition to the platelet count, a limited but sensitive number of assays (K(+), LD, glucose and Pi for biochemistry, and SACT for coagulation) can be used to determine appropriate centrifuge settings to consistently obtain the highest quality lithium heparin and citrate plasma samples. The findings will aid laboratories to balance the need to provide the most accurate results in the best turnaround time.

  14. Urinary extracellular vesicles for RNA extraction: optimization of a protocol devoid of prokaryote contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataruch-Weinert, Dorota; Musante, Luca; Kretz, Oliver; Holthofer, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs) represent an ideal platform for biomarker discovery. They carry different types of RNA species, and reported profile discrepancies related to the presence/absence of 18s and 28s rRNA remain controversial. Moreover, sufficient urinary RNA yields and respective quality RNA profiles are still to be fully established. UEVs were enriched by hydrostatic filtration dialysis, and RNA content was extracted using 7 different commercially available techniques. RNA quantity was assessed using spectrophotometry and fluorometry, whilst RNA quality was determined by capillary electrophoresis. The presence of prokaryotic transcriptome was stressed when cellular RNA, as a control, was spiked into the UEVs samples before RNA extraction. The presence of bacteria in hydrostatic filtration dialysis above 1,000 kDa molecular weight cut-off and in crude urine was confirmed with growth media plates. The efficiency in removing urinary bacteria was evaluated by differential centrifugation, filtration (0.22 µm filters) and chemical pretreatment (water purification tablet). For volumes of urine >200 ml, the chemical treatment provides ease of handling without affecting vesicle integrity, protein and RNA profiles. This protocol was selected to enrich RNA with 7 methods, and its respective quality and quantity were assessed. The results were given as follows: (a) Fluorometry gave more repeatability and reproducibility than spectrophotometry to assess the RNA yields, (b) UEVs were enriched with small RNA, (c) Ribosomal RNA peaks were not observed for any RNA extraction method used and (d) RNA yield was higher for column-based method designed for urinary exosome, whilst the highest relative microRNA presence was obtained using TRIzol method. Our results show that the presence of bacteria can lead to misidentification in the electrophoresis peaks. Fluorometry is more reliable than spectrophotometry. RNA isolation method must be selected in conjunction with

  15. Metabolite extraction from adherently growing mammalian cells for metabolomics studies: optimization of harvesting and extraction protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Katja; Nürnberger, Nadine; Kaspar, Hannelore; Gruber, Michael A; Almstetter, Martin F; Oefner, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin/ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) treatment and cell scraping in a buffer solution were compared for harvesting adherently growing mammalian SW480 cells for metabolomics studies. In addition, direct scraping with a solvent was tested. Trypsinated and scraped cell pellets were extracted using seven different extraction protocols including pure methanol, methanol/water, pure acetone, acetone/water, methanol/chloroform/water, methanol/isopropanol/water, and acid-base methanol. The extracts were analyzed by GC-MS after methoximation/silylation and derivatization with propyl chloroformate, respectively. The metabolic fingerprints were compared and 25 selected metabolites including amino acids and intermediates of energy metabolism were quantitatively determined. Moreover, the influence of freeze/thaw cycles, ultrasonication and homogenization using ceramic beads on extraction yield was tested. Pure acetone yielded the lowest extraction efficiency while methanol, methanol/water, methanol/isopropanol/water, and acid-base methanol recovered similar metabolite amounts with good reproducibility. Based on overall performance, methanol/water was chosen as a suitable extraction solvent. Repeated freeze/thaw cycles, ultrasonication and homogenization did not improve overall metabolite yield of the methanol/water extraction. Trypsin/EDTA treatment caused substantial metabolite leakage proving it inadequate for metabolomics studies. Gentle scraping of the cells in a buffer solution and subsequent extraction with methanol/water resulted on average in a sevenfold lower recovery of quantified metabolites compared with direct scraping using methanol/water, making the latter one the method of choice to harvest and extract metabolites from adherently growing mammalian SW480 cells.

  16. Optimization of contrast of MR images in imaging of knee joint; Optymalizacja kontrastu obrazow MR na przykladzie obrazow stawu kolanowego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szyblinski, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Bacic, G. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The work describes the method of contrast optimization in magnetic resonance imaging. Computer program presented in the report allows analysis of contrast in selected tissues as a function of experiment parameters. Application to imaging of knee joint is presented. 2 refs, 4 figs.

  17. Development of an acquisition protocol and a segmentation algortihm for wounds of cutaneous Leishmaniasis in digital images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Kristians; Castañeda, Benjamín; Miranda, César; Lavarello, Roberto; Llanos, Alejandro

    2010-03-01

    We developed a protocol for the acquisition of digital images and an algorithm for a color-based automatic segmentation of cutaneous lesions of Leishmaniasis. The protocol for image acquisition provides control over the working environment to manipulate brightness, lighting and undesirable shadows on the injury using indirect lighting. Also, this protocol was used to accurately calculate the area of the lesion expressed in mm2 even in curved surfaces by combining the information from two consecutive images. Different color spaces were analyzed and compared using ROC curves in order to determine the color layer with the highest contrast between the background and the wound. The proposed algorithm is composed of three stages: (1) Location of the wound determined by threshold and mathematical morphology techniques to the H layer of the HSV color space, (2) Determination of the boundaries of the wound by analyzing the color characteristics in the YIQ space based on masks (for the wound and the background) estimated from the first stage, and (3) Refinement of the calculations obtained on the previous stages by using the discrete dynamic contours algorithm. The segmented regions obtained with the algorithm were compared with manual segmentations made by a medical specialist. Broadly speaking, our results support that color provides useful information during segmentation and measurement of wounds of cutaneous Leishmaniasis. Results from ten images showed 99% specificity, 89% sensitivity, and 98% accuracy.

  18. Comprehensive small animal imaging strategies on a clinical 3 T dedicated head MR-scanner; adapted methods and sequence protocols in CNS pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepu R Pillai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small animal models of human diseases are an indispensable aspect of pre-clinical research. Being dynamic, most pathologies demand extensive longitudinal monitoring to understand disease mechanisms, drug efficacy and side effects. These considerations often demand the concomitant development of monitoring systems with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: This study attempts to configure and optimize a clinical 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner to facilitate imaging of small animal central nervous system pathologies. The hardware of the scanner was complemented by a custom-built, 4-channel phased array coil system. Extensive modification of standard sequence protocols was carried out based on tissue relaxometric calculations. Proton density differences between the gray and white matter of the rodent spinal cord along with transverse relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility differences at the cortex and striatum of both rats and mice demonstrated statistically significant differences. The employed parallel imaging reconstruction algorithms had distinct properties dependent on the sequence type and in the presence of the contrast agent. The attempt to morphologically phenotype a normal healthy rat brain in multiple planes delineated a number of anatomical regions, and all the clinically relevant sequels following acute cerebral ischemia could be adequately characterized. Changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability following ischemia-reperfusion were also apparent at a later time. Typical characteristics of intra-cerebral haemorrhage at acute and chronic stages were also visualized up to one month. Two models of rodent spinal cord injury were adequately characterized and closely mimicked the results of histological studies. In the employed rodent animal handling system a mouse model of glioblastoma was also studied with unequivocal results. CONCLUSIONS: The implemented customizations including extensive

  19. Comprehensive Small Animal Imaging Strategies on a Clinical 3 T Dedicated Head MR-Scanner; Adapted Methods and Sequence Protocols in CNS Pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Deepu R.; Heidemann, Robin M.; Lanz, Titus; Dittmar, Michael S.; Sandner, Beatrice; Beier, Christoph P.; Weidner, Norbert; Greenlee, Mark W.; Schuierer, Gerhard; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Schlachetzki, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Background Small animal models of human diseases are an indispensable aspect of pre-clinical research. Being dynamic, most pathologies demand extensive longitudinal monitoring to understand disease mechanisms, drug efficacy and side effects. These considerations often demand the concomitant development of monitoring systems with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution. Methodology and Results This study attempts to configure and optimize a clinical 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner to facilitate imaging of small animal central nervous system pathologies. The hardware of the scanner was complemented by a custom-built, 4-channel phased array coil system. Extensive modification of standard sequence protocols was carried out based on tissue relaxometric calculations. Proton density differences between the gray and white matter of the rodent spinal cord along with transverse relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility differences at the cortex and striatum of both rats and mice demonstrated statistically significant differences. The employed parallel imaging reconstruction algorithms had distinct properties dependent on the sequence type and in the presence of the contrast agent. The attempt to morphologically phenotype a normal healthy rat brain in multiple planes delineated a number of anatomical regions, and all the clinically relevant sequels following acute cerebral ischemia could be adequately characterized. Changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability following ischemia-reperfusion were also apparent at a later time. Typical characteristics of intra-cerebral haemorrhage at acute and chronic stages were also visualized up to one month. Two models of rodent spinal cord injury were adequately characterized and closely mimicked the results of histological studies. In the employed rodent animal handling system a mouse model of glioblastoma was also studied with unequivocal results. Conclusions The implemented customizations including extensive sequence protocol

  20. Real-time SPARSE-SENSE cardiac cine MR imaging: optimization of image reconstruction and sequence validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Juliane; Nensa, Felix; Bomas, Bettina; Schemuth, Haemi P; Maderwald, Stefan; Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Improved real-time cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequences have currently been introduced, but so far only limited practical experience exists. This study aimed at image reconstruction optimization and clinical validation of a new highly accelerated real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE sequence. Left ventricular (LV) short-axis stacks of a real-time free-breathing SPARSE-SENSE sequence with high spatiotemporal resolution and of a standard segmented cine SSFP sequence were acquired at 1.5 T in 11 volunteers and 15 patients. To determine the optimal iterations, all volunteers' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed using 10-200 iterations, and contrast ratios, image entropies, and reconstruction times were assessed. Subsequently, the patients' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed with the clinically optimal iterations. LV volumetric values were evaluated and compared between both sequences. Sufficient image quality and acceptable reconstruction times were achieved when using 80 iterations. Bland-Altman plots and Passing-Bablok regression showed good agreement for all volumetric parameters. 80 iterations are recommended for iterative SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction in clinical routine. Real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE yielded comparable volumetric results as the current standard SSFP sequence. Due to its intrinsic low image acquisition times, real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE imaging with iterative image reconstruction seems to be an attractive alternative for LV function analysis. • A highly accelerated real-time CMR sequence using SPARSE-SENSE was evaluated. • SPARSE-SENSE allows free breathing in real-time cardiac cine imaging. • For clinically optimal SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction, 80 iterations are recommended. • Real-time SPARSE-SENSE imaging yielded comparable volumetric results as the reference SSFP sequence. • The fast SPARSE-SENSE sequence is an attractive alternative to standard SSFP sequences.

  1. Urinary extracellular vesicles for RNA extraction: optimization of a protocol devoid of prokaryote contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Tataruch-Weinert

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs represent an ideal platform for biomarker discovery. They carry different types of RNA species, and reported profile discrepancies related to the presence/absence of 18s and 28s rRNA remain controversial. Moreover, sufficient urinary RNA yields and respective quality RNA profiles are still to be fully established. Methods: UEVs were enriched by hydrostatic filtration dialysis, and RNA content was extracted using 7 different commercially available techniques. RNA quantity was assessed using spectrophotometry and fluorometry, whilst RNA quality was determined by capillary electrophoresis. Results: The presence of prokaryotic transcriptome was stressed when cellular RNA, as a control, was spiked into the UEVs samples before RNA extraction. The presence of bacteria in hydrostatic filtration dialysis above 1,000 kDa molecular weight cut-off and in crude urine was confirmed with growth media plates. The efficiency in removing urinary bacteria was evaluated by differential centrifugation, filtration (0.22 µm filters and chemical pretreatment (water purification tablet. For volumes of urine >200 ml, the chemical treatment provides ease of handling without affecting vesicle integrity, protein and RNA profiles. This protocol was selected to enrich RNA with 7 methods, and its respective quality and quantity were assessed. The results were given as follows: (a Fluorometry gave more repeatability and reproducibility than spectrophotometry to assess the RNA yields, (b UEVs were enriched with small RNA, (c Ribosomal RNA peaks were not observed for any RNA extraction method used and (d RNA yield was higher for column-based method designed for urinary exosome, whilst the highest relative microRNA presence was obtained using TRIzol method. Conclusion: Our results show that the presence of bacteria can lead to misidentification in the electrophoresis peaks. Fluorometry is more reliable than spectrophotometry. RNA

  2. Ultrafuzziness Optimization Based on Type II Fuzzy Sets for Image Thresholding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudan Studiawan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Image thresholding is one of the processing techniques to provide high quality preprocessed image. Image vagueness and bad illumination are common obstacles yielding in a poor image thresholding output. By assuming image as fuzzy sets, several different fuzzy thresholding techniques have been proposed to remove these obstacles during threshold selection. In this paper, we proposed an algorithm for thresholding image using ultrafuzziness optimization to decrease uncertainty in fuzzy system by common fuzzy sets like type II fuzzy sets. Optimization was conducted by involving ultrafuzziness measurement for background and object fuzzy sets separately. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed image thresholding method had good performances for images with high vagueness, low level contrast, and grayscale ambiguity.

  3. An Image Enhancement Method Using the Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization with an Adaptive Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Image enhancement techniques are very important to image processing, which are used to improve image quality or extract the fine details in degraded images. In this paper, two novel objective functions based on the normalized incomplete Beta transform function are proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of grayscale image enhancement and color image enhancement, respectively. Using these objective functions, the parameters of transform functions are estimated by the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO. We also propose an improved QPSO with an adaptive parameter control strategy. The QPSO and the AQPSO algorithms, along with genetic algorithm (GA and particle swarm optimization (PSO, are tested on several benchmark grayscale and color images. The results show that the QPSO and AQPSO perform better than GA and PSO for the enhancement of these images, and the AQPSO has some advantages over QPSO due to its adaptive parameter control strategy.

  4. The optimization of low-dose scanning protocols of 64-slice spiral CT in the adult chest: a multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Wei; Huang Yao; Wu Ning

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the image quality of chest low dose CT (LDCT) using automatic exposure control (AEC) and constant current. control (CCC) and explore a more reasonable scanning protocol. Methods: Two hundred and eighty participants were examined with 64 CT scanner at 7 centers in China. All were divided into 4 groups. Two groups underwent LDCT using AEC with standard deviation set at 25 (Al) and 30 (A2) respectively and the tube current ranged from 10 mA to 80 mA. The other two groups underwent LDCT using CCC with tube current set at 40 mA (Cl) and 50 mA (C2) respectively. The axial and MPR images were evaluated by two radiologists who were blinded to the scanning protocols. The radiation dose, noise and the image quality of the 4 groups were compared and analyzed statistically. Differences of radiation dose and noise among groups were determined with variance analysis and t test, image quality with Mann- Whitney test and the consistency of diagnosis with Kappa test. Results: There was a significant lower DLP in AEC group than in CCC group [(82.62±40.31) vs (110.81±18.21) mGy · cm (F=56.88, P 0.05]. The noisy of AEC group was higher than that of CCC group both on lung window (41.50±9.58 vs 40.86±7.03) and mediastinum window (41.19±7.83 vs 40.92±9.89), but there was no significant difference (F lung =0.835, P=0.476, F wediastinum =1.910, P=0.128). The quality score of axial image in AEC group was higher than that in CCC group (superior margin of the brachiocephalic vein level: 4.49± 0.56 vs 4.38±0.64, superior margin of the aortic arch: 4.86±0.23 vs 4.81±0.32, the right superior lobar bronchus Level: 4.87±0.27 vs 4.84±0.22, the right middle lobar bronchus Level: 4.90±0.25 vs 4.88±0.21) except on the right inferior pulmonary vein level (4.92±0.25 vs 4.93±0.17) and superior margin of the left diaphragmatic dome level (4.91±0.27 vs 4.93±0.22) on lung window, but no significant differences (F=0.076-1.748, P>0.05) were observed. A significant

  5. Optimization of protocol in computerized tomography scans of children's chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, L.T.A.; Roberto, W. dos S.; Mourão Filho, A.P.

    2017-01-01

    The diffusion of the Computed Tomography (CT) has promoted a significant increase of the dose absorbed by patients. This technique showed a high growth as a result of clinical cases of medical emergencies, neoplasia and pediatric traumas. The risks of stochastic effects are greater for children due to tissue radiosensitivity coupled with longer life expectancy. In the present work, a cylindrical simulator was used, representing an adult thorax made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and a second simulator object of the same material was developed in oblong format including the axillary regions, based on the dimensions of the patient's thorax one-year-old pediatric population. The scanning on the adult simulator object was performed with the chest radiograph diagnostic service with a 120 kV supply voltage and in the pediatric simulator object were performed optimized scans with 120, 100 and 80 kV. This work compared the dose variation absorbed by the pediatric simulator object mentioned by the change in the tube supply voltage

  6. Cameras and settings for optimal image capture from UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike; O'Connor, James; James, Mike R.

    2017-04-01

    Aerial image capture has become very common within the geosciences due to the increasing affordability of low payload (markets. Their application to surveying has led to many studies being undertaken using UAV imagery captured from consumer grade cameras as primary data sources. However, image quality and the principles of image capture are seldom given rigorous discussion which can lead to experiments being difficult to accurately reproduce. In this contribution we revisit the underpinning concepts behind image capture, from which the requirements for acquiring sharp, well exposed and suitable imagery are derived. This then leads to discussion of how to optimise the platform, camera, lens and imaging settings relevant to image quality planning, presenting some worked examples as a guide. Finally, we challenge the community to make their image data open for review in order to ensure confidence in the outputs/error estimates, allow reproducibility of the results and have these comparable with future studies. We recommend providing open access imagery where possible, a range of example images, and detailed metadata to rigorously describe the image capture process.

  7. Feature and Intensity Based Medical Image Registration Using Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Basset, Mohamed; Fakhry, Ahmed E; El-Henawy, Ibrahim; Qiu, Tie; Sangaiah, Arun Kumar

    2017-11-03

    Image registration is an important aspect in medical image analysis, and kinds use in a variety of medical applications. Examples include diagnosis, pre/post surgery guidance, comparing/merging/integrating images from multi-modal like Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and Computed Tomography (CT). Whether registering images across modalities for a single patient or registering across patients for a single modality, registration is an effective way to combine information from different images into a normalized frame for reference. Registered datasets can be used for providing information relating to the structure, function, and pathology of the organ or individual being imaged. In this paper a hybrid approach for medical images registration has been developed. It employs a modified Mutual Information (MI) as a similarity metric and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) method. Computation of mutual information is modified using a weighted linear combination of image intensity and image gradient vector flow (GVF) intensity. In this manner, statistical as well as spatial image information is included into the image registration process. Maximization of the modified mutual information is effected using the versatile Particle Swarm Optimization which is developed easily with adjusted less parameter. The developed approach has been tested and verified successfully on a number of medical image data sets that include images with missing parts, noise contamination, and/or of different modalities (CT, MRI). The registration results indicate the proposed model as accurate and effective, and show the posture contribution in inclusion of both statistical and spatial image data to the developed approach.

  8. Improving CT quality with optimized image parameters for radiation treatment planning and delivery guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Pei Chen

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: CT image quality can be improved with the IQE protocols created in this study, to provide better soft tissue contrast, which would be beneficial for use in radiation therapy, e.g., for planning data acquisition or for IGRT for hypo-fractionated treatments.

  9. Improving the characterization of endothelial progenitor cell subsets by an optimized FACS protocol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Huizer

    Full Text Available The characterization of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs is fundamental to any study related to angiogenesis. Unfortunately, current literature lacks consistency in the definition of EPC subsets due to variations in isolation strategies and inconsistencies in the use of lineage markers. Here we address critical points in the identification of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs, circulating endothelial cells (CECs, and culture-generated outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs from blood samples of healthy adults (AB and umbilical cord (UCB. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were enriched using a Ficoll-based gradient followed by an optimized staining and gating strategy to enrich for the target cells. Sorted EPC populations were subjected to RT-PCR for tracing the expression of markers beyond the limits of cell surface-based immunophenotyping. Using CD34, CD133 and c-kit staining, combined with FSC and SSC, we succeeded in the accurate and reproducible identification of four HPC subgroups and found significant differences in the respective populations in AB vs. UCB. Co-expression analysis of endothelial markers on HPCs revealed a complex pattern characterized by various subpopulations. CECs were identified by using CD34, KDR, CD45, and additional endothelial markers, and were subdivided according to their apoptotic state and expression of c-kit. Comparison of UCB-CECs vs. AB-CECs revealed significant differences in CD34 and KDR levels. OECs were grown from PBMC-fractions We found that viable c-kit+ CECs are a candidate circulating precursor for CECs. RT-PCR to angiogenic factors and receptors revealed that all EPC subsets expressed angiogenesis-related molecules. Taken together, the improvements in immunophenotyping and gating strategies resulted in accurate identification and comparison of better defined cell populations in a single procedure.

  10. Using remote sensing images to design optimal field sampling schemes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available sampling schemes case studies Optimized field sampling representing the overall distribution of a particular mineral Deriving optimal exploration target zones CONTINUUM REMOVAL for vegetation [13, 27, 46]. The convex hull transform is a method... of normalizing spectra [16, 41]. The convex hull technique is anal- ogous to fitting a rubber band over a spectrum to form a continuum. Figure 5 shows the concept of the convex hull transform. The differ- ence between the hull and the orig- inal spectrum...

  11. MO-G-BRF-02: Enhancement of Texture-Based Metastasis Prediction Models Via the Optimization of PET/MRI Acquisition Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallieres, M; Laberge, S; Levesque I, R; El Naqa, I [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have previously identified a prediction model of lung metastases at diagnosis of soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) that is composed of two textural features extracted from FDG-PET and T1-weighted (T1w) MRI scans. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether the optimization in FDGPET and MRI acquisition parameters would enhance the prediction performance of texture-based models. Methods: Ten FDG-PET and T1w- MRI digitized tumor models were generated from imaging data of STS patients who underwent pre-treatment clinical scans between 2005 and 2011. Five of ten patients eventually developed lung metastases. Numerically simulated MR images were produced using echo times (TE) of 2 and 4 times the nominal clinical parameter (TEc), and repetition times (TR) of 0.5, 0.67, 1.5 and 2 times the nominal clinical parameter (TRc) found in the DICOM headers (TEc range: 9–13 ms, TRc range: 410-667 ms). PET 2D images were simulated using Monte-Carlo and were reconstructed using an ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm with 1 to 32 iterations and a post-reconstruction Gaussian filter of 0, 2, 4 or 6 mm width. For all possible combinations of PET and MRI acquisition parameters, the prediction model was constructed using logistic regression with new coefficients, and its associated prediction performance for lung metastases was evaluated using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: The prediction performance over all simulations yielded AUCs ranging from 0.7 to 1. Notably, TR values below or equal to TRc and higher PET post-reconstruction filter widths yielded higher prediction performance. The best results were obtained with a combination of 4*TEc, TRc, 30 OSEM iterations and 2mm filter width. Conclusion: This work indicates that texture-based metastasis prediction models could be improved using optimized choices of FDG-PET and MRI acquisition protocols. This principle could be generalized to other texture-based models.

  12. Parametric Optimization of Lateral NIPIN Phototransistors for Flexible Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Seok Kim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Curved image sensors, which are a key component in bio-inspired imaging systems, have been widely studied because they can improve an imaging system in various aspects such as low optical aberrations, small-form, and simple optics configuration. Many methods and materials to realize a curvilinear imager have been proposed to address the drawbacks of conventional imaging/optical systems. However, there have been few theoretical studies in terms of electronics on the use of a lateral photodetector as a flexible image sensor. In this paper, we demonstrate the applicability of a Si-based lateral phototransistor as the pixel of a high-efficiency curved photodetector by conducting various electrical simulations with technology computer aided design (TCAD. The single phototransistor is analyzed with different device parameters: the thickness of the active cell, doping concentration, and structure geometry. This work presents a method to improve the external quantum efficiency (EQE, linear dynamic range (LDR, and mechanical stability of the phototransistor. We also evaluated the dark current in a matrix form of phototransistors to estimate the feasibility of the device as a flexible image sensor. Moreover, we fabricated and demonstrated an array of phototransistors based on our study. The theoretical study and design guidelines of a lateral phototransistor create new opportunities in flexible image sensors.

  13. Optimization of compressive 4D-spatio-spectral snapshot imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xia; Feng, Weiyi; Lin, Lihua; Su, Wu; Xu, Guoqing

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a modified 3D computational reconstruction method in the compressive 4D-spectro-volumetric snapshot imaging system is proposed for better sensing spectral information of 3D objects. In the design of the imaging system, a microlens array (MLA) is used to obtain a set of multi-view elemental images (EIs) of the 3D scenes. Then, these elemental images with one dimensional spectral information and different perspectives are captured by the coded aperture snapshot spectral imager (CASSI) which can sense the spectral data cube onto a compressive 2D measurement image. Finally, the depth images of 3D objects at arbitrary depths, like a focal stack, are computed by inversely mapping the elemental images according to geometrical optics. With the spectral estimation algorithm, the spectral information of 3D objects is also reconstructed. Using a shifted translation matrix, the contrast of the reconstruction result is further enhanced. Numerical simulation results verify the performance of the proposed method. The system can obtain both 3D spatial information and spectral data on 3D objects using only one single snapshot, which is valuable in the agricultural harvesting robots and other 3D dynamic scenes.

  14. Improving digital image watermarking by means of optimal channel selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huynh-The, Thien; Banos Legran, Oresti; Lee, Sungyoung; Yoon, Yongik; Le-Tien, Thuong

    2016-01-01

    Supporting safe and resilient authentication and integrity of digital images is of critical importance in a time of enormous creation and sharing of these contents. This paper presents an improved digital image watermarking model based on a coefficient quantization technique that intelligently

  15. International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment for Depression (iSPOT-D, a randomized clinical trial: rationale and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinically useful treatment moderators of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD have not yet been identified, though some baseline predictors of treatment outcome have been proposed. The aim of iSPOT-D is to identify pretreatment measures that predict or moderate MDD treatment response or remission to escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine; and develop a model that incorporates multiple predictors and moderators. Methods/Design The International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment - in Depression (iSPOT-D is a multi-centre, international, randomized, prospective, open-label trial. It is enrolling 2016 MDD outpatients (ages 18-65 from primary or specialty care practices (672 per treatment arm; 672 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy controls. Study-eligible patients are antidepressant medication (ADM naïve or willing to undergo a one-week wash-out of any non-protocol ADM, and cannot have had an inadequate response to protocol ADM. Baseline assessments include symptoms; distress; daily function; cognitive performance; electroencephalogram and event-related potentials; heart rate and genetic measures. A subset of these baseline assessments are repeated after eight weeks of treatment. Outcomes include the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (primary and self-reported depressive symptoms, social functioning, quality of life, emotional regulation, and side-effect burden (secondary. Participants may then enter a naturalistic telephone follow-up at weeks 12, 16, 24 and 52. The first half of the sample will be used to identify potential predictors and moderators, and the second half to replicate and confirm. Discussion First enrolment was in December 2008, and is ongoing. iSPOT-D evaluates clinical and biological predictors of treatment response in the largest known sample of MDD collected worldwide. Trial registration International Study to Predict Optimised Treatment - in Depression (iSPOT-D ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

  16. Design and protocol for the Dialysis Optimal Health Program (DOHP) randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Simon R; Ski, Chantal F; Langham, Robyn; O'Flaherty, Emmet; Thompson, David R; Rossell, Susan L; Moore, Gaye; Hsueh, Ya-Seng Arthur; Castle, David J

    2016-09-09

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) are serious and growing health problems with enormous impact on psychological and social functioning. Despite high rates of comorbid depression and anxiety in these patient populations, and the adverse impact these have upon treatment adherence, quality of life, social connectedness and healthcare costs there has been little attention focused on the prevention or management of these problems. Thus, our aim was to evaluate the Dialysis Optimal Health Program (DOHP) that adopts a person-centred approach and engages collaborative therapy to educate and support those diagnosed with ESKD who are commencing dialysis. The study design is a randomised controlled trial. Ninety-six adult patients initiating haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis will be randomly allocated to either the intervention (DOHP) or usual care group. Participants receiving the intervention will receive nine (8 + 1 booster session) sequential sessions based on a structured information/workbook, psychosocial and educational supports and skills building. The primary outcome measures are depression and anxiety (assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; HADS). Secondary outcomes include health-related quality of life (assessed by the Kidney Disease Quality of Life instrument; KDQOL), self-efficacy (assessed by General Self-Efficacy Scale) and clinical indices (e.g. albumin and haemoglobin levels). Cost-effectiveness analysis and process evaluation will also be performed to assess the economic value and efficacy of the DOHP. Primary and secondary measures will be collected at baseline and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up time points. We believe that this innovative trial will enhance knowledge of interventions aimed at supporting patients in the process of starting dialysis, and will broaden the focus from physical symptoms to include psychosocial factors such as depression, anxiety, self-efficacy, wellbeing and community

  17. Optimization of imaging before pulmonary vein isolation by radiofrequency ablation: breath-held ungated versus ECG/breath-gated MRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgayer, C.; Haller, S.; Bremerich, J. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Zellweger, M.J.; Sticherling, C.; Buser, P.T. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Cardiology, Basel (Switzerland); Weber, O. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Medical Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-12-15

    Isolation of the pulmonary veins has emerged as a new therapy for atrial fibrillation. Pre-procedural magnetic resonance (MR) imaging enhances safety and efficacy; moreover, it reduces radiation exposure of the patients and interventional team. The purpose of this study was to optimize the MR protocol with respect to image quality and acquisition time. In 31 patients (23-73 years), the anatomy of the pulmonary veins, left atrium and oesophagus was assessed on a 1.5-Tesla scanner with four different sequences: (1) ungated two-dimensional true fast imaging with steady precession (2D-TrueFISP), (2) ECG/breath-gated 3D-TrueFISP, (3) ungated breath-held contrast-enhanced three-dimensional turbo fast low-angle shot (CE-3D-tFLASH), and (4) ECG/breath-gated CE-3D-TrueFISP. Image quality was scored from 1 (structure not visible) to 5 (excellent visibility), and the acquisition time was monitored. The pulmonary veins and left atrium were best visualized with CE-3D-tFLASH (scores 4.50 {+-} 0.52 and 4.59 {+-} 0.43) and ECG/breath-gated CE-3D-TrueFISP (4.47 {+-} 0.49 and 4.63 {+-} 0.39). Conspicuity of the oesophagus was optimal with CE-3D-TrueFISP and 2D-TrueFISP (4.59 {+-} 0.35 and 4.19 {+-} 0.46) but poor with CE-3D-tFLASH (1.03 {+-} 0.13) (p < 0.05). Acquisition times were shorter for 2D-TrueFISP (44 {+-} 1 s) and CE-3D-tFLASH (345 {+-} 113 s) compared with ECG/breath-gated 3D-TrueFISP (634 {+-} 197 s) and ECG/breath-gated CE-3D-TrueFISP (636 {+-} 230 s) (p < 0.05). In conclusion, an MR imaging protocol comprising CE-3D-tFLASH and 2D-TrueFISP allows assessment of the pulmonary veins, left atrium and oesophagus in less than 7 min and can be recommended for pre-procedural imaging before electric isolation of pulmonary veins. (orig.)

  18. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  19. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Optimizing pulse sequence protocols for the evaluation of cartilage and labrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali, E-mail: Ali.Guermazi@aspetar.com [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Jomaah, Nabil [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Hayashi, Daichi [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Department of Radiology, Bridgeport Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, 267 Grant Street, Bridgeport, CT 06610 (United States); Jarraya, Mohamed [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Silva, Jose Roberto [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Niu, Jingbo [Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Almusa, Emad; Landreau, Philippe [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); and others

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To compare axial T1weighted fat-saturated (T1w fs) and T1w non-fs sequences, and coronal T1w-fs and T2w-fs sequences, for evaluation of cartilage and labrum using CT arthrography (CTA) as the reference. Methods: Patients had MR arthrography (MRA) and CTA of the shoulder on the same day. Cartilage was assessed for superficial and full thickness focal and diffuse damage. Labral lesions were graded for Bankart variants and SLAP lesions. CTA images were read for the same features. The diagnostic performance of MRA including area under the curve (AUC) was evaluated against CTA. Results: When comparing axial sequences, the diagnostic performance for cartilage lesion detection on T1w non-fs was 61.9% (sensitivity) 93.6% (specificity) and 89.5% (accuracy) with AUC 0.782, while that for T1w fs was 61.9%, 94.0%, 89.8% and 0.783. For labral assessment, it was 89.1%, 93.0%, 91.4% and 0.919 for T1w non-fs, and 89.9%, 94.0%, 92.6% and 0.922 for T1w fs. Comparing coronal sequences, diagnostic performance for cartilage was 42.5%, 97.5%, 89.8% and 0.702 for T1w fs, and 38.4%, 98.7%, 90.2%, and 0.686 for T2w fs. For the labrum it was 85.1%, 87.5%, 86.2%, and 0.868 for T1w fs, and 75.7%, 97.5%, 80.8% and 0.816 for T2w fs. Conclusions: Axial T1w fs and T1w non-fs sequences are comparable in their ability to diagnose cartilage and labral lesions. Coronal T1w fs sequence offers slightly higher sensitivity but slightly lower specificity than T2w fs sequence for diagnosis of cartilage and labral lesions.

  20. MR arthrography of the shoulder: